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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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 ANNUAL  EEPOET
MINISTER OF MINES
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
YEAR ENDED  31ST DECEMBER
1940
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. J. Asselstine, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner. To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1940 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. J. ASSELSTINE,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1941.  THE MINING INDUSTRY.
BY
John F. Walker.
The value of mine production in 1940 was $75,352,730, an increase of $9,761,183
over 1939. This figure of $75,352,730 is somewhat below the actual figure because the
value for copper is based on the London price, whereas British Columbia copper is sold
at the New York price. The London price is used so that value figures in the tables
will correspond closely with Provincial figures published by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics. The Dominion Bureau uses the London price because most of Canada's
copper is sold through London.
The customary summary and the usual tables reviewing and showing detailed mine
production are not being given at the present time, as authorities at Ottawa do not
consider it in the best interests of the country to divulge certain detailed information.
DEPARTMENTAL WORK.
MlNERALOGICAL BRANCH.
Douglas Lay continued his investigation of the drainage history of the Fraser
River in connection with placer-mining in the Cariboo area. A report supplementing
Bulletin No. 3, 1940, is in course of preparation.
B. T. O'Grady, besides working with the Superintendent of Brokers, carried out a
number of investigations in connection with transportation to mining properties
throughout the central part of the Province.
J. T. Mandy carried out investigational work along the main line of the Canadian
National Railway between Prince Rupert and Prince George, and also in the Portland
Canal area, in connection with Sampling Plant work at Prince Rupert. He also carried
out investigational work and made recommendations in regard to transportation in
connection with mining properties in the northern part of the Province.
H. Sargent continued geological mapping in the Bedwell River-Drinkwater Creek
area of Vancouver Island and did investigational work in the vicinity of Pender Harbour.    A report supplementing Bulletin No. 8, 1940, is in course of preparation.
M. S. Hedley, attached to a topographic party surveying in connection with the
proposed Alaska Highway, made a geological reconnaissance in the area of the headwaters of the Kechika River. The result of. this work has been published in Bulletin
No. 12, 1941, under the joint authorship of M. S. Hedley and S. S. Holland.
J. S. Stevenson continued the study, commenced four years ago, of the minor metals
such as tungsten, chromite, manganese, and molybdenum. The results of this work
have appeared in Bulletins Nos. 5 and 10,1940, and bulletins on manganese and chromite
are in course of preparation.
J. M. Cummings continued investigational work in connection with industrial
minerals. As much of the field-work has been completed in past seasons, Mr. Cummings, for the next year, will be confining his attention chiefly to laboratory-work in
connection with these studies. This work includes a study of bentonites, diatomites,
roofing granules, fillers, and beneficiation of sands.
R. J. Maconachie carried out investigational work in connection with transportation facilities in the south-eastern part of the Province.
S. S. Holland, attached to a topographic party surveying in connection with the
proposed Alaska Highway, carried out a geological reconnaissance in the vicinity of
the lower reaches of the Kechika River and westerly up Turnagain River. A report
on this work has been published in Bulletin No. 12, 1941, under the joint authorship
of M. S. Hedley and S. S. Holland.
RETIREMENTS.
J. B. Adams, Chief Analyst and Assayer, retired on superannuation at the end of
March, 1941, after twenty-three and one-half years' service with the Department.
Before coming to the Department Mr. Adams served as assayer to the Canadian Bank
of Commerce in the Yukon and was there during the gold-rush. A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
J. G. Biggs, Inspector of Mines at Princeton, retires on superannuation on May
31st, 1941, after twenty-one years' service with the Department. Prior to joining the
Department Mr. Biggs was engaged in coal-mining for many years on Vancouver Island
and obtained his First-class Coal-mine Manager's Certificate in 1908.
The services of Messrs. Adams and Biggs with the Department are appreciated and
the Department wishes them many pleasant years in which to enjoy their leisure.
SAMPLING PLANT, PRINCE RUPERT.
In 1937 a sampling plant was built on the waterfront at Prince Rupert and put into
operation on August 20th. The object in erecting a sampling plant at this point was
chiefly for the purpose of stimulating prospecting and development of properties along
the Prince Rupert branch of the Canadian National Railway. The sampling plant was
erected on the Coast so that full advantage could be taken of special freight rates
arranged especially for shipments of ore to the plant.
The sampling plant is, as its name implies, only a sampling plant and not a concentrator. Ores containing sufficient value to ship direct to the smelter are purchased
and assembled at the plant until sufficient tonnage is accumulated to warrant shipment
to the smelter. By mixing lots at the plant it is possible also to reduce smelter penalties
on individual shipments and so give the prospector the benefit of a mixed lot.
The plant may also be used by those developing properties for the purpose of
bulk-sampling.
For the calendar year 1940, 40 lots for shipment, 117 lots for testing, and 27
samples for assaying were received at the plant. These lots aggregated 170 tons.
During the year $15,637.17 was paid to shippers.
GOLD PURCHASING.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of
Mines, undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the
individual placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province are paying
a cash price of $29 per ounce for clean placer gold and are purchasing dirty placer gold
and amalgam on a deferred-payment basis. Purchases in 1940 amounted to 1,336 lots,
valued at approximately $31,600. The total price paid has been almost exactly the
same as that received from the Royal Canadian Mint, except for the Mint's handling
charge of 1 per cent.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, all geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be
carried on by the Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered
to by the Dominion of Canada and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry
of the Province. Each year several geological parties are kept in the field and in the
aggregate a vast amount of information is made available to the prospector and the
mining engineer in the many excellent reports and maps covering British Columbia
which have been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in
Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained.
The officer in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address is
305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was
effected, and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main
branches of this Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known
as the Bureau of Geology and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological
Survey of Canada and the Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of
Geology and Topography. During the season of 1940 the Bureau of Geology and Topography had the following officers employed on field-work in British Columbia:— THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 7
Geological Parties.
1. A. H. Lang: Manson River, east half. Longitude 124° to 125°, latitude 55°
to 56°.    This is 4-mile work and is less than half completed.
2. J. E. Armstrong: Manson River, west half. Longitude 125° to 126°, latitude
55° to 56°.    This is 4-mile work and is less than half completed.
3. W. E. Cockfield: Ashcroft, east half. Longitude 120° to 121°, latitude 50° to
51°.    This is 4-mile work and is nearing completion.
4. H. M. A. Rice: Examination of deposits of manganese, antimony, mercury, and
tungsten in British Columbia.
Topographical Parties.
No topographical parties operated in British Columbia during 1940.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total mine output of the Province consists of the outputs of metalliferous
minerals, coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials,
valued at standard recognized prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in
previous years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to
facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered
to. The methods used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent
Annual Reports, with the addition of new tables.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments
made during the full calendar year by the producers the net recovered metal contents
have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content" necessary corrections for smelting and refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be
remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with
the exception of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores
shipped; deductions for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages of the
metal prices.
(2.) Gold-placer returns are received from operators giving production in crude
ounces recovered; these are converted to fine-gold ounces by dividing the crude-ounce
value by the old standard price of gold. The fine-gold content is then valued at the
yearly average price of gold, which in 1940 was $38.50 per ounce. On this basis the
average crude-gold value per ounce was $31.66 on Provincial placer-gold production.
(3.) The prices used in valuing the different metals are: For gold, the average
price for the year; for silver, the average New York metal-market price for the year;
for lead, the average London metal-market price for the year; and for zinc, the average
London metal-market price for the year. Copper in 1940 is valued at the average
London metal-market price. (See foot-note to Table I.) Prior to 1932 copper was
valued at the average New York price. The change was made because very little
copper was being marketed in the United States on account of high tariff charges
against importations from foreign countries. The bulk of the lead and zinc production
of the Province is sold on the basis of the London prices of these metals and they are
therefore used. The New York, St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices
differ materially from the London prices of these metals and are not properly applicable
to the valuing of the British Columbia production.
By agreement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Provincial Statistical Bureaus, the following procedure of taking care of the exchange fluctuations
has been agreed upon:—
(a.)   Silver to be valued at the average New York price, adjusted to Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate.
(&.) Lead, zinc, and copper to be valued at London prices, adjusted to Canadian funds at the average exchange rate. A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary
mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made
in by-product ovens was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was
credited as coal production. The result was that the coke-production figures were
incomplete. Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal
produced, including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-
making is considered a manufacturing industry. As it is, however, of interest to the
mining industry, a table included in the report shows the total coke produced in the
Province, together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This
valuation of coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the
Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton. In
making comparisons with former years the decline in dollar value is accentuated by
this lowered price.
TABLES.
The collection and compilation of mining statistics and the preparation of statistical
■tables for this report is in charge of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade and Industry.
PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on the mining industry are compiled from information supplied
by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, through the
courtesy of the property-owners and also from information obtained by the officers of
the Mineralogical Staff in the course of their field-work. The Registrar of Companies
and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through their respective
offices. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 9
INDEX TO TABLES.*
Title. Page.
Table I.—Production;   all Metals,  Structural, and Miscellaneous—1939 and 1940
compared -  10
Table II.—Metal Prices;  Average Prices used in valuing Production, 1901 to 1940,
inclusive  11
Table III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1940  12
Table IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1940, inclusive  12
Table V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1937, 1938, 1939, and 1940  12
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc,  1887-1940,
inclusive  13
Table VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date—Lode Gold and Placer Gold  15
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  16
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia from 1895
to 1925  16
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1939 and 1940.. 16
Table XVIL—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1940  17
Table XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1940 .  20
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1940  21
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-1940  22
Table XXI.—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1940  23
* Certain detail tables of mine production have been omitted.    The numbers  of those retained correspond to
their number in previous Annual Reports. A 10
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1939 and 1940.
Quantity,
1939.
Quantity,
1940.
Value, 1939.
Value, 1940.
Mbtallics.
Gold, lode* _.  	
 oz.
587,180
49,746
574,366
39,067
$
21,221,272
1,478,492
32,300,826
1,189,608
$
22,113,091
1,236,928
39,498,623
tungsten
1,714,770
Totals   	
           |
56,190,198
64,563,412
 tons
Fuel.
Coal   (2,240 lb.)   _-             	
1,477,872
1,667,827
6,280,956
7,088,265
NON-METALLICS.
35,144
1,233,362
23,090
99,703
9,504
12,300
1,002,317
31,262
120,043
Flux—limestone    __	
 tons
69,420
Iron oxides, slate and rock granules, talc -+	
Sodium carbonate, magnesium sulphate 	
 tons
 tons
815
850
850
220
10,831
1,760
Totals.	
1,377,959
1,166,213
KIALS.
 -No.
 No.
Clay Products and other Structural Mate
,, . ,                                  Clay Prodzicts.
Brick—
Common    .	
Face, paving, sewer brick    	
5,914,812
789,222
8,655,120
987,161
84,563
29,223
112,079
8,324
29,095
88,649
11,360
8,873
132,434
38,328
140,727
8,294
592
609
47,543
Drain-tile,  sewer-pipe  	
No.
1,084,408
1,119,455
130,842
11,321
10,094
Totals.    	
372,166
519,583
.
Other Structural Materials.
1,079,096
190,751
74,159
116,262
1,413,189
294,682
58,672
4,550
140,514
123,461
1,559
287,042
55,347
252,039
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock   	
 tons
Totals  	
1
1,460,268
2,015,257
1     	
Total value in Canadian funds  	
65,681,547
75,352,730
1
Note.—In accordance with the Dominion of Canada " War Measures Act " and Foreign Exchange Control Regulations, it is not possible to set forth Provincial production figures in as detailed a manner as was done heretofore.
Dominion production of copper is evaluated at the average price on the London market and British Columbia
production in the above table is likewise so valued, in order that Dominion and Provincial compilations agree. It is
to be noted that British Columbia copper is contracted and paid for in U.S. funds, and if such had been used, an
appreciable amount could be added to the above Provincial value for 1940.
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 11
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production op Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold,
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
1901...... ..
S
20.67
Cents.
56.002 N.Y.
49.55      „
50.78
53.36 „
51.33      „
63.45      „
62.06      „
50.22      „
48.93      „
50.812    „
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 ,,
52.10
47.20      „
62.38
77.35
91.93
105.57
95.80      „
59.52
64.14      „
61.63      „
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.37 „
58.176    „
52.993    „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
38.249   „
Cents.
16.11   N.Y.
11.70      „
13.24      „
12.82      „
15.59
19.28
20.00      „
13.20      „
12.98      „
12.738    „
12.38      „
16.341    „
15.27      „
13.60      „
17.28
27.202    „
27.18
24.63      „
18.70
17.45       „
12.50       „
13.38      „
14.42      „
13.02      „
14.042    „
13.795    „
12.92
14.570    „
18.107    „
12.982    „
8.116    „
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419     „
7.795     „
9.477    „
13.078    „
9.972    „
10.092    „
10.086   „
Cents.
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81
3.88      „
4.24      „
4.81      „
4.80      „
3.78      „
3.85      „
4.00
3.98      „
4.024    „
3.93      „
3.50      „
4.17      „
6.172    „
7.91       „
6.67 „
5.19      „
7.16      „
4.09
5.16      „
6.54      „
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    „
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    „
2.710    „
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133    „
3.913    „
5.110    „
3.344    „
3.169    „
3.362   „
Cents.
1902	
1903 	
1904-	
1905
1906 -	
1907 —	
1908      	
1909      	
1910 	
	
4.60 E. St. L.
1911 ...   . 	
1912
4.90      „
5.90      „
1913
4.80      „
1914    	
4.40      „
1915     _	
11.25
1916
10.88
1917 	
1918                 	
7.566    „
6.94      „
1919	
6.24
1920
6.52      „
1921 	
	
3.95      „
1922	
4.86      „
1923
5.62      „
1924
5.39      „
1925
7.892 Lond.
1926
7.409    „
1927
6.194    „
1928      	
5.493    „
1929
5.385    „
1930
3.599    „
1931        	
2.554    „
1932— ..— _	
1933  	
1934   	
1935.  ...	
1936     	
1937—   - 	
1938 	
1939  	
1940	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.141
38.S0
2.405    „
3.210    „
3.044    „
3.099    „
3.315    „
4.902    „
3.073    „
3.069    „
3.411   ,,
Average 1936-40 (inclusive)   	
35.968
42.444    „
10.541    „
3.779    „
3.554    „
Note.—In making comparisons with average prices used prior to 1925, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content" of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1925 was taken at " net " ;
silver, at 95 per cent.; lead, at 90 per cent.; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1925 (inclusive) prices are
true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining. A 12
REPORT OF THE  MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1940.
Gold, placer
Gold, lode —
Silver, copper, lead, zinc
Coal and coke 	
Structural materials 	
Miscellaneous minerals, etc.
Total..
$88,647,379*
270,884,559*
907,006,943
391,447,367
81,308,412
20,045,808
$1,759,340,468
* Canadian funds.
TABLE IV.—Production for each
1852 to 1895 (inclusive).
1896 	
1897 	
1898 	
1899 	
1900 	
1901 	
1902 	
1903 	
1904 	
1905 	
1906 	
1907 	
1908 	
1909 	
1910 	
1911 	
1912 	
1913 	
1914 	
1915 	
1916 	
1917 	
1918 	
$94,547,370
7,507,956
10,455,268
10,906,861
12,393,131
16,344,751
20,086,780
17,486,550
17,495,954
18,977,359
22,461,325
24,980,546
25,882,560
23,851,277
24,443,025
26,377,066
23,499,072
32,440,800
30,296,398
26,388,825
29,447,508
42,290,462
37,010,392
41,782,474
Year from 1852 to 1940 (inclusive).
1919   $33,296,313
1920   35,543,084
1921   28,066,641
1922   35,162,843
1923   41,304,320
1924   48,704,604
1925   61,492,242
1926   67,188,842
1927 . ...  60,729,358
1928   65,372,583
1929   68,245,443
1930   55,391,993
1931   34,883,181
1932   *28,798,406
1933   *32,602,672
1934   *42,305,297
1935   *48,821,239
1936   *54,081,967
1937   *74,475,902
1938   *64,485,551
1939   *65,681,547
1940   *75,352,730
Total..
$1,759,340,468
* Canadian funds.
TABLE V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1938, 1939, and 1940.
Description.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
57,759
557,522
10,861,578
65,769,906
412,979,182
298,497,295
1,309,428
$1,671,015
19,613,624
4,722,288
6,558,575
13,810,024
9,172,822
5,565,069
1,975,249
1,396,885
49,746
587,180
10,771,585
73,254,679
378,743,763
278,409,102
1,477,872
$1,478,492
21,221,272
4,361,199
7,392,862
12,002,390
8,544,375
6,280,956
1,832,434
2,567,567
39,067
574,366
$1,236,928
Gold, lode*	
22,113,091
Silver    	
1
1   39,498,623
  lb.
 lb.
    lb.
1,667,827
|
Coal 	
tons, 2,240 lb.
and minerals
7,088,265
2,534,840
2,880,983
Totals	
$64,485,551
$65,681,547
75,352,730
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 13
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A 15
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Year.
Placer.
Lode.
Total.
1858-1862	
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
513,520
643,346
1,344,900
1,278,724
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647,000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580,500
496,000
320.000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
1.249,940
1,558,245
1,671,015
1,478,492
1,236,928
$9,871,634
1863-1867	
16,283,592
1868-1872 	
9,895,318
1873-1877-	
9,019,201
1878-1882	
5,579,911
1883-1887.	
3,841,515
1888-1892	
2,525,426
1893.....	
$23,404
125,014
785,400
1,244,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
2,857,573
3,453,381
4,348,603
4,888,269
4,812,616
4,589,608
4,933,102
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,880
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,513
5,322,442
5,627,490
5,109,004
5,167,934
4,587,334
2,367,190
3,403,812
3,150,645
2,481,392
2,804,154
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,269
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,888,097
3,004,419
3,323,576
3,018,894
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
12,852,936
14,168,654
16,122,727
19,613,624
21,221,272
22,113,091
379,535
1894  	
530,530
1895   	
1,267,083
1896..... 	
1,788,206
1897   	
2,636,340
1898	
2,844,563
1899 ...	
1900  	
4,202,473
4,732,105
1901 ...	
5,318,703
1902 	
5,961,409
1903  ...  	
5,873,036
1904 	
5,704,908
1905 	
5,902,402
1906  	
5,579,039
1907  	
4,883,020
1908 	
5,929,880
1909        	
5,401,090
1910  	
6,073,380
1911 	
5,151,513
1912            	
5,877,942
1913   	
6,137,490
1914     	
5,674,004
1915 .... ....	
5,937,934
1916  	
5,167,834
1917         	
2,863,190
1918 ....	
3,723,812
1919 	
3,437,145
1920  ..
2,702.992
1921	
3,037,354
1922....      	
4,458,484
1923..  	
4,124,994
1924 -	
5,541,285
1925    -	
4,615,361
1926     	
4,519,362
1927  	
3,835,848
1928	
4,031,305
1929                 	
3,123,130
1930      .
1931	
3,475,811
3,310,886
1932        	
4,656,849*
1933      	
6,955,716*
1934     _
10,965,416*
1935    .            	
13,747,994*
1936  	
15,418,594*
1937    ...	
1938    	
1939   	
17,680,972*
21,284,639*
22,699,764*
1940 .  .       	
23,350,019*
Totals     	
$88,647,379
$270,884,559
$359,531,938*
* Canadian funds. Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
      3,029,011
         326,636
413,360
        489,301
        579,830
         678,140
     1,029,097
          826,335
         978,294
     1,012,953
         939,654
          896,222
         882,854
      1,135,865
      1,306,324
1900       1,439,595
TABLE XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.*
Value.
1836-1885.
1886	
1887	
1888	
1889	
1890	
1891	
1892 	
1893	
1894	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906
1907-
1908.
.   1,460,331
   1,397,394
  1,168,194
  1,253,628
   1,384,312
     1,517,303
  1,800,067
.--   1,677,849
1909  2,006,476
1910    2,800,046
1911 _  2,193.062
1912   2.628.804
1913   2,137,483
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,818,962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3,407,595
3,918,972
4,318,785
4,380,993
4,192,182
3,504,582
3,760,884
4,152,936
4,551,909
6,300,235
5,872,472
7,022,666
9,800,161
7,675,717
9.200.814
7,481,190
1914..
1915-
1916..
1917..
1918..
1919.
1920.
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
  1,810,967
  1,611,129
  2,084,093
..    2,149,975
   2,302,245
  2,267,541
  2,595,125
1921    2,483,995
1922  2,511,843
1923.     2,453,223
1924  1,939,526
1925  2,328,522
1926  2,330,036
1927  2,453,827
1928  2,526,702
1929  2,251,252
1930  1,887,130
1931  1,707,590
1932  1,534,975
1933  1,264,746
1934  1,347,090
1935  1,187,968
1936  1,346,471
1937  1,444,687
1938  1,309,428
1939  1,477,872
1940   1,667,827
Totals -    91,664,205
* For all years to 1925   (inclusive)   figures are net coal production and do not include coal made
sequent figures are entire coal production,  including coal made into coke.
Value.
$6,338,385
5,638,952
7,294,325
7,524,913
11,511,225
11,337,705
12,975,625
12,419,975
12,559,215
12,266,115
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048.864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565.069
6.280.956
7,088,265
$365,773,767
into coke; sub-
TABLE XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
1895-97 - - 	
       19,396
1898 (estimated) 	
       35,000
1899......	
      34,251
1900	
      85,149
1901	
127,081
1902	
.    128,015
1903 	
165,543
1904	
238,428
1905.	
    271,785
1906  	
..   199,227
1907	
222,913
1908   	
     247,399
1909	
...    258,703
1910 	
218,029
1911	
66,005
1912 	
    264,333
Value.
$96,980
175,000
171,255
425,745
635,405
640,075
827,715
1,192,140
1,358,925
996,135
1,337,478
1,484,394
1,552,218
1,308,174
396,030
1,585,998
1913.
1914.
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
286,045
234,577
1915   245,871
1916  267,725
1917  159,905
1918 _  188,967
1919   91,138
1920   67,792
1921..
1922 .
1923 .
1924.
1925.
Totals..
.. 59,434
.. 45,835
.. 58,919
30,615
..     75,185
.4,393,255
Value.
$1,716,270
1,407,462
1,475.226
1,606,350
959,430
1,322,769
637,966
474.544
416,038
320,845
412,433
214,305
526,295
$25,673,600
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1939 and 1940.
Description.
1939.
1940.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
152,818
$569,945
164,429
$577,706
44,787
6,426
51.909
$286,491
37,015
325.435
33,790
26,004
54.220
$220,211
151,931
303.421
103,122
$648,941
1,768,977
44,108
114,014
$675,563
1,810,083
54,379
	
3,060
Total production value of coke industry ...       	
$2,462,026
$2,543,085 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 17
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1940.
Lode-gold Mines.*
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Arlington ,	
Erie	
Gold  	
Gold	
Gold.. 	
Gold	
Gold '...
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold 	
Gold  	
$71,676
25,000
Bralorne  	
Bridge River 	
Princess Royal Island	
Wells  	
Camp McKinney..	
Nelson	
Rossland— 	
Oliver   	
Nelson  	
Ymir   	
Sheep Creek  	
Hedley.. 	
Wells   	
Rossland	
6,598,850
1,437,500
1,066,644
565,588
37,500
472,255
7.922
15,000
Goodenough —  	
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd —	
13,931
102,000
792,444
577,894
1 X.L.
Gold	
134,033
Gold.	
Gold.    .
11,751
Kelowna Exploration (Nickel Plate)  	
Hedley.	
570,000
Gold  	
Gold....... 	
Gold......	
303,840
Rossland	
Rossland  _	
Bridge River 	
1,475,000
Le Roi No. 2
1,574,640
Gold.	
Gold	
Gold  	
Gold..... 	
Gold......	
20,450
110.000
Nickel Plate..                     	
Hedley	
3,423,191
8,108,168
Nelson  	
25,000
Gold   	
19,658,075
Gold	
Gold 	
981,632
85,000
Relief Arlington Mines, Ltd. (Second Relief)	
Gold	
Gold..... 	
Gold	
155,000
Sheep Creek.....	
926,040
1,256,250
Premier	
Zeballos  	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet  	
Gold  	
1,000,000
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd	
Gold	
Gold	
84,000
115,007
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd 	
Gold.	
Gold	
Gold 	
40,093
1,245,250
Sheep Creek 	
Ymir 	
Ymir —
162,500
Ymir Gold     	
Ymir Yankee Girl    	
Gold..... 	
Gold  	
Gold 	
300,000
133.501
23,530
$53,706,165
* The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
Rambler  —	
Beaverdell _._ __	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Siiver-lead-zinc.	
Siiver-lead-zinc. —
Siiver-lead-zinc.  .
Siiver-lead-zinc.  .
Siiver-lead-zinc.... 	
Siiver-lead-zinc...     .
Silver-lead-zinc .__      .
Siiver-lead-zinc._	
Silver-lead-zinc —_	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Siiver-lead-zinc. —
$10,000
97.200
476,297
27,500
5,500
93,697,225
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
132,464
370.0S4
Beaverdell-Wellington.. -    	
Bell -                 -                   	
New Denver. 	
Trail __.__	
PiVM	
Goodenough     _ __ 	
H.B. Mining Co- _ _ _	
Cody _ _ _____
Hall Creek	
Highland Lass, Ltd..	
Highland Bell, Ltd-- -_	
Beaverdell ___ __.	
Beaverdell..-  	
Carried forward __   	
$95,670,550 A 18
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1940—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines—Continued.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
$95,670,550
Similkameen  	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Siiver-lead-zinc    .
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc    .
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -
Siiver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -
Siiver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc	
6,000
400,000
Iron Mountain (Emerald)    _	
Salmo  —	
Retallack 	
Three Forks 	
20,000
20,000
213,109
50.000
80,000
6,000
10,257
27,500
Cody —.            	
71,387
45,088
Cody  	
72,859
North Star _   _   _	
Kimberley... __ 	
496,901
6,754
107,928
1,438,000
Greenwood	
43,424
25,000
575,000
Cody -  	
332,492
165,000
Moyie  -	
Sandon.   .
Alamo — - —	
566,000
Silversmith* '     	
Slocan Silver   	
725,000
11,600
567,500
Spokane-Trinket.  	
Standard Silver Lead .    	
Ainsworth - —	
Silverton  	
Retallack 	
9,564
2,700,000
88,000
64,000
Wallace Mines, Ltd. f Sully).  	
Beaverdell ,„ 	
Rambler Station	
Retallack. 	
135,000
38,000
Whitewater ____        _	
592,515
70,237
$104 741,556
* These two properties are now amalgamated as Silversmith Mines, Ltd., August, 1939. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 19
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1940—Continued.
Copper Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Copper — _  ..
Copper	
Copper -	
Copper 	
Copper —
Copper - -
Copper _ -
58,225,140
Canada Copper Corporation  ._._.  —
Greenwood     .
615,399
8,500
8,565,754
Texada Island  _._..
Nelson     .
175,000
233,280
261,470
$18,084,543
* The Howe Sound Company is the holding company for the Britannia mine in British Columbia and other mines
in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the Howe Sound Company are therefore derived from all
operations, and in the foregoing table ths dividends credited to the Britannia mine have been paid by the Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, none being credited subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison
with yearly totals the amounts credited to the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so the
total in the annual report concerned will show the higher figure. Dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company,
Limited, are derived from operations in British Columbia and other countries, and so cannot now be credited to
British Columbia. Silbak Premier is a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, and dividends paid by that
company are, of course, included in Provincial totals.
t The amount shown to the credit of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, Limited,
does not include the sum of $6,749,996 paid by the company during 1935 and 1936 as a distribution or repayment of
capital, subsequent to the closing-down of its operations at Anyox and the company going into voluntary liquidation.
Operations ceased at Anyox in August, 1935. The company since that date has revived its business charter and is
conducting operations at Allenby, B.C.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
\vith payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Pernie..
Total	
Various
Miscellaneous and Structural.
Aggregate of all Classes.
$16,000,000
12,495,310
$28,495,310
$1,972,506
Lode-gold mining   $53,706,155
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting   104,741,556
Copper-mining   18,084,543
Coal-mining   28,495,310
Miscellaneous and structural   1,972,506
Total  $207,000,070
Dividends paid Yearly,
Year. Amount paid.
1919    $2,494,283
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1,870,296
736,629
3,174,756
2,983,570
2,977,276
5,853,419
8,011,137
8,816,681
9,572,536
1919 to 191)0, inclusive.
Year.
1931 	
1932 	
1933 	
1934 	
1935 	
1936 	
1937 	
1938 	
1939 	
1940 	
1929    11,263,118
1930   10,543,500
Amount paid.
$4,650,857
2,786,958
2,471,735
4,745,905
7,386,070
10,513,705
15,085,293
12,068,875
11,865,698
14,595,530
Total  $154,467,827 A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1940—Continued.
Dividends paid during 1939 and 1940.
Arlington (R. O. Oscarson)
Bralorne Mines, Ltd. 	
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd	
The  Consolidated Mining and  Smelting Co.  of
Canada, Ltd. 	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd	
Fairview Amalgamated Gold Mines	
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd	
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power
Co., Ltd. 	
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd	
Highland Bell, Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd	
Kelowna Exploration  (Nickel Plate)	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd	
Privateer Mine, Ltd. 	
Relief Arlington Mines, Ltd	
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd	
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd	
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd	
1939.
$11,430
1,496,400
206,924-
266,660
6,540,672
186,354
2,593
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd...
Others 	
180,097
249,054
105,269
157,607
210,000
121,536
700,700
539,898
28,200
318,750
400,000
143,554
Totals $11,865,698
1940.
$4,778
1,496,400
1,465,638
319,994
7,367,455
186,354
102,000
360,186
181,130
105,268
157,607
270,000
81,024
110,000
700,700
441,734
150,000
356,250
400,000
84,000
40,093
214,919
$14,595,530
TABLE XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1940.
Cla
Capital
employed.
Salaries
and Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
$95,939,423
3,151,768
20,609,785
17,581,710
2,412,047 '
$17,116,905
672,625
4,015,064
903,266
683.470
$2,703,554
142.577
241,338
231,265
155,987
$5,158,254
35,158
900,778
830,549
37,423
Totals, 1940
$139,694,733
$23,391,330
$3,474,721
$6,962,162
Grand totals, 1939 --.    , „	
Grand totals, 1938  	
$135,473,482
153,012,848
145,520,641
142,663,065
143,239,953
$22,357,035
22,765.711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
124,504,752
$2,066,203
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
17,347,124
$6,714,347
6,544,500
Grand totals, 1937  	
6,845,330
Grand totals, 1936  	
Grand totals, 1935 	
Grand totals, 1935-1940              	
4,434,501
4,552,730
36,053,570
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of capital employed in the mining industry, the amount of money distributed in salaries and wages,
fuel and electricity, and process supplies   (explosives,  chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.).
Capital employed includes: Present cash value of the land (excluding minerals) ; present value of buildings,
fixtures, machinery, tools, and other equipment; inventory value of materials on hand, ore in process, fuel and
miscellaneous supplies on hand; inventory value of finished products on hand; operating capital (cash, bills and
accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, etc.). THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 21
TABLE XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1940.
Year.
Tonnage.
No. of Shipping-mines.
No. of Mines
shipping
over 100
Tons.
Net Value
to Shipper of
Lode Minerals
produced.
Gross Value
of Lode
Minerals
produced.
1901..          	
920,416
998,999
1,280,176
1,401,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,804,114
2,083,606
2,057,713
2,210,428
1,770,755
2,088,532
2,663,809
2,175,071
2,090,110
3,188,865
2,761,579
2,892,849
2,112,975
2,178,187
1,562,645
1,573,186
2,421,839
3,397,105
3,849,269
4,775,073
5,416,021
0,241,310
0,977,681
6,803,846
5,549,103
4,340,158
4,030,778
5,087,334
4,916,149
4,456,521
0,145,254
7,377,091
7,210,676
8,026,639
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
08
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
'  72
70
113
92
99
92
$14,100,282
11,581,153
12,103,237
1904	
12,909,035
1905	
15,980,164
1906..                   	
18,484,102
1907	
17,316,847
1908.. .     	
15,847,411
15,451,141
1910.. .            	
14,728,731
11,454,063
1912	
17,662,766
1913... .            	
17,190,838
1914.. '..
15,225,061
1915
19,992,149
1916	
31,483,014
1917. .              . i
26,788,474
1918	
27,590,278
1919 .
19,750,498
1920	
19,444,365
1921	
12,920,398
1922	
19,227,857
1923	
25,347,002
1924... .           	
35.538,247
1925.
46,200,135
1028	
$38,558,013
27,750,304
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,68S
9,513,931
7,075,393
13,970,308
20,243,278
25,407,914
29,975,608
44,762,880
35,759,022
40,711,287
43,550,732
51,508,031
1927	
44,977,082
1928	
48,281,825
1929	
51,174,859
1930	
40,915,395
1931	
22,535,573
1032	
1033	
19,700,235
25,007,137
1934	
33,895,930
1935	
40,597,509
1936	
43,060,452
1937	
62,912,783
1938	
53,877,333
1939	
53,522.098
1940	
62,848,642 A 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1940.
TABLE XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry op British Columbia, 1901-1940.
e
'3
1
_
o
5
Lode-mining.
o
ej
u
43
C
QJ
a
a
o
o
a
m
s
s
a
Coal-mining.
Structural
Materials.
to
a
o
_
a
_
3
.-
S
>
<
"3
o
Si
a
_
>
o
A
<
3
o
03
B
s
o
1901	
1902	
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
1,371
1,303
1,252
1,004
2,736
2,219
1,662
2,143
2,470
2,680
2,704
2,567
2,184
2,472
2,435
2,472
2,773
2,741
2,709
3,357
3,290
2,626
2,513
2,074
1,355
1,510
2,102
2,353
2,298
2,606
2,671
2,707
2,926
2,316
1,403
1,355
1,786
2,796
2,740
2,959
3,603
3,849
3,905
3,923
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1,237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,910
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
1,818
2,266
2,050
2,104
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3,576
2,297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4,237
4,799
5,421
6,115
5,955
6,027
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
1,168
919
996
1,048
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,030
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
3,027
3,158
3,187
2,944
3,041
3,101
3,137
3,278
3,127
3,415
2,862
4,432
4,713
5,903
5,212
5,275
4,950
4,267
3,708
3,694
3,760
3,658
4,145
4,191
4,722
4,712
4,342
3,894
3,828
3,757
3,646
3,814
3,675
3,389
2,957
2,628
2,241
2,050
2,145
2,015
2,286
2,088
2,167
2,175
931
910
1,127
1,175
1,280
1,390
907
1,041
1,705
1,855
1,661
1,855
1,721
1,465
1,283
1,366
1,410
1,709
1,821
2,158
2,163
1,932
1,807
1,524
1,615
1,565
1,579
1,520
1,353
1,256
1,125
980
853
843
826
799
867
874
809
699
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,906
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,608
3,094
2,893
2,971
2,814
3,153
2,962
2,976
2,874
......
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
724
900
652
827
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
327
295
311
334
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
825
938
369
561
647
7,922
7.35G
1903-     	
7,014
1904	
7,759
1905	
8,117
1906         	
8,788
1907..    	
7,712
1908	
9,767
1909	
9,672
1910      	
11,467
1011	
10,467
1912	
10,967
1913      	
10,949
1914	
9,906
1915	
9,135
1916	
10,453
1917	
10,658
1918     	
9,637
1919      	
10,225
1920 .    	
10,028
1921	
1922	
9,215
9,393
1923 	
9,707
1924	
1925	
9,451
10,581
1926	
14,172
1927     	
14,830
1928	
15,424
1929	
15,565
1930..    	
14,032
1931..    	
12,171
1932      	
10,524
1933	
11,369
1934..    	
12,985
1935	
13,737
1936	
14,179
1937	
16,129
16,021
1939	
15,890
1940	
15,705*
* The average number of wage-earners was obtained by adding the monthly figures for individual companies and
dividing by 12 irrespective of the number of months worked, the average number of wage-earners in the industry is
the sum of these individual averages. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 23
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
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A 25
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
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P. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 29
SYNOPSIS OF MINING LAWS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
The mining laws of British Columbia are very liberal in their nature and compare
favourably with those of any other part of the world. The terms under which both
lode and placer claims and placer leaseholds are held are such that a prospector is
greatly encouraged in his work, and the titles, especially for mineral claims and placer-
mining leaseholds, are perfect. The fees required to be paid are as small as possible,
consistent with a proper administration of the mining industry, and are generally lower
than those commonly imposed elsewhere. Provision is also made for the formation of
mining partnerships practically without expense, and a party of miners is enabled to
take advantage of these sections of the Acts so that such miners may work their
claims jointly.
Placer-mining leases are granted for a period of twenty years and are approximately 80 acres in size. On a lode claim of 51 acres the expenditure of $500 in work,
which may be spread over five years, is required to obtain a Crown grant, and surface
rights are obtainable at a small figure, in no case exceeding $5 per acre.
The following synopsis of the mining laws will be found sufficient to enable the
miner or intending investor to obtain a general knowledge of their scope and requirements; for particulars, however, the reader is referred to the Acts relating to mining,
which may be obtained from any Mining Recorder, or from the Department of Mines
or the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Free Miners' Certificates.
Any person over the age of 18, and any joint-stock company, may obtain a free
miner's certificate on payment of the required fee.
The fee to an individual for a free miner's certificate is $5 for one year. To a
joint-stock company having a capital of $100,000, or less, the fee for a year is $50; if
capitalized beyond this, the fee is $100.
The free miners' certificates run from date of issue and expire on the 31st day of
May next after its date, or some subsequent 31st day of May (that is to say, a certificate may be taken out a year or more in advance if desired). Certificates may be
obtained for any part of a year, terminating on May 31st, for a proportionately less fee.
The possession of this certificate entitles the holder to enter upon all lands of the
Crown, and upon any other lands on which the right to so enter is not specially reserved,
for the purpose of prospecting for minerals, locating claims, and mining.
A free miner can hold, by location, during any period of twelve months, eight
mineral claims within a radius of 10 miles, and may acquire others by purchase. Under
the " Placer-mining Act," a free miner may locate, in any period of twelve consecutive
months, one placer claim or leasehold in his own name and one placer claim or leasehold
for each of three free miners for whom he acts as agent, on any separate creek, riverbed, bar or dry diggings.   Other placer claims or leaseholds may be acquired by purchase.
In the event of a free miner allowing his certificate to lapse, his mining property
(if not Crown-granted) reverts to the Crown (subject to the conditions set out in the
next succeeding paragraph), but where other free miners are interested as partners or
co-owners the interest of the defaulter becomes vested in the continuing co-owners or
partners pro rata, according to their interests.
Six months' extension of time within which to revive title in mining property which
has been forfeited through the lapse of a free miner's certificate is allowed. This privilege is given only if the holder of the property obtains a special free miner's certificate
within six months after the 31st of May on which his ordinary certificate lapsed. The
fee for this special certificate in the case of a person is $15 and in that of a company
$300.
It is not necessary for a shareholder, as such, in an incorporated mining company
to be the holder of a free miner's certificate. A 30 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Mineral Claims.
Mineral claims are located and held under the provisions of the " Mineral Act."
A mineral claim is a piece of land not exceeding in area fifty-one and sixty-five one-
hundredths acres. The angles must be right angles unless the boundaries, or one of
them, are the same as those of a previously recorded claim.
No special privileges are allowed for the discovery of new mineral claims or
districts.
A mineral claim is located by erecting two " legal posts," which are stakes having
a height of not less than 4 feet above ground and squared 4 inches at least on each face
for not less than a foot from the top. A tree-stump so cut and squared also constitutes
a legal post. A cairn of stones not less than 4 feet in height and not less than 1 foot
in diameter 4 feet above the ground may also be used as a legal post. Upon each of
these posts must be written the name of the claim, the name of the locator, and the date
of location.    On No. 1 post, in addition, the following must be written:   " Initial post.
Direction of Post No. 2 [giving approximate compass-bearing~\  feet of this claim
lie on the right and   feet on the left of the line from No. 1 to No. 2 posts."
Numbered metal identification tags must be attached to both posts at the time of
staking.
The location-line between Nos. 1 and 2 posts must be distinctly marked—in a timbered locality by blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in bare country by monuments of earth or rock not less than 2 feet in diameter at the base, and at least 2 feet
high—so that the line can be distinctly seen.
Mineral claims must be recorded in the Mining Recorder's office for the mining
division in which they are situate within fifteen days from the date of location, one day
extra being allowed for each 10 miles of distance from the recording office after the
first 10 miles. If a claim is not recorded in time it is deemed abandoned and open for
relocation, but if the original locator wishes to relocate he can only do so by permission
of the Gold Commissioner of the district and upon the payment of a fee of $10. This
applies also to a claim abandoned for any reason whatever.
Mineral claims are, until the Crown grant is issued, held practically on a yearly
lease, a condition of which is that during such year assessment-work be performed on
the same to the value of at least $100, or a payment of such sum be made to the Mining
Recorder. Such assessments must be recorded before the expiration of the year, or the
claim is deemed abandoned. If, however, the required assessment-work has been performed within the year, but not recorded within that time, a free miner may, within
thirty days thereafter, record such assessment-work upon payment of an additional fee
of $10. The actual cost of the survey of a mineral claim, to an amount not exceeding
$100, may also be recorded as assessment-work. If, during any year, work is done to
a greater extent than the required $100, any further sum of $100—but not less—may
be recorded and counted as further assessments; such excess work must be recorded
during the year in which it is performed. All work done on a mineral claim between
the time of its location and recording may be counted as work done during the first
period of one year from the recording. As soon as assessment-work to the extent of
$500 is recorded and a survey made of the claim, the owner of a mineral claim is
entitled to a Crown grant on payment of a fee of $25, and giving the necessary notices
required by the Act. Liberal provisions are also made in the Act for obtaining mill-
sites and other facilities in the way of workings and drains for the better working of
claims.
Placer Claims.
Placer-mining is governed by the " Placer-mining Act," and by the interpretation
clause its scope is defined as " the mining of any natural stratum or bed of earth,
gravel, or cement mined for gold or other precious minerals or stones." Placer claims
are of four classes, as follows:—
" ' Creek diggings ':  any mine in the bed of any stream or ravine:
" ' Bar diggings ':  any mine between high- and low-water marks on a river, lake,
or other large body of water: THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 31
" ' Dry diggings ':  any mine over which water never extends:
"'Precious-stone diggings': any deposit of precious stones, whether in veins,
beds, or gravel deposits."
The following provisions as to extent of the various classes of claims are made by
the Act:—
" In ' creek diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet long, measured
in the direction of the general course of the stream, and shall extend in width
one thousand feet, measured from the general course of the stream five hundred feet on either side of the centre thereof:
" In ' bar diggings ' a claim shall be:—
"(a.)  A piece of land not exceeding two hundred and fifty feet square on any
bar which is covered at high water;   or
"(&.)  A strip of land two hundred and fifty feet long at high-water mark, and
in width extending from high-water mark to extreme low-water mark.
" In ' dry diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet square."
