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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1940]

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 ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
MINISTEE OF MINES
OP   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRLTLSH COLUMBLA
TEAE ENDED 31ST DECEMBER
1939
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OP  THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
I'rlnted by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. J. Asselstine, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
J. B. Adams, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner. To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1939 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. J. ASSELSTINE,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
May, 1940.  *€'<-^ ■'■£•*
■'    ■■       :::-,:'
■
■        ■ ■. ■   :
Polished specimen of cinnabar ore from Pinchi Lake, B.C.  THE MINING INDUSTRY.
BY
John F. Walker.
The value of mine production in 1939 was $66,614,179, an increase of $2,128,628
over 1938. This figure of $66,614,179 is $932,632 greater than the figures for total
production and for copper in the following tables. The value for copper in the tables
is based on the London price, whereas British Columbia copper is sold at the New York
price. The London price is used so that value figures in the following tables will
correspond closely with Provincial figures published by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics. The Dominion Bureau uses the London price because most of Canada's
copper is sold through London.
The increased value of mine production is due largely to greater volume and correspondingly greater value for copper, gold, and silver, and to antimony and bismuth
which did not appear in 1938 figures. All phases of the industry, except structural
materials such as cement, sand, gravel, stone, and riprap, showed increases.
Lode-gold production which has been establishing successive yearly records since
1933 shows an increase in volume and a greater proportionate increase in value due to
exchange.
Copper shows an increase in volume and a corresponding increase in value; but
to this must be added the $932,632 difference between London and New York figures,
not shown in the tables.
Silver showed little change in volume and value production.
Lead decreased slightly in volume and to a greater extent in value, due to relatively low prices for the metal throughout the greater part of the year.
Zinc production for the year was slightly lower than in 1938, and the average price
being about the same the value production is correspondingly less.
Cadmium shows an appreciable increase and antimony and bismuth substantial
values as against nothing in 1938.
Coal production, valued at $6,280,956, shows an increase of 13 per cent, over 1938.
Non-metallic minerals show a substantial gain in value of 39.8 per cent, as compared to 1938, and this is due largely to an appreciable increase in both volume and
value of sulphur output. The greatest loss in this group was for gypsum products.
Clay products show a slight gain, but other structural materials such as cement, sand,
and riprap show a decrease of 9.3 per cent, as compared to 1938.
The total number of shipping-mines increased from 211 to 217, those shipping
100 tons increased from 92 to 99.
The number of men employed decreased slightly from 16,021 to 15,890; wages and
salaries decreased from the 1938 record of $22,791,685 to $22,357,035.
Dividends decreased slightly from $11,992,316 to $11,865,698.
Machinery to the value of $1,393,353, building supplies to the value of $581,553,
and food supplies to the value of $1,187,503 were purchased by the industry during
the year.
GENERAL SITUATION.
It is anticipated lode gold will show a slight increase in volume and an appreciable
increase in value, due to the differential in exchange which has been constant for some
months, and provided it remains constant during the remainder of the year.
Placer gold shows a decrease for 1939 as compared to 1938, but the bringing into
production of one or two new operations should result in some improvement during the
present year.
It is impossible to predict what may happen to the price of silver, but it is anticipated that volume production will increase and, if prices hold firm, there should be a
slight increase in value production.
Copper production should show a further increase in volume and there should be a
substantial increase in value. A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1939.
Lead production should show an increase in volume and an appreciable increase in
value due to better average prices for the metal.
Zinc production should also show an increase in volume and, like lead, an appreciable increase in value.
Non-metallic minerals and structural materials will likely have about the same
value as last year.
In preparing the foregoing estimate war conditions have been taken into consideration and it is assumed that no major disaster will affect the mining industry or
any of the large producers. If the industry functions smoothly throughout the year,
it is anticipated that the value of mine production will be about $6,000,000 greater
than in 1939.
GOLD PURCHASING.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of
Mines, undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the
individual^ placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province are paying
a cash price of $29 per ounce for clean placer gold and are purchasing dirty placer
gold and amalgam on a deferred-payment basis. Purchases in 1939 amounted to
2,322 lots, valued at approximately $60,000. The total price paid has been almost
exactly the same as that received from the Royal Canadian Mint, except for the Mint's
handling charge of 1 per cent. This purchasing scheme has returned to the individual
miners from $10,000 to $15,000 per annum more than if they had sold through the
ordinary channels.
DOMINION-PROVINCIAL YOUTH TRAINING.
The Dominion-Provincial Youth Training Plan in connection with mining was
continued during the summer and autumn of 1939 with the idea in mind that, if the
trainees were given more instruction in geology, mineralogy, etc., by qualified men,
they would be better fitted to take their places as prospectors.
With the above ideas in mind, the Department of Mines felt that within a period
of a few years about fifty young men might be trained, particularly in the field, so that
they could identify, within reasonable limits, the rocks and minerals which they came
across.
There was a total of 450 applications received by the Department of Labour for
training. Out of these, 228, between the ages of 19 and 25, were enrolled and sent to
Emory Creek camp in two separate lots about six weeks apart. Approximately 96 of
the applicants Were rejected for various reasons, 53 failed to report, and 73 held in
reserve.
Six weeks' preliminary training was given at Emory Creek, where the rudiments of
mining, geology, mineralogy, field traversing, mapping, cabin construction, tempering and
sharpening steel, hand-drilling, placer-mining in all its phases, construction of sluice-
boxes and rockers, panning, dam construction, first aid, packing-horses, back-packing,
making pack-boards, cooking over a camp-fire and in a " dutch " oven, making yeast
bread, etc., were taught.
Examinations were held from time to time throughout the six weeks' course and
those who did not qualify were discharged. Good behaviour, ability to work, and
aptitude towards mining and prospecting played a large part in choosing the young
men for further training at Cowichan Lake, Vancouver Island. All those sent to
Cowichan Lake were orally examined, after passing written examinations, by the
Deputy Minister of Mines or the Chief Mining Engineer.
Those who did not pass the examinations and desired to continue prospecting on
their own account were given a "grub-stake" and transportation to Quesnel Forks
where they were supervised. Parties of four and eight under a "captain" either
placer-mined or prospected until war was declared when several parties quit and were
given their transportation home so that they might enlist. Others continued in the
field until the end of October.
For the first time since the Youth Mining Training began at Emory Creek, the
trainees were instructed by qualified geologists.    Classes were held in mineralogy and THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 7
rock classification, for which specimens were supplied; map reading; plotting traverses; identification of rocks and minerals in the field; compass traversing; staking
claims, etc.
The fifty men chosen for further training made their headquarters in the spare
cabins belonging to the Forestry Department on the south side of Cowichan Lake,
Vancouver Island, and about 7 miles from the south-east end. This camp was used
as a base for supplies and as headquarters by N. F. G. Davis, Ph.D., who was in
charge of the training. Five parties of ten men each under the supervision and
instructorship of graduate geologists back-packed their supplies and equipment into
different areas both north and south of Cowichan Lake and, after setting up a fly-camp
consisting of light mosquito-tents and a fly for the cook trainee, ran traverses at one-
eighth mile intervals from which the section was geologized in a general way and
mapped.
Work commenced about June 5th and continued with some interruption on account
of the fire-hazard until September, when the parties were called in on account of the
declaration of war. In all about 170 square miles was prospected; the average per
party being 3 square miles a week.
After it was ascertained that all young men were not required at present for active
service, and word had been received from the Dominion Department of Mines that
tungsten, manganese, mercury, and molybdenum might be needed for Empire war
material, about ten of the Cowichan Lake trainees were sent, under the management of
H. Sargent, Department of Mines Engineer, to further investigate the possibilities of
the manganese deposits lying north of Cowichan Lake.
Six other Cowichan Lake trainees were sent to Yalakom River area and near
Savona, where some further geological work, under the supervision of M. S. Hedley,
Department of Mines Engineer, was done on cinnabar deposits.
About twenty of the trainees who took the advanced course have obtained jobs in
the operating mines of the Province and they have proved very satisfactory to the
OT)PT*fl t{W8
SAMPLING PLANT, PRINCE RUPERT.
In 1937 a sampling plant was built on the waterfront at Prince Rupert and put
into operation on August 20th. The object in erecting a sampling plant at this
point was chiefly for the purpose of stimulating prospecting and development of
properties along the Prince Rupert branch of the Canadian National Railway. The
sampling plant was erected on the Coast so that full advantage could be taken of special
freight rates arranged especially for shipments of ore to the plant.
The sampling plant is, as its name implies, only a sampling plant and not a concentrator. Ores containing sufficient value to ship direct to the smelter are purchased
and assembled at the plant until sufficient tonnage is accumulated to warrant shipment
to the smelter. By mixing lots at the plant it is possible also to reduce smelter
penalties on individual shipments and so give the prospector the benefit of a mixed lot.
The plant may also be used by those developing properties for the purpose of
bulk-sampling.
For the calendar year 1939, 43 lots for shipment, 101 lots for testing, and 27
samples for assaying were received at the plant. These lots aggregated 217 tons. Ten
shipments totalling 201.7 tons were made to smelters, for which $12,596.75 was received
as against $12,663.92 paid out by the plant.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered
Confederation, all geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be
carried on by the Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered
to by the Dominion of Canada and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry
of the Province. Each year several geological parties are kept in the field and in the
aggregate a vast amount of information is made available to the prospector and the
mining engineer in the many excellent reports and maps covering British Columbia
which have been issued by the Geological Survey of Canada. A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in
Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained.
The officer in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address
is 305 Federal Building, Vancouver, B.C.
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was
effected, and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main
branches of this Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known
as the Bureau of Geology and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological
Survey of Canada and the Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of
Geology and Topography. During the season of 1939 the Bureau of Geology and Topography had the following officers employed on field-work in British Columbia:—■
Geological Parties.
1. E. D. Kindle continued the study and mapping of the geology of the Hazelton
area, west half (latitude 55° to 56°, longitude 127° to 128°), and of the Hudson Bay
Mountain area (latitude 54° 45' to 54°, longitude 127° 10' to 127° 30').
2. A. H. Lang completed the study and mapping of the geology of the Smithers
area, east half (latitude 54° to 55°, longitude 126° to 127°), and continued work in
the west half of the same area (latitude 54° to 55°, longitude 127° to 128°).
3. C. H. Crickmay completed the study and mapping of the geology of the Tyaugh-
ton Lake area (latitude 50° 50' to 51° 05', longitude 122° 40' to 123° 05').
4. A. F. Buckham commenced the study and mapping of the geology of an -area
on the east coast of Vancouver Island (latitude 49° 30' to 49° 45', longitude 124° 45' to
125° 15').
5. W. E. Snow continued the study and mapping of the geology of the Hope area,
west half (latitude 49° to 50°, longitude 121° to 122°).
6. H. M. A. Rice commenced the study and mapping of the geology of the Hope
area, east half (latitude 49° to 50°, longitude 120° to 121°).
7. W. E. Cockfield commenced the study and mapping of the geology of the Ashcroft area, east half (latitude 50° to 51°, longitude 120° to 121°).
Topographical Parties.
C. H. Smith mapped the Zeballos area (92 E/15, west half), latitude 49° 45' to
50° 00', longitude 126° 45' to 127° 00'; and the Tahsis area (92 E/15, east half),
latitude 49° 45' to 50° .00', longitude 126° 30' to 126° 45'. This was for publication on
a scale of 1 inch to 1 mile with 100-foot contours.
H. A. S. West mapped 90 per cent, of the west half of the Nelson sheet (82 F/6),
longitude 117° 15' to 117° 30', latitude 49° 15' to 49° 30'. This was for publication
on a scale of 1 inch to 1 mile with 100-foot contours.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total mine output of the Province consists of the outputs of metalliferous
minerals, coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials,
valued at standard recognized prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in
previous years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to
facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered
to. The methods used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent
Annual Reports, with the addition of new tables.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments
made during the full calendar year by the producers the net recovered metal contents
have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content" necessary corrections for smelting and refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be
remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with
the exception of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 9
shipped;   deductions for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages of the
metal prices.
(2.) Gold-placer returns are received from operators giving production in crude
ounces recovered; these are converted to fine-gold ounces by dividing the crude-ounce
value by the old standard price of gold. The fine-gold content is then valued at the
yearly average price of gold, which in 1939 was $36,141 per ounce. On this basis the
average crude-gold value per ounce was $29.72 on Provincial placer-gold production.
(3.) The prices used in valuing the different metals are: For gold, the average
price for the year; for silver, the average New York metal-market price for the year;
for lead, the average London metal-market price for the year; and for zinc, the average
London metal-market price for the year. Copper in 1939 is valued at the average
London metal-market price. (See foot-note to Table I.) Prior to 1932 copper was
valued at the average New York price. The change was made because very little
copper was being marketed in the United States on account of high tariff charges
against importations from foreign countries. The bulk of the lead and zinc production
of the Province is sold on the basis of the London prices of these metals and they are
therefore used. The New York, St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices
differ materially from the London prices of these metals and are not properly applicable
to the valuing of the British Columbia production.
By agreement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Provincial Statistical Bureaus, the following procedure of taking care of the exchange fluctuations has
been agreed upon :■—
(a.)  Silver to be valued at the average New York price, adjusted to Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate.
(b.)  Lead, zinc, and copper to be valued at London prices, adjusted to Canadian funds at the average exchange rate.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary
mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made
in by-product ovens was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was
credited as coal production. The result was that the coke-production figures were
incomplete. Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted. This consists of crediting all coal
produced, including that used in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-
making is considered a manufacturing industry. As it is, however, of interest to the
mining industry, a table included in the report shows the total coke produced in the
Province, together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This
valuation of coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the
Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the
price used was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton. In
making comparisons with former years the decline in dollar value is accentuated by
this lowered price.
TABLES.
The collection and compilation of mining statistics was taken over on April 1st,
1939, by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade and Industry.
The Department of Mines Statistician, H. Pearson, was transferred to the Bureau on
the same date.
The arrangement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the collection of
mining information is still in effect and no change has taken place, except to centralize
to a greater extent the collection of statistical information in one Provincial department.
The Bureau of Economics and Statistics now prepares all the statistical tables in
this report for the Department of Mines. The Bureau also supplies to the Department
of Mines statistical information when required. A 10
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on the mining industry are compiled from information supplied by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics through
the courtesy of the property-owners and also from information obtained by the officers
of the Mineralogical Staff in the course of their field-work. The Registrar of Companies and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through their
respective offices.
D. E. Whittaker, Chief Analyst and Assayer, who retired at the end of
the year after forty-two years' service with the Provincial Government, died
on May 18th, 1940.
D. E. Whittaker was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1875, and
came to Victoria in 1879, where he received his education at the city schools.
He entered the Government service in August, 1897, as an apprentice to the
Provincial Assayer and Public Analyst and was appointed Assistant Assayer
in 1901. In 1913 he was also appointed Public Analyst and in 1925 he was
promoted to Provincial Assayer, as well as Public Analyst. In 1937 he
became Chief Assayer and Analyst, the office of Provincial Assayer and
Public Analyst long since having been absorbed in the Department of Mines.
Mr. Whittaker's long and faithful service with the Department is deeply
appreciated by all those with whom he had dealings. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 11
INDEX TO TABLES.
Title. Page.
Table I.—Production;   all Metals,  Structural,  and Miscellaneous—-1939 and  1938
compared  12
Table II.—Metal Prices;   Average Prices used in valuing Production, 1901 to 1939,
inclusive ,  13
Table III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1939  14
Table IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1939, inclusive  14
Table V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1937, 1938, and 1939—  14
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1939,
inclusive    15
Table VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date—Lode Gold and Placer Gold  16
Table VIII.—Output of Mine Products by Districts and Divisions, 1935, 1936, 1937,
1938, and 1939  17
Tables IX.a, IX.b, and IX.c.—Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver,
Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1938 and 1939, and IX.D, IX.E, and IX.F, production for
1900-1939, inclusive 18-23
Table X.—Production in Detail of Structural Materials, 1939  24
Table XL—Production in Detail of Miscellaneous Metals, Minerals, and Materials,
1939  25
Table XII.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1939, inclusive—Graph  26
Table XIII.—Production of Lode Mines in British Columbia, 1913-1939, inclusive—
Graph -  27
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  28
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia from 1895
to 1925  28
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1938 and 1939.. 28
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1939 29-31
Table XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1939  32
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1939  33
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-1939  34
Table XXL—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1939 and List of Mills operating 35-41
Table XXII.—Mining Companies employing an Average of Ten or more Men during
1939—Shipping and Non-shipping  42 A 12                           REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production,
1938 and 1939.
Quantity,
1938.
Quantity,
1939.
Value,
1938.
Value,
1939.
Per Cent.
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease ( —).
Quantity.
Value.
Metallics.
$
$
152,739
466,362
563,242
7,392,862
21,221,272
1,478,492
12,002,390
1,226
1,122
4,361,199
4,917
8,544,375
+ 100.0
+ 100.0
+ 37.3
+ 12.7
+    8.2
— 11.5
— 13.1
+ 61.3
+ 117.9
— 0.8
+ 100.0
— 6.9
65,769,906
557,522
57,759
412,979,182
760
16
10,861,578
410,090
6,558,575
19,613,624
1,671,015
13,810,024
760
515
4,722,288
73,254,679
587,180
49,746
378,743,763
436
32
10,771,585
+ 11.4
+    5.3
— 13.9
— 8.3
— 42.6
+ 100.0
— 0.8
Gold, placerf  oz.
