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THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

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 I
THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OP   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1940, TO MARCH 31ST, 1941
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Must Excellent Majesty.
1941.  To His Honour William Culham Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-seventh Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1941.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal. Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Garrard, Miss J. M., Nurse-Matron. Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I submit herewith the thirty-seventh annual report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the period April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941, and respectfully
draw to your attention the departmental reports contained herein. I feel that some real
progress has been made in rehabilitating those committed to our care and genuine interest
in our programme has been displayed by our inmates.
You will note that there has been a slight increase in the number of new commitments
over the previous year, making a total of 17,490 inmate-days as against 16,479 for the
year 1939-40. This made an average daily population of approximately fifty boys, thus
taxing our equipment to the point of overflow and making adequate supervision very difficult.
Realizing that the treatment of a delinquent youth should depend on his character rather
than on the character of his delinquency, we have constantly endeavoured to avoid regimentation and to study and meet individual needs. The many satisfactory adjustments recorded
point to some success in this endeavour. It is our hope, however, that some study may be
given to Juvenile Court procedure, particularly in the outlying districts, and adjustments
made whereby there would be more uniformity of practice and equality of treatment. Many
of our behaviour problems within the school would be solved and more satisfactory adjustments made possible as a result.
As far as our staff and facilities permitted, we have endeavoured to implement the
recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry and over the past few years our class
instruction and shopwork have grown until to-day we have instruction in tailoring, woodwork,
tinsmithing, electricity, motor mechanics, draughting, art metalwork, blacksmithing, cooking,
and garden and greenhouse work.
During the past year we have been able to promote self-governing hobby clubs. Three
old brooder-houses have been taken over and fixed up by the boys. Here they spend much
of their free time, " riding their hobbies " and making the things they want. One group is
interested in model aircraft building, leather-work, wood-carving, stamp collecting, etc.
Another is centred around an old 30-foot fish-boat which, during the last year, has been
practically rebuilt. The knowledge gained in steaming ribs and planks and the use of tools
and equipment required in boat-building has been invaluable. The third group has developed
a miniature toy and gadget factory and is busily engaged in making toys to be turned over
to the auxiliary organizations to the armed forces. Every lad in our school is active in one
of these hobby groups and their loyalty to their clubs has had a noticeably favourable effect
on the discipline of the school.
A graded programme of physical education has been developed, enabling our inmates
to take their place upon their release from the school with other groups in their communities
promoting physical activities.
Many of the lads committed to the school are found to be in poor physical condition
and it is essential to take care of these physical needs before we can accomplish much in the
way of reform. The report of our nurse reveals to some degree the extent of our health
services; X-ray examination, Kahn and tuberculin tests are routine procedure, eyes are
examined and teeth attended to, and medical and surgical care are provided for those
requiring same.
In an endeavour to bring our treatment of the delinquent child in line with the most
modern methods, a system of recognitions and privileges for good behaviour and faithful
effort has been put into effect. The loss of any or all privileges becomes the penalty for
the violation of the rules agreed upon as best for all.    These recognitions include trips by L 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
truck to points of interest, attendance at games of athletic nature, school picnics and movies,
brief visits home, and a weekly spending allowance, etc. The response to this treatment has
been most favourable.
The exigencies of war have had their effect on our school, four of our staff having left
to join the armed forces within the past year. The remaining staff members are contributing
liberally by monthly salary deductions to the various war service appeals, including
Auxiliary War Services, Red Cross, War Savings, etc., and several are active in Red Cross
and A.R.P. work.
It would be difficult to estimate the number of boys released from the school within the
past few years who have enlisted, but from the number who visit the school when on leave
and from letters received it is evident that there are a great many.
We have enjoyed in an increasing measure the support and co-operation of the various
police departments and Juvenile Courts throughout the Province and also that of many
private child welfare agencies and the various Health and Welfare Departments of the
Government, thus enabling us to render more efficient service by the application of modern
methods and practices in the treatment and care of youthful delinquents. To all of these and
to the many individuals concerned, we would like to convey our grateful thanks.
The genuine interest of the members of the Advisory Committee to the Industrial Schools
and their willingness to share our problems have been most gratifying indeed and our
thanks are due them for the many services rendered during the past year.