The following provision is made for new discoveries of placer-mining ground:—
" If any free miner, or party of free miners, discovers a new locality for the
prosecution of placer-mining and such discovery be established to the satisfaction of
the Gold Commissioner, placer claims of the following sizes shall be allowed to such
discoverers, namely:—
" To one discoverer, one claim     600 feet in length;
" To a party of two discoverers, two claims amounting together
to 1,000 feet in length;
" And to each member of a party beyond two in number, a claim of the ordinary
size only.
" The width of such claims shall be the same as ordinary placer claims of the same
class: Provided that where a discovery claim has been established in any locality no
further discovery shall be allowed within five miles therefrom, measured along the
watercourses."
Every placer claim shall be as nearly as possible rectangular in form, and marked
by four legal posts at the corners thereof, firmly fixed in the ground. On each of such
posts shall be written the name of the locator, the number and date of issue of his free
miner's certificate, the date of the location, and the name given to the claim. In timbered localities boundary-lines of a placer claim shall be blazed so that the posts can be
distinctly seen, underbrush cut, and the locator shall also erect legal posts not more
than 125 feet apart on all boundary-lines. In localities where there is no timber or
underbrush, monuments of earth and rock, not less than 2 feet high and 2 feet in
diameter at base, may be erected in lieu of the last-mentioned legal posts, but not in the
case of the four legal posts marking the corners of the claim.
A placer claim must be recorded in the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
division within which the same is situate, within fifteen days after the location thereof,
if located within 10 miles of the office of the Mining Recorder by the most direct means
of travel. One additional day shall be allowed for every 10 miles additional or fraction
thereof. The number of days shall be counted inclusive of the days upon which such
location was made, but exclusive of the day of application for record. The application
for such record shall be under oath and in the form set out in the Schedule to the Act.
A claim which shall not have been recorded within the prescribed period shall be deemed
to have been abandoned.
To hold a placer claim for more than one year it must be rerecorded before the
expiration of the record or rerecord.
A placer claim must be worked by the owner, or some one on his behalf, continuously, as far as practicable, during working-hours. If work is discontinued for a
period of seven days, except during the close season, lay-over, leave of absence, sickness,
or for some other reason to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner, the claim is
deemed abandoned.
Lay-overs are declared by the Gold Commissioner upon proof being given to him
that the supply of water is insufficient to work the claim. Under similar circumstances
he has also the power to declare a close season, by notice in writing and published in the A 32 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Gazette, for all or any claims in his district. Tunnel and drain licences are also granted
by him on the person applying giving security for any damage that may arise. Grants
of right-of-way for the construction of tunnels or drains across other claims are also
granted on payment of a fee of $25, the owner of the claims crossed having the right
for tolls, etc., on the tunnel or drain which may be constructed. These tolls, however,
are, so far as the amount goes, under the discretion of the Gold Commissioner.
Co-owners and Partnerships.
In both the " Mineral " and " Placer-mining" Acts provision is made for the
formation of mining partnerships, both of a general and limited liability character.
These are extensively taken advantage of and have proved very satisfactory in their
working. Should a co-owner fail or refuse to contribute his proportion of the expenditure required as assessment-work on a claim he may be " advertised out," and his
interest in the claim shall become vested in his co-owners who have made the required
expenditure, pro rata according to their former interests.
It should not be forgotten that if any co-owner permits his free miner's certificate
to lapse, the title of his associates is not prejudiced, but his interest reverts to the
remaining co-owners; provided that said co-owner has not taken advantage of the six
months' period of grace allowed for the taking-out of a special free miner's certificate,
thus reviving the title to his interest.
Placer-mining Leases.
Leases of unoccupied Crown lands approximately 80 acres in extent may be granted
by the Gold Commissioner of the district after location has been made by staking along
a " location-line " not more than one-half a mile (2,640 feet) in length. In this line
one bend, or change of direction, is permitted. Where a straight line is followed two
posts only are necessary—namely, an " initial post" and a " final post." Where there
is a change of direction a legal post must be placed to mark the point of the said change.
The leasehold is allowed a width not in excess of one-quarter mile (1,320 feet), and the
locator, both on his " initial post" and in his notice of intention to apply, which is
posted at the office of the Mining Recorder, is required to state how many feet are included in the location to the right and how many feet to the left of the location-line.
That section of the Act dealing with the staking of placer-mining leases follows:—
" 105. (1.) For the purpose of locating a placer leasehold, a line to be known as the
' location-line ' shall be marked on the ground by placing a legal post at each end, one
post to be known as the ' Initial Post' and the other as the ' Final Post.' The direction
of the location-line may change at not more than one point throughout its length, and
an intermediate legal post shall be placed at the point at which the direction changes.
The total length of the location-line, following its change of direction (if any), shall
not exceed two thousand six hundred and forty feet.
"(2.) Upon the initial post and the final post shall be written the words ' Initial
Post' and ' Final Post' respectively, together with the name of the locator and the date
of the location. On the initial post shall also be written the approximate compass-
bearing of the final post, and a statement of the number of feet of the leasehold lying
on the right and on the left of the location-line, as viewed from the initial post, not
exceeding in the aggregate a width of thirteen hundred and twenty feet, thus: ' Direction of Final Post, . feet of this claim lie on the right and feet
on the left of the location-line.' In addition to the foregoing, where there is a change
of direction in the location-line as marked on the ground, the number ' 1' shall be
written on the initial post; the number ' 2 ' shall be written on the intermediate post;
and the number ' 3 ' shall be written on the final post. There also shall be affixed to the
initial post a notice to the following effect, namely: ' Application will be made under
the " Placer-mining Act" for a lease of the ground within this location.'
"(3.) The location-line shall at the time of location be marked between the legal
posts throughout its length so that it can be distinctly seen; in a timbered locality, by
blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in a locality where there is neither timber
nor underbrush, by placing legal posts or monuments of earth or stones not less than THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 33
two feet high and not less than two feet in diameter at the base, so that the location-line
can be distinctly seen.
"(4.) Where, from the nature or shape of the surface of the ground, it is impracticable to mark the location-line of a leasehold as provided by this section, the leasehold!
may be located by placing legal posts as witness-posts, as near as possible to the
location-line, and writing on each witness-post the distance and compass-bearing of
some designated point on the location-line from the witness-post; and the distances
and compass-bearing so written on the witness-posts shall be set out in the application
for the lease and in any lease granted thereon.
"(5.) The locator shall, within thirty days after the date of the location, post a
notice in Form I in the office of the Mining Recorder, which notice shall set out:—
"(a.)  The name of the intending applicant or each applicant if more than one,
and the numbers of their free miners' certificates:
"(&.)   The date of the location:
"(c.)  The number of feet Tying to the right and left of the location-line, and
the approximate area or size of the ground.
Examples of Various Methods of laying out Placer Leaseholds.
Showing Areas secured with Location-lines of Various Lengths.
Final Post-x ^Final Post
Initial Post
Post-'
Initial PostNo
Final Post
-*00si*^-No.3 A 34 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The words written on the initial post and final post shall be set out in full in the notice;
and as accurate a description as possible of the ground to be acquired shall be given,
having special reference to any prior locations it may join, and the general locality of
the ground to be acquired."
Another provision is that there must be affixed to the " initial post" and to the
" final post" a numbered metal identification tag furnished by the Mining Recorder
with each free miner's certificate issued. These tags must be attached to the posts or
placed in a container within a cairn, at the time of location.
The annual rental on a placer-mining lease is $30, and the amount to be expended
annually on development-work is $250.
Authority also has been given for the granting of special placer-mining leases in
locations other than has been defined.
For more detailed information the reader is referred to the complete " Placer-
mining Act," which may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Table of Fees, Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
Individual free miner's certificate, annual fee  $5.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital $100,000 or less), annual fee  50.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital over $100,000), annual fee  100.00
Recording mineral or placer claim  2.50
Recording certificate of work, mineral claim  2.50
Rerecord of placer claim  2.50
Recording lay-over  2.50
Recording abandonment, mineral claim  10.00
Recording abandonment, placer claim  2.50
Recording any affidavit  2.50
Records in " Records of Conveyances "  2.50
Filing documents, " Mineral Act " 25
Filing documents, " Placer-mining Act "  1.00
Recording certificate of work, placer-mining lease  2.50
For Crown grant of mineral rights under " Mineral Act "  25.00
For Crown grant of surface rights of mineral claim under " Mineral Act"  10.00
For every lease under " Placer-mining Act "  5.00
Provisional Free Miners' Certificates (Placer) Act.
This Act provides for the issuance of " provisional free miners' certificates " for
the locating, recording, representing, and working of placer claims of a size, and
according to the terms, and in the manner set out in Parts II. and III. of the " Placer-
mining Act." Any person over 18 years of age who has resided in the Province continuously for a period of not less than six months prior to date of his application may,
on application accompanied by a statutory declaration or other satisfactory evidence
as to his age and period of residence in the Province, obtain from any Gold Commissioner or Mining Recorder a provisional free miner's certificate. No fees are payable
in respect of such certificate, and it abolishes the fees payable in respect of the recording or rerecording of placer claims, but no record or rerecord of a claim shall be
granted for a longer period than one year without the payment of fees. It should be
pointed out that the provisional free miner's certificate does not carry the privileges
of an ordinary free miner's certificate as to the staking and working of placer-mining
leases or mineral claims.
The Act also gives the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, as a means of unemployment relief, power to make provision for the establishment, equipment, maintenance,
and operation of one or more placer training camps at suitable locations, at which
unemployed persons who hold provisional free miners' certificates and are British subjects may acquire knowledge and training in the art of placer-mining and may be
afforded gainful work in the recovery of minerals by placer-mining. Reserves for the
location of such camps shall not exceed one mile in length by one-half mile in width,
and the right is given to enter into agreements with private holders under the Act for
the development of their ground by means of unemployment relief camps. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 35
Department of Mines Act, 1937.
The " Department of Mines Act" empowers the Minister of Mines to organize the
Department or to reorganize it from time to time to meet changing conditions in the
mining industry. It provides for examination and certification of assayers; for the
conducting of short courses of lectures in practical geology and mineralogy; and for
the purchase of ore from the Provincial sampling plants. The said Act also provides
for the expenditure of public moneys for the construction, reconstruction, or repair of
trails, roads, and bridges to facilitate the exploration of the mineral resources of any
mining district, or in the operation and development of any mining property.
Iron and Steel Bounties Act, 1929.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may enter into an agreement with any person
whereby the Crown will pay to that person, out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund,
bounties on pig-iron and steel shapes when manufactured within the Province, as
follows:—
(a.)   In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced
from ore mined in the Province, a bounty not to exceed three dollars per
ton of two thousand pounds:
(6.)   In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced
from ore mined outside the Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar
and fifty cents per ton of two thousand pounds:
(c.)   In respect of steel shapes of commercial utility manufactured in the Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar per ton of two thousand pounds.
Bounty, as on pig-iron under this Act, may be paid upon the molten iron from ore
which in the electric furnace, Bessemer or other furnace, enters into the manufacture
of steel by the process employed in such furnace;   the weight of such iron to be ascertained from the weight of the steel so manufactured.
Bounty on steel shapes under this Act shall be paid only upon such steel shapes as
are manufactured in a rolling-mill having a rated productive capacity per annum of at
least twenty thousand tons of two thousand pounds per ton.
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act.
This Act is designed to provide for the safe working of mines by practical regulations which govern the main phases of mining, such as hoisting installations, ropes,
shaft and cage equipment, mine examination, transportation systems, electrical installations, use of explosives, approaching abandoned workings, and the connection of
adjacent mines.
Shaft-hoists are required to be equipped with overwind devices and approved
braking systems, and all hoistmen in charge must have an annual medical examination
and certificate testifying their fitness to perform this work. Hoisting-ropes where men
are hoisted must have a static factor of safety of at least 10 for depths of 1,000 feet,
with an allowable decrease of one for each 500 feet additional depth with a minimum
factor of safety of 6. The working-life of a hoisting-rope when men are hoisted or
lowered is limited to two years.
Cages must be provided with safety-catches, properly designed covers, and safety-
gates where men are hoisted.    Safety-catches must be tested at stated intervals.
The manager of the mine or some qualified person appointed by him must make a
daily examination of all places in the mine where persons are at work and report the
conditions found in regard to safety in a book kept at the mine for that purpose.
All persons handling or using explosives must hold a certificate of competency for
blasting. This certificate is issued by the district Inspector of Mines to miners who
show by an oral examination that they are qualified to use explosives safely. This
certificate may be cancelled for cause.
Where the workings of any mine are approaching any abandoned workings, whether
belonging to that mine or to an adjacent mine, the manager of the present workings
shall report the circumstance to the Inspector of Mines if the abandoned workings A 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
cannot be examined before the live workings are closer than 300 feet to the abandoned
workings, and no work shall be done within this distance until a definite method of
approach has been submitted to and approved by the Inspector.
Where it is considered necessary, the Minister of Mines may order a connection to
be made and maintained between adjacent mines, and determine the conditions under
which such a connection must be maintained.
All electrical installations must comply with the requirements of the " Electrical
Energy Inspection Act " of British Columbia.
In addition to the Act and General Rules applicable to all mines, each mine which
employs fifty or more men must have a code of Special Rules covering the details of
operation at that mine. These Special Rules are drafted by the mining company and
its employees and, when approved by the Minister of Mines, have the full force of law.
The Inspectors of Mines in the different districts have discretionary authority on a
number of points that may arise in the course of mining operations.
Coal-mines Regulation Act.
This Act, like the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," is designed to provide for
the safe working of mines by practical regulations. It is, however, broader in scope
than the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " in that it provides for the examination
and licensing of coal-mine officials and miners.
Explosives.
Under the provisions of Dominion Order in Council No. 2903, issued July 4th, 1940,
no person or company may own or purchase explosives, except under a special permit
prescribed and issued under this order. Each purchase of explosives requires a
separate permit, except in the case of mining and quarrying operations, in which cases
the Provincial Inspector of Mines has authority to issue the explosives purchase permit
for one calendar year.
Only the owner of an explosives factory or a licensed magazine may sell explosives,
but an exemption is made in the case of any mining company to the extent that such a
company may be permitted, on applying for the necessary authority, to resell small
quantities of explosives to properly qualified prospectors in their district. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 37
SUMMARY OF ACTS SPECIALLY RELATING TO MINING.
(The complete Acts may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.)
Mining Licences under the Coal and Petroleum Act.
Any person desiring to prospect for coal, petroleum, or natural gas upon any unsur-
veyed unreserved lands in which these resources are held by the Crown may acquire a
licence to do so over a rectangular block of land not exceeding 640 acres, of which the
boundaries shall run due north and south and east and west, and no side shall exceed
80 chains (1 mile) in length. Before entering into possession of the said lands he shall
place at the corner of such block a legal stake, or initial post, and shall inscribe thereon
his name and the angle represented by such post, thus: "A. B.'s N.E. corner," or as
the case may be, and shall post in a conspicuous place upon the said land, and also in
the Government office of the land recording district, notice of his intention to apply,
as well as publishing the same in the B.C. Gazette and local newspaper once each week
for four consecutive weeks. If the area applied for is surveyed no staking is required,
but the same procedure with regard to advertising notice of intention to apply is
necessary.
The application for said licence shall be in writing, in duplicate, and shall contain
the best written description possible, with a diagram of the land sought to be acquired,
and shall be accompanied with a fee of $100. The application shall be made to the
Commissioner of Lands for the district, within sixty days from date of first publication
in B.C. Gazette, and by him forwarded to the Minister of Lands, who will grant such
licence—provided no reasons arise to the contrary—for a period not to exceed one year,
and at the expiration of the first year an extension of such licence may be granted for
a second or third year at a fee of $100.
Where coal is discovered during the existence of licence or within thirty days after
expiration, the land held under licence, having been surveyed and licence conditions
fulfilled, may be leased for five years at rental of 15 cents an acre, subject to renewals
for five successive periods of three years each, renewal fee being $100 for each lease,
in addition to annual rental.
Lessees, on showing continuous work has been done and reasonable expenditure
made for development, may, after carrying out the provisions of the lease, purchase at
$20 per acre where surface is available, or $15 per acre for under-surface rights where
surface is not available. Lands under the sea may be purchased at $15 per acre. Provided also that, in addition to the rental or purchase price, there shall be paid to the
Government as a royalty 21/_ cents a barrel (35 imperial gallons) of crude petroleum
raised or gotten from such land.     (See chapter 175, R.S.B.C. 1936.)
Taxation Act.
A preliminary note is essential to the understanding of this Act. As the law has
stood, a Crown-granted mineral claim on which taxes were in arrears for a number of
years was offered for sale by the Government at a tax sale, with arrears of taxes plus
interest and charges and Crown-grant fees as an upset price. If no sale was made the
property remained in the hands of the Assessor until desired by some one, when it could
only be purchased by tender. It was not open to location under the " Mineral Act"
and a prospector had no protection, and to relieve the situation an amending Act was
passed.
Under the amended Act such reverted Crown-granted mineral claim may be
obtained by any person under a lease for one year upon payment of $25, and a renewal
of such lease may be granted upon payment of further $25 for a further period of one
year, but no longer. During the period of such lease the lessee has the right to enter,
prospect, and mine on such mineral claim, save for coal, petroleum, and natural gas,
and during such time the lessee has the option to purchase such Crown-granted mineral
claim upon payment of all taxes, costs, and interest which remained due and unpaid on
such claim on the date of its forfeiture to the Crown, together with an amount equal
to all taxes and interest which, except for its forfeiture to the Crown, would have been A 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
payable in respect thereof from the date of the lease to the date of application for a
Crown grant. If, however, the lessee establishes to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner that he has expended upon the claim in mining-development work a sum of
not less than $200 a year during the continuance of the lease, then the payment of the
sum in respect of taxes and penalties from the date of the lease to the date of application for a Crown grant shall not be required. Provision also is made for the grouping
of adjoining claims, not exceeding eight in number, and the performing on one of such
claims mining-development work for all of the claims.
A person may obtain a lease, or interest in a lease, of eight such claims in the
same mining division.
Such leases are not transferable and are subject to the rights any person may
already hold to any portion of the surface of such Crown-granted mineral claim.
Taxation of Mines.
Crown-granted mineral claims are subject to a tax of 25 cents per acre. The tax
becomes due on April 1st in each year, and if unpaid on the following June 30th is
deemed to be delinquent.
All mines, other than coal, are subject to an output tax (payable quarterly) of
2 per cent, on gross value of mineral, less cost of transportation from mine to reduction-
works and the cost of treating same at reduction-works or on the mining premises.
Any such mine, not realizing on ore shipments a market value of $5,000 in any one
year, is entitled to a refund of the output tax paid.
Coal is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except coal shipped to coke-
ovens within the Province.    Tax payable monthly.
Coke is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except in respect of coke
produced from coal upon which this tax has already been paid.    Tax payable monthly.
Coal land from which coal is being mined (Class A) is taxed at 1 per cent, upon
the assessed value, in addition to any other tax.
Unworked coal land, known as " Coal Land, Class B," is subject to a tax of 2 per
cent, upon the assessed value.
For further particulars see the " Taxation Act," also the " Public Schools Act,"
which are obtainable from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 39
ASSAY OFFICE.
BY
J. B. Adams.
During the year 1940 there were made by the staff in the Department of Mines
Assay Office 4,761 assays or quantitative determinations and 83 analyses; of these the
majority were for the Department or for the other departments, for which no fees
were received.
The fees collected by the office were as follows:—
Fees for analyses     $20.00
Fees for assaying       71.50
Fees for assayers' examinations     195.00
$286.50
Determinations and examinations made for other Government departments, for
which no fees were collected:—
Attorney-General's Department      $325.00
Agricultural Department        325.00
Board of Health        195.00
Treasury       1,336.00
Forest Branch  5.00
Liquor Board  10.00
Public Works Department        105.00
$2,301.00
One thousand three hundred and thirty-six lots of gold were received from the Gold
Commissioners, who are purchasing amounts up to 2 oz. to aid the prospector in disposing of his gold.
FREE DETERMINATIONS.
In addition to the above quantitative work, 157 qualitative determinations, or tests,
were made in connection with the identification and classification of rocks or minerals
sent to the Assay Office for a report; for these no fees were charged, as it is the established custom of the Department to examine and test qualitatively, without charge,
samples of minerals sent in from any part of the Province, and to give a report on same.
This has been done for the purpose of encouraging the search for new or rare minerals
and ores, and to assist prospectors and others in the discovery of new mining districts,
by enabling them to have determined, free of cost, the nature and probable value of any
rock they may find. In making these free determinations, the Department asks that the
locality from which the sample was obtained be given by the sender.
EXAMINATIONS FOR ASSAYERS.
The writer has the honour, as Secretary, to submit the Annual Report for the year
1940 of the Board of Examiners for Certificates of Competency and Licence to practise
Assaying in British Columbia, as established under the " Department of Mines Act."
One candidate applied for examination on May 6th and passed the examination.
Two candidates applied for examination on December 6th and both passed the examination.    One candidate applied for exemption under the Act and was granted a certificate. A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
DEPARTMENT OF MINES SAMPLING PLANT,
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
BY
Joseph T. Mandy and T. Norton Youngs.
The function, objective, and operation of the sampling plant at Prince Rupert are
described in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for the years 1938 and 1939.
Increasing use of the plant by prospectors, lessees, small operators, and by some of
the larger mining companies developing properties in the Northern district has again
been evident during 1940.
A total of 184 shipments was received from 52 different properties, distributed
from Vancouver Island in the south to the Portland Canal area in the north.
During the year $15,637.17 was paid by the plant to shippers.
A number of fairly large shipments of good grade ore from the Stewart area has
provided funds and encouragement for further work in that section.
Information and results from test shipments from the Duthie mine, Smithers, in
1939 and 1940, have been an important factor in assisting this property into comparatively steady production of car-load shipments direct to the smelter, with about ten men
employed at the mine and the establishment of a community, with school, of about
twenty-five people.
Tonnage and test shipments to the plant by the Conwest Exploration Company
•during its development of the Hunter Basin group near Telkwa have supplied this company with information in its exploratory development-work and furthered direct shipments to the smelter.
It is of interest to note that since the inception of this service in August, 1937, the
sampling plant has handled a total of 543 shipments, for which $33,972.58 has been paid
to shippers. During the same period, twenty-six shipments have been made by the
plant to the smelters, for which $33,856.28 has been received.
The following is a synopsis of the operating details of the plant for the year 1940
from January 1st to December 31st:—
Class of Shipments.
No. of
Shipments.
No. of different
Properties.
Weight of
Shipments.
40
117
27
16
32
16
Tons.
144.4676
26.8489
0.0288
Totals   	
184
52
171.3453
SHIPMENTS FROM SAMPLING PLANT TO SMELTERS.
Number of shipments to smelters     12
Dry tons paid for by smelters    196.5187*
Paid out by plant on Ore Purchasing Account  $15,637.17
Received from smelters  $15,800.21
♦Difference between this figure and total weight of shipments received during the year  (171.3453 dry tons)   is
accounted for by carry-over at end of 1939 and end of 1940.
The details of the tonnage, bulk test lots and assay lots, with relative assay and
analysis results, follow. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 41
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cc THE MINING INDUSTRY.                                                   A 47
GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.
The following list shows the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders of the
Province:—
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Atlin      	
Atlin	
H. F. Glassey,..
H. F. Glassey—
J. G. B. Egdell.
R. W. Meldram.
Telegraph Creek 	
Sub-office  _	
W. J. Nelson.
J. V. Rees.
John Brown.
W. R. Henry.
F. W. Beatton.
R. J. Campbell.
A. J. Lancaster.
Chas. E. Moore.
L. G. Skinner.
B. E. Munkley.
A. Fisher.
Oscar Olander.
Percy Gadsden.
Geo. H. HiU.
C. A. Brynildsen.
C. N. Ramsay.
Mrs. L. Cummings.
J. Copeland.
C. A. Brynildsen.
A. MacKinnon.
Norman Henry.
W. B. Steele.
T. J. Thorp.
Geo. Milburn.
Percy Gadsden.
F. W. Beatton.
James Ware.
John Thompson.
B. E. Munkley.
J. D. Moore.
Geo. Ogsdon.
J. C. McCubbin.
L. I. Olson.
John Brown.
Jas. L. Bethurem.
Mrs. Wilhemina
Aiken.
L. G. Skinner.
H. J. Engleson.
G. Milburn.
A. MacKinnon.
M. S. Morrell.
E. C. Lunn.
Geo. Milburn.
M. B. McBrayne.
J. E. Mclntyre.
Telegraph Creek  	
Boundary via Telegraph
Creek
R. W. Meldram.     .
R. W. Meldram	
Sub-office. 	
Sub-office..	
Fort St. John	
Dease Lake Townsite	
N. A. Watt	
N. A. Watt..	
Sub-office	
Stewart (Portland Canal)
Kimsquit 	
Bella Coola
Queen Charlotte 	
N. A. Watt (at Prince
Rupert)
A, Fisher	
Smithers	
H. B. Campbell _	
H. B. Campbell 	
Sub-office — —   -
Bella Coola	
Telkwa 	
Sub-office. _	
Kimsquit —	
Fort St. John ._ _	
Whitewater (Finlay
River) via Fort
Grahame
S ub-office	
 _  §-'<  	
Usk
Fort St. John 	
H. B. Campbell (at
Smithers)
F. W. Beatton	
H. A. Bryant	
Barkerville 	
H. A. Bryant	
Sub-office	
Sub-office. -	
Sub-office	
Fort McLeod 	
' A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Gold Commissioners
and Mining Eecorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
L. C. Maclure	
L. C. Maclure -   -—
E. C. Lunn.
A. Morrison.
H. A. Bryant.
A. B. Campbell.
Wm. Lowden.
E. R. Hance.
L. C. Maclure.
W. Haylmore.
E. R. Hance.
George M. Fennell.
H. Finley.
A. P. Suckling.
H. Elgie.
John M. Deane.
F. H. C. Wilson.
C. W. Dickson.
G. B. Gane.
T. W. Clarke.
W. H. Laird.
E. Harrison.
L. S. Coleman.
John M. Deane.
W. H. Laird.
C. J. Dainard.
A. A. Robertson.
D. H. Bruce.
A. Robb.
W. E. Graham.
J. A. Stewart.
R. H. Hassard.
S. Curwen.
M. C. Donaldson.
W. H. Cochrane.
Jos. Howe.
Henry Carter.
C. C. Thompson.
H. J. Bull.
A. G. Freeze.
Geo. Nicholson.
W. H. Boothroyd.
Russell Sneddon.
Sub-office
Quesnel  „
Likely.—	
Barkerville	
Horsefly. 	
Sub-office
R. J. A. Dorrell	
Clinton  	
Sub-office 	
Clinton   	
Williams Lake	
Haylmore via Gold Bridge
R. J. A. Dorrell _	
Kamloop s  	
Chu Chua
P. H. McCurrach
P. H. McCurrach	
Sub-office -	
Vavenby 	
Salmon Arm  	
Ashcroft	
Lytton	
Merritt 	
Princeton ___.
Hedley
W. F. Knowlton-	
R. G. Couper	
Chas. Nichols	
Ashcroft
Sub-office.	
Nicola.                „
Similkameen 	
Sub-office
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
Chas. Nichols	
R. M. McGusty	
R. M. McGusty-	
Sub-office 	
L. A. Dodd 	
L. A. Dodd	
Sub-office	
Kettle Valley _ _.
Beaverdell  	
Sub-office.	
W. R. Dewdney	
W. R. Dewdney	
A. W. Anderson	
A. M. Chisholm _.
W. G. Taylor. 	
W. M. H. Dunn	
Sub-office	
Keremeos	
Golden 	
Golden 	
Windermere 	
Fort Steele	
Windermere	
Cranbrook	
A. W. Anderson (at
Golden)
W. G. Taylor __	
Sub-office..	
Claude MacDonald
Frank Broughton	
ClaudeMacDonald (at
Kaslo)
Slocan  - 	
J. Cartmel- —
J. Cartmel-	
Creston  	
Ymi r	
Salmo  	
Nakus p  	
Sub-office __   ...
Sub-office
Arrow Lake	
J. Cartmel (at Nelson)
Wynfield Maxwell
Wynfield Maxwell (at
Revelstoke)
N. A. Herridge	
W. Maxwell	
C. A. McElroy....	
Sub-office	
E. L. Hedley	
C. L. Monroe	
E. L. Hedley 	
C. L. Monroe	
Sub-office	
Sub-office
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O.Granite Bay - __
Sub-office
Knh-nffice
W. H. Boothroyd     -
W. H. Boothroyd	 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 49
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
C layoqu o t 	
Tofino ■   	
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
C. W. Sharp	
Alberni ' , ,, __	
W. H. Boothroyd.
Quatsino 	
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
R. J. Steenson.	
A. P. Grant	
Ed. Evenson ,	
P. J. Mulcahy _
A. B. Gray	
A. E. Wilson—..	
New Westminster	
New Westminster 	
C. N. Tingle.
H. Elgie.
A. S. Tyrer-	
L. J. Price 	
J. P. Scarlett.
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O._
L. J. Price —	
G. H. Beley.
Haylmore via Gold Bridge A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
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PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on the mining industry are compiled from information supplied
by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, through the
courtesy of the property-owners and also from information obtained by the officers of
the Mineralogical Staff in the course of their field-work. The Registrar of Companies
and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through their respective
offices.
LODE-GOLD DEPOSITS.
TAKU RIVER AREA.
TULSEQUAH.
Company office,  807 Lonsdale  Building,  Duluth,  Minnesota, U.S.A.;
Polaris-Taku     mine office, Tulsequah, B.C.;   E. C. Congdon, President;   Harvie A.
Mining Co., Ltd.  Garver, Secretary;  Walter B. Congdon, Treasurer;   F. H. McPherson,
Manager;  W. F. Gowans, Mine Superintendent.    Capital:   10,000 preferred shares, §100 par;   20,000 common shares, $1 par;   issued—10,000 preferred,
12,200 common.
The property is located on the Tulsequah River, about 6 miles from its junction
with the Taku River. The mine is reached by boat and aeroplane in summer and by
aeroplane only in winter. Development during the year consisted of 521 feet of shaft
sinking, 8,463 feet of crosscutting, 4,650 feet of raising and drifting, 18,533 feet of
diamond-drilling, and 714 feet of churn-drilling. Production of 80,364 tons of ore
yielded 23,000 oz. of gold.
A three-compartment shaft was sunk from the Polaris level.    Levels were driven
at 150 feet, 300 feet, and 450 feet.    Active development is proceeding on each of these
levels.    An additional Diesel-driven generator, 500 horse-power, was installed in the
power-house.   A set of rolls was installed in the mill.   A crew of 154 men was employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part B.]
UNUK RIVER AREA.
MacKay Gold Mines, Ltd.—Nothing was done on this property during the year.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
Salmon River.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Silbak Premier    Premier, B.C.;   H. A. Guess, President;   J.  C. Emison, Treasurer;
Mines, Ltd.      G. A. Brockington, Secretary;  Bert F. Smith, Manager;  J. G. Pearcey,
Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:   3,000,000   shares,   $1   par;   issued,
2,500,000.   The property of this company is located in the Salmon River valley, about
14 miles from Stewart.    During the past year development consisted of 1,674 feet of
crosscutting, 13,445 feet of drifting, 148 feet of winzing, 4,326 feet of raising, and
49,044 feet of diamond-drilling.    Most of the development was concentrated on No. 5
level.    The mine worked 313 days and produced 171,504 tons of ore, from which were
recovered 37,000 oz. of gold and 612,000 oz. of silver.    An average crew of 330 men was
employed.
Company office, Trail, B.C.;  mine office, Stewart, B.C.;  M. M. O'Brien,
Buena Vista      President;   E. G. Randall, Secretary-Treasurer;   D. S. Campbell, Man-
Mining Co., Ltd. ager; E. James, Mine Superintendent.  This company owns and operates
the Big Missouri mine, located in the Salmon River valley, 18 miles
from Stewart.   Development during the year consisted of 434 feet of crosscutting, 954
feet of drifting, and 2,823 feet of raising.    Most of the development was toward the north section of the mine, where new stopes have been opened. There was a suspension
of mill operations and curtailment of mining owing to power shortage in the spring.
An average crew of 111 men was employed.
Salmon Gold Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 800 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.; E. C.
Morris, President; A. B. McDonald, Secretary. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, 50 cents
par; issued, 1,200,000. Nothing was done at this property during the year. The
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company have dropped their option.
Tide Lake Gold Group.—This group, owned by Mrs. J. L. Campbell, of Hyder, Alaska,
is located on the west side of Tide Lake. During the year high-grade ore was mined
and a small shipment made to the sampling plant. Work was continued on the property
by two lessees.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1927, 1930, 1939.]
Portland Group.—During the season this property was optioned by Silbak Premier
Mines, Ltd., and some exploratory stripping, open-cutting, and 150 feet of drifting in
an adit was done.    The option was relinquished.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part B.]
Bear River.
Company office, 603 Central Building, Victoria, B.C.   Capital: 3,000,000
Stewart Canal     shares, 50 cents par.    J. Haathi, Manager.    The property is located
Gold Mines, Ltd.  opposite the town of Stewart, across the Bear River.   This year a small
Gibson mill was installed on the bank of the river and a tram built
between the showing and the mill.    Power was furnished by a Pelton wheel located at
the mill.    Operations were suspended at the end of the year owing to lack of water for
power.
Red Cliff Group.—H. D. Haywood has an option on this property. From surface
open-cut work, 34 tons of ore was shipped which yielded 82 oz. of gold and 36 oz. of
silver.
In the early part of the year, J. D. O. Rochfort and A. Bugnello, lessees,
Dunwell Mines,   continued mining of shipping-grade ore from the Ben Ali claim.    Sev-
Ltd. (Ben Ali     eral shipments were made to the sampling plant by these lessees.   Later
Claim). in the year, Samis & Company, Vancouver, entered into an agreement
with the Dunwell company for acquisition of the property. The
Rochfort-Bugnello lease was cancelled and two representatives of the Samis company
took over the extraction of shipping-grade ore. From this operation only one shipment of 0.5505 ton had been made when work ceased in the autumn.
Marmot River.
This group, about 2 miles from the mouth of Marmot River, is owned
Gold Drop Group, by Joseph Morrin and Albert Casey, of Hyder, Alaska, and Stewart,
B.C.    Work was continued by the owners with a view to extracting
shipping-grade ore.    One shipment of 0.0283 ton was made to the sampling plant.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1939, Crusader Mines, Ltd.]
ALICE ARM AREA.
Nass River.
At the head of Willoughby Creek, a tributary of the White River draining into
the Nass River south of Meziadin Lake, prospecting of a mineralized zone carrying
low-grade gold values in places was done by Owen McFadden for H. C. Bennet and
partners, of Stewart.
The area is about 14 miles by road and 55 miles by trail from Stewart.
Anyox.
The owner of the claim, James Flynn, of Anyox, carried out cross-
Gold Leaf Claim, cutting for the purpose of intersecting the beach vein.    A fault striking north 48 degrees west and dipping 67 degrees south-west intersects
the vein at the portal.    The crosscut has advanced 75 feet to the face.    At the face a PROGRESS NOTES. A 53
lamprophyre dyke 16 inches in width is intersected and is adjoined on each side by
veins 4 to 10 inches in width. Assays of samples of these did not return any gold
values.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part B.]
NORTHERN COAST.
Princess Royal Island.
Company office, 507 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Surf Inlet Con-    office, Surf Inlet, B.C.;   Robert L. Reed, President;   Lindsey Hooper,
solidated Gold    Treasurer;    J.   C.   Ralston,   Secretary;    Angus   McLeod,   Manager.
Mines, Ltd.      Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 2,672,855.    The property of this company is comprised of the Pugsley and Surf mines,
located at the head of Surf Inlet.    Both mines were operated during the year and
development-work totalled 262 feet of crosscutting, 3,906 feet of drifting, 1,151 feet of
raising, and 13,006 feet of diamond-drilling.    The mine worked 365 days.    From 39,437
tons of ore mined and milled there were produced 14,903 oz. of gold and 5,224 oz. of
silver.    An average crew of ninety-five men was employed.
Khutze Inlet.
The property is located on the north branch of the Khutze River, about
Hunter Group.    13  miles  from the beach.    Nine men were  engaged  in  sinking an
inclined shaft.    The shaft was sunk 150 feet and 50-foot drifts were
driven from each side of it.
Porcher Island.
The Porcher Island Mines, Limited, did not operate during the year.
TERRACE-HAZELTON AREA.
Terrace-Kitsumgallum Lake Section.
This claim, owned by J. Hamer, Terrace, B.C., is located half a mile
Oakwood Claim,  north of the town of Terrace at about altitude 500 feet.    The showings
consist of small,  isolated,  and discontinuous areas of pyritized and
hybridized hornblende-schist inclusions, with some quartz stringers and lenses, in grano-
diorite of the Coast Range batholith.    Some stripping and open-cutting was done on
these, but nothing of importance was uncovered.
This claim, owned by Axel Erickson, of Terrace, B.C., is located on the
Gold Bar Claim,   west side of Kitsumgallum Lake, about 3 miles from its southerly end.
The ground covered by this claim was formerly occupied by the Kalum
Lake Mines, Limited, and was restaked by the present owner in 1938.
The continuation of the vein has been stripped for a distance of 60 feet in a southwesterly direction from the lake-shore. Some open-cutting was also done in this
section. From this work, 10.4383 tons of selected ore, in five separate lots, was shipped
to the sampling plant.
The property was examined, sampled, and mapped with the objective of determining the possibility of selectively mining shipping ore. A map and assay results covering this examination may be obtained for a small charge upon application to the
Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
[Reference: Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927,
1928, and 1930.    See also Portland:   1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, and 1927.]
Zymoetz River.
Company office, 785 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  Fred M. Wells,
OminecaGold    President;  C. Hansen, Superintendent.    The property of this company
Quartz Mining    is located on the north bank of the Zymoetz River,  14 miles from
Co., Ltd. Copper City.    The adit being driven to intersect the veins at depth
was continued during the summer.    This is now in about 1,400 feet.
A crew of eleven men was employed. A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
This group of eight mineral claims is owned by T. Turner, of Terrace,
Zymoetz Group. B.C., and is situated at the base of the southerly slope of Kleanza
(" O.K.") Mountain, between elevation 250 and 600 feet. The claims
lie along and adjacent to the north side of the Zymoetz River, about 2 miles east of its
confluence with the Skeena River. It is reached by a branch motor-road, suitable for
light motor-cars, which leaves the Terrace-Usk Highway on the north end of the
Zymoetz River Bridge.
Some further work was done in the lower adit in which the vein was intersected at
60 feet from the portal. At this locality, the mineral deposit consists of an irregularly
reticulated quartz replacement from 1 to 3 feet in width, well mineralized with pyrite
and sphalerite with some galena and chalcopyrite in altered hornblende-schist.
In order to ascertain the possible localization of gold values and the possible occurrence of shipping-grade ore, the following samples were taken:—
A sample from the lower adit of the deposit exposed in the face for a width of
from 1 to 3 feet assayed: Gold, 0.28 oz. per ton; silver, 0.6 oz. per ton; copper, 0.1
per cent.;  lead, nil; zinc, 4.3 per cent.;   silica, 60.9 per cent.
A sample of selected sphalerite and galena mineralization from a small dump at
the portal of the lower adit assayed: Gold, trace; silver, 5.2 oz. per ton; lead, 16.6
per cent.;  zinc, 24 per cent.
A sample of selected pyrite and chalcopyrite mineralization from the small dump
at the portal of the lower adit assayed: Gold, 0.26 oz. per ton; silver, 0.5 oz. per ton;
copper, 0.45 per cent.;   silica, 47.4 per cent.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part B.]
This group of eight claims is owned by Wm. Hagen, of Terrace, B.C.,
Black Bull Group, and is situated on the west side of Kleanza Mountain.    It is reached
by trail extending for about l1/, miles south-easterly from the Copper
River Bridge to the cabin at about altitude 3,500 feet.
During the year, work was continued on the Gem No. 1 mineral claim. This consisted of some stripping and open-cutting. The adit was also extended in a northerly
direction through the lamprophyre dyke and the vein picked up on the north side of
this dyke. The vein was then drifted on to the face of the adit, which at the time of
the examination was 106 feet from the portal. The workings were mapped and sampled
for the purpose of determining the possibility of sorting and cobbing a shipping-grade
ore. Maps covering the details of the workings on the Gem No. 1 and the Bluebird
No. 3 mineral claims and also one covering the trail leading to this property may be
obtained for a small charge upon application to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
During the year the owner shipped to the sampling plant thirteen small lots of ore,
totalling 2.2888 tons.
USK.
Company office, 300 Insurance Building, Seattle, Washington;   British
Nicholson Creek   Columbia office, 602 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   R. K. Young,
Mining Corpora-  President;   W. A. Schwalbe, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   5,000,000
tion. shares, 1 cent par.    T. J. Shenton, Superintendent.    The corporation
owns a group of claims on the south side of Nicholson Creek, 5 miles
northward from Usk Station on the Canadian National Railways. Additional development-work during the year consisted of 195 feet of drifting, 95 feet of raising, and
63 feet of crosscutting.    A crew of five men was employed.
This group of claims covering ground formerly held by the Columario
Victor Group. Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd., was staked in 1937 by W. W. Duncan,
of Usk, and S. C. Cooper, of Terrace. The claims are between 200 and
4,200 feet elevation on the westerly slope of Kleanza Mountain and are reached by
motor-road from Usk for 3.3 miles; thence go-devil trail for 1.7 miles to the Columario
camp at 1,700 feet elevation; thence a good pack-horse trail for 2 miles to the main
showings at 4,000 feet elevation. Work was continued on this property with the view
to extracting shipping-grade ore. During the year, one test shipment totalling 0.1230
ton and one assay lot were shipped to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert. PROGRESS NOTES. . A 55
This group of twelve claims is owned by J. Bell, A. M. Bethurem,
Grotto Group. G. Alger, and R. L. Brash, of Usk. It is located in the valley of Hard-
scrabble Creek, about 2 miles south-westerly from Pitman, on the
Canadian National Railway.
During the year exploration on the upper and lower showings was continued by
the Canadian Explorations, Ltd., Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C., with one man
employed. A cut was also taken out on No. 1 vein in front of and 6x/_ feet below the
floor of No. 1 adit.
In order to ascertain the possibility of shipping-grade ore being uncovered by the
new working, the following samples were taken and assayed as follows:—
Poes mineral claim, No. 2 cut. A sample across No. 7 vein, 12 inches wide, well
mineralized with galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite in a quartz gangue, assayed: Gold,
0.01 oz. per ton; silver, 5.5 oz. per ton; copper, 1.5 per cent.; lead, 15.4 per cent.; zinc,
8.4 per cent.
Poes mineral claim, No. 7 vein, No. 4 cut. A sample across a width of 15 inches,
well mineralized with sphalerite, galena, and chalcopyrite, assayed: Gold, 0.02 oz. per
ton;  silver, 6.1 oz. per ton;  copper, 4.5 per cent.;  lead, 6.8 per cent.;  zinc, 8.6 per cent.
No. 1 vein. A sample in face of cut, 61/. feet below the portal of No. 1 adit portal
across a width of 3 feet, well mineralized with pyrite in a quartz gangue, assayed:
Gold, 0.06 oz. per ton;  silver, 0.9 oz. per ton;  copper, 0.05 per cent.
