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TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1940

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Full Text

 TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1939, TO MARCH 31ST, 1940
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1940.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1940.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Industrial School for Girls from April 1st, 1939, to
March 31st, 1940.
The year just completed has presented problems and difficulties, decisions had to be made
which required much thought, also new procedures which had not before been necessary; yet
the latter part of our term brought harmony and co-operation.
Two Social Service graduates recently spent a day with us before taking over their new
appointments, and this remark was overheard: " Isn't it sad that the general public cannot
see the School as it is—a place of training and development—instead of the picture usually in
their minds of a reformatory, with all it implies." We are endeavouring to make this institution a real training school, a place of care, education along broad lines, and the proper conditioning for maladjusted children by diagnosis and treatment. Their time is divided that
they may devote a portion to learning to do useful work, a portion to formal education, a
portion to religious instruction and wholesome recreation and play.
Our population has been more than usually varied. There is the normal intelligence
group capable of doing quite well academically, yet often unstable and unreliable, while others
are so easily influenced for good that we forget temporarily that they can be just as easily
affected by undesirable suggestions. These lapses are only occasional and very much
regretted. The embittered girl must be given a new picture of fairness and decency still to
be found among normal people. There are always a few who consistently object to order,
restraint, and discipline. The subnormal, moron, and even imbecile classification have to be
considered in training arrangements, and special plans made before release. A number of
these are not employable and must be cared for in the Mental Hospital.
Epileptic seizures and temper tantrums are very disturbing to a group. With both types
allowances must be made and situations carefully handled, which sometimes leads to a feeling
among the others that partiality is being shown.
Our girls are easily excited, are not stable, and do not stop to reason things out. An
agitator can soon collect sympathizers, and if you have several of these malcontents you can
expect trouble. We always have two or three, but they are usually outnumbered by the better
group; but during the past year we had a greater number than usual, which disrupted our
normal life here and interfered with general training. Finally, in fairness to the other
students, transfer to a senior institution was made of four of the most difficult; then comparative peace was established. The relief on the part of the better behaved group was very
marked when they were assured that there would be no further bullying from that quarter.
I have regretted delay in application for transfer.
Among the parents, too, is bitterness and a sense of defeat, which naturally is communicated to our girls in their visiting hours and letters from home. This increases the
feeling of their recklessness and " what-difference-does-it-make " attitude that requires understanding approach. In reading recent annual reports of similar institutions this trend is
often referred to in varying comments.
There has been continuing interest in school attendance and advancement. Almost every
girl accepts enrolment as routine in the school grade for which she is qualified. Reports from
their former principals come in promptly in answer to our questionnaire, which is sent out
immediately following admission. Many of the teachers send in additional information which
is helpful, not only in placement, but for social history being prepared for Child Guidance
Clinic. This clinic is most valuable to us in planning training and relative problems. We
gratefully acknowledge our indebtedness.
The Government Correspondence Course is most satisfactory for our needs. With admissions occurring any time during the school-year pupils can be absorbed into this programme S 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
so much more easily than into regular classes. Their progress depends on application, and
assistance is given where necessary by the teacher in charge. An older girl, who possibly
has been out of school for several years and only able to undertake junior work, does not feel
embarrassed when working on individual papers with necessary direction as she might in
open class.
One girl sent in from the Interior has been given extra instruction in our " special class."
This girl, adopted when 7 years of age, had only attended school for four months previous to
adoption. Her foster-parents had a logging camp, and because of a lack of sufficient pupils
no teacher was available in the immediate neighbourhood. Other pupils were sent by boat
and bus to a community school, but Anne was not, though her foster-parents were financially
able to do so. Her foster-father did teach her to read and write. He died, there were
reverses, and this girl was expected to earn her living elsewhere. She was 16 years of age,
a woman in stature, but in many ways a child, bewildered and unable to make proper
decisions. Her psychometric report showed border-line intelligence with possibilities for
improvement. Anne has made splendid progress in school work, is eager to learn, and
maturing rapidly. There is still some bitterness because of lost opportunities, but she is
appreciative of present training.