In closing I wish to express my personal appreciation of the fine co-operation given me
by the staff of the Provincial Secretary's Department, the Department of the Attorney-
General, the Department of Public Works, and also my co-workers at the Boys' Industrial
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1940, TO MARCH 31st, 1941.
Number in school, April 1st, 1940  60
Number on parole, April 1st, 1940    36
Number in foster homes, April 1st, 1940 _•__ 7
Number on extended leave, April 1st, 1940  6
Number away without leave, April 1st, 1940   7
Number of new commitments during year  72
Number committed for second term  4
192
Number of boys released  57
Number committed to Provincial Mental Hospital     1
Number transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm     2
Number at present on parole  56
Number at present in foster homes     5
Number at present on extended leave  10
Number escaped and not returned r     1
  132
Number in school, March 31st, 1941     60 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41.
L 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1940, TO MARCH 31st, 1941.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
previous to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1777
Unknown  	
Years.
Life.
14
Life.
13
3 wks.
14
8
3
Life.
16
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
10
Life.
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
4
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
Years.
Life.
1778
14
1779
Nelson, B.C	
Life.
1780
Polish   -  ....
Life.
1781
Amherst, N.S	
Canadian  	
Life.
1782
Life.
1783
American _.	
Life.
1784
Life.
1785
Life.
1786
16
1787
Life.
1788
Masset, B.C	
Life.
1789
Unknown	
Ukrainian-English   	
Life.
1790
Ferine, B.C.
Life.
1791
Life.
1792
English-Canadian —	
American   _	
Life.
1793
Life.
1794
Life.
1795
Toledo, Ohio      	
10
1796
English-Canadian 	
Unknown — —
German-English	
Life.
1797
Life.
1798
Life.
1799
Life.
1800
Burnaby. B.C.
Life.
1801
Life.
1802
1803
Swedish-American  	
Life.
1804
Vancouver, B.C 	
Creston, B.C -
Life.
1805
Life.
1806
Life.
1807
English  	
Life.
1808
Life.
1809
Life.
1810
1811
Nanaimo, B.C  	
Powell River, B.C.
English-Canadian 	
Life.
Life.
1812
Albreda, B.C	
American     	
Life.
1813
Life.
1814
Life
1816
Sikh ....  	
Life
1817
Winnipeg, Man 	
1818
Irish-Canadian   	
American 	
Russian   	
Scottish-English	
American	
German-Indian	
Polish   	
Life
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
Charlie Lake, B.C.
Life
Bodo, Alta  	
Vancouver, B.C —	
Life.
Life.
Life
Fort Nelson, B.C.
Life
1825   I Kndnkn   B.C.
Life.
6
Life
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1836
1837
Life.
Life.
Life
Vawn, Sask 	
Victoria, B.C 	
English-Canadian   ;.	
Life.
Victoria, B.C.        ,
Life.
Life. L 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Boys committed—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1838
Canadian	
Chinese  _ _	
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
5
Life.
Life.
Unknown.
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
Life.
Life.
Years.
Life.
1839
1840
Duncan, B.C 	
Life.
Life.
1841
1842
Rock Bay, B.C 	
Maillardville, B.C.	
Canadian.	
Life.
Life.
1843
1844
Beaumont, Alta.... 	
American 	
Life.
Life.
1845
1846
Unknown	
Edmonton, Alta	
Indian  	
Life.
Life.
1847
Life.
1848
Life.
1849
Life.
1850
Life.
1851
1852
Vancouver, B.C	
Canadian 	
Life.
Life.
I
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both)   7
Canadian (both)   12
Chinese (both)   1
English (both)   3
Indian  (both)    4
Polish (both)   2
Russian  (both)    1
Scottish (both)   2
Sikh (both)   1
American-English    1
Canadian-American    3
Canadian-English   6
Canadian-Indian   1
English-Canadian   11
English-Irish 	
German-English  	
German-Indian 	
Irish-Canadian 	
Irish-English 	
Irish-Indian 	
Scottish-English 	
Swedish-American ._
Ukrainian-English .
Unknown-American
Unknown-German _
Unknown 	
Total   76
. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41. L 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION FOR THE
YEARS 1938-39, 1939-40, 1940-41.
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
1938-39.
     10
1939-40.
7
43
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
6
1
1
3
73
1940-41
6
     35
54
Holland   „_   -   	
Ireland              „     - -  „ - .   	