The workings on the Poes mineral claim were mapped; a copy is procurable for a
small charge on application to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part C]
HAZELTON TO HOUSTON AREA.
Smithers.
This organization is operating the old Duthie mine under lease.    The
Smithers Mines,   property  is  located  9  miles  by  road  from  Smithers.    Development
Ltd. during the year consisted of 100 feet of drifting.    From a stope off a
sub-level above the 500 level and from surface open-cuts, 242 tons of
ore was mined.    This tonnage yielded 52 oz. of gold, 42,592 oz. of silver, as well as lead
and zinc.    A crew of eight men was employed.
La Marr Gold Mines, Ltd.—B. F. Messner, owner. The property of this company is at
the head of Driftwood Creek. Six hundred feet of trenching and 100 feet of tunnelling
constituted development for the year.
This property is owned by the estate of Messrs. Cain & King and is
Hyland Basin     situated at the head of Cronin Creek in the Babine Mountains.    Small
Group. shipments of selected ore have been made from time to time during
former years, and considerable exploration had been carried out in
numerous open-cuts and two adits.
During 1940, the property was optioned by H. W. Agnew and associates, of Vancouver, with the objective of extracting shipping-grade ore.    Three men were employed
in this work.    During the season, two lots comprising 2.462 and 1.949 dry tons of
carefully sorted and cobbed ore were shipped to the sampling plant.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1926 and 1935.]
Telkwa.
Head office, c/o W. R. Wilson & Sons, 744 Hastings Street, Vancouver,
Babine Gold     B.C.    This is a private company.    Authorized capital:   50,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd. (Free $1 par value, all issued.    The company holds an option on sixteen
Gold Group),     claims, including the Free Gold group, owned by Alex Chisholm, of
Smithers, and situated on Dome Mountain, about 26 miles easterly by
motor-road and winter-road from the town of Telkwa,  on the  Canadian  National
Railway.
The property is reached from Telkwa (altitude 1,677 feet) by motor-road, a
distance of 9 miles, from whence a sleigh-road extends for about 17 miles to the camp
at 4,160 feet altitude. A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
During the latter part of the year, some work was carried out with the objective
of ascertaining the possibility of mining and shipping high-grade ore. From this
work, 2.463 dry tons was shipped to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference: Annual Reports, 1915, 1916, 1918, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1929, 1934,
and 1938.]
CARIBOO AREA.
Wells.
Company office, 675 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Cariboo Gold     Wells, B.C.;  Dr. W. B. Burnett, President;  J. R. V. Dunlop, Secretary-
Quartz Mining    Treasurer;  R. R. Rose, Managing Director and Mine Manager;  R. E.
Co., Ltd.        Vear, Mine Superintendent.   Capital:  2,000,000 shares, $1 par;  issued,
1,333,309.    The property is on Cow Mountain, south-east from Jack of
Clubs Lake, 63 miles by road from Quesnel.
Development-work amounted to 7,987 feet of drifting, 6,818 feet of crosscutting,
1,814 feet of raising, 64 feet of shaft sinking, and 19,748 feet of diamond-drilling. Ore
mined and milled amounted to 111,826 dry tons. The 1,500 main level was advanced
942 feet towards the B.C. vein and the face was reportedly close to this objective at the
end of the year. On the surface this vein had been stripped by bulldozer over a length
of 1,700 feet, and the old B.C. shaft had been dewatered for the purpose of gaining
information regarding the vein at shallow depth. The 2,000 level drive was advanced
3,005 feet, bearing north 17 degrees west, towards the company's holdings on Island
Mountain. As this drive will pass under Willow River about 800 feet from the outlet
of Jack of Clubs Lake and 440 feet below the surface, precautionary drill-holes are kept
ahead of the drive. In the Butts zone, development and ventilation raises are being
driven from the 1,500 main level to the 1,300 and 1,400 levels, and eventually will be
completed through to the 1,100 level. In November, sinking operations were resumed
in No. 3 shaft and at the end of the year the 1,800 level pocket was being cut. It is
intended to sink this shaft to the 1,900 level.
The mill capacity was increased to 350 tons by additions to the thickening, clarifying, and filtering equipment. Additions to the power plant consisted of a 180-horse-
power Diesel connected to a 125-watt, 480-volt alternating-current generator; and of a
vertical two-stage compressor of 500 cubic feet capacity, driven by a 100-horse-power
synchronous motor. Other additions to the surface plant consist of a new lamp-house
and an extension to the dry- The average number of men employed was 361.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Company office,  744  Hastings  Street West,  Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine
Island Mountain   office, Wells, B.C.;   F. W. Guernsey, President;   Fred Searls, Jr., and
Mines Co., Ltd.   H. DeWitt Smith, Vice-Presidents;  H. E. Dodge, Secretary-Treasurer;
T. H. Munn, General Superintendent;   H. W. Seamon, Mine Superintendent.    Capital:   1,100,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued,  1,050,716 shares.    The
property is on Island Mountain, on the north-west side of Jack of Clubs Lake, at Wells,
about 4 miles west of Barkerville.
Development-work consisted of 10,593 feet of drifting and crosscutting; 1,478 feet
of raises, inclusive of shaft pockets; and 34,228 feet of diamond-drilling. Development-work was cari-ied out on all levels below the main 4,000 level, and on the 4,130 level
and 4,230 level above the main level. Ventilation raises were completed towards the
extremities of the workings on either side of the shaft between the 3,250 and 3,500
levels, thus completing the ventilation system from the surface to the 3,250 level. Shaft
pockets were cut at the 3,125- and 3,000-foot horizons and the corresponding levels were
opened up. Approximately 4,500 feet of 6-inch air-line was installed between the
power-house and the bottom of the shaft to replace the smaller lines previously used.
A 300-horse-power Diesel, directly connected to a 250-k.v.a. alternator, was installed in
the power-house. Extensions were made to the machine-shop and a new, well-equipped
carpenter-shop was built.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C] PROGRESS NOTES. A 57
Cow Mountain.
Cariboo Rainbow Mines, Incorporated.—This company did some development-work on the
old Cariboo Central ground, which lies between Stout's Gulch and Lowhee Creek. It is
reported that a system of small but closely-spaced quartz veins were revealed by this
work.
Proserpine Mountain.
Under this name the Privateer Mine, Limited, did considerable explora-
Privateer Mine,   tory work on the holdings of the Proserpine Gold Mines, Limited.    The
Ltd. old Warspite tunnel was extended to pass under the bottom of the
Warspite shaft.    Drifting and crosscutting combined amounted to 328
feet.    About 36,000 feet of stripping was done on the surface;  11,750 feet by hand and
the remainder by bulldozer.    Five trenches were made, going north-westerly about
parallel to the formation for the full length of the property, and two were made across
these at right angles.   Thirty men were employed under the direction of B. G. Campbell.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Cunningham Creek.
Cariboo Hudson Gold Mines, Ltd.—This property was not active, but under contract,
about 19,000 lineal feet of stripping and trenching was done on the Hudson and Shasta
claims.
Cariboo Rainbow Mines, Incorporated.—This company has taken an option on the Cariboo
Thompson ground and did about 600 feet of deep trenching. This was all to the northwest of the underground workings. The same company also did some surface-stripping
on their ground which adjoins the Cariboo Hudson to the south-east.
Simlock Creek.
Alladin Group.—Dean Cochrane, of Barkerville, is the owner of this group and did a
small amount of surface-stripping.
P.D. Group.—P. McDonnel, of Wells, is the owner of this group and employed two
men to do some surface-stripping.
Yanks Peak.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   Howard W.
Amparo Mining   White, President;   J. B. Knaebel, Managing Director;   W. S. Jordon,
Co., Ltd.        Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   10,000 shares, $1 par;   issued,  1,000
shares.    This company did not work on the Midas group, on Yanks
Peak, and towards the latter part of the year the machinery and equipment were
removed from the property.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Company office, 785 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  Fred M. Wells,
Snowshoe Gold    President and Manager;   E. T. Gook, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:
Mines, Ltd.      3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;    issued, 1,656,475.    On the Jane group
at the head of Little Snowshoe Creek, a sub-level was driven 365 feet.
After this development, operations ceased for the year.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1929.]
CHILCOTIN AREA.
Perkins Peak.
Mountain Boss Group.—It is reported that J. Killas, owner of this group, employed
several men to do additional drifting and to mine high-grade ore from some of the old
workings.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Denain Creek.
Claims of J. Mossi.—These claims are located on Denain Creek, tributary of Taseko
River.    A 25-foot tunnel was driven and, in addition, some open-cut work was done. A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Cadwallader Creek.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Pioneer Gold Mines Pioneer Mines P.O., B.C.;   Victor Spencer, President;   A. E. Bull,
of B.C., Ltd.       Secretary-Treasurer; H. T.James, Managing Director; E.F.Emmons,
General Superintendent.    Capital:   2,500,000 shares, $1 par;   issued,
1,751,750.   This company owns the Pioneer mine on Cadwallader Creek, a tributary of
Bridge River, 52 miles by road from Bridge River Station on the P.G.E. Railway.    The
mine is serviced by three shafts:   No. 2 shaft extends from the surface to the 2,600
level, No. 3 from the surface to the 1,400 level, and No. 4 from the 2,400 level to the
2,900 level.
Operations were resumed on March 8th after a five-month period of inactivity
which resulted from the strike called on October 7th, 1939. It was not possible to bring
the mine crew up to normal strength until July, because of necessary repair-work.
Readily available reserves, however, made it possible to put the mill on a normal production basis almost at once after the strike ended, and a total of 77,585 tons was treated
during the ten months of operation. Development-work was largely confined to the
2,700 and 2,800 levels, where drifts are being advanced westerly on the main vein.
Work is also being rushed on a system of raises from the lower levels in order to
improve ventilation on these levels. Total development-work amounted to 1,423 feet of
drifting and 1,439 feet of raising.
Production amounted to 88,942 tons mined and 77,585 tons milled, yielding 43,000
oz. of gold and 7,300 oz. of silver.    A crew averaging 190 men was employed.
Company office, 1403 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine
Holland Gold     office, Pioneer, B.C.;  Dr. G. H. Worthington, President;  F.W.Holland,
Mines, Ltd.      Manager.    Capital:   1,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 422,457.
The property of this company is located above the Pioneer mine, on the
lower slopes of Mount Fergusson.    At the beginning of the year a diamond-drill hole
was collared at the face of the exploratory adit, then 1,050 feet from the portal.    This
hole was drilled flat for 427 feet, bearing north 31 degrees east, and was terminated in
badly-crushed ground.    The drift was advanced 230 feet along the line of this hole when
operations were suspended on June 1st.     Since then no further work has been done.
Company  office,   555   Burrard   Street,   Vancouver,   B.C.;   mine   office,
Bralorne Mines,   Bralorne, B.C.;   Austin C. Taylor, President;   R. H. Grace, Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;    D.   N.   Matheson,   Manager;    E.   J.   Chenowith,   General
Superintendent;   G. H. Wilson, Mine Superintendent;   C. M. Manning,
Assistant  Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    1,250,000  shares,  no  par value;    issued,
1,247,000.
Development-work done totalled 17,623 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 1,031 feet
of raising, 958 feet of shaft sinking, 1,242 feet of shaft transfer raises, and 25,058 feet
of diamond-drilling. This development-work and underground work generally was
largely confined to the Crown and Empire sections of the mine. Considerable development-work was done on the 2,000 level of the Crown mine, where the drive was timed to
connect with a similar drive from the Empire side before the new Empire hoist was
ready for operation. Concurrently with the main 2,000 level advance, drifts were
advanced along the " 51," " 73," and " 75 " veins at this horizon. The shaft pocket was
also cut at the 1,800 level horizon. On the Empire side the shaft was completed to the
2,000 level, this pocket cut, and the connecting drive to the Crown started by the end of
the year. Some work was also done in the King and Blackbird mines, but the former
was closed before the end of the year. The Coronation mine has not been active for
five years.
A new camp was established below the 300-level portal of the Empire mine. A new
and much larger entrance has been made to the Empire shaft slightly below the old 300
portal; and a new station, 26 feet high, has been cut. The majority of the mine
supplies will henceforth be taken into the mine through this portal, thus eliminating
the long underground haul to the Crown and Empire shafts on the 800 level. The
increased depth of the Empire shaft made it necessary to install a much larger hoist. PROGRESS NOTES. A 59
The hoist installed is an Ingersoll-Rand, drum size, 60 by 72 inches, powered by a
350-horse-power slip-ring induction motor. It is completely equipped with safety
devices and is housed in a new, well-protected, and spacious hoist-room. Aluminium
two-deck man skips have also been installed. Preparations have been made for the
installation of two large surface fans to exhaust from the Crown and Empire mines.
The only other additions to the surface plant are a dry, bunk-house, and mess-house at
the Bradian camp.
To simplify the problem of supervision the mine has been divided into four sections
and a foreman appointed to take charge of each section. The average number of men
employed was approximately 400.
During the summer of 1940 a geological survey was made both on the
B.R.X. (1935)    surface and underground.    About 10,000 cubic feet of stripping was
Consolidated     done on the Gloria and Top and Mexico vein systems.    Underground,
Mines, Ltd.      No. 2 shaft was dewatered to the 250-foot level and an examination of
the vein made at this point.    The old California workings, although
badly caved in places, were opened for inspection.    Considerable retimbering was done
on the main drift.    The hoist and hoisting equipment were removed from No. 2 shaft to
the north end of the workings.
Golden Ledge Syndicate.—Company office, 503 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.; J. S.
Harrison, President. Capital: 5,000 shares, $50 par. This company maintained a
watchman at its property but did no mining. At the end of the year, however, preparations were being made to sink a shaft from the bottom level.
Bonanza Basin.
This group is owned by the J. G. Mining Company, of which J. G.
Robson Group.    Robson and J. A. Anderson are the principals.    It is reached by 25
miles of automobile-road from Minto to the junction of Relay Creek
with Tyaughton Creek;   thence by 10 miles of horse-trail to its location on Bonanza
Creek, another tributary of Tyaughton Creek.    It is located at an elevation of about
6,000 feet.
The Bralorne Mines, Limited, held an examining option for six weeks during 1940.
In this time they repaired an old adit 70 feet long and extended it 130 feet; faced a
second adit, which was later advanced 40 feet by Anderson; did considerable open-cut
work and completed 700 feet of diamond-drilling. They also completed the trail to the
property, prospected the surface thoroughly, surveyed the original claims, and staked
others.
Tommy Creek.
Company office, 425 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. Spence, Secre-
Bristol Mines,    tary;   A. E. Stromberg, Managing Director.    Capital:   50,000 shares,
Ltd. no par value.    The property is on Tommy Creek, about 4 miles south
of the highway, at a point 12 miles east of Minto.    Underground work
during the year consisted of 100 feet of drifting, 45 feet of crosscutting, and 20 feet
of winzing.    It was decided that the results of this work merited the installation of
equipment, so work was commenced on a road over which the equipment could be hauled.
A bridge was built across Bridge River, and the initial rock-work completed on the
north side of Tommy Creek along the proposed route.
Tyaughton Creek.
Lucky Strike Gold Mines, Ltd.—A small amount of underground work was done at this
property before operations were suspended and the equipment removed.
Eldorado Basin.
This property is located in Eldorado Basin, at the headwaters of
Eldorado Property. Eldorado Creek, northern tributary to Gun Creek.    Gun Creek is a
tributary of Bridge River. Eldorado Basin is at an elevation of 6,000
feet. The owner, Grant White, has optioned the property to the Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited.    During the summer months the Britannia Company con- A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
ducted exploration work with a crew of twelve men under the supervision of E. C. Roper.
In addition to extensive surface cuts, over 300 feet of tunnelling and considerable
diamond-drilling were completed.
Lower Bridge River.
Company office, 102-6 Pacific Building, 744 Hastings Street West, Van-
Minto Gold Mines, couver, B.C.; J. Miller, Secretary. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, no par
Ltd. (N.P.L.). value. Messrs. N. Evans and W. Davidson obtained a lease on this
company's mine. In the months of April, May, and June they carried
out mining and milling operations with a crew of men ranging up to fifty in number.
The ore treated was from pillars and from broken material in a few of the upper stopes.
Some of this broken material had caved from the hanging-wall side of the stopes. It is
reported that about 4,000 tons of ore was treated. The shaft was also dewatered to the
600 level, and it was the intention to drive to the vein on the 500 level, but the project
was abandoned before this plan could be carried out.
Messrs. P. Schultz, of Pioneer, and E. Laurentzen, of Minto, obtained
Congress Mines,   an option on part of the holdings of this company lying to the north
Ltd. of the old underground workings.   They employed a small crew of men
and did considerable open-cut work on several showings which were
discovered during the life of the option.    They now have made other arrangements with
the company.
LILLOOET AREA.
Grange Consolidated Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 1351 Broadway West, Vancouver,
B.C.; mine office, Kelly Lake, B.C. The only work done at the property of this company
consisted of underground maintenance-work.
Watson Bar Creek.
These claims are located at the head of the North Fork of Watson Bar
Claims of        Creek, and lie about 10 miles west of the Big Bar ferry crossing on the
W. Trimble.      Fraser River,  about 40 miles north of Lillooet.    Trimble has been
searching for the source of high-grade float since 1914 and has done
considerable tunnelling and other prospect work on the claims, carrying on as usual
during the past year.
ASHCROFT-KAMLOOPS AREA.
Company office,  404  Pacific  Building,  Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine office,
Vidette Gold      Savona, B.C.;   C. E. Smythe, President;   G.  F. H. Long,  Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.       Treasurer;   R. Avison, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, no
par value;  issued, 1,104,568.    The company operates the Vidette mine,
33 miles by road north of the highway.    The mine road leaves the highway at a point
5 miles west of Savona.    The drive, started last year to cross under Vidette Lake to the
Dexheimer zone, was completed under the supervision of R. Avison, and a small amount
of drifting and raising was done on the zone.    As further funds were not available and
arrangements could not be made for further financing, this work had to be discontinued.
The mine was finally abandoned and the plant and equipment put up for sale.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part F.]
Hamilton Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.—It is understood that A. Galloway, of Kamloops, one
of the principals of this company, had a small amount of surface trenching done on the
company's property near Vidette Lake.
This was formerly known as the Telluric mine and is located about 15
Curtis Mine.     miles east of Vidette Lake.    D. B. Sterrett, of Kamloops, reported his
intention to employ about three men to explore for and to mine high-
grade ore from this property.
Douglas B. Sterrett, Superintendent.    This property is located close
Iron Cap Mine,    to the Kamloops-Ashcroft Highway, 5 miles west of Kamloops.    An
inclined shaft has been sunk for 75 feet on a vein which contains gold-
copper mineralization.    A gas-engine provides power for hoisting.    Operations ceased
in August. PROGRESS NOTES. A 61
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Hedley.
Company office, Room 2402, 19 Rector Street, New York, N.Y.;   mine
Kelowna Explora- office, Hedley, B.C.;   W. Adams Kissam, Chairman;   Sewell T. Tyng,
tion Co., Ltd.     President;   John W. Mercer,  Treasurer;   0.  P.  Ebeling,  Secretary;
W. C. Douglass, Mine Manager.    This is a private company, operating
the Nickel Plate mine at Hedley.    The  underground haulage,  storage,  and loading
facilities at the top of the main haulage winze were considerably improved during the
year.    Development consisted of 4,602 feet of crosscutting and drifting, 60 feet of
winzing, and 380 feet of raising.    A total of 82,660 tons of ore was milled, yielding
5,591 tons of concentrates.    A crew of 179 men was employed at the mine.
Company office, 1132 Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Hedley Mascot    Hedley, B.C.;  Wendell B. Farris, President;  V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
Gold Mines, Ltd.  W. S. Charlton, Treasurer; C. W. S. Tremaine, General Superintendent.
Capital:   3,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,264,130.    The property of
this company is located 1 mile north of Hedley.    A raise has been driven to connect the
4,300 level with the 4,800 level.    From the raise exploratory development-work has been
done at intermediate levels.    Ore from the 4,300 level is raised by surface aerial tram
from the portal of this level to one portal of the 4,800 level.    On the 4,800 level the ore
is transported to the main portal.    At this main portal is located the top terminal of the
main surface aerial tramway to the mill.
During the past year a cyanide plant has been installed to operate in conjunction
with the flotation-mill. Several buildings have been constructed for use as offices,
shops, and storage-room.
Development during the year consisted of 423 feet of crosscutting, 1,330 feet of
drifting, 1,788 feet of raising, and 17,070 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 6,115
tons of concentrates yielded 22,819 oz. of gold and 2,829 oz. of silver. An average crew
of 133 men was employed.
Company office, 1132 Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Canty Gold Mines Hedley, B.C.;  Wendell B. Farris, President;  V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
(Hedley), Ltd.    W. S. Charlton, Treasurer; R. H. Stewart, Managing Director; Charles
Bishop,   Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000   shares,   $1   par;
issued, 2,172,788.    The property of this company is about 2 miles east of the Nickel
Plate mine.    During the past season the mine was dewatered.    Work of exploratory
nature was confined largely to the No. 1 drift level.
Ore from the Canty was treated in the Mascot mill. To permit haulage by truck
it was necessary to improve the road from the Canty to a point above the Mascot mine.
From this point the ore was transferred by a short aerial tram to the top terminal of
the Mascot tramway.
TULAMEEN.
Lloyd Kissick, Superintendent. This company operates the property
Grasshopper Mine, known generally as the " Rabbitt Group," located 8 miles from the town
of Tulameen, on the west bank of the Tulameen River. The property
is accessible by good road from Tulameen. The property was located by the Rabbitt
Bros, in 1938. Several truck-loads of selected ore were mined from the surface and
shipped during that year. The property was optioned and mining machinery was
installed. During 1939 and 1940 two adits were driven on the vein for distances of 110
and 336 feet respectively. A stope was carried from the upper, No. 1, level to the surface. A raise was driven from No. 2 level. Operations were suspended in November,
1940.
Development consisted of 110 feet of crosscutting, 1,150 feet of drifting, and 350
feet of raising. A total of 1,361 tons of ore was mined, yielding 924 oz. of gold and
514 oz. of silver.
An average crew of eight men was employed. A 62 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
STUMP LAKE AREA.
Company office, 506 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Consolidated Nicola Box 759, Kamloops, B.C.;   Mathew Sutton, President;   C. J. White,
Goldfields, Ltd.     Secretary-Treasurer;   R. A. Petter, Mine Superintendent.    Capital:
6,500,000 shares, $1 par.    This company operates the Nicola mine,
located 2 miles west of the Kamloops-Nicola Highway, about 30 miles north from
Merritt.
During the past year exploratory development was confined largely to the Enterprise and King William veins on the 550, 675, 800, and 900 levels. A new crushing plant
was installed in the mill. Changes were made in the power plant and to the flotation
equipment. With these additions and changes completed, the mill was put into operation in May and has been in production intermittently since that date.
Development included 230 feet of crosscutting, 345 feet of drifting, and 40 feet of
winzing.
A total of 4,759 tons of ore produced 476 tons of concentrates, which yielded 437 oz.
of gold, 20,750 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part D.]
CAMP McKINNEY AREA.
This property was operated under lease by George Boag, of Greenwood,
Cariboo Amelia.   B.C., and associates.    Hand-steel was used during the early part of the
year  but  later  a  small  gasoline-powered  compressor  was  installed.
Operations were confined to recovering pillars and the remnants of old stopes near the
surface.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 6, 1940.]
This property adjoins the Cariboo Amelia. It is under option to the
Wiarton. Highland Bell, Limited, who are carrying on development-work. A
power plant consisting of a 60-horse-power McCormick Diesel engine
belt-connected to a 265-cubic-foot Gardner-Denver single-stage compressor was installed
for this work, while the shaft was served by a small Holman air-hoist. Development-
work included 60 feet of sinking, 100 feet of drifting, and 120 feet of crosscutting. A
crew of five men was employed.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 6, 1940.]
KETTLE RIVER AREA.
This claim, on the North Fork of the Kettle River, about 24 miles north
Maybe. of Westbridge, is owned by L. Clery and S. Berglund, of Westbridge
and Rossland respectively.    Early in the year it was optioned by the
Canadian Exploration, Limited, who employed a crew of three men to do a small amount
of development-work with hand-steel.    At the same time S. Berglund, on a lease from
the optionees, mined and shipped to Trail 143 tons of ore which yielded 83 oz. of gold
and 157 oz. of silver.    A small gasoline-driven portable compressor was used for this
work.    Development-work consisted of 80 feet of drifting.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part D.]
This property is situated on Horseshoe Mountain, about 24 miles from
Mogul. Westbridge.    Leasers using hand-steel shipped 10 tons of ore to Trail
which yielded 10 oz. of gold and 3 oz. of silver.    Development-work
consisted of 30 feet of drifting.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part D.]
BEAVERDELL AREA.
This property is situated at Carmi, B.C.    It is under option to John D.
Butcher Boy.     and James Kerr and H. S. Nordman, of Beaverdell.    A small gasoline-
driven hoist is the only mechanical equipment at the mine.    Three
men were employed underground. PROGRESS NOTES. A 63
This property adjoins the Butcher Boy. The underground workings
Carmi. of the two properties are connected.    During the year it was optioned
by the Highland Bell, Limited, who, in addition to dewatering the mine
for sampling and examination, mined and shipped ore from the upper level. A total of
eight men, four underground, were engaged in this operation. The Highland Bell
option was dropped during the summer and the property operated under lease by J. Kerr
and three associates, using hand-steel to mine. A total of 603 tons was shipped from
this property, yielding 222 oz. of gold and 910 oz. of silver.
Rosemont.—This property, situated 9 miles from Beaverdell, is under option to the
Highland Bell, Limited. Development-work included 30 feet of drifting and 100 feet
of crosscutting.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
Jewel Lake.
Company office,  850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   G. T.
Dentonia Mines,  Vaux, Vice-President.    Capital: 2,500,000 shares, no par value; issued,
Ltd. 1,645,000.    The company owns the Dentonia mine near Jewel Lake.
The property is operated under lease by John Halstrom, Eric Schoberg,
and Robert Lee, of Greenwood.    A crew of five men, four of whom worked underground,
was employed throughout the year.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 13, 1941.]
Amandy.—This property, situated on Roderick Dhu Mountain above Jewel Lake, is
owned by E. C. Henniger, of Grand Forks, and operated under lease by Martin Holm
and associates, of Grand Forks.
Ethiopia.—This property adjoins the Dentonia. It was operated under lease for a
short time by P. Russell, Joe Price, and J. Walker, of Greenwood.
Lakeside.—This property is situated about half a mile north of the Dentonia. It is
owned by Mrs. Duhamel, of Greenwood, and is optioned under lease by Nick Ogloff and
four partners, of Grand Forks, B.C.
Franklin Camp.
This property is situated in the Franklin Camp, about 48 miles north
Homestake.      of Grand Forks.    It is owned by W. E. McArthur and associates, of
Greenwood, and is operated under lease and bond by Herman Brunner
and partner. This year 2% miles of road was constructed to connect the property with
the main road from Grand Forks to the Union mine.
This property, situated 46 miles from Grand Forks, in the Franklin
Union. Camp, is owned by the J. F. McCarthy estate, of Wallace, Idaho, and is
operated under lease and bond by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C.
Development-work done during the year included 30 feet of drifting, 75 feet of raising
and surface trenching. A crew of six was employed throughout the year. A total of
4,144 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded 1,082 oz. of gold and 38,031 oz. of silver.
Boundary Falls.
This property is owned by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
No. 7. Company of Canada, Limited, and is operated under lease by W. E.
McArthur, of Greenwood. A crew of three men was employed and a
portable compressor used for underground work. Development-work included 130 feet
of drifting and 200 feet of raising. A total of 723 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded
185 oz. of gold and 8,855 oz. of silver.
PAULSON AREA.
Albion No. 2.—This property, situated about 8 miles from Paulson, is owned and
operated by Joe Kloman.    Four men were mining with hand-steel.
Berlin and Inland Empire.—This property, adjoining the Albion No. 2, is being operated
under lease by S. Sinnerud and four partners, of Paulson, B.C. A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
LARDEAU AREA.
Trout Lake.
Company office, 302 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   A. C.
Winslow Con-    Speirs, Manager.    This property is situated on Winslow Creek, about
solidated, Ltd.    7 miles by tractor-road from Trout Lake, and is held under option by
(N.P.L.).        the Winslow Consolidated,  Limited.    W. J.  Scorgie is in charge of
operations  at the  mine.    Milling  operations,   suspended   during  the
winter of 1939, were resumed in July and continued until about the middle of October.
A crew of fourteen men was employed.
Okanagan.—This property adjoins the Winslow and is included in that group of
claims.    It was leased to William Butler and partner of Beaton.
This property is situated at the head of Triune Creek, about half a mile
Triune. north-east of the Okanagan.    It was optioned from the Triune Mining
Company, 301 Standard Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C., by A. H.Upton,
D. H. Lougheed, and associates.    The 5 miles of old road from Ten Mile on Ferguson
Creek up Triune Creek to the property were cleaned out and repaired.    A new bridge
was built across Ferguson Creek.    A crew of six men was employed.
Copper Queen.—This property is situated about l1/. miles west of the Winslow. A
small amount of surface work was done by the owner, A. D. Oakey, of Beaton.
GERRARD AREA.
Silver Crest.—This property, formerly known as Mobbs mine, is situated on Poplar
Creek. During the season it was under option to a Revelstoke syndicate. Two men,
using hand-steel, did a small amount of development-work.
SLOCAN AREA.
Retallack.
Company office,  535 Georgia Street, Vancouver,  B.C.;   A. J.  Noble,
Highland Surprise Secretary.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The company's
Gold Mines, Ltd.  property is situated on Lyle Creek, 31/. miles from Retallack.    A crew
of thirty-five men was employed under the direction of V. J. Southey.
John Vallance was in charge of milling.    An extensive programme was undertaken
during the summer months.    Surface construction included the building of 1,700 feet
of 2-bueket jig-back aerial tram to connect the No. 4 level with the truck-road.    A new
power-house was constructed near the upper tram terminal.    Additional mechanical
equipment installed included a two-stage Diesel-driven Sullivan compressor of 400 cubic
feet capacity.    Underground development for the year consisted of 974 feet of drifting
and crosscutting, 185 feet of raising, 9 feet of sinking, and 1,000 feet of diamond-
drilling.    The Whitewater mill and hydro-electric power plant were leased by the Highland Surprise Company and the mill was operated, mostly on a one-shift basis, from
August 26th to November 4th.    During the operation, about 2,800 tons of ore was
mined and milled.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 7, 1940.]
Lemon Creek.
This property, situated on Chapleau Creek and owned by the Milton
Chapleau.       Gold Mining Company, of Penticton, was operated under lease and bond
by W. K. Cross and associates.    C. A. Ritchie was in charge of mining.
A crew of seven men was employed during the summer months.
Crusader.—This property, situated on Crusader Creek, was operated under option
during the early part of the year by C. A. Ritchie.
This  property,  situated  at the  head  of  Gold  Creek,   is  owned and
Howard Fraction, operated by F. T. Harbour, of Slocan City.    During the summer, work
was confined chiefly to reopening a low-level adit 1,600 feet long which
had been caved for many years.    A crew of three men was employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part E.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 65
Ainsworth.
Company office, 404 Title and Trust Building, Portland, Oregon;  Brit-
Scranton Consoli- ish Columbia office, Ainsworth, B.C.;   Ben W. Scott, President;   S. O.
dated Mining Co. Griffith,   Secretary.    Capital:    650,000   shares,   no   par   value.    The
Scranton property, situated at the head of Woodbury Creek, about 11
miles by pack-trail from the Nelson-Kaslo Highway, is owned by the above company.
R. B. Mahan is in charge of operations.    A crew of eight men was employed throughout
the year.    Development-work consisted of 800 feet of drifting, 260 feet of crosscutting,
and extensive surface-trenching.
Silverton and Slocan City.
Senator (formerly Batchelor).—This property, situated on Memphis Creek, about 5 miles
from Slocan City, is owned by E. Graham and associates, of Slocan City, and operated
under lease by Ed Bergstrom and R. H. Kline. Three men were engaged in hand-steel
operation which yielded 3.5 tons of ore.
Exchange.—This property, situated on Dayton Creek, was operated under lease by
F. T. Harbour.    Six tons of ore was shipped.
Bell No. 2.—This property is situated on the Republic road, 5 miles from Slocan
City. It was operated by E. B. Peterson and partner, of Ymir, B.C., who mined 5 tons
of ore with hand-steel.
NELSON AREA.
This property,  situated near Hall  Siding,  about  10 miles  south  of
Euphrates.       Nelson,  is now operated  by the  Gold  Silver  Tungsten  Mining and
Milling Company of Seattle, Washington. Operations at the mine are
under the direction of Sarkis Terzian, Nelson, B.C. A 100-ton flotation-mill, originally
at the Ottawa mine near Slocan City, has been acquired by the above company and
installed at the Euphrates mine. In addition to this, the tram-line from the mine to the
railroad was rebuilt to connect with the head of the mill. At the upper terminal a 200-
ton ore-bin was constructed. A crew of from nine to twenty-two men was engaged in
this work during the latter half of the year. Practically no work has been done
underground.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
Toad Mountain.
Athabasca.—This property, situated on Morning Mountain, is owned by the Noble
Five Mines, Limited, and operated under lease by L. Gormley and associates. A small
compressor plant has been installed.    Some of the ore has a high cadmium content.
This property, owned by Mrs. Mary Wilson, of Nelson, was operated
California.       under option by F. F. Tait, of Alameda, California.    A small Diesel-
driven compressor was installed and a small amount of development-
work done.    A crew of three to four men was employed.    Eight tons of ore was mined,
yielding 10 oz. gold and 14 oz. silver.
Gold Leaf.—This property is situated about 5 miles south of Nelson. A small
amount of development-work was done with hand-steel by the owner, Herbert Wood,
of Nelson.
These properties, on Morning Mountain, just north of Toad Mountain,
Venus-Juno.     are owned by the R. Heddle estate and operated under lease by several
small groups and individuals;  namely, L. Gormley, Bruno Sterna, John
Sandal, and Ed Myers.    Hand-steel was used.    A total of 183 tons of ore shipped to
Trail yielded 191 oz. of gold and 450 oz. of silver.
Victoria-Jessie.—This property, situated on Toad Mountain, was operated by Ed
Mathews and R. Sherradan.    Hand-steel was used for mining.
Hall Creek.
Bear.—This property, situated on Hall Creek adjoining the Fern mine, was operated
by two leasers, J. Bergquist and Arthur Carlson. Thirty-two tons of ore mined by
hand-steel yielded 51 oz. of gold and 12 oz. of silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.] A 66 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
This is an old property with extensive underground workings.    It is
Fern. owned by C. E. and L. R. Hawley, of Spokane, Washington.    Operation
during the year was by two separate groups of leasers.    Hand-steel
was used.    A total of 108 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded 6'6 oz. of gold and 53 oz.
of silver.
The Canadian Belle property is owned and operated by the Canadian
Canadian Belle   Belle Mining Company, 328 Peyton Building, Spokane, Washington.
Mining Co.       Mining was carried on throughout the summer, hand-steel being used
for underground work.    Development included 12 feet of drifting, 9
feet of crosscutting, and 400 feet of surface-trenching.    In addition, about 1 mile of
truck-road and 800 feet of trail were built to make parts of the property more easily
accessible.    A total of 14 tons of ore mined yielded 17 oz. of gold.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
Company office, 521 Central Building, Seattle, Washington; H. R.
Livingstone Mining Smith, President and Manager; R. W. Hutchison, Secretary. This
Co., Incorporated, company owns and operates the Granite-Poorman mine on Eagle
Creek, near Blewett, B.C. Fourteen men were employed throughout
the year. In addition, several groups of leasers worked on various parts of the property. Company development included 575 feet of drifting, 120 feet of raising, and
considerable surface-trenching. This latter disclosed a new vein to the east of the
Poorman vein and on the east bank of Eagle Creek. This vein was stripped for some
500 feet and found to be parallel in dip and strike to the other veins on the property.
Some of the ore from the company operations was treated in the customs mill at Granite
Siding and the concentrates shipped to Trail. The remainder of the ore mined by the
company, and all that mined by the leasers, was shipped direct to the Trail smelter.
A total of 780 tons of ore yielded 482 oz. of gold and 553 oz. of silver.
Company office,  Nelson, B.C.;   D. H. Norcross, President and Mine
Venango Gold    Manager;   J. A. Cullinane, Secretary-Treasurer.    The company owns
Mines, Ltd.      and operates the Venango mine, on the west side of Eagle Creek, adjoining the Granite-Poorman.    A total crew of six men, all of whom
worked underground, was employed throughout the year.    Development-work included
850 feet of drifting, 115 feet of crosscutting, 100 feet of raising, and 1,750 feet of
diamond-drilling.    Ore totalling 127 tons was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded
48 oz. of gold and 61 oz. of silver.    This ore contains some tungsten but no recovery of
this has been made to date.
Forty-nine Creek.
May and Jenny.—This property, situated on Forty-nine Creek, was operated for a
short time under lease by C. H. Erickson and A. Olsen, of Nelson, B.C. A small amount
of work was directed toward reopening the old tunnels.
Sitkum Creek.
Company office, 415 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.; James B. Curtis, Presi-
Alpine Gold, Ltd. dent;   Barbara O'Neil, Secretary.    Capital:   500,000 shares, 50 cents
(N.P.L.).        par.    The Alpine property, situated at the head of Sitkum Creek, about
9 miles from the Nelson-Kaslo Highway, is owned and operated by the
Alpine Gold, Limited (N.P.L.).    The work was conducted under the management of
L. D. Clark.    The crew varied from twelve to thirty-five men.    Development consisted
of 600 feet of drifting, 175 feet of crosscutting, and 596 feet of raising.    This work was
completed early in November, at which time the mill was started and run continuously
for the remainder of the year.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Ymir.
This property, situated on Ymir Creek just above its junction with
Blackcock.       Huckleberry Creek, is owned and operated by Frank W. Henderson, of
Calgary, Alberta.    Operations at the mine are under the direction of
R. H. Weaver.    Eight men were employed during most of the year.    A small mining PROGRESS NOTES. A 67
plant was installed, which consisted of an 80-horse-power Widdop Diesel engine belt-
connected to a single stage 12- by 12-inch Jenks compressor.
This property, situated about three-quarters of a mile above the Black-
Ymir Wilcox,     cock on Ymir Creek, is operated under lease by Aitken Wolfe and
associates, of Ymir, B.C. A crew of eight men, all partners in the
lease, was employed in hand-steel operation. In addition to the ore mined from underground, selected portions of an old tailings dump were found to be of sufficiently good
grade to warrant shipping.
This property, situated on Ymir Creek at the junction of Huckleberry
Colorado.        Creek, is operated by a local syndicate composed of J. D. Ferguson,
W. Griffiths, A. Holstrom, and S. Curwen, of Ymir, B.C., with J. D.
Ferguson as mine manager. The mine was operated intermittently during the year,
three men being employed.    Development-work was limited to 100 feet of raising.
The Ymir Commodore property, situated on Ymir Creek, is operated
Ymir Commodore by the Ymir Commodore Mines Company, of Spokane, Washington,
Mines Co.       with J. D.  Ferguson in charge.    Development-work, carried out by
machinery by a crew of four men, consisted of 500 feet of drifting
and 150 feet of raising.
Company office, 704 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Ymir Consolidated Ymir, B.C.; R. C. McCorkell, President; T. G. Cowan, Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd. Treasurer; G. G. Sullivan, Mine Manager. Capital: 1,500,000 preferred shares, no par value; 2,500,000 common shares, no par value.
Issued, 2,159,453 common shares. The company owns and operates the Goodenough
mine on Elise Mountain. A development programme was carried on by the company
under the direction of G. G. Sullivan until April. The property, including all the
mechanical equipment except the mill, was then leased to R. Cooper, A. and M. Burgess,
and associates. A crew of six to eight men was employed by the leasers. Late in the
year the mill was taken over by the leasers and operated on a one-shift basis.
The Ymir mine adjoins the Goodenough and is owned by the same company. It
was operated by two separate groups of leasers working in different parts of the mine.
The lower levels were leased by Harold Watson and associates and the upper by Leo
Madden and partners, a total crew of eight men being engaged.
Company office, 525 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Ymir-Yankee Girl Ymir, B.C.; E. P. Crawford, President; R. B. Lamb, Managing Direc-
Gold Mines, Ltd. tor;  W. A. Sutton, Secretary-Treasurer;  L. G. Morrell, Mine Manager.
Capital: 3,000,000 shares, no par value; issued, 2,225,005. The company owns and operates the Yankee Girl mine on Oscar Creek, 3 miles from Ymir. The
mine and mill were operated continuously throughout the year. During the early part
of the year an option was taken on the adjoining Dundee property and a crosscut was
driven from the 1,235 level to develop this vein. Stoping on this vein and mining of
pillars and remnants of ore in the original Yankee Girl mine has provided the supply for
the mill. An average crew of seventy-eight men was employed. Fifty of these were
employed in underground work. Development consisted of 397 feet of drifting, 64 feet
of crosscutting, and 889 feet of raising in the Yankee Girl workings; and 973 feet of
drifting, 1,118 feet of crosscutting, 508 feet of raising, and 91 feet of sinking in the
Dundee. Of the 53,527 tons of ore milled, 36,540 came from the Yankee Girl workings
and the remainder from the Dundee. The production from this ore was 10,205 oz. of
gold and 55,292 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
This property, situated near Ymir, was leased during the last three
Wesko. months of the year by Oscar Anderson and E. P. Haukendahl, of Ymir,
B.C. Hand-steel operations were confined to a vein on the No. 3 level.
A crew of four men was employed.
Salmo.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;
Clubine Comstock Charles F. Hunter, Secretary. Capital: 2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.
Gold Mines, Ltd.  This company owns and operates the Clubine-Comstock mine on Boulder
Creek, about 4 miles north of Salmo.    Mining was carried on for the A 68 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
first eight months of the year. Of the seven-man crew, four were employed underground. A low level crosscut was completed and some drifting done on the vein. Total
development included 75 feet of drifting, 269 feet of crosscutting, and 176 feet of
raising.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part E.]
Sheep Creek.
Company office, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office, Sheep
Kootenay Belle Creek, B.C.; Jonathan Rogers, President; J. A. Clarke, Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Treasurer;   Vere McDowall, Mine Manager.    Capital:   750,000 shares,
50 cents par; issued, 675,200. The property is on Sheep Creek, about
10 miles by road from Salmo. The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the
year, employing an average of 142 men, with 104 underground. The greatest part of
the ore recovered in the year's operation was from the area served by the main shaft
between the 6 and 10 levels. The remainder came from the older parts of the mine and
from the Dixie vein on the north side of Sheep Creek. The ground below the 10 level is
now being prospected by a winze. Total development included 4,663 feet of drifting,
1,764 feet of crosscutting, 40 feet of sinking, and 610 feet of diamond-drilling. A total
of 38,837 tons of ore was mined and treated, and this yielded 12,743 oz. of gold and
3,507 oz. of silver.
This property is situated between the Motherlode and Gold Belt mines.