Mercury   .   .lb.
Platinum         oz.
Silver    oz.
Zinc   - —-   lb.
298,497,295
278,409,102
9,172,822
—    6.7
55,959,713
56,190,198
+    0.4
Fuel.
Coal  (2,240 lb.)    tons
NON-METALLICS.
1,309,428
1,477,872
5,565,069
6,280,956
+ 13.0
+ 13.0
363
16,676
171,372
4,560
3,295
11,668
777,586
448
23,090
99,703
8,017
3,587
12,300
1,230,814
+ 23.4
+ 27.8
— 41.8
+ 75.8
+    8.8
+    5.4
+ 58.3
Fluxes—limestone, quartz tons
21,089
35,144
+ 66.6
Slate and rock granules, talc...tons
Sodium carbonate, magnesium sulphate   tons
Sulphurt     tons
274
722
78,918
265
850
133,676
—    3.3
+ 17.7
+ 69.4
985,520
1,377,959
+ 39.8
Clay Products and other
Structural Materials.
Clay Products.
Brick—
Common    No.
Face, paving, sewer brick ..No.
7,221,378
625,715
5,914,812
789,222
592
102,767
21,045
105,933
6,489
30,411
87,139
9,699
2,486
84,563
29,223
112,079
8,324
29,095
88,649
11,360
8,873
— 19.0
+ 48.2
— 17.7
+ 39.0
+    5.8
+ 28.3
— 4.4
+     1-7
+ 17.1
+257.0
Fireclay   tons
Structural tile—hollow blocks	
Drain tile, sewer pipe  No.
Pottery—glazed or unglazed 	
Bentonite ;   other clay products
467
+ 27.0
953,240
1,084,408
+ 13.8
365,969
372,166
+    1.7
Other Structural Materials.
Cement 	
Lime and limestone — —tons
42,373
12,207
230,538
626,731
102,444
609,464
90,970
179,671
520,420
190,751
558,676
74,159
116,262
— 17.0
+ 86.2
— 8.3
— 18.5
— 35.3
58,672
+ 38.5
Stone—building, pulpstone     tons
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock—tons
Totals	
4,550
140,514
— 62.7
— 39.5
1
1,609,280
1,460,268
—    9.3
Total value in Canadian
64,485,551
65,681,547
+    1-9
* Dominion production of copper is evaluated at the average I
production in the above table is likewise so valued, in order that E
to be noted that British Columbia copper is contracted and paid
additional gross amount of about $932,632 could be added to the al
f Canadian funds.
% Sulphur content of pyrites shipped, estimated sulphur conts
gases, and elemental sulphur.
>rice on the I.
ominion and
for in U.S. i\
ove Provincia
ined in sulph
ondon market and British
Provincial compilations ag
mds, and if such had bee
1 value for 1939.
uric acid made from was'
Columbia
ree.    It is
n used an
e smelter- THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 13
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices used in compiling Value of Provincial
Production of Gold, Sdiver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc
Year.
Gold,
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
■ Lb.
$
20.67
Cents.
56.002 N.Y.
49.55      „
50.78 „
53.36 „
51.33      „
63.45      „
62.06      „
50.22      „
48.93
50.812    „
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80 „
52.10
47.20      „
62.38
77.35
91.93      „
105.57      „
95.80      „
59.52      „
64.14      „
61.63      „
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.37 „
58.176    „
52.993    „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
Cents.
16.11   N.Y.
11.70      „
13.24
12.82      „
15.59 „
19.28      „
20.00      „
13.20
12.98
12.738    „
12.38
16.341    „
15.27 „
13.60 „
17.28 „
27.202    „
27.18      „
24.63
18.70      „
17.45      „
12.50      „
13.38      „
14.42      „
13.02      „
14.042    „
13.795    „
12.92      „
14.570    „
18.107    „
12.982    „
8.116    „
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419    „
7.795    „
9.477   „
13.078    „
9.972    „
10.092    „
Cents.
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81      „
3.88      „
4.24      „
4.81      „
4.80      „
3.78      „
3.85
4.00      „
3.98
4.024    „
3.93      „
3.50      „
4.17      „
6.172    „
7.91      „
6.67 „
5.19      „
7.16      „
4.09      „
5.16      „
6.54      „
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.761    „
5.256    „
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    „
2.710   „
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133    „
3.913    „
5.110    „
3.344    „
3.169    „
Cents.
	
	
	
7.566    „
	
6.24
	
5.62
5.39      „
7.409    „
6.493    „
3.599    „
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.141
2.405    „
3.210    „
1934 	
1935  ..
1936 _	
3.044    „
3.099    „
3.315   „
1937 :	
1938   	
4.902    „
8.073   „
3.069    „
Average 1935-39 (inclusive) 	
35.306
47.752    „
10.082    „
3.734    „
3.491    „
Note.—In making: comparisons with average prices used prior to 1926, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content" of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1926 was taken at
"net"; silver, at 95 per cent.; lead, at 90 per cent.; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1926 (inclusive)
prices are true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1939.
Gold, placer
Gold, lode 	
Silver 	
Copper 	
Lead 	
Zinc 	
Coal and coke	
Structural materials 	
Miscellaneous minerals, etc.
Total.
$87,410,451*
248,771,468*
138,110,087
306,055,053
263,501,845
159,841,335
384,359,102
78,773,572
17,164,825
$1,683,987,738
'■ Canadian funds.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1939 (inclusive).
1852
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
to 1895 (inclusive)  $94,547,370
  7,507,956
  10,455,268
  10,906,861
  12,393,131
  16,344,751
  20,086,780
  17,486,550
..:  17,495,954
  18,977,359
  22,461,325
  24,980,546
  25,882,560
  23,851,2 77
  24,443,025
  26,377,066
  23,499,072
  32,440,800
  30,296,398
  26,388,825
  29,447,508
  42,29 0,4 62
  37,010,392
1918
1919
$41,782,474
33,296,313
1920      35,543,084
1921      28,066,641
1922      35,162,843
1923     41,304,320
1924      48,704,604
1925      61,492,242
1926      67,188,842
1927      60,729,358
1928      65,372,583
1929      68,245,443
1930      55,391,993
1931      34,883,181
1932   *28,798,406
1933   *32,602,672
1934   *42,305,297
19315   *48,821,239
1936   *54,081,907
1937   *74,475,902
1938   *64,485,551
1939   *65,681,547
Total $1,683,987,738
1 Canadian funds.
TABLE V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1937, 1938, and 1939.
Description.
Gold,   placer*  	
Oold. lode* 	
 oz.
 lb.
 lb.
      lb.
Coal _ 	
.....tons, 2,240 lb.
Miscellaneous metals
Totals	
and minerals
1937.
Quantity. Value.
54,153
460,781
11,308,685
46,057,584
419,118,371
291,192,278
1,444,687
$1,558,245
16,122,727
5,075,451
6,023,411
21,416,949
14,274,245
6,139,920
2,098,337
1,766,617
$74,475,902
1938.
Quantity. Value.
57,'759
557,522
10,861,578
65,769,906
412,979,182
298,497,295
1,309,428
$1,671,015
19,613,624
4,722,288
6,558,575
13,810,024
9,172,822
5,565,069
1,975,249
1,396,885
$64,485,551
Quantity.
49,746
587,180
10,771,585
73,254,679
378,743,763
278,409,102
1,477,872
Value.
$1,478,492
21,221,272
4,361,199
7,392,862
12,002,390
8,544,375
6,280,956
1,832,434
2,567,567
$65,681,547
1 Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 15
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1939.
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Year.
Placer.
Lode.
Total.
1858-1862.
1863-1867-
1868-1872..
1873-1877-
1878-1882.
1883-1887-
1888-1892..
1893	
1894	
1895 	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900.	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905.
1906
1907.
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927.
1928.
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937.
1938.
1939.
$9,871
16,283
9,895
9,019
5,579;
3,841
2,525:
356.
405,
481,
544.
613,
643,
1,344,
1,278,
970,
1,073,
1,060,
1,115,
969,
948,
828,
647,
477,
540,
426,
555,
510,
565,
770,
580,
496,
320,
286,
221,
233,
368,
420,
420,
280,
355,
156,
143,
118,
152,
291,
395,
562,
714,
895,
1,249,
1,558
1,671,
1,478
634
592
318
201
,911
,515
426
,131
,516
,683
026
,520
,346
900
724
100
140
420
300
300
400
000
000
000
000
000
500
000
000
000
500
000
ooo
500
600
200
,800
000
750
092
503
247
208
711
235
992
542
787
431
058
,940
,245
015
492
$23,404
125,014
785,400
1,244,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
2,857,573
3,453,381
4,348,603
4,888,269
4,812,616
4,589,608
4,933,102
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,880
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,513
6,322,442
5,627,490
5,109,004
5,167,934
4,587,334
2,367,190
3,403,812
3,150,645
2,481,392
2,804,154
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,269
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,888,097
3,004,419
3,323,576
3,018,894
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
12,852,936
14,168,654
16,122,727
19,613,624
21,221,272
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
379,535
530,530
1,267,083
1,788,206
2,636,340
2,844,563
4,202,473
4,732,105
5,318,703
5,961,409
5,873,036
6,704,908
5,902,402
5,579,039
4,883,020
5,929,880
5,401,090
6,073,380
5,151,613
6,877,942
6,137,490
5,674,004
6,937,934
5,167,834
2,863,190
3,723,812
3,437,145
2,702,992
3,087,354
4,458,484
4,124,994
5,541,285
4,615,361
4,519,362
3,835,848
4,031,305
3,123,130
3,475,811
3,310,886
4,656,849*
6,955,716»
10,965,416»
13,747,994*
15,418,594*
17,680,972*
21,284,639*
22,699,764*
Totals..
$87,410,451
$248,771,468
$336,181,919*
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 17
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03 03 S  L> A 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE IX.A.—Detail op Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver in 1938 and 1939.
Year.
Tons.
Gold—Placer.
Gold—Lode.
Silver.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
North-western   District:
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1038
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
58,759
68,969
339,027
373,987
24,871
17,958
13
2
75
68
26
33
2,181
3,475
13,616
10,868
3,728
3,860
155
218
8,283
8,500
172
225
$
719,538
533,727
376
59
2,170
2,021
752
981
63,098
103,280
393,922
323,005
107,854
114,722
4,484
6,479
239,634
252,627
4,976
6,687
12,765
16,997
57,610
56,413
$
449,073
614,288
2,026,931
2,038,822
$
830
824,211
944,779
	
336
358,342
382,522
15
21,052
34,051
127
8,872
18,034
4,590
312,117
651,767
9
7,817
13,544
4
3,399
5,484
North-eastern   District:
130
149,893
166,916
114
62,105
70,418
4,120
2,184,854
2,544,977
20
0,304
8,845
8
2,741
3,581
60
13
470
4,593
1,859
South  Central  District:
2,250
19,445
9,774
16
198
6,208
1,836
7,156
218,397
66,355
271
969
792
5,520
110
421
321
2
148
149
27
15
156
165
12
9
324
247
31
12
o
6
957
652
16
11
60
4,282
4,428
781
446
4,513
4,904
347
268
9,374
7,341
897
357
58
178
27,687
19,378
463
327
1,277
1,078
1,980
2,678
28,841
28,198
247,294
223,412
1,223,214
1,452,230
968
944
50
378
441
673
1,069
4,655
4,903
62,563
55,990
8,740
12,423
507
326
19
13,298
15,938
23,076
38,636
163,763
177,199
2,200,966
2,023,535
307,790
448,979
17,836
11,746
669
1,274
385
3,861
3,797
998,636
961,486
57,867
34,082
214,705
242,727
8,261
15,055
93
554
156
1,079
1,537
389,287
13,799
South-eastern  District:
98,275
6,095
40
2,273,264
2,091,362
79
83
2,779
2,999
8,012,355
7,976,707
3,229,609
367
1,186
332,274
277,886
272
376
124,957
107,631
9,569
13,589
4,305,987
3,889,892
15,288
204
225,020
148,184
0,047
83
9
232
364
144
111
268
6,712
10,818
4,166
3,299
59,997
4,867
1,026
880
651
119,038
18,446
89
118
105
88
8,496
8,635
3,131
4,265
3,694
3,180
298,889
312,078
123,790
109,506
68,741
26,357
60,649
8,489
6
10
178
289
44,337
10,671
20,368
3,437
216
251
4
6,249
7,460
58
119
South-western  District:
75
3,125
23
984
809
35,563
28
1,905
2
504
570
60
14,581
16,941
771
26,483
57,929
6,765
6,552
308,640
272,962
423
325
17,979
54,892
3,289
3,206
162,215
148,475
63
146
032,501
1,983,852
115,707
115,868
5,706,724
5,366,035
2,216
5,276
11,750
18,750
3,920
3,155
44,830
42,872
01
233
5,108
7,592
1,707
1,277
19,491
17,358
26
94
969
727
549
627
2
8
211
508
28,034
21,607
15,883
18,635
58
238
6,104
15,098
Lillooet	
Quatsino	
572
352
12,722
279
113
2,212,106
2,113,972
3
14,769
22,893
519,574
827,376
104.930
203,729
14
71,707
82,486
6
69
4
15
123
2,051
116
445
3,559
Yale	
84
76
2,674
09
30
1938
1939
7,377,091
7,210,676
57,759
49,746
tl,671,051
ti,478.492
557,522
587,180
19,613,624
21,221,272
10,801,578
10,771,585
4,722,288
4,361,199
From and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division.
From and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with the Portland Canal Mining Division.
New Westminster and Yale Mining Divisions consolidated as the New Westminster Mining Division from July,  1939.
Stikine and Bella Coola Mining Divisions consolidated as the Stikine Mining Division from September, 1939.
Slocan and Slocan City Mining Divisions consolidated as the Slocan Mining Division from November, 1939.
* Includes all shipments to Government sampling plant at Prince Kupert during 1938 and 1939.
t Includes  placer gold  purchased  by  Gold   Commissioners  from  " snipers "  and  others,   and
obtained in the mining division where sold, but disposed of at the most convenient place.
many instances  was not THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 19
TABLE IX.b.—Production in Detail of Copper, Lead, and Zinc in 1938 and 1939.
Districts and Divisions.
Year.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.              Value.
Pounds.             Value.
Pounds.
Value.
North-western   District:
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1-939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1938
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
1038
1939
8
$
$
303
30
779,834
880,427
20,078
27,901
Skeena	
125,736
133,851
12,689
13,348
21,779
690
8,996
276
North-eastern   District:
Cariboo -._
Peace River	
42,629
1,351
12,713
390
South   Central   District:
97,004
116,645
9,682
11,772
Nicola	
5.328                   17S
0,010
203
880
30
322
10
6,146
1,608
240,048
339,798
372,506
338,417
20,052,013
33,430,508
613
162
23,938
34,292
37,155
34,153
2,956,958
3,373,807
1.559
1,368
030,464
610,831
34,809
18,857
52
43
21,283
19,357
1.166
	
1,481
17,192
807,344
792,935
287
45
528
24,810
24,335
0
12
Greenwood -
598|                  406
 |     	
South-eastern   District:
3,116
72,168
124,432
99]                  657
2,413|           24,760
3,9431           45,372
  I     	
20
701
1,393
 |     	
406,222,153
372,991,646
13,584,069|267,766,054
11 .820.1 OS 228.1 04.1 77
8,228,451
7,000,517
	
258,718
526
3,890,303
1,841,307
8,052
17
130,092
58,351
73,598
28
1,547,177
1,223,560
1
47,545
37,551
500,658
377,536
12,198
8,477
287,362
1,651,992
10,742
11,964
408
037,388
158,960
10,587
4,879
145
144
848,994                   ^
1,474,329                     V
	
269|              4,701
9,009|   27,027,545
52,352|   48,039,405
1,700,604
1,659,104
169,593
167,437
South-western   District:
4,302
170,240
435
17,181
6,339
201
180.738
18.021
6,754
11,625
220
368
1411                      14
2,207
375
109
96
301
3,591
226
38
11
10
30
362
1,561
49
3,242
327
33,308,702
37,065,178
085
3,327,536
3,740,618
68
209,934
149,315
9,020
4,732
307
31
1938
1939
05,760,0061     6.558,575(412.979,182
73,254,679|     7,392,862|378,743,763
1                          1
13,810,0241298,497,295
1 2,002,3901278,409,102
I
9,172,822
8,544,375
* Includes zinc and lead recovers
d from slf
g and reclaimed slags which cannot be credited to individual mines. A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE IX.c.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
Zinc in 1938 and 1939.
Districts and Divisions.
Mining Division Total.
District Total.
1938.
1939.
1938.
1939.