Another girl, 16 years, from the far north, never had attended school, could not read or
write, and found great difficulty in expressing herself, welcomed gladly the opportunity of
primary work. She is eager for information along all lines. She now, in less than a year,
can write quite a fair letter, is reading the daily paper and simple books from the school
library.    She still is a walking question-mark eager for information.
Three classes are maintained: Specials during morning hours, Grades VII and VIII.,
from 1 to 4 p.m., taken by one teacher, Grades IX. and X. by another, and the Commercial
Class by office secretary during afternoon.
Knitting, sewing, cooking, gardening, laundry—the many phases of home-making—are
not known to many of our admissions. The necessity for such training is impressed on them,
both as a means of livelihood and because they will need this knowledge in their own homes
in the future if they desire to make a success of their venture. A girl who is a good housekeeper, including cooking, can secure a position very readily. She will be paid not less than
$15 per month, and more often $20, and even $25 if very capable, and this with all found.
I doubt that her hours are longer than in many other forms of employment, because in
working for her employers she is also doing things for herself—meals, laundry, etc. She has
a pleasant room, good food, and if she is wise enough to become a necessary part of the household she can expect fair treatment, even if it is only self-interest on the part of her employer.
It is unfortunate that housework is considered menial if you are paid to do it. Making a real
home should be approved not scorned. We have no difficulty in placing our graduates; in
fact we have a waiting list of offers. The majority of our girls long for a home of their own
and, at least, a semblance of security. They are satisfied with a humble one, and many of
them are happy and making a real effort to improve things for themselves and their children.
I prize among my social engagements invitations to homes of our former graduates, who show
them with such pride.
Our routine for training and recreation varies a little with the seasons. In good weather
walks are included daily, sometimes before breakfast, following the noonday meal, or long
hikes after school closes at 4 o'clock. In summer, softball, tennis, croquet are an incentive
to keeping lawns for such in good order. Swimming is very popular, Windermere Park pool
is within walking distance and is available three times a week. To go by street-car to Stanley
Park and swim in the pools there is an extra treat. Sometimes we have long rides in the
truck from the Boys' School and this is very popular. The gymnasium is useful in winter
with basket-ball groups, physical education and dancing classes, also some of our larger
concerts.
Credits are given for good conduct and efficiency, which are posted twice monthly. A
report from each supervisor is turned into the office with full explanation as to event, time,
etc., in every case where there is a loss of credits. A record is kept for each girl and she has
the privilege of looking over her sheet and seeing where she failed. We realize that it is much
easier for some to conform than others and take into account an honest effort to improve.
Effort and efficiency are stressed as well as conduct, as some of our passive type could qualify REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1939-40. S 7
for conduct but not for attention to duty. The hours spent in discussing credits earned and
lost are valuable to both student and instructor. Spending-money and treats are in ratio to
standing.    A picture-show is very popular as a reward.
All holidays are suitably celebrated and each girl has a birthday cake and party. Some
months have quite a number, but they are arranged for individually.
Religious instruction has been lacking in most cases previous to admission, but is accepted
here, and with the majority services are enjoyed and the teachers are given an attentive
hearing. Different denominations send well qualified representatives, and we are very
grateful to them.
Concerts provided by the Women's Musical Society, Philharmonic, Red Cross, Lions' Club,
and private parties have proven most enjoyable to staff and girls. Tickets from the Rotary
Club for the Ice Carnival were certainly appreciated, also the delightful party given by the
Toe H Auxiliary in their club-rooms. All spare time has been well employed on Red Cross
knitting.    This service is given gladly and the girls are very proud of their donations.
In closing, I gratefully acknowledge the kindly thoughtfulness and co-operation of the
Government departments with whom I have been working.