       1
Manitoba        -        __         .            -    	
       5
1
New Brunswick 	
Nova Scotia                   -             	
       2
1
Norway     	
Ontario                                     -   -
       2
1
Poland      - -    	
1
Russia       _
Saskatchewan                                ..   	
     10
7
Scotland        -          .        .               	
       1
Sweden                 .          „   -       	
United States of America               _   -
...          1
3
Unknown  ..	
2
Total 	
     67
76
1939-40.
1940-41
28
39
1
1
22
20
3
3
4
....
1
....
1
....
2
1
1
1
1
1
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
1938-39.
Theft     32
Breaking and entering .... .  ....
Breaking and entering and stealing  11
Retaining stolen property  8
Wilful destruction of stolen property  3
Being in possession of stolen property  ....
Attempted theft   1
Attempted breaking and entering   1
Assault  j  1
Vagrancy  .  1
Sexual immorality    ....
Being in a state of intoxication  ....
Indecent act  1
Indecent exposure   1
Indecent assault   1              2
Violation of probation   1            ....              1
Supplying liquor to minor   1
Being unsatisfactory ward   ....              1              2
Escaping from custody  ....             1
False pretence          1
Murder  ,.  ....              1
Incorrigibility      4              3              2
Unlawfully throwing stones       .... 1
Unlawfully carrying revolver       .... 1
Forgery          1
Gross indecency          .... J
Infraction of defence regulations   ....           ....             1
Totals   67           73           76 L 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Indefinite        24
J.D.A.  	
3 months 	
6 months 	
9 months 	
1 year 	
2 years 	
3 years 	
4 years 	
>38-39.
1939-40.
1940-41
24
34
54
23
16
18
1
	
4
6
....
2
1
	
1
3
	
11
10
3
1
1
1
2
Totals        67
73
76
AGES OF BOYS.
1938-39.
1
1
3
3
9 years 	
10 years 	
11 years 	
12 years 	
13 years  .	
14 years      12
15 years      12
16 years      17
17 years      17
18 years        1
Unknown       _.
1939-40.
1
1
1
2
7
19
12
18
11
2
1
4
6
9
28
14
11
1
Totals      67
73
76
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Abbotsford                                     „          .   -
1938-39.
1
1939-40.
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
1940-41
Alexis  Creek   	
Armstrong   .   .   .      	
....
Ashcroft                        .    .   ...   ...   	
1
.                1
Brighouse              .   ..     ... 	
2
.. ...   ... .      2
5
       2
1
Cloverdale                                          -    	
2
Cobble Hill                           ..    	
       1
Coquitlam, Municipality of               ....
       1
3
 ....      2
1
       1
1
       2
           1
1
1
Enderby                 ..   .. ... 	
1
Fernie                   . -   ~ .    —
       4
1
1
Fort St. John                 — 	
2
Galiano 	
1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41. L 11
COMPARATIVE  STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1938-39. 1939-40.     1940-41.
Grand Forks  1
Hazelton   ._. 1
Hope     — —.              1
Kamloops    -.. 1
Kaslo   .... 1
Kelowna    .... 1
Keremeos     .... —.              1
Ladner   1
Ladysmith     .... ....              2
Lake Cowichan     1 ....              1
Masset   1 ....             1
Matsqui    1 1
Moricetown   —. 1
McBride    3 ....              1
Nanaimo     4 ....              2
Nelson     3 4
New Westminster   3 6              4
North Vancouver   4 11
Penticton     .... 2              2
Port Alberni   .... 2              1
Port Moody     1
Powell River   2 11
Pouce  Coupe   2
Prince George  .... 1              2
Prince Rupert     4
Princeton       12 4
Red Pass   1
Revelstoke     .... 4
Sechelt   .... ....             2
Sidney   1
Sumas  .... _L              1
Summerland   .... 3
Terrace    1
Trail     2 4              2
Vancouver     15 9            19
Vernon     .... 2              1
Victoria   2 4              3
Totals     67 73            76
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
1938-39. 1939-40.     1940-41.
Baptist    3 12
Chinese   1
Christadelphian   .  1
Church of England   16 9           22
Church of Open Door  1
Greek Catholic   .... 5
Greek Orthodox   .... 2
Interdenominational    __ 1
Lutheran     2             1
Methodist  ,    _              1
Moravian    2 L 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Religious Statistics—Continued.