$
s
$
3,975,252
$
4,383,565
1,108,611
2,411,757
2,170
329,016
63,098
1,148,351
2,449,304
19,304
659,198
107,408
2,933,489
3,256,727
2,581,517
107,854
4,484
239,034
2,871,563
118,792
6,479
259,893
6,586,032
6,797,328
233,470
2,781
18,174
26,S46
072,484
2,264,802
3,307,409
85,135
60
20,522
41,351
649,374
2,072,365
3,928,521
31,550,438
28,267,612
25,409
767
25,326,518
463
27,130
4,678,429
4,160
03,284 .
34,422
1,350.702
58
23,534
178
22,072,608
327
13,958
4,056,609
3,299
65,623
14.C64
2,017,093
119
Fort Steele	
10,503,137
12,295,358
1,256
14,581
656,756
145,674
5,742,100
2,330
6,104
53,776
16,941
1,991,826
138,790
5,402,087
5,370
28,260
Nanaimo	
New Westminster	
Quatsino	
Vancouver	
3,927,843
190
6,294
4,657,263
445
Victoria	
Tale	
Totals	
55,548,348
55,000,590
55,548,348
55,000,590
From and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division.
From and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with the Portland Canal Mining Division
New Westminster and Yale Mining Divisions consolidated as the New Westminster Mining Division from July   1939
Stikine and Bella Coola Mining Divisions consolidated as the Stikine Mining Division from September,  1939. '
Slocan and Slocan City Mining Divisions consolidated as the Slocan Mining Division from November,  1939. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 21
TABLE IX.d.—Production of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver, 1900-1939.
Districts and Divisions.
Gold—Placer.
Gold—Lode.
Silver.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
North-western  District:
545,755
5
14,356
175
23
1,553
2,151
11,007
$
12,200,222
104
285,770
3,500
065
35,465
44,683
355,372
47,553
$
1,433,380
53,283
$
124,395
1,513,034
2,080
375,435
114
2,765,216
37,012,268
45,764
8,498,040
.   4,120
8,175,079
38,735,091
29,422
212,207
20
5,004,918
20,788,064
16,920
156,571
8
District totals	
575,025
12,025,781
2,062,011
50,358.78N
47,200,302
26.590,707
North-eastern  District:
1,884,971
33,099
3,707
005,243
38,159,749
798,760
84,035
12,407,800
267,853
8,267
9,418,639
183,262
31,232
2,244,490
14,430
1,413,245
198
7,156
271
110
District totals	
2,527,080
51,450,350
276,318
9,009,057
2,275,993
1,427,794
South  Central  District:
2,751
230
1,411
066
3.09S
182
6,211
65,071
4,052
33,406
14,098
72,861
3,889
132,945
38,604
7,932
4,310
105,549
905,387
853,038
47,118
1,288,419
212,100
140,913
3,588,191
19,244,804
21,210,007
1,323,317
279,472
238,678
6,683
1,944,781
16,638,297
476,617
1,279,125
166,536
115,335
3,406
856,720
8,817,612
310,025
631,494
District totals	
11,798
326,922
2,021,938
47.007,751
20,803,653
10,001,128
South-eastern  District:
212
115
15,884
214
872
2,832
3,778
7
24
844
861
220
5,658
2,598
357,280
4,921
20,052
08,798
79,220
207
004
24,049
17,137
5,279
2,673
180
2,475
6
19,048
940,861
12
4,008
1,055
2,582,343
5,502
04
66,937
4,052
54,709
124
525,590
27,200,087
335
00,172
41,954
54,720,017
113,725
1,323'
6,480,044
13,099
103,087,337
388,762
152,554
3,835,353
50,097
35,453.041
3,440,150
3,220,542
1,920,701
705,082
3,912,191
10,527
51,300,844
197,445
84,456
2,112,380
31,309
21,740,042
2,000,007
1,800,283
1,030,840
503,498
District totals	
25,863
585,809
3,558,827
82,831,085
158,748.802
84,736.422
South-western   District:
26S
10,OSS
1,308
8,797
89,307
225
1,732
233
182
438
7,423
5,503
224,486
26,436
200,100
1,817,788
4,710
40,701
4,002
5,300
9,714
152,529
1,393
8,476
77,848
22,031
1,140,712
06,806
352
59
223,607
35,348
3,455
49,155
289,080
2,775,348
774,900
37,301,583
1,387,904
12,722
1,210
0,122,819
730,044
78,182
3,486
16,804
57,386
30,261
313,100
512,827
547
4,245
3,072,025
734,287
6,532
1,694
9,513
31,175
13,715
145,500
295,763
280
2,157
1,723,182
399,098
Yale	
3,270
District totals	
120,058
2,498.295
1,580,207
49,584,150
4,752,160
2,025,446
3,259,824
07,787,217
9,499,901
239,390,837
233,840,970
126,290,497
From and including 1937 the Hard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division.
From and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with the Portland Canal Mining Division.
From and including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division.
New Westminster and Yale Mining Divisions consolidated as the New Westminster Mining Division from July,  1939.
Stikine and Bella Coola Mining Divisions consolidated as the Stikine Mining Division from September,  1939.
Slocan and Slocan City Mining Divisions consolidated as the Slocan Mining Division from November, 1939.
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.^
t Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
t Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ Lillooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1874. A 22
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1939.
TABLE IX.e.—Production of Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1900-1939.
Districts and Divisions.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
North-western   District:
83,161
11,949
100,045
$
7,036
$
045,243,514
3,896,838
1,583,277
5,653,225
96,155,780
579,010
280,160
883,032
50,148
21,376,219
2,621
937,863
1,867,664
110,254
21,779
690
8,996
276
656,460,015
07,919,840
21,558,001
948,210
1,876,600
110,530
North-eastern   District:
656
5,893,907
30
334,180
492
3,802,301
16
0,050,228
1,338,025
243,274
District totals	
6.050,228
1,338,025
5,804,503
334,210
3,802,793
243,290
South Central  District:
5,715,138
536.304
614
47,137,904
393,840,684
1,536,320
169,652,123
1,016,450
103,443
89
7,327,003
03,147,334
170,878
21,805,294
307,164
2,008,415
6,331
416,512
6,965,319
252,418
238,577
20,087
84,004
292
13,400
288,295
7,475
9,00G
406,758
233,077
2,704
508,729
5,707,077
5,209
04,377
25,981
7,561
147
14,529
Greenwood..	
Osoyoos ....
192,616
163
2,616
District totals	
018,425,147
93,030,491
10,344.730
423,705
7,048,501
243,613
South-eastern   District:
10,175
210,034
28,592
10,822
155
5,085,201
683
3,284
1,201
41,651
6,193
1,940
12
880,008
124
636
120,974,367
24,734
5,435,417,404
54,180,305
984,663
48,544,026
939,741
285,578,788
5,098,736
16,571,054
8,502.337
13,298,509
5,001,447
1,504
230,800,070
1,717,514
45,187
2,171,805
55,885
13,733,130
235,832
074,100
334,390
829,410
33,712,051
140
3,275,094,816
53,302,821
228,012
20,405,408
8,003
159,106,043
568,313
153,088,018
02,705
592,705
■
1,008,264
137,538,404
1,750,033
10,748
1,317,134
Golden	
10,834,459
35,012
5,148,138
113,288,249
5,439
40,550
16,972,068
773
8,641
33,011
1 19.295,350
1 7,022,250
5,001,223,064
250,027,108
3.096.859,785
157,679,909
South-western   District:
483,880
033,775
1,289,707
50,940
205
20,045,042
24,954
174,042
008,015,792
20,505,707
333
68,510
155,721
219,239
5,844
21
3,173,035
6,224
27,693
85,828,821
3,049,838
34
6,002
99
22 712
193
61,789
209
4
813
7
2,519
Clavoquot	
Clinton	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo _	
New Westminster	
Quatsino	
Vancouver	
Victoria  	
7,169,673
250,268
17,981,772
503,988
Yale	
12,088
541
651,230,983
02,535,580
7,273,156
254.301
17,981,772
503,988
Provincial totals	
2,051,461,723
303,346,192
0,030,294,210
258,587,660
3,727,569,601
158,841,330
Prom and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division.
From and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with the Portland Canal Mining Division.
From and including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division.
New Westminster and Yale Mining Divisions consolidated as the New Westminster Mining Division from July, 1939.
Stikine and Bella Coola Mining Divisions consolidated as the Stikine Mining Division from September, 1939.
Slocan and Slocan City Mining Divisions consolidated as the Slocan Mining Division from November,  1939. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 23
TABLE IX.f.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and
Zinc, by Mining Divisions and Districts, 1900-1939.
Districts and Divisions.
Mining Division Total.
District Total.
$
$
188,862,856
13,685,213
104
285,770
104,532,035
60,029,033
387,309
9,583,292
359,500
64,402,732
47,592,873
4,310,758
84,035
12,415,000
152,533,670
2,583,144
527,095
178,253
11,813,947
91,763,522
21,702,437
23,964,672
600,382,640
10,955,698
60,396
420,124,166
3,671,980
080,045
33,705,272
167,348
46,404,652
2,314,069
79,350,751
1,501,104
1,381,162
Fort Steele	
148,061,826
125,131
679,404
3,053,011
994,626
39,327,510
4,802,012
65,927
35,971
94,404,384
4,189,294
234,556
1,154,243,733
1,154,243,733
From and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division.
From and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with the Portland Canal Mining Division.
From and including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division.
New Westminster and Yale Mining Divisions consolidated as the New Westminster Mining Division from July,  1939.
Stikine and Bella Coola Mining Divisions consolidated as the Stikine Mining Division from September,  1939.
Slocan and Slocan City Mining Divisions consolidated as the Slocan Mining Division from November,  1939.
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.
t Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
X Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ Lillooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including  1874. A 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE XII.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1939.
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Production
5F
Lode Mines
IN
British Columbia,
1913-1939.
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.*
1836-
1886
1887.
1888
1889.
1890
1891.
1892..
1893.
1894..
1895.
1896
1897..
1898.
1899..
1900..
1901..
1902.
1903..
1904.
1905..
1906
1907..
1908
1909.
1910 .
1911.
1912..
1885
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
3,029,011
326,636
413,360
489,301
579,830
678,140
1,029,097
826,335
978,294
1,012,953
939,654
896,222
882,854
1,135,865
1,306,324
1,439,595
1,460,331
1,397,394
1,168,194
1,253,628
1,384,312
1,517,303
1,800,067
1,677,849
2,006,476
2,800,046
2,193,062
2,628,804
Value.
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,818,962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3,407,595
3,918.972
4,318,785
4,380,993
4,192,182
3,504,582
3,760,884
4,152,936
4,551,909
6,300,235
5,872,472
7,022,666
9,800,161
7,675,717
9,200,814
1913...-
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918.	
1919.	
1920	
1921.	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925.	
1926	
1927.	
1928.	
1929.	
1930 —
1931.	
1932	
1933	
1934 .....
1935.	
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939 .....
Tons.
,240 lb.)
137,483
,810,967
,611,129
,084,093
,149,975
,302,245
,267,541
595,125
,483,995
,511,843
453,223
939,626
328,522
330,036
453,827
526,702
251,252
,887,130
,707,590
,534,975
,264,746
347,090
187,968
,346,471
,444,687
309,428
477,872
Totals..
* For all years to 1925   (inclusive)  figures are net coal production and do not include
sequent figures are entire coal production,  including coal made into coke.
,996,378
coal made
Value.
$7,481,190
6,338.385
5,638,952
7,294,325
7,524,913
11,511,225
11,337,705
12,975,625
12,419 975
12,559,215
12,266,115
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048,864
5,722,502
6,139,920
5,565,069
6,280,956
$358,685,502
into coke; sub-
TABLE XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
1895-97	
1898 (estimated) .
1899	
1900 — 	
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
19,396
35,000
34,251
85,149
1901. — 127,081
1902 ....
1903 —
1904
1905	
1906	
1907	
128,015
165,543
238,428
271,785
199,227
222,913
1908 — — 247,399
1909 „   258,703
1910 ....    218,029
1911—  66,005
1912    264,333
Value.
$96,980
175,000
171,255
425,745
635,405
640,075
827,715
1,192,140
1,358,925
996,135
1,337,478
1,484,394
1,552,218
1,308,174
396,030
1,585,998
1913	
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
    286,045
Value.
$1,716,270
1914—	
      234,577
1,407,462
1,475,226
1916 	
     245,871
1916—	
     267,725
1,606,350
1917—	
         159,905
959,430
1918 	
     188,967
1,322,769
1919 	
91,138
637,966
1920	
1921...	
       67,792
          59,434
474,544
416 038
1922	
45,835
320,845
412,433
1923	
       58,919
1924—	
1925	
       30,615
75,185
214,305
526,295
 -4,393,255
Totals-	
$25,673,600
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1938 and 1939.
Description.
1938.
1939.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
157,951
$623,649
152,818
$569,945
48,760
53,004
$315,294
44,787
6,426
51,909
$286,491
37,015
325,435
345,790
101,764
$661,084
1,770,839
44,324
103,122
$648,941
1,768,977
44,108
$2,476,247
$2,462,026
1 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 29
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1939.
Lode-gold Mines.*
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class,
Amount
paid.
Erie 	
Gold
$66,898
25,000
5,102,450
1,437,500
746,650
565,588
37,500
472,255
7,922
15,000
13,931
611,314
420,287
132,533
11,751
300,000
222,816
1,475,000
1,574,640
20,450
3,423,191
7,407,468
25,000
19,658,075
539,898
85,000
5,000
926,040
900,000
600,000
115,007
1,245,250
162,500
300,000
133,501
23,530
Gold
Gold
Princess Royal Island	
Wells.. ..
Gold
Gold
Camp McKinney_ 	
Nelson._  	
Rossland  	
Oliver ..„,_ 	
Gold
Gold
Centre  Star.__ —___   —	
Gold	
Gold
Gold      	
Ymir   _—.
Hedley .... ._
Wells -	
Gold
Hedley  Mascot      _	
Gold 	
Gold     -	
I.X.L. -     ----- --	
Rossland  	
Green wo od 	
Hedley- ,	
Gold
Gold      	
Kelowna  Exploration __   	
Gold ..-	
Gold      	
Rossland __ 	
Rossland  -	
Bridge River 	
Hedley—_ 	
Bridge River -	
Nelson  ____	
Premier	
Zeballos •	
Sheep Creek _ 	
E rie ,   , , 	
Sheep Creek  	
Gold   	
Le Roi No. 2            	
Gold
Gold—. 	
Gold     	
Nickel Plate  —-   -  	
Gold     	
Gold—.	
Gold...  	
Gold
Gold—	
Gold  - 	
Gold.. -.-_.	
Gold      	
Silbak  Premier  ,  	
Sunset No.  2  , , ,. *  	
"War Eagle -  - - -	
Motherlode  — _ —- - - -
Premier  __ _.
Rossland —     	
Rossland ...  _	
Sheep Creek __ 	
Gold      	
Gold— —-
Gold— 	
Gold.... 	
Gold  —
Ymir  	
Gold-  	
Gold    -	
Miscellaneous mines _ ,,, - 	
$48,808,945
* The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc  "
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc...	
Silver-lead-zinc —
$10,000
97,200
476,297
27,500
5,500
86,329,773
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
132,464
264,816
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,109
50,000
Beaverdell  	
Bea verdell—  _	
New Denver  	
New Denver _
Trail	
Bell                                    	
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.	
Field   -
Smithers - 	
Florence  Silver  _ — - —- —	
Cody  _ 	
Hall Creek 	
Highland Lass, Ltd.    —.  —
Beaverdell -	
Similkameen	
Sandon ___ _ __
Retallack 	
$88,197,827 A 30
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1939.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1939—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines—Continued.
* These two properties are now amalgamated as Silversmith Mines, Ltd., August, 1939.
Copper Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
$88,197,827
Three Forks _	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc _
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc.
Silver-lead-zinc	
80,000
Mercury     	
6,000
10,257
Monitor and A jax _  	
Three Forks  	
Cody    	
27,500
71,387
Three Forks _.	
Cody .... _   	
40,894
72,859
Kimberley —_ 	
496.901
6,754
107,928
Sandon —	
Greenwood  , „    ,„.
Alamo   _
1,438,000
Providence   - —  	
Queen Bess  —    —
33,810
25,000
575,000
Reco           	
Cody 	
332,492
165,000
566,000
725,000
Slocan Silver   -	
Slocan   Star*   —   	
Spokane-Trinket    	
Standard Silver Lead   	
Alamo  —_	
Sandon   _  .
11,600
567,500
9,564
Silverton _       .
2,700,000
88,000
64,000
Wallace Mines, Ltd.   (Sally)       .	
Beaverdell  _	
135,000
"Washington.   - -	
Whitewater -    	
38,000
Retallack .._  _	
592,515
70,237
$97,255,025
Britannia M. & S. Co.*	
Canada Copper Corporation-
Cornell —- 	
Granby Cons. M.S.
Marble Bay 	
Hall Mines.. 	
P. Co.t~
Miscellaneous  mines _
Total, copper mines..
Britannia Beach ._„
Greenwood	
Texada Island __.
Copper Mountain
Texada Island	
Nelson  	
Copper
Copper
Copper.
Copper.
Copper-
Copper.
Copper.
