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SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1939-40 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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Full Text

 SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OP   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1939-40
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OP EDUCATION
PKINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP  THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Chables P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Sixty-ninth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
the Province.
G. M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
December, 194-0.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1939-40.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable G. M. WEIR.
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education: Assistant Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D. D. L. MacLaurin, B.A., Ph.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
H. B. King, M.A., Ph.D.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Cranbrook.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouver.
T. G. Carter, Penticton.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster.
*J. F. K. English, M.A., Pouce Coupe.
*C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Prince George.
W. G. Gamble, B.A., Victoria.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay.
T. W. Hall, Revelstoke.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
*H. D. Stafford, B.A., Prince George.
*A. S. Towell, M.A., Abbotsford.
*A. Turnbull, B.A., Prince Rupert.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Rossland.
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Nelson.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
George H. Deane, Victoria. W. Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster. C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver :
A. R. Lord, B.A., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
W. P. Weston, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A.
H. B. MacLean.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc.
J. M. EwiNG, B.A., D.Paed.
H. M. Morrison, Ph.D.
Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
Miss M. McManus, B.Mus., M.A.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A.
Victoria:
V. L. Denton, B.A., D.C.L., Principal.
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Vice-Principal.
John Gough, M.A.
Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A., Ph.D.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A.
F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O.
Mrs. N. E. Murphy, B.Sc.
Miss Barbara Hinton.
Mrs. Ethel Reese-Burns.
Model School :
Miss Isabel M. L. Bescoby, M.A.
Miss Marian D. James.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar:  J. L. Watson, B.A.
Officer in Charge of Industrial Education:   F. T. Fairey, B.A.
Inspector of Technical Classes:   H. A. Jones.
Director of Home Economics:  Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc.
Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:  J. W. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Organizer of School and Community Drama:  L. Bullock-Webster,
A.R.C.M., F.T.C.L., M.R.S.T.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:  P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk:  R. D. Smith.
Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind:  C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed.
Director, Recreational and Physical Education:  Ian Eisenhardt. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education  7
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools .  32
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  37
Victoria  38
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education  39
Report of the Officer in Charge of Industrial Education  47
Report of the Director of Home Economics — 53
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  55
Report's of Municipal Inspectors—
Victoria  66
New Westminster  67
North Vancouver (City and District) and West Vancouver  68
Burnaby  70
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind  72
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  74
Elementary School Courses  78
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  80
Report on Work of Adult Education  82
Report of Director of Recreational and Physical Education  89
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  91
Report of Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "  93
Report of Organizer of School and Community Drama  94
Statistical Returns—
High Schools (Cities)  98
High Schools (District Municipalities)  113
High Schools (Rural Districts)  119
Superior Schools (District Municipalities)  124
Superior Schools (Rural Districts) :  124
Junior High Schools (Cities)  130
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  139
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  141
Elementary Schools (Cities)  143
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  175
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  194
Elementary Schools (Community Districts)  213
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  214
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  217
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  220
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  221 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION, 1939-40.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1940.
To the Honourable G. M. Weir,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Sixty-ninth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1940.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province decreased during the year from 120,934 to
120,459 and the average daily attendance increased from 107,660 to 108,826. The percentage
of regular attendance was 90.34. The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of
schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Community
Districts.
Total.
17,276
4,804
609
1,709
19,076f
2,356
2,878
1,065
19,055
548
24,436
3,487
9,753
41,330*
12,527
80,009
Totals, 1939-40	
68,359
26,198
25,354
548
120,459
Totals, 1938-39 - -
69,219
25,860
25,306
549
120,934
* These figures include an enrolment of 92 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind,
t These figures include an enrolment of 68 pupils in the Provincial Model School.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the—
High Correspondence School classes, regular students (exclusive of
the 1,751 officially registered in high, superior, or elementary
schools)    	
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students	
Night-schools
Classes formed under section 13  (g) of the " Public Schools Act
Adult education—
Vocational classes  (Dominion-Provincial Youth Training
Plan)   	
Students.
1,203
1,023
8,069
62
Vocational classes  for unemployed   (Provincial  Government)   	
Vancouver School of Art	
Victoria School of Art	
Vancouver School of Navigation—
Regular students 	
Special night class
1,891
106
503
20
96
28
122
872
97
Classes in Mining for Prospectors	
High Correspondence School, Technical-Vocational courses
Elementary Correspondence School 	
Community Self-help Groups  (adults only)     1,420
Recreational and Physical Education classes  21,183
Normal School, Vancouver 	
Normal School, Victoria 	
Victoria College 	
University of British Columbia
26,338
189
120
237
2,594
Total.
39,835 B
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
firsiHe T.
6,451
5,914
6,225
6,063
5,787
5,817
5,526
5,399
4,909
3,778
2,967
2,310
403
5,501
5,262
5,789
5,562
5,503
5,738
5,273
5,417
4,857
4,120
3,168
2,343
377
11,952
Grade II.       _     -   	
11,176
Grade III   ._ - _.
12,014
11,625
Grade IV.	
11,290
Grade VI       -	
11,555
0«d" VTT
10,799
Grade VIII - -  	
10,816
Grade IX.        .   	
9,766
7,898
Grade XI.                                     _                   - -  	
6,135
Grade XII.      ....                   .                ..     ...        	
4,653
780
61,549
58,910
120,459
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO  THE  DIFFERENT
CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher are shown
below:—■
Schools.
qj
u _:
■mJ
6 85
[c3
's »
S *
ft O
rn +j
o
"tf 3
. -w
o 2
z&
a
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Eh
'ft
t a
Z  QJ
§3 a
o^ a
QJ   £
ft-a
■" a
togt1
rt_a a,
k a <»
t> a £
<p-io
t* QJ *.
_3 ft <"
ri QJ o
cd c a)
Si S'0
S;JS d
506
148
107
17
115
270
49
33
1,155
531
897
21
127
38
19
70
10
7
87
9
4
633
186
126
17
115
340
59
40
1,242
540
901
21
17,276
4,804
2,356
609
2,878
9,753
1,709
1,065
41,330
19,076
19,055
548
14.34
3.99
1.96
.51
2.38
8.10
1.42
.88
34.31
15.84
15.82
.45
34
32
22
36
25
36
35
32
36
36
21
26
30
High schools (district municipalities) -   - 	
28
19
31
23
32
30
29
33
32
19
17
Totals           	
3,849
371
4,220
120,459
100.00
31
28
* These figures include 21 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 92 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
f These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 58 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 9
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class:—
Schools.
6
1
OJ
Bi
3
-p
73
a
o
u
QJ
m
'a
u
la
Eh
qj
QJ
a
h
e
0
ft
S
QJ
Eh
QJ
60
a
rt
_a
a
X
H
o
'rt
g
6
S
QJ
o
Eh
504
150
109
3
6
162
27
20
169
23
28
3
2
4
11
91
87
19
11
679
366
654
8
3
17
5
1
307
135
207
13
1
23
7
10
120
34
13
83
11
8
52
5
1
3
1
2
1
3
2
2
10
4
410
107
88
9
49
181
27
21
305
157
275
1
223
79
38
8
66
159
32
19
937
383
626
20
633
186
126
Superior schools (district municipalities) _  .
17
115
340
59
40
Elementary schools (cities) *   ___ 	
1,242
540
901
21
Totals, 1939-40    .	
1,201
1,935
688
41
327
7
21
1,630
2,590
4,220
Totals, 1938-39   „-           	
1,123
1,854
799
43
350
25
1,601
2,593
4,194
* These figures include 21 teachers employed in the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind,
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School. B 10
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
CLASSIFICATION OF TEACHERS BY SEX AND EXPERIENCE.
The following table gives a classification by sex and experience of 4,076 of the 4,194
teachers in the Province for the school-year 1938-39. (This table was prepared by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics.)
City Schools.
District
Municipality
Schools.
Rural Schools
of more than
One Room.
One-room Rural
Schools.
All Schools.
QJ
s
oj
'rt
s
QJ
fc.
+-
o
Eh
3
CJ
s
QJ
fc.
rt
+-
o
Eh
QJ
$
5
Q)
Eh
QJ
a
oj
la
a
V
fc.