Pentecostal    —
Presbyterian   	
Roman Catholic      16
Salvation Army       2
Seventh-day Adventist 	
United  	
Non-denominational 	
1938-39.
1939-40.
1940-41
1
4
5
6
2
16
18
21
2
3
	
	
1
8
11
12
11
10
15
Totals       67
73
76
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
1938-39.
With both parents living  42
With both parents dead  1
With father living and mother dead   5
With mother living and father dead  4
With both parents living but separated  8
With foster parents   1
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown  3
With father living and stepmother   2
With mother living and stepfather  1
Totals   67
1939-40.
1940-41
38
40
3
3
6
5
8
9
10
13
	
1
	
3
3
....
5
2
73
76 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41. L 13
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1941, the mouths of all the boys entering the
school were examined carefully and record charts made.    Of the seventy-six boys examined
very few had evidence of regular dental care and most of them had very unhealthy mouths.
The following work was completed:—
Hopelessly diseased teeth extracted      49
Local anaesthetic for relief of pain      64
Amalgam fillings inserted  107
Silicate and cement fillings     87
Minor treatments for relief of pain       5
Treatments for gingivitis   103
Treatments of abscess in front tooth and filling root        3
" As far as time would permit the most urgent cases were selected and the mouths
converted to healthy condition.    I believe the services rendered will be of great benefit in
assisting these boys to become useful citizens. „
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—The past year has been a particularly active one from the standpoint of health
services rendered by the school.    Many of the lads sent to us are undernourished and below
par physically, which necessitates particular attention to diet and extra medical care while
they are with us.
" Upon admission every boy is given a thorough physical examination, which includes
a Kahn test and a chest X-ray. Immediate steps are taken to make necessary corrections,
medical and surgical attention being given when required. During the year nine boys had
their eyes examined and eight were fitted with glasses. All boys were sent to the dentist for
examination.
" A complete medical record on each boy is kept showing his condition on admission,
results of tests and examinations, monthly height and weight, illnesses while in the school and
treatment given.
" The medical staff of the Provincial Mental Hospital is on twenty-four-hour call and
administers to all cases that can be cared for in the school.    Specialists are called in or the
cases removed to hospital as deemed necessary by the doctor.
" Hospitalization for the year included the following:—
Tonsillectomies    ..  5
Appendectomy    1
Herniotomy     1
Double myringotomy   1
Removal of cyst from arm   1
Threatening mastoid   1
Pleurisy     1
Orchitis    1
Infected hand   1
Fractures   2
Venereal disease   2
Tuberculosis    1
" Infectious diseases, of which we have our share, present one of our greatest problems.
Scabies and impetigo, two of the most common, are often brought in by new admissions.
Venereal disease was exposed in three lads upon admission. Two were immediately removed
to hospital for treatment while the third was cared for by the Out-patients' Clinic of the
Division of Venereal Disease Control. One boy was admitted with tuberculosis and removed
to the Vancouver General Hospital, where he is still under treatment.
" During the year we also had to combat epidemics of both measles and influenza.
Owing to inadequate accommodation isolation was impossible, with the result that the
majority of our boys were stricken and on occasion as many as twenty-five were confined to
bed at one time. This necessitated the cancellation of all school activities and the securing
of a special nursing staff. L 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The lack of quarters for segregation is a decided handicap in our effort to control these
diseases. As yet no solution has been found for this problem, but it is hoped that before
we are again exposed to an infectious disease some arrangements will have been made
whereby we may have proper isolation facilities. With this help, much of the undue expense,
loss of time, and unnecessary suffering incurred in quarantine and epidemics could be
eliminated. ,, jENNIE M  Garrard, R.N.,
Nurse-Matron."
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
(1) Office and school supplies .
(2) Travelling expenses 	
Gas, oil, repairs.—. -
Purchase of new truck	
(3)   Purchase of shoes and clothing.
Shoe-shop supplies  	
Tailor-shop supplies 	
(4) Janitor supplies and maintenance of grounds„
(5) Light   -
Heat   	
Water ...     	
(6) Provisions    	
(7) Medical—doctor's salary, medicine, and opera
tion expenses  	
Dental—dentist's salary   	
(8) Laundry    -	
(9) Feed for stock   — _.
(10) Purchase of live stock    	
(11) Vocational supplies for various departments ..