;,759,502
615,399
8,500
1,205,568
175,000
160,000
260,770
$16,184,739
* The Howe Sound Company is the holding company for the Britannia mine in British Columbia and other mines
in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the Howe Sound Company are therefore derived from all
operations, and in the foregoing table the dividends credited to the Britannia mine have been paid by the Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, none being credited subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison
with yearly totals the amounts credited to the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so
the total in the annual report concerned will show the higher figure. Dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining
Company, Limited, are derived from operations in British Columbia and other countries, and so cannot now be
credited to British Columbia. Silbak Premier is a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, and dividends paid
by that company are, of course, included in Provincial totals.
f The amount shown to the credit of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited,
does not include the sum of $6,749,996 paid by the company during 1935 and 1936 as a distribution or repayment of
capital, subsequent to the closing-down of its operations at Anyox and the company going into voluntary liquidation.
Operations ceased at Anyox in August, 1935. The company since that date has revived its business charter and is
conducting operations at Allenby, B.C.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 31
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1939—Continued.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo  $16,000,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Fernie     12,308,956
Total  $28,308,956
Miscellaneous and Structural.
Various      $1,773,595
Aggregate of all Classes.
Lode-gold mining   $48,808,945
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  97,255,025
Copper-mining   ...  16,184,739
Coal-mining   28,308,956
Miscellaneous and structural   1,773,595
Total  $192,331,260
Dividends paid Yearly, 1919 to 1939, inclusive.
Year.                                              Amount paid.                     Year. Amount paid.
1919—   $2,494,283      1931  $4,650,857
1920    1,870,296      1932  2,786,958
1921     736,629      1933  2,471,735
1922    3,174,756      1934  4,745,905
1923    2,983,570      1935  7,386,070
1924    2,977,276      1936  10,513,705
1925    5,853,419      1937 y_. 15,085,293
1926    8,011,137      1938  12,068,875
1927    8,816,681      1939  11,865,698
1928    9,572,536 	
1929       11,263,118                                Total  $139,872,297
1930       10,543,500
Dividends paid during 1938 and 1939.
1938. 1939
Arlington            $11,510 $11,430
Bralorne Mines, Ltd       1,184,650 1,496,400
Britannia   :             206,924
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd          213,329 266,660
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada, Ltd.       8,164,587 6,540,672
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd          186,354 186,354
Pairview Amalgamated Gold Mines              2,661 2,593
Granby               180,097
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd         362,260 249,054
Highland Bell, Ltd           92,110 105,269
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd          105,072 157,607
I.X.L.   900 	
Kelowna Exploration            90,000 210,000
Kootenay Belle         101,280 121,536
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd         700,700 700,700
Privateer   '_            539,898
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd          197,400 28,200
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd         281,250 318,750
Silbak Premier           200,000 400,000
Others            174,812 143,554
Totals  $12,068,875 $11,865,698 A 32
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1939.
District and Class.
Capital
employed.
Salaries
and Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
North-western District—
Lode-mining —
Placer-mining-
Coal-mining	
Miscellaneous and structural-
Totals 	
North-eastern District-
Lode-mining	
Placer-mining	
Coal, miscellaneous, and structural-
Totals 	
South Central District—
Lode-mining 	
Placer-mining and coal-mining..
Miscellaneous and structural-	
Totals  	
South-eastern District-
Lode-mining	
Placer-mining 	
Coal-mining 	
Miscellaneous 	
Structural	
Totals .
South-western District-
Lode-mining —
Placer-mining	
Coal-mining-	
Miscellaneous -
Structural	
Totals-
Grand totals, 1939	
Grand totals, 1938	
Grand totals, 1937	
Grand totals, 1936.	
Grand totals, 1935	
Grand totals, 1935-1939.
5,826,987
677,183
484,000
1,365,638
204,843
0,975
6,988,170
1,631,456
2,534,594
1,264,012
73,569
843,819
424,768
56,986
3,872,175
1,325,573
8,436,318
1,109,882
314,759
2,044,444
507,009
84,453
9,860,959
57,206,887
32,805
6,145,769
791,923
66.384
2,635,906
8,295,335
12,693
987,150
83*896
17,979
64,243,768
9,397,053
18,186,756
266,952
14.422,441
15,718,668
1,913,593
4,013,666
12,898
2,418,820
558,249
363,414
50,508,410
7,367,047
135,473,482
153,012,848
145,520,641
142,663,065
143,239,953
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
101,113,422
117,989
30,312
18,339
$
427,643
16,954
27,167
166,640
471,764
100,477
20,045
2,820
228,655
17,215
11,130
123,342
257,000
324,245
50,184
16,211
882,462
59,727
40,921
390,640
983,110
642,397
1,161
78,496
880
1,031
2,103,682
20
254,950
2,294
4,107
723,965     I       2,365,053
275,439
88
175,048
120,475
90,566
661,616
2,066,203
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
13,872,403
1,818,234
41
560,809
223,441
34,895
2,637,420
I
6,714,347
6,544,500
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
29,091,408
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of capital employed in the mining industry in 1939, the amount of money distributed in salaries and
wages, fuel and electricity, and process supplies   (explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.).
Capital employed includes: Present cash value of the land (excluding minerals) ; present value of buildings,
fixtures, machinery, tools, and other equipment; inventory value of materials on hand, ore in process, fuel and
miscellaneous supplies on hand; inventory value of finished products on hand; operating capital (cash, bills and
accounts receivable,  prepaid expenses, etc.).
A special survey was made covering the mining industry for 1939 and the following data were compiled from
all returns received, and is additional to the statistics set forth in Table XVIII. It should also be kept in mind
that in the aggregate a substantial amount can be credited to individuals who do not make a return to the
Department.
Origin.
Machinery.
Building
Materials.
Food-
supplies.
Totals.
Canada  	
$977,953
271,816
143,584
$568,154
$1,183,716
$2,729,823
271,816
143,584
17,186
3,787
Others  	
13,399
$1,393,353
$581,563
$1,187,503
$3,162,409 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 33
TABLE XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1939.
District.
y
Year.
Tonnage.
No. of Shipping-mines.
No. of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons.
Net Value
to Shipper of
Lode Minerals
produced.
Gross Value
of Lode
Minerals
produced.
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
192G
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1939
1939
1939
1939
920,416
998,999
1,286,176
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,804,114
2,083,606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,690,110
3,188,865
2,761,579
2,892,849
2,112,975
2,178,187
1,562,645
1,573,186
2,421,839
3,397,105
3,849,269
4,775,073
5,416,021
6,241,310
6,977,681
6,803,846
5,549,103
4,340,158
4,030,778
5,087,334
4,916,149
4,456,521
6,145,254
7,377,091
477,152
169,226
1,717,370
2,391,501
2,455,427
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
12
6
72
96
31
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
8
4
34
38
15
$14,100,282
11,581,153
12,103,237
12,909,035
15,980,164
18,484.102
17,316,847
15,847,411
15,451,141
14,728,731
11,454,063
17,662,760
17,190,838
15,225,061
19,992,149
31,483,014
26,788,474
27,590,278
19,750,498
19,444,305
12,920,398
19,227,857
25,347,092
35,538,247
46,200,135
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
9,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,368
20,243,278
25,407,914
29,975,608
44,762,800
35,759,022
3,283,380
2,471,731
5,771,361
18,282,984
10,901,831
51,508,031
44,977,082
48,281,825
51,174,859
40,915,395
22,535,573
19,700,235
25,007,137
33,895,930
40,597,509
43,600,452
02,912,783
53,877,333
3,743,497
2,559,894
6,773,194
28,225,230
South-western	
12,220,283
1939
7,210,676
217
99
40,711,287
53,522,098 A 34
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia, 1901-1939.
Struc
Lode-mining.
Coal-mining.
tural
Mate
District.
g
rt
rials.
CQ
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1901
2,736
1,212
3,948
3,041
931
3,974
.      7,922
1902
2,219
1,126
3,345
3,101
910
4,011
7,350
1903
1,662
1,088
2,750
3,137
1,127
4,264
7,014
1904
2,143
1,163
3,300
3,278
1,175
4,453
.      7,759
1905
2,470
1,240
3,710
3,127
1,280
4,407
.      8,117
1900
2,680
1,303
3,983
3,415
1,390
4,805
.      8,788
1907
2,704
1,239
3,943
2,862
907
3,769
.      7,712
1908
2,567
1,127
3,694
4,432 | 1,641
0,073
.      9,767
1909
2,184
1,070
3,254
4,713
1,705
6,418
.      9,672
1910
2,472
1,237
3,709
5,903
1,855
7,758
.    11,467
1911
2,435
1,159
3,594
5,212
1,661
6,873
.    10,467
1912
2,472
1,304
3,837
5,275
1,855
7,130
.    10,967
1913
2,773
1,505
4,278
4,950
1,721
0,071
.    10,949
1914
2,741
1,433
4,174
4,267
1,465
5,732
.      9,906
1915
2,709
1,435
4,144
3,708
1,283
4,991
.      9,135
1916
3,357
2,036
5,393
3,694
1,366
5,000
.    10,453
1917
3,290
2,198
5,488
3,760
1,410
5,170
.    10,058
1918
2,626
1,764
4,390
3,658
1,769
5,247
.      9,637
1919
2,513
1,746
4,259
4,145
1,821
5,906
.    10,225
1920
2,074
1,605
3,079
4,191
2,158
0,349
.    10,0~28
1921
1,355
975
2,330
4,722
2,163
6,885
9,215
1922
1,510
1,239
2,749
4,712
1,932
6,044
.      9,393
1923
2,102
1,516
3,618
4,342
1,807
6,149
.      9,767
1924
2,353
1,680
4,033
3,894
1,524
5,418
.      9,451
1925
2,298
2,840
5,138
3,828
1,615
5,443
.    10,581
1926
299
2,000
1,735
4,341
808
2,461
3,757
1,565
5,322
493
324
12-
14,172
1927
415
2,671
1,910
4,587
854
2,842
3,646
1,579
5,225
047
138
12!
!    14,830
1928
355
2,707
2,469
5,176
911
2,748
3,814
1,520
5,334
412
368
12
i    15,424
1929
341
2,926
2,052
4,978
906
2,948
3,675
1,353
5,028
492
544
2(1,
15,565
1930
425
2,310
1,260
3,576
832
3,197
3,389
1,256
4,645
843
344
17
14,032
1931
688
1,463
834
2,297
581
3,157
2,957
1,125
4,082
460
526
88
i    12,171
1932
874
1,355
900
2,255
542
2,036
2,628
980
3,008
536
329
34-
:    10,524
1933
1,134
1,786
1,335
3,121
531
2,436
2,241
853
3,094
376
269
40
11,369
1934
1,122
2,796
1,729
4,525
631
2,890
2,050
843
2,893
377
187
86
'    12,985
1935
1,291
2,740
1,497
4,237
907
2,771
2,145
826
2,971
536
270
7 5'
13,737
1930
1,124
2,959
1,840
4,799
720
2,678
2,015
799
2,814
931
288
821
14,179
1937
1,371
3,603
1,818
5,421
1,168
3,027
2,286
867
3,153
724
327
93
16,129
1938
1,303
3,849
2,266
6,115
919
3.158
2,088
874
2,962
900
295
30!
1    16,021
1939
1939
292
688
372
376
266
130
638
506
82
33
10
4
14
61           3
1
2
)      1,095
North-eastern	
44
1,306
1939
1939
45
105
604
1,120
359
575
963
1,695
318
377
3,187
270
538
140
193
410
731
75
119
9
3
5-
20.
1,871
South-eastern	
1      6,420
1939
122
1,433
720
2,153
186
1,349
472
1,821
353
296
26
5,198
Totals*
1939
1,252
3,905 I 2,050
I
5,955
996
3,187
2,167
809
2,976
652
311
56
15,890
* The average number of wage-earners was obtained by adding the monthly figures for individual companies and dividing by
12 irrespective of the number of months worked, the average number of wage-earners in the industry is the sum of these
individual averages. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
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A 41
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rH A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
TABLE XXII.—Mining Companies employing an Average of Ten
or more Men during 1939.
Shipping Mines.
Name of Mine or Company.
Days Operating.
Tonnage.
Average Number
of Men.
Mine.
Mill.
Mined.
Milled.
Mine.
Mill.
Polaris-Taku Mining Co., Ltd.
Big Missouri   (Buena Vista Mining Co., Ltd.) ....
Silbak Premier Mines, Ltd.
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd.
Porcher Island Mines, Ltd.*
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co., Ltd.
Cariboo Hudson Gold Mines, Ltd.*
Island Mountain Mines Co., Ltd	
363
334
311
364
313
365
97
327
296
270
336
334
177
365
362
357
365
304
224
363
279
365
365
365
336
356
365
365
.....
255
365
359
365
334
365
360
365
239
365
364
303
311
351
365
365
212
327
150
361
365
55
365
362
365
361
365
365
157
361
210
365
365
137
363
365
365
284
340      |
69,045
202,321
169,164
32,821
6,600
110,208
10,500
46,209
2,250
17,236
6,706
15,500
765
68,590
90,251
1,566
45,962
1,451,491
68,968
202,321
169,164
27,264
6,600
110,208
10,500
46,209
2,250
11,750
17.236
	
15,000
100
67,572
90,204
1,566
45,962
1,450,352
680
2,091,064
119
89
305
75
. is
290
60
119
15
15
11
34
25
7
8
69
112
18
49
406
8
10
757
11
11
81
10
139
94
75
83
22
69
18
80
18
56
30
49
87
10
70
12
356
188
1,133
7
36
26
8
3
13
8
Quesnelle Quartz Mining Co., Ltd.*
Windpass Gold Mining Co., Ltd.f
Brooklyn   (W. E. McArthur).....	
Highland Bell, Ltd.„.
3
2
Canty Gold Mines, Ltd.
Fairview Amalgamated Gold Mines, Ltd.	
Gold Standard (Fairview) Mining Co., Ltd.*
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines, Ltd	
2
18
57
1
11
218
Kelowna Exploration Co., Ltd.   (Nickel Plate)...
Monashee Development Co., Ltd.
Osoyoos Mines of Canada, Ltd.	
Granby Cons. Mining, Smelting & Power Co., Ltd.
Red Buck Mines, Ltd.*
Highland Surprise Gold Mines, Ltd	
Cons. M. & S. of Canada, Ltd.   (Sullivan)....
Arlington   (R. 0. Oscarson)	
197
2,097,124
783
200
57,838
1,296
52,666
51,700
16,085
55,558
9,595
47,317
191
9,434
1,039
6,449
14
8,821
38,262
3,368
35,607
358
184,922
103,738
2,112,784
272
Daylight Gold Mines, Ltd 	
57,838
     ■,
52,666
31,498
16,421
55,668
8,345
47,218
|
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd.
9
11
28
14
9
2
13
Granite-Poorman (Livingstone Mining Co., Ltd.) ..
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Ltd	
Relief-Arlington Mines, Ltd  '  _   .
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd	
Ymir Consolidated Gold Mines, Ltd.
Ymir-Yankee Girl Gold Mines, Ltd	
Molly Hughes  (Slocan Idaho Mines Corp.)...   _
Rossland Properties   (C. M. & S.)	
Havilah  Gold Mines,  Ltd.
l
"      1
	
6,522
Vidette Gold Mines, Ltd.
4
Central Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd..	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines, Ltd 	
Privateer Mine, Ltd	
Rey Oro Mine, Ltd.*  	
6,837
26,820     '
3,368    i
20,950    j
184,922    !
88,009    ;
2,112,784    |
3
13
5
10
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd	
White Star Mine, Ltd	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd	
22
25
100
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd.J 	
Non-shipping Mines.
Anyox Exploration   (C. M. & S.).
Snowshoe Gold Mines, Ltd	
Cons. Nicola Goldflelds, Ltd.	
Alpine Gold,  Ltd 	
Silver Ridge Mining Co., Ltd	
Muskateer Mines, Ltd. -—	
Kennedy Lake Gold Mines,  Ltd. ...
B.R.X.   (1935)   Consolidated Mines, Ltd...
Gem Gold Mines, Ltd ...._ 	
210
365
365
254
304
158
365
243
300
* Estimated ; no official return received.
t Clean-up operations ; lessees.
t Labour strike at mine, October, 1939, to March, 1940.
14
11
30
19
10
10
15
14
10 THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 43
SYNOPSIS OF MINING LAWS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
The mining laws of British Columbia are very liberal in their nature and compare
favourably with those of any other part of the world. The terms under which both
lode and placer claims and placer leaseholds are held are such that a prospector is
greatly encouraged in his work, and the titles, especially for mineral claims and placer-
mining leaseholds, are perfect. The fees required to be paid are as small as possible,
consistent with a proper administration of the mining industry, and are generally lower
than those commonly imposed elsewhere. Provision is also made for the formation of
mining partnerships practically without expense, and a party of miners is enabled to
take advantage of these sections of the Acts so that such miners may work their claims
jointly.
Placer-mining leases are granted for a period of twenty years and are approximately 80 acres in size. On a lode claim of 51 acres the expenditure of $500 in work,
which may be spread over five years, is required to obtain a Crown grant, and surface
rights are obtainable at a small figure, in no case exceeding $5 per acre.