Golden Belle.     It is being operated under option by the Kootenay Belle Gold Mines,
Limited. During the summer a complete small mining plant was
installed and camp accommodation provided for sixteen men. A crew of seventeen men,
with nine underground, was employed for the last four months of the year. Underground development consisted of 842 feet of drifting. A quarter of a mile of road was
reconditioned and rebuilt to connect the property with the old Gold Belt-Motherlode
Road.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine
Sheep Creek office, Sheep Creek, B.C.; R. W. Bruhn, President; James Anderson,
Gold Mines, Ltd. Secretary-Treasurer; H. E. Doelle, General Superintendent and Managing Director. Capital: 2.000,000 shares, 50 cents par; issued,
1,875,000. The company owns and operates the Queen mine on Waldie Creek, a tributary of Sheep Creek, and has options on adjoining properties. On the Queen and
adjoining properties an average crew of 102 men was employed throughout the year
with sixty-seven working underground. Development in the Queen included 4,119 feet
of drifting, 1,860 feet of crosscutting, 744 feet of raising, and 428 feet of diamond-
drilling. On the Ore Hill property, 279 feet of drifting, 1,326 feet of crosscutting, and
1,145 feet of diamond-drilling were done. The underground work on the Ore Hill
property is an extension of that in the main Queen mine. Development on the adjoining
Midnight property included 134 feet of raising and 191 feet of diamond-drilling.
Development on the Bonanza property, held under option from C. Donaldson, of Salmo,
included 813 feet of drifting, 372 feet of crosscutting, and 1,145 feet of diamond-drilling.
A total of 55,077 tons of ore yielded 26,229 oz. of gold and 8,337 oz. of silver.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Gold Belt Mining office, Sheep Creek, B.C.;   A. E. Jukes, President;   James Anderson,
Co., Ltd.        Secretary-Treasurer;  H. E. Doelle, Mine Manager.    Capital: 3,000,000
shares, 50 cents par; issued, 2,535,000. The property is situated on
Sheep Creek, between the Reno and Kootenay Belle holdings, about 14y2 miles from
Salmo. An average crew of 126 men, with ninety-two underground, was employed
throughout the year. Development-work included 4,736 feet of drifting, 1,799 feet of
crosscutting, and 933 feet of raising. A total of 62,366 tons of ore was mined and
treated and the bullion yielded 16,948 oz. of gold and 6,875 oz. of silver.
Company office,  525  Seymour  Street,  Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine office,
Reno Gold Mines, Salmo,   B.C.;    K.   G.   Nairn,   President;    W.   A.   Sutton,   Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;   W. S. Ellis, General Superintendent.    Capital:   2,000,000
shares, $1 par; issued, 1,880,000. The company owns the Reno,
Motherlode, Nugget, and Bluestone mines and the Coyote prospect, all of which form a PROGRESS NOTES. A 69
block of ground in the Sheep Creek camp which adjoins the Gold Belt and Motherlode on
the north. The Reno was inactive during the year. On the others an average crew of
sixty-eight men, with forty-nine underground, was employed throughout the year. The
property is equipped with two complete mining plants, at the Motherlode and Bluestone
respectively, and a 140-ton capacity cyanide mill. The mill was operated continuously
until November 15th when it was closed down for lack of ore, but development was continued on the Motherlode, Nugget, and Coyote. Development on the Motherlode-Nugget
consisted of 2,746 feet of drifting, 279 feet of crosscutting, 630 feet of raising, 276 feet
of sinking, and 74 feet of diamond-drilling. The greatest proportion of the ore milled
was recovered from the area in which this work was done. At the Bluestone development consisted of 596 feet of drifting, 132 feet of crosscutting, 41 feet of raising, 190
feet of sinking, and 1,360 feet of diamond-drilling. In addition some surface-trenching
was done on the Bluestone vein. At the Coyote workings development consisted of 179
feet of drifting, 922 feet of crosscutting, and 47 feet of diamond-drilling. Bullion from
a total of 35,978 tons of ore yielded 11,200 oz. of gold and 3,795 oz. of silver.
The Nugget mine was operated continuously throughout the year by two leasers
using hand-steel. Activities were confined to the older parts of the mine and to the
tailings dump of the old mill. A total of 1,191 tons of ore was recovered and shipped to
Trail.    This yielded 628 oz. of gold and 426 oz. of silver.
This property is situated on  Muskrat Creek,  a tributary of  Sheep
Eureka. Creek.    Intermittent hand-steel operation was conducted during the
year.    The property is equipped with a small water-power grinding
and amalgamation unit. _,       „
Erie Creek.
Company office, 626 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Relief-Arlington   Erie, B.C.;   Bert F. Smith, President and Managing Director;   D. G.
Mines, Ltd.      Marshall, Secretary-Treasurer; S. M. Manning, General Superintendent.
Capital: 3,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 3,000,000. The company is
controlled by Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, which holds 1,530,000 shares.
The company owns and operates the Second Relief mine, situated on Erie Creek, about
13 miles from Salmo. The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year,
employing an average of 134 men, with eighty-seven underground. The ore from the
mine is hand-sorted, about 40 per cent, being rejected before treatment in the mill.
Development-work included 2,125 feet of drifting, 529 feet of crosscutting, and 1,359
feet of raising in the main workings. Across Erie Creek, 462 feet of drifting, 24 feet
of crosscutting, and 70 feet of raising were done on the Rand vein. A total of 31,333
tons of ore was milled, and the bullion yielded 10,604 oz. of gold and 3,556 oz. of silver.
This property, situated on Keystone Mountain, 3 miles north of Erie, is
Arlington.       owned by the Relief-Arlington Mines, Limited, and operated under lease
by R. Oscarson, of Spokane, Washington. Twelve men were employed
throughout the year under the supervision of Albert J. Johnson. Hand-steel only was
used. Development included 218 feet of drifting, 49 feet of crosscutting, and 373 feet
of raising.    A total of 819 tons of ore yielded 1,150 oz. of gold and 2,461 oz. of silver.
This property, situated on Keystone Mountain, 3% miles north of Erie,
Keystone.       was operated under option by the Slocan Silver Mines, Limited, who did
500 feet of surface-trenching. Late in the year it was subleased to
Arthur F. Forsyth and associates who are mining underground with hand-steel. Four
men were engaged in this work.    No ore was shipped during 1940.
This property,  owned by E.  Ballinger,  of  Salmo,  and leased by  S.
Harriett. Curwen and associates, is situated on Craigtown Creek, about 3 miles
above the Second Relief road.    Seven men were employed, four of them
underground.    The property is equipped with a small mining plant.    Development-work
included 500 feet of drifting and 50 feet of crosscutting.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
Ross Spur.
Reliance Group.—This property, situated near Ross Spur, about 9 miles south of
Salmo, is under lease to G. H. Grimwood and associates. A small mining plant was
installed late in the year. a 70 report of the minister of mines, 1940.
Pend-d'Oreille River.
Bunker Hill.—This property is owned by the Waneta Gold Mines, Limited, and, for a
short time, was operated under lease by A. H. W. Crossley and associates. Hand-steel
only was used.
SOUTH KOOTENAY LAKE AREA.
Company office,  308 Pacific Building, Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine office,
Bayonne Consoli- Bayonne, B.C.;   W. C. Ditmars, President;   H. T. Wilson, Secretary-
dated Mines, Ltd. Treasurer;   John Broatch, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,500,000 shares,
no par value;   issued, 2,500,000.    The company owns and operates the
Bayonne mine, situated on Summit Creek, about 23 miles by road from Tye Siding.    An
average crew of seventy-four men was employed.    The development programme undertaken in 1939 blocked out sufficient ore to keep the mill in operation since April of this
year.    Exploratory work has exposed commercial ore on the lowest adit level, No. 8
level.    Development included 1,818 feet of drifting and 570 feet of crosscutting.    Ore
totalling 13,083 tons was milled, and the bullion yielded 6,720 oz. of gold and 13,925 oz.
of silver.    During the summer a bush fire destroyed the office, assay office, powder-
house, stable, and several dwellings and outbuildings.    These were replaced.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property, owned and operated by R. M. and K. K. Laib, is situated
Spokane.        on Wall Mountain, 18 miles from Tye Siding.   Five men were employed
during the summer and autumn months.    Hand-steel only was used.
Ore totalling 230 tons from underground and taken from old dumps yielded 133 oz. of
gold and 1,826 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.    Development consisted of 30 feet
of drifting and 25 feet of raising.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property is situated on Hughes Creek, a tributary of Midge Creek,
Wisconsin. about 11 miles from Kootenay Lake. It is owned by the Vendors,
Limited, and was optioned to the Canadian Exploration, Limited. A
crew of sixteen men was employed during the summer months under the direction of
H. L. Batten. The property is equipped with a complete small mining plant. Development-work included 250 feet of drifting and 180 feet of crosscutting, all on the No. 1
level north of the shaft. In addition all the surface-cuts were cleaned out and resampled
and some additional stripping done on the south end.    No ore was shipped.
This property, situated about 2 miles from Ginol Landing on Kootenay
Sanca. Lake, is under option to P. D. McTavish, of Vancouver, and associates.
During the latter part of the year eleven men under the direction of
W. E. Johnson were engaged in building an aerial tram some 3,700 feet long to connect
the mine workings with the end of the road.   The mine is equipped with a small portable
compressor.    No work was done underground.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Mount Roberts.
Midnight.—This property is owned and operated by B. A. Lins and associates, of
Rossland, B.C.    It is equipped with a small mining plant.    A crew of four men was
employed.    Very little development was done during the year.
This property was operated under lease by Chris Jorgensen and Vic
I.X.L. Larsen.    It is equipped with a small mining plant and employs four
men, all partners.    A small amount of development-work was done.
The 38 tons of ore mined yielded 390 oz. of gold and 135 oz. of silver.
O.K. and Gold Drip.—A small amount of hand-steel work was done on these properties
by leasers.
Rossland.
This property, situated about 1 mile east of Rossland and just off the
Jumbo. main Cascade Highway, is owned by Mrs. Charlotte Finch Smith, of
California, and is operated under lease by M. J. Doran and M. Michaley.
Four men, all partners, were employed, and hand-steel only was used. PROGRESS NOTES. A 71
South Belt.
This property is operated under lease  and bond to the  Mayflower
Mayflower.      Mining Syndicate, comprised of Lloyd A. Smith and associates, of Penticton.    R. W. Haggen acts as consultant and Frank Brinson as mine
foreman.    The property is equipped with a small mining plant.    Five men were employed for the greater part of the year.    Development included 210 feet of drifting,
203 feet of crosscutting, 320 feet of surface-trenching, and 693 feet of diamond-drilling.
VERNON AREA.
Kalamalka.—This property, situated on Brewer Creek, 2 miles from Lavington, is
leased by S. M. and C. Penny and J. A. Thomasson. Hand-steel only was used. The
property was operated continuously from February 1st.
This property is situated on the Vernon-Edgewood Highway, 30 miles
Monashee.      east of Lumby.    Late in the year it was leased by G., M. F., and F. H.
Peterson, S. Flodstrom, and William McLaren.    All the milling and
mining equipment has been removed from this property and the present operation is
confined to areas within the mine where the ore, mined by hand-steel, can be taken out
in wheelbarrows.
TEXADA ISLAND.
Company office,  1604 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Gem Gold Mines, office, Vananda, B.C.;  Ralph A. Logan, President;  R. E. Logan, Secre-
Ltd. tary-Treasurer;   W.  J.  Sclater,  Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,000,000
shares, $1 par;   issued, 1,669,628.    This company owns the Gem mine
on Texada Island, 5 miles from Blubber Bay.    From the bottom of No. 2 shaft, which
was sunk in 1939 to a depth of 250 feet from the surface, a crosscut was driven to the
No. 2 vein, a distance of 20 feet from the shaft, and drifting was done on this vein for
a distance of 115 feet in a north-easterly direction.    A crosscut was then driven 215
feet in a south-easterly direction to connect to No. 1 vein, and drifting on this vein
amounted to 110 feet.
No further work has been done underground, but surface work on the outcrops
was continued.
Company office, 325 Standard Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Seccondee Mines, office,   Vananda,   B.C.;    John   Morgan,   Secretary.    Capital:    50,000
Ltd. shares, $1 par;   company in voluntary liquidation  (February, 1940).
This company was operating the old Marjorie property, but work was
discontinued in February.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Zeballos.
Company office, 602 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   D. S.
Privateer Mine,   Tait, President; N. E. McConnell, Manager.    Capital: 2,500,000 shares,
Ltd. no par value;   issued, 2,454,080.    The company operates the Privateer
mine in Spud Valley, 4 miles by road from Zeballos. The property is
equipped with a 75- to 90-ton amalgamation and cyanide mill. Most of the stoping in
this mine is now on the No. 2 vein. The shaft is sunk to the 1,200 level from the 1,100
level and preparations are being made to continue sinking. Drifting has been carried
on for 300 feet on the No. 2 vein in the 1,200 level. The total amount of drifting for
the year amounts to 3,149 feet; crosscutting, 1,309 feet; raising, 708 feet; and diamond-
drilling, 10,855 feet. A crew of 115 men was employed. This company also operates
the Prident mine. Some work was done there and preparations are being made to
resume operations.
[Reference: Lode Gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office,  1001  Federal Building, Toronto,  Ont.;   mine office,
Mount Zeballos   Zeballos, B.C.;   F. M.  Connell, President;   A.  Cockeram,  Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd. Treasurer; W. S. Hamilton, Mine Manager.    Capital: 1,500,000 shares,
$1 par;   issued, 1,100,000.    The company operates the Mount Zeballos A 72 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
mine, on the west side of Spud Creek. Seven levels have been opened up, all from the
surface. Stoping is being carried on in the 1,500, 1,600, 1,800, 1,900, and 2,000 levels.
The 2,150 level is in 179 feet. Total amount of drifting done was 3,439 feet; cross-
cutting, 9 feet; raising, 1,450 feet; and diamond-drilling, 815 feet. A crew of eighty-
five men was employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Company office, 814 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
White Star Mine, Zeballos, B.C.;   R. P. Stockton, President;   T. D. Pickard, Manager.
Ltd. Capital:   200,000 shares, $1 par.    This company operates the White
Star mine on Spud Creek.    Stoping has been carried out on the Nos. 1,
2, and 3 levels in both Nos. 1 and 2 veins.    The total drifting for the year amounted to:
No. 1 level, 120 feet;   No. 2 level, 315 feet;   and No. 3 level, 670 feet.    Crosscutting on
No. 3 level, 155 feet.    About seventeen men are employed.
[Reference:  Lode Gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office, 716 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.    This
Zeballos Pacific   company has started operations on the Gold Peak property.   A Gardner-
Mining Co.      Denver compressor operated by an International Diesel engine has been
installed, giving 350 cubic feet of free air per minute.    Two drifts have
been started, one on the No. 4 vein is in 600 feet and one on the No. 1 vein is in 450 feet.
Seventeen men are employed.
Company office, 703 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Spud Valley Gold Zeballos, B.C.;   A. J. Hendrey, President;   N. F. Brookes, Manager.
Mines, Ltd.       Capital:   2,500,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,100,000.    The company
operates the Spud Valley mine in Spud Valley, 7 miles from Zeballos,
B.C.    The claims extend beyond the ridge between Spud Valley Creek and Gold Valley
Creek.    In all, six tunnels are operating—Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.    Stoping is carried
on in all levels in the Goldfield vein and in the Spud vein in No. 4 level.    Some drifting
in the Spud vein has been done in No. 3 level.    Total amount of drifting, crosscutting,
and raising for the year is 4,638 feet.    All the tunnels down to No. 5 are driven through
the mountain from Spud Valley to Gold Valley.    No. 7 tunnel is in 1,660 feet from the
Spud Valley side.    The mill is the amalgamation-flotation type, and handles 60 to 70
tons per day.    A crew of ninety-five men was employed.
Company office, 815 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Central Zeballos  Zeballos, B.C.;   A. J. Hendrey, President;   N. F. Brookes, Manager.
Gold Mines, Ltd.   Capital: 2,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 1,450,000.    Reno Gold Mines,
Limited, in March, 1939, acquired a 40-per-cent. interest in the company  for  financing  $30,000   development-work.    Active  development-work  has  been
carried out since.
At the present time all the stoping is done above the No. 2 level, mostly on the west
side. A winze was sunk from the No. 2 level and levels 3, 4, and 5 turned off east
and west. In No. 3 level 570 feet of drifting has been done and 400 feet in east and
west in No. 4 level. An adit has been started just above mill level; this will not intersect the vein at the No. 9 level. Total drifting for the year amounted to 1,603 feet;
raising, 113 feet; crosscutting, 282 feet; sinking, 218 feet. The mill has a capacity of
25 to 40 tons. A crew of forty-five men was employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Situated in Nomash Valley, Zeballos;   G. G. Sullivan, Manager.    A
Homeward Mine. 25-ton mill is under construction at this property.    Two drifts have
been driven, each over 600 feet.    A crew of seventeen men was employed, mostly on mill construction.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Tagore Mine.—Situated on west side of the Zeballos River, about 2 miles from
Zeballos.    The only work being done on this property was sinking a shaft.    It had
reached a depth of 150 feet.    Work has been suspended.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 73
CLAYOQUOT.
H. T. James, Managing Director;   John L. Swanson, Manager.    The
Musketeer Mines, Musketeer mine is owned and operated by Musketeer Mines, Limited,
Ltd. and is situated on Sam Craig Creek, in the Bedwell River district.   The
company began operating in this district on December 1st, 1938, with a
crew of fourteen men engaged in building 9 miles of pack-horse trail to the Musketeer
claims, together with an additional 7 miles of trail to the Corsair-Casino camp. Prior
to January 1st, 1940, 1,144 feet of drifting and crosscutting was done on the various
claims on this property and a further 2,195 feet driven during the present year. The
power plant consists of a Schramm compressor, model 210, with a capacity of 210 cubic
feet a minute, belt-driven by a 60-horse-power Allis-Chalmers 4-cylinder gasoline-
engine. The ventilation in the main adit is provided by a Sheldon No. 3 fan with a
capacity of 1,500 cubic feet of air a minute, belt-driven by a 3-horse-power Fuller-
Johnson gasoline-motor. An average crew of thirteen men was steadily employed.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 8, 1940.]
H. L. Hill, General Manager.    This company operates the Buccaneer
Buccaneer Mines, mine in the Bedwell River district, served by the same road and trails
Ltd. as the Musketeer mine and located approximately 2 miles beyond the
latter property. During the latter part of 1939 and early 1940, operations were confined principally to the construction of 2 miles of pack-horse trail from
the Musketeer mine to the Buccaneer camp and the cutting of trails from the camp to
the different veins on the property. Underground work during the present year consisted of 895 feet of drifting between the lower and upper adits on the main vein and
473 feet of drifting in the west adit on the west vein. A winze was sunk from the
latter adit for a distance of 31 feet on the vein, this being located a short distance from
the portal.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 8, 1940.]
O. T. Bibb, Manager. This group of claims is owned by the Noble
Noble " B " Mine. Bear River Syndicate and located in the vicinity of the Bedwell River
Road, approximately 6 miles from the head of Bedwell Sound. Operations were begun in August on this group with a crew of three men and, up to the end
of December, had been principally confined to surface-trenching and constructing the
necessary camp buildings.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 8, 1940.]
NANAIMO.
R. A. Pitre, Manager.    This property is owned by the Crown Gold
Vulcan. Mining Syndicate, of Victoria, and is situated in the Nanaimo Lakes
district, approximately 25 miles from Nanaimo. According to available information, a shaft was sunk on a showing of gold-bearing ore to a depth of 105
feet some thirty-five or forty years ago and two comparatively short drifts were driven,
one from the shaft and the other from the surface, but apparently the values found did
not warrant a continuation of operations in those early days. In May R. A. Pitre, of
Victoria, took an option on the property and contracted to carry on a limited amount
of prospecting and development-work with a view to proving the extent of the ore body.
The shaft was drained to a depth of 100 feet and 78 feet of drifting done. Mr. Pitre's
option expired at the end of July and the mine remained idle until September, when
M. Zablosky and associates resumed operations under a lease from the owners, work
being carried on until the middle of November by a crew of three men who drifted on
the vein a distance of 15 feet at a point close to the bottom of the shaft.
A total of 12 tons of ore was sacked and shipped to Tacoma for treatment when the
mine closed down in November.
Company office, Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C.;   R. A. Pitre,
United Prospec-   General Manager.    Capital:   100,000 shares, no par value.    This corn-
tors, Ltd.        pany owns the Thistle mine.    It was operated under lease by John
Separovich and associates from the beginning of the year until October
20th, on which date the above lease terminated.    During this period an average crew of A 74 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
twelve men was engaged and several shipments of ore made to the Tacoma smelter for
treatment, all of this tonnage being practically produced from open-cuts on the surface
and the " glory-hole " method of mining.
Company office,  Room  10,  Herald  Building,   Nanaimo,  B.C.;    F.  A.
Nanoose Bay Gold Whitehouse, Secretary and Manager.    Capital:   50,000 shares, $1 par.
Mines, Ltd.      The company is developing a gold prospect approximately 20 miles
north of Nanaimo, within a quarter of a mile from the Island Highway.
From May 1st to September 30th two men were engaged in constructing a flume to
carry the creek past the shaft and extending the drift an additional distance of 25 feet.
The power plant consists of a small Gardner-Denver compressor which is driven by a
Buick gasoline-engine.
Phillips Arm.
The old Alexandria mine was reopened by the Alex Mining Company
Alexandria.      for the purpose of taking out any ore that was in sight.    The shaft
from No. 2 tunnel was dewatered down to the 100-foot level and stoping
carried on between this level and No. 2 tunnel.    Some stoping was also done in No. 2
tunnel.    A crew of thirty men was employed for a few months and work was discontinued.
Thurlow Island.
J. J. Fagan is in charge. This company opened up the old Douglas
Piedmont Mining Co. Pine property.    A 25-ton mill was erected and an aerial tram-line put
in from the mine to the mill. Two levels were driven in a few hundred
feet and a little stoping done.    A crew of five men was employed.
GOLD-COPPER DEPOSITS.
TELKWA AREA.
This group is owned by O. A. Riegle, of Smithers, and is located at
Hunter Basin     the head of Cabin Creek, about 17 miles from the town of Telkwa on
Group. the Canadian National Railway.    It is reached by road from Telkwa
for a distance of 17 miles to the camp at altitude 4,900 feet.    The
property is optioned by the Conwest Exploration Company, with office at 514 Royal
Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.    F. M. Connell, President.
Work was carried out on the King claim and consisted of drifting east and west
on the " King " vein at the upper adit-level. A crosscut, with the objective of intersecting the possible downward extension of the " King " vein at 125 feet lower elevation
was also commenced.
At the close of the year, a car-load of ore was shipped direct to the smelter. Two
lots of selected ore, consisting respectively of 3.1565 tons and 3.9799 tons, were also
shipped to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference: Annual Reports, 1904, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1925, and
1929.]
VANCOUVER ISLAND AREA.
Company   office,   553   Granville   Street,   Vancouver,   B.C.     Capital:
Tyee Consolidated 2,000,000   shares,   $1  par.    The   Sheep  Creek  Gold   Mines,   Limited,
Gold Mining Co., operated the Tyee, Lenora, and Richard HI. mines, situated in the
Ltd. Mount Sicker area, which they optioned from the Tyee Consolidated
Gold Mining Company in the early part of December, 1939.    At that
time a small crew of men was sent in to clean up and repair the main tunnel of the
Lenora mine while the mechanical staff was overhauling the compressor and surface
machinery. PROGRESS NOTES. A 75
Underground work consisted of 850 feet of crosscutting and drifting, 75 feet of
raising, 51 feet of sinking, and 3,070 feet of diamond-drilling, which included a number
of advance and flank holes in the face of the main drift as a safety measure against
inadvertently contacting the abandoned workings of the Tyee and Richard III. mines.
Surface work consisted of 905 feet of diamond-drilling, together with a certain
amount of stripping and trenching. During the course of the operations an average
crew of ten men was employed steadily, six underground and four on the surface.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
This property, situated at Phoenix, is owned by Robert Forshaw and is
Brooklyn.        operated under lease by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood.    The mine
was operated until March, 1940, when the lease was given up and all
equipment owned by the lessees was removed. Up until that time an average crew of
thirteen men was employed between the mine and the mill. Development-work included
75 feet of raising. Ore totalling 1,979 tons was mined and treated in the mill at Greenwood. The concentrates were shipped to Tacoma and yielded 619 oz. of gold, 731 oz. of
silver, and some copper.
This property, situated at Phoenix, is owned and operated by W. E.
Granby. McArthur, of Greenwood.    A complete mining plant, formerly used at
the Brooklyn, was moved to this property. Ore was milled at a 50-ton
plant at Greenwood. The crew employed at mine and mill varied from three men in
January, when only development was in progress, to a total of eighteen men when this
property was in production. Development included 250 feet of drifting, 180 feet of
crosscutting, 90 feet of raising, and 50 feet of sinking. A total of 9,816 tons of ore was
mined and 9,132 tons milled and the concentrates shipped to Tacoma.
This property, situated in the Wellington Camp near Phoenix, is oper-
Athelstan.       ated under lease by W. E. McArthur.    A gasoline-driven compressor
has been installed. Two men were employed continuously throughout
the year. Development included 25 feet of drifting, 225 feet of crosscutting, and 25
feet of sinking. Ore totalling 88 tons was mined and yielded 51 oz. of gold and 83 oz.
of silver.
Winnipeg.—This property, situated in the Wellington Camp, was operated under
lease by Arthur Cox and Wilfred Tomblay. A small mining plant was installed. Some
ore was mined from shallow workings.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street West, Montreal, Quebec;  mine
Consolidated Mining office, Trail, B.C.;   Sir Edward Beatty, Chairman;   S. G. Blaylock,
and Smelting Co.    President and  Managing Director;   J.  E.  Riley,   Secretary;   Jas.
of Canada, Ltd.     Buchanan,   General  Manager;    R.  W.  Diamond,  Assistant  General
Manager.   Capital: 4,000,000 shares, $5 par; issued, 3,271,669.   This
company owns the Centre Star, War Eagle, LeRoi, Josie, Iron Mask, No. 1, Annie, and
Columbia and Kootenay on Red Mountain at Rossland.    These properties were operated
continuously throughout the year by leasers.    From fifty to sixty-five men were engaged
in mining ore from underground and surface on some eighteen to twenty-five separate
leases.    Some of the leasers have installed small, complete mining plants.    The work of
the leasers was carried on under the supervision of J. K. Cram, of Trail, B.C.
This property, situated on the Cascade Highway, 13 miles east of
Velvet. Rossland, is owned by the Velgo  Mining  Incorporated  of  Seattle,
Washington, and is operated under lease by the Velvet Leasing Syndicate, consisting of Harold S. Elmes, Renaldo Bielli, and Ole Osing, of Rossland, B.C.
The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and a 100-ton flotation-mill. It
was operated practically continuously throughout the year and employed twenty-eight
men, twelve working underground. Development included 265 feet of drifting, 300 feet
of raising, and 385 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 7,300 tons of ore was milled
and the product, a gold-copper concentrate, was shipped to Tacoma. This yielded 2,171
oz. of gold, 1,358 oz. of silver, as well as copper. A 76 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
GOLD-COBALT DEPOSITS.
HAZELTON AREA.
This group is located on the north-west slope of Rocher Deboule Moun-
Hazelton View    tain, 4 miles south of South Hazelton and 3 miles east of the railway.
Group. A pack-horse trail 3 miles long leads from Comeau's ranch  at the
foot of the mountain to the mine camp at altitude 4,100 feet.    The
workings are immediately above the camp, between elevations 5,100 and 6,025 feet.
The claims were acquired by the New Hazelton Gold Cobalt Mines, Ltd., in 1916,
and were developed continuously until 1919. Further -work was done in 1925. During
1928 the property was operated by the Aurimont Gold Mines, Ltd.
During these former operations, several appreciable shipments of ore were made
to the smelter and in 1918 a car-load was also shipped to the Ore Testing Laboratories,
Mines Branch, Ottawa.
During 1940 the property was operated by Jack Lee, Hazelton, B.C., under a
leasing agreement with R. C. McCorkell, 703 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.
From this operation, at the latter part of the year, 7.6635 dry tons of ore was shipped
to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference: See also New Hazelton Gold Cobalt Co. and Aurimont Gold Mines,
Ltd.    Annual Reports, 1916 to 1918, 1925 to 1929.]
SILVER-GOLD-LEAD DEPOSITS.
SMITHERS AREA.
J. J. Herman and associates continued their option on this property,
Duthie Mines,    which is about 9 miles by road from Smithers.    The property was
Ltd. examined for the purpose of ascertaining additional localities from
which shipping-grade ore could be extracted.    The following are the
assay results from samples taken for this purpose:—
" Womens Cut," selected from fine-grained galena: Gold, 0.14 oz. per ton; silver,
69.8 oz. per ton; copper, 0.2 per cent.; lead, 59.5 per cent.; zinc, 12.5 per cent.;
arsenic, 1.1 per cent.;   antimony, 0.4 per cent.
" Dome Cut," selected yellow-brown decomposed oxidized vein matter: Gold, 1.2
oz. per ton;   silver, 42.4 oz. per ton.
" Dome Cut," average of ore dump to be cobbed and sorted: Gold, 0.08 oz. per ton;
silver, 72.6 oz. per ton; copper, 1 per cent.; lead, 60.9 per cent.; zinc, 5 per cent.;
arsenic, 2 per cent.;  antimony, 0.4 per cent.
"Dome Cut," grab of twenty-two sacks of sorted ore: Gold, 0.26 oz. per ton;
silver, 59.1 oz. per ton; copper, 0.7 per cent.; lead, 50.7 per cent.; zinc, 9.5 per cent.;
arsenic, 4.6 per cent.; antimony, 0.5 per cent.
In order to direct the shipment of ore from the property to the smelter, numerous
test samples were shipped to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
During the year, several car-loads of ore were shipped direct from the property
to Trail smelter.
This property is located on Hudson Bay Mountain and joins the Mamie,
Coronado Group. Duthie,  and  Victory groups.    It is owned  by the  R.  J.   McDonnell
estate.    It is 16 miles by road from Smithers.    The property is under
lease to  Harold  Orm and  Fred  Griffin,  of  Smithers.    These  operators  carried  out
stripping, open-cutting, and drifting with the objective of locating shipping-grade ore.
In order to direct the shipment of ore from the property to the smelter, several
test shipments were made to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.    Bulk ore was also
shipped direct to the Trail smelter.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1914 and 1939.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 77
GREENWOOD AREA.
This property, situated about 1 mile north of Greenwood, was operated
Providence.      continuously throughout the year by W. E. McArthur and associates.
It is equipped with a complete small mining plant.    A crew of thirteen
men, with seven underground, was employed.    Development included 500 feet of drifting, 200 feet of raising, and 20 feet of sinking.    A total of 1,280 tons of ore was shipped
crude to Trail.    This yielded 568 oz. of gold, 96,629 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
This property, situated on the Greenwood-Phoenix Road, 3 miles from
Crescent.        Greenwood, was operated under lease during the summer months by
Eric Larsen, Mike Balint, and John Poelzur.    Five men were employed
and a small gasoline-driven compressor and gasoline-hoist were installed.
This property is situated half a mile from Greenwood and is owned by
Gold Finch.      the Mark F. Madden estate.    Toward the end of the year a lease was
acquired by Eric Larsen, A. D. Broomfield, and J. J. Malone.    Five
men were employed.    A small mining plant was installed.
GRAND FORKS.
Company office, Room 40, Williams Building, Vancouver, B.C.; George L.
Regal Mines, Ltd. Mclnnis,  Secretary.    Capital:   5,000,000  shares,  no par value.    The
company owns the Yankee Boy mine, situated 4 miles from Grand
Forks. It is operated under lease by Norman Cunningham, of Rossland, B.C. A total
of four men was employed. A small mining plant, sufficient to operate one drill, was
installed. An attempt was also made to ship an old dump after concentrating it by
washing and screening.
SILVER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
SLOCAN LAKE AREA.
Company office,  504  Empire  State  Building,   Spokane,  Washington;
Slocan Silver     Percy C. Morey, Secretary-    Capital:   500,000 shares, $1 par.    This
Mines, Ltd.      company owns the McAllister, on London Ridge, near Three Forks.    It
was operated under two separate leases by Harold Allen and partners
and J. Vandergrift and sons, all of New Denver.    A total of five men was engaged in
the two leases.    Hand-steel only was used although the property is equipped with a
complete mining plant.    Development consisted of 123 feet of drifting and 87 feet of
sinking.    A total of 518 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 5 oz.
of gold and 25,069 oz. of silver.
This property, situated near the McAllister, was leased for a short time
Jo Jo. during the summer by E. Battelli and C.  Stedile,  of New Denver.
Hand-steel was used to mine 9 tons of ore.    This was shipped to Trail
and yielded 1,709 oz. of silver.
Company office, 204 Howard Street, Spokane, Washington; John Stan-
Slocan Idaho Mines ford, Manager.   This company operates the Molly Hughes mine, which
Corporation.       is  located  about  a  mile  north  of  New  Denver.    The  property  is
equipped with a complete mining plant.    Seventeen men, with fifteen
underground, were employed until September, when the mine closed.    During the last
few months, the operation was conducted by leasers who were former employees of the
company.    Total development-work included 457 feet of drifting, 226 feet of cross-
cutting, 249 feet of raising, and 353 feet of diamond-drilling for the year.    A total of
387 tons of ore yielded 107 oz. of gold, 31,339 oz. of silver, and some lead and zinc. A 78 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
SILVER DEPOSITS.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
The head office of this company is at 112 St. James Street, Montreal.
Mountain Boy    The British Columbia office is at 716 Hall Building, 789 Pender Street
Mining Co., Ltd.  West,   Vancouver.    Armand   Derome,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:
6,000,000   shares.    The  property  comprises   eight  claims   and  three
fractional claims, situated on the west side of American Creek, about 18 miles from
the town of Stewart.    It is reached by motor-road from Stewart up the Bear River
Valley for a distance of 14 miles, whence a good trail extends for 4 miles to the property.
During the year a small amount of mining was carried on for the purpose of
extracting shipping-grade ore.    Ore totalling 3.0555 tons was shipped to the sampling
plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1910, 1919, 1922, 1929, and 1938.]
ALICE ARM AREA.
This property consists of seven Crown-granted mineral claims owned
Dolly Varden     by the Dolly Varden Properties, Ltd.    In 1935 the property was leased
Group. by T. W. Falconer, Alice Arm, and in 1936 this lease was renewed for
a five-year term.    The property is located in the Upper Kitsault River
Valley, about 18 miles from seaboard at the town of Alice Arm.    From this point a
narrow-gauge railway extends up the west side of the Kitsault River Valley for 18%
miles to Camp 8 at altitude 950 feet, whence a good pack-horse trail extends up the
mountain-slope for five-eighths of a mile to the working camp at 1,730 feet elevation.
During the period of T. W. Falconer's lease up to the end of 1939, the lessee had
been actively mining and shipping high-grade ore direct to the smelter.    During 1940,
1.3595 tons was shipped to the Government sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part B.]
SILVER-LEAD-ZINC DEPOSITS.
TOPLEY-BABINE LAKE AREA.
Golden Eagle Group.—D. Heenan, owner. This property is located about 7 miles by
road from Topley.    It was operated under lease for a short time during the summer.
This  group  consists  of the Neivman,  Home,  Jim,  Jean,  and  Nord
Newman Group,  mineral claims,  owned by E.  F.  Campbell,  1325  Fifteenth  Avenue
West, Vancouver, B.C., and associates.    It is located on the south side
of Copper Island, Babine Lake, about 11 miles from Topley Landing.
During the season, at about 30 feet westerly from the lake-shore and 30 feet higher
elevation, a shaft was sunk to a depth of 35 feet, from which point the zone was
intersected by crosscutting and explored by some lateral drifting. Details of this work
are shown on a map which may be obtained for a small charge on application to the
Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
[Reference:   Richmond and Robinhood, Annual Reports, 1927 and 1929.]
BEAVERDELL AREA.
Company office, Penticton, B.C.;   mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.;   F. V.
Highland Bell,    Staples, Managing Director.    Capital: 1,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
Ltd. 1,315,856.    The company owns and operates the Highland Bell, which
is situated on Wallace Mountain, about 5 miles from Beaverdell.    A
crew of thirty-nine men was employed throughout the year.    Development-work in- PROGRESS NOTES. A 79
eluded 300 feet of drifting, 400 feet of crosscutting, and 125 feet of raising. A total of
7,752 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail. This yielded 236 oz. of gold, 993,803
oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
Company office, Penticton, B.C.; mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.; S. J.
Sally Mines, Ltd. Crocker, President; H. B. Morley, Secretary-Treasurer; R. C. Mc-
Landers, Mine Manager. Capital: 1,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
1,000,000 shares. This company owns and operates the Sally, on Wallace Mountain,
adjoining the Highland Bell and Wellington. The property is equipped with a complete
mining plant. Seven men were employed until early autumn when the mine was closed
down. The work was confined to a section of ground adjoining the Wellington, access
being obtained through the 5 level of that mine under an agreement with the management of that company. A total of 270 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.
This yielded 17 oz. of gold, 51,898 oz. of silver, as well as lead and zinc.
In addition to this operation, J. L. Nordman and partner leased a section of the
surface on which they worked with hand-steel.
Company office, Greenwood, B.C.;   mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.;   Jas.
Beaverdell-      Kerr, President;   G. S. Walters, Secretary-Treasurer;   A. J. Morrison,
Wellington Syndi-Manager.    Capital:   50,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 50,000.    This com-
eate, Ltd.        pany owns the  Wellington, on Wallace Mountain.    The property is
operated under lease by A. J. Morrison and associates.    Three men
were employed.    The property is equipped with a complete mining plant.    Efforts were
directed chiefly to recovering remnants of ore in old stopes and to general salvage-work.
A small amount of development-work was done.
Company office, Box 609, Kelowna, B.C.;  mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.;
Beaver Silver     R. B. Staples, President;  J. C. Ralston, Secretary.    Capital:  2,000,000
Mines, Ltd.      shares,  50  cents par;    issued,   1,600,000.    This company  owns the
Beaver claim, adjoining the ground of the Highland Bell.    During the
year the property was operated by two leasers.    Entry to the workings is underground,
through the Highland Bell property.    Compressed air was obtained from the Highland
Bell.
Revenge.—A small amount of development-work was done on this property late in
the year under the direction of A. St. Clair Brindle. The property adjoins the Highland
Bell.
Napanee-Cobalt.—This property is situated on Wallace Mountain. A small amount
of development-work was done by the owner, E. J. Cummings.
This property, situated on Wallace Mountain, adjoining the Highland
Highland Chief.   Bell, is owned by Mark Smith, of Beaverdell, B.C.    During the year it
was operated under lease by Alex. Bell and associates.    Four men were
employed, using hand-steel.    Development-work included 30 feet of drifting, 240 feet
of crosscutting, and 15 feet of raising.    In addition, 140 feet of surface-stripping and
open-cutting was done.
Midnight Group.—This property is on the main road, 1% miles south of Beaverdell.
A small amount of development was done by the owner, William Youngsten.
LARDEAU AREA.
True Fissure.—This property is situated 3V_ miles from Ferguson. J. Van de Haeghe
and two partners were engaged in cleaning up and shipping zinc concentrates from
previous milling operations.
SLOCAN.
Kaslo-Three Forks.
Lucky Boy.—This property is situated at Blaylock, B.C., and is owned and operated
by C. Lind and sons, of Kaslo.
This old property, situated on McGuigan Creek, was operated under
Rambler.       lease by S. N. Ross and H. Lazier, of Nelson.    Activity was confined to
reclaiming of the old dump from the upper levels and concentration of
this material by washing, screening, and jigging.    A total of 116 tons of concentrates
was shipped to Trail. A 80 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
This property, situated at Zincton, B.C., is now owned by the Zincton
Lucky Jim.       Mines, Limited, a subsidiary of the Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited.
Work was chiefly confined to reconditioning of underground workings
and overhauling of the surface plant and mill.    From three to fifteen men were employed toward the end of the year.    A total of 10% tons of concentrates, cleaned up
around the mill, was shipped to Trail.
This property, located on Paddy's Peak, about 9 miles from the Kaslo-
Utica. Three Forks Highway, is owned and operated by the Utica   (1937)
Mines, Limited, 815 Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C., and was operated
during the summer under the direction of D. M. Armstead. The property is equipped
with a complete mining plant operated by Diesel and water power. Work was confined
to driving a raise to connect the low-level crosscut with the old upper workings, but this
was not completed. A crew of eight men was employed, five working underground. No
ore was shipped.
Kokanee Chief.—This property, situated at the head of Woodbury Creek, was operated for a short time during the summer by the owner, R. G. McLeod. Hand-steel only
was used.
Cork Province.—This property is situated on Keen Creek. Clean-up around the mill
accounted for 18 tons of concentrate, which was shipped to Trail.
Caledonia.—This property, situated at Blaylock, B.C., was operated for a short time
by J. E. McCready, who shipped 6 tons. This yielded 331 oz. of silver and some lead
and zinc.    Development consisted of 20 feet of sinking.
Sandon-Three Forks.
Company office, Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.;   R.  H.  Stewart,
Ruth Hope       President;    R.   S.   Lennie,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:    2,500,000
Mining Co., Ltd.  shares, $1 par;   issued, 1,500,000.    This company owns the Ruth Hope
mine at Sandon.    Leases were held by W. C. Stewart and S. Mazoli.
A total of 38 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded 1 oz. of gold, 3,356 oz. of silver, as well
as lead and zinc.
Silversmith Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 916 American Building, Seattle, Washington;
B. P. von Anderson, Secretary. This company owns the Silversmith mine at Sandon.
Activities were confined to cleaning and reconditioning old workings. Five men were
employed.
Company office, Sandon, B.C.; R.A.Grimes, President; D. D. Townsend,
Silver Ridge      Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:  2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;  issued,
Mining Co., Ltd.  760,000, of which 260,000 pooled.    This company owns and operates the
Sunshine group, situated on Silver Ridge, about 4% miles from Sandon.
The property is equipped with a small Diesel mining plant.    Company operation was
suspended on March 1st;   during the first four months of the year, development consisted of 146 feet of drifting and 481 feet of crosscutting.    A crew of six men was
employed.    Later in the year a lease was taken by J. Tattrie and partners, who mined
45 tons of ore.
This property, situated about 3 miles from Sandon, is owned by Mrs.
Victor. D. Petty, of Nelson, and is operated under lease by E. Doney and son.
A total of 33 tons of ore yielded 3 oz. of gold, 4,912 oz. of silver, as well
as lead and zinc.    Development consisted of 130 feet of drifting, 35 feet of crosscutting,
and 80 feet of raising.
Monitor.—This property is located at Three Forks. Hans Peterson and partner
operated under lease and mined 5 tons from shallow workings and surface-cuts.
Newport.—This property is situated on the Three Forks-New Denver Road, near
Alamo.    E. J. Vandergrift and partners mined 2.13 tons near the surface by hand-steel.
Other properties in the area, operated under lease by hand-steel, made shipments
as follows:—
Capella, by C. Stedile, 5 tons, which yielded 1 oz. of gold and 914 oz. of silver.