(12) Incidentals and contingencies —
Salaries   —   -	
Total expenditure _	
Increase in value of stock .
Expenditure, Public Works .
Decrease in value of stock ....
Total expenditure for year..
Total revenue for year—
Rent  	
Sale of carcass	
Telephone calls 	
Per capita cost..
$120.00
$914.73
2,284.32
628.32
1,023.85
908.50
392.84
.78.06
532.49
874.00
2,400.00
483.48
7,656.44
1,656.93
600.00
820.48
89.68
700.87
925.49
26,540.73
$49,511.21
3,939.74
211.39
$53,662.34
$53,542.34
$3.71
$375.00
15.00
$880.39
1,909.74
619.39
2,155.46
389.45
1,057.61
808.00
2,400.00
727.07
7,359.45
1,729.26
600.00
1,186.57
306.52
1,753.73
26,352.92
$50,235.56
651.65
$49,583.91
5,145.76
$54,729.67
$54,339.67
$582.53
15.15
$830.77
1,439.28
377.91
1,243.95
1,240.46
54.56
442.74
836.00
2,400.00
563.29
7,493.33
2,428.90
600.00
1,348.69
415.52
2,158.21
26,944.13
$50,817.74
4,202.28
132.17
$55,152.19
$54,554.51
$3.12
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—Our scholastic work proceeded as usual during the year. The number attending
classes has shown a steady increase. At March 31st, 1940, there were fourteen on the roll
while by March 31st, 1941, this number had risen to twenty-four. This increase may be
attributed to the tendency to keep the boys at the school longer and to the fact that the
number of new arrivals between Christmas and Easter was greater than usual. Another
reason was that a number of the older boys, wishing to continue their studies, were enrolled.
" Two entrance class pupils were examined by the Inspector prior to the closing of school
in June.    One of these was promoted to Grade IX. and the other has repeated his year.
" We added more books to the library, replacing some of the worn-out volumes. The
reading class functioned satisfactorily during the winter months, but with the approach
of good weather attendance dropped. „ Ekic w   Blagburn." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41. L 15
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—The following is a report of the work done in the tailor-shop during the period
from April 1st, 1940, to March 31st, 1941 :—
" The following articles were made: 94 pairs of tweed pants, 31 pairs of overalls,
37 tea-towels, 94 bath-towels, 59 table-cloths, 120 aprons, 12 pillow-covers, 121 sheets,
62 mattress-covers, 25 pairs of curtains. Pants and suits were pressed and repaired and
other articles and equipment mended. All shoes were checked once a week and during the
year it was necessary to have 261 pairs repaired.
" Twenty-eight boys have received instruction in sewing and general repairing of clothing
and, as in other years, several boys have worked steadily in the tailor-shop, receiving special
instruction. ... _   TT
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—I have the pleasure to report a very satisfactory year completed in motor
mechanics. Each year the demand on the labour market is for better mechanics, and regardless of what phase is required the groundwork given opens up a varied mechanical field. Our
shop is being equipped with suitable material for our work, which makes the task more
attractive.    The class has increased considerably in attendance.
" The system of grading the boys depending on interest, tidiness, punctuality, and
efficiency has been very effective. Due to competition among the boys it is naturally helpful
to the instructor.
" All boys are given an opportunity to take the responsibility of some phase of a repair
job and questions relating to it are carefully gone over and answered. ' Quiz ' periods from
time to time are very beneficial and lead to favourable discussions. Thus, we have a very
busy session twice weekly.
" D. W. Munro,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" Sir,—This time of the year is a very logical one for the making of an annual report
for the garden, as everything relating to plants is taking on life and will soon appear very
pleasing to the eye.
" Our seeding season came on unexpectedly early, which is rather unusual for this part
of British Columbia, making it necessary to rush our work at top speed. However, all
planting and cultivation is well under control. With fair germination of seed a good harvest
should result. A larger area is being devoted to truck-gardening, with special emphasis on
the vegetables required to make up a balanced diet.
" The harvest last fall turned out very well with a noticeable increase over the previous
year.
" A variety of flowering and foliage plants brightened up the greenhouse during the
winter months. The building gave good service this spring with plenty of seeds started for
our vegetable and flower garden.    Plant pests were kept well under control.
" A very attractive addition was made to our flowering shrubs by the purchase of a
hundred roses of some dozen varieties, which are doing very well.