The following synopsis of the mining laws will be found sufficient to enable the
miner or intending investor to obtain a general knowledge of their scope and requirements ; for particulars, however, the reader is referred to the Acts relating to mining,
which may be obtained from any Mining Recorder, or from the Department of Mines
or the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Free Miners' Certificates.
Any person over the age of 18, and any joint-stock company, may obtain a free
miner's certificate on payment of the required fee.
The fee to an individual for a free miner's certificate is $5 for one year. To a
joint-stock company having a capital of $100,000, or less, the fee for a year is $50; if
capitalized beyond this, the fee is $100.
The free miners' certificates run from date of issue and expire on the 31st day of
May next after its date, or some subsequent 31st day of May (that is to say, a certificate may be taken out a year or more in advance if desired). Certificates may be
obtained for any part of a year, terminating on May 31st, for a proportionately less fee.
The possession of this certificate entitles the holder to enter upon all lands of the
Crown, and upon any other lands on which the right to so enter is not specially reserved,
for the purpose of prospecting for minerals, locating claims, and mining.
A free miner can hold, by location, during any period of twelve months, eight
mineral claims within a radius of 10 miles, and may acquire others by purchase. Under
the " Placer-mining Act," a free miner may locate, in any period of twelve consecutive
months, one placer claim or leasehold in his own name and one placer claim or leasehold
for each of three free miners for whom he acts as agent, on any separate creek, riverbed, bar or dry diggings. Other placer claims or leaseholds may be acquired by purchase.
In the event of a free miner allowing his certificate to lapse, his mining property
(if not Crown-granted) reverts to the Crown (subject to the conditions set out in the
next succeeding paragraph), but where other free miners are interested as partners or
co-owners the interest of the defaulter becomes vested in the continuing co-owners or
partners pro rata, according to their interests.
Six months' extension of time within which to revive title in mining property which
has been forfeited through the lapse of a free miner's certificate is allowed. This privilege is given only if the holder of the property obtains a special free miner's certificate
within six months after the 31st of May on which his ordinary certificate lapsed. The
fee for this special certificate in the case of a person is $15 and in that of a company
$300.
It is not necessary for a shareholder, as such, in an incorporated mining company
to be the holder of a free miner's certificate. A 44 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Mineral Claims.
Mineral claims are located and held under the provisions of the " Mineral Act."
A mineral claim is a piece of land not exceeding in area fifty-one and sixty-five one-
hundredths acres. The angles must be right angles unless the boundaries, or one of
them, are the same as those of a previously recorded claim.
No special privileges are allowed for the discovery of new mineral claims or
districts.
A mineral claim is located by erecting two " legal posts," which are stakes having
a height of not less than 4 feet above ground and squared 4 inches at least on each face
for not less than a foot from the top. A tree-stump so cut and squared also constitutes
a legal post. A cairn of stones not less than 4 feet in height and not less than 1 foot
in diameter 4 feet above the ground may also be used as a legal post. Upon each of
these posts must be written the name of the claim, the name of the locator, and the date
of location.    On No. 1 post, in addition, the following must be written:   " Initial post.
Direction of Post No. 2 [giving approximate compass-bearing] feet of this claim
lie on the right and   feet on the left of the line from No. 1 to No. 2 posts."
Numbered metal identification tags must be attached to both posts at the time of
staking.
The location-line between Nos. 1 and 2 posts must be distinctly marked—in a timbered locality by blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in bare country by monuments of earth or rock not less than 2 feet in diameter at the base, and at least 2 feet
high—so that the line can be distinctly seen.
Mineral claims must be recorded in the Mining Recorder's office for the mining
division in which they are situate within fifteen days from the date of location, one day
extra being allowed for each 10 miles of distance from the recording office after the
first 10 miles. If a claim is not recorded in time it is deemed abandoned and open for
relocation, but if the original locator wishes to relocate he can only do so by permission
of the Gold Commissioner of the district and upon the payment of a fee of $10. This
applies also to a claim abandoned for any reason whatever.
Mineral claims are, until the Crown grant is issued, held practically on a yearly
lease, a condition of which is that during such year assessment-work be performed on
the same to the value of at least $100, or a payment of such sum be made to the Mining
Recorder. Such assessments must be recorded before the expiration of the year, or the
claim is deemed abandoned. If, however, the required assessment-work has been performed within the year, but not recorded within that time, a free miner may, within
thirty days thereafter, record such assessment-work upon payment of an additional fee
of $10. The actual cost of the survey of a mineral claim, to an amount not exceeding
$100, may also be recorded as assessment-work. If, during any year, work is done to
a greater extent than the required $100, any further sum of $100—but not less—may
be recorded and counted as further assessments; such excess work must be recorded
during the year in which it is performed. All work done on a mineral claim between
the time of its location and recording may be counted as work done during the first
period of one year from the recording. As soon as assessment-work to the extent of
$500 is recorded and a survey made of the claim, the owner of a mineral claim is
entitled to a Crown grant on payment of a fee of $25, and giving the necessary notices
required by the Act. Liberal provisions are also made in the Act for obtaining mill-
sites and other facilities in the way of workings and drains for the better working of
claims. .
Placer Claims.
Placer-mining is governed by the " Placer-mining Act," and by the interpretation
clause its scope is defined as " the mining of any natural stratum or bed of earth,
gravel, or cement mined for gold or other precious minerals or stones." Placer claims
are of four classes, as follows:—
" ' Creek diggings ':   any mine in the bed of any stream or ravine:
" ' Bar diggings ':   any mine between high- and low-water marks on a river, lake,
or other large body of water:
" ' Dry diggings ':   any mine over which water never extends:
" ' Precious-stone diggings ':   any deposit of precious stones, whether in veins,
beds, or gravel deposits." THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 45
The following provisions as to extent of the various classes of claims are made by
the Act:—
" In ' creek diggings' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet long, measured
in the direction of the general course of the stream, and shall extend in width
one thousand feet, measured from the general course of the stream five hundred feet on either side of the centre thereof:
" In ' bar diggings ' a claim shall be :■—
"(a.)  A piece of land not exceeding two hundred and fifty feet square on any
bar which is covered at high water;  or
"(b.)  A strip of land two hundred and fifty feet long at high-water mark, and
in width extending from high-water mark to extreme low-water mark:
" In ' dry diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet square."
The following provision is made for new discoveries of placer-mining ground:—
" If any free miner, or party of free miners, discovers a new locality for the
prosecution of placer-mining and such discovery be established to the satisfaction of
the Gold Commissioner, placer claims of the following sizes shall be allowed to such discoverers, namely:—
" To one discoverer, one claim     600 feet in length;
" To a party of two discoverers, two claims amounting together
to 1,000 feet in length;
" And to each member of a party beyond two in number, a claim of the ordinary
size only.
" The width of such claims shall be the same as ordinary placer claims of the same
class: Provided that where a discovery claim has been established in any locality no
further discovery shall be allowed within five miles therefrom, measured along the
watercourses."
Every placer claim shall be as nearly as possible rectangular in form, and marked
by four legal posts at the corners thereof, firmly fixed in the ground. On each of such
posts shall be written the name of the locator, the number and date of issue of his free
miner's certificate, the date of the location, and the name given to the claim. In timbered localities boundary-lines of a placer claim shall be blazed so that the posts can be
distinctly seen, underbrush cut, and the locator shall also erect legal posts not more
than 125 feet apart on all boundary-lines. In localities where there is no timber or
underbrush, monuments of earth and rock, not less than 2 feet high and 2 feet in
diameter at base, may be erected in lieu of the last-mentioned legal posts, but not in
the case of the four legal posts marking the corners of the claim.
A placer claim must be recorded in the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
division within which the same is situate, within fifteen days after the location thereof,
if located within 10 miles of the office of the Mining Recorder by the most direct means
of travel. One additional day shall be allowed for every 10 miles additional or fraction
thereof. The number of days shall be counted inclusive of the days upon which such
location was made, but exclusive of the day of application for record. The application
for such record shall be under oath and in the form set out in the Schedule to the Act.
A claim which shall not have been recorded within the prescribed period shall be deemed
to have been abandoned.
To hold a placer claim for more than one year it must be rerecorded before the
expiration of the record or rerecord.
A placer claim must be worked by the owner, or some one on his behalf, continuously, as far as practicable, during working-hours. If work is discontinued for a
period of seven days, except during the close season, lay-over, leave of absence, sickness,
or for some other reason to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner, the claim is
deemed abandoned.
Lay-overs are declared by the Gold Commissioner upon proof being given to him
that the supply of water is insufficient to work the claim. Under similar circumstances
he has also the power to declare a close season, by notice in writing and published in the
Gazette, for all or any claims in his district. Tunnel and drain licences are also granted
by him on the person applying giving security for any damage that may arise.   Grants A 46 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
of right-of-way for the construction of tunnels or drains across other claims are also
granted on payment of a fee of $25, the owner of the claims crossed having the right
for tolls, etc., on the tunnel or drain which may be constructed. These tolls, however,
are, so far as the amount goes, under the discretion of the Gold Commissioner.
Co-owners and Partnerships.
In both the " Mineral" and " Placer-mining" Acts provision is made for the
formation of mining partnerships, both of a general and limited liability character.
These are extensively taken advantage of and have proved very satisfactory in their
working. Should a co-owner fail or refuse to contribute his proportion of the expenditure required as assessment-work on a claim he may be " advertised out," and his
interest in the claim shall become vested in his co-owners who have made the required
expenditure, pro rata according to their former interests.
It should not be forgotten that if any co-owner permits his free miner's certificate
to lapse, the title of his associates is not prejudiced, but his interest reverts to the
remaining co-owners; provided that said co-owner has not taken advantage of the six
months' period of grace allowed for the taking-out of a special free miner's certificate,
thus reviving the title to his interest.
Placer-mining Leases.
Leases of unoccupied Crown lands approximately 80 acres in extent may be granted
by the Gold Commissioner of the district after location has been made by staking along
a " location-line " not more than one-half a mile (2,640 feet) in length. In this line
one bend, or change of direction, is permitted. Where a straight line is followed two
posts only are necessary—namely, an " initial post" and a " final post." Where there
is a change of direction a legal post must be placed to mark the point of the said change.
The leasehold is allowed a width not in excess of one-quarter mile (1,320 feet), and the
locator, both on his " initial post" and in his notice of intention to apply, which is
posted at the office of the Mining Recorder, is required to state how many feet are included in the location to the right and how many feet to the left of the location-line.
That section of the Act dealing with the staking of placer-mining leases follows:—
" 105. (1.) For the purpose of locating a placer leasehold, a line to be known as the
' location-line' shall be marked on the ground by placing a legal post at each end, one
post to be known as the ' Initial Post' and the other as the ' Final Post.' The direction
of the location-line may change at not more than one point throughout its length, and
an intermediate legal post shall be placed at the point at which the direction changes.
The total length of the location-line, following its change of direction (if any), shall
not exceed two thousand six hundred and forty feet.
"(2.) Upon the initial post and the final post shall be written the words 'Initial
Post' and ' Final Post' respectively, together with the name of the locator and the date
of the location. On the initial post shall also be written the approximate compass-
bearing of the final post, and a statement of the number of feet of the leasehold lying
on the right and on the left of the location-line, as viewed from the initial post, not
exceeding in the aggregate a width of thirteen hundred and twenty feet, thus: ' Direction of Final Post, . feet of this claim lie on the right and feet
on the left of the location-line.' In addition to the foregoing, where there is a change
of direction in the location-line as marked on the ground, the number ' 1' shall be
written on the initial post; the number ' 2' shall be written on the intermediate post;
and the number ' 3 ' shall be written on the final post. There also shall be affixed to the
initial post a notice to the following effect, namely: ' Application will be made under
the " Placer-mining Act " for a lease of the ground within this location.'
"(3.) The location-line shall at the time of location be marked between the legal
posts throughout its length so that it can be distinctly seen; in a timbered locality, by
blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in a locality where there is neither timber
nor underbrush, by placing legal posts or monuments of earth or stones not less than
two feet high and not less than two feet in diameter at the base, so that the location-line
can be distinctly seen. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 47
"(4.) Where, from the nature or shape of the surface of the ground, it is impracticable to mark the location-line of a leasehold as provided by this section, the leasehold
may be located by placing legal posts as witness-posts, as near as possible to the
location-line, and writing on each witness-post the distance and compass-bearing of
some designated point on the location-line from the witness-post; and the distances
and compass-bearing so written on the witness-posts shall be set out in the application
for the lease and in any lease granted thereon.
"(5.) The locator shall, within thirty days after the date of the location, post a
notice in Form I in the office of the Mining Recorder, which notice shall set out:—
"(a.)  The name of the intending applicant or each applicant if more than one,
and the numbers of their free miners' certificates:
The date of the location:
The number of feet lying to the right and left of the location-line, and
the approximate area or size of the ground.
The words written on the initial post and final post shall be set out in full in the notice;
and as accurate a description as possible of the ground to be acquired shall be given,
having special reference to any prior locations it may join, and the general locality of
the ground to be acquired."
Examples of Various Methods of laying out Placer Leaseholds.
Showing Areas secured with Location-lines of Various Lengths.
Final Post
"(6.)
"(c)
nitial Post
Post-"
Initial PostNo.
Final Post A 48 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Another provision is that there must be affixed to the " initial post" and to the
" final post" a numbered metal identification tag furnished by the Mining Recorder
with each free miner's certificate issued. These tags must be attached to the posts or
placed in a container within a cairn, at the time of location.
The annual rental on a placer-mining lease is $30, and the amount to be expended
annually on development-work is $250.
Authority also has been given for the granting of special placer-mining leases in
locations other than has been defined.
For more detailed information the reader is referred to the complete " Placer-
mining Act," which may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Table of Fees, Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
Individual free miner's certificate, annual fee  $5.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital $100,000 or less), annual fee  50.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital over $100,000), annual fee  100.00
Recording mineral or placer claim  2.50
Recording certificate of work, mineral claim  2.50
Rerecord of placer claim  2.50
Recording lay-over  2.50
Recording abandonment, mineral claim  10.00
Recording abandonment, placer claim  2.50
Recording any affidavit   2.50
Records in " Records of Conveyances "  2.50
Filing documents, " Mineral Act "  .25
Filing documents, " Placer-mining Act "  1.00
Recording certificate of work, placer-mining lease  2.50
For Crown grant of mineral rights under " Mineral Act "  25.00
For Crown grant of surface rights of mineral claim under " Mineral Act "  10.00
For every lease under " Placer-mining Act "  5.00
Provisional Free Miners' Certificates (Placer) Act.
This Act provides for the issuance of " provisional free miners' certificates " for
the locating, recording, representing, and working of placer claims of a size, and
according to the terms, and in the manner set out in Parts II. and III. of the " Placer-
mining Act." Any person over 18 years of age who has resided in the Province continuously for a period of not less than six months prior to date of his application may,
on application accompanied by a statutory declaration or other satisfactory evidence
as to his age and period of residence in the Province, obtain from any Gold Commissioner or Mining Recorder a provisional free miner's certificate. No fees are payable
in respect of such certificate, and it abolishes the fees payable in respect of the recording or rerecording of placer claims, but no record or rerecord of a claim shall be
granted for a longer period than one year without the payment of fees. It should be
pointed out that the provisional free miner's certificate does not carry the privileges
of an ordinary free miner's certificate as to the staking and working of placer-mining
leases or mineral claims.
The Act also gives the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, as a means of unemployment relief, power to make provision for the establishment, equipment, maintenance,
and operation of one or more placer training camps at suitable locations, at which
unemployed persons who hold provisional free miners' certificates and are British subjects may acquire knowledge and training in the art of placer-mining and may be
afforded gainful work in the recovery of minerals by placer-mining. Reserves for the
location of such camps shall not exceed one mile in length by one-half mile in width,
and the right is given to enter into agreements with private holders under the Act for
the development of their ground by means of unemployment relief camps. Department of Mines Act, 1937.
The " Department of Mines Act " empowers the Minister of Mines to organize the
Department or to reorganize it from time to time to meet changing conditions in the
mining industry. It provides for examination and certification of assayers; for the
conducting of short courses of lectures in practical geology and mineralogy; and for
the purchase of ore from the Provincial sampling plants. The said Act also provides
for the expenditure of public moneys for the construction, reconstruction, or repair of
trails, roads, and bridges to facilitate the exploration of the mineral resources of any
mining district, or in the operation and development of any mining property.
Iron and Steel Bounties Act, 1929.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may enter into an agreement with any person
whereby the Crown will pay to that person, out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund,
bounties on pig-iron and steel shapes when manufactured within the Province, as
follows:—
(a.)   In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced
from ore mined in the Province, a bounty not to exceed three dollars per
ton of two thousand pounds:
(b.)  In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced
from ore mined outside the Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar
and fifty cents per ton of two thousand pounds:
(c.)   In respect of steel shapes of commercial utility manufactured in the Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar per ton of two thousand pounds.
Bounty, as on pig-iron under this Act, may be paid upon the molten iron from ore
which in the electric furnace, Bessemer or other furnace, enters into the manufacture
of steel by the process employed in such furnace;  the weight of such iron to be ascertained from the weight of the steel so manufactured.