+-
o
oj
"rt
a
oj
'a
e
9
Eh
o
E-i
Experi
te
1 ye
2 ye
3 ,
2nce where
aching—
84
58
55
44
40
17
19
34
39
51
41
56
27
30
128
43
41
16
2
19
136
105
78
63
41
24
26
45
63
66
62
54
59
43
202
107
82
28
5
23
220
163
133
107
81
41
45
79
102
117
103
110
86
73
330
150
123
44
7
42
62
39
21
16
10
5
8
14
8
10
17
12
11
9
19
6
2
91
77
35
29
29
10
12
17
17
25
16
26
18
15
48
12
12
1
153
116
56
45
39
15
20
31
25
35
33
38
29
24
67
18
14
1
63
53
42
18
16
7
3
12
15
11
5
4
5
106
88
32
30
15
5
13
11
15
3
6
5
4
3
8
169
141
74
48
31
12
16
23
30
14
11
9
4
3
13
84
42
21
7
11
5
1
2
3
3
1
204
84
34
16
7
6
6
8
6
3
3
3
3
288
126
55
23
18
11
7
10
9
6
4
3
3
293
192
139
85
77
34
31
62
65
75
64
72
38
39
152
49
43
16
2
19
537
354
179
138
92
45
57
81
101
97
87
88
81
61
261
119
94
29
5
23
830
546
318
4    ,
223
5    ,
169
6    ,
79
7    ,
88
8    ,
143
9    ,
166
10    ,
172
11    ,
151
12    ,
160
13    ,
119
14    ,
100
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35 ye
Unsp
Total e-
1 ye
2 ye
3 ,
413
168
137
45
irs and over
7
42
Totals..
844
1,312
2,156
269
490   |  759
254
344
598
180
383
563
1,547
2,529
4,076
cperience—
15
14
29
36
42
37
37
25
28
39
41
44
28
31
168
70
58
43
40
19
34
47
62
52
49
30
29
37
31
48
66
50
60
56
239
177
102
84
36
23
49
61
91
88
91
67
66
62
59
87
107
94
88
87
407
247
160
127
76
42
17
15
21
16
14
11
19
15
6
10
13
13
13
13
33
17
6
12
5
41
45
37
30
27
18
16
12
25
16
17
30
17
18
69
26
27
13
6
58
60
58
46
41
29
35
27
31
26
30
43
30
31
102
43
33
25
11
17
19
22
25
20
13
19
16
9
16
10
18
8
18
6
3
3
3
37
45
30
27
25
23
17
19
14
12
18
17
11
7
28
6
4
1
3
54
64
52
52
45
36
36
35
23
28
28
35
20
15
46
12
7
4
6
30
36
35
16
8
7
6
5
6
6
3
1
1
2
4
4
6
2
2
76
72
51
35
19
16
17
17
8
11
7
11
8
2
18
10
4
1
106
108
86
51
27
23
23
22
14
17
10
12
9
4
22
14
10
3
2
79
84
107
93
84
68
81
61
49
71
67
76
51
54
223
97
73
60
50
19
188
209
180
144
120
87
79
85
78
87
108
108
96
83
354
219
137
99
45
23
267
ars 	
293
287
4    ,
237
5    ,
204
6    ,
155
7    ,
160
8    ,
146
9    ,
127
10    ,
158
11    ,
175
12    ,
184
13    ,
147
14    ,
137
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35 ye
Unsp
years.. 	
577
316
210
159
ars and over
ecified	
Totals -	
95
42
844
1,312
2,156
269
490  1  759
254
344
598
180
383
563
1,547
2,529
4,076 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 11
NEW SCHOOLS.
High schools were established in Coquitlam, Field, Fruitvale, James Island, McBride,
and Salmo School Districts; a junior high school in the Chilliwack High School Area; and
superior schools at Baldonnel (Peace River), Blue River, Bowen Island, Lodore, Lytton,
Matsqui (Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford), North Pine (Peace River), Pitt Meadows, Robson,
Waldo, and Wardner.
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in the following districts:—
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Cay Creek (Brilliant Community) Nelson-Creston.
Hansard Fort George.
Manning Yale.
Wallace Mountain Grand Forks-Greenwood.
The following districts were created but no schools were opened:—
B arrett Lake Omineca.
Big Missouri Atlin.
Birchbank :_—Rossland-Trail.
Lemon Creek Kaslo-Slocan.
Port Neville Mackenzie.
Stout Yale.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and also the
cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
wT3
tt  V
£Eh §
'o
o
-a
-Si »
<h.S
°4-
6.2
ZP
si
rt QJ
8 J
ta fh
m a
QJ
i -i
E° •_, a
Sail
> M £
<!n«!
Percentage of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78  	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28t
3,532,518.951:
3,765,920.69t
3,743,317.081
3,834,727.191
4,015,074.37t
2,849,972.021
2,611,937.801:
2,835,040.741:
2,972,385.04*
3,277,660.231
3,524,962.69t
3,630,670.781:
3,585,769.00t
1882-83..    .	
1887-88  _.
1892-93	
$215,056.22f
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,668,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.541:
9,261,094.981:
11,149,996.271:
10,008,255.66J
10,061,387.991
9,719,333.81t
8,941,497.341:
8,213,369.041:
8,458,156.001:
8,775,353.781
9,593,562.641:
10,193,367.08t
10,640,740.47t
10,521,684.921
1897-98-    	
1902-03 	
1907-08                  	
1912-13
1913-14   	
1917-18	
1922-23   	
1927-28 	
1928-29... 	
1929-30   	
1930-31   	
1931-32
1932-33...  	
1933-34  	
1934-35 	
1935-36  	
1936-37
1937-38                                    	
1938-39	
1989-40 	
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
t This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. B 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage
at High
Schools of
the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1928-29 -              	
14,545
14,675
16,197
18,134
18,552
18,932
19,969
21,119
22,338
22,582
23,747
24,436
95,013
96,342
97,717
97,785
98,264
96,860
97,264
95,603
96,093
97,778
97,187
96,023
109,558
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
13.27
13.22
14.21
15.64
15.80
16.35
17.03
18.09
19.71
18.76
19.63
20.28
$28.32
28.07
28.03
29.62
21.55
19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
$33.03
1929-30 —  	
1930-31                	
32.79
32.74
1931-32... 	
1932-33-	
1933-34               	
33.18
23.98
21.85
1934 35
23.47
1935-36          .	
24.46
1936-37                                   	
26.10
1937-38  —	
1938 39	
27.18
27.92
1939-40   	
27.14
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1939-40.
Grand total cost of education $10,521,684.92
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College     $4,270.90
General grant to Victoria College      5,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia-
Normal School, Vancouver-
Normal School, Victoria—
Cost of Night-schools	
Correspondence Schools—
High School 	
Elementary  School —
Adult education 	
426,350.00
24,930.17
33,764.41
14,842.84
40,255.82
13,927.60
68,863.26
632,205.00
Net cost for total enrolment of 120,459 pupils    $9,889,479.92
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  82.10
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on total enrolment  .43
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 108,826  90.87
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on average daily attendance  .48
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 120,459 pupils for
year ($3,585,769-$632,205)       2,953,564.00
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  24.52
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day   (191 days)   on total
enrolment   .13
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance.. 27.14
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (191 days) on average
daily attendance   .14
Cost per capita for year on population of 774,000 (1939 estimate)—;  *12.78
Cost per capita per school-day (191 days) on estimated population of 774,000— *.07
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on estimated population of
774,000     t3.82
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day  (191 days)  on estimated population of 774,000  t-02
* Computed on net total cost of $9,889,479.92.
t Computed on net cost to Provincial Government of $2,953,564. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 13
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows:—
oj
a
rt
School.
qj"
QJ
OJ
OJ
QJ
a
S3
0.
a
o
_Q
O
J3
>
a
oj
R
_a
QJ
a
QJ
a
rt
oj
oj
a
.5
oj
a
a
#M
'a
'rt
u
QJ
■a
ft
O
rt
%
"o
u
QJ
s
3
a
s
j3
-M
-S
0
o
l-a
l-H
a
CO
xn
Ch
a
In
<
<
E
K
i-H
P
O
Eh
340
814
q
7
317
61
148
51
4'
85
315
58
368
2,849
795
32
190
99
27
129
7
33
52
5
8
63
'1
40
?5
141
129
545
9
4
283
14
74
216
69
IT
31
31
10R
339
68
306
2,333
City elementary schools	
938
1,969
119
152
1,084
37
230
717
214
222
60
101
395
1,022
341
1,195
8,796
Elementary schools in district
municipalities 	
77
1,359
76
6
560
42
124
998
104
64
20 103|129
103
137
580
4,482
64
564
?9
390
547
69
189
707
q9
98
641 98J117
422
??n
692
4,362
Community schools 	
470
-|-.|--
470
Totals.    .. .
1,580
5,441
264
1,056
2,920
186
711
2,838
535
652
22KI4571RS0
2,241
849[3,282
!
24,087
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which schools
were in operation during all or some portion of the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
1939-40.
..    33
City school districts 	
District municipality school districts   24
Rural school districts   659
Community school districts   4
Totals .
720*
1938-39.