Freddie Lee, by S. and N. Sibillean, 3 tons, which yielded 227 oz. of silver and some
lead and zinc. PROGRESS NOTES. A 81
Silverton-New Denver.
This property is situated on Slocan Lake, between New Denver and
Bosun. Silverton.    It is owned by Colin J. Campbell, of New Denver, and was
operated by several small groups of leasers during the year. Hand-
steel only was used. A total of 95 tons yielded 2 oz. of gold, 5,856 oz. of silver, as well
as lead and zinc.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  S. W.
Galena Farm Con-Miller,   President;    James  Anderson,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:
solidated Mines,   2,500,000 shares of no par value;   issued, 1,602,203.    This company
Ltd. owns the Hewitt mine, about 6 miles from Silverton.    Early in the year
it was leased by Ed. Mathews and R. Sherradan, who mined by hand-
steel. Later it was operated under lease for a short time by H. V. Dewis, of Silverton,
and associates. A small semi-portable compressor plant was installed and four men
were employed. A total of 317 tons was mined, which yielded 4 oz. of gold, 8,427 oz. of
silver, as well as lead and zinc.
A. M. Ham, General Superintendent;  B. Avison, Mine Superintendent;
Western Explora- T. Leask, Mill Superintendent.    This company operates the Standard
tion Co., Ltd.     mine, situated on Emily Creek, 2 miles from Silverton.    It is equipped
with a complete mining plant and a 200-ton selective flotation-mill.
The mill was put into operation on September 11th on a rate of about 170 tons a day to
treat zinc tailings which had been dumped into Slocan Lake from earlier operations. A
total of 16,197 tons of these tailings was milled. New equipment, installed for recovering tailings, included an electrically-driven double-drum hoist and drag-line scraper,
with a bin and belt-conveyer to put the tailings in the fine-ore bin in the mill. Early in
November a small crew started to open up old underground workings and prepare for
stoping. Some 50 feet of old raise was reconditioned. From underground mining 343
tons of ore was recovered. The number of men employed varied from twelve when the
mill alone was operating to a total of thirty-four in both the mine and mill. A total of
1,884 tons of concentrates was shipped to the U.S. Smelting, Refining, and Mining Company at Salt Lake City, Utah. This yielded 5 oz. of gold, 29,909 oz. of silver, and lead
and zinc.
Ainsworth.
This property is situated on Woodbury Creek, about half a mile from
Amazon.        Kootenay Lake.    It is owned by T. E. Levasseur, of Nelson, and was
operated for a short time under lease by J. Flagel and four partners.
Hand-steel only was used to mine 31.5 tons of ore.
Other properties in this area from which small amounts of ore were shipped are
as follows:  Highland, 7 tons;  Silver Coin, 4 tons;  and Silver Cup, 3.5 tons.
Slocan City.
This property is situated on Springer Creek, about 5 miles from Slocan
Ottawa. City.    During the year it was operated under lease by W. Hicks and
associates, of Slocan City.    Four men were employed.    Hand-steel only
was used for mining, although a mechanical ventilation system was kept in operation.
A total of 85 tons of ore yielded 1 oz. of gold and 22,392 oz. of silver.    Development
consisted of 175 feet of raising.
Meteor.—This property is located at the head of Tobin Creek, a tributary of
Springer Creek. Messrs. Larsen and Lundstrom, of Slocan City, operating under lease
with hand-steel, shipped 7 tons of ore during the year.
In addition to the above operations a small amount of work, chiefly development and
assessment, was done on the following properties in this area: Speculator, Richmond,,
Myrtle, Jack, and Morning Star.
NELSON AREA.
This property is situated 8 miles from Salmo.    Three men, using hand-
Emerald,        steel, were employed throughout the year.    Development included 159
feet of drifting and 60 feet of crosscutting.    This development is A 82 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
entirely separate from the original Emerald workings, some 750 feet distant from them.
The recent work has been done in what is known as the Dodger tunnel.
CRANBROOK AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal, Quebec;   mine office,
Consolidated Mining Trail, B.C.;  Sir Edward Beatty, Chairman;  S. G. Blaylock, President
and Smelting Co.    and Managing Director;  J. E. Riley, Secretary.    Sullivan mine office,
of Canada, Ltd.     Kimberley, B.C.;   William Lindsay, General Superintendent;   J. G.
Giegerich, Mine Superintendent;   H. R. Banks, Mill Superintendent.
Capital:  4,000,000 shares, $5 par;   issued, 3,271,669.    The company owns and operates
the Sullivan mine at Kimberley.
The modified methods of extraction, described in the report for 1939, have been
applied successfully in the course of 1940 in parts of the mine in which, owing to the
uncertain nature of the backs or for other reasons, the application of the method of
mining generally followed presented some difficulty or increased hazard. Considerable
and conspicuously successful use of long-hole blasting has been made, fan-shaped rounds
being bored from sub-levels, at 2-yard intervals, by means of a small and easily transported type of diamond-drill, the performance of which has been remarkable in this kind
of work. The filling of worked-out stopes was resumed in the spring and continued
until late in the fall, a total of 245,000 cubic yards, equivalent to 882,000 tons of ore in
the solid, being placed in the course of the year. Of the stowing material used in this
manner, 200,376 cubic yards or 81.78 per cent, was obtained from the surface, and the
balance came from development operations and induced caving.
As waste rock alone constitutes a stowing lacking the desired amount of cohesion,
it is customary to use it for this purpose in only a part of any one stope and to complete
the work with finer material obtained from the surface which, eventually, penetrates
and cements the coarser fill effectively. The proportion of water mixed with the gravel
and clay, excavated and brought to the raises by bulldozers and a Le Tourneau carry-all,
has to be gauged rather closely, as the ultimate quality of the fill and the distance to
which it will run from the foot of the raises depend largely upon it. A very effective
technique has been developed in this respect and the results, wherever observed, left
very little to be desired.
A development of considerable interest and importance is the installation of a tin-
recovery plant at the concentrator, work on which was well advanced at the end of the
year, this representing the culmination of research carried on locally for some time.
As the metal, in the form of cassiterite, is present in the ratio of only about 1 lb. per
ton of tailings, with a comparatively large percentage of it of so-called 1,500-mesh size,
the process of concentration is a rather complicated one, but a 50-per-cent. recovery is
expected.    The plant is expected to be in operation at the beginning of 1941.
The total number of persons on the pay-roll at the end of 1940 was 1,223, of which
623 were employed underground, 309 in various capacities on the surface, and 286 at
the concentrator.
Company office, 25 King Street West, Toronto, Ontario;  W. S. Morlock,
St. Eugene Mining President;   W. B.  Malone,  Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   3,000,000
Corporation, Ltd. shares, $1 par;  issued, 1,589,505.    The company acquired the holdings
at Moyie of the St. Eugene Extension Gold Mines, Limited.    All activities were limited to diamond-drilling from the surface on both sides of Moyie Lake.
This work was done under contract in the early part of the summer.
GOLDEN AREA.
Company office, 350 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario;   mine office, Field,
Base Metals Mining B.C.;   J. H. C. Waite, President;   G. C. Ames, Secretary-Treasurer;
Corporation, Ltd.   J. D. Galloway, Manager;  H. D. Forman, Mine Superintendent; J. A.
Edwards, Mill Superintendent. Capital: 3,000,000 shares, no par
value; issued, 2,330,715. The company operates the Monarch mine on Mount Stephen,
3 miles east of Field. The property is equipped with a 300-ton concentrator. The mill
was started on January 15th and production has been maintained since. The major part of the output was supplied by the East Monarch, but it was found
that some low-grade ore, abandoned in former years in the western section of the mine,
could be mined profitably and that part of the property was re-equipped for production.
The development-work done comprised 61 feet of raising, 180 feet of crosscutting, and
366 feet of long holes drilled for exploratory purposes.
The company also owns the Kicking Horse mine on Mount Field, on the north side
of the Kicking Horse Valley. The property is at approximately the same altitude as the
Monarch. Operations were resumed in October after having been suspended for nearly
three years. It was necessary to complete the construction of the aerial tramway, left
unfinished in 1937, and to establish connections between the underground upper terminal
of the tramway and the partly developed ore-bodies above it. The latter part of the
programme involved 170 feet of raising, the straightening of an existing raise over a
length of 80 feet, and 17 feet of crosscutting. The entrances to the mine are on the face
of a very abrupt cliff and are somewhat difficult of access. Production was expected to
begin on or about February 1st, 1941. The ore will be transported by trucks from the
lower terminal of the tramway to the Monarch concentrator.
[Reference:  Annual Reports, 1935 and 1938, Part E.]
COPPER DEPOSITS.
BURNS LAKE AREA.
This group consists of the Golden Glory No. 1, Good Luck, Echo No. 1,
Reid Group.      and Echo No. 2, with which are associated the Hyland and Echo claims.
It is owned by W. Reid, A. Ostrem, and associates, of Burns Lake.
The claims are located on the south side of Decker Lake, opposite Decker Lake Station
and about 1% miles from the lake-shore in the canyon of Reid Creek, around altitude
1,990 feet (altitude of Decker Lake, 1,800 feet).
In one place on the Golden Glory No. 1 claim, a sparse and irregular mineralization
of galena and sphalerite associated with seams of chalcopyrite in a quartzose gangue
occurs.
This mineral deposit has been known for a number of years and open-cutting and
a small amount of underground exploration has been carried out on it from time to
time. Most of the old workings are caved. No appreciable mineralization was observed
in the workings and outcrops examined.
In order to determine the degree of values associated with the mineralization,
samples were taken and assayed as follows:—
(1.) Hyland mineral claim, elevation 2,025 feet. Pyritized dioritic rock intrusive
into red andesitic breccia:   Gold, nil;  silver, nil;  copper, 0.2 per cent.
(2.) Golden Glory No. 1, sample of 13 tons of mineralized material in a collapsed
bin (reported by W. Reid to have been extracted from an adjacent caved shaft) : Gold,
0.01 oz. per ton;  silver, 2.9 oz. per ton;  copper, 4.4 per cent.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1926, 1927, and 1930.]
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Princeton.
Company office, 675 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Granby Consolidated office,  Copper Mountain, B.C.;   Julian B. Beaty,  President;   A.  S.
Mining, Smelting & Baillie, General Manager;   B. E. Perks, Secretary;   A. W. Seaton,
Power Co., Ltd.     Treasurer;  W. R. Lindsay, Mine Manager.    Capital:  600,000 shares,
$5 par; issued, 450,260. The company owns and operates the Copper
Mountain mine, 12 miles south of Princeton. During the year a 10,000-k.v.a. unit was
added to the steam-electric power plant. The coal-supply for the steam generators is
from the company's own coal-mining operations in the Princeton district. A 84 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
This year mining development at Copper Mountain was concentrated at the south
end of the mine. Here the principal effort was directed toward recovery of stope
pillars. Underground ventilation has been improved by the installation of three fan
units located on the Nos. 4, 5, and 6 levels. Exploration and development included
9,376 feet of drifting, 15,847 feet of raising, and 37,504 feet of diamond-drilling. A
total of 69,648 tons of concentrates was produced. An average of 643 men was
employed.
Highland Valley.
This group is located about 26 miles south-east of the town of Ashcroft,
Snowstorm Group, on the eastern side of Highland Valley.    Work was done under the
supervision of James Rodda. At the time of inspection an old shaft
had been dewatered and repaired. The intention was to sink this shaft farther on a
small and irregular bornite vein and, if the results of this work proved satisfactory, to
drift on the vein from the bottom of the extended shaft.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Howe Sound.
Company office, 730 Fifth Avenue, New York City;   mine office, Bri-
Britannia Mining tannia Beach, B.C.; E. B. Sebley, President; C. P. Charlton, Secretary-
and Smelting     Treasurer; C. P. Browning, General Manager; C. V. Brennan, Assistant
Co., Ltd.        General Manager;   and George C. Lipsey, Superintendent.    The company operates the Britannia mine at Britannia Beach, on Howe Sound.
The property is fully equipped with mining and milling plant to handle an output of
6,000 to 7,000 tons a day.
In the Victoria, Fair-view, No. 5, and Bluff mines the regular development-work and
stoping was carried on throughout the year. In the 4,100 tunnel district two ore-bodies
are being opened up and an inclined shaft is being sunk. This shaft is now below the
4,200 level. The 4,100 tunnel is within 2,500 feet of the Victoria shaft. This tunnel,
when it reaches the Victoria shaft, will be about 4 miles in length. The recovery of
metals was augmented by the operation of the copper precipitation plant, which continued to treat the copper-bearing portion of the mine-drainage water.
Development-work totalled 28,677 feet or 5.43 miles, made up as follows: drifting,
10,895 feet; crosscutting, 3,771 feet; raises and winzes, 11,602 feet; powder-blast
working, 2,155 feet; and shafts, 254 feet. A total of 41,977 feet of diamond-drilling
was done.    Around 1,200 men were employed over the whole operations at this property.
COPPER-SILVER DEPOSITS.
TELKWA.
Hunter Basin.
Company office, 86 Richmond Street, Toronto, Ontario;  British Colum-
Conwest Explora- bia office, 514 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   F. M. Connell,
tion Co., Ltd.     President;   Alan  Cockeram,  Secretary-Treasurer;    Gordon  F.  Mac-
Donnell, in charge of B.C. operations; F. C. Tomlinson, Manager.
Capital: 2,000,000 shares, no par value; issued, 1,250,007 shares. Work was commenced late in 1939 and continued through 1940. A crosscut at 5,804 feet elevation
was driven to intersect the vein. Some drifting was done on the vein and high-grade
ore was mined selectively. A second crosscut driven at 5,680 feet elevation also intersected the vein. A road about 9 miles in length was built from the Bulkley Valley
coal-mine road. A camp was built and small power plant installed. A tramway was
installed to connect the camp with the portal of the lower tunnel. Camp elevation is
5,240 feet.    Work was continued during the winter.    Thirteen men were employed. PROGRESS NOTES. A 85
Development totalled 150 feet of crosscutting and 300 feet of drifting. About 45 tons
of ore was mined; 7 tons of this was shipped, yielding 7 oz. of gold, 122 oz. of silver, as
well as copper.
ANTIMONY DEPOSITS.
FORT ST. JAMES AREA.
This property, located on the south shore of Stuart Lake, 12 miles west
Stuart Lake      of Fort St. James, is under option to Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C.,
Antimony.       Limited.    During the past year a shaft, inclined at 45 degrees, was
sunk 130 feet.    At the bottom of the shaft a small amount of lateral
development was done.    In addition to this development a drift, 150 feet long, was
driven on another showing.    Sixteen men were employed.    Operations were suspended
for the winter.
MANGANESE DEPOSITS.
FORT FRASER AREA.
This claim is owned by Ben Teed, of Fort Fraser.    It is reached by
Big Marcelle     motor-road for about 10 miles from Fort Fraser via Stellaco to Fon-
Claim. deur's ranch, whence a trail extends for 1% miles to the showing.    The
formation in the area consists of cherty quartzite which occupies a
ridge rising to altitude 2,700 feet. At the top of this ridge a shaft has been sunk to a
depth of 12 feet on a small discontinuous slip about 2 inches in width, in which leached
manganese oxide has been deposited. Towards the bottom of the shaft the slip is
composed of gouge and crushed rock. The fracture planes of the quartzite are also
stained with a thin coating of black manganese oxide. In the vicinity of the shaft
some sections of the quartzite are also superficially stained with a thin coating of
manganese oxide. No manganese mineralization of any commercial importance was
observed on these showings.
MERCURY DEPOSITS.
FORT ST. JAMES AREA.
Pinchi Lake.
E. Bronlund, Superintendent.    The property owned by this company
Consolidated Mining is located on the north side of Pinchi Lake, north of Fort St. James.
and Smelting Co.    Production commenced during the past summer.    At about 110 feet
of Canada, Ltd.     below the surface (710 feet above lake-level), an adit was driven in
and through the ore-body.    Four raises were put up to surface in the
ore and a glory-hole opened around the raises.    Ore is drawn off in the tunnel and
trammed to a bunker, from which point it is taken by truck to the treatment plant.    A
new tunnel was started at 300 feet above lake-level, just above the treatment plant,
which will eliminate the truck-haul and permit further underground prospecting.
Change-house, bunk-house, and other buildings were erected.    The plant is powered by
steam.    A road 11 miles long was built connecting the mine with the Fort St. James-
Omineca River Highway.    A crew of forty-one men was employed.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.] A 86 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Company office, 2050 Eighteenth Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Empire Mercury   office, Minto, B.C.;   C. P. Riel, President;   S. W. Taylor, Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares,  50 cents par.    Development-
work was almost entirely confined to effecting a connection between
the No. 2 workings, which had access to the mill, and the No. 3 workings which opened
on to the opposite slope of the hill, and in which several bunches of ore had been previously discovered.    A crew of eleven men was employed to do this work.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
During 1940 a syndicate headed by A. E. Jukes spent four months at
Red Eagle Group, exploratory work on this property.    This work, done under the supervision of E. R. Shepherd, consisted of about 200 feet of tunnelling at
shallow depth and open-cutting along the strike of the mineralization for a distance of
some 1,500 feet.    Four miles of trail was also made passable for pack-horses.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
PYRITE DEPOSITS.
ECSTALL RIVER.
Company office, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Northern Pyrites, Port  Essington,   B.C.;    R.   H.   Stewart,   President;    Sherwood  Lett,
Ltd. Secretary-Treasurer;  E. E. Mason, Mine Manager.    Capital: 1,100,000
shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,050,716.    The property is situated on
the east side of Ecstall River, about 45 miles from Port Essington, and is reached by
river-boat from that point.    During the summer the main adit was extended 904 feet.
Four crosscuts, with total length of 635 feet, were driven into the ore-bodies.    A raise
was put through to the surface and three stations cut at intermediate levels;   5,964 feet
of diamond-drilling was done from the underground workings.
The total workings underground now comprise the adit tunnel, 2,780 feet in length;
seven crosscuts totalling 864 feet in length; and a raise at 60 degrees, about 600 feet
in length.
TUNGSTEN DEPOSITS.
ATLIN AREA.
McLeod White, Manager.    This company carried out extensive strip-
Consolidated Mining ping in deep overburden and some open-cutting on the Tungsten and
and Smelting Co.    Wolframite groups located at the head of Boulder Creek.    The min-
of Canada, Ltd.     eral deposit consists of irregular quartz veins in a feldspar porphyry
phase of phanerocrystalline granodiorite.    The  quartz is generally
barren, but wolframite occurs in very sparse and widely-distributed patches and specks.
WELLS.
Company office, 61 Broadway, New York, N.Y.;   F. Hewitt, President;
Columbia Tung-   A. E. Pike, Mine Superintendent.    This company owns and operates
stens Co., Ltd.    the Hardscrabble mine on Hardscrabble Creek, 5 miles north of Wells.
Only development-work was done at the property of this company.
The two-compartment shaft which gives access to the mine was extended 94 feet and
is now 312 feet deep.    The 300 level, as measured from the collar of the shaft, was then
opened up.    On this level a crosscut was driven 65 feet in a westerly direction to the PROGRESS NOTES. A 87
major shear, which strikes north-westerly. Forty feet from the shaft a second crosscut
was collared on the north wall of the first crosscut and advanced 573 feet, roughly
paralleling the major shear. From this long drive several short crosscuts were driven
to the shear. A quartz vein about 3 feet wide and well mineralized with pyrite was
intersected at 385 feet from the collar of the long drive, and after the drive was stopped
this vein was followed for several rounds. A little scheelite mineralization was detected
in a fracture, in the right wall of the drive at 170 feet from the collar. This fracture
was followed with a drift and a small body of scheelite was exposed. The crew averaged
eleven men. There were no additions to the surface plant and the mill remained
inactive throughout the year.
[Reference: Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
BRIDGE RIVER.
This group is located on both sides of the Manitou Road, on the south
Phillips Group,    side of Tyaughton Creek, and about 2 miles from the Manitou mine.
It is owned by E. Phillips, of Minto, who has worked the property
intermittently and has made several small shipments of tungsten ore.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
REVELSTOKE AREA.
This property, situated on Woolsey Creek, is now controlled by W. S.
Regal Silver. Campbell, J. F. McMillan, and E. N. Kennedy, 36 Dominion Bank Building, Edmonton, Alberta. The property is equipped with a complete
mining plant and a mill of 75 to 100 tons capacity, the latter located underground. A
total of twenty-two men, fifteen underground, was employed from August 15th to the
end of the year, under the direction of A. S. MacCollough. Additions have been made
to the mill equipment in an attempt to improve the scheelite recovery. The mill is
operated electrically and a 60-horse-power Fairbanks-Morse Diesel, belt-connected to a
75-k.v.a. generator, has been installed in the power-house for this purpose. Development included 125 feet of drifting.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 10, 1941.]
PLACER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
ATLIN AREA.
Spruce Creek.*
No. 1 shaft:   John W. Noland is the owner and operator.    During the
Dream Lease,     year the Columbia Development,  Limited, made an arrangement by
which this company was given a lay on 2,000 feet up-stream from the
face of the Dream workings, with an option on an additional 1,000 feet.
The Columbia Development started sinking operations in the No. 2 shaft and also
in the drift off No. 1 shaft. Part of the programme of this company consists of completion of a second exit from the underground workings. Soon after work began difficulty developed with the power equipment, and it was necessary to install new machinery.
Thirty-five men were employed.
Company office, 615 Credit Foncier Building, 850 Hastings Street West,
Spruce Creek     Vancouver, B.C.;   J. G. Wheeling, Manager.    Capital:   50,000 shares,
Mining Co., Ltd.   $1 par.    No. 1 shaft:   This is the upper shaft, which is now operated
on a lay by J. Clee and partners.    They are working up-stream, close
to the old workings, in ground not worked previously by the Colpe Mining Company.
Four men are employed on single shift.
* Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part B. A 88 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
No. 2 shaft: Matson and partners have a lay on this shaft from which there is a
connection to No. 1 shaft. All water from both shafts is handled at No. 2. The object
of the present operation is to reach the China section of the mine where there remain
some recoverable pillars.    Four men were employed.
No. 4 shaft: This shaft is operated by the company. There has been considerable
difficulty with water owing to caving which occurred where pillars had been drawn.
As a result it has been necessary to build a surface flume to carry across the area disturbed by the caving.    Twenty men were employed.
No. 5 shaft: A lay has been in effect at this shaft for some time but little has been
done on account of the water. The fluming of the creek mentioned above should permit
operation.
McDonald, McKay, and Munro, operators.    This lease adjoins No. 4
Clydesdale Lease, shaft of the Spruce Creek Mining Company.    Seepage of surface water
has delayed operations but, here too, the recent fluming of the creek
will be beneficial.    Only the laymen were employed.
Wolf Lease.—Vickstrom, Malm, and Johnson, laymen. This is a bench lease. The
laymen are employed in drifting up-stream adjacent to No. 4 shaft.
Croker Lease.—Fred Ohman and partners. This is a bench lease. A drainage-tunnel
from the Poker lease has been completed. A connection was also made through to the
Brown shaft, and these workings were unwatered.
Poker Lease (Lower).—Troha and partners. These workings have been idle since the
flume collapsed on the Olalla lease.
Otto Miller and sons.    These men have been working around old work-
Peterboro Lease,   ings which were damaged by water when the flume collapsed on the
Olalla lease.    A settlement was made between Miller and the Columbia
Development, Limited, and development of a new opening into the workings is now in
progress.
Gladstone Lease.—John Logar and partners. Three men were engaged drifting into
the bench and extracting pillars.
From this point down-stream to the lowest working on the creek, the St. Quentin
lease, most of the ground is being worked by laymen.
Boulder Creek.
Consolidated  Mining  and  Smelting  Co.  of Canada,   Ltd. McLeod  White,   Superintendent.
This is a hydraulic operation employing twenty-two men.
Pine Creek.*
P. Jensen, Superintendent.    This organization has only recently corn-
Northern        menced operations in the district.    Options have been acquired on all
Resources, Ltd.   of Pine Creek and Gold Run up to Surprise Lake.    Drag-line and bulldozers are used to move gravel to a mobile sluice-box.    Pine Creek has
been deepened from a point below the Spruce Creek Road in order to give drainage on
bed-rock farther up-stream.    Thirty men were employed.
Otter Creek.
Compagnie Francaise des Mines d'Or du Canada.—Walter Sweet, Manager.     Underground
operations have been suspended.    Walter Johnson & Company have an option on the
property and have done a considerable amount of prospecting and sampling.    Sweet and
three partners, working on a lay, opened a small hydraulic pit down-stream from the
underground workings.
Birch Creek.
Several groups of men were engaged in ground-sluicing.
Wright Creek.
Arctic Lease.—Hodges and Moran, laymen. This is a hydraulic operation employing
five men. Water is scarce, sufficient only for four to five runs of half-hour duration
daily.
Three other groups of men were engaged ground-sluicing farther up-stream.
* Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part B. PROGRESS NOTES. A 89
Ruby Creek.
Surprise Lake Mining Co., Ltd.—P. Matson and partners, laymen. This is a hydraulic
operation employing five partners.
Allen and Cawder Leases.—The Columbia Development, Limited, had an option on these
leases and did some prospecting.    The lease was dropped.
Scott Lease.—J. W. Noland, owner. Three men had a lay on this and were drifting
into the bench.
McKee Creek.
Conroy Fraction.—Clayton Gibbs and partners, laymen. Three men were engaged
drifting into the bench.
P. Nord is working alone driving drainage-tunnel to his lease. This is now in
over 300 feet with 150 feet yet to drive.
Watt, Lindgren, and Swanson.—The partners and three other men were engaged in preparing for a hydraulic operation. A deep drainage-ditch has been cut for 250 feet
through rim rock.
Fourth of July Creek.
Two groups of men were engaged prospecting on the creek.
Oscar Nelson and partners.    This lease has not worked for a number
Brown Shaft.     of years on account of excess water.    When the connection was made
from the Croker lease and the mine drained, operations were commenced by the laymen.    Three men were employed.
Wright and Brown, laymen.    This property did not work during the
Friendship Lease, year on account of excess water.    The McRae interests have taken an
option on this lease and other up-stream creek leases as far as the
small canyon below the Spruce Creek Mining Company No.  5 shaft.    In this area
considerable drilling was done during the summer.
Rose Claims.—Nelson and Johnson, operators. Five men were employed drifting
and extracting pillars.    Only the upper shaft was used.
James H. Eastman, Manager.    This company worked on the Olalla
Columbia Develop- lease.    Steam-shovel surface operations were continued.    At the start
ment, Ltd.       of the season drag-line methods were tried but were discontinued.
Early in the season delay was caused by the collapse of the flume which
carries the creek around the shovel pit.    Twenty men were employed.
Poker Lease (Upper).—Ivanie and partners. This bench lease adjoins the Olalla and
Rose leases.    Four men are employed drifting up-stream and into the bench.
SQUAW CREEK AREA.
Squaw Creek is located in the extreme north-westerly corner of the Province and
flows across the Yukon Boundary to its confluence with the Tatchenshini River. Individual placer-mining has been carried out on this creek for several years by both Indian
and white miners.
During 1940 twenty-five men were employed at thirteen different operations on
this creek, from which 175 oz. of gold is reported to have been produced from the
handling of 3,000 cubic yards.
STIKINE AREA.
This area was not visited during the year.
MANSON CREEK AREA.*
Lost Creek.
Company office, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.; Bert McDonald,
Lost Creek Placer Manager.    Capital:  100,000 shares, $1 par.   This is a hydraulic opera-
Gold, Ltd.       tion at the mouth of Lost Creek, using one monitor in the pit and
another stacking tailings in Manson Creek.    Slightly over 6 miles of
ditch and flume have been built to bring an adequate head of water from Manson Creek.
* Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part C. A 90 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The pipe-line from the pressure-box to nozzle is 2,900 feet long and has a head of 225
feet.    Approximately 125,000 cubic yards of gravel was moved.    Fourteen men were
employed.
Slate Creek.
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company did not operate during the year.
Germansen Creek.
Company  office,   789   Pender  Street  West,  Vancouver,   B.C.;    R.   C.
Germansen      McCorkell, President;   M. A. Manson, Secretary;   A. A. McCorkell,
Mines, Ltd.      Manager.    Capital:   750,000 shares, 50 cents par.    This company has
a hydraulic operation on the east bank of Germansen  Creek.    The
overburden is heavy and there is a band of glacial clay above the pay-gravels.    The
clay is very resistant to water and usually comes down in large pieces which have to be
blasted in the pit.    Thirty men were employed.
Company office, Stanley House, Hardinge Street, Nairobi, Kenya Col-
Venture Explora- ony;   British  Columbia office,  Prince  Rupert,  B.C.;   A.  A.  Lawrie,
tion Co. (East     Secretary;   W. H. Eassie, Manager.    Capital:   3,000 shares, no par
Africa), Ltd.      value.    This company has a hydraulic operation on the west bank of
Germansen Creek, near its junction with the Omineca River.    One pit
was in full operation during the past season and another was being prepared.    Two
monitors were in use in the operating pit, the face of which is over 100 feet high.   Over
1,000,000 cubic yards was moved during the season.    Fifty-three men were employed.
There are a considerable number of individuals employed on the various small
creeks in the district, sniping and prospecting.
TAKLA LAKE AREA.
Tom Creek.
Company office,  510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   T. A.
Tom Creek      Kelley, President;   Laura L. McGhee, Secretary;   J. J. Warren, Man-
Placers, Ltd.      ager.    Capital:   250 shares, $100 par.    This is a steam-shovel operation employing fifteen men.    A narrow canyon was encountered in the
channel and shovel operations were suspended about the end of August.
Prospectors were engaged on Vital, Harrison, Silver, and Quartz Creeks.
CARIBOO AREA.
Barkerville-Wells.
Company  office,   Rust  Building,   Tacoma,   Washington;    mine   office,
Lowhee Mining    Barkerville, B.C.;   C. W. Lea, President and General Manager;   Paul
Co., Ltd.        Barker, Secretary-Treasurer;   Henry Lea, Superintendent.    Capital:
750,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 635,156. The company operates an
hydraulic mine on Lowhee Creek near Barkerville. The hydraulic pit was advanced
260 feet during the season and about 250,000 cubic yards of material were washed
through the sluice-boxes. Operations started in mid-April and continued to the end
of October. During high water in the spring about fifteen men were employed on two
daylight shifts; after the water dropped in the autumn only one shift was employed.
The face of the pit is now only about 150 yards from the dam at the head of the creek.
Company office, Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   J. A. Wright,
Barkerville Gold   Secretary; C. A. McPherson, Superintendent.    Capital: 200,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      $1 par.    This company continued to develop the Waverly Placers at
Grouse Creek. A search is being made for the outlet of the old Grouse
Creek channel, known also as the Glasgow channel. Drilling during the year located a
portion of this channel and also some shallow pay-gravels alongside it. It was decided
to work these pay-gravels but, in order to establish dumping space and grade for the
sluice-boxes, it was necessary to pipe out a very narrow and irregular gutter leading
from the old pit to the location of these newly discovered gravels. This work was
completed at the time of inspection, and it is estimated that 86,000 yards of gravel has
been moved. PROGRESS NOTES. A 91
French Creek Placers.—A crew of ten men under the supervision of I. I. Felker was
employed at this property during the early part of the 1940 season. At the time of
inspection a No. 6 monitor was working under a head of 280 feet. It is reported that
15,000 yards of gravel was hydraulicked.
This property was worked during the season by J. J. Gunn, layman.
Red Gulch Placers. He employed as many as seven men during high water, and was using
a No. 4 monitor.    He was engaged in removing remnants of the channel left by other operators, but was unable to reach bed-rock at the mouth of his
sluice-boxes.
Black Jack Cariboo Mines, Ltd.—This company was engaged in small-scale sluicing
operations on Williams Creek, Grouse Creek, and Canadian Creek.
Little Valley Creek.
Lease of A. Fleury.—It is reported that two men sluicing on this creek treated 3,000
yards of gravel.
Lease of R. Niemeyer.—Sluicing and hydraulicking operations on this lease were
undertaken on a small scale.    About 1,500 yards of material was treated.
Lease of G. Halverson.—Two men hydraulicking on this lease treated 2,500 yards of
material.
Two-bit Creek.
Lease of T. Dunlop.—This lease is located on Two-bit Creek, a tributary of Little
Valley Creek.    Three men sluiced about 1,500 yards of gravel during the season.
McArthur's Gulch.
Lease of Knut Johannson.—This ground lies beside the Wells-Barkerville Highway,
midway between the two towns. Working alone, K. Johannson hydraulicked about
2,000 yards of material with a small monitor.
Wolfe Creek.
Lease of Thompson and Dowsett.—Wolfe Creek is a tributary of Antler Creek and lies
about 7 miles south of Barkerville. It is reported that a test-shaft was sunk and that
about 1,200 yards was hydraulicked.
Cunningham Creek.
Three leases located on Cunningham Creek, about 12 miles south of
Trehouse Placers. Barkerville, are owned by the Tregillus brothers and J. House, of
Barkerville.    They were worked by W. G. Beamish and associates, laymen.    These men used a small monitor and washed about 5,000 yards of gravels from
three small pits.    They were unable to get to bed-rock, and to do so would require
considerable development-work.
Test-work was also being done on this creek on behalf of Fraser and Pears, of
Quesnel.
Copper Creek.
Triple Hydraulic Placers.—Development-work was continued at this operation and
about 15,000 yards of material was moved with a small monitor.
Shepherd Creek.
Claim of R. D. Rees.—It is reported that R. D. Rees, working alone, treated about
1,000 yards of material.
Pine Creek.
Lease of J. P. Roddick.—The lessee and two other men were engaged at this property.
A No. 2 monitor was in use at the time of inspection.    Some test-work was also done.
Wells-Stanley.
This property is located beside the Quesnel-Barkerville Road, about 5
Ketch, Ltd.      miles west of Wells.    Working under the supervision of R. E. McDou-
gall, of Wells, a maximum of ten men was employed during the season. A 92 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The equipment was not changed during the year, but the operation was on a smaller
scale and there was available only 1,100 hours of water as compared with 1,400 last
year. A new pit is being advanced towards the old and is also being used to prospect
lower benches than formerly worked. About 60,000 yards was hydraulicked in the
old pit and about 20,000 in the new.
This hydraulic operation, owned by Messrs. Peebles and McDougall, is
Dragon Creek located on Dragon Creek, about 5 miles northerly from the Ketch prop-
Placers, erty.    Advance this season was through ground worked by Chinamen
in the early days. A No. 2 monitor is used and a hoist and high-line
permit removal of large boulders. About 35,000 yards of material was removed in an
advance of about 500 feet. This advance was to establish grade for the boxes, and is
heading for virgin ground above the Chinese workings. Some gold was recovered,
including coarse nuggets left behind by the Chinese.
Owned and operated by William Hong, this property is located about 1
Montgomery mile south of the Dragon Creek Placers. Development-work was con-
Creek Placers,    tinued during this season.    At the time of inspection two men were
clearing ground and piping from the top of the narrow pit, which was
about 60 feet deep. This pit is being advanced on grade up Montgomery Creek from
the Willow Creek flats. It has not yet reached bed-rock, and is as yet non-productive.
Some further drilling to outline the pay-channel was also done.
This property is owned and operated by William Hong, of Barkerville.
Sangdang Placers. It is located on Slough Creek benches, about 1 mile north of the Ketch
property. Gravel from an area of approximately 7 acres was removed
by hydraulicking. This area was south-west of and lower than the location of last
year's operation. The amount of water available, the equipment, and height of the
banks were all about the same as last year. The scarcity of large boulders reduced the
powder consumption, but the gold-recovery was low and much of the gold was in the
crushed bed-rock. Fifteen men were employed. Three monitors used an average of
30 second-feet of water.
Coulter Creek enters Slough Creek directly across from the Sangdang
Coulter Creek    operation.    Three laymen were operating in the pit of this property
Placers.        for two months during the summer.    They were using a No. 2 monitor
working under a head of 100 feet. Little water was available, which
fact necessitated the use of a flood-gate.
Jack of Clubs Creek.
Jack of Clubs Lake Mining Syndicate.—It was the intention of this syndicate, headed by
H. R. Hatch, to drift on ground lying about 5 miles up Jack of Clubs Creek from the
Wells Highway. A good road was made to the property and a camp established; after
this, work was discontinued.
Lightning Creek.
This operation is located on Grub Gulch, which enters Lightning Creek
Grub Gulch      from the west at Van Winkle.    It is owned jointly by William Hong,
Placers. Jack Hind, and Frank Freeman, all of Barkerville, and R. H. Harlin,
of Seattle.    During the year two of the partners, with one other man,
installed sluice-boxes and pipe-line and washed about 10,000 yards from two small pits.
A No. 3 monitor under a 75-foot head used about 18 second-feet of water.
R. E. McDougall and associates, of Wells, have obtained a working
Bowman Mines,   option on the property of this company, which lies along the west side
Ltd. of Lightning Creek above Amador Creek.    Development-work was con
fined to the Eldorado claim, located at the confluence of the two creeks
about 2 miles south-east of Stanley. A narrow gutter was piped out in the belief that
it was the probable outlet of a Tertiary channel in which test-work done some years ago
had revealed good values. A large portion of the hillside above Lightning Creek was
caused to slide into the creek by hydraulicking down to sloping beds of slum. In all,
about 225,000 yards were moved by these means and in the actual piping out of the
gutter. PROGRESS NOTES. A 93
This company is developing an underground placer operation beneath
Stanley Mining   Lightning Creek at Stanley.    The work is supervised by A. Brown,
Co., Ltd.        of Barkerville.    Before actual mining was started considerable drilling
was done to prove the ground.    A shaft has been sunk 16 feet to clay.
A head-frame, dry, machine-shop, and warehouse have been erected.
Stanley-Quesnel.
This property has been purchased from M. Sunberg by Mr. Graham,
Donovan Creek   of Kamloops, who intends to enlarge the scope of the operation.    He
Placers.        has cleaned the existing ditch and has started another, which eventually will tap Peters Creek.    At present this new ditch adds to his
water-supply  by  tapping  several  springs  on the  hillside.    This  has  permitted  the
installation of a larger pipe-line and monitor.
Company office, Saunders Avenue, Wells, B.C.;   H. B. King, Secretary;
Langford Mines,  K. K.  Langford,  Manager.    Capital:   100,000  shares,  $1 par.    This
Ltd. company owns the property known as Langford Placers, located 7 miles
north of the highway at Beaver Pass. During the first part of the
past season the property was operated by the Coast and Lakes Alluvials, Limited.
A carry-all and bulldozer were added to the equipment, as described in the Annual
Report for 1939. This year about 50,000 yards of bench gravels have been washed.
The Coast and Lakes Alluvials, Limited, ceased operations in midsummer and the
property reverted to the Langford Mines, Limited. The latter company has installed
a gravity water system for the sluice-boxes and a small steam plant which provides
power to stack tailings by scraper. A bulldozer will move the gravels to the sluice-
boxes.    Capacity of the sluice-boxes and undercurrents is about 60 yards per hour.
K. K. Langford is President and Manager of this company.    The prop-
. C.B.A. Mines, Ltd. erty lies midway between the Wells Highway and the Langford Mines,
Limited.    Two monitors are used, and the tailings are stacked by a
large crescent scraper run off a double-drum hoist, powered by a 50-horse-power Diesel
engine.
Fry's Placer.—This hydraulic operation was operated during 1940 by Thomas Fry
and two hired men. The slide mentioned in the Annual Report for 1939 made it necessary to open a new pit farther up Larsen's Gulch.
Carlsen's Placer.—This property is located about 1 mile north of Langford Placers
and is operated by Mr. Carlsen alone. During the year he was engaged in the construction of flume and sluice-boxes.
Slade Creek Placers.—This operation is located on Slade Creek beside the Langford
road about 4 miles north of the Wells Highway. Pipe and sluice-boxes have been
installed and a hydraulic pit started.
This operation is located about 3 miles from the Wells Highway at
Pearson's Placers. Beaver Pass, and adjoins the ground of the C.B.A. Placers. D. Pearson, owner of the lease, and E. Dreske, owner of a small monitor and
pipe-line, operated during the year. One other man was employed. Work was concentrated on shallow gravels at the mouth of Kee Khan Creek. Large boulders were
hoisted out of the pit on a stone-boat which was pulled up an inclined skid-road by
means of a hand-winch and block and tackle.
Hyde Creek Placers.—It is reported that some work was done at this property near
Beaver Pass Valley, owned by Dr. O. R. Hougen, of Mission City.
The operation of this company is located at the mouth of Mosquito
Slade Placers, Ltd. Creek, which enters Lightning Creek about 2 miles west of Wingdam.
The pit opened up last year was enlarged and about 37,500 yards were
treated.    The plant and crew were the same as the previous year.
Lease of E. J. Norman.—Formerly known as Svenson's Lease. Norman and various
partners carried out development-work and did considerable prospecting during the
year. The ground is located along the Swift River, between Lightning and Sovereign
Creeks.
Sovereign Creek.—D. D. Fraser and associates, of Quesnel, have done considerable
test-work on their ground on Sovereign Creek. A 94 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Quesnel-Prince George.
Company office,  612 Vancouver Block,  Vancouver,  B.C.;    President,
Cottonwood Gold Charles  Wm.   Neville;    Secretary,   Rowland   John   Neville.    Capital:
Dredging Co., Ltd. 25,000 preferred shares, $1 par;   100,000 common, no par value.    This
(N.P.L.).        company conducted test-work on the holdings of Jones, Burt, and Ayton
on the  Cottonwood  River,  about  7 miles  below  Cottonwood  House.
Seventeen test-pits were sunk in shallow gravels and about 1,000 yards were treated by
hand-sluicing methods.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.; J. W. Phillips,
Cariboo Cottonwood Manager. Capital: 250,000 shares, $1 par. The property of this
Placers, Ltd. company is located about 7 miles up the Cottonwood River from the
Prince George-Quesnel Highway, at Cinema, 20 miles north of
Quesnel. Hydraulicking operations commenced early in the year and continued until
freeze-up. It is reported that 460,000 yards were treated. The greater part of this
consisted of Cottonwood gravels which overlie the deep Tertiary channel. It is understood that the Tertiary channel proper was entered about the end of the season. At
the time of the last inspection eight men were working on three shifts, operating two
monitors under a head of 300 feet. The gravels were washed into sluice-boxes which
were 5 feet wide, laid with a slope of 7 inches in 12 feet for a total length of 164 feet.
The riffles were 40-lb. rails laid longitudinally. At the lower end there were five undercurrent boxes with slopes of 1 and 1% per cent. These are covered with a mat and
metal lathing. The main sluice-boxes can be cleaned in eight hours. The undercurrents are cleaned in four hours, one at a time, twice a week. All the material is
washed through a Laurentsen gold-saving box, and the gold is not handled until it is
removed from this box in the form of a high-grade concentrate. Water-supply is
adequate and dumping-space entirely satisfactory. Boulders are few and there is no
heavy timber-growth on the surface.
During the summer a storage-dam and spillways were constructed to provide emergency water-supply at a lake 14 miles from the pit. During the period of construction
the crew totalled about twenty-four men.    The road to the property was gravelled.