Bounty on steel shapes under this Act shall be paid only upon such steel shapes as
are manufactured in a rolling-mill having a rated productive capacity per annum of at
least twenty thousand tons of two thousand pounds per ton.
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act.
At the 1935 session of the Provincial Legislature " An Act to amend and consolidate the Enactments regulating the Working of Metalliferous Mines, Quarries, and
Metallurgical Works " was passed. This Act is known as the " Metalliferous Mines
Regulation Act," and, in its general tone, its clear purpose is to maintain the highest
standard in respect of safety and of healthy conditions, both on the surface and underground in mining operations. The idea is to not only assure, as far as practicable, the
protection of workmen against injury, but to establish those conditions best calculated
to safeguard the health of the men employed. The Act also provides for the drafting
of regulations, if such are found necessary, for the protection of men who are working
under conditions which may lead to pulmonary disability.
This Act may be divided into six parts, as follows:—
(1.)   Administration:
(2.)   Duties of owners, managers, and others:
(3.)   Special Rules for protection of miners:
(4.) General Rules, having reference to: (a) Employees: (b) Ventilation;
(c) Explosives and blasting; (d) Fire-protection; (e) Connection between
mines; (/) Mine signals; (g) Aid to injured; (h) Prevention of dust;
(i) Handling of water; (/) Sanitation; (k) Protection of working-
places, shafts, winzes, raises, etc.; (I) Ladder-ways; (m) Shaft equipment and operation; (w) Testing of brakes; (o) Haulage; (p) Protection from machinery; (q) Electrical installations:
(5.) General Rules for quarries:
(6.)   Supplemental. SUMMARY OF ACTS SPECIALLY RELATING TO MINING.
(The complete Acts may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.)
Mining Licences under the Coal and Petroleum Act.
Any person desiring to prospect for coal, petroleum, or natural gas upon any unsur-
veyed unreserved lands in which these resources are held by the Crown may acquire a
licence to do so over a rectangular block of land not exceeding 640 acres, of which the
boundaries shall run due north and south and east and west, and no side shall exceed
80 chains (1 mile) in length. Before entering into possession of the said lands he shall
place at the corner of such block a legal stake, or initial post, and shall inscribe thereon
his name and the angle represented by such post, thus: "A. B.'s N.E. corner," or as
the case may be, and shall post in a conspicuous place upon the said land, and also in
the Government office of the land recording district, notice of his intention to apply,
as well as publishing the same in the B.C. Gazette and local newspaper once each week
for four consecutive weeks. If the area applied for is surveyed no staking is required,
but the same procedure with regard to advertising notice of intention to apply is
necessary.
The application for said licence shall be in writing, in duplicate, and shall contain
the best written description possible, with a diagram of the land sought to be acquired,
and shall be accompanied with a fee of $100. The application shall be made to the
Commissioner of Lands for the district, within sixty days from date of first publication
in B.C. Gazette, and by him forwarded to the Minister of Lands, who will grant such
licence—provided no reasons arise to the contrary—for a period not to exceed one year,
and at the expiration of the first year an extension of such licence may be granted for
a second or third year at a fee of $100.
Where coal is discovered during the existence of licence or within thirty days after
expiration, the land held under licence, having been surveyed and licence conditions
fulfilled, may be leased for five years at rental of 15 cents an acre, subject to renewals
for five successive periods of three years each, renewal fee being $100 for each lease,
in addition to annual rental.
Lessees, on showing continuous work has been done and reasonable expenditure
made for development, may, after carrying out the provisions of the lease, purchase at
$20 per acre where surface is available, or $15 per acre for under-surface rights where
surface is not available. Lands under the sea may be purchased at $15 per acre. Provided also that, in addition to the rental or purchase price, there shall be paid to the
Government as a royalty 2V2 cents a barrel (35 imperial gallons) of crude petroleum
raised or gotten from such land.     (jSee chapter 175, R.S.B.C. 1936.)
Taxation Act.
A preliminary note is essential to the understanding of this Act. As the law has
stood, a Crown-granted mineral claim on which taxes were in arrears for a number of
years was offered for sale by the Government at a tax sale, with arrears of taxes plus
interest and charges and Crown-grant fees as an upset price. If no sale was made the
property remained in the hands of the Assessor until desired by some one, when it could
only be purchased by tender. It was not open to location under the " Mineral Act"
and a prospector had no protection, and to relieve the situation an amending Act was
passed.
Under the amended Act such reverted Crown-granted mineral claim may be
obtained by any person under a lease for one year upon payment of $25, and a renewal
of such lease may be granted upon payment of further $25 for a further period of one
year, but no longer. During the period of such lease the lessee has the right to enter,
prospect, and mine on such mineral claim, save for coal, petroleum, and natural gas,
and during such time the lessee has the option to purchase such Crown-granted mineral
claim upon payment of all taxes, costs, and interest which remained due and unpaid on
such claim on the date of its forfeiture to the Crown, together with an amount equal
to all taxes and interest which, except for its forfeiture to the Crown, would have been THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 51
payable in respect thereof from the date of the lease to the date of application for a
Crown grant. If, however, the lessee establishes to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner that he has expended upon the claim in mining-development work a sum of
not less than $200 a year during the continuance of the lease, then the payment of the
sum in respect of taxes and penalties from the date of the lease to the date of application for a Crown grant shall not be required. Provision also is made for the grouping
of adjoining claims, not exceeding eight in number, and the performing on one of such
claims mining-development work for all of the claims.
A person may obtain a lease, or interest in a lease, of eight such claims in the
same mining division.
Such leases are not transferable and are subject to the rights any person may
already hold to any portion of the surface of such Crown-granted mineral claim.
Taxation of Mines.
Crown-granted mineral claims are subject to a tax of 25 cents per acre. The tax
becomes due on April 1st in each year, and if unpaid on the following June 30th is
deemed to be delinquent.
All mines, other than coal, are subject to an output tax (payable quarterly) of
2 per cent, on gross value of mineral, less cost of transportation from mine to reduction-
works and the cost of treating same at reduction-works or on the mining premises.
Any such mine, not realizing on ore shipments a market value of $5,000 in any one
year, is entitled to a refund of the output tax paid.
All mines are subject to a tax upon income, subject to the exemptions and allowances given in the " Income Tax Act "; provided, in the case of those mines paying an
output tax, that an income tax is only collected if such tax prove greater than the output
tax, and the output tax is then regarded as part payment of the income tax.
In addition to the ordinary working expenses, mines are allowed to deduct from
their income a charge for:—
(1.)   Development—being such proportion of this capital expenditure as is
ascertained to be chargeable to the year's operation:
(2.)   Depreciation of buildings and plant:
(3.)   Depletion—being such proportion of the capital cost of the mine as, being
a wasting asset, is ascertained to be chargeable to the year's operation.
The above-mentioned charges are allowable at the discretion of the Minister of
Finance, subject, however, to an appeal to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The rate of income tax varies from 1 per cent, up to a maximum of 10 per cent, on
incomes of $19,000 and over.
Coal is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except coal shipped to coke-
ovens within the Province.    Tax payable monthly.
Coke is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except in respect of coke
produced from coal upon which this tax has already been paid.   Tax payable monthly.
Coal land from which coal is being mined (Class A) is taxed at 1 per cent, upon
the assessed value, in addition to any other tax.
Unworked coal land, known as " Coal Land, Class B," is subject to a tax of 2 per
cent, upon the assessed value.
For further particulars see the " Taxation Act," also the " Public Schools Act,"
which are obtainable from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C. A 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
ASSAY OFFICE.
BY
J. B. Adams.
During the year 1939 there were made by the staff in the Government Assay Office,
7,015 assays or quantitative determinations and 432 analyses; of these the majority
were for the Department of Mines or for the other departments, for which no fees
were received.
The fees collected by the office were as follows:—
Fees for analyses     $167.00
Fees for assaying       134.95
Fees for assayers' examinations       360.00
Total cash receipts     $661.95
Determinations and examinations made for other Government departments, for
which no fees were collected:—
Attorney-General's Department   $195.00
Agricultural Department  96.50
Board of Health  480.00
Treasury   2,322-00
Forest Branch   35.00
$3,128.50
Two thousand three hundred and twenty-two lots of gold were received from the
Gold Commissioners, who are purchasing amounts up to 2 oz. to aid the prospector in
disposing of his gold.
FREE DETERMINATIONS.
In addition to the above quantitative work, 203 qualitative determinations, or tests,
were made in connection with the identification and classification of rocks or minerals
sent to the Assay Office for a report; for these no fees were charged, as it is the established custom of the Department to examine and test qualitatively, without charge,
samples of minerals sent in from any part of the Province, and to give a report on same.
This has been done for the purpose of encouraging the search for new or rare minerals
and ores, and to assist prospectors and others in the discovery of new mining districts,
by enabling them to have determined, free of cost, the nature and probable value of any
rock they may find. In making these free determinations, the Department asks that
the locality from which the sample was obtained be given by the sender.
EXAMINATIONS FOR ASSAYERS.
The writer has the honour, as Secretary, to submit the Annual Report for the year
1939 of the Board of Examiners for Certificates of Competency and Licence to practise
Assaying in British Columbia, as established under the " Department of Mines Act."
Five candidates applied for examination on May 15th and four passed the examination. Eight candidates applied for examination on November 20th and one failed in
the examination. One candidate applied for exemption under the Act and was granted
a certificate. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 53
DEPARTMENT OF MINES SAMPLING PLANT,
PRINCE RUPERT.
BY
Joseph T. Mandy.
A sampling plant was constructed by the Department of Mines, Victoria, at Prince
Rupert during the summer of 1937. The plant is on a portion of the " Lumber Dock "
leased from the Canadian National Railways and is accessible by railway or steamship.
It has a coarse crushing capacity (to 1 inch) of about 16 tons per eight-hour shift and
a continuous sampling capacity of average ores, by hand-methods, of about 4 tons
per day.
The service of the sampling plant is free and its function has been organized to
assist prospectors and operators in the finding, exploration, and development of mining
properties, by the following means:—
(1.) Bulk test-sampling of mineral deposits to ascertain the mineralization and
values and to establish the commercial or non-commercial aspects of these deposits.
(2.) Guidance through information concerning the factors governing the markets
and marketability of the content of mineral deposits, together with assistance in the
sale of ores to the smelter or ore-buyer.
(3.) Guidance in the exploration and development of mineral deposits of commercial importance, through contact and advice in the field.
(4.) Assistance through the advantageous purchase, grading, assembly, and marketing of shipping-grade ores by the plant during the preliminary stages of exploration
and development of mineral deposits.
The objective of the plant is to promote and foster the actual production of ore
and in this way bring mining properties into continuous profitable production. As
bearing on this, the all-important matter of freight rates and transportation costs
covering shipments of ore from properties to seaboard or the railway is carefully considered. The railway and steamship companies have co-operated in this regard and
grant preferential freight tariffs applied to shipments destined for the sampling plant
at Prince Rupert. To assure this, a shipping permit signed by the sampling plant
manager is, on application, mailed to intending shippers. On presentation of this to
the transportation company agent, the shipper is granted the advantage of the preferential freight tariff. In this way many prospectors and small operators have been
enabled to profitably mine, ship, and market small lots of ore, and by this means secure
funds for further prospecting, exploration, and development of properties.
During 1939, the sampling plant continued to function with increasing popularity
and usefulness. A total of 171 shipments was received from fifty-six different properties located over an ever-expanding area extending south to Vancouver Island.
In its relation to the Portland Canal Mining Division, increasing interest in the
service of the sampling plant was shown in the Alice Arm and Stewart districts and a
number of substantial shipments were made from properties in these localities.
Relative to the Omineca Mining Division, the interest in and utilization of the
services of the sampling plant continued and increased and is doubtless an important
factor in the gradual revival of lode-mining activity in that area.
The following is a synopsis of the operating details of the plant for the year 1939
from January 1st to December 31st:—
No. of
Shipments.
Different
Properties.
Weight of
Shipments.
43
101
27
20
40
13
Tons.
200 5824
17.0534
171
56 A 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
SHIPMENTS FROM PLANT TO SMELTER.
Number of shipments to smelters     10
Dry tons paid for by smelters  201.6960*
Paid out by plant to shippers and for freight charges advanced   $12,663.92
Received from smelters  $12,596.75
* Difference between this figure and total weight of shipments received  (2-7.6722 dry tons)  is accounted for by
carry-over at end of 1938 and end of 1939.
The details of the tonnage and bulk test lots with relative assay and analysis
results follow. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 55
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ec A 60
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.
The following list shows the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders of the
Province:—
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Atlin „._ 	
Atlin 	
H. F. Glassey	
H. F. Glassey..	
G. H. Hallett.
Sub-office	
Telegraph Creek.	
T. S. Dalby.
W. J. Nelson
T. S. Dalby _	
T. S. Dalby    ,
Boundary via Telegraph
Creek
F. W. Grimble.
Sub-office      	
Fort St. John  	
Dease Lake Townsite
N. A. Watt	
N. A. Watt   	
Copper River	
Terrace.   ..
Stewart (Portland Canal)
Ross wood —-	
H. W. Dodd.
Geo. H. Hill.
Bella Coola	
N. A. Watt (at Prince
Rupert)
H. W. Dodd -	
N. A. Watt	
A. G. McKinnon, M.D.
Smithers ..  -	
H. B. Campbell,...	
H. B. Campbell	
Bella Coola	
Fort St. James  	
Manson Creek	
Telkwa ---	
W. B. Steele.
T. J. Thorp.
M. Kyllo.
Sub-office     	
Fort St. John -	
Whitewater (Finlay
River) via Fort
Grahame
F. W. Beatton.
Terrace	
P. Kelsberg.
  	
Usk - -
H. B. Campbell (at
Smithers)
F. W. Beatton 	
Aiken.
Fort St. John
H. J. Engleson.
Prince George ___	
Finlay Forks 	
Hudson Hope	
Pouce Coupe... 	
H. A. Bryant 	
H. A. Bryant „	
A. Sydney.
M. B. McBrayne.
J. E. Mclntyre. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 61
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Sub-office -
A. B. Campbell.
Hanceville. 	
E. R. Hance.
R. J. A. Dorrell _	
R. J. A. Dorrell..	
Sub-office	
Haylmore via Gold Bridge
P. H. McCurrach
P. H. McCurrach
E. R. Hance.
Chu Chua.              . .
Vavenby	
H. Finley.
A. P. Suckling.
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
W. F. Knowlton
H. Elgie.
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
Chas. Nichols	
R. G. Couper,	
Chas. Nichols.	
R. M. McGusty.-	
R. M. McGusty. -
L. A. Dodd	
F. H. C. Wilson.
C. W. Dickson.
L. A. Dodd	
Kettle Valley	
G. B. Gane.
T. W. Clarke.
W. H. Laird.
Grand Forks 	
Grand Forks 	
E. Harrison	
W. R. Dewdney _	
E. Harrison	
L. S. Coleman.
Hedley
Charles H. Martin.
W. H. Laird.
Golden  	
A. W. Anderson	
C. J. Dainard.
Windermere 	
A. W. Anderson (at
Golden)
W. G. Taylor 	
Fort Steele      -	
W. G. Taylor-. 	
A. A. Robertson.
J. R. Nolan.
Claude MacDonald
W. M.H. Dunn.
Frank B rough ton
J. Cartmel _ __
A. Robb.
New Denver	
Claude MacDonald (at
Kaslo)
W. E. Graham.
J. Cartmel	
J. A. Stewart.
R. H. Hassard.
Ymir
J. Cartmel (at Nelson)
Wynfield Maxwell.
Wynfield Maxwell (at
Revelstoke)
N. A. Herridge	
W. Maxwell	
Trail Creek 	
Rossland 	
Nanaimo	
Ladysmith 	
A. C. Sutton _
C. L. Monroe 	
A. C. Sutton—	
C. L. Monroe	
Nanaimo.. "„_.
Sub-office -
W. H. Cochrane.
J. A. Knight.
Jos. Howe.
Sub-office 	
Henry Carter.
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O...
C. C. Thompson.
H. J. Bull.
A. G. Freeze.
Sub-office —	
Sub-office	
Geo. Nicholson.
W. H. Boothroyd.
W. H. Boothroyd
W. H. Boothroyd .     .
G. C. Rolf. A 62
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Sub-recorder.
Tofino. 	
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
C.W. Sharp	
Alberni.  ____ 	
W. H. Boothroyd.
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
R. J. Steenson	
A. P. Grant _
P. J. Mulcahy...	
A. B. Gray	
R. A. Burgoyne	
C. N. Tingle.
H. Elgie.
Vancouver  	
A. S. Tyrer	
Powell River   _
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O.
J. P. Scarlett.
L. J. Price	
L. J. Price	
T. B. Williams.
Haylmore via Gold Bridge THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 63
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CO A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
PROGRESS NOTES.
The Progress Notes on the mining industry are compiled from information supplied by the Inspectors of Mines and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics through
the courtesy of the property-owners and also from information obtained by the officers
of the Mineralogical Staff in the course of their field-work. The Registrar of Companies and Superintendent of Brokers have also supplied information through their
respective offices.
LODE-GOLD DEPOSITS.
TAKU RIVER AREA.
TULSEQUAH.