EXPENSE AND REVENUE  STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1940.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940  9,398
Per capita cost, one year        $973.56
Per capita cost, one day  2.66
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries      12,645.61
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies      $230.50
Telephone and telegraph        165.60
  396.10
Travelling expenses  625.51
Farm operations          1,420.66
Household equipment (other than furniture)  788.88
Clothing—
Clothing       $502.74
Boots and shoes        229.43
  732.17
Janitors' supplies   286.32
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel   $1,922.88
Water         247.35
Light and power        592.00
       2,762.23
Provisions—
Groceries   — $2,988.24
Meat         979.80
Fish   90.90
4,058.94
Medical attendance, medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical attendance       $400.00
Medical supplies          208.07
Surgery (tonsillectomies, etc.)         245.00
Dental cost        340.50
       1,193.57
Good Conduct Fund  71.60
Incidentals and contingencies  186.45
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $25,168.04
Carried forward ___.._   $25,168.04 S 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Expense and Revenue Statement of School, March 31st, 1940—Continued.
Brought forward    $25,168.04
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department).
Inventory, March 31st, 1939 	
399.11
878.92
$26,446.07
Less rent       $432.34
Less inventory, March 31st, 1940  995.45
1,427.79
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1940.
$25,018.28
On roll, April 1st, 1939     35
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940     30
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  22
Released by Juvenile Court  6
Released on probation by Police Magistrate  1
Released on probation by Deputy Provincial Secretary  1
Transferred to Children's Aid Society  1
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm  5
Transferred to Kamloops Gaol  1
65
—    37
Total in School, March 31st, 1940     28 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1939-40.
S 9
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1939, TO MARCH 3 1st, 1940.
No
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
Length of Term.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Calgary, Alta 	
Kolally, Sask.           	
Years.
5
5
17
5
9
17
10
3
1
11
18
15
13
18
18
17
17
15
17
17
11
11
12
17
5
11
11
17
13
8
Years.
16
16
17
16
16
17
15
16
14
16
19
17
13
18
18
17
17
16
17
17
16
14
12
17
5
15
15
17
16
16
542
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
451
Fernie, B.C             	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
543
Italian-French half-breed
Indian-Irish	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
544
Sec. 20<, J.D.A., 1929.
506
Rocky Mountain House, Alta—
Edmonton, Alta...  	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
546
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
549
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
550
Chilliwack, B.C.
Indian    	
551
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
538
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Chilliwack B.C
Scotch  — _	
Returned from Oakalla.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
554
540
Clyde, Alta.  	
Vancouver, B.C	
Unknown, part Indian
Newfoundland-Scotch
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Returned from Oakalla.
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
Edmonton, Alta  —
Stoke-on-Trent, England	
French-Canadian —	
Indeterminate.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Lethbridge, Alta..— _	
Cawley, Alta. 	
English ...._	
Canadian-American 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Industrial School for Girls Act.
American-Canadian	
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English  (both)  3
Scotch  (both)   1
Indian  (both)    1
German (both)   1
Japanese (both)   1
Canadian-American   1
Canadian-English   3
Canadian-Scotch  1
English-Canadian   1
English-Irish   2
French-Canadian   2
French-English   1
Italian-French half-breed  1
Indian-Irish   1
Irish-American   1
Irish-English    1
Newfoundland-Scotch   1
Norwegian-English   1
Scotch-Indian   1
Scotch-French   1
Swedish-American   1
Swedish-Chinese   1
Swedish-Indian   1
Unknown, part Indian   1
Total  30
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
Alberta   12
British Columbia  11
England      1
Ontario     1
Saskatchewan
Yukon 	
Total
4
1
30 S 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
AGES OF GIRLS.