33
24
660
4
721
* At the time this Annual Report was prepared 311  school districts were under the administration of Official
Trustees.    In 230 of the 311 districts schools were in operation.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 17,276. Of this number, 8,567
were boys and 8,709 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolments for 1939-40 and for 1938-39 in each city are shown in the following table:'—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
5
10
4
8
5
3
2
6
4
2
9
1
6
7
2
7
9
8
7
13
4
10
5
2
8
4
2
11
1
7
10
3
12
10
213
161
337
109
222
135
123
55
143
97
23
273
34
224
231
76
234
287
202
Armstrong  	
132
503
Courtenay.  	
88
109
127
50
135
88
20
30
197
Merritt     	
73 B 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
High Schools—Cities—Continued.
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
27
3
2
5
7
7
3
5
1
8
285
15
7
35
32
3
2
7
9
9
5
6
1
12
352
17
11
45
933
74
44
136
184
180
93
159
23
255
10,183
552
219
1,264
945
69
36
117
174
186
81
Salmon Arm High School Area   	
148
18
249
10,260
Vancouver, North..     _	
533
215
1,226
Totals —-
44
506
633
17,276
17,197
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools for the year was 4,804. Of this
number, 2,206 were boys and 2,598 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1939-40 and 1938-39 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Abbotsford: Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
Administrative Area.— - 	
Burnaby    	
Coquitlam   	
Delta    	
Esquimalt - _ _	
Kent    -
Langley   	
Maple Ridge _
Mission	
Oak Bay	
Peachland .....
Penticton	
Richmond	
Saanich _
Summerland-
Surrey 	
Vancouver, West-
Totals	
35
1
5
5
2
8
10
5
10
2
6
7
18
4
15
10
44
1
6
7
3
10
10
6
15
2
11
9
20
5
17
10
240
1,324
35
132
124
51
322
267
141
350
17
217
223
507
103
489
262
4,804
264
1,174
111
115
45
271
268
146
337
16
218
193
518
92
487
258
4,513 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 15
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 2,356. Of this number, 1,149
were boys and 1,207 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1939-40 and 1938-39 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
6
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
2
2
2
5
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
5
4
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
9
1
2
1
1
1
2
6
2
2
4
2
2
8
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
9
6
2
2
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
1
2
2
3
1
2
2
2
40
26
39
24
56
44
35
158
34
37
19
17
17
31
84
31
53
33
16
36
155
27
35
81
16
44
25
16
43
92
37
36
183
75
39
49
15
52
30
36
51
68
41
17
42
44
62
21
43
23
28
42
12
23
45
23
Cobble Hill                                                                	
41
48
30
137
27
32
Field                                                                           	
17
24
Harewood     	
81
27
35
34
29
146
26
34
73
36
New Denver. _ — — -
North Bend    	
18
13
34
79
27
34
69
35
Quesnel 	
34
Rolla                                                                             	
Saanich, North, Consolidated 	
35
Telkwa            .             .....     ..	
41
Vanderhoof    —
Wells     	
Westbank _  	
Woodfibre.   	
26
39
20
26
Totals 	
51
107
126
2,356
1
2,037 B 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was 609. Of
this number, 335 were boys and 274 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1939-40 and 1938-39 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Abbotsford: Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
2
1
1
' 7
4
6
7
4
6
236
143
230
445
Delta     	
146
Totals	
4
17
17
609
591
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools for the school-year was 2,878. The number
of boys was 1,483, of girls 1,395.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Alert Bay 	
Ashcroft 	
Blue River —
Bowen Island	
Brechin  	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Canal Flat. 	
Cedar, North	
Chase   	
Coalmont 	
Copper Mountain .
Falkland	
Fort St. John	
Fruitvale - 	
Gabriola United —
Hazelton 	
Hope  —
James Island .
Kaleden	
Lantzville _
Lodore	
Lytton —	
Malcolm Island
Mayo 	
Mountain —	
McBride	
Mackenzie United-
Oyster, North	
Peace River—
Baldonnel	
Pine, North	
Pouce Coupe -
Swan Lake	
Pender Harbour	
Pender Island	
Pioneer Mine ...
Port Alice 	
69
94
69
38
161
70
117
49
60
81
34
101
50
37
41
65
67
66
76
58
37
60
42
48
34
82
29
34
47
67
95
194
65
86
50
66
73
49
86
53
60
196
45
54
112
43
50
68
78
63
43
54
54
46
74
36
35
52
64
82 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 17
Superior Schools—Rural Districts—Continued.
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
3
4
2
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
3
4
2
39
44
73
87
94
56
57
45
68
119
66
38
113
Sechelt United                                             	
71
28
96
86
59
Waldo United   '
77
Wellington, South  —  	
71
107
Yahk United          	
76
88
Totals 	
44
115
115
2,878
3,104
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 9,753. The number of boys was 5,006,
and of girls 4,747.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment.
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
16
5
6
8
2
9
9
10
28
2
9
6
11
112
12
9
16
18
5
8
11
2
14
10
15
37
4
10
6
13
144
14
9
20
594
175
172
300
22
349
313
365
1,103
56
301
162
434
4,135
386
334
552
166
188
317
Kaslo — : 	
30
368
286
Nelson 	
355
994
68
330
163
414
Vancouver  	
4,212
397
339
583
Totals -   „.„	
22
270
340
9,753
9,210 B  18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools was 1,709. Of this number, 878 were boys and 831 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1939-40 and 1938-39 are given in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools,
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
6
6
9
14
8
8
6
9
11
15
10
191
151
216
344
472
335
148
Delta   	
161
229
341
Richmond '        -  "
Vancouver, West   	
488
296
Totals 	
6
49
59
1,709
1,663
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in rural junior high schools was 1,065. The number of boys was 554,
and of girls 511.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1939-40 and 1938-39 are given in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
»
2
9
3
3
2
8
2
10
5
10
3
2
235
37
283
73
244
116
77
218
35
255
Ocean Falls	
85
276
109
63
7
33
40
1,065
1,041
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of_
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Number op Pupils in Grades.
-
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XL
XII.
o c c
o.S.3
High schools :
Cities  — —
District municipalities	
17,276
4,804
2,356
8,567
2,206
1,149
8,709
2,598
1,207
15,036.04
4,119.08
2,048.84
3,564
1,223
582
5,404
1,480
734
4,341
1,156
564
3,331
837
440
636
108
36
Totals—	
24,436
11,922
12,514
21,203.96
5,369
7,618
6,061
4,608
780
Junior high schools :
Cities —  	
9,753
1,709
1,065
5,006
878
554
4,747
831
511
8,729.33
1,490.08
963.12
3,303
607
370
3,394
587
356
3,056
515
339
	
Totals 	
12,527
6,438
6,089
11,182.53
4,280 ] 4,337 j 3,910 |
-----
36,963
18,360
18,603
32,386.49
4,280
4,337
9.279 1 7.618
6,061
4,608
780 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 19
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS-
CITIES.
Of this number, 21,330 were
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 41,330.
boys and 20,000 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1939-40 and 1938-39 are given in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
4
2
6
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
53
1
3
1
14
7
11
9
10
14
10
11
8
10
14
2
18
8
6
18
19
46
16
7
5
8
15
12
14
4
2
35
676
11
21
19
84
7
11
9
12
14
10
11
4
8
10
2
14
2
18
8
6
18
20
46
17
7
5
8
15
12
14
4
2
36
741
21
22
20
88
255
463
358
351
512
395
441
107
304
334
52
537
57
686
336
193
593
678
1,900
582
208
188
301
612
389
483
135
65
1,327
23,659
92
783
804
3,150
243
459
Chilliwack  	
911
361
512
394
417
106
297
337
55
523
58
696
331
216
Nanaimo   	
592
696
1,929
601
227
185
317
591
428
465
148
66
1,292
24,485
School for the Deaf and the Blind 	
Vancouver, North  	
97
802
Totals.  	
118
1,156
1,242
41,330
42,812 B 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 19,076. The number
of boys was 9,931, of girls 9,145.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Abbotsford: Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational
13
19
1
14
2
5
2
9
1
2
15
7
9
2
1
1
7
14
8
1
23
5
2
34
108
7
33
3
13
2
14
10
30
31
18
17
2
18
34
46
10
8
54
19
14
34
113
7
33
3
13
2
14
10
6
30
31
18
18
2
19
35
46
10
8
55
19
14
1,300
3,904
267
1,036
85
475
61
381
408
225
1,186
1,055
559
685
56
707
1,275
1,653
282
286
1,987
657
546
1,077
3,982
259
1,066
89
492
Cowichan, North — 	
Delta                                    -     -
71
392
341
Kent            .... 	