Company office, Lonsdale Building, Duluth, Minn., U.S.A.;  mine office,
Polaris-Taku     Tulsequah, B.C.;  E. C. Congdon, President;  Harvie A. Garver, Secre-
Mining Co., Ltd. tary;   Walter B. Congdon, Treasurer;   F. H. McPherson, Manager;
W.   F.   Gowans,   Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    10,000   preferred
shares, $100 par;   20,000 common shares, $1 par;   issued—10,000 preferred,  12,200
common.
The property is located on Tulsequah River, longitude 133° 36', latitude 58° 44',
about 6 miles by road from its junction with Taku River. It is reached by boat and
aeroplane in summer and by aeroplane only in winter.
It is equipped with a complete mining plant and 150-ton flotation plant built in
1937. Development to date is on four levels. Development during the year consisted
of 8,171 feet of drifting and 2,446 feet of raising. A diamond-drilling programme to
test the ground below the Polaris (present lowest level) was commenced and 18,891
feet of drilling done. A raise was put up from C level to the Canyon level veins which
have not yet been developed. The mine was worked 364 days and 69,045 tons of ore
produced;   126 men were employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part B.]
DEASE RIVER AREA.
McDame Creek.
Company office, 703 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.; Henry G.
McDames Lake Boulton, Seattle, President; A. W. Boulton, Seattle, Secretary-
Mining Co., Inc.  Treasurer.    Capital: 2,500 preferred shares, $10 par; 100,000 common
shares, 1 cent par; issued—625 preferred, 75,500 common. This
company installed a 10-ton mill, comprising a small jaw-crusher and combination ball-
mill and amalgamator, on claims situated at an elevation of 4,650 feet, or 1,400 feet
above McDame Lake, on the slope of Erickson Creek, longitude 129° 35', latitude 59°
15'. This equipment was flown from Carcross to McDame Lake and taken in from
there by dog-teams. A broken plate in the jaw-crusher at the start delayed operation
for six weeks. When the property was examined the mill was on its third week of
operation and 60 oz. of gold was reported to have been recovered from 50 tons of ore
in two weeks. All ore was being taken from an open-cut in No. 2 vein. The operation
has been suspended and it is understood there is some trouble regarding title to the
claims.
[Reference:  Annual Reports, 1935, Part B, and 1937, Part B.]
Quartz Creek.
Another small mill was taken in via Telegraph Creek and Dease River to be installed by Hope and Hankins on a property on the north side of McDame Lake almost
directly across from the Erickson Creek property. PROGRESS NOTES. A 65
UNUK RIVER AREA.
Company office, Room 102, Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   G. B.
MacKay Gold    Duncan, Secretary;   T. S. MacKay, Manager.    Capital:   10,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      $1 par.    This company, financed by Selukwe Gold Mining and Finance
Company, Limited, acquired the MacKay Syndicate property situated
near the headwaters of the Unuk River, longitude 130°  30', latitude 56° 37'.    The
property consists of the Unuk Gold and Unuk Valley groups, on which considerable
stripping and some diamond-drilling was done by Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, in 1937 and 1938.
Supplies for the winter were taken over the Unuk River trail and also by plane to
the property. A drift has been started on the north end of the Unuk Gold group and
another one at a different showing. Work has been done by hand as it was impossible
to get a compressor in before winter. A camp has been built and nine men were employed.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
Salmon River.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Silbak Premier   Premier, B.C.    H. A. Guess, President;   J. C. Emison, Treasurer;
Mines, Ltd.      G. A. Brockington, Secretary;  Bert F. Smith, Manager; J. G. Pearcey,
Mine  Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000  shares,   $1  par;    issued,
2,500,000.    The property consists of the former holdings of:   Premier Gold Mining
Company, Limited;   B.C. Silver Mines, Limited;   Selukwe Gold Mining and Finance
Company;   Sebakwe and District Mines, Limited;   and British Canadian Silver Corporation, Limited.    It is located in the Salmon River valley, longitude 130°   latitude
56° 03', about 14 miles from Stewart.
The property is equipped with a complete mining plant and 500-ton flotation plant.
It is developed on six levels. The mine was worked 311 days and 169,164 tons of ore
produced.    An average of 351 men were employed.
The mill operated 311 days with mill-heads assaying: Gold, 0.25 oz. per ton;
silver, 6.21 oz. per ton. From this, 14,538 dry tons of concentrates was produced and
shipped, assaying: Gold, 2.78 oz. per ton; silver, 64.99 oz. per ton. No crude ore was
shipped during the year. During the year 20,649 feet of drifting, raising, and cross-
cutting and 38,088 feet of diamond-drilling was done.
The following table shows the production for 1939 and for the four years to the
end Of 1939:- Four Years to
1939. End of 1939.
Tonnage milled     169,164 747,418
Gold ounces produced       40,417 176,402
Silver ounces produced     897,539 3,606*507
Company office, Trail, B.C.;  mine office, Stewart, B.C.;  M. M. O'Brien,
Buena Vista     President;    E.   G.   Randall,   Secretary-Treasurer;    D.   S.   Campbell'
Mining Co., Ltd. Manager;   E. James, Mine Superintendent.    Company owns the Big
Missouri mine in Salmon River valley, longitude 130°, latitude 56° 06',
about 18 miles from Stewart.    Property is equipped with complete mining and underground milling plant of 750 tons capacity;   also hydro-electric plant at Long Lake.
Milling started in May, 1938, and production to end of 1939 was 356,708 tons.
During the year 4,253 feet of drifting and raising and 2,745 feet of diamond-
drilling were done. The property was worked 334 days, operations being suspended,
due to power shortage, for six weeks in the spring. The dam at Long Lake has been
raised 5 feet 3 inches to increase water-storage to provide for continuous operation.
Additions and improvements were made to the camp.
Company office, 800 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   E. C. Morris,
Salmon Gold     President.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;  issued, l,200,OOo!
Mines, Ltd.      The property is situated on the west side of Summit Lake, longitude
130° 06', latitude 56°  13', about 27 miles from Stewart.    The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, continued development in
5 A 66 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
the early summer, but dropped their option at the end of July when operations were
suspended.
This group, owned by Mrs. J. L. Campbell, of Hyder, Alaska, is located
Pioneer Group, on the west side of Tide Lake, longitude 130° 4', latitude 56° 15'. It
is reached by road to the Big Missouri mine and thence by 13 miles of
rough trail. An adit at 2,500 feet elevation, started by Jancowski brothers in 1933,
was advanced and some drifting done on a shear from which two small shipments
of selected ore was made to the sampling plant (see page 56). The property was
examined in August and the sampling results may be obtained on application to the
Department of Mines, Victoria.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1927 and 1930.]
Portland Group.—This group, owned by Alphonse Thomas, of Stewart, is located
on the westerly side of a glacier on the west side of the lower end of Tide Lake. The
owner continued stripping and open-cutting.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part B.]
Stewart.
This group is on the mountain-side 2 miles south-east of Stewart.
Silverado Group.  This property was formerly operated by Silverado  Mines, Limited.
With the exception of intermittent operations by leasers it has been
inactive for a number of years. During the year John Stewart and two miners explored the so-called " canyon " vein at 1,860 feet elevation on the Rainier Fraction, with
the object of mining ore for shipment.    No ore was shipped.
Bear River.
This group was optioned by the R. W. Wood and W. R. Wilson estates
Red Cliff Group, to H. D. Haywood, of Vancouver. It is located on the west side of
Bear River about 15 miles from Stewart. H. D. Haywood explored a
small showing in Lydden Creek canyon, at 1,900 feet elevation, on the Montrose claim.
Some small shipments were made to the sampling plant. This showing was examined
and sampled and the results may be obtained on application to the Department of
Mines, Victoria, B.C.
American Creek.
Company office, 800 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Russell W. Ken-
Napco Gold      nedy, Secretary.    Capital:   1,500,000 shares, no par value.    The hold-
Mines, Ltd.      ings comprise twenty-one mineral claims on the west side of American
Creek,  about 27%  miles by motor-road and pack-horse trail from
Stewart.    During 1939, open-cut exploration of the new showings in the northern part
of the claims, particularly the " Bugnello " cut, was continued.    Some work was also
done in the " Johnny " cut, adjacent to the boundary of the Tooth group, on a probable
continuation of the " McLeod " shear.
[Reference:  Annual Reports, 1937, Part B, and 1938, Part B.]
Marmot River.
Company office, 521 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Capital:
Crusader Mines,  50,000 shares, no par value.    This company optioned in 1938 the Gold
Ltd. Drop group from Joseph Morrin and Albert Casey, of Hyder, Alaska,
and Stewart, B.C. The claims are located on the rugged south ridge
of the Marmot River valley, longitude 130°, latitude 55° 52', about 2 miles from its
mouth, and extend from 500 to 5,000 feet elevation. The property is reached by 2 miles
of road, the Marmot crossed, and thence trail to a tent-camp at 2,100 feet elevation.
During the winter of 1938-39 exploratory work was carried out for the company by
Chartered Mining Explorers. The option was dropped in the spring and the owners
resumed work. The company made a shipment of 2 tons and the owners one of 4.8 tons
of selected ore to the sampling plant (see pages 56 and 58). PROGRESS NOTES. A 67
Company office, 603 Central Building, Victoria, B.C.   Capital: 3,000,000
Stewart Canal    shares, 50 cents par.    This company owns the Gold Boulder claim on
Gold Mines, Ltd. the north side of the Marmot River, longitude 130°, latitude 50° 52',
about 2x/2 miles from its mouth.    The showings, between 1,000 and
1,400 feet elevation, are reached by road for 2 miles;  thence by pack-horse trail to 800
feet elevation;   and thence by foot-trail to the camp at 1,000 feet elevation.
Development to date consists of one adit 176 feet long, one started, and two open-
cuts. Three shipments of 0.74, 2.78, and 7.26 tons of selected ore were made to the
sampling plant (see page 56).
Nass River.
The Meziadin group of sixteen claims, being explored by this syndi-
Nass River Mining cate, is located at the head of Porter Creek, longitude 129° 25', latitude
Syndicate.       56°, about 10 miles southerly from Meziadin Lake.    The property is
about 14 miles by road and 47 miles by trail from Stewart.    The property, staked in 1938 by Owen McFadden, covers ground explored and staked by a Mr.
Porter and James Mowat many years ago (previous to 1913) as the Bullion claim, and
later, about 1922, by J. Green and H. Ficklin, of Hyder, Alaska, as the Delnorte group.
The syndicate has explored the ground by a series of fifteen open-cuts and some small
pop-holes.    The property was examined and sampled and a preliminary plan showing
the results may be obtained from the Department of Mines, Victoria, upon payment
of 50 cents.
Anyox.
Gold Leaf Claim.—This claim is owned by James Flynn, of Anyox, and is about 2
miles south of Anyox. The owner did further exploratory work by stripping and open-
cutting to the south-west of the beach showings.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part B.]
Alice Arm.
This group of five claims is owned by G. Fiva, of Alice Arm. The
Gold Strike Group, property, discovered in 1938, is situated on the east side of Kinskuch
Lake, longitude 129° 20', latitude 55° 40'. It is reached by speeder
on the Dolly Varden railway for 12 miles; thence by trail up East Creek for 7 miles
to Kinskuch Lake at 3,950 feet elevation; thence across the lake, about 1% miles wide,
by a small rowboat to the tent-camp on the east side. G. Fiva further explored this
discovery. It was examined and sampled, and the results may be obtained on application to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
British Lion Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 553 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. A. F.
Smith, President;   Thos. Slattery, Secretary-Treasurer.
This company continued exploratory work on the Homestake group, in the Upper
Kitsault Valley.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part B.]
QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS.
D. F. Kidd, lessee, made a small shipment of high-grade ore from the old Early
Bird group at Gold Harbour.
NORTHERN COAST.
Princess Royal Island.
Company office, 507 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine
Surf Inlet Con-   office, Surf Inlet, B.C.;   Robt. L. Reed, President;   Lindsey Hooper,
solidated Gold    Treasurer;    J.   C.   Ralston,   Secretary;    Angus   McLeod,   Manager.
Mines, Ltd.      Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 2,672,855.    The property comprises the old Surf and Pugsley mines at the head of Surf
Inlet, longitude 128° 55', latitude 53°.    The property is equipped with mining plant
and an old 300-ton milling plant reconditioned to operate at about 70 tons per day.
Development-work consisted of 5,888 feet of drifting and raising. The mine was
operated 364 days and 27,264 tons of ore milled;   eighty-three men were employed. A 68 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Some new ore was developed in the Pugsley mine on the 900 and 1,000 levels. The
upper levels of the Surf mine were explored, sampled, some ore mined, and preparations
made to open up above the old stopes.
Khutze Inlet.
Hunter Group.—This group, owned by J. M. Meldrum and J. G. Campbell, was
optioned late in the year to P. W. Racey and Seattle interests and exploration and
development-work commenced. The group is located on the north branch of Khutze
River, longitude 128° 18', latitude 53° 10', about 12 miles from tide-water.
Porcher Island.
Porcher Island Mines, Ltd.—This company went into bankruptcy in October, 1939.
It owned the Surf Point and Edye Pass properties on Porcher Island, longitude 130°
40', latitude 54°.
[Reference: Annual Reports, 1934, Part B, and 1935, Part B.]
,    TERRACE-HAZELTON AREA.
Zymoetz River.
Company office, 785 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.; Fred M. Wells,
Omineca Gold    President;  C. Hansen, Superintendent.    The property, longitude 128°
Quartz Mining   10', latitude 54° 30', is situated on the north bank of the Zymoetz River,
Co., Ltd.        14 miles from Copper City.    The property is equipped with a small
compressor driven by a water-turbine.    An adit is being driven to
intersect veins exposed on the surface and is in 705 feet.    A 4-foot vein was cut at 410
feet.    Six men were employed and operations suspended in September.
Usk.
This old property in the vicinity of Usk was formerly operated by the
Cordillera Group. Kitselas Mountain Copper Company and the Usk Mining Company,
Limited, but no work has been done on it for many years. During the
year James Darby, of Usk, carried out work with a view to mining shipping-grade
ore, and sent 1 ton of ore to the sampling plant (see page 57). The property was
examined and it was found that the outlook for profitable mining, sorting, and cobbing
of shipping-grade ore was not encouraging.
This group of six claims, covering ground formerly held by Columario
Victor Group. Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited, was staked in 1937 by W. W.
Duncan, of Usk, and S. C. Cooper, of Terrace. The claims are between
200 and 4,200 feet elevation on the westerly slope of Kleanza Mountain and are reached
by motor-road from Usk for 3.3 miles; thence go-devil trail for 1.75 miles to the
Columario camp at 1,700 feet elevation; thence a good pack-horse trail for 2 miles to
the main showings at 4,000 feet elevation. Three samples were sent to the sampling
plant (see page 59). The property was sampled to determine the possibility of sorting
and cobbing a shipping-grade of ore. Four samples from No. 2 vein indicate the presence of such ore.
This is an old group of five mineral claims, owned by W. R. Adams, of
Golden Crown    Usk.    It is located around 800 feet elevation on the west side of
Group. Kleanza Mountain, and is reached by motor-road for 3% miles from
Usk and thence by foot-trail for % mile.    Old work consists of open-
cuts, stripping, and four adits.    The owner extended No. 4 adit drift on No. 2 vein.
[Reference: Annual Report, 1921, page 95.]
Company office, 300 Insurance Building, Seattle, Washington.   British
Nicholson Creek Columbia office:   602 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.    R. K. Young,
Mining Corpora- President;  W. A. Schwalbe, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:  5,000,000
tion. shares, 1 cent par.    The corporation owns a number of claims on the
south side of Nicholson Creek, between 1,500 and 220 feet elevation,
about 5 miles northward from Usk station on the Canadian National Railways. PROGRESS NOTES. A 69
During 1938 and 1939, some stripping and open-cutting was done on a showing at
1,800 feet elevation on the Mac-Shannon claim, about 9,000 feet south-eastward from
the long adit. This showing has no relation to any of the showings in the locality of
the long adit. In 1938 the following shipment was made from this showing to the
Government sampling plant at Prince Rupert: Dry tons, 0.374; gold, 1.26 oz. per ton;
silver, 44 oz. per ton; copper, 16.3 per cent.; sulphur, 8.6 per cent.; silica, 49.6 per
cent.
The showing was sampled in 1939 as follows:—
(1.)  Across 2.5 feet, width of mineralization, in shear at centre of cut at
1,830 feet elevation:   Gold, trace;   silver, 1 oz. per ton;  copper, 1.2 per
cent.
(2.)  At locality of (1), two flat quartzose stringers each 3 inches wide:  Gold,
0.12 oz. per ton;  silver, 5 oz. per ton; copper, 3.4 per cent.;  silica, 58.94
per cent.
(3.)  Selected cobbed-grade from dump of 1.5 tons (could be cobbed to about
1 ton) :   Gold, 1.10 oz. per ton;   silver, 47 oz. per ton;   copper, 17.3 per
cent.;  silica, 43.74 per cent.