This   property   adjoins   that   of   the   Cariboo   Cottonwood   Placers,
Property of A. Bellos Limited.    Mr. Bellos worked a 50-foot bench on the north side of the
and Associates.     river at Mile 19, or about l1/. miles above the Cariboo Cottonwood
pit.    Using a 4-inch centrifugal pump to raise water from the river
to operate a No. 1 monitor with a 2-inch nozzle, he was able to treat ordinary gravel
and sand at the rate of about 25 yards per day.
Kent Dredging Co.—It is understood that test-work conducted on ground at the
mouth of the Cottonwood River was for the account of this company.
Tabor Creek.
This operation is on bench leases located along the Fraser River about
Operation of Thomas 15 miles south of Prince George.    At the time of inspection in June
Robertson et al.    the equipment consisted of a %-yard gas-shovel and two dump-trucks,
each of 3-yard capacity.    The trucks were used to haul gravel from
the shovel to a grizzly over the sluice-boxes.    Six men were employed, all on one shift.
The property of this company is located on the west side of the Fraser
Cormack Mining  River, about 20 miles north of Quesnel.    It is directly across the river
Co., Ltd.        from the old Tertiary mine, and access is by means of the Tertiary
mine road.    The ground that it is proposed to mine by underground
methods is said to be the extension to the south-west of the channel in the Tertiary
mine workings.    Old drift workings are flooded to the river-level, but above this are
still accessible.    At the time of inspection a frame building had been erected to house
a Denver gold-pan and a small compressor, the latter to operate a jack-hammer.    A small
storage-bin had been built above the gold-pan and a ramp extended from this to the
portal of an old adit.    Four men were employed. PROGRESS NOTES. A 95
Tertiary Mine.—It is understood that E. J. Reese, of Quesnel, is attempting to recover
values from the old dumps at this mine. Two partners built a small dredge with the
intention of recovering gold from a sunken bar down-stream from this mine.
QUESNEL-WILLIAMS LAKE.
Fraser River.
Operation of A. P. Himmelman.—Himmelman rented the Ainlay bowl plant belonging
to the Canamco Mining Company, and used it on his bench leases at Alexandria.
Quesnel River.
This operation is conducted on a bench on the north bank of the
Operations of     Quesnel River, down-stream from the mouth of Buxton Creek.    At the
H. Craig, Munn,   time of inspection of this property a mobile washing plant was being
and E. J. Reese,   constructed.    This consisted of an incline to the top of a wooden tower,
erected on skids, and with a bin at the top.    A bulldozer moves gravel
to the bottom of the incline where it is dumped into a skip.    On its return for more
gravel the bulldozer hoists the skip to the top of the incline where it dumps automatically into the bin.    From the bin the gravels enter the sluice-boxes through a grizzly.
A Diesel centrifugal pump is used to hoist the water to the boxes.    As soon as the
gravels within economic range have been treated, the entire plant is moved to a new
location along the bench.
Company office, 917 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.;  R. F. Sharpe,
Bullion Placers,   President and  Mine  Manager;   H.  Ray,  Secretary-Treasurer.    This
Ltd. company owns and operates the Bullion property on the South Fork
of the Quesnel River.    The season started on April 1st and continued
until September, when labour trouble caused the premature suspension of work for the
year.    It is estimated that the gravel handled amounted to 1,037,000 yards from the
South Fork pit, and 512,000 yards from the Drop pit.    In addition, about 150,000 yards
of solid rock was removed to provide a sluice-channel at the latter pit.    During the
earlier part of the season two monitors were employed, one in each pit.    Later, when
work was confined to the Drop pit, there was used a specially built monitor with an
llV_-inch nozzle, which required in excess of 90 second-feet of water under a head of
about 400 feet.    The crew varied from sixty to seventy-five men, a large number of
these being required for maintenance on the waterways leading to the pits.
Black Bear Mountain (Vicinity of Likely) .
L. O. Gostling, Manager.    The adit mentioned in the Annual Report
Perseverance     for 1939 had been advanced to a point 650 feet from the portal at the
Gold Mines, Ltd.  time of inspection in June.    It had passed through one channel, several
feet above bed-rock, and was half-way across a second channel when it
broke into a small slum-body and had to be discontinued.    An up-stream drive was then
started in order to reach bed-rock in the main channel.    It is understood that this has
been advanced about 50 feet, and that a ventilation raise has been driven 44 feet.
Keithley.
Company office, 504 Randall Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Placer Engineers, Keithley Creek, B.C.;  George Harrison, President;  George V. F. Hud-
Ltd. son, Secretary-Treasurer;   E. Lang, Superintendent.   Capital:  750,000
shares, no par value; issued, 541,452. The company is operating an
hydraulic mine on Keithley Creek, about 4 miles from the town of Keithley. Operations started in the Onward pit this year were planned to prove that the ancient
Keithley channel extended easterly from this pit. When the desired information was
obtained work was resumed in the China pit, where a remaining bench was cleaned off.
After this was completed, work was started to reopen the Onward pit, where it will be
necessary to cut a rock channel for the sluice-boxes. The channel which it is proposed
to work is above the old gutter drifted on by Veith and Borland in 1900. A crew of
twelve men was employed on three shifts throughout the greater part of the season. A 96 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
There was ample water until the middle of October. One monitor was used with a
15-inch intake and 6-inch nozzle. The head of water in the Onward pit was about 240
feet;   the monitor used about 30 second-feet.
Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  B. Boe, Manager.
Burrard Placers,   Capital:   2,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,000 shares.    At Pine Creek,
Ltd. 5 miles east of Keithley, this company continued operations with practi
cally the same crew and equipment as last year. One monitor was
destroyed by a bank-slide early in the season. The pit was ringed with a ditch to carry
surplus water from the hillside into the supply-flume, and so prevent further slides that
could be caused by seepage between the boulder-clay and gravel strata.
Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.    This property
Harvey Creek     is on Harvey Creek, about 5 miles north-east of Pine Creek.    A new
Mines, Ltd.      pit was started early in the season, down-stream from previous workings.    The overburden was stripped for about 1% miles and the sluice-
boxes  were  built  and  installed.    It  is  understood  that  piping  of  the  pay-gravels
commenced toward the end of the season.
CLINTON AREA.
Watson Bar Creek.
This lease extends up-stream from the mouth of the North Fork of
Canyon Lease.    Watson Bar Creek, tributary of the Fraser River, about 35 miles north
of Lillooet.    The lessee, J. Ross, and his two sons are drifting to bedrock and have advanced an adit about 150 feet in glacial clay and gravels.
This lease lies immediately above the Canyon lease.   Messrs. H. McLeod
Sunrise Lease,    and J. Ormond, partners, were engaged in ground-sluicing and in sinking a shaft to bed-rock.    A lV_-inch pump was used to remove seepage
from the shaft.
This lease lies above the Sunrise and is the top lease on the stream.
Homestake Lease. During the past season M. Daly and J. C. McWhirter have been engaged
in driving a long open-cut and adit on water-grade to reach bed-rock
at the lower end of their lease. The open-cut is about 300 feet long. The adit extends
150 feet from the end of the open-cut. To reach bed-rock an additional advance of 150
feet is required in the adit.
LILLOOET AREA.
Fraser River.
This lease extends northward along the east bank of the Fraser River
Lease of        from Sallus or 14-Mile Creek.    L. D. Leonard, the lessee, is testing an
L. D. Leonard,    old channel which intersects the Fraser at the mouth of Sallus Creek
and again about 1% miles farther north.    He has driven two short
tunnels along the rim of this channel and has done some open-cutting, all at the downstream exposure.
McGillivray Creek.
Lease of Leonie Weeden.—About 2,000 yards of gravel was moved on two leases.
Large boulders were handled by blasting and mechanical means.
Cayoosh Creek.
Lease of Clayton D. Waring.—This is located about 5 miles above the mouth of Cayoosh
Creek. D. Waring, lessee, has done considerable testing on this lease, and at the end
of the year was engaged in driving a tunnel to divert the creek from the pay-gravels.
Operation of Frank Johnson and Associates.—These men were attempting to recover gold
from the bed of Cayoosh Creek, about 7 miles above its mouth. A dam was built to
deflect the river through a diversion channel.    The dam did not hold. PROGRESS NOTES. A 97
VERNON AREA.
This property is situated on Monashee Creek, a tributary of Cherry
Rambler Placers.   Creek, about 42 miles from Vernon, B.C.    It is owned and operated by
H. J. Fallow and associates, of Vernon, B.C. The gold-bearing gravel
is in an old channel just below the present creek-bed and is mined by stripping the
overlying ground and taking up the pay-dirt by means of a gasoline-operated shovel
mounted on a truck. The gravel is then hauled by truck up a ramp and dumped
through a grizzly into a standard sluice-box. Water is supplied by a 12- by 24-inch
wooden flume with the intake some 700 feet up the creek. Boulders on the grizzly are
collected in a bin and moved by truck. Some 3,100 feet of new road was built and
about the same length of old road reconditioned to give access to the property from
the Vernon-Edgewood Highway. Camp buildings were constructed. Six men were
employed until November, when the operation ceased.
Rock Creek.
This property is situated on Rock Creek, about 3 miles from Camp
Jolly Creek      McKinney,  and  is owned  and  operated by V.  J.  Melsted,  of  Rock
Placers. Creek, B.C.    An old channel is being mined by drift methods.    About
200 feet of drifting and crosscutting was done during the season.    The
pay-dirt is stripped from bed-rock and transported in wheelbarrows to the surface
where the gold is recovered in a standard sluice-box.    Four men were employed.
NELSON AREA.
Nelson Placers, Ltd.—This property is situated on Forty-nine Creek, about 8 miles
from Nelson. It was operated under a lease by Herman Hallett and W. Swift. The
gravel is washed into standard sluice-boxes by monitors.
Hall Creek.
Several small operations were conducted during the summer.
Pend-d' Oreille River.
Several small operations employing one or two men were conducted along the river
during the summer months.
BIG BEND AREA.
The only activities in this area during the past season were on Lease No. 202 on
McCullough Creek, owned and operated by C. M. Williams and D. M. Fulmore, and on
the Hail Columbia lease at 62-Mile, owned and operated by Alex. McCrae and sons.
CLAY AND SHALE.
NEW WESTMINSTER AREA.
Company office, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; W. C.
Clayburn Co., Ltd. Cummings, Secretary-Treasurer; J. W. Ball, Manager.    Capital: 4,000
shares, $100 par. The mines and plant of this company are situated
about 50 miles east of Vancouver. The method of operating the fireclay deposits is
similar to the operating methods in the coal mines. The roadways and working-places
are well timbered and ventilation is good. Thirteen men are employed underground.
The production for the year amounted to: Fireclay from Kilgard mine, 14,363 tons;
No. 4b mine, 1,485 tons;   No. 9 mine, 1,935 tons;  and shale, 462 tons.
Sumas Firebrick Co.—This company operates a small fireclay quarry at Kilgard.    The
clay is transported by truck to the plant at New Westminster.   Three men are employed.
7 GABRIOLA ISLAND.
Thomas G. McBride, Manager.    This property was formerly operated
Dominion Brick   by the Gabriola Shale Products, Limited.    Work under the Dominion
Co. Brick Company was begun in August with a crew of twenty-three men
steadily employed until November, when the plant was closed for the
season.    The quarry operations proper are under the supervision of an experienced
workman and all blasting is done by electric cable and battery.
GYPSUM.
FALKLAND AREA.
Company office, Paris, Ontario;   British Columbia office, 804 Richards
Gypsum, Lime,    Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  R. Haire, President;   S. H. Reid, Secretary;
and Alabastine,   Alex. Jessiman, Superintendent.    Capital: 100,000 shares, no par value.
Canada, Ltd.     The company operates four quarries situated at Falkland, 40 miles
south of Kamloops, near the Kamloops-Vernon Highway.    Shipping
facilities are provided by the Canadian National Railway, over which the gypsum is
shipped to the calcining and board mill at Port Mann, B.C.
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 quarries are operated at an elevation of 500 to 800 feet higher
than the railroad bunkers, to which the gypsum is transported by an aerial tram some
3,500 feet long. The gypsum is mined in open quarries, and during the present year
work has been confined to operating the Nos. 2 and 5 quarries. The overburden is thin,
and with the quarry woi'k advancing into the side of the mountain the walls rise to a
considerable height above the quarry floors, making it necessary to keep the walls at a
low angle of inclination for the safety of the employees. The drilling is done by jack-
hammers. Sixteen men are employed and approximately 3,000 tons of gypsum is
shipped from these quarries per month.
LIMESTONE.
KOEYE RIVER AREA.
Koeye River Limestone Co.—P. Christensen, operator. The property of this company
comprises two small quarries on the Koeye River, about 7 miles south of Namu. Limestone is shipped to the Pacific Mills at Ocean Falls. During the year 19,380 tons were
produced.    Eight men were employed.
GRAND FORKS AREA.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Ltd.—The Company owns and
operates the Fife limestone quarry, situated at Fife, B.C., above Christina Lake. About
22,000 tons of limestone was mined and shipped to Trail to be used as a flux. An
.average of eighteen men was employed.
TEXADA ISLAND.
Pacific Lime Co.—O. Peele, Manager. Two quarries are operated by this company
at Blubber Bay. The plant produces quicklime, hydrated lime, and other limestone
products.    About thirty-two men have been steadily engaged in the quarries.
B.C. Cement Co.—This company operates a limestone quarry on the opposite shore of
Blubber Bay from the Pacific Lime Company. ■ The limestone is shipped to the Bamber-
ton plant.    Robert Hamilton is in charge.    Ten men are employed.
Van Anda Quarries.—F. J. Beale, Manager. The quarries and crushing plant are
situated at Vananda. Twenty-three men have been steadily employed in producing
Jimestone and products from this operation. PROGRESS NOTES. A 99
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Office, Belmont Building, Victoria, B.C.    Capital:   32,000 shares, $100
B.C. Cement Co.  par.    This company operates two limestone quarries—one at Bamber-
ton and one at Texada Island—and a cement plant at Bamberton.    The
total crew for the whole operation is around 110 men.
MICA DEPOSITS.
BAKER INLET AREA.
This property of two claims is located in Baker Inlet, about 20 miles
Baka-Mica Group, southerly of Prince Rupert.    It is owned by P. M. Ray, of Prince
Rupert.    The mineral deposit consists of a micaceous zone varying
from a few inches to several feet in width and occurring in altered mica schists of the
Prince Rupert series.
The zone is traced by stripping and natural outcrop for a distance of about 666
feet and occurs at about 400 feet elevation and about 600 feet from the shore. In the
traced length of 666 feet, about 420 feet is exposed and comprises lengths from 6 to
100 feet consisting of from 10 to 90 per cent, sericite mica content across widths of
from 2 to 7 feet.
During the year, 80 tons of crude sericite mica were produced and shipped from
the Sericite claim to Vancouver for marketing.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part B.]
STONE, SAND, GRAVEL.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Burrard Inlet.
Coast Quarries, Ltd.—T. Burrows, Superintendent. The quarries are situated at
Granite Falls, near the head of Burrard Inlet. The stone is used for general construction-work.    From seven to ten men are employed.
North Vancouver.
Deeks Sand and Gravel, Ltd—Company office, 101 First Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.;
H. S. Armstrong, Secretary;   T. O. Burgess, Superintendent.    Six men are employed.
Cascade Sand and Gravel Co.—Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.;
W. J. Timlick, Secretary-Treasurer; W. A. McCullum, Manager. Capital: 1,000 shares,
$100 par.    Fifteen men are employed.
Highland Sand and Gravel Co. (formerly B.C. Sand and Gravel Co.).—This plant is now under
the management of the Cascade Sand and Gravel Company. Complete alterations are
being made to the screening plant. Until this is completed, no work is being done at
the gravel pit.
Road Materials Co.—Company office, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; A.
Ellis, Secretary and Manager. Capital: 100 shares, $100 par. Part of this plant has
been dismantled.    Only two men are employed.
Gilley Bros. Quarry.—The plant and quarry of this company are situated at Silver
Valley, on the Pitt River. From twenty to thirty men are employed. The stone from
this quarry is used for general construction purposes.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Quarry.—Operated by Gilley Bros. Around sixteen men are
employed. The sand and gravel are moved from the face of the quarry by hydraulic
guns and by power-shovels, and carried by conveyer-belts to the screening plant.
Nelson Island.
Vancouver Granite Co.—This company operates a dimension stone granite quarry on
Nelson Island.    Work has been intermittent throughout the year. A 100 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
by
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in Districts.
Coast Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Nanaimo, Victoria, Vancouver, and
New Westminster.
Northern Interior Lillooet,  Ashcroft,  Clinton,  Quesnel,
Cariboo, and Peace River.
Interior Similkameen, Osoyoos, Nicola, Vernon,
and Kamloops.
East Kootenay and Boundary Greenwood,    Trail    Creek,    Nelson,
Slocan, Arrow Lake, Ainsworth,
Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort Steele,
Windermere, and Golden.
Northern Atlin, Stikine, Portland Canal, Skeena,
and Omineca.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their
respective districts.
Board op Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard —  Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an
examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to
coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard Nichol Nanaimo Station.
James L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould Princeton Station.
John T. Puckey Fernie Station.
The District Inspectors of Mines have their headquarters in the different mining
areas as follows: John MacDonald, Nanaimo; James Strang, Victoria; Edward R.
Hughes, Cumberland; James A. Mitchell, Lillooet; John G. Biggs, Princeton; Hamilton C.
Hughes, Nelson;  H. E. Miard, Fernie;  and Charles Graham, Prince Rupert.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended
December, 1940, was 1,667,827 tons, being an increase of 189,955 tons or 12.8 per cent,
over production of 1939.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton, and
Northern Districts, produced 891,309 tons, a decrease of 24,605 tons or 2.6 per cent,
from 1939.
Vancouver Island collieries produced 732,659 tons, an increase of 15,325 tons or
2.1 per cent, over 1939.
The Northern District produced 5,824 tons, an increase of 1,056 tons over 1939.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 152,786 tons, a decrease of 41,026 tons or
21.1 per cent, from 1939. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 101
The East Kootenay District produced 776,518 tons, an increase of 214,560 tons or
38.1 per cent, over 1939.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the
year at the various mines:—
Colliery and Mine.
0)
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la
Tons of Coal
mined per Employee daily.
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IS
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O oj
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ZiD
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee
daily.
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee
for Year.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine) 	
230,449
126,800
146,706
183,162
3,696
5,100
32,818
298
1,238
621
713
379
679
232
242
266
251
262
222
258
128
240
183
211
184
108
625
268
322
377
16
15
75
3
2
2
2
5
7
1.59
1.95
1.71
1.93
0.88
1.76
1.69
0.77
2.58
1.69
1.68
0.41
0.90
368
473
455
486
231
392
437
99
619
310
356
76
97
496
236
284
233
13
12
57
2
2
2
2
5
6
2.00
2.22
1.94
3.13
1.08
1.91
2.23
1.15
2.57
1.69
1.68
0.41
1.04
464
537
516
South Wellington (No. 10 mine) 	
786
284
Chambers* mine  _ __-_
Beban mine .„   „
Loudon mine      __  	
425
575
149
619
Biggs' mine 	
Lewis' mine  	
310
356
76
Neville Prospect  —  	
113
Coalmont Colliery	
Middlesboro Colliery 	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co., Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co 	
22,449
24,618
81,780
23,595
344
62
165
250
251
104
162
100
100
37
2
2.22
1.49
3.27
2.54
1.65
138
246
817
637
172
88
66
80
27
1
4.06
2.26
4.09
3.48
3.30
252
373
1,022
874
344
Bulkley Valley Colliery 	
5,488
336
227
78
13
6
1.86
0.73
422
56
8
3
3.02
1.43
686
123,963
652,555
181
276
157
574
4.36
4.11
789
1,136
117
433
5.85
5.46
1,059
1,507
40
20
4
0.50
10
2
1.00
Collieries op Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island collieries was 732,659 tons. Of this amount,
107,492 tons or 14.6 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 5,903 tons or
0.8 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; and 595,368 tons was sold
in the competitive market. Of the amount sold in the competitive market, 515,771 tons
or 86.6 per cent, was sold in Canada; 34,049 tons or 5.7 per cent, was sold in the United
States;  and 45,548 tons or 7.7 per cent, was sold elsewhere.
Collieries of the Nicola-Princeton Inspection District.
Of the gross output of 152,786 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-
Princeton District, 2,055 tons or 1.4 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market;
7,345 tons or 4.8 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; and 143,202
tons or 93.8 per cent, was sold in the competitive market in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries in the East Kootenay District was 776,518 tons. Of
this amount, 50,082 tons or 6.4 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 14,794
tons or 1.9 per cent, was used by producing companies as fuel; 88,418 tons or 11.3 per
cent, was used in making coke; and 623,102 tons was sold in the competitive market.
Of this amount, 548,412 tons or 88 per cent, was sold in Canada and 74,690 tons or
12 per cent, was sold in the United States.
12841) A 102
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the
past five years. Similar figures for the years prior to 1936 are shown in previous
Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of ;   Tons of Coal
Employees mined per
at Producing Employee for
Collieries. Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
1936
1938
1940
East Kootenay District
Coast District	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District,
Coast District—	
Whole Province _.
East Kootenay District
Coast District ,
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District
Coast District....- -
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District.
Coast District	
Whole Province	
470,606
875,865
1,346,741
459,136
985,551
1,444,687
434,068
875,360
1,309,428
561,958
915,914
1,477,872
776,518
891,309
1,667,827
606
2,208
2,814
628
2,525
3,153
693
2,269
2,962
731
2,245
2,976
731
2,143
2,874
776
396
478
731
390
458
626
386
442
768
468
496
1,062
462
580
459
1,556
2,015
462
1,824
2,286
467
1,621
2,088
538
1,629
2,167
550
1,625
2,175
1,025
563
668
972
540
632
972
540
675
1,044
662
682
1,412
548
766
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various
collieries and districts, compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 103
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lz; LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1940, 2,874 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the
Province, a decrease of 102 men from 1939. Taking the average of all the mines in
Vancouver Island District, about 23 per cent, of the working-days was lost through lack
of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton District, the different collieries worked an average
of 70 per cent, of the working-days. In the East Kootenay District the average for the
year was about 76 per cent.
The table on page 104 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and
about the mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground
and above ground, compiled from returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1940, imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled
219,615,000 gallons, and 22,395,000 gallons of fuel-oil was imported as bunker-fuel for
shipping. The fuel-oil sold in British Columbia consisted of 147,419,000 gallons of
fuel-oil and 37,053,000 gallons of light fuel-oil. Of this amount the major transportation companies operating in the Province used 66,270,000 gallons.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1940 the importation of coal into British Columbia consisted of 236 tons of
anthracite, 2,591 tons of bituminous, and 1,419 tons of lignite. In addition, 600 tons of
coke and 453 tons of petroleum coke were imported. All imports were from the United
States.
Alberta coal and fuel sold in British Columbia amounted to 311,232 tons. This consisted of 134,840 tons of bituminous coal, 41,055 tons of sub-bituminous coal, 61,747 tons
of domestic coal, 70,705 tons of coke, and 2,885 tons of briquettes.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia during past years:—
Year. Short Tons. Year. Short Tons.
1931  193,060 1936   244,928
1932  136,188 1937   269,023
1933  119,026 1938 ,   238,435
1934  123,968 1939   239,227
1935  221,748 1940   311,232
Of the 1,367,339 tons of British Columbia coal marketed, 147,407 tons was sold for
domestic and industrial use in the Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and
Ontario, and 281,831 tons was sold for railroad use in these Provinces; 8,365 tons was
sold for railroad use in United States, and 155,504 tons was sold for railroad use in
British Columbia; 100,374 tons was exported to United States and 156,537 tons was
sold for ships' bunkers; 45,548 tons was sold in other countries. The tonnage of coal
used in the Province was 471,773 tons of British Columbia coal, 311,232 tons of Alberta
coal and briquettes, and 4,246 tons of imported coal.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1940, 2,874 persons were employed in and around coal mines. Six fatal
accidents occurred during the year as compared with two during 1939.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 2.08 as compared with
0.67 for 1939. In 1938 the ratio was 3.37; in 1937, 3.17; in 1936, 2.84; in 1935, 1.67;
in 1934, 2.07; in 1933, 0.97; in 1932, 2.21; and in 1931, 1.22. The average for the
ten-year period being 2.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1940 was 3.65;
during 1939 the figure was 1.35; in 1938, 7.63; in 1937, 6.92; in 1936, 5.94; in 1935,
4.21; in 1934, 4.45; in 1933, 2.37; in 1932, 5.21; and in 1931, 2.81. The average for
the ten-year period being 4.41 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined. A 106
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during
1940 and comparative figures for 1939:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1940.
1939.
1
4
1
1
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd	
No. 10 mine, South Wellington  , —	
1
Totals 	
6
2
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents in 1940 and their
percentage of the whole, and comparative figures for 1939:—
Cause.
1940.
1939.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
2
3
1
1
1
50.00
33.34
50.00
16.66
50.00
6
100.00
■ 2
100.00
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident
in their respective classes in the years 1940 and 1939:—
1940.
1939.
Cause.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
2
3
1
1
1
1,477,872
833,913
555,942
1,667,827
1,437,872
6
277,971
2
738,936
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1940 was 277,971 tons, compared with 738,936 tons in 1939.    The average for the ten-year period was 226,804.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during
the year 1940 compared with 1939, according to Inspection Districts:—
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Totals.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-
cars and
Haulage.
Mine
Explosion.
Falling
Timber.
1940.
1939.
Vancouver Island ,  - _ -	
....
1                    3
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
3
1
6
Province (1939) - - —
2 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 107
Ratio of Accidents.
Accident Death-eate.
District.
Per 1,000 Persons         '.    Per 1,000,000 Tons of
employed.                           Coal mined.
1940.
1939.
1940.
1939.
2.90
1.36
0.55
2.42
6.82
1.29
1.39
5.15
Province (1940)..  	
Province (1939)           	
2.08
0.67
3.65
1.35
The details regarding the occurrences of fatal accidents in coal mines during 1940
are as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to Thomas Chapman, fireboss, Beban mine,
Nanaimo, on February 27th was due to deceased being crushed between a trip of empty
cars that was being run into a level parting. Chapman had ordered the rope-rider to
lower the cars, but meantime a loaded car in the parting had become derailed and while
rerailing this car he was struck by the empty trip;  he died ten hours later.
The fatal accident which occurred to Oscar Numella, tracklayer, No. 10 mine, South
Wellington, was due to deceased being struck and crushed by a single car which was
being hoisted on a slope. The car was travelling at a low speed and the slope at this
point is 11 feet wide at the floor level. Numella died one hour after the accident.
There were no witnesses of this accident, although the miners at the face of the slope
were only some 60 feet away.
The fatal accident which occurred to Anibale Ius, miner, Michel Colliery, on July
6th was due to deceased being struck on the head by a post timber which sprang out of
position 9 feet from where deceased was standing. There was no evidence of sudden
weight from the roof to account for this unusual accident.
The fatal accident to Christopher Mills, fireboss; James Waring and Eugino Gava,
miners, in No. 10 mine, South Wellington, on December 22nd was due to an explosion
of gas. All three men were killed instantly. The details in regard to this explosion
are given in another part of this report.
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during
1940, together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of
explosive used, and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities
include all explosives used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines) :—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine)_
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)_
Northfield Colliery-
South Wellington (No. 10 mine).
Lantzville Colliery...	
Chambers' mine 	
Beban mine. _  	
Loudon mine 	
Cassidy mine  	
Biggs' mine 	
Lewis' mine -
Big Flame Wellington (Richardson)..
Neville Prospect —  	
Totals for district .
49,167
46,600
68,033
74,375
4,000
1,600
14,500
150
900
300
700
450
200
260,975
230,449
126,800
146,706
183,162
3,696
5,100
32,818
298
1,238
621
713
379
679
732,659
68,099
84,750
102,781
85,413
6,000
3,700
23,780
300
2,200
600
1,200
900
170
379,893
4.61
2.72
2.15
2.46
0.92
3.18
2.26
1.98
1.36
2.07
1.01
0.84
3.38
2.80
0.72
0.55
0.66
0.87
0.66
0.43
0.61
0.50
0.41
0.50
0.58
0.50
1.17
0.68 A 108
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
6,000
6,150
20,350
4,000
200
22,449
24,618
81,780
23,595
344
9,000
9,075
34,500
8,000
250
3.74
4.00
4.01
5.89
1.72
0.66
0.67
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co., Ltd   _	
0.58
0.50
0.80
36,700
152,786
60,825
4.17
0.60
Northern District.
1,500
200    j
1
5,488     ]
336    ]
2,700
193
3.66
1.68
0.55
1.03
1,700     j
5,824    |
2,893
3.42
0.58
East Kootenay District.
Coal Creek Colliery.
Michel Colliery	
Totals for district -
2
54,172
123,963
652,555
4
67,493
61,981.50
12.04 |
0.50
0.80
54,174
776,518
67,497
14.14
Peace River District.
200
40
400
0.2
0.50
369,049
1,667,827
511,505
4.52
0.72
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Lb.
Monobel of different grades   319,741
Permissible rock-powder     49,308
Total  369,049
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable the Minister of Mines, under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause
(i), " Coal-mines Regulation Act ":—
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
Polar Monobel No. 7.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1940, mining-machines produced approximately 890,000 tons or
53.4 per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type
of machine used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Chain Undercutting.
Puncher
Type.
-
28
25
31
20
3
8
25
28
84
23
61 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 109
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,606 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this
number, 225 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,381 were electric lamps of
various makes, as follows:   Edison, 2,311;  Wolf electric, 70.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking,
and illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Method oi
Locking.
Illuminant used.
Colliery and Mine.
Magnetic
Lock.
Automatic
Clip.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
37
67
25
17
2
3
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
499
226
267
261
24
18
96
5
5
4
3
4
6
36
31
24
17
2
3
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
500
262
268
261
24
18
96
5
5
4
3
4
6
165
1,418
127
1,456
Nicola-Princeton District.
8
8
8
1
1
88
70
80
70
6
6
8
8
1
1
88
Middlesboro Colliery  "	
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co., Ltd. -	
70
80
70
6
24
314
24
314
Northern District.
1
6
21
1
6
21
Totals for district 	
7
21
7
21
East Kootenay District.
12
53
130
460
12
53
130
460
65
590
65
590
Peace River District.
2
2
Totals for Province —   	
263
2,343
225
2,381 A 110 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the
1930 Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp
approval given under Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp
carries the symbol BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the
General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18H of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States
Bureau of Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol
BM-18H and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric
Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
No. 13.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Koehler Manufacturing Company,
and known as the Super-Wheat Model " W " electric safety cap-lamp under Approval
No. 20 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the
Department of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all
persons underground in the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by
the officials of the mines in the carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at ten mines and underground at five.
The purpose for which it is used, together with the amount of horse-power in each
instance, is shown in the following table:—
Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Above ground—
Winding or hoisting  2,538
Ventilation  1,660
Haulage  386
Coal-washing   1,876
Miscellaneous   6,979
Total horse-power   13,439 INSPECTION OF MINES. A 111
Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Underground—
Haulage     1,295
Pumping      1,320
Coal-cutting	
Miscellaneous   25
Total horse-power     2,640
Total horse-power above and below ground  16,079
Of the above amount, approximately 1,178 horse-power was operated as direct
current and 14,901 horse-power as alternating current.
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the
amount of ventilation in the main airways and working splits of the different mines.
In a number of instances where the methane content of the air on face-lines or working
areas tended to indicate abnormal outflows as indicated by the flame safety-lamp or
other testing devices, the Inspector prohibited the use of explosives until such a condition was remedied, and that part of the mine again examined by him and reported in
normal condition.
In no instance was this condition due to the ventilation reaching the minimum of
100 cubic feet per man per minute set out by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," General
Rule 12.
Methane Detection.
The Burrell Methane Detector and the M.S.A. Methane Detector were in general
use throughout the year to detect the presence of methane in percentages less than could
be detected by means of the flame safety-lamp.
The flame safety-lamp is in general use as the every-day means of testing for the
presence of methane by the firebosses and mine officials, and during the year intensive
efforts were made by the Inspectors to train firebosses and miners to estimate closely
the percentage of methane indicated by very small " gas-caps " on the flame safety-lamp.
This work was carried out underground where the gas-caps could be immediately calibrated with the results found at the same time and place by one of the above-mentioned
methane detectors.
While practically all workmen underground use the electric safety-lamp, many of
the miners were given practical instruction in the use of the flame safety-lamp as a
methane detector, and all new men who apply for a coal-miner's certificate of competency
must show that they possess this knowledge.
Mine-air Samples.
Sampling of mine-air was maintained throughout the year, this varying in the
number of samples with the conditions anticipated or existing. During the year 230
samples were taken, and of this number sixteen were lost or destroyed in transit.
The samples are analysed by the Dominion Bureau of Mines, and this service is of
much value to this Department. The results, in addition to their immediate value, form
a record for future mines that may be opened in the vicinity of the presently operated
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
With the exception of several small operations where only a few men are employed,
all the mines in the Province had inspection committees appointed by the workmen
under General Rule 37, section 101, " Coal-mines Regulation Act," in operation through-
°Uttheyear" COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust as per the Regulations for Precautions against Coal-dust was
well maintained during the year and a total of 1,744 samples was taken. Very few
samples showed less than the minimum of 50 per cent, incombustible content required A 112
REPORT OF THE  MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
by the regulations. This is largely due to the fact that it is the policy of the Inspection
Branch to maintain the incombustible content of the dust as high above the minimum
as possible, and this is done by frequent reminders to the managements of the different
mines when there is a tendency towards a decrease in the incombustible content of
the dust.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On March 1st while men were being lowered in Northfield shaft, Canadian
Collieries, a loose lag-screw allowed the upper end of one of the cage-guides to project
sufficiently far to arrest the cage. The cage safety-catches came into action and the
cage safely held until the trouble was diagnosed and remedied. The cage and men were
suspended as above for fifteen minutes, but no one was injured.
On April 29th while coal was being hoisted in No. 8 shaft, Comox Colliery, the main
cross-beam of the cage broke from the main upright member, causing the cage to tilt
and jam in the shaft. It was found that faulty or oxidized rivets had failed. No one
was injured.
On April 29th, and again on May 10th, outbursts of methane occurred from the
floor in 2 West section, No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery. Considerable volumes of gas were
given off, accompanied by rumblings in the floor. The men were immediately withdrawn until the gas was cleared off by the ventilation.    No one was injured.
On June 7th a violent " bump " occurred in the 26 West district of No. 1 East mine,
Coal Creek Colliery. The bump heaved the floor over a considerable area, threw down
a large amount of roof, and blew out several of the ventilating-doors. It occurred on
night shift when there were no men at work.
On August 4th a 2,200-volt armoured cable on the Main slope of No. 5 mine, Comox
Colliery, heated to redness at a point about 1 mile from the shaft, but this was discovered and the power cut off before an open fire resulted. Investigation showed that
the cable had been damaged at some time prior to the occurrence.
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1940 there were seven prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coalmines Regulation Act," as follows:—
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
April 22..
May 14	
May 20...
July 19-
Oct. 2
Oct. 3
Dec. 21....
Michel Colliery..
Northfield Colliery __
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
Northfield Colliery	
Northfield Colliery	
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
Miner	
Fireboss	
Fireboss	
Haulageman
Miner	
Haulageman
Timberman_.
Stored a supply of explosives underground
Failed to see that all men had taken
shelter before he fired a shot
Firing a shot where there was a
visible gas-cap on his flame safety-
lamp
Had lucifer matches in his possession underground
Quarrelling and fighting underground
Quarrelling and fighting underground
Had lucifer matches in his possession underground
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $50< and costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $5 and costs.
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $5 and costs.
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four fully-equipped mine-rescue stations in charge
of trained instructors located in the chief coal-mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo,
Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie. At any of these stations persons engaged in
mining may be trained without cost, either on their own application or by request from
any mining company. Where a mine is some distance from the rescue-station the
instructor, by arrangement, will take the rescue apparatus to such mine and give the
necessary training there, this also without cost. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 113
In addition to the above stations, a fully-equipped station with apparatus provided
by the Department is maintained at Middlesboro Collieries, Merritt, under the care of
the mine management, and a smaller unit of rescue apparatus is stationed at the
Premier mine, Stewart. The use of these stations and apparatus is available to any
medical practitioner, and during the year many requests for oxygen and apparatus for
administering same are received and given immediate response.
In the larger mining areas of Nanaimo, Cumberland, and the Crowsnest Pass,
experienced mine-rescue teams maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the
year and so keep ready for any emergency calls. The rescue-stations also serve as
centres for first-aid lectures and training.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual
use of oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere, and instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-
work. The training itself is strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a
special physical examination before starting training and must be under 34 years of age.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, thirty-two new men
took the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
1070
10-86
1071
John David Williams 	
South Wellington.
1087
Jack Tantrum   ,. 	
Cumberland.
1072
Ralph Maughan 	
South Wellington.
1088
Frank Lawson 	
Cumberland.
1073
Joseph Addison 	
South Wellington.
1089
Erskine Scott. 	
Cumberland.
1074
Edward McGechie Charles	
South Wellington.
1090
Edward Morrisey __  	
Cumberland.
1075
Norman Tony Laskovitch	
South Wellington.
1091
Jack Southern  ,,.
Cumberland.
1076
William Hunchuck ,	
Cumberland.
1002
Alexander Percy Barnes	
Bevan.
1077
1093
1078
1094
1079
Robert Weir  	
Cumberland.
1095
Arthur H. Dockrill  ,	
Cumberland.
1080
1096
1081
Thomas Cochrane	
Cumberland.
1097
Edward Harry Nagle	
Kimberley.
1082
George High—  	
Cumberland.
1098
George William Law ___	
Kimberley.
1083
Joseph Frew     _
Cumberland.
1099
John Robert Carney 	
Kimberley.
1084
Robert Hannah	
Cumberland.
1100
John Stocks Carter   	
Kimberley.
1086
Alex. Somerville  	
Cumberland.
1101
Harry Badgley Gilliland	
Kimberley.
MINE-RESCUE AND FIRST-AID WORK.
Mine-rescue teams carried on training at the mine-rescue stations at Nanaimo,
Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie, and the different Mine Safety Associations were
active in promoting first-aid and mine-safety work during the year.
There are Mine Safety Associations at East Kootenay, Princeton, Vancouver
Island, Britannia, Bridge River, Portland Canal, and Zeballos; the membership of these
Mine Safety Associations consists of mine officials and working miners who are particularly interested in safety-work, and the Inspector of Mines for each district takes
active steps to assist in every possible way to spread this work. The Mine Safety
Associations are assisted financially by the Department of Mines, and at all the different
centres competitions in mine-rescue work, safety, and first aid were held and materially
resulted in an increasing number of miners being interested in working more safely
themselves and in spreading safety education generally.
It may be added that while this safety and first-aid movement was originally
started for the mining industry, these competitions have attracted men and teams from
the logging camps, pulp industry, military units, and several other industries where
large groups of men are employed.
In addition to male teams, large numbers of ladies', boys', and girls' first-aid teams
take part, and these also help to spread the gospel of " safety first." A 114
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year nineteen coal companies operated twenty-four mines, employing
2,175 men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there were
twelve managers, fourteen overmen, 102 firebosses and shotlighters; a total of 128, or
one official for every seventeen persons employed underground.
"COAL SALES ACT."
During the year very few complaints were recorded under this Act. These complaints were either on the substitution of an inferior grade of coal for a superior grade
or excessive slack in lump or nut coal.
In the Vancouver area, valuable assistance is rendered by the Weights and
Measures Inspector for Vancouver City, who keeps a close check on the sale of coal
in the City.
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief
Inspector of Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales
Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Comox.... 	
Old Wellington 	
Ladysmith-Wellin gton..
Hi-Carbon  	
Lantzville-Wellington..
Fiddick-Douglas _.
Chambers-Extension.—
Wellington Big Flame.. „
Biggs-Wellington  	
Berkley Creek-Little Wellington
Nanaimo Jingle Pot  	
C a ss i dy- Wellin g ton  	
Middlesboro ...   	
Coalmont  —
Tulameen Valley Coal, Princeton.
Granby Tulameen  	
Hat Creek-
Tulameen -	
Bulkley Valley..
Aveling 	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek-
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Colliery and District.
Nos. 5 and 8 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland).
No. 9 mine (Wellington) _.   	
No. 10 mine (South Wellington) 	
Mixture of Canadian Collieries' coal and B.C. Electric coke
Lantzville (Lantzville)  	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington).
Chambers' (Extension) _	
Richardson mine -  _	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)	
Berkley Creek Colliery (Extension).
Old East Wellington (Nanaimo)	
Cassidy mine (Cassidy) —	
Middlesboro (Merritt)   	
Coalmont (Coalmont)  — —
Tulameen (Princeton) -	
Granby (Princeton)  	
Hat Creek (Lillooet)....
Tulameen Collieries (Princeton).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa) 	
Aveling (Telkwa)	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek) 	
Michel (Michel)   -	
Producing Company.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Lantzville Colliery.
Fiddick mine.
R. H. Chambers.
A. B. Richardson.
Biggs' mine.
Hugh McLean Davidson.
Thos. Lewis.
A. H. Carroll.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen  Coal Co.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Canada Coal and Development
Co., Ltd.
Tulameen Collieries.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. A 115
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR GOAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; H. E. Miard, member; and James
Strang, member and Secretary to the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Department of Mines in
Victoria. The examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the
Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929.
Two examinations were held in 1940, the first on May 15th, 16th, and 17th, and the
second on November 13th, 14th, and 15th. The total number of candidates at the
examinations were as follows: For First-class Certificates, 2 (2 failed) ; for Second-
class Certificates, 5 (2 passed, 3 failed) ; for Third-class Certificates, 18 (8 passed,
10 failed).    There were no candidates for Mine-surveyors' Certificates.
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various
classes:—
Second-class Certificates.—Thomas Eccleston (Jr.) and Stanley J. Lawrence.
Third-class Certificates.—Sidney Hunt (Jr.), James Cochrane, Primo Cimolini,
James Fairley, Reginald O'Brien, John Magielka, John E. Anderson, and Thomas M.
Wynne.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under
the Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the
holder of a certificate of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed
underground in any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, either
by hand or machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all coal-mining districts.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate has failed to
satisfy the Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working
knowledge of the English language.
During 1940 there were 193 candidates for coal-miners' certificates; of these, 188
passed and 5 failed to qualify.
In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute certificates were issued to
those who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for
the use of their premises for holding the examinations when necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate as
a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of a coal-
miner for a period not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination
before the Board. A 116 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
Richard Nichol.
The equipment at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen
apparatus; six sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell
all-service gas-masks; two H.H. inhalators; one Sparklet resuscitator; and seventy
self-rescuers. A sufficient supply of materials to maintain the above equipment in
service is kept at all times.
There is an 85-horse-power truck at this station to permit immediate transportation
of the equipment in a case of emergency.
Trained teams from the different mines underwent a monthly practice, and six new
men took the full training course and obtained certificates of proficiency in this work.
During the year there were twenty calls for oxygen from the Nanaimo and Lady-
smith Hospitals. These calls were given immediate attention, as were also calls for
oxygen from the fire and police departments of Victoria and Oak Bay.