" Some boulevard-work was done last year and seeded to grass.    The catch was quite
satisfact0ry- "D.W. Munro,
Gardener."
Department op Manual Arts.
" Sir,—During the past year the Department of Manual Arts has offered the following
subjects: Woodwork, sheet metal, draughting, electricity, and forging. As was the case
last year, woodwork had by far the largest enrolment and while numerous jobs were taken
home by the boys they left quite a lot of work for the school to remember them by, such as a
table for table-tennis, six large windows for the aeroplane club, repairing table in reception-
room, arranging and building cubby-holes for shoes and clothing so that the storage-space L 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in the cottage can accommodate eighty boys instead of sixty, turning 125 chair spindles,
reconditioning the school desks, repairing and attending to screens for the cottage, erecting
a diving-board in the tank, and making 150 seed-boxes for garden use.
" The draughting classes seem to have fallen off altogether and, in order partially to
offset this lack of interest, when any boy wants to make something for which I have no
drawing he has to make one. Also, in the sheet-metal classes, all projects are drawn and
then developed on paper before the metal is touched, the accuracy of the finished product
depending upon the correctness of the development.
" Quite a number of boys have taken advantage of the electrical classes, and while some
of them progressed only as far as magnetism others did the whole course as laid out for
Junior High Schools, with the exception of conduit-work, for which we have not the materials.
" The photography club, which was started last year, is not enjoying so much success,
due to lack of private funds, but when any developing or printing is required by any of the
boys, the work is done and then criticized for arrangement, backgrounds, etc.
" While the foregoing subjects are offered as class studies, no boy is stopped from delving
into any trade not listed. In fact, every assistance possible is given him, for, after all, the
fact that a boy wants to do something is proof that his creative ability is at work and if we
can develop his creative ability in the right way it is one step towards rehabilitation.
" At the Hobbies Display arranged by the Y.M.C.A. in New Westminster last fall we
had 10 feet of table, together with wall and floor room. In this we arranged the products of
the work done in the school workshop. This display enlightened a number of people who
did not realize that such training was being given at the school.
" Arnold Hewson,
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—The activities of the year 1940-41, while similar to those of the previous year,
produced much finer results. The underlying reason for this improvement was that the
motivation for these activities was based on interest rather than on compulsion. The planning of programme was done, within limits, by the boys and as a result received their wholehearted support. This self-produced readiness resulted in a general improvement in their
attitude to all phases of the school routine. The much higher learning rate which was noted
was undoubtedly a result of this change of attitude.
" As in the previous year, the club was used as a means of segregation. This year, however, instead of having only the one club it was possible through a process of group education
to guide the school into the formation of three natural groups.
" The more socialized junior grouping, still with a voted membership, which had carried
on from the previous year, continued to centre its activities around such hobbies as model
aeroplane and boat building, leather-work, stamp collecting, and a series of projects which
took in the whole group. Their first big co-operative effort was the fitting up of an old
chicken-house into a quite serviceable hobby club. Later in the season they built a camping-
spot on a stream in the backwoods with a swimming-pool, diving-board, and a camp-fire site
surrounded by Indian seats for use at their evening sing-songs, pow-wows, and story hours.
This was done during their leisure hours and with money saved from their weekly allowances.
" The boat club, the more socialized of the senior boys, has centred its activities around
the rebuilding of an old 30-foot Columbia River fish-boat, which was donated for the purpose
by the Vancouver Y.M.C.A., after it had served its period of usefulness with them. The
organization period of this group was a long one, since there is in our boys a lack of.
community spirit and a general disregard for any effort which does not stress personal gain.
In these older and more hardened boys this lack of social awareness hindered any group
effort. The rebuilding of the boat, however, while a slow process entailing the building of
steam-boxes and the saving of money for tools, lumber, nails, and sacking, provided the
incentive and challenge which eventually welded these boys into a very cohesive, patient,
hard-working group. Their problems were many, but whole-hearted co-operation and the
skilful guidance of their far-seeing counsellor, Mr. Westman, enabled them to surmount them
all. Proof of the educational value and character-building potentialities of a project of this
kind is shown by both the marked change in the attitudes of these boys to the school routine
and their gradually changing philosophy of life. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41.       L 17
" The remainder of the boys in the school, those unable to qualify as members of the first
two clubs, were organized into a club within the last month, after a great deal of guidance
and preparation. These boys, since they had very little ability to work together and very
little desire to do anything constructive, were unable to be brought together on any one
project, but had to be started on some work in which the incentive would satisfy the desire
of each member individually. A toy-shop for the provision of toys for the army charities
seems to have satisfied their needs, each boy working at first by himself on his own models.