217
1,206
1,067
532
Oak Bay '	
639
53
691
196
1,233
1,683
273
290
2,015
673
556
Totals    	
163
531
540
19,076
19,093
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the rural districts was 19,055. The number
of boys was 9,836, of girls 9,219.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
681
897
901
19,055
19,075
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the community school districts was 548. Of
this number, 274 were boys and 274 were girls.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1939-40 and 1938-39:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Numb.er
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1939-40.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Community school districts    	
13
21
21
548
549 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 21
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OF EACH CLASS AND NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN
EACH CLASS OF SCHOOL.
Class of School.
No. of Schools.
No. of Teachers.
1939-40.
1938-39.
1939-40.
1938-39.
High schools:
44
20
51
4
44
22
6
7
118
163
681
13
44
19
48
3
43
21
6
7
119
165
685
12
633
186
126
17
115
340
59
40
1,242
540
901
21
608
177
116
Superior schools:
District municipalities —  	
16
117
Junior high schools:
Cities          	
823
51
37
Elementary schools:
1,273
District municipalities .    ,	
555
901
20
Totals—    - —  	
1,173
1,172
4,220
4,194
SALARIES.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary  (quoted in dollars
only)  paid to teachers during the school-year 1939-40:—
High Schools.
JUNIOf
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
$2,200
2,600*
1,750
2,850
1,680
2.230
1,417
3,050
2,100
1,518
2,500
1,800
2,515
1.950
2,000
2,635
3.600
3,497
2,500*
1,800
1,850
2,000
2,300
2,500
2,750
2,100*
1,200
3,800
$1,400
1,350*
1,200
1,450
1,260
1,200
1,200
1,400
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,800
1,325
1,200
1,200
1,232
1,875
1,301
1,350*
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,300
1,200
1,200
1,350*
1,200
1,500
$1,850
1,900
1,350
1,950
2,700
1,931
1,900
1,417
1,250
1,900
1,200
2,350
1,000
2,050
1,400
1,160
1,410
2,300
2,144
2,500
1,315
1,300
2,000
1,830
2,350
2,300
1,848
1,150
2,400
$800
900
780
900
1,045
880
800
780
1,100
900
850
1,150
1,000
850
850
1,000
1,020
942
896
1,020
850
900
900
960
1,050
950
1,170
900
950
$1 100
$1,600
1,714*
1,406
1,684
1,396
1,452
1,308
1,680
1,550
1,359
1,889
1,800
1,681
1,444
1,466
1,737
2,397
2,478
1,766*
1,417
1,525
1,380
1,583
1,735
1,850
1,652*
1,200
2,167
1,184
1,069
$1,610
$1,100
$1,222
1,145
1,313
1,209
1,400
1,500
1,575
1,350
2,250
Duncan - 	
1,150
1,300
1,230
1,032
981
1,383
1,194
1,130
983
Kamloops —  	
Kaslo   -
Kelowna   	
1,200
1,250
1,200
1,353
1,300
1,373
1,415
1,000
1,188
1,084
1,060
1,307
1,453
1,349
1,272
1,005
1,572
3,100
2,984
Nanaimo   —	
Nelson    	
1,147
1,600
1,100
1,417
2,002
1,692
1,150
1,450
1,450
........
....
2,900
1,150
1,150
1,250
1.150
1,269
1,329
1,178
1,339
1,025
1,276
Prince Rup*ert - —	
1,200
1,400
1,442
1,695
1,250
* These figures refer to high school area. B 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
Salaries—Continued.
High Schools.
Junior
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities—Continued.
4,147
2,500
2,800
3,702
1,200
1,280
1,400
1,524
2,602
1,816
1,782
2,456
4,147
2,170
1,600
3,062
1,219
1,100
1,300
1,520
2,059
1,517
1,458
2,051
3,770
1,809
2,625
2,970
882
950
1,000
900
1,690
Vancouver, North 	
1,333
1,240
1,733
$4,147
$1,200
$2,316
$4,147
$1,100
$1,783
$3,770
$780
$1,552
District Municipalities.
Abbotsford:   Matsqui-S>umas-
Abbotsf ord Educational Ad-
$1,650
2,705
$1,250
1,200
$1,367
1,553
$1,450
2,430
1,500
1,450
1,125
1,250
1,125
1,600
2,515
1,050
1,100
1,550
1,390
3,000
1,000
1,980
1,975
1,860
1,100
2,100
1,310
1,860
2,272
$820
780
850
780
800
800
1,000
830
1,100
800
780
800
800
1,050
850
900
780
850
800
900
780
1,000
1,295
$962
1,241
1,050
963
1,700
1,950
2,336
1,500
1,900
1,900
2,300
3,100
1,300
2,670
2,100
2,500
1,850
2,120
1,700
$1,250
1,250
992
1,700
$1,100
1,100
$1,150
1,012
Cowichan, North ___ 	
1,062
1,350
1,650
1,350
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,365
1,200
1,265
1,250
1,200
1,525
1,847
1,425
1,310
1,355
1,646
2,360
1,250
1,731
1,563
1,765
1,183
973
1,475
950
889
1,600
-
1,100
985
1,209
1,047
1,670
1,700
1,550
1,250
1,100
925
1,411
1,275
1,135
1,085
1,097
890
Summerland  	
1,200
1,200
1,525
1,487
1,353
..
	
1,181
     1	
908
	
1,261
Vancouver, West  	
2,822
2,073
1,946
1,100
1,513
1,602
For   all   district   munici-
$3,100
$1,200
$1,625
$1,946
$1,100
$1,308
$3,000
$780
$1,105
Rural Districts.
$3,300
$1,200
$1,614
$2,175
$1,150
$1,484
$2,270
$780
$915
Community Districts.
..     |    	
      1	
$1,145
$800
$914
1
1 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 23
Salaries—Continued.
Superior Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Abbotsf ord: Matsqui-
Sumas-Abbotsford Educational Administrative
.     $1,150
1,260
1,650
1,100
1,200
1,150
1,500
1,750
1,100
1,200
1,300
1,100
1,565
1,200
1,200
1,100
1,100
1,600
1,200
1,100
1,100
1,100
$900
950
1,300
850
900
850
950
1,000
900
780
1,000
850
1,000
930
925
780
780
950
850
900
850
950
$1,021
1,053
1,450
967
1,050
960
1,133
1,300
1,000
943
1,100
975
1,221
1,022
1,062
906
940
1,125
1,025
1,000
933
1,025
Malcolm Island .. — 	
Mayo .. 	
Mountain   .
$1,152
1,100
1,150
1,100
1,100
1,150
1,100
1,100
1,400
1,150
1,500
1,150
1,200
1,100
1,200
1,700
1,200
1,100
1,150
1,100
1,550
1,100
$841
800
800
1,050
780
780
800
850
1,000
850
850
880
800
780
900
1,100
900
780
830
850
900
1,000
$961
916
975
1,075
Oyster, North ..
Peace River Educational
Administrative Area .
Pender Harbour	
940
Ashcroft —	
994
950
975
Burns Lake -	
Pioneer Mine - 	
1,150
933
Canal Flat	
Port Alice     -
1,100
1,015
Chase — 	
Coalmont  	
Robson        . 	
Sechelt United— 	
1,000
946
1,000
Stewart 	
Stillwater United	
Waldo ..._	
Wardner 	
Wellington, South 	
Williams Lake	
Yahk United 	
For all superior schools
1,300
Falkland     -	
Fort St. John	
1,050
940
990
Hope  	
Kaleden	
Lantzville — —
Lodore  	
Lytton — —	
933
1,125
1,050
$1,750
$780
$1,037
The average yearly salary paid to teachers employed in all public schools (high, superior,
junior high, and elementary) of the Province for the school-year 1939-40 was $1,477; to
teachers employed in all high schools, $2,086; to teachers employed in all superior schools,
$1,037; to teachers employed in all junior high schools, $1,691; to teachers employed in all
elementary schools, $1,242;   and to teachers employed in all community schools, $914. B 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
The following table shows the number of teachers in the Province receiving the annual
salary indicated:—
Salary.
No. of   ;
Teachers.1
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Below $780
284
140
23
88
109
56
166
21
57
113
32
136
14
29
97
33
■ 120
20
39
67
21
151
35
52
97
20
74
37
29
81
15
87
33
38
50
25
68
41
12
27
16
40
36
$1,621-1,640
1,641-1,660	
1,661-1,680
1,681-1,700 -
1,701-1,720
1,721-1,740 .
1,741-1,760
1,761-1,780
1.781-1,800
1,801-1,820	
1,821-1,840....	
1,841-1,860
1,861-1,880
1,881-1,900 ...