Immediate response was made to the call for the rescue truck and apparatus on the
occasion of the explosion in No. 10 mine, South Wellington, on December 22nd, where
the rescue apparatus was used by a trained crew to explore the part of the mine affected
and locate the bodies of those killed.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one Sparklet resuscitator;
one H.H. inhalator; and forty self-rescuers, with sufficient supplies to maintain the
equipment in service.
During the year four trained teams carried out rescue training, and twenty new
men underwent the full training course and obtained certificates.
Emergency calls for oxygen by the local hospital and medical men were attended to
at once, 500 cubic feet being supplied in response to the various calls.
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; eleven sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; twenty self-rescuers; one
H.H. inhalator, with sufficient supplies to maintain the above in service.
During the year the Instructor from this station made visits to various mines to
train men in the use of the rescue apparatus. These men took the full training course
and obtained certificates of proficiency in this work. In addition to the mine-rescue
work, a large number were given training in first aid.
Calls from the local hospital for oxygen treatment during the year were given
immediate attention. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. A 117
FERNIE.
BY
J. T. PUCKEY.
The apparatus at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen
apparatus; eleven sets of the McCaa apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service
gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; and thirty-five self-rescuers, with sufficient supplies to
maintain the equipment in service.
There were no emergency calls from the mines during the year. In response to
various calls from the Fernie Hospital, 600 cubic feet of oxygen was delivered throughout the year.
Six men from the Sullivan mine of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
of Canada took the full training course and obtained certificates, and the station was in
use throughout the year as the centre for first-aid training and instruction. A 118 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
EXPLOSION AT No. 10 MINE, CANADIAN COLLIERIES (D.), LTD.,
SOUTH WELLINGTON.
On Sunday morning, December 22nd, an explosion occurred in No. 10 mine, South
Wellington, owned and operated by the Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
The explosion occurred in a part of the mine known as No. 4 Heading district, consisting of two headings with the necessary crosscuts, which had been driven from the
main slope towards the outcrop of the seam, chiefly to provide a new intake airway.
The No. 4 heading was provided with a separate ventilating current of fresh air
with a volume of 10,000 cubic feet of air per minute which passed up the main heading
and returned by the counter-heading. These headings had almost reached the
extremity of the coal; but as the outcrop at this point is covered by a surface deposit
of gravel, a raise was started in the roof strata of the second crosscut back from the
heading faces to connect with a 30-foot shaft already sunk through the surface gravels
to the rock-head. The heading faces were approximately 100 feet past the crosscut
from which the raise was driven.
The faces of the headings were bratticed to the face, although the crosscut from
which the raise was started was open except for any raise supplies that were piled
between the raise and the counter-heading. Apparently sufficient air was passed around
the heading faces to keep them free from gas.
The raise was provided with a manway, midwall, and a " booster " fan, and one-half
of the raise was used as a chute for the debris; the fan was used only at intervals for
clearing out the smoke and gases due to blasting.
The connection between the raise and the shaft was so nearly completed that the
last round of shots fired by the shift finishing at 9 p.m. on the night of December 21st
shattered the rock in the bottom of the shaft but did not make an opening. There were
also two drill-holes through from the raise to the shaft.
The round of shots on the 21st was fired at the end of the shift and no examination
of the place was made by the fireboss in charge and he so reported in the fireboss's
report-book. On the night shift starting at 11 p.m. on the 21st there was no one in the
mine except the night-shift fireboss; and as there was usually a considerable amount
of work involved in reaching the raise face after firing a round of shots, the night-shift
fireboss did not examine this area, and made a report to this effect.
On the morning of the 22nd nine men, including the mine manager and two firebosses, went underground, with Christopher Mills, one of the firebosses, and two men,
James Waring and Eugino Gava, being detailed to work at the raise in No. 4 heading.
Fireboss Mills was informed by the night-shift fireboss that no inspection had been
made of the No. 4 heading; this in addition to the report made by the night-shift fireboss in the book;  and Mills stated that he would attend to this examination at once.
Apparently Mills took the two men with him up No. 4 heading, but his following
course of action is in doubt, as nothing more was known until the explosion which killed
all three men.    This occurred a few minutes before 8 a.m.
The other men in the mine were engaged in repair-work and did not feel the shock
of the explosion, but noticed a disturbance in the air-current, and on investigating
found evidence of the explosion at the foot of No. 4 heading and the body of James
Waring a few feet up the heading beside a trip of two cars of rock which he had brought
down the heading. The mine manager arrived a few minutes later and efforts were
made to explore the No. 4 heading, but the gases and smoke made this impossible and
an emergency call was made to the Inspector of Mines for the use of the rescue
apparatus from the Nanaimo Mine-rescue Station, and for more men.
Meantime efforts were made to restore the ventilation, but it was later found that
the No. 4 heading return airway was tightly caved; this necessitated an attempt to
advance the ventilation by bratticing the main No. 4 heading. A team using the two-
hour oxygen apparatus entered the heading and reached the raise crosscut and the
heading hoist where the bodies of Mills and Gava were found. All men had been killed
instantly. , Bluff
Winch on end
Lamp battery in front of winch     >,
FATAL ACCIDENT
• OF
EUGINO GAVA, CHRISTOPHER MILLS and JAMES WARING
No. 4  HEADING of No.  10 MINE
CANADIAN   COLLIERIES   (D)   LTD.
SOUTH   WELLINGTON.   B.C. EXPLOSION AT No. 10 MINE, CANADIAN COLLIERIES. A 119
A large amount of timber was blown out, and there was considerable caving over
the whole area, although there was only one impassable cave.
CAUSE OF THE EXPLOSION.
There can be no doubt that this was wholly a gas explosion, and that coal-dust did
not enter into the propagation of the explosion in any way. From an appraisal of the
damage done and the length of roadways damaged by the explosion, there must have
been a considerable body of gas; and it is difficult to understand why Fireboss Mills
did not discover this gas, as an examination to determine the condition of the atmosphere is the main purpose and duty of a fireboss.
Mills was aware that No. 4 heading area had not been examined by the fireboss on
night shift, and stated he would make the required examination at once on reaching it.
A contravention of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" was made when he allowed the
two miners to accompany him, as he ought to have made the required examination and
report of conditions before permitting these men to enter the section. Whether this
contravention had any bearing on the explosion is doubtful, as Mills apparently failed
to discover the gas in any case.
SOURCE OF IGNITION.
Mills' flame safety-lamp was found in good condition and no shots had been fired,
which left the electric signalling system and bell on No. 4 heading as the only other
probable source of ignition. After reaching the raise crosscut the men had loaded two
cars from the chute and lowered them down No. 4 heading with Waring accompanying
the cars and Mills operating the hoist. The chute is within speaking distance from the
hoist and it is probable that no use was made of the electric signalling system until
Waring signalled from the foot of No. 4 heading to stop the trip there; the explosion
apparently occurred at this moment.
It is possible that Mills examined No. 4 heading as far as the raise crosscut and
started the men to work with the intention of later examining the headings and the
raise. Mills' flame safety-lamp was found beside Gava's body, which may indicate that
Mills at the hoist had sensed the presence of gas and called to Gava to bring the safety-
lamp immediately prior to the explosion.
From the evidence of the different witnesses at the inquest concluded on January
6th, no bodies of inflammable or explosive gas had ever been found in this No. 4
heading operation, and it may be that this immunity had produced a false sense of
security and belief that this favourable condition would continue. An abandoned mine
adjacent to No. 10 mine experienced many sudden outbursts of gas and evidence of such
an outburst in No. 4 heading was carefully sought, but there was definitely no evidence
of any outburst.
It is possible that some derangement of the ventilation, either due to the firing of
the round of shots at 9 p.m. on the 21st or to some caving during the eight hours following, permitted the gas to accumulate either in the raise or in the heading faces; in
either case an ordinary examination should have discovered any such body of gas.
The accompanying plan shows the different points in connection with this explosion. A 120 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald and E. R. Hughes.
J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.; H. R. Plommer, Vice-President,
Canadian Collieries Vancouver, B.C.; P. S. Fagan, Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo, B.C.;
(Dunsmuir), Ltd. John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.; H. Baird, Superintendent, Cumberland, B.C.; R. K. Smart, Assistant Superintendent,
Nanaimo, B.C. Mr. Hunt retired from active service with the company at the end
of May, and was succeeded by Mr. Baird, who has established his headquarters at
Cumberland.
Northfield Mine.—A. Newbury, Manager; J. Sutherland, Overman. This mine is
situated 4 miles north of Nanaimo and has railway facilities over the Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway, which makes connection with the company's private lines to the
bunkers and wharves at Nanaimo. The colliery operated 266 days during the year and
produced 146,706 tons of coal from the Nos. 1, 3, and 4 Wellington seams, the major
portion of this tonnage coming from low long-wall faces where the coal is mined by
Anderson-Boyes coal-cutting machines and loaded on to Meco shaker-conveyers for
transportation to the loading-points on the various levels. All new development during
the year was confined to the Nos. 3 and 4 seams which so far had not been touched in
this part of the field. The No. 3 seam, with an average thickness of 20 inches, was
developed by a heading driven on the full pitch of the seam for a distance of 600 feet
from the main haulage-level at the top of No. 5 Incline. As the seam did not increase
in thickness, this area was abandoned. The No. 4 seam, which averages from 20 to 22
inches in thickness, was opened up by a main level driven from the hoisting-shaft at a
point 75 feet up from the main shaft-bottom. A temporary landing was made for a
distance of 120 feet from the shaft and at the inby end of the landing a main heading
was turned off and driven for a distance of 650 feet at the end of the year. As in
previous years, a considerable amount of advance drilling has been done in doubtful
areas to guard against accidental contact with old workings. Working conditions have
been found generally satisfactory in the course of inspection and, except for an occasional emission of black-damp when roadways were being driven through gob areas in
the No. 5 Incline district, the ventilation was good throughout the workings and
measured as follows at the last inspection in December:—
No. 5 Incline split: 16,200 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-seven
men and four horses.
Slope split:   18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men.
Main north return: 47,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of seventy-seven
men and four horses.
Twenty-one samples of air were taken in the return airways, the analyses showing
the methane content to be under 0.5 per cent, travelling in the air in these roadways.
Eighty-three samples of dust were collected in accordance with the requirements of the
Coal-dust Regulations, all but one of these being well above the minimum standard of
incombustible content stipulated in the regulations; 42,000 lb. of rock-dust were used
in treating 18,000 feet of roadways in the maintenance of the above satisfactory
condition.
No. 10 Mine, South Wellington.—William Frew, Manager; Jos. Wilson, Overman.
This mine is situated in the Cranberry District about one-half mile south of the old
No. 5 mine, and now ranks as the chief producing mine in the Nanaimo area, operating
251 days during the year with a total production of 183,162 tons. The rapid development of this mine has entailed a number of changes and additions to the plant, consisting of the installation of a Gardner-Denver compressor with a capacity of 750 feet
of air a minute;   a combined blacksmith and car-repair shop, 20 by 40 feet, was con- INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 121
structed convenient to the mine portal; a 35-horse-power electric hoist was installed on
the rock dump, and a new road built from the main Island Highway to the mine yards.
The old tipple was remodelled and extended to take care of the increased output, and a
new fire-protection system installed around the surface works.
Due to the rapid expansion of the workings under limited ventilating facilities,
together with an occasional free outflow of gas from the working-faces, it was found
necessary on several occasions to prohibit blasting in certain areas and the management
advised that a substantial increase in the quantity of air available was required to keep
the methane content in the general body of the air to the lowest possible minimum.
With a view to effecting a permanent improvement in the general ventilating system,
two new return airways, one on each side of the Main slope, were driven and connected
to the fan-shaft while a new intake raise was driven from No. 4 Incline to connect with
a 10- by 10-foot vertical shaft which was sunk to a depth of 38 feet from the surface to
the bed-rock. These roads were all connected and in operation at the end of the year,
providing two separate intakes and two returns for the mine. New development has
been centred chiefly in the Main slope and No. 2 Diagonal slope; each of these roadways
was driven a distance of 1,500 feet during the year with the necessary levels and
headings turned off these main arteries to form each district into a separate panel.
Apart from the occasions mentioned when it was found necessary to prohibit blasting,
the ventilation was generally good, the quantity passing in each split at the last inspection measuring as follows:—
No. 1 split:  35,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty men.
No. 2 split: 31,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-four men.
Main return:  93,720 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighty-four men.
Twenty-six samples of air were taken at the testing-stations in the return airways,
the resultant analysis showing the methane content to vary from 0.44 per cent, in the
return from No. 1 split to 1.25 per cent, in the return from No. 2 split. One hundred
and eight samples of dust were collected from the roads in general, all of which were
above the standard of incombustible content as stipulated in the Coal-dust Regulations.
In this connection, 196,000 lb. of dust was used in treating 30,000 feet of roadways.
Prospect Slope, Extension.—This prospect is situated at Extension on the southerly
end of the " Harewood Ridge," and is at present operating the Wellington seam. This
slope was originally opened by the old Vancouver Coal Company in 1899 and driven for
a distance of 650 feet from the surface. A counter-slope was also driven a distance of
150 feet and connected to the main slope by a small shaft for ventilating purposes. In
August of this year, the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, dewatered the slope
to a depth of 550 feet and turned off levels to right and left to prove the seam. These
were driven a distance of 120 feet and 130 feet respectively before being abandoned on
account of low coal and rock in the seam. Two new levels were started at a point 150
feet from the portal and had been advanced a distance of 80 feet, with the coal varying
from 4 to 7 feet in height. The surface plant consists of a locomotive-type boiler which
provides power to operate a Dobeson hoist on the surface, a small pumping unit underground, and a Capell-type fan located at the return outlet. This fan is driven by a
small vertical engine and has a capacity of 5,000 cubic feet of air a minute.
F. W. Beban Company, Operators; George Frater, Overman. This
Beban Mine. mine is situated in the Extension district and operates an isolated
portion of the Wellington seam which was left in this area by former
operators. No new development-work was undertaken during the year, all operations
being confined to retreating with extraction of the pillars from the boundary barriers
toward the Main slope. Working conditions have been found fairly satisfactory during
the course of inspection, although nearly all roadways suffered materially from crushing
incidental to pillar extraction. The ventilation was found satisfactory at all inspections, with an average of 14,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of twenty-four
men and two horses. Fourteen samples of air were taken, the analysis of these showed
a very slight percentage of methane in the return air-current.
Nos. 2 and 3 Mines.—R. H. Chambers, Operator;   Charles Webber and
Chambers'.      Thomas McCann, Firebosses.    These mines are located in the Extension district and operated in a small portion of the Wellington seam A 122 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
which had been left by former operators. All available coal that could be extracted
with safety was finished in the No. 2 mine in April, when this mine was abandoned.
No. 3 mine was developed by a slope driven for a distance of 450 feet from the surface,
but a succession of faults and rolls retarded further development in the lower section
of the mine. A small gasoline-driven fan was installed at the upcast shaft, but it was
seldom found necessary to have it in operation, as a good current of air was available
by natural means.
Nos. 1 and 2 Mines.—H. N. Freeman, Manager. These mines are
Neville Prospect, situated on the Extension Ridge and operated in a small portion of the
Wellington seam which had been left as a barrier along the outcrop by
the management of the old Extension Colliery. Working conditions were found to be
generally satisfactory at all inspections.    No accidents were reported from these mines.
Nos. 2 and 3 Mines.—A. B. Richardson, Operator; N. Mclntyre, Fire-
Big Flame.       boss.    These mines are situated in the South Wellington area and were
operated in small outcrop areas of the Douglas seam. No. 1 mine
worked 104 days and produced 211 tons before being finally abandoned near the end of
May. The No. 2 mine was opened on June 1st, when a slope was started from the
surface to reach a few pillars presumably left intact along the outcrop by former
operators. An average crew of five men was engaged at these mines on a co-operative
basis. Working conditions were found to be fairly good and operations were carried
out free from accidents.
J. McKellar and Associates, Operators;  James Nimmo, Fireboss.   This
No. 5 Mine,     mine was opened by a slope 300 feet in length, which was driven from
Cassidy. the surface through faulted ground to reach a portion of the Douglas
seam left in this particular area when Granby Colliery was abandoned.
Three attempts were made to develop this area by levels off the slope, but in each case
the coal was pinched out by rolls and steps. It would appear that the future of this
operation depends on extending the slope for a distance of approximately 100 feet to
reach a virgin portion of the seam already located by a bore-hole from the surface.
This extension would have to be driven through solid rock and presents an expensive
problem to a small operator. The mine is ventilated by natural means and working
conditions have usually been found satisfactory at all inspections. No accidents were
reported.
No. 1 Mine.—J. A. Challoner and Associates, Operators; J. A. Chal-
Lanrzville Colliery, loner, Overman.    This mine is situated on the shore-line of the Strait
of Georgia, 9 miles north of Nanaimo, and operates in the Wellington
seam, which is reached by a slope 270 feet in length from the surface. As in former
years, operations continue on a co-operative basis with an average crew of fourteen
men engaged. Ventilation and working conditions in general were found to be fairly
satisfactory during the course of inspection. At the last inspection in December,
12,000 cubic feet of air a minute was circulating for the use of eleven men. Eleven
samples of air were taken at the testing-station in the main return airway, none of
which showed more than a very slight trace of methane in the general body of the air.
No accidents were reported.
James Biggs, Operator and Fireboss. This mine is located in the
Biggs' Mine.     Wellington area and was operated over a period of 183 days, producing
621 tons from a small patch of outcrop coal with a crew of three men
engaged. The ventilation is provided naturally and has always been found ample for
all requirements; working conditions generally were found fairly satisfactory. No
accidents were reported during the year.
W. D. Loudon, Operator; James Rallison, Fireboss. This mine is also
Loudon's Mine, located in the Wellington area and operates in a small portion of outcrop coal left in the district by former operators. Working conditions
have been found satisfactory and sufficient ventilation is provided by natural means for
all practical purposes.    No accidents were reported.
T. and G. Lewis, Operators; G. Lewis, Fireboss. This mine is situated
Lewis' Mine,     in the East Wellington district and comprises a small area of coal left
in the vicinity of the old Jingle Pot slope.   The mine was abandoned in INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 123
the early part of October as all available coal that could be extracted with safety had
been recovered.    Working conditions were found generally good at all inspections.
James A. Quinn, Manager; John S. Williams, Overman;  A.W.Watson
No. 8 Mine,     and Daniel Morgan, Shiftbosses;   W. Johnstone, M. Frame, J. Queen,
Comox Colliery.   T. Shields, E. Surtees, J. W. Smith, A. Maxwell, Frank Woods, Frank
Coates,  and  James Weir,  Firebosses.    The mine is  situated in the
vicinity of the Lake Trail road and 2 miles east of the mine camp at Bevan.    The seams
are reached by two shafts, each 1,000 feet in depth.    The No. 2 seam is the only one
being operated at the present time;  it lies at a depth of 700 feet.    Before opening out
on the long-wall advance method of work, a shaft pillar 1,000 feet in diameter was left
and only narrow openings driven through it.
The mine operated throughout the year and during this period all development has
been on the south side of the shaft. During the early part of the year the main South
level encountered a downthrow fault displacing the seam 27 feet; this fault cutting off
No. 1 and No. 2 walls and thus causing coal production to be discontinued in this area.
A rock tunnel driven to regain contact with the seam encountered the coal after a
drivage of 200 feet. A crosscut was then driven to No. 1 Left level to re-establish
ventilation, but no further development was done in this part of the mine. In the No. 1
Incline section, the face of the incline advanced to a point 2,000 feet from the Main
level intersection, the advance during the year being made by a long-wall triple-entry
system, the incline forming the centre entry and the right and left counters made at the
top and bottom of the long-wall face-line. By this method of advance, long-wall conveyer units, of 300 feet in length, have been developed on both sides of the incline. To
give the required height, the incline and counter roadways are brushed in the roof and
the rock stowed on either side of the roadways. Four long-wall faces of 300 feet in
length are developed and working daily, three long-wall faces are developed and ready
for operation, and another four long-wall faces are being developed. The total length
of active face-line is 1,200 feet with an average seam thickness of 3 feet 6 inches, with
varying thickness of bone from 1 inch to 15 inches. Airways have been maintained to
keep pace with this development. The coal is mined by means of Anderson-Boyes long-
wall machines and1 solid places driven with post-type punching machines. Meco-type
conveyers are used to convey the coal down the working-faces and load it into mine-cars.
Roof conditions are not of the best and require close attention on account of the
numerous slips encountered, together with cap-rock or false roof of from 1 inch to
6 inches, which comes down with the coal.
The Keith fan which formerly provided the mine ventilation was found to be inadequate for the needs of this growing mine, and on January 14th was replaced by a
Sullivan fan having a rated capacity of 250,000 cubic feet of air per minute, with a
7-inch water-gauge. It is becoming increasingly evident that this is a potentially gassy
mine, and for this reason it is essential that the area on long-wall face-lines be kept as
large as natural conditions will allow. The main air-current of the mine is divided into
five splits, and at the time of the last measurements the quantities were found to be as
follows:—
No. 1 split: 8,140 cubic feet per minute.    No workmen in this split.
No. 2 split:  18,000 cubic feet per minute.    No workmen in this split.
No. 3 split: 13,320 cubic feet per minute for thirty-five men and one horse.
No. 4 split: 68,400 cubic feet per minute for sixty men and two horses.
No. 5 split: 12,500 cubic feet per minute for thirty-five men and two horses.
Main South return: 142,065 cubic feet per minute for ninety-five men and five
horses.
In addition to the above-measured air-current, ventilation is also provided for the
inactive North side. Adding the quantities passing in both the north and south sides
of the mine, the total amount of air passing to the upcast shaft during the last measurement was 227,500 cubic feet per minute;  this with a water-gauge of 7 inches.
Thirty-six samples of mine-air were collected during the year, two of which were
spoiled by leakage. This sampling serves as a check on safety-lamp readings and gives
advance information regarding future ventilating requirements. The analysis of the
air-sample taken in the main South return airway on December 4th showed a methane A 124 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
content of 0.86 per cent., with 142,065 cubic feet of air passing at the time; so that
1,221.7 cubic feet per minute of methane was being produced from the active South
side, this being equivalent to 1,759,248 cubic feet of methane per twenty-four hours.
The analysis of the mine-air sample taken in January, 1940, showed 1.3 per cent, of
methane with 76,230 cubic feet of air, or 1,427,025 cubic feet of methane for the twenty-
four-hour period. Thus, a substantial increase in methane emission was noted during
the year. A total of 327,040 lb. of rock-dust were used underground during the past
twelve months, 110,000 lb. of this being used in tamping shots and the remainder in
treating the roadways and face-lines of the mine. As an additional precaution against
the coal-dust hazard, all main roadways have an adequate water-supply and the coal is
subjected to a spray of water as it is discharged from the conveyer-pans. Two hundred
and sixteen samples of mine-dust were analysed during the year for the purpose of
ascertaining the percentage of incombustible matter and moisture in the dust collected
from the roof, floor, and sides of the mine roadways.
This mine was inspected on thirty-one occasions during the year.
R. B. Bonar, Manager;   John Christie and Irving Morgan, Overmen;
No. 5 Mine,      William  Herd  and  Thomas  Eccleston,  Shiftbosses;    Thomas  Smith,
Comox Colliery.   L. Cooper, A. G. Jones, William Devoy, A. Williams, C. Williams, G.
Harvie, A. Dunsmore, R. Walker, R. O'Brien, Thomas Robertson, A.
Sommerville, J. Vaughan, and R. Littler (Sr.), Firebosses.
This mine operates the No. 2 seam, which is reached by a shaft 280 feet in depth.
All the workings lie to the dip of the shaft and are accessible by four slopes which are
driven from the level of the No. 1 seam. All of the output is produced from long-wall
faces and their accompanying development places. At the end of the year there were
eight active long-wall faces, having a total length of 2,060 feet. The average daily
output of coal during the month of December was 800 tons, with 470 men employed
underground and fifty-seven men on the surface.
The long-wall faces are equipped with Meco-type pan-conveyers which carry the
coal from the face-lines to loading-points on the levels. In addition to the pan-
conveyers, two 20-inch gate-end belt-conveyers are used to carry the coal from the pan-
conveyers to mine-cars in loading roads where roof brushing is done. Where this
system is used the roof brushing is stowed on either side of the roadways. All mining
is done in the rock-bands, either in the centre of the seam or underneath, by means of
Anderson-Boyes coal-cutting machines which mine the coal to a depth of 6 feet. In the
development places the cutting is also done in the rock-bands by means of Hardiax post-
type punching machines. Compressed air is used to operate the coal-cutters and
conveyers.
A timbering innovation introduced during the year was the use of telescopic legs
for supporting stringers in roadways being driven and maintained close to the
advancing long-walls. Previously, these roadways had to be brushed and retimbered
as many as four times before final settlement took place; this was very costly and
hindered haulage and ventilation at the time of maximum squeeze. The use of these
telescopic legs, together with roof brushing and subsequent rock stowage has done much
to improve roadway conditions in the vicinity of the working-face. The total length
of roadways to date using this type of support is approximately 4,000 feet, and while
results are so far highly satisfactory, this innovation is yet in the experimental stage.
Due to the gassy nature of the mine the closest attention is at all times required in
maintaining efficient ventilation, and while it has been necessary on several occasions
during the past year to temporarily prohibit blasting on some of the long-wall faces and
levels, there were no instances of protracted prohibitions being required. At the time of
the last inspection the quantities measured in the intake airways were as follows:—
Main slope: 38,940 cubic feet per minute for the use of forty-seven men and one
horse.
No. 2 West: 48,300 cubic feet per minute for the use of fifty-six men and two
horses.
No. 4 West: 37,100 cubic feet per minute for the use of thirty-three men and
two horses. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 125
The analysis of mine-air samples taken in the returns during December, together
with safety-lamp tests in the East return, indicated that approximately 3,500,000 cubic
feet of methane is given off from this mine during the 24-hour period.
Two hundred and sixty-one tons of rock-dust was used during the year. The dust
was distributed by hand on the roadways and long-wall faces of the mine for the purpose of combating the coal-dust hazard, and is also used for the tamping of shots. To
further counteract the danger from coal-dust, the coal coming off the conveyer-pans is
sprayed with water and all Main slope trips are sprayed with water as they leave the
various partings. Samples of mine-dust are collected each month from the different
roadways as required, and a total of 563 such samples were analysed, all of which
exceeded the minimum requirements of the dust regulations.
A 500-horse-power electric hoist situated at the top of the Main slope, carrying
5,300 feet of 1%-inch rope, hauls all the coal from the various sections of the mine to
the top of the slope. The slope is laid with heavy steel as a precaution against derailment of trips, which of a necessity must travel at a high speed on this long haul. A
man-trip is run on this slope to bring the workmen out at the end of the shift. Additional man-trips are run in the No. 2 West and Main slope sections.
The six underground compressors which formerly supplied the compressed-air
requirements of the mine have been replaced by three surface compressors located near
the top of the No. 3 intake air drift. The compressed-air pipes are placed in this drift.
The total rated capacity of the present installation is 4,996 cubic feet of air per minute.
Two electrically heated bath-houses have been erected in the mine-yard for the use
of twenty-two mine officials. A large bath-house for the accommodation of 512 workmen is being erected and should be ready for use early in 1941. The heating and water
for the large bath-house will be furnished by a hot-water boiler situated outside the
main building.
Monthly inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee," and copies of all
these reports of inspection were received through the courtesy of the committee members. All report-books required to be kept at the mine were examined regularly and
were found to be in order.
This mine was inspected on sixty-five occasions during the year.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John G. Biggs.
The following coal companies operated in this district during 1940: The Coalmont
Collieries, Limited; Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; Princeton Tulameen Coal Company, Limited; Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited;
and the Hat Creek Colliery.
Blake M. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. H. Malkin, Vice-
Coalmont       President, Vancouver, B.C.;   R. A. C. Douglas, Secretary, Vancouver,
Collieries, Ltd.    B.C.;  D. McLeod, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;  George Murray, Superintendent,  Blakeburn,  B.C.    With the abandonment of  No.  5 mine
during April, the Coalmont Collieries, Limited, at Blakeburn ceased coal production
after twenty-four years of operation, during which time over 2,000,000 tons of coal was
produced from Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mines.    The mines are all exhausted and abandoned,
and the equipment at the mines, the aerial tram between the mines, and the preparation
plant on the Kettle Valley Railroad are being dismantled and sold.
As there is no other mine or industry in the vicinity of Blakeburn this small settlement will probably be totally deserted.
His Honour E. W. Hamber, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  E. McDonald,
Middlesboro     Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;  Robert Fairfoull, Manager, Merritt, B.C.
Collieries, Ltd.    This colliery is situated 1 mile west of Merritt on a branch line from
the Kettle Valley Railway.    The power plant and preparation installation are at the railroad, while the No. 2 South and No. 3 North mines, the only mines A 126 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
now operating, are reached by a surface inclined tramway 3,000 feet long. These mines
are in steeply inclined seams with the result that chutes are in general use to convey
the coal from the working-places to the cars on the different levels. Only compressed
air is used for power underground and several raises driven to surface openings provide
adequate natural ventilation.    No trace of explosive gas was found during the year.
Both mines were developed by the pillar-and-stall method, and as the workings are
now retreating all the production is from pillar extraction.
Julian B. Beaty, President, New York;   A. S. Baillie, Vice-President,
Granby Consoli-   Copper Mountain, B.C.;   B. E. Perks,  Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
dated Mining,    A. W.  Seaton, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. R. Lindsay,  Super-
Smelting & Power intendent, Allenby, B.C.; Thomas M. Wilson, Manager, Princeton, B.C.
Co., Ltd.        This colliery consists of Nos. 1 and 2 mines situated 6 miles west of
Princeton, off the Hope-Princeton Highway.    Almost all the output
from these mines is used at the company's steam electric power plant near Princeton,
which supplies all the power requirements at the Copper Mountain mining operation,
the concentrator at Allenby, and at the coal mines.
The coal is transported from the mines by auto trucks to a point near Princeton,
from which it is carried across the Similkameen River by an aerial tram to the power
plant. During the year the power plant was augmented by the addition of a 10,000-
k.v.a. steam electric unit with the steam generated by a modern high-pressure boiler
using pulverized coal. The total power capacity of the plant is now approximately
17,000 k.v.a.
The seams operated have a pitch of 20 degrees, and mining is carried on by the
pillar-and-stall system, the coal being carried from the working-faces by chutes to the
different haulage-levels. With the exception of the main underground electric hoist,
all the underground power is from compressed air.
No. 1 mine is divided into two ventilating splits, one on each side of the Main
slope, and each split is provided with modern electric-driven fan, and at the last inspection in December, 50,000 cubic feet of air per minute was passing into the mine for the
use of thirty-eight men.
No. 2 mine is in the development stage, and is ventilated by natural means.
Guy F. Atkinson, President,  San Francisco,  California;   George H.
Princeton        Atkinson, Vice-President, San Francisco, California;   W. D. Seaman,
Tulameen Coal    Secretary-Treasurer, Princeton, B.C.;  James Taylor, Manager, Prince-
Co., Ltd. ton, B.C.;   Ben Cheetham and Robert Gourley, Firebosses.    This mine
is situated close to the Tulameen River about 1 mile west of Princeton,
and was developed by a slope on a pitch of 17 degrees, which followed the seam from the
outcrop for a distance of 1,200 feet.    The mine is developed on the pillar-and-stall
system.
During the year the Main slope and counter-slope were advanced under the Tulameen River under restrictions from the Chief Inspector of Mines. These restrictions
prescribed the size of pillar to be left under the bed of the river and limited the number
of drivages that may be driven in this supporting pillar; ordinary mining operations
are being developed beyond this prescribed area.
The coal is all mined by percussive air-driven machines of the post-puncher type,
and ventilation is supplied by an Aerodyne-type fan. During the last inspection in
December, this fan was passing 25,000 cubic feet of air per minute for the use of
twenty-two men.
L. D. Leonard, Superintendent.    This property is 34 miles north of
Hat Creek Coal   Ashcroft, and is held under lease by L. D. Leonard.    The seam worked
Mine. is almost vertical, and the workings to date consist of levels driven in
the seam with a raise driven to the surface for ventilation.    The faces
have reached approximately 500 feet from the portal.    The small surface equipment
consists of a bunker, bar-screens, and a 5-horse-power gasoline-driven motor.
PEACE RIVER AREA.
Some prospecting and development was carried on at two properties in the Peace
River area, one owned by Quentin F. Gething and the other by George A. Packwood. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 127
At the Gething mine, situated 1% miles north of the Peace River and 12 miles
south-west of Hudson Hope, an adit was driven in the " Grant" seam and a small
tonnage of coal mined. The seam dips 26 degrees north and a cross-section taken at
the face of the adit showed the following structure: Sandy shale roof; 18 inches carbonaceous shale; 4 inches coal; 1% inches bone; 11% inches coal; 18 inches rock
concretion; 12 inches coal; 1 inch shale; 24 inches coal; 6 inches " blacksmith " coal.
Total thickness of coal, 4 feet 9% inches.
An analysis of the coal at the face gave the following values:—        Per Cent.
Moisture      1.70
Volatile combustible matter  17.40
Fixed carbon   70.00
Ash   10.90
Sulphur      0.77
B.T.U.'s, 13,237.
The Packwood mine is situated on Butler Ridge, about 22 miles north-west of
Hudson Hope, and consists of an adit driven in a seam 33 inches thick and dipping
45 degrees.    A small tonnage of coal was mined and shipped.    An analysis of coal taken
from the face showed the following values:— Per Cent.
Moisture     1.1
Volatile combustible matter   15.4
Fixed carbon  80.2
Ash     3.3
Sulphur      0.6
B.T.U.'s, 14,136.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
F. M. Dockrill, Operator;  A. H. Dockrill, Fireboss.    The mine is situ-
Bulkley Valley    ated on Goat Creek, a tributary of Telkwa River, about 7 miles from
Collieries.       Telkwa, to which point coal is hauled by truck.    The market is chiefly
domestic and is confined, by transportation costs, to the area between
Prince Rupert and McBride on the line of the Canadian National Railway.
No methane in quantity that could be detected on the flame of a safety-lamp was
noted during the year; 4,400 cubic feet of air was passing per minute for the use of
nine men. An average of twelve men was employed. Production for the year was
5,960 tons, an increase of 903 tons over 1939.    Conditions generally were good.
J. M. Wilson, Fireboss.    This mine is situated on the north bank of the
Aveling Coal     Telkwa River about 6.5 miles from Telkwa, to which point coal is hauled
Co., Ltd.        by truck.    The " Betty " seam, as it is known locally, shows a fine
section of coal as follows:   Roof, shale;   coal, 2 feet;   hard shale, 1.5
inches;   coal  (blacksmith), 3 feet 4 inches;   parting;   coal, 3 feet 5 inches;   shale,
1.5 inches;  coal, 3 feet 8 inches;  shale, 8 inches;  coal, 4 feet;  floor, shale.
The top 2 inches of coal and the 1% inches of hard shale are left up as a working-
roof.
The next section, 3 feet 4 inches, is very high grade and seems to make an excellent
blacksmith coal. This is mined separately and sold as blacksmith coal, two car-loads
having been sent to Vancouver. There is a distinct parting between the blacksmith
coal and the next section of coal, and the blacksmith coal separates cleanly from it.
The centre section, containing 7 feet 1 inch of coal with 1% inches of shale approximately in the middle of the section, is mined as steam or domestic coal. The lower
section, 8 inches of shale and 4 feet of coal, is left as a working-floor.
The main slope is started on the vein, where it outcrops in the river-bank about
15 feet above river-level, and has been driven down about 120 feet (due north magnetic) A 128 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
on a pitch of 16 degrees. The river at this point runs N. 22° E. (magnetic) for about
500 feet and then turns sharply east. The slope is off true dip, which is about N. 30° E.
(magnetic). A crosscut has been turned off the slope to the west, which will be driven
in about 60 feet and then turned up the pitch to the surface to furnish a second opening.
A single line aerial tram has been stretched across the river from the mouth of the
slope to the bunkers on the south side of the river. Two bunkers have been built, the
blacksmith-coal bunker having a capacity of 80 tons and the domestic bunker 175 tons.
These were completed in November.
No methane was seen at any time and general conditions were satisfactory. The
gasoline hoist and the air compressor from the Tatlow property have been installed to
furnish the necessary power. Six men were employed. Production for the year was:
Blacksmith coal, 78 tons;  domestic coal, 256 tons.
Lake Kathleen Anthracite.—This property has apparently been abandoned, nothing
being done during the year.
TATLOW AREA.
Nothing was done on the property near Tatlow during the year. The hoist and
compressor equipment has been transferred to the Aveling Coal Company at Telkwa.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
H. E. MlARD.
The only coal-mining operations active in the Crowsnest district during the year
were those of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, at Coal Creek and Michel.
Somewhat greater activity prevailed there than in the previous twelve months, with a
net output of 776,518 long tons for the district and the production of 59,788 tons of coke.
Accidents entailing personal injuries to 179 employees were investigated in the
course of the year, sixteen having occurred on the surface and 153 underground. In
addition, four accidents met in the course of the same period by men engaged in timber-
cutting operations on the company's property were recorded at this office but were not
investigated.
One fatal accident occurred at Michel. A prop, apparently displaced by a movement of the coal-bench at a long-wall face, fell and struck a man on the head and
shoulders, inflicting injuries from which he died on the following day.
H. P. Wilson, President and General Manager; Thomas Balmer, Seattle,
Crow's Nest Pass Wash., U.S.A., Vice-President;   J. S. Irvine, Fernie, B.C., Secretary;
Coal Co., Ltd.    Jas.  H.  Marshall,   Fernie,  B.C.,   Treasurer;   William  C.  Whittaker,
Colliery Manager, Coal Creek;   Bernard Caufield, Colliery Manager,
Michel.   This was the only company operating coal mines in the district during the year.
Coal Creek Colliery, No. 1 East Mine.—William C. Whittaker, Manager; John
Caufield, Overman; Carmichael MacNay, Shiftboss. This was the only mine active in
the course of the year, although the possibility of extending operations to another seam
has been considered. The only addition of some importance made to the plant, in the
same period, was the provision of a new wash-house.
The chief difficulties against which it is necessary to contend at this operation are
the rapid heaving of the pavement in roadways maintained in the immediate vicinity
of active areas, the so-called " face " bumps, and the less frequent but highly destructive
phenomena known as " roadway " bumps, which may entail extensive damage to the
openings affected.
In the course of the past year, three roadway bumps occurred, on June 22nd and
October 23rd and 24th respectively, and each partially wrecked the part of the mine
affected.
Numerous " face " bumps occurred in the course of the year, and several miners
sustained slight injuries, either through being struck by fragments of coal projected INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 129
from the face or being thrown off benches. Particularly violent were those occurring
in headings driven with the object of releasing accumulated stresses, in a large triangular pillar on the south side of No. 26 West incline and immediately above the
28 West return airway. The preventive measures so far discovered consist in a comparatively slow rate of advance, avoiding rounded corners at the face and keeping the
faces of adjoining places on the same line, this paralleling the strike of the seam. In
other words, provide the greatest possible facility for expansion.
Samples of air taken in the worked-out area of the 26 West district in the month of
May showed the presence of traces of free hydrogen, ethane, and ethylene which, for a
short time, induced some anxiety, as these are normal products of the destructive high
temperature distillation of hydrocarbons. However, the oxidation quotients remained
low, and it was finally decided that the intruding gases had been liberated through the
crushing of small pillars abandoned in the waste.
In July, signs of heating were discovered in a small section of the 16 East abandoned area, which had remained imperfectly sealed off while the balance of the district
was being reopened. There also, hydrogen and ethylene appeared but, despite abundant
condensation on the edges of the affected area, the relative humidity remained extraordinarily low within it, ranging between 54 and 56 per cent., while that normally found
in the working sections of the mine is about 88 per cent. The maximum temperature
encountered at any point was 94 degrees Fahrenheit, and 90 degrees Fahrenheit was
not uncommon, but these came speedily down to 76 degrees Fahrenheit or less when air
was admitted to the formerly sealed-off section. This part of the mine was notorious
for outbursts of gas and coal at one time, which lends plausibility to the assumption that
the chemical activity of the coal there exceeds the normal. Oxygen is seemingly
absorbed rapidly, but only in the case of a single one among the samples of air analysed
did the oxidation quotient exceed 0.5 by an appreciable margin.
The production of coal-dust in the course of mining and transporting operations
constitutes a weighty problem, but the nature of the coal and the extraordinarily small
volume of percolating water joining to complicate the task of subduing it. In the
course of the year 212,000 lb. of limestone-dust and 40,000 lb. of flue-dust were applied
to roadways and working-places, the latter material being used only in abandoned areas
and the approaches thereto. Often, however, a small bump shaking a district renders
a fresh application of inert dust practically worthless.
The ventilation was on the whole satisfactory, but preparations were being made
at the end of the year for a rearrangement intended to increase materially the volume
of air passing through the abandoned sections of the mine without diminishing materially that supplied to the active areas. At the time of the last inspection, 27,000 cubic
feet of air per minute was supplied to the 26 West district for the use of thirty-two men
and three horses, and 14,000 cubic feet per minute was circulating through the 28 West
section for thirty men and three horses.
Michel Colliery.—Bernard Caufield, Manager; William Chapman, Assistant Manager; William Gregory, James Littler, and Walter McKay, Overmen. This is at
present the most important coal-mining operation in the district.
Two important additions were made to the plant in the course of the year. A new
wash-house was completed and ready for occupancy at the end of December, while, at
that time, considerable progress had already been made with the installation of a 5- by
7-foot Keith-Sheldon fan, having a rated capacity of 200,000 cubic feet against a 3-inch
water-gauge, at an opening on the outcrop of " A " seam. Work had then been started
also on another structure intended to be used as a garage and to include, beside, plumber
and tool-sharpening shops.
The new wash-house is a brick and concrete building with flat laminated roof, 154
feet long, 66 feet wide, and 16 feet high, containing a 110- by 48-foot changing-room
with space for 688 lockers; two shower-rooms with an aggregate floor space of 2,015
square feet and equipped with fifty-one sprays; a lamp-room 42 by 17 feet, with
separate work-shop and motor generator set compartment; also separate wash and
changing rooms for officials, power-house employees, etc., capable of accommodating
fifty-eight persons. A 130 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
Neither the installation of the new fan nor the erection of the garage had been
completed at the end of the year. A small but perhaps interesting addition to the byproducts coking plant was the introduction of a naphthalene separator, the primary
object of which is not to permit the recovery of the small quantity of the compound that
can be scrubbed out, but to avoid the trouble incident to its separation from the gas
in the pipe-lines.
" A " Seam.—James Littler, Overman. This has now become the most important
section of the colliery and is supplying a constantly increasing share of the steam-
coal trade.
The upper bench of the seam, 8 to 10 feet in thickness, is that worked at present,
under a shale roof, moderately strong in some parts of the area opened so far but
decidedly weak in others. The general method of extraction is the form of long-wall
already successfully applied to the overlying " B " seam. Very little, if any, blasting
is necessary at the faces, and the coal is mined chiefly with the help of compressed-air
picks and that of a chain machine at one of the long-wall faces. In the long-wall section
transportation from the faces is effected by means of a system of shaking conveyers
and travelling belts, while in development-work this requires a combination of tracks,
conveyers, and chutes. It is in this seam that the new airways already mentioned are
being driven, and its workings will be those deriving the greatest benefit from the
intended remodelling of the ventilation. At the time of the December inspection 11,000
cubic feet of air per minute was supplied to forty-one men and two horses in No. 1 split
(or West side) and 12,400 cubic feet was circulating through No. 2 split (South side)
for the use of fifty-nine men and three horses. In this, as in other sections of the
colliery, some fluctuations in the volume of air circulating take place following variations in the ratio existing between surface and mine temperatures.