This company is in liquidation.    The property, on the east side of the
Columario Con-   Skeena River, 3 miles below Usk, was leased to W. W. Duncan and
solidated Gold    associates, of Usk.    Their object was to selectively mine and ship
Mines, Ltd.      high-grade  ore  from  certain   sections  of  the  old  workings.    They
shipped 15.86 tons of selected ore and also ten samples to the sampling
plant (see page 55).
The property was examined and sampled with the object of determining the possibility of selectively mining stripping ore. Details of the sampling may be obtained
upon application to the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.
Pitman.
This group of twelve claims is owned by J. Bell, A. M. Bethurem,
Grotto. G. Alger, and R. L. Brash, of Usk.    It is located in the valley of Hard-
scrabble Creek, longitude 128° 22', latitude 54° 43', about 2 miles
south-westward from Pitman, on the Canadian National Railways.
During the first half of the year, the owners carried out exploration and development on both the upper and lower showings and shipped 19.7 tons of selected ore to the
sampling plant (see pages 55 and 58).
In the late summer the property was optioned to Canadian Explorations, Limited,
of Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C. This organization with a crew of two men
carried out superficial exploration up to about the middle of December. This consisted
of stripping and tracing of No. 6 and No. 7 veins, and drifting on No. 2 and No. 3 veins.
[Reference: Annual Report, 1937, Part C; additional information obtained in
1938 may be had from Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C., for 50 cents.]
In the vicinity of Usk and Terrace work was done on several groups of claims, including the following:—
Zymoetz group, by T. Turner, of Terrace; Black Bull group, by W. Hagen, of
Copper City; Nugget, Lucky Strike, and Morning Star claims, by P. Brusk, of Usk and
Vanarsdol; Lucky Luke, by L. E. Moody and partner, of Usk; and Four Ace group,
by Milton Allison, of Usk.
HAZELTON TO HOUSTON AREA.
Smithers.
A. W. Herman, J. J. Kelley, and associates took an option on this prop-
Duthie Mines,    erty and commenced work in October.    The property is at longitude
Ltd. 127° 25' and latitude 54° 47', about 9 miles by road from Smithers.
Two shipments were made to the sampling plant at Prince Rupert.
One shipment of 2.68 tons contained 0.17 oz. gold per ton, 223.6 oz. silver per ton, 44
per cent, lead, 13.6 per cent, zinc, and 1 per cent, arsenic.    The second lot of 5.7 tons A 70 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
contained 0.10 oz. gold per ton, 184.9 oz. silver per ton, 22 per cent, lead, 21 per cent,
zinc, and 1.2 per cent, arsenic.
Company office, 1010 Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.    This is a private
La Marr Gold     company.    A.  M.  Pallan,  President;    Stanley W.  Taylor,  Secretary.
Mines, Ltd.      This company has taken an option from Messrs. Messner and Harrer
on a group of claims situated at the head of Driftwood Creek at longitude 126° 55', latitude 53° 55'.    A camp was erected and work started on a prospect
adit in November.
This property, consisting of thirteen claims, is owned by S. F. Camp-
Glacier Gulch    bell, Grover Loveless, and Wesley Banta, of Smithers.    The property
Group. embraces claims on both the north and south sides of Glacier Gulch,
on the eastern slopes of Hudson Bay Mountain, and is reached by
motor-road from Smithers for 6 miles to the camp at 2,440 feet elevation. From this
point a trail ascends the steep slope of the mountain to the main workings around 3,100
feet elevation. The owners worked the auriferous bismuth-telluride deposit on the
south side of the gulch. Several short adits and extensive open-cutting has been done
on this showing. Seven lots of ore and samples aggregating 31 tons were shipped to
the sampling plant (see page 55).
CARIBOO AREA.
Wells.
Company office, 675 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Cariboo Gold     Wells, B.C.    Dr. W. B. Burnett, President;  J. R. V. Dunlop, Secretary-
Quartz Mining    Treasurer;   R. R. Rose, Managing Director and.Mine Manager;   R. E.
Co., Ltd.        Vear, Mine Superintendent.    Capital: 2,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
1,333,309.    The property is on Cow Mountain, south-east from Jack of
Clubs Lake, longitude 121° 35', latitude 53° 05', and is reached by 63 miles of road from
the terminus of Pacific Great Eastern Railway at Quesnel.    It is equipped with a complete mining plant and a 300-ton cyanide plant.    Access to the mine is by three crosscut
adits.    Below the main haulage-level   (1,500)   the mine is developed through three
shafts.
During 1939, development-work amounted to 9,418 feet of drifting, 6,481 feet of
crosscutting, 1,667 feet of raising, 238 feet of shaft sinking, and 7,168 feet of diamond-
drilling. The 1,500 main haulage-level was advanced throughout the year towards the
B.C. vein. The No. 1 shaft was sunk 215 feet from the 1,800 level and two new levels
were opened up. On the lower of these, the 2,000 level, a drive will be made in a
northerly direction to the company's claims on Island Mountain. A new hoist was
installed at No. 3 shaft and work resumed on the 1,600 and 1,700 levels.
In the Pinkerton zone, service raises were driven from the 1,500 level to the 1,200
level, and the 1,300 and 1,400 levels were opened up. Other development-work was
principally on the 1,300, 1,400, 1,800, and 1,900 levels of the Rainbow zone. In the
power plant, a 4,500-cubic-foot-per-minute after-cooler was installed, and it has proved
effective in taking moisture out of the air.
A bonus scheme was recently inaugurated whereby one-third  of the exchange
premiums received on gold is distributed pro rata amongst the employees.    During
1939, 112,414 man-shifts were worked in the entire plant.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Company office, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Island Mountain  office, Wells, B.C.    F. W. Guernsey, President;   Fred Searls, Jr., and
Mines Co., Ltd.   H. DeWitt Smith, Vice-Presidents;  H. E. Dodge, Secretary-Treasurer;
T. H. Munn, General Superintendent.    Capital:   1,100,000 shares, 50
cents par;  issued, 1,050,716 shares.    The property is on Island Mountain on the northwest side of Jack of Clubs Lake, at Wells, about 4 miles west of Barkerville.    It is
reached by 55 miles of motor-road from Quesnel on the P.G.E. Railway.    It is equipped
with a mining plant and 125-ton cyanide plant.    Below the main haulage-level the mine
is opened by an internal three-compartment shaft sunk to a depth of 1,079 feet below
the collar.    Stations were cut at distances of 625, 750, 875, and 1,000 feet below the PROGRESS NOTES. A 71
collar. The 625 and 750 levels were opened up from the new section of the shaft and
development-work was done on the 125, 250, and 375 levels. On completion of the
shaft, a new hoist was installed.
In 1939, development consisted of 9,040 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 1,869
feet of raising, 78 feet of sinking, and 21,494 feet of diamond-drilling. The company
also did 1,377 feet of diamond-drilling on its claims on Proserpine Mountain. Ore
mined and milled during 1939 was 46,209 dry tons.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Proserpine Mountain.
Company office, 544 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office, Barker-
Proserpine Gold   ville, B.C.   Colin S. Cradock, President; Hugh McL. Russell, Treasurer;
Mines, Ltd.      W. Gordon McKee, Secretary;   C. B. North, Mine Manager.    Capital:
3,000,000 shares, $1 par;   issued,  1,630,167,  of which  1,065,000 are
escrowed.    The holdings of this company extend over a large area  on  Proserpine
Mountain, 2% miles from Barkerville, longitude 121° 29', latitude 53° 02'.
As early as snow conditions permitted in the spring of 1939, a road was cleared up
Grouse Creek and a tent camp established about 2 miles above the Cariboo Hudson road.
Equipment was purchased, a compressor plant and blacksmith-shop set up, and work
was commenced. By September 9th, when operations ceased, a deep-level adit-crosscut
had been driven for 1,056 feet.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Cunningham Creek.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C. Dr. W. B.
Cariboo Hudson Burnett, President; Frederick Field, Secretary-Treasurer; I. S. Corn-
Gold Mines, Ltd.  fort,   General  Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000  shares,   50  cents
par; issued, 2,145,338. The property is at the head of Cunningham
Creek, longitude 121° 19', latitude 52° 53', about 20 miles by road south-east from
Barkerville. It is equipped with mining plant and a 100-ton cyanide plant. During
1939, the development-work consisted of 1,052 feet of drifting, 400 feet of raising, and
3,197 feet of contracted diamond-drilling.
The raise between the 600 and 300 levels was completed and the 400 was opened
up from the raise from a distance of 150 feet. Considerable exploratory drifting was
done on the 600 level. Stoping operations were carried out on the 200, 250, and 600
levels, but facilities for hoisting from the latter were not completed at the time of
shut-down. Up until August 8th, 1939, when the mine and mill were closed, 13,492
tons of ore having a gold content of 4,013 oz. was milled. The equipment at the
property is intact and a watchman is employed.
Yanks Peak.
Company office, Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Howard W.
Amparo Mining   White, President;   J. B. Knaebel, Managing Director;   W. S. Jordon,
Co., Ltd.        Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   10,000 shares, $1 par;   issued,  1,000
shares.    The company is doing development-work on the Midas group
on Yanks Peak, longitude 121° 26', latitude 52° 51', about 12 miles north of Keithley
Creek.    Extensive crosscutting and drifting operations were carried out from the north
side of Yanks Peak.    Bulk samples were taken and reduced in a sampling plant erected
on the south side of the peak at the new camp-site.    Bunk-houses and a warehouse were
also constructed preparatory to further underground development.    Between fifty and
seventy men were employed by the company on surface and underground development-
work until late in the year.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part C]
Company office, 785 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.    Fred M. Wells,
Snowshoe Gold   President and Manager;   E. T. Gook, Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:
Mines, Ltd.      3,000,000   shares,   50   cents   par;    issued,   1,656,475.    The   property,
known as the Jane group, is at the head of Little Snowshoe Creek,
longitude 121° 26', latitude 52° 52'.    It is reached by tractor-road from Barkerville. A 72 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Underground operations were carried on intermittently during 1939 and several hundred feet of drifting and crosscutting accomplished by hand-miners. A compressor
was installed in August and one shift, drilling and blasting one round per day, was
employed up to the end of the year. The low-level adit was advanced 650 feet from the
portal and considerable crosscutting was done from it. The total over-all footage to
date is 1,200 feet. Eleven men were employed while the camp was in operation. A
team of six huskies is kept at the camp for emergency use when the roads are blocked
with snow.
[Reference: Annual Report, 1929.]
Spanish Mountain.
Owned by P. Hunter and associates. The property is on Spanish
Three Hills Group. Mountain, longitude 121° 25', latitude 52° 34', about 4 miles southeast of Likely. It is reported that an adit was started in 1939 to cut
at depth a quartz vein much oxidized on the surface and apparently responsible for
rough, coarse gold found in a small dry gulch below. This adit was stopped before the
objective was reached.
CHILCOTIN AREA.
Company office,  208 Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Taylor Windfall  Williams   Lake,   B.C.    Ervin   J.   Taylor,   President;    Wm.   Warner,
Gold Mining     Secretary-Treasurer; S. H. Davies, Mine Manager.    Capital: 2,000,000
Co., Ltd.        shares, $1 par.    The company operates the Taylor Windfall mine on
the upper Taseko River.    The mine operated from May 17th to August
15th.    A maximum of about twenty men were employed.    Development-work was continued on the 200 and 300 levels.    On the former, this work consisted of 150 feet of
drifting north-easterly along the zone and of 223 feet of crosscutting both ways from
the drifting.    On the latter, it consisted of 270 feet of drifting to the north-east and
260 feet of crosscutting.    A new powder magazine was erected and a Gardner-Denver
H.K. hoist and fan for the 300 level were installed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1935, Part F.]
Blackhorn Mountain.
Company office, 507 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Wm.
Homathko Gold   Pohlman, President.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The
Mines, Ltd.      company  owns  claims  on  Blackhorn  Mountain,   longitude  124°   40',
latitude 51° 43', near the head of Homathko River.    It is reached by
road and trail from Williams Lake, on the P.G.E. Railway.    N. A. Timmins, Limited,
optioned the property in 1938, and in 1939 did 180 feet of drifting, 120 feet of cross-
cutting, and 2,100 feet of diamond-drilling before relinquishing the option in September.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Cadwallader Creek.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Pioneer Gold Mines Pioneer Mines P.O., B.C.    Victor Spencer, President;   A. E. Bull,
of B.C., Ltd.       Secretary - Treasurer;    H.   T.   James,   Managing   Director;    E.   F.
Emmons,   General  Superintendent.    Capital:    2,500,000  shares,   $1
par;  issued, 1,751,750.
The company owns the Pioneer mine on Cadwallader Creek, a tributary of Bridge
River, 52 miles by road from Bridge River station on the P.G.E. Railway. The mine is
equipped with mining plant and 400-ton cyanide plant. The mine is developed by two
shafts from the surface and one internal shaft, No. 4, from the 24th to the 29th level.
The levels are at 125-foot intervals.
On October 8th, 1939, this mine was closed by a strike and remained closed for the
remainder of the year. Up to that date the development-work carried out consisted of
4,279 feet of drifting, 38 feet of crosscutting, and 2,456 feet of raising.    No. 4 shaft PROGRESS NOTES. A 73
was put into operation at the beginning of the year, and drifting on the 27, 28, and 29
levels, served by that shaft, was carried on. Raising from the 29 level was commenced
just prior to the strike. Production amounted to 103,738 tons mined and 88,009 milled,
yielding 48,118 oz. gold. During the strike a maintenance crew was employed at
keeping the mine-workings under repair.
Company office, 1403 Dominion Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine
Holland Gold    office, Pioneer, B.C.    Dr. G. H. Worthington, President;   F. W. Hoi-
Mines, Ltd.      land,  Manager.    Capital:    1,000,000  shares,   50  cents  par;    issued,
422,457.    The property is located above the Pioneer mine on the lower
slopes of Mount Ferguson.    It is reached by a mile of narrow steep road from Pioneer.
A crew averaging five men on one shift advanced the exploratory adit to a point 1,050
feet from the portal.
Company office,  555 Burrard Street, Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine office,
Bralorne Mines,  Bralorne, B.C.    Austin C. Taylor, President;  R. H. Grace, Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;  D. Matheson, General Superintendent.    Capital:  1,250,000
shares, no par value; issued, 1,247,000. The company owns and operates the Bralorne mine on Cadwallader Creek, a tributary of Bridge River, 50 miles
by road from Bridge River station on the P.G.E. Railway. It is equipped with mining
plant and 550-ton capacity flotation plant.
Underground development is in three sections—the King mine, the Empire mine,
and the Coronation. Operating throughout the year, a total of 184,922 tons of ore was
produced with a content of 104,862 oz. of gold and 34,956 oz. of silver. Development-
work consisted of 21,219 feet of drifting, 660 feet of raises, 1,462 feet of shaft sinking,
22 feet shaft transfer crosscuts, 181 feet of ventilation raises and crosscuts, and 13,578
feet of diamond-drilling.
The Empire shaft was sunk 619 feet from the 1,000 level to the 1,400 level. Following this, work commenced on the sinking of the Crown shaft a distance of 900 feet,
from the 1,400 level to the 2,000 level. This was almost completed at the end of the
year and pockets were cut for the 1,900 level. From the Empire shaft, the 1,100, 1,200,
1,300, and 1,400 levels were opened up and ventilation raises extended through to the
100 level on the 51 vein, and from 1,400 to 1,200 on the 55 vein. From the Crown head-
frame a ventilation raise was put through to the 600 level.
Additions to the plant include an electric boiler in the heating plant; electric ear
on the 6 by 6 Allis-Chalmers ball-mill; a new powder magazine; new general offices,
and new aluminium cage and skip combinations in the Crown shaft. Three hundred
and seventy-eight men were employed and a total of 129,697 man-shifts were worked.
Company office, 503 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.    J. S. Harrison,
Golden Ledge     President.    Capital:   5,000 shares, $50 par.    The Golden Ledge prop-
Syndicate,       erty lies on both sides of Cadwallader Creek, several miles north of
Bralorne.    A crosscut adit, about 70 feet above the river on the east
bank, was advanced 350 feet to intersect a mineralized quartz vein exposed in No. 3
adit, 135 feet above.    Drifts were then driven along the vein, 20 feet to the south and
150 feet to the north.    The crew consisted of six men, mining on day shift and mucking
on night shift.
Tyaughton Creek.
Lucky Strike Gold Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 811 Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver, B.C. Robt. S. Macdonald, President; George F. Corlett, Secretary. Capital:
3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    Open-cut work was done during the summer.
[Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part F (Goldside Mines, Ltd.).]
Tommy Creek.
Company office, 425 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.    W. Spence, Secre-
Bristol Mines,    tary;   A. E. Stromberg, Managing Director.    Capital:   50,000 shares,
Ltd. no par value.    This company is developing a property on Tommy
Creek, about 4 miles south of the highway, at a point 12 miles east of
Minto.    Development consisted of 250 feet of drifting on an oxidized vein and 250
feet of crosscutting in an adit started 185 feet lower.    A maximum of twelve men were
employed on three shifts. A 74 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Truax Mountain.
Easter Group.—This group on Truax Mountain is owned by T. Morrison and associates, of Bralorne.    On it, 100 feet of adit was driven for the account of Bralorne
Mines, Limited.
LILLOOET AREA