23
40
30
376
44
20
20
11
46
14
6
23
7
67
2
5
19
17
22
5
3
7
25
17
6
4
5
31
18
6
11
32
12
4
5
34
7
14
2
4
26
5
$2,481-2,500
2,501-2,520
2,521-2,540 -
14
9
4
17
3
8
7
12
5
2
7
10
35
12
3
15
1
9
"'
1
2
6
3
7
8
80
6
1
2
8
1
1
1
19
$3,341-3,360 —	
$780
3,361-3,380	
1
781- 800
3,381-3,400 -
9
801- 820
2,541-2,560 	
2,561-2,580
2,581-2,600	
2,601-2,620	
2,621-2,640
2,641-2,660
2,661-2,680 	
3,401-3,420	
821- 840
841- 860-	
861- 880	
3,421-3,440
3,441-3,460	
3,461-3,480
3,481-3,500	
1
1
881  900
5
901- 920
921- 940
3,501-3,520	
3,521-3,540  ..
1
941  960
2,681-2,700
2,701-2,720 .
2,721-2,740	
3,541-3,660
961  980
3,561-3,580 .
981-1,000
3,581-3,600
3,601-3,620
3,621-3,640-	
5
1,001-1,020
2,741-2,760
2,761-2,780 	
1
1,021 1,040
1,901-1,920
1,921-1,940	
1,941-1,960	
1,961-1,980 _ —
1,981-2,000 -  .
2,001-2,020	
2,021-2,040	
2,041-2,060 ..
2,061-2,080
2,081-2,100	
2,101-2,120 	
2,121-2,140 .
2.141-2,160 	
2.161-2,180 	
2,181-2,200 	
2,201-2,220 _	
2,221-2,240	
2,241-2,260
2,261-2,280 	
2,281-2,300
2,301-2,320	
2,321-2,340 .. ....
2,341-2,360 	
2,361-2,380	
1,041 1,060
2,781-2,800
2,801-2,820 —	
2,821-2,840	
2,841-2,860
2,861-2,880
2,881-2,900 _. ..
2,901-2,920
2,921-2,940	
2,941-2,960	
3,641-3,660	
1,061-1,080	
1,081-1,100
3,661-3,680
1
3,681-3,700	
1,101-1,120
1,121-1,149 	
3,701-3,720
3,721-3,740 ..—	
3,741-3,760
3,761-3,780
3,781-3,800
3,801-3,820 .... 	
2
1,141-1,160
1,161-1,180
1,181-1,200
1,201-1,220	
1,221-1,240
2
2
2,961-2,980	
3,821-3,840	
1,241-1,260	
2,981-3,000
3,001-3,020	
8,021-3,040
3,041-3,060 	
3,061-3,080 . . ..
3,081-3,100
3,101-3,120 	
3,121-3,140 	
3,141-3,160
3,161-3,180
3,181-3,200	
3,201-3,220
3,221-3,240
3,241-3,260
3,261-3,280	
3,841-3,860
3,861-3,880	
1,261-1,280
1,281-1,300 ....
3,881-3,900
3,901-3,920	
1.301-1,320
1,321-1,340
3,921-3,940	
1,341-1,360 .
1,361-1,880
3,941-3,960
3,961-3,980 -	
1
3,981-4,000
1,401 1,420
4,001-4,020 .—	
1,421 1,440
4,021-4,040	
1,441 1,460
4,041-4,060. -	
1
1,461-1,480
4,061-4,080.	
1,481-1,500
4,081-4,100 .
4,101-4,120 ...__	
1,501-1,520
2,381-2,400 .
2,401-2,420	
1,521 1,540
4,121-4,140  ..
1.541-1,560
2,421-2,440....-	
3,281-3,300  	
3 301 3,320
4,141-4,160 	
6
♦Total -..-
1,581-1,600
2,461-2,480 -_..
3,321-3,340 	
4,177
1,601-1,620
* Exchange and part-time teachers not included. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. B 25
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1939-40.
Minister's Office:
Salaries   .-     $1,530.00
Office supplies   316.58
Travelling expenses  .       1,482.72
  $3,329.30
General Office:
Salaries     $24,441.80
Office supplies         2,084.28
Travelling expenses   303.87
  26,829.95
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc.  .  51,424.69
Correspondence Schools—High:
Salaries   $35,572.37
Office supplies   10,275.48
Revision of courses  2,928.47
Travelling expenses   180.45
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services   180.00
$49,136.77
Less fees  :       8,880.95
Correspondence Schools—Elementary:
Salaries  ... $11,279.77
Office supplies          2,647.83
Industrial Education:
Salaries      $14,465.00
Office supplies        1,353.75
Travelling expenses        5,219.25
Grants in aid      12,453.49
Night-schools        14,842.84
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries     $87,800.47
Office supplies   9,316.82
Travelling expenses  _  30,892.76
$128,010.05
Less amount paid by School Boards        8,824.22
Normal School, Vancouver:
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468) _•_  $36,392.50
Office supplies   1,823.78
Travelling expenses   425.19
Fuel, light, and water  1,829.30
Books, binding, periodicals  1,101.48
Allowance to Demonstration School    1,800.00
Desks and furniture (part by Public Works)  312.00
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  2,442.35
Incidentals   2,216.07
$48,342.67
Less Normal School fees  :     23,412.50
40,255.82
13,927.60
48,334.33
119,185.83
24,930.17 B 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
Normal School, Victoria:
Salaries (part by Public Works)  $34,250.03
Office supplies   1,666.57
Travelling expenses   .».  365.66
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)  2,393.76
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  7,567.01
Furniture (by Public Works)  1,522.20
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools   385.17
Incidentals   .  498.76
$48,649.16
Less Normal School fees     14,884.75
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (less deductions for rent, etc., $3,620.69)  $35,828.27
Office supplies     366.92
Laundry and janitor supplies   1,137.46
Travelling expenses   273.45
Fuel, light, and water   2,724.19
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  4,041.86
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment (part by Public Works)  1,577.02
Provisions    4,640.43
Incidentals  .-.  1,001.02
$33,764.41
$51,590.62
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta     850.00
50,740.62
High. Superior. Junior High. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities  $325,308.70           $191,871.56       $546,117.13     1,063,297.39
Salary grants to district municipalities    109,334.19    $10,992.38        46,246.50 349,629.28        516,202.35
Salary grants to rural school
districts      88,731.58      74,602.20        31,505.80 597,932.97        792,772.55
Salary grants to community
school districts                 14,173.85 14,173.85
$523,374.47    $85,594.58    $269,623.86    $1,507,853.23
School buildings, erection and maintenance, and special aid to school districts ....        119,823.27
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses   ._ 14,405.40
School tests, High School and Senior Matriculation examinations   $31,236.59
Less fees for examinations and certificates     32,227.57
Credit            $990.98
Conveying children to central schools          117,752.96
School libraries   9,804.81
Summer schools and teacher-training for special certificates   $18,216.05
Less summer-school fees       17,706.95
  509.10
Official Trustee, Community School Districts:
Salary      $2,400.00
Expenses        1,305.09
$3,705.09
Less paid by districts       1,852.54
1,852.55 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
B 27
Board of Reference
Less fees 	
$385.88
150.00
Adult Education:
Extension and adult education and education of the unemployed $27,300.85
Recreational and physical education for youths over school age.    41,562.41
School radio broadcasts	
Curriculum revision and educational supervision, etc.
Incidentals and contingencies 	
University of British Columbia 	
Special grant to Victoria College	
Less credit for school tests, etc.
$235.88
68,863.26
4,638.15
14,377.23
3,978.51
426,350.00
5,000.00
1,586,759.98
990.98
Total cost to Government  .    $3,585,769.00
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High.
Cities  $1,558,664.47
District municipalities        290,381.74
Rural school districts       190,349.24
Community school districts 175.00
Superior.
$21,120.51
101,369.71
Junior High
$733,465.01
104,914.54
77,786.24
Elementary.
$2,617,823.46
619,098.62
608,501.41
12,265.97
$2,039,570.45 $122,490.22 $916,165.79 $3,857,689.46
4,909,952.94
1,035,515.41
978,006.60
12,440.97
Grand total cost of education  $10,521,684.92
EXAMINATIONS, 1940.
University Entrance Examinations.
Date of Examination.
June, 1940  ..
August, 1940
No. of
Candidates.
7,133*
l,226t
No. granted
Full
Standing.
2,177
408
2,585
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
4,676
581
No. failing
to obtain any
Standing.
280
237
* This number includes many candidates who wrote on completion of Grade XI. one or more of the following
subjects:   Social Studies V., General Science V., Foreign Language III.
t Almost all of these were candidates at the June Examination.
Senior Matriculation Examinations.
Date of Examination.
No. of
Candidates.
No. granted
Full
Standing.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
No. failing
to obtain any
Standing.