" B " Seam.—William Gregory and Walter McKay, Overmen. This is an intensively
operated section of the colliery on account of the high coking qualities of the coal and
its low intrinsic ash content. The chief difficulty met here is undoubtedly presented
by the nature of the roof, a more or less laminated shale, containing many of the irregularities commonly known as " pot-holes " and requiring careful timbering. The coal
gives off only a moderate volume of methane but, on the other hand, a considerable
amount of coal-dust is liberated in the course of mining and transporting operations.
This condition reaches its most objectionable proportions here as elsewhere at the
colliery where chutes are in use, and it is highly desirable that some efforts be made
towards improving the design of these appliances in such manner as to minimize the
emission of dust from coal handled in this manner.
The coal is moderately hard and compressed-air picks are resorted to, as an aid to
mining, only occasionally, and in narrow places under roof too frail to permit the use
of other mechanical mining equipment. As a rule, the coal is undercut with radial
machines in development-work, and chain coal-cutters at the long-wall faces, it having
to be subsequently blasted in the former case, an operation seldom necessary in the
latter, as usually the coal falls of its own accord behind the machine.
Rather low surface temperatures prevailed at the time of the last inspection of this
part of the colliery, and the " booster " fan on the surface passed only 19,000 cubic feet
of air per minute, this supplying seventy men and six horses in the No. 4 West entry
district and the East side workings, while 9,000 cubic feet of air per minute was passing
through the south side for the use of twenty men and three horses. An idea of the
effect of changes of temperature may be gathered from the fact that, in midsummer, the
same airways passed 22,000 and 12,000 cubic feet per minute respectively.
No. 3 Mine.—Walter McKay, Overman. Final abandonment is approaching apace
for this part of the colliery, and all work there has been limited to the extraction of
pillars for a couple of years. However, some blocks of coal of considerable size still
standing in a part of the No. 12 Incline district may offer an incentive to continue
operations in that area for some time to come, should it be found possible to maintain
sufficiently efficient ventilation. This has been one of the chief difficulties encountered
there within the past eighteen months. The return airway from the split passes first
through a fault zone, then enters an area on one side of which the greater part of the pillars has been extracted, which readily explains why its maintenance is becoming
constantly more onerous.
The seam gives off surprisingly little methane, but oxygen disappears rapidly in
abandoned and unventilated areas, the resulting black-damp occasionally invading
adjacent workings when the atmospheric pressure becomes abnormally low. To avoid
a repetition of the trouble experienced on this score in one instance, a small Sirocco fan
acting as a booster was installed in the district towards the end of the summer and satisfactory conditions have prevailed there ever since. The roof over this seam is probably
better than that found in any other part of the colliery, when first exposed, but it begins
to lose its cohesion after being uncovered for some time and, in some sections, becomes
particularly brittle under the stresses induced by extensive extraction of the seam.
In the No. 4 Incline section, which covers a comparatively small area, the extraction
of pillars is well advanced and the roadways are showing the effects of weight thrown
upon them to a considerable extent.
A peculiar feature, for which no satisfactory explanation has yet been found, is
that, while extensive areas of abandoned workings remain extraordinarily cool, even
after the ventilation has been cut off for some time, a tendency towards heating is
observed in similar circumstances within a zone extending for only about 200 feet from
the outcrop. Rather high temperatures were observed in the upper section of the old
No. 2 Incline towards the end of the year, and this part of the abandoned workings has
been kept under close observation since then.
The air measurements taken at the time of the last inspection showed that 8,200
cubic feet of air per minute was circulating through the live workings of the No. 12
Incline section for the use of twenty-nine men and two horses, while about 6,000 cubic
feet was supplied to No. 4 Incline district for twenty men and three horses, these being
the quantities actually reaching the working-places. The mine return air current
amounted to 28,000 cubic feet per minute, at the same time. At no point in any of the
return airways did the percentage of methane carried exceed 0.4.
No. 3 East Mine.—This section of the colliery has been sealed off for several years
on account of a fire. Samples of the mixture of gases filling the area affected were
taken at regular intervals and their analyses tended to prove that no important modification of existing conditions was taking place there, which can be considered as
satisfactory.
The total volume of air circulated by the fans, for the entire colliery, amounted to
113,800 cubic feet per minute, under a water-gauge of 2.9 inches.
In the course of the year 540,000 lb. of limestone-dust was applied to working-
places and roadways. The consumption of explosives amounted to 49,155 lb. of Polar
Monobel No. 4 and 5,017 lb. of Polar CXL-ite No. 2 in 67,493 shots, of which five
missed fire. A 132
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
PRODUCTION.
The output for metalliferous mines for 1940 was 8,026,639 tons, an increase of
815,963 tons over the tonnage for 1939. This tonnage was produced from 216 mines,
of which ninety-two produced 100 tons or more.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES   (INCLUDING
UNDERGROUND PLACER-MINING).
There were nine fatal accidents in and around metalliferous mines and concentrators in 1940, being a decrease of five from the figures for 1939. In addition to this,
two surface placer-workers lost their lives. One placer-miner at Beggs Gulch was
found drowned, a boulder had slid down and pinned him in the water; and one man
at Bullion Placers was caught by a gravel slide and swept into the sluice. There were
no fatalities in the quarries of the Province.
There were 6,027 persons under and above ground in the metalliferous mines and
1,048 persons in the concentrators in 1940. The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000
persons employed was 1.27 compared with 2.01 in 1939.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1940 was 891,848 tons compared with
515,048 tons in 1939. The tonnage mined per fatal accident during the last ten-year
period was 420,565 tons.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1940
and the comparative figures for 1939:—
Mine.
No. of Accidents.
Mining Division.
1940.
1939.
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Privateer   ___ ____ _
1
5
Lillooet -   -	
Bralorne       ,
Vidette „	
Columbia Tungstens _    	
1
1
1
1
Nickel Plate  — -- — 	
Yankee Girl  -   -	
1
Second Relief Mine , _   _	
Old Granby Mine —._- __	
1
1
Queen Charlotte Islands. - - -	
Surf Inlet Mine - -  	
Silbak Premier .. -	
Totals    -
ft
14 INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
A 133
The following table shows the causes of, the percentage to the whole of the fatal
accidents, and comparative figures for 1939:—
Cause.
1940.
1939.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
By falling down chutes or shafts..—	
3
2
2
2
33.34
1
2
5
2
3
1
7.14
14.29
22.22
35.71
14.29
21.43
7.14
22.22
22.22
Totals  ' _ -	
9
100.00
14
100.00
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN LODE MINES, PLACER MINES,
PROSPECTING, AND QUARRYING.
There were eleven fatalities during 1940 in all phases of mining. Of these, nine
occurred at producing metalliferous mines and two at producing placer operations.
Ordinary care would have averted most of these fatalities, as few were due to
abnormal or dangerous conditions, but were due to a dangerous method of doing
routine-work.
Following are the details of the fatal accidents in lode mines:—
The fatal accident which occurred to William Scott, mucker, Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, on January 28th, was due to a slab falling from the hanging-
wall of a raise. Deceased had been told by his shiftboss not to go into the raise until
accompanied by the shiftboss, who would examine the place, as it had not been barred
down since the previous blasting. The shiftboss was delayed, and on his arrival found
deceased severely injured, death ensuing the following day.
The fatal accident which occurred to Raymond M. West, nipper, Copper Mountain
mine, Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, Limited, on February 5th, was due to his being struck by a falling slab of rock from the back of a stope.
The barmen had gone over this ground shortly before the accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Matt Pelto, barman, Sullivan mine, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, on February 17th, was due to deceased falling
down a raise. He had gone to help another man who had difficulty with large pieces
of ore he was barring into the raise, and Pelto went on to these rocks to size up conditions, when the rocks rolled from under him and carried him down the raise. He
was holding a safety-rope, but had not secured himself to it and was unable to retain
his hold.
The fatal accident which occurred to Henry Hansen, pluggerman, Nickel Plate
mine, Kelowna Exploration Company, on March 29th, was apparently due to deceased
drilling into a miss-fire charge in a large piece of ore lying on the stope floor. This
miss-fire shot had been clearly marked by the preceding shift and should have been
bulldozed.    Deceased died two days later.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alex Dykstra, miner, Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, on June 27th, was due to blasting. Dykstra and his helper had
spit two shots and the miner in.an adjacent bulldoze chamber had spit a third hole in
the presence of deceased. Dykstra turned on the warning blasting-whistle and when
two reports had been heard he turned off the warning whistle and entered the bulldoze
chamber just as the third shot went off, killing him instantly. He had evidently
forgotten the third shot.
The fatal accident which occurred to Charles E. Pratt, Diesel operator, Wisconsin
mine, Canadian Exploration Company, on July 7th, was due to deceased being struck
by a falling tree while engaged in fighting a bush fire on the Wisconsin Road. He was
killed instantly. The fire-fighting, while being voluntarily done, was under the company's supervision. A 134 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1940.
The fatal accident which occurred to George D. Kennedy, shiftboss, Relief Arlington mine, on July 21st, was due to deceased being carried down a raise by a slide of
muck in which he was buried for several hours. He was unconscious when taken out
and was apparently making a good recovery in Nelson Hospital, but died suddenly from
internal haemorrhage on August 6th.
The fatal accident which occurred to Regnar Thillesen, carpenter, Nickel Plate
mine, Kelowna Exploration Company, on October 21st, was due to deceased falling 25
feet into an ore-bin, part of which was being dismantled following a fire. A staging
of 2- by 12-inch planks had been installed over the bin and deceased was engaged in
rigging equipment to tear down part of the debris due to the fire, and stepped off the
staging on to a 1- by 12-inch board, which broke under his weight. He died in
Princeton Hospital the same day.
The fatal accident which occurred to Louis Legge, aerial tram operator, Silbak
Premier mines, was due to deceased being crushed at the Nine-mile angle station on
the aerial tram. He had evidently tried to make some adjustment to the running-gear
without stopping the tram. The angle stations and the tram-control station are interconnected by telephone but apparently deceased did not call to have the tram stopped.
There were no witnesses to this accident.
As this Nine-mile station is in Alaskan territory, the inquest was held there by the
United States authorities.
Following are the details regarding the fatal accidents in placer-mining during
1940:—
On May 31st Harry R. Furler, placer-miner, was found drowned in the sluice of
his hydraulic operation in Beggs Gulch. Apparently a slide of ground had caught him
and carried him towards the sluice-boxes where a boulder held him under the water.
He worked alone and was discovered only after a search when he failed to return home
at night.
The fatal accident to Rennie A. Blais, jackhammer-driller, Bullion Placers, Limited,
on August 4th, was due to a slide of ground that swept him into the sluice which carried
him over 1,000 feet to the tailings dump, where he died within a few minutes after the
other men reached him. The start of the slide was noticed and a warning shouted to
deceased and other men on the floor of the pit. The other men were able to escape to
the sides, but Blais had run in the same direction as the slide, which overtook him.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On June 17th, at the Proserpine operation of the Privateer Company, a used receptacle 8 feet 3 inches long and 3 feet 3 inches in diameter was being prepared to store
water for the drilling-machines. While the receptacle was being blown out by compressed air at 80-lb. pressure one end blew off; the mine foreman, who was near-by,
was thrown 30 feet away, but escaped with minor injuries.
On August 7th a large slide occurred in the drop-pit side of the Bullion placer mine
(surface) ; the men employed in the pit had sufficient warning to withdraw to safety,
but the tools and equipment were buried.
On August 23rd the north carriage on the Hedley Mascot " quad " double-track
aerial tram left the track.    No one was injured.
On September 6th, while the East side cage in No. 2 shaft, Pioneer mine, was being
placed on the shaft station chairs for inspection purposes, the hoistman gave out sufficient slack to kink the rope, which had to be cut and shortened.
On November 8th, in No. 3 shaft, Cariboo Gold Quartz mine, a new " non-spun "
hoisting rope for sinking purposes " bird-caged " badly after only three hours' service
and had to be removed. Upon investigation it was found that the inner rope and the
outer strands had the same lay, due to an error of construction.
On December 10th, while men were being hoisted in the Island Mountain mine
shaft, the hoistman took the men up past the main station a distance of 40 feet before
stopping the cage. The cage was stopped just below the automatic stop, which was
in good working order. The hoistman was discharged. There were no injuries or
equipment damage. On December 22nd, while hoisting in the Silbak Premier shaft the hoistman applied
the brake too strongly, with the result that while he brought the drum to a sudden
stop the inertia of the motor forced up and broke the pinion-shaft bearings. The
skiptender riding the cage was not injured.
During 1940 there were no prosecutions made for infractions of the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act."
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1940 the explosives used in mining and quarrying in British Columbia
consisted of 10,179,000 lb. of high explosives; 3,400,000 fuse detonators; 528,000
electric detonators; 52,000 delay detonators; 13,500 feet Primacord and 24,700,000
feet of safety-fuse. While there were several accidents due to the use of explosives,
there were no cases due to faulty explosives.
At a number of abandoned mining and prospecting operations the Inspectors of
Mines in the respective districts had stocks of explosives disposed of by destruction or
sale, according to the condition of such explosives. As a safety precaution, no stocks
of explosives may be left unguarded during the war.
AIR-SAMPLING.
Air-sampling was done in a number of mines, where heavy blasting or long, single
drifts were carried on, to determine whether carbon monoxide was present and if the
oxygen content of the atmosphere was sufficient. No dangerous conditions were indicated, but in a number of cases augmented ventilation was ordered.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
Further progress in the installation of fans for the general ventilation of mines
was made during the year by the installation of fans of fairly large capacity at several
of the larger mines, these being in addition to the fan installations given in detail in
the annual report for 1939. In no instance have any of the fans mentioned previously
been discontinued.
The efforts at the different mines to reduce as far as possible the amount of dust
produced by the blasting, handling, transportation, and milling of ore have been well
maintained, and there is an increasing efficiency in removing as quickly as possible, by
adequate ventilation, any dust that is unavoidably produced.
MINE-LIGHTING.
The use of the safety electric cap-lamp is standard at all the larger mines with
one exception, and many of the smaller mines have adopted this advance in safety and
efficiency. In no case where the safety electric cap-lamp has been tried has there been
a return to the carbide lamp formerly in use.
FIRST-AID AND SAFETY WORK.
First-aid and safety work has been well maintained in all the metalliferous-mining
areas and, in addition to the work done along this line by the individual mining companies, there are Mine Safety Associations in all the more important districts, such as
East Kootenay, Princeton, Britannia, Bridge River, Zeballos, and Portland Canal.
These associations draw their membership from the mine officials and miners interested
in safety in the different areas, and are financially assisted in this work by the
Department of Mines.
The value of safety committees at the larger mines is recognized as an important
factor in making for general safety and they are well supported by the managements
of the mines. As the members of these safety committees are selected from different
parts of a mine and serve for only short periods, this permits a large number of men
being brought directly into contact with this work, so that many of them continue to
point out potential dangers to their fellow-employees after their official membership
on the safety committee has ended. These safety committees, with their personal
knowledge of the mine in which they are employed, are in a position to note and report
minor defects as they arise and have these matters remedied before they become a
contributing factor in an accident.  INDEX.
A 137
INDEX.
A.
Page.
Accidents in metal mines  132
Lode, placer, prospecting, quarrying  133
Accidents in coal mines   105
Adams, John B., resignation of       5
Annual report as Assayer     39
Ainsworth      81
Air-sampling   135
Albion No. 2     63
Alexandria (Vancouver)      74
Alexandria, placer-mining at     95
Alex Mining Co.     74
Alice Arm . 52, 78
Alladin (Cariboo)      57
Allen and Cawder leases  (Atlin)      89
Alpine  (Nelson)        66
Alpine Gold, Ltd.     66
Amandy      63
Amazon      81
Amelia, Camp McKinney      62
Amparo Mining Co. .     57
Annie      75
Antimony      85
Antler Creek      91
Anyox      52
Arctic lease     88
Arlington (Nelson)       69
Dividends      20
Ashcroft area      60
Assay Office, report by Assayer     39
Athabasca (Nelson), Noble Five Mines at    65
Athelstan      75
Atlin, tungsten    86
Aurimont Gold Mines, Ltd.      76
Aveling Coal Co., Ltd  127
B.
Babine Gold Mines, Ltd.  55
See also Free Gold.
Baka-Mica   99
Baker Inlet, mica at  99
Bamberton, lime   98
Barkerville area   90
Barkerville Gold Mines, Ltd.   90
Base Metals Mining Co., Ltd.   82
Batchelor, later Senator  65
Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Ltd.   70
Bear (Nelson)    65
Bear River (Portland Canal)   52
Beaver, Beaverdell   79
Beaverdell  62, 78
Beaverdell-Wellington Syndicate, Ltd  79
Beaver Silver Mines, Ltd.   79
Beban mine  121
Bedwell River  73
Bell No. 2 (Slocan)   65
Bellos leases (Cariboo)   94
Ben Ali (Portland Canal)   52
Berlin (Trail Creek)   63
Biggs, J. G., retirement of  6
Biggs' mine  122
Big Bend area  97
Big Flame mine  122
Big Marcelle (Fort Fraser)   85
Big Missouri  51
Birch Creek (Atlin)   88
Black Bear Mountain (Quesnel)   95
Blackbird (Lillooet)   58
Page.
Black Bull, Kleanza Mountain  54
Blackcock (Ymir)   66
Black Jack Cariboo Mines, Ltd.   91
Blubber Bay, lime at  98
Bluestone (Nelson)   68
Bonanza, Sheep Creek  68
Bonanza Basin, Tyaughton Creek  59
Bonanza Creek, Tyaughton Creek  59
Bosun (Boatswain Fraction)   81
Boulder Creek (Atlin)   88
(Salmo)     67
Boundary Falls   63
Bowman Mines, Ltd.  92
Bralorne Mines, Ltd., dividends   20
References  58, 59
Brewer Creek (Vernon)   71
Bridge River (Lower)  58, 60
Tungsten   87
Bristol Mines, Ltd.   59
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co  84
At Eldorado (Lillooet)   59
Dividends   20
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd., at Bamberton ...98, 99
B.C. Sand and Gravel Co.   (later Highland Sand and Gravel Co.)   99
See also Cascade Sand and Gravel Co.
Brown lease (Atlin)   89
B.R.X. (1935) Consolidated Mines, Ltd.... 59
Buccaneer, Bedwell River   73
Buccaneer Mines, Ltd.   73
Buena Vista Mining Co., Ltd.   51
Bulkley Valley Collieries   127
Bullion Placers, Ltd.   95
Bunker Hill (Nelson)   70
Burns Lake  83
Burrard Inlet  99
Burrard Placers, Ltd.  96
Butcher Boy   62
Buxton Creek  95
G.
Cadmium, at Athabasca
Cadwallader Creek _..
Caledonia
  do
  58
  80
California  (Lillooet)    59
(Nelson)     65
Canadian Belle (Nelson)   66
Canadian Belle Mining Co., Ltd.   66
Canadian Collieries, inspection  120
Canadian Creek   91
Canadian Exploration, Ltd., at Maybe  62
At Wisconsin  70
Canamco Mining Co.  95
Canty Gold Mining (Hedley), Ltd. _____ 61
Canyon lease  (Clinton)    96
Capella  80
Cariboo Amelia, Camp McKinney  62
Cariboo area  56, 90
Cariboo Central, Cariboo Rainbow Mines,
Inc.   57
Cariboo-Cottonwood Placers, Ltd. . j  94
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd  56
Dividends   20
Cariboo Hudson Gold Mines, Ltd.   57
Cariboo Rainbow Mines, Inc.   57
Cariboo Thompson property  57
Carlsen lease (Cariboo)   93 A 138
INDEX.
Page.
Carmi, Highland Bell, Ltd., at  63
Cascade Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.  99
See also B.C. Sand and Gravel Co.
Casino, Bedwell River   73
Cassidy mine   122
Cayoosh Creek, placer at  96
C.B.A. Mines, Ltd.   93
Central Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd., Reno
Gold Mines, Ltd., at  72
Centre Star   75
Chambers' mine   121
Chapleau Creek   64
Cherry Creek, Vernon   97
Chilcotin area   57
Clay and shale   97
Clayburn Co., Ltd.   97
Clayoquot   73
Clinton area   96
Clubine Comstock Gold Mines, Ltd.  67
Clydesdale (Atlin)   88
" Coal and Petroleum Act "  37
Coal-dust   111
Coal from outside British Columbia  105
" Coal-mines Regulation Act "  36
Coal-mining, reports by Inspectors.—100, 120
Coast and Lakes Alluvials, Ltd.   93
Coast Quarries, Ltd.   99
Colorado   67
Colpe Mining Co.   87
Columario Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd. 54
Columbia (Trail Creek)   75
Columbia Development, Ltd.  87, 89
Columbia Tungstens, Ltd.   86
Comox Colliery  123
Compagnie Francaise des Mines d'Or du
Canada   88
Congress Mines, Ltd.   60
Conroy Fraction (Atlin)   89
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada   75, 82
At Boulder Creek (Atlin)   88
Fife   98
No. 7   63
Pinchi Lake   85
Salmon Gold Mines   52
Slate Creek   90
Dividends  20
Consolidated Nicola Goldfields, Ltd.   62
Conwest Exploration Co.  40, 84
At Hunter Basin   74
Copper Creek (Cariboo)   91
Copper Island, Babine Lake  78
Copper Mountain  83
Copper Queen (Trout Lake)   64
Cork-Province   80
Cormack Mining Co., Ltd.   94
Coronado   76
Coronation (Lillooet)   58
Corsair, Bedwell River  73
Cottonwood Gold Dredging Co., Ltd.  94
Cottonwood River (Cariboo)   94
Coulter Creek   92
Cow Mountain   57
Coyote  (Nelson)     68
Craigtown Creek   69
Cranbrook area   82
Crescent (Greenwood)   77
Croker lease (Atlin)   88
Cronin Creek   55
Crown (Lillooet)   58
Crown Gold Mining Syndicate     73
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd  128
Dividends   20
Crusader (Slocan)   64
Crusader Mines, Ltd.   52
See also Gold Drop.
Cummings, J. M.   5
Cunningham Creek (Cariboo)  57, 91
Curtis (formerly Telluric), Vidette Lake 60
Cyanide at Reno   69
Cyanide mill   61
D.
Dayton Creek   65
Deeks Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.   99
Denain Creek   57
Dentonia Mines, Ltd.   63
Dividends   17
Dolly Varden, Nass River  78
Dominion Brick Co., Ltd.   98
Donovan Creek (Cariboo)   93
Douglas Pine (Vancouver)   74
See also Piedmont Mining Co.
Dragon Creek Placers   92
Dream lease (Atlin)   87
Driftwood Creek (Omineca)   55
Dundee (Nelson)   67
Dunlop lease (Cariboo)   91
Dunwell Mines, Ltd.   52
Dust in mines  135
Duthie Mines, Ltd., at Smithers 40, 76
See also Mamie.
E.
Ecstall River   86
Eldorado lease  (Cariboo)    92
Eldorado (Lillooet)    59
Eldorado Basin (Lillooet)   59
Electricity in coal mines   110
Emerald (Nelson)        ..._     _. 81
Emily Creek   81
Empire (Lillooet)   58
Empire Mercury Mines, Ltd.   86
Enterprise  (Nicola)    62
Erie Creek   69
Ethiopia (Greenwood)   63
Euphrates (Nelson)   65
Eureka (Nelson)   69
Examination of Assayers   39
Exchange (Slocan)   65
Explosion at No. 10 Mine, Wellington 118
Explosives 36, 107, 135
Fairview Amalgamated Gold Mines, Ltd. 20
Falkland, gypsum at  98
Ferguson Creek   64
Fern mine (Nelson)   66
Fife, limestone at 1      ._. 98
First aid  135
Fleury lease   91
Fort St. James, antimony at  85
Forty-nine Creek 66, 97
Fourth of July Creek  89
Franklin camp   63
Fraser, Fort, manganese at  85
Fraser River placers   95
Freddie Lee (Slocan)   80
Free Gold (Omineca)   55
See also Babine Gold Mines, Ltd. INDEX.
A 139
Page.
French Creek  (Cariboo)    91
Friendship lease (Atlin)   89
Fry lease   93
Fuel-oil competition  >  105
G.
Gabriola Island, brick  98
Galena Farm Consolidated Mines, Ltd  81
Gem, Texada Island   71
Gem Gold Mines, Ltd.  j  71
Geological Survey of Canada  6
Germansen   90
Germansen Mines, Ltd.  90
Gerrard   64
Gilley Brothers, quarry   99
Gladstone lease (Atlin)  ,  88
Gold, lode deposits  51
Gold, placer, Atlin  87
Fraser River   95
Purchase of   6
Gold Bar, Terrace   53
See also Portland.
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd  68
Dividends   20
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders 47
Gold Creek (Slocan)   64
Gold Drip (Rossland)   70
Gold Drop, Marmot River   52
See also Cinnabar Mines, Ltd.
Gold Finch (Greenwood)   77
Gold Leaf (Anyox)   52
(Nelson)    65
Gold Peak, Zeballos Pacific Mining Co...... 72
Gold Silver Tungsten Mining and Milling
Co., Ltd.   65
Golden Belle (Nelson)   68
Golden Eagle, Topley   78
Golden Glory, Burns Lake  83
Golden Ledge Syndicate  59
Granby Consolidated M.S. and P. Co., Ltd.,
dividends   20
At Princeton  83
At Phoenix  _  75
Colliery at Princeton   126
Grand Forks  77
Grange Consolidated Mines, Ltd.   60
Granite  (Nelson)    66
Granite, Coast Quarries, Ltd.   99
Grasshopper (Similkameen)   61
Or Rabbitt group.
Gravel   99
Greenwood area   63
Brooklyn at  75
Grotto, Hardscrabble Creek  55
Grouse Creek (Cariboo)   90
Grub Gulch (Cariboo)   92
Gypsum, Falkland  98
Gypsum  Lime  and  Alabastine  Canada,
Ltd.   98
H.
Hail Columbia lease
Hall Creek	
(Nelson), placer
  97
  65
  97
Halverson lease   91
Hamilton Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.  60
Hardscrabble, tungsten   86
Hardscrabble Creek (Omineca)   55
(Cariboo), tungsten on   86
Page.
Harriett (Nelson)   69
Harrison Creek .  90
Harvey Creek Mines, Ltd.   96
Hat Creek Coal Mines  126
Hazelton   53
Hazelton area  76
Hazelton View   76
Hedley, M. S.  ,  5
Hedley, town   61
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd.  20, 61
Hewitt   81
Highland  (Ainsworth)    81
Highland Bell, Ltd  78
Wiarton   62
Maybe   62
Carmi   63
Rosemont   63
Dividends   20
Highland Chief (Greenwood)   79
Highland Surprise Gold Mines, Ltd.  64
Highland Sand and Gravel Co. (formerly
B.C. Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.)  99
See also Cascade Sand and Gravel.
Highland Valley   84
Himmelmann placers   95
Holland, S. S.   5
Holland Gold Mines, Ltd.   58
Homestake, Franklin Camp   63
Homestake lease (Clinton)   96
Homeward, Zeballos  72
Hope (Slocan)   80
Horseshoe Mountain   62
Howard Fraction (Slocan)   64
Howe Sound     84
Hudson (Cariboo)   57
Hughes Creek  70
Hunter, Khutze Inlet  53
Hunter Basin, Conwest Exploration at __ 74
References     40, 84
Hyde Creek leases  (Cariboo)   93
Hyland Basin   55
I.
Inland Empire (Trail Creek)      63
Inspection of Mines   100
Inspector's Report  132
Iron and Steel Bounties Act     35
Iron Cap (Kamloops)      60
Iron Mask (Trail Creek)      75
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd.     56
Dividends         20
I.X.L. (Trail Creek)      70
J.
Jack (Slocan City) .
Jack of Clubs Creek
81
92
92
Jack of Clubs Lake Mining Syndicate..
Jane, Little Snowshoe Creek  57
Jessie (Nelson)    65
Jewel Lake  63
J. G. Mining Co.   59
Johannson lease   91
Jo Jo (Slocan)   77
Jolly Creek placers   97
Josie   75
Jumbo  (Rossland)    70
Juno  (Nelson)    65 A 140
INDEX.
Page.
71
53
K.
Kalamalka 	
Kalum Lake Mines, Ltd.	
Kathleen Lake coal  128
Keithley    95
Kelowna Exploration Co., Ltd.   61
Dividends  20
Kent Dredging Co.  __ 94
Ketch, Ltd.  .  91
Kettle River   62
Keystone (Nelson), Slocan Silver Mines,
Ltd.    69
Keystone Mountain  69
Khutze Inlet   53
Kicking Horse   83
Kilgard brickyards  ,  97
King  (Lillooet)    58
King, Hunter Basin   74
King William (Nicola)   62
Kitsumgallum Lake   53
Kleanza Mountain   54
Koeye River, limestone  98
Koeye River Limestone Co.   98
Kokanee Chief   80
Kootenay  (Rossland)    75
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd.   68
Dividends   20
63
55
Lakeside (Greenwood) 	
La Marr Gold Mines, Ltd.	
Lamps   135
Langford Mines, Ltd.   93
See also Coast and Lakes Alluvials, Ltd.
Lantzville Collieries   122
Lardeau area  64, 79
Larsen Gulch (Cariboo)   93
Laurentzen gold-saver   94
Lay, Douglas   5
Lemon Creek   64
Lenora (Nicola)   74
Leonard lease   96
Le Roi (Trail Creek)   75
Lewis mine   122
Lightning Creek (Cariboo)  92, 93
Lillooet area   96
Limestone, Koeye, Grand Forks, Texada
Island,   Fife,   Vananda,   Vancouver
Island   98
Little Valley Creek   91
Livingstone Mining Co., Inc.  66
Lost Creek, Manson Creek  89
Lost Creek Placer Gold, Ltd.  89
Loudon's mine   122
Lowhee Mining Co.   90
Lucky Boy (Ainsworth)   79
Lucky Jim, Zincton  80
Lucky Strike Gold Mines, Ltd.  59
Lyle Creek  64
M.
Mandy, J. T., report by  5
Manganese   85
Manson Creek area   89
Marmot River   52
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Quarries  99
May and Jenny     66
Maybe, Kettle River, Highland Bell, Ltd.,
at   62
Mayflower (Trail Creek)   71
Page.
Mayflower Mining Syndicate  70
Memphis Creek  65
Men employed   22
Mercury, Bridge River and Pinchi Lake .. 85
Metal mines, inspection of  132
Meteor (Slocan City)   81
Mica   99
Midas, Yanks Peak  57
Midge Creek   70
Midnight (Greenwood)   79
(Nelson)     68
(Trail Creek)    70
Milton Gold Mining Co., Ltd.   64
"Mineral Act" and "Placer-mining Act" 29
Mining Industry, The, J. F. Walker  5
Mining laws, synopsis of  29
Minto Gold Mines, Ltd.   60
Mobbs (later Silver Crest)   64
Mogul (Kettle River)   62
Molly Hughes (Slocan)    77
Monarch (Golden)   82
Monashee  (Vernon)    71
Monashee Creek placer   97
Monitor (Slocan)   80
Montgomery Creek placers   92
Morning Mountain   65
Morning Star   81
Mosquito Creek (Cariboo)   93
Mossi claims      57
Motherlode (Nelson)   68
Mountain Boss   57
Mountain Boy (Portland Canal)   78
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd.   71
Dividends   20
Moyie Lake   82
Musketeer, Bedwell River   73
Musketeer Mines, Ltd.   73
Muskrat Creek (Nelson)   69
Myrtle (Slocan City)   81
McAllister (Slocan)    77
McArthur Gulch   91
McCarthy Estate __   63
McCullough Creek (Revelstoke)   97
McGillivray Creek  96
MacKay Gold Mines, Ltd.   51
McKee Creek     89
McKinney CamB placers  62, 97
Maconachie, R. J.   5
N.
Nanaimo  	
Nanoose Bay Gold Mines, Ltd.
73
74
Napanee (Greenwood)   79
Nass River ...   52
Nelson area, placer   97
References  65, 81
Nelson Island, granite  99
Nelson Placers, Ltd.   97
Neville mine         122
New Hazelton Gold Cobalt Mines, Ltd. .... 76
Newman, Topley   78
Newport (Slocan)   80
New Westminster, clay and shale at  97
Nicholson Creek Mining Corporation  54
Nickel Plate, Hedley  61
Niemeyer lease (Cariboo)   91
Noble '" B," Bedwell River  73
Noble Bear River Syndicate .    73
Noble Five Mines, Ltd., at Athabasca  65
Norman leases   93 INDEX.
A 141
Page.
Northern Pyrites, Ltd.      86
Northern Resources, Ltd.     88
Nugget (Nelson)      68
No. 1  (Trail Creek)      75
No. 7, Consolidated M. & S. Co. at     63
o.
Oakwood, Terrace   53
O'Grady, B. T.   5
O.K. (Rossland)   70
Okanagan (Lardeau)   64
Olalla lease (Atlin)  .  89
Omineca Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd  53
Onward placer   95
Ore Hill (Nelson)   68
Ore Testing Laboratories, Ottawa   76
Oscar Creek  67
Ottawa    81
(Slocan)     65
Otter Creek (Atlin)   88
P.
Pacific Lime Co.
  98
P.D.  (Cariboo)    57
Peace River coal   126
Pearson lease   93
Pend-d'Oreille River, placer 70, 97
Perkins Peak  57
Perseverance Gold Mines, Ltd.   95
Peterboro lease (Atlin)   88
Phillips Arm  74
Phillips Group, tungsten   87
Piedmont Mining Co., Douglas Pine   74
Pinchi Lake, mercury at  85
Pine Creek (Atlin)   88
(Cariboo)     91
(Quesnel)     96
Pioneer   58
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd.   85
At Stuart Lake, antimony  85
Reference   58
Dividends   20
Pitt River, gravel  99
Placer Engineers, Ltd.   95
Poes (Omineca)   55
Poker lease (Atlin)   88, 89
Polaris-Taku Mining Co., Ltd.   51
Poorman  (Nelson)     66
Porcher Island        53
Porcher Island Mines, Ltd.   53
Portland, Terrace  53
See also Gold Bar.
Portland Group   52
Portland Canal  51, 78
Premier Gold Mining Co. at Relief-Arlington   69
Prident, Zeballos ..  71
Prince Rupert Sampling Plant 5, 6
Princess Royal Island   53
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co., Ltd.      126
Privateer Mine, Ltd., Proserpine Mountain       57,71
Dividends     20
Production, computation of ,  7
Progress notes  51
Proserpine Gold Mines, Ltd.   57
Proserpine Mountain .      57
Providence (Greenwood)    77
Pugsley
Pyrite  _.
Page.
....   53
_    86
Q.
Quartz Creek	
Queen (Nelson) 	
Quesnel River placer
90
68
95
R.
Rabbitt Group or Grasshopper mine  61
Rambler (Ainsworth)   79
Rambler placers  97
Red Cliff (Portland Canal)   52
Red Eagle, Bridge River  86
Red Gulch placers  (Cariboo)   91
Red Mountain, Rossland   75
Rees lease   91
Reese leases   95
Regal Mines, Ltd., Yankee Boy  77
Regal Silver   87
Reid Group, Burns Lake  83
Reliance (Nelson)   69
Relief-Arlington Mines, Ltd.   69
Dividends   20
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd.   68
At Central Zeballos  72
Dividends   20
Rescue-stations   115
Retallack   64
Revenge     79
Richard III.    •  74
Richmond (Slocan City)    81
Road Materials Co.   99
Roberts Mountain   70
Robertson lease, Tabor Creek  94
Robson Group  (Lillooet)   59
Roche Deboule Mountain   76
Rock Creek placers   97
Roddick lease (Cariboo)   91
Roderick Dhu   63
Rose (Atlin)   89
Rosemont, Beaverdell, Highland Bell, Ltd.,
at   63
Ross Spur (Nelson)   69
Rossland area  70, 75
Ruth (Slocan)    80
Ruth Hope Mining Co.  80
Safety-lamps   109
Sallus Creek   96
Sally   79
Sally Mines, Ltd.   79
Salmon   Gold  Mines,  Ltd.,  Consolidated
M. & S. Co. at  52
Salmon River (Portland Canal)   51
Sam Craig Creek  73
Samis and Co.   52
Sampling plant at Prince Rupert 40, 76
Mandy's report  5, 6
Sanca   70
Sand   99
Sandon  80
Sangdang placers   92
Sargent, H., report     5
Scott lease  (Atlin)     89
Scranton Consolidated Mining Co., Ltd... 65 A 142
INDEX.
Page.
Seccondee   Mines,   Ltd.   (formerly  Mar-
jorie)
71
Second Relief (Nelson)   69
Senator (formerly Batchelor)   65
Shasta (Cariboo)   57
Sheep Creek (Nelson)   68
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd  68
At Lucky Jim  80
At Tyee   74
Dividends   20
Shepherd Creek  (Cariboo)   91
Shipping mines  21, 23, 24
Sicker Mountain   74
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd.  51, 52
Dividends   20
Silver Coin   81
Silver Creek   90
Silver Crest (formerly Mobbs)   64
Silver Cup (Ainsworth)   81
Silver Ridge Mining Co., Ltd  80
Silversmith  (Slocan)    80
Silversmith Mines, Ltd.   80
Silverton   65, 81
Silver Valley, gravel  99
Similkameen River 61, 83
S-'mlock Creek   57
Sitkum Creek   66
Slade Creek placers  93
Slate Creek, Manson Creek, Consolidated
M. and S. Co. at  90
Slocan area  64, 77, 79
Slocan City  65, 81
Slocan  Idaho  Mines  Corporation.  Molly
Hughes mine  .  77
Slocan Silver Mines, Ltd.  77
At Keystone (Nelson)   69
Slough Creek (Cariboo)   92
Smithers       55, 76
Smithers Mines, Ltd., Duthie mine  55
Snowshoe Gold Mines, Ltd.  57
Snowstorm, Highland Valley  84
Sovereign Creek (Cariboo)   93
Speculator    81
Spokane (Nelson)   70
Spruce Creek (Atlin)   87
Spruce Creek Mining Co., Ltd.   87
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd.   72
Dividends   20
Squaw Creek (Atlin) .    89
St. Eugene Extension Gold Mines, Ltd..... 82
St. Eugene Mining Corporation, Ltd.  82
St. Quentin, placer lease  88
Standard  (Slocan)  .  81
Stanley Mining Co., Ltd  93
Stevenson, John S.   5
Stewart Canal Gold Mines, Ltd.  52
Stikine area  :  89
Stone   99
Stuart Lake, antimony  85
Stump Lake   62
Sumas Firebrick Co.  97
Sunrise lease (Clinton)   96
Sunshine   (Slocan)  80
Surf Inlet Consolidated Mines, Ltd 20, 53
Surprise Lake Mining Co., Ltd.   89.
Swift River  93
Tabor Creek      94
Tacoma, ores and concentrates to      75
Page.
Tagore, Zeballos   72
Takla Lake   90
Taku River   51
Taseko River   57
Tatlow area, coal   128
Tatshenshini River   89
" Taxation Act "   37
Telkwa  55, 74, 84
Telkwa River, coal   127
Telluric, Vidette Lake, later Curtis   60
Terrace     53
Tertiary mine   95
Texada Island   71
Lime   98
Thistle  (Nanaimo)    73
Three Forks   80
Thurlow Island   74
Tide Lake, Gold group (Portland Canal) 52
Toad Mountain   65
Tom Creek   90
Tom Creek Placers, Ltd.   90
Tommy Creek  59
Topley, town   78
Trehouse placers (Cariboo)   91
Trimble's claims (Lillooet)   60
Triple Hydraulic placers   91
Triune       64
Triune Mining Co., Ltd.   64
Trout Lake   64
True Fissure   79
Tulameen River   61
Tulsequah River  :  51
Tungsten, Atlin   86
Cariboo   86
Bridge River   86
Revelstoke      87
Venango  (Nelson)    66
Tungsten (Atlin)   86
Two-bit Creek   91
Tyaughton Creek   59
Tyee (Victoria)     .... 74
Tyee Consolidated Gold Mining Co., Ltd. 74
See also Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.
u.
Union (Grand Forks)   63
United Prospectors, Ltd.   73
United   States   Smelting,   Refining,   and
Mining Co.   81
Unuk River   51
Usk, town   54
Utica (Ainsworth)   80
Utica (1937) Mines, Ltd  80
V.
Vananda, lime at  98
Vancouver area   84
Vancouver Granite Co., Ltd.   99
Vancouver Island, lime   99
References  71, 74
Velgo Mining, Incorporated  .  75
See also Velvet Leasing Syndicate.
Velvet (Trail Creek)     75
Velvet Leasing Syndicate   75
See also Velgo Mining, Incorporated.
Vendors, Ltd., at Wisconsin  70
Venango     66
Venango Gold Mines, Ltd.   66
Ventilation    , .  135 INDEX.
A 143
Page.
Venture Exploration Co.   (East Africa).
Ltd.    90
Venus (Nelson)   65
Vernon, placer at  71, 97
Victor (Slocan)   80
Victor, Usk   _ 54
See also Columario Consolidated Gold
Mines Co.
Victoria (Nelson)   65
Vidette Gold Mines, Ltd.  60
Vital Creek  90
Vulcan (Nanaimo)   73
w.
Walker, John F., The Mining Industry.... 5
Waneta Gold Mines, Ltd.  70
War Eagle (Trail Creek)   75
Warspite  (Cariboo)    57
Watson Bar Creek 60, 96
Waverley lease (Cariboo)    90
Weeden lease (Lillooet)   96
Wellington Camp   75
Wells, tungsten at 56, 86
Wells area  90
Wesko (Nelson) _:  67
Western Exploration Co., Ltd.   81
White River (Portland Canal)   52
White Star Mine, Ltd  72
Whitewater mill   64
Wiarton   62
Page.
Williams Creek (Cariboo)   91
Willoughby Creek   52
Winnipeg    75
Winslow Consolidated, Ltd.  64
Wisconsin (Nelson), Vendors, Ltd., at  70
Canadian Explorers, Ltd., at  70
Wolf lease (Atlin)   88
Wolfe Creek   91
Woolsey Creek, tungsten   87
Woodbury Creek  65, 80, 81
Wright Creek   88
Y.
Yankee Boy   77
See also Regal Mines, Ltd.
Yanks Peak  57
Ymir, town   66
Ymir Commodore Mines, Ltd.  67
Ymir Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd.   67
Ymir Wilcox (Nelson)   67
Ymir-Yankee Girl Gold Mines, Ltd  67
Youngs, T. Norton   40
z.
Zeballos   71
Zeballos Pacific Mining Co., Ltd.   72
See also Gold Peak.
Zincton Mines, Ltd.  80
Zymoetz Group   54
Zymoetz River  53
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.
2,125-441-2193 

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