13 years      1
14 years      2
15 years      3
16 years   10
17 years
11
18 years      2
19 years      1
Total   30
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Armstrong   1
Chilliwack  2
Cranbrook  2
Kamloops   1
Lower Post  1
North Vancouver   1
Returned from Oakalla     2
Penticton       4
Vancouver   12
Victoria      3
West Summerland      1
Total
30
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible   11
Sexual immorality   9
Theft   2
Incendiarism   1
Neglect  1
Unsatisfactory wards   4
Returned from Oakalla  2
Total   30
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Juvenile Delinquents Act  1
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  17
Indeterminate   5
Two years  1
Industrial School for Girls Act.    2
Unsatisfactory wards     2
Returned from Oakalla     2
Total   30
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist   1
Church of England  9
Four-square Gospel   1
Lutheran    1
Pentecostal   1
Presbyterian   1
Roman Catholic  6
United Church  9
Gospel Hall  1
Total   30
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  14
Number who have both parents dead  1
Number who have father living, mother dead  4
Number who have mother living, father dead  5
Number who have father unknown, mother dead  1
Number who have father living, mother unknown  1
Number who have mother living, father unknown  1
Number whose parents are unknown  3
Total
30
Of the above, the parents of 3 girls are separated, 2 are divorced;  there are 4 stepfathers,
3 stepmothers, and 3 adopted parents. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1939-40. S 11
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Assistant Superintendent and Teacher Miss Ayra E. Peck.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher   Miss Marrion D. Tulloch.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Sewing Supervisor Miss M. E. Murray.
Night Supervisor. Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Supervisor (Linen-keeper) Miss Anna C. Martin.
Supervisor Mrs. E. E. Paterson.
Cook Miss Irene G. Reid.
Relief Supervisor Mrs. Alice McCormack.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener George B. Boving.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Sitperm.ewc.ewt.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1939,
to March 31st, 1940:—
Calls made by physician  43
Patients seen by physician, including treatments  246
Complete physical examination  23
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection  4
Smears taken for Neisser infection  83
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman  40
Girls treated for syphilis intraveneously  4
Treatment for syphilis intraveneously  43
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection  248
Argyrol and silver nitrate treatments for Neisser infection  77
Prontylin tablets for Neisser infection (5 grains) 1,558
Urine tests   91
Chest clinic  7
Basal metabolism  1
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital—
Tonsillectomy      7
Maternity cases (6 girls, 1 boy)     7
Ward X observation     2
— 16
Examination by eye specialist  6
Glasses provided   6
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a
complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. S 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School for Girls
during the year ended March 31st, 1940:—
Visits to dentist  19
Number of girls seen   57
Amalgam fillings   82
Cement fillings   69
Cleanings       1
Extractions   31
Novacaine administrations   41
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following are movements of high school pupils from April 1st, 1939,
to March 31st, 1940:—
Number enrolled   8
Grade IX.   4
Grade X  3
Grade XL   1
Girls leaving during term
Girls in class March 31st, 1940  4
The year from April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940, was the fifth in which we have
enrolled with the Government Correspondence Course. This course is most helpful to us, for
our girls are entering the different classes at any time during the year and the correspondence
course enables each girl to work ahead as rapidly as her ability permits.
The girls in all cases but one enrolled in hygiene, social studies, English literature,
English grammar and composition. The one other pupil chose art instead of hygiene, taking
the other subjects too.
All these students received tuition in commercial training as well.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher.
Dear Madam,—Our library department has enjoyed a most successful year. Funds from
the sale of our lavender-crop and donations from interested friends provided us with many
new books. Our library contains about 500 books, some for reference, but mostly fiction.
Many of our girls have never learned to enjoy books, but when the opportunity is presented
they discover a new field of entertainment. This year particularly the library has been most
popular and many discussions over books read have taken place. A number of book reviews
have been written in connection with school-work. Many current magazines have been provided by friends and greatly appreciated by the girls.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1939-40. S 13
Dear Madam,—During the period between April 1st, 1939, and March 31st, 1940, there
has been an average monthly attendance of twelve girls in the afternoon class and five in the
morning class. The hours for these classes are 1 to 4 p.m., and 10 a.m. to 12 noon, respectively.