June, 1940           	
1,314
485»
395
148
771
252
148
85
543
* Almost all of these were candidates at the June Examination. B 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
SCHOLARSHIPS.
University Entrance.
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded in June, 1940, by the University of British
Columbia to the students who ranked first and second in their respective districts were won
by the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
Kamloops   	
Victoria —  	
95.4
87.6
85.8
92.0
89.2
92.6
91.0
94.6
91.8
91.8
93.0
83.0
86.2
84.8
87.8
85.0
$175
No. 1	
(1) George Alexander Baxter  	
(2) George Herbert LeBus  	
(1) Richard Arthur Kendall 	
(2) James Lewthwaite Bryant   	
(1) Mary Janet Handling  	
(2) Helen Urquhart	
(1) Richard Mountford Bibbs 	
*(2) Basil A. Dunell   	
*        Ralph David Barer .:: 	
(1) Frank Samuel Mathews         	
(2) Marjorie Alice Sandys 	
(1) Donald Baker Robinson  	
175
175
„   2...  	
175
175
,,   3—    ..
North Vancouver	
175
175
„   4     _
University Hill   	
Burnaby, South   i.  .
Magee, Vancouver .. .
Langley    	
175
„   5	
175
175
175
175
„   6	
Oliver    .	
Oliver 	
175
175
,,   7
(1) Kenneth Donald Hester 	
(2) Ada Elizabeth Littler 	
175
Michel-Natal 	
175
* These two students tied for second place in District 4.
Senior Matriculation.
The winners of the scholarships awarded in June, 1940, by the University of British
Columbia on the results of the Senior Matriculation examination to (1) the two students
obtaining the highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining the highest standing in districts other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster, were:—
1
Name.                                                                            High School.
Per       ]   Scholar-
Cent.     !       ship.
1
94.0
92.2
87.fi
87.6
$175
Geoffrey Leslie Thomas Ashe ,	
♦Barbara Mary D. Burrows....	
♦Annie Barbara Peterson  _
High Correspondence School, Department of Education ......
Kelowna      	
Prince Rupert     	
175
175
175
* These two studsnts tied for first place in districts other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster.
The three additional scholarships established by the University of British Columbia for
the students obtaining the highest standings in Districts Nos. 2, 5, 6, and 7, were awarded to
the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
No 2
Phyllis Josephine Hill-Tout	
83.6
$175
„   5	
Harold Walter Holy. ,	
Mission  —- -	
Kelowna    	
80.2                175
86.8              175
The conditions under which these scholarships  are awarded are fully outlined in the
Calendar of the University of British Columbia.
OATH OF ALLEGIANCE.
In February, 1940, the Council of Public Instruction directed that teachers in the public
schools of the Province, as well as students in the Provincial Normal Schools and in the teacher-training class at the University of British Columbia, be required to take an Oath of
Allegiance to His Majesty King George VI., his heirs and successors.
This did not mean that the loyalty and the devotion of teachers were open to doubt. It
was simply one way of indicating that a person holding an important and responsible position
in a public service should be ready to conduct himself in such a way as not to give rise to any
doubt of his loyalty to his Sovereign.
The Inspectors of Schools were appointed Commissioners for the purpose of administering this oath free of charge. It is pleasing to report that the oath has been taken
already most willingly by almost all teachers in the Province, including those who graduated
recently from the two Provincial Normal Schools and the training class for teachers at the
University of British Columbia. The remaining few will have taken the oath before the end
of September, 1940.
WAR SAVINGS.
In May, 1940, the principals and teachers of all public schools in the Province were
advised that within a few days they would receive information regarding the Dominion
Government's plan to offer War Savings Certificates for sale, and were requested to explain
it to their pupils and interest them in it.
Just before the reopening of the schools after the summer vacation these principals and
teachers, at the request of the Honourable the Minister of Education, were again strongly
urged to give their full and enthusiastic co-operation in the furtherance of the sale of
War Savings Stamps to their pupils.
THE SCHOOL FLAG.
That more effective use might be made of the flags supplied to the schools, the section
of the Rules and Regulations of the Council of Public Instruction for the Government of
Public Schools in the Province, relating thereto, was revised to read as follows:—
" School Flag.—At least one day in each week, preferably at the opening of school in the
morning, the pupils shall be assembled in front of the flag and shall salute it and sing the
National Anthem; or an assembly of the school shall be held in the school auditorium (in
the case of a small school in the class-room or class-rooms), when patriotic exercises, including
the singing of the National Anthem, shall be carried out. It shall be the duty of the
principals and teachers to endeavour to see that proper ideals of loyalty to our King and
Country are instilled into the minds of the pupils in attendance and that due respect is paid
to the flag and British institutions.
" Notes.—I. When head-dress is not worn, as in a class-room, the flag is saluted by standing at attention.
" II. The Department provides a Union Jack for every school in the Province."
JUNIOR RED CROSS.
Last year in British Columbia schools there were 1,077 Junior Red Cross branches, with
30,995 members.   Forty-four of these branches were in the high schools.
In August, 1940, the Honourable the Minister of Education addressed a letter to the
boys and girls in these schools and their teachers, urging that an effort be made to double
the number of members of the Junior Red Cross in the schools of the Province during the
school-year 1940-41 and to increase the number of branches in the larger schools. The cost
of forming a branch is only $1. Literature and information may be obtained from the
Junior Red Cross, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
CADET INSTRUCTION.
In July, 1940, the Council of Public Instruction authorized the following regulations
governing Cadet Instruction in the schools of the Province:—
"{a.) The Minister of Education in his discretion may require the curriculum of any
school to include cadet instruction and training as a part of the regular
programme of studies for the school, and may require that this instruction
and training be given in a cadet corps regularly organized and inspected by
the Department of National Defence. The cadet corps so established shall
pursue the syllabus of instruction and training laid down for cadet corps by
the Department of National Defence and shall be instructed and trained by B 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
a cadet instructor or corps of cadet instructors with military qualifications
satisfactory to the Department of National Defence. The time allotment
provided in the Programme of Studies for physical education may be used for
cadet instruction, which must include a due proportion of time for physical
education and first aid: Provided that a pupil who is physically incapacitated
shall be exempted from taking cadet corps training.
"(6.) The foregoing provisions shall apply equally to a cadet corps established and
maintained by a Board of School Trustees under section 140 of the ' Public
Schools Act,' and in all cases the Board of School Trustees shall make provision for the storage and safe custody of cadet equipment and shall provide
proper space and facilities for the efficient training of the corps.
"(c) In all high, superior, and junior high schools the course in physical education
for boys from Grades IX. to Senior Matriculation, inclusive, shall include the
elements of infantry squad and platoon drill without arms, as laid down by the
Department of National Defence. The elements of first aid must be taught
to all pupils of both sexes in these grades. In all schools where there are a
sufficient number of boys to permit of it, squad drill without arms shall be
taught in the physical education work of Grades VII. and VIII.
" (d.) In a school in which a cadet corps has been organized, the instruction specified
in (c) above shall be given as a part of the regular cadet instruction."
PROGRESS CARDS.
During 1938-39 revised progress cards were issued for (1) Grades I., II., and III., and
(2) for Grades IV., V., and VI. In the school-year 1939-40 a new form was issued for use
in Grades VII. to XII., inclusive. Two types of this form are provided, a loose-leaf form
for larger schools and a booklet form for smaller schools. The cover page of this progress
card for Grades VII. to XII. has upon it this statement addressed to the parent:—
" The aim of education is to provide the child with an opportunity to acquire knowledge,
habits, and skills, and to develop traits, attitudes, and ideals that will enable him to live
usefully and happily. Your co-operation with the school in fostering such growth will aid
your child's progress."
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS.
Eighteen months of experimentation had proved to the satisfaction of the Department
of Education that education by radio had justified the cost and effort involved. It became
evident during the school-year that the time had arrived when a Director of School Radio
Broadcasts should be appointed. It seemed essential that this officer should have both
school and radio experience. On March 1st, 1940, Mr. Kenneth P. Caple, M.S.A., was
appointed to that office and was given the opportunity to secure several months of training
in radio techniques. This arrangement was made possible through the interest of the
Carnegie Corporation of New York. This Corporation bore the expenses of this training
and paid the full salary of the Director until the end of August. After that date the salary
of the Director will be borne jointly by the Department of Education and the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation.
ACCREDITING OF HIGH SCHOOLS.
In June, 1938, forty-nine of the high schools of the Province were accredited under initial
temporary regulations. Under more rigid regulations, in June, 1939, forty-two high schools
were placed on the accredited list; and in June, 1940, the number of high schools accredited
was forty-five. Students of these schools in June, 1940, who in Grade XII. subjects had
reached a standing of C+ or higher, were not required to sit for examinations conducted by
the Board of Examiners. Those students who had reached a standing of C or C— in a
subject were also granted standing, provided this grade was compensated by a higher grade
in another subject.