The club, unlike the others, was of necessity organized with the membership on a graded
scale, so that recognition could be given where due. As the boys acquire the proper skills
and attitudes they will rise in their group, and as they develop a sufficient degree of social
awareness they will be chosen as members of the upper clubs, where higher standards are
required and where more intensive character-building through group work is carried on.
It is too early to pass judgment on this group, but if present progress is continued this club,
under careful leadership, will be able to complete the picture by its provision of the medium
whereby a system of personal attention and treatment may be given to even the most
hardened and unco-operative.
" While the different phases of the recreational programme are gradually becoming part
of the group activity the point has not yet been reached where mass activity and regimentation can be abandoned. Although still a mass effort, the gymnasium-work this year was
followed with enthusiasm and progressed very rapidly with the development of a physical
rating card which, when completed, fitted a boy to enter any type of physical activity he
might encounter after leaving the school. This work was hard but graded and, as results
proved, well within the reach of all who tried conscientiously. Particular enthusiasm was
shown for the work on the horse, high bar, and mats, with the result that the exercises on
these pieces were very well done. The degree of proficiency reached in all this gymnasium-
work would not have been possible without the individual instruction supplied by the boys'
leaders' corps. This corps was made up of boys who, being interested in this type of
recreation, gave up some of their leisure time in order that they might receive special
attention and training as leaders.
" Basket-ball was played as part of the gym training and sixteen games were played with
church groups, high school teams, the Vancouver and New Westminster Y.M.C.A. teams,
and some of the clubs in the surrounding districts.
" Softball, soccer, and lacrosse, the major outdoor sports, were played in junior and
senior divisions, and while we won only our share of the games the sportsmanship and
good-fellowship displayed by our teams were so marked that we always had more requests
for games than we could handle.    Twenty-three games were played with outside teams.
" Work in the swimming-tank and at the river was a little more intensive this year,
with a great deal of individual tuition being given in diving, swimming, and life-saving.
Although every boy entering the school learned to swim and dive, the instruction was not as
general as it could have been, and it is hoped that next year we will come closer to reaching
our objective through closer adherence to the individual aquatic achievement chart which is
now in use.
" Truck-rides to points of interest and hikes outside the property were a weekly occurrence and were open to all boys who were trustworthy and who at the same time had not lost
the privilege through misbehaviour. These trips took in the Vancouver Exhibition, White
Rock, Ruskin, the lacrosse games at the New Westminster Arena, and truck-rides to various
points from which hiking, swimming, or fishing parties started out.
" A number of trips were made by the concert party, our group of amateur musicians,
who gave nine performances. These outings were arranged and conducted by Mr. Jones, who
deserves a great deal of the praise which was given our boys for their very fine work.
" In summing up the year's work, it has been both interesting and encouraging to note
the following:—
(1.)  There has been a definite trend from mass methods toward more individual
study and treatment.
(2.)   This more intensive work has been accomplished with no added expenditure for
equipment or leadership. L 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(3.)  All these outstanding results and the changes to more modern treatment were
made possible through a system which was based on the provision of far-seeing
guidance and understanding, the placing of the responsibility for reform on the
patient himself, and the dependence for its final success on the efforts of the
individual.
" While the results of this procedure were more than encouraging, the progress in some
phases of the work has been slow due to a lack of skilled leadership.    An attempt to remedy
this situation is being made in the calling of regular conferences in which problems are
discussed and where time is set aside for the training of the counsellors.    We hope in the
following year that with improvement in leadership and perfection of our present method
we shall be able to do a more specialized job with even more successful results.
" Hugh G. Christie,
Instructor."
SOCIAL WORK REPORT.
" Sir,—Where there is delinquency among juveniles the cause of their anti-social
behaviour must be discovered. Our Provincial Psychiatrist, Dr. A. L. Crease, and his fellow
workers of the Child Guidance Clinic have given us splendid co-operation and much valuable
advice in the disposition of the twenty-seven of our boys presented to them for examination
during the past year.