The girls in the afternoon class are enrolled in Grades VIII. and VII. in the Government
Elementary Correspondence Course. This course consists of thirty-six lessons, each of which
contains the following subjects: Spelling, mathematics, grammar, language, literature, social
studies, health, general science, and drawing.
The girls enrolled in these classes last September have now completed one-half the
required number of lessons.
In the morning class most attention is given to such subjects as spelling, writing,
language, reading, and arithmetic.    Considerable time in this class is given to hand-work.
There has been keen interest shown during the term, and it is the ambition of each girl
to complete her grade before leaving.
Marion D. Tulloch,
Sc/ioo.-.eac/ier.
Dear Madam,—In my department on main floor, which includes the dining and serving
rooms, junior and senior sitting-rooms, as well as the large common living-room where both
junior and senior girls mingle in their off-duty time, the girls are trained in general housework.
In the dining and serving rooms the girls are instructed in care of dishes and silver,
setting and waiting on tables. Two waitresses attend to the girls' tables and one to staff
during meal-times. In this lovely room the tables are laid with white cloths, napkins with
pretty rings, flowers tastefully arranged, and three girls are seated at each table. In the
serving-room our meals are served cafeteria style, which has proved most satisfactory, speeding service and eliminating waste.
In my department the girls are also instructed in knitting, in which the majority of them
take a great interest. Each new girl knits a Royal blue sweater for daily wear and later a
three-piece suit in any colour she may choose. During the past year thirty-two sweaters and
thirty-one suits were completed.
Agnes Craig Oxley,
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—From April 1st, 1939, to March Slst, 1940, eighteen girls received full or
partial training in sewing, embroidery, and crocheting. During the year these girls completed 44 dresses, which included uniforms and print frocks, 23 morning dresses, 289 personal
garments, 91 baby garments, 65 articles for kitchen use, 150 pieces of table linen, and 228
pieces of bed linen; 127 articles of household furnishings, such as couch covers, pillows, curtains, bedspreads, and rugs were also completed, as well as 1,580 miscellaneous articles.
A very beautiful crocheted banquet-cloth and knitted bedspread were made by the girls.
These will be on view and for sale on our annual " Open Day " in May. The money derived
from the sale of such articles will be used for library books.
Each girl attends to her own mending and darning, which is supervised in the sewing-
room. As this branch of training is usually the final step before release the girls look forward
to it with enthusiasm, and those who show extra ability and interest become skilful enough to
gain not only an elementary knowledge but are able to complete their own home-going outfit.
M. E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor. S 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dear Madam,—The annual report of work done in the laundry is as follows:—
The entire work of the laundry for the School from April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940,
has been done by fifty-one girls, under supervision.
The number of girls taking laundry training at a time averages six, with an average of
3,187 articles handled every month. During the year, 5,471 hours were spent in the laundry
and 38,245 articles laundered.
The work is progressive, new girls taking charge of their own clothes, later learning by
practice the washing of silks and woollens, and fine ironing, including starched uniforms and
lingerie.
Anna C. Martin,
Linen-keeper.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 8,000 lb. _
Peas, 200 lb. 	
Beans, 165 lb	
Beets, 2,200 lb. 	
Tomatoes, 400 lb. ...
Cabbage, 700 lb. .„.__
Cauliflower, 110 lb.
$140.00
10.00
12.50
38.50
20.00
17.50
5.50
Carrots, 1,200 lb.        18.00
Onions, 200 lb. 	
Onions, green, 35 bunches
Spinach, 158 lb	
Celery, 160 heads 	
Cucumbers, 80 	
Lettuce, 150 heads 	
Vegetable marrow, 24 	
Lavender, 10 lb. 	
Manure, 10 loads	
4.00
1.25
7.90
16.00
4.00
7.50
2.40
10.00
30.00
$345.05
Fruit.
Apples, 200 lb. 	
Pears, 50 lb. 	
Cherries, 175 lb. 	
Raspberries, 75 lb. _
Loganberries, 50 lb.
$6.00
1.50
17.50
6.25
5.00
$36.25
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.
425-1040-7127  

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