In accordance with a resolution of the High School Accrediting Committee a school that
has been placed on the accredited list for 1940 will remain on that list from year to year,
provided that it is found that an endeavour is still being made to meet the conditions as set
forth in the criteria for accreditation;   and provided further that the Accrediting Committee does not deem it advisable to remove the school from the list because of an unfavourable
report from the Inspector or because of some other reason.
BIBLE STUDY.
That the reading and study of the Bible might be encouraged among students the
Honourable the Minister of Education, towards the end of the school-year 1939-40, presented
a plan whereby credits might be earned extra-murally by students in Grades IX., X., XL,
and XII.    As an experimental basis of procedure it was suggested that:—
(a.)  The various churches or denominations or groups of churches or denominations
be invited to draw up and submit to the Minister of Education a suggested
elective course or courses in Biblical literature;   the Biblical selections need
not be uniform but all must have real literary or historical value :
(b.)  The instruction  be given extra-murally by accredited  representatives  of the
churches or denominations concerned:
(c.)   The course be divided into four parts (A, B, C, D), which parts might be taken
in two, three, or four years:
(d.)  Each part carry one unit of credit  (making a total of four credits for Grades
IX., X., XL, and XII.) and each unit of credit represent at least a 40-minute
period of actual teaching weekly and an additional 40 minutes of study weekly:
(e.)   The religious bodies concerned submit to the schools affected a report of the
pupils' marks and a copy of the examinations or tests upon which the marks
were based;   these marks and the copies of tests to be sent to the principal in
time to be of use at all regular periods for reporting to parents:
(/.)   The standard of instruction as indicated by the examinations or tests must
be satisfactory to the Department of Education in order that credit for the
courses might continue to be given by the Department:
(g.)  The marked examination or test papers  be available for examination by a
competent school authority as determined by the Department of Education.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. WILLIS,
Superintendent of Edtication. B 32 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1939-40.
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
REPORT OF H. B. KING, Ph.D., CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In making this my first report as Chief Inspector, a position which I am the first person
in this Province to hold, I wish to thank the many people who have co-operated with me so
well—you, sir, yourself; the other departmental officials and inspectors; the Municipal
Inspectors; the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver, and his staff; the Normal School
principals and staff;   and principals, teachers, and School Boards throughout the Province.
In carrying out my statutory duty of " co-ordination of inspection and supervision in all
schools in the Province," I visited schools of every type in all but three inspectorates,
accompanied on these visits by the district Inspector. These visits, in the case of graded
schools, culminated in conferences, several hours in duration, held at the close of school,
attended by the local Inspector, the principal and his staff. In these conferences, matters
connected with school and class-room organization and administration, teaching procedures,
the philosophy and interpretation of the curriculum were discussed freely, with particular
reference to the problems of the school which was being visited.
In many cases my visit to an inspectoral area included conferences with School Boards
in the district. I held many such meetings with boards which were engaged in a building
programme or were contemplating such a programme.
THE NEW CURRICULUM.
Before taking over the duties of Chief Inspector, a large part of my time was given
to the work of curriculum construction in my capacity of Curriculum Adviser. During
the past year I have been in a position to see the curriculum in action, and it would seem
proper to record some of my observations and conclusions.
I wish first of all to pay tribute to the splendid way in which the great majority of
teachers have tried to interpret and to give effect to the new Programme of Studies, or as
it is popularly called, the " New Curriculum." The effort to understand and to apply the
" New Curriculum " has given an intellectual quickening to the teaching body which has
brought freshness and vitality to their teaching.
One of the insidious dangers to which any system of schools is exposed is self-satisfaction,
self-complacency, self-admiration. British Columbia has received much praise in other
Provinces for recent curricular reforms. Other Provinces have been influenced by British
Columbia in both the form and the content of the curriculum. This, no doubt, is gratifying
but should not lead us to forming jejune notions of being " in the lead," or " setting the pace,"
or havin" the " best schools in Canada." The development of our own curriculum is simply a
British Columbia expression of educational philosophy and psychology as these have been
developing in the English-speaking world. The principles laid down in our own bulletins
have a remarkable resemblance to those appearing in the most recent " Handbook of Suggestions for Teachers," of the English Board of Education (which I had not read until our
own bulletins were printed). The Programmes of Study recently issued in other Canadian
Provinces are based upon a similar philosophy, which may most briefly be expressed as the
promotion of individual growth and social adjustment through purposeful activity. The
modernization of teaching procedures is not a British Columbian, nor an American, peculiarity. The newer methods which are being developed in the progressive schools in this
Province are spreading with equal rapidity in the other parts of Canada and in the British
Isles. Any local reactionary, dissatisfied with the changes which are occurring, would find
little comfort in returning to the place of his origin.
CURRICULUM REVISION.
Curriculum revision this year has been mainly in the Senior Matriculation field—
Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and French—to bring these courses into proper relation with
the earlier courses, to increase their social utility, and to organize them better pedagogically.
It is worthy of comment that the new General Science courses have been well received
by students. It is gratifying to note that in recent writings of Professors Julian Huxlev
and J. B. S. Haldane the same principles of Science organization have been advocated which
have been followed in this Province. INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. B 33
THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
When the new Programme of Studies was issued, the Normal Schools were faced with
the problem of training their students for the new programme. This involved considerable
reorganization. The task was carried out most efficiently, and the Normal Schools are
developing a fine spirit of enthusiasm in the teachers-in-training. The young teachers
trained for the " New Curriculum " are giving excellent effect to it, and not infrequently in
a remote ungraded rural school one will find a bright, attractive class-room, full of purposeful
activity carried on in the modern spirit.
To effect better liaison between the Normal School staffs and the Inspectors, so that each
will understand the point of view and the problems of the others, I have arranged to hold
joint conferences of the Inspectors and Normal School instructors.
THE PROVINCIAL SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS.
This school continues to exercise well the important function of promoting the professional growth of teachers-in-service. In the summer of 1940, as in previous summers, the
staff was very able and had some members with continental reputations.
The influence of the Summer School is clearly visible throughout the Province. But it
is to be noted that it is attended chiefly by young teachers and by older teachers who are
professionally keen. Principals and secondary-school teachers are conspicuously absent,
although eminent visiting educationists have been engaged to give courses keyed to the level
of the more able and mature teachers. This absence is unfortunate, for principals and other
senior teachers would reap both pleasure and profit from attending the Summer School.
They would sometimes be spared the embarrassment of having young assistants with a fresher
outlook and a more understanding grasp of the curriculum. In order to supervise their
schools, principals should know more of the curriculum for the first six grades. The
Provincial Summer School has reached such a standard of merit that the ablest of principals
will be enriched by attending it.
THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Attention is drawn to this paragraph, which appears in the most recent (1939) issue of
the Junior High School Programme of Studies:—
" Correlation and Integration.
" Certain topics appear in a number of subjects. ' Water,' for example, may be studied
in General Science, in Health, in Home Economics, and in the Social Studies. The Practical
Arts have intimate association with English, with the Graphic Arts, with Mathematics, and
with General Science. An ' activity ' may draw upon the content of a variety of subject-
matter fields. In current phraseology this is termed ' integration.' Integration is more
readily effected when one teacher is in permanent charge of a group of pupils than in schools
which are departmentalized. In such schools teachers should be careful not to become
teachers of isolated subject-matter; interrelationships and possible correlations should not be
overlooked. It is a duty of the principal in such circumstances to arrange for conferences
of those teachers whose work has something in common in order that as much co-ordination
of effort may be effected as is possible.
" From causes largely historical the Practical Arts have often operated in relative
isolation, and where this has been true the teaching of them has been inconsistent with modern
educational theory. Procedures in the Practical Arts should conform with present-day
psychology. Teachers of the Practical Arts should endeavour to understand and apply the
philosophy upon which the whole curriculum is based. Principals, inasmuch as they are
responsible for all the activities in their schools, should assume their rightful leadership in
these matters and should exercise such supervision over the Practical Arts as will ensure
that these directions are given effect.
" The same observations apply to the Graphic Arts.    They, too, should be brought into
relation with all other subjects, and the Art products of the pupils should gradually beautify
the school.
3 " Teachers who have difficulty in adjusting their methods to modern requirements in
these matters will find help in the courses on the principles and-techniques of teaching and on
the curriculum which are given regularly in the Provincial Summer School of Education."