" Although commending the character-building training many of the boys received in
our school, Dr. Crease stressed the urgent need for better after-care supervision and follow-up
work when the delinquent boy is returned to his community and home-life. Lack of adequate
recreational facilities and neglect of parental supervision in home-life were found to be the
major factors responsible for committals to the Industrial School.
" Summary of the twenty-seven examinations made at the Child Guidance Clinic is as
follows:—
" Intelligence ratings— Cases.
No rating owing to language difficulty       1
Average        5
Dull normal      12
Border-line          7
High-grade moron        2
" Superior mechanical ability noted        6
" Physical defects recognized by clinic—
Tonsils and adenoids needing attention        1
Teeth needing attention        6
Poor vision .       9
Poor hearing        2
Nasal infection        1
" Recommendations—
Extended training and discipline  ;       2
City foster home—opportunity class       1
Foster home         7
Return home to school     12
Return home to work        3
Placement on boat       1
Placement with relatives        1
" A complete social history is prepared on each lad committed to the school in readiness
for his examination at the Child Guidance Clinic and every effort is made to implement the
recommendations made by the Provincial Psychiatrist. This calls for a great deal of work—
interviews, observation of the patient's behaviour, visits to homes, contacts with Juvenile
Court officials, police, school teachers, family doctors, and parents are all necessary before a
true picture of the boy's background can be secured and plans made to help him overcome
his difficulties. Upon his release or parole there comes the problem of after-care or follow-up.
This we feel is very inadequate, owing to the scattered population and the distance many of
our inmates are from urban centres. Tribute is due to the Superintendent of Neglected
Children and the Welfare Field Service for their untiring efforts in regard to this work.
" E. E. Rogers." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1940-41. L 19
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" Sir,—I submit the following report with respect to my work during the year which
has just passed. The time devoted to home and office visits, business calls, interviews, and
telephone calls has increased considerably over that of last year, as the following table will
show:—
Visits to homes   1,242
Visits to offices  1,197
Business calls and interviews   1,074
Telephone calls   1,468
" The year has been full of a great many problems, as is quite usual, and the general
success during the course of the year has been quite satisfactory and gratifying. It is
obvious that the turmoil of the war and its attendant demands have had an effect on the
minds of our youth, particularly those of teen age. I have noted that the war conditions
have made them feel a little older, and indeed imbued them with a greater sense of
responsibility in so far as they and their country are concerned. Viewing the matter as a
whole in the light of my experience with these young men, I feel it is rather unfortunate
that in the present scheme of things no provision is made available in the way of military
training (other than cadet training) for boys between fifteen years and draft age.
" The placing of boys this year has been considerably easier because of the fact that a
large number of men gainfully employed in industry have retired from their employment to
enlist in the armed forces. As a result, greater opportunity was available, generally speaking, to place these boys in some gainful endeavour.
" It is encouraging to note the favourable effect my type of work has had on the lives
of the many boys who have passed through our hands during the past few years. Among
the encouraging results noted from our contacts with these young men, the outstanding
included their endeavours to find their places in society, their marriages, the establishment of
good homes, the improvement of their positions, and, in a large number of cases, the building
of some cash reserve in the bank.
" This indicates clearly that the work is of incalculable value in the restoration of these
boys to their proper places in the social structure.
" With respect to the girls, the situation generally, in so far as placing to work is
concerned, is even better. This year for the first time in some years it is found that the
number of calls for girls exceeds the number of girls available for those positions, and no
difficulty has been experienced in placing all of the girls in fairly decent jobs and in domestic
atmospheres that would be beneficial to their characters and general conduct.
" Quite a number of boys have joined the armed forces, although they were not of
military age, and they have done exceptionally well in their military work and are a credit
to His Majesty's Forces and are quite enthusiastic about being in the Army.
" Generally, this year more time has been devoted to business contacts and in an
endeavour to place boys than before. Co-operation on the part of business men in so far
as this phase of work is concerned has been splendid. The boys have been honest and
industrious in the jobs they have obtained and the parents of the boys and girls have again
co-operated magnificently, with the result that the year has been an exceptionally good one
and quite satisfactory.
" My sincere thanks go forward to all of the agencies, including the military authorities,
that I have met during my work and who have given me such splendid co-operation. They
have been of real assistance in the satisfactory discharge of my work during the year.
" K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles E. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.
410-941-4298     

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