The old system of Manual Training, based upon psychological conceptions no longer
tenable, has been slow in disappearing, even though it has been expanded into the Industrial
Arts. Swedish in origin, the system is now disowned in Sweden. The Director of Technical
Education has reorganized the training of Industrial Arts teaching, and has provided for the
retraining of teachers already in service. A larger proportion of these teachers now have
modern training. Where they have the capacity to apply the principles set forth in the
Industrial Arts bulletin the increased enthusiasm of the pupils and the improved quality
of their work stand out conspicuously.
PRACTICAL ARTS IN GRADES I.-VI.
The Practical Arts in Grades I. to III., as developed in the Programme of Studies, are
well connected with other subjects, especially with the Social Studies, but less well in Grades
IV. to VI. Subsequent revision should correct this deficiency. In the meantime, teachers
should remember that the exercises in Practical Arts are not prescriptive, and it is the
teacher's function to encourage creative activity, and to have pupils engage in constructive
work in the Practical Arts which may have a bearing upon any other activities in the
curriculum.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE.
Mr. H. O. English, of the Victoria Normal School, has, at my request, developed units in
Elementary School Science for Grades IV. to VI., arranging them so as to be economical of
time in one-room schools and small graded schools. The Science instruction has been
organized in three parallel sections, A, B, and C. So that in a class-room or school in which
pupils of all of these grades appear, the grades may be combined for instruction. The
sections will follow in cyclical order in subsequent years, so that no pupils will miss essential
learnings.
Mr. English's students in the Normal School co-operated with him in the production
of the units of which the course is comprised, and in so doing they received valuable training
in curriculum construction.
The units developed by Mr. English and his students are being tried experimentally this
year, and may be modified as a result of this period of testing before being included in subsequent issues of the Programme of Studies.
MUSIC AND ART.
A few years ago a visiting Director of Education from the United Kingdom, in a public
address upon his return (the press report of which he kindly sent to me), commented upon
the fact that while Music was carefully taught in the schools of the larger urban areas, it
was rarely heard in the rural schools. This reproach is no longer applicable. It is now
rarer to find the art neglected. Fewer teachers profess inability to teach it. Teachers are
finding that song gives a feeling-tone to a school which makes life in it more joyous.
More creativeness and free expression, and more integration with other school activities,
are appearing in the Graphic Arts.
In many schools the walls of the class-rooms, and the corridors, are being beautified
by the Art work of the pupils.
SCHOOL LIBRARIES.
The year has been marked by a great increase in the number of school libraries. There
has been marked improvement both in the quality of the books and in library management.
The school libraries in Vancouver, in both elementary and secondary schools, are not
equalled in Canada.
There are a few high schools where the libraries are supervised by peripatetic teachers.
This system doesn't work. The library periods given to a number of teachers should be
allotted to one teacher, the responsible librarian.
The number of trained school librarians is increasing.
Sustained efforts should be made to beautify the library. It is as important to have
recreational books in the library as to have reference books—probably more important, if
reading is to become a lifetime habit. _
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. B 35
With the exercise of a little energy, even a small school may have a " library corner."
Facing page J 30, in the Annual Report for 1937-38, is a photograph of such a " library
corner."
LIBRARY SERVICE.
A revised bibliography has been prepared which lists in one volume the books recommended for school libraries, reference books which have appeared in the various bulletins,
and supplementary readers. Subsequent editions of the Programme of Studies will not
contain these lists and will be less bulky because of the concentration of this material into
one place. The bibliography should be useful for guidance in book selection. Many of the
professional books listed in it may be obtained on loan from the Public Library Commission,
Victoria.
Two errors in reference to the Public Library Commission occur on pages 4 and 5 of
the Rural School Bulletin.    They are corrected here:—
(1.)  Freight both ways must be paid by the school district for books loaned by the
Public Library for the use of pupils.
(2.)  Pictures are sent post free, but postage must be paid on returning the pictures.
(3.)  Professional books for the use of teachers are sent post free and a sticker is
enclosed which, by arrangement with the postal authorities, serves for return
carriage for the books.
The professional books are intended for teachers who are employed elsewhere than in
the cities of Victoria and Vancouver, where good professional libraries are available locally.
This portion of the provincial library is kept up to date with a carefully made selection of the
best of recent educational books.    It is thus possible for teachers in the most remote districts
to keep abreast of the literature of their profession.
EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH.
A considerable amount of educational research has been conducted by Inspectors and
teachers, especially in Reading, both in elementary and high school grades. Most of this
research has been of the survey type, in order that cases of reading disability might be
discovered, to be followed by remedial instruction. These investigations have confirmed what
similar investigations have revealed elsewhere; namely, that there are many cases of reading
disability throughout all of the higher elementary and secondary school grades, and that
the study of literature as belles-lettres does not ensure reading efficiency in the secondary
school. It was also revealed that high school failure in other subject-fields is related to
deficiency in reading skill. It is therefore incumbent upon teachers in the secondary school
to study the psychology of reading. Pages 37-42 of Bulletin I. of the High School Programme
of Studies and pages 178-184 of the Junior High School Programme of Studies discuss this
question fully.
It has usually been asserted that remedial groups for the correction of reading disabilities
should be small in size. This has erected an administrative barrier to remedial instruction.
In the past school-year Mr. A. T. Hunkin, principal of the Victoria Central Junior High
School, conducted an experiment in remedial reading in which he employed a training group
of normal size, using the techniques outlined in " Remedial Reading," by Monroe and Backus
(Houghton, Mifflin Company). The training group made significant gains over the control
group, which received ordinary class-room instruction. The training group also made equally
as good gains as those reported by Monroe and Backus in classes half the size of the Victoria
experimental class. This experiment may be said to establish the fact that effective remedial
instruction may be given by competent teachers without unusual administrative arrangements. Mr. Hunkin's research has been elaborated into a thesis in the University of
Washington.
The Canadian Council for Educational Research is prepared to aid in research studies
which are judged by the Council to be of general value. Information may be obtained upon
this matter by the secretary of the B.C. Committee, Dr. C. B. Conway, Department of Education, Victoria, B.C.
GUIDANCE.
Guidance is a function of the school.    It is not a subject.
In some high schools of considerable size one teacher is given all the work of Guidance,
usually some unfortunate who happens to have taken a  course in a summer school.    To exercise the function of Guidance, a teacher must know his pupils thoroughly, and so should
have as many as possible in the same Guidance group from year to year. The Home Room
teacher should be responsible for the Guidance period of his home room class. In larger schools,
a boys' and a girls' counsellor should co-ordinate Guidance and do the more technical aspects
of the work.
" Home Room Guidance," by McKown (McGraw-Hill), is a most helpful manual. With
this, and the Guidance section of the Programme of Studies, a Home Room teacher should be
able to use the Guidance period profitably.
MENTAL HYGIENE.
Mental Hygiene is dealt with in the Health courses, and elsewhere in the Programme of
Studies, but it should more generally be recognized that the principles of Mental Hygiene
should pervade all the instruction, and all the practices of the school. It is implicit in the
fundamental philosophy of the curriculum, but it is apt to be overlooked in the routine of
the class-room. It should be kept in mind that repressive methods of discipline and the use
of the fear of failure as a stimulus to study are unfavourable to mental health. In a school
marked by purposeful activity, where learning is a joyous adventure, problems of Mental
Hygiene are rare, just as problems of discipline are rare. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
B 37
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The attendance at the thirty-ninth annual session of the Vancouver Normal School was
as follows:-
Women.
Men.
Total.
130
9
0
41
7
2
171
Three-month students     , , _
Partial students  __ ,  _   	
16
2
Total    , ,.„	
139
50
189
Seven of the full-course students withdrew during the year, nineteen failed to qualify,
and diplomas were granted to 145.
The general plan of organization differed little from that in force in recent years. The
school-year was divided into two terms, the first ending on February 15th. Participation in
the Model School with each student receiving one-half day's experience weekly featured the
first term; case-studies involving diagnostic and remedial work with backward pupils was
an important phase of the second. Each term concluded with the usual four weeks' teaching
practicum.
Investigations, particularly the recent Quebec Survey, seem to indicate the necessity of
devoting a larger share of time to actual teaching. Last year each of our students spent
300 hours in observation and teaching. This does not include the time spent in remedial
work with individual pupils or in preparing for, observing, and discussing the dozen formal
demonstrations presented by members of the Model School staff.
Physical and Health Education advanced several steps toward their rightful place in a
Normal School programme. First-aid instruction was given and every graduate carries to
his or her first school a St. John Ambulance certificate. Strathcona Trust certificates were
granted, with the full approval of the Department of National Defence, on the recommendation of the instructor, Mr. Ernest Lee. Weak students and candidates for the medal were
examined by a committee consisting of Miss Hinton, of Victoria Normal School, Captain
Worthington, and Mr. Lee. One hundred and forty-eight students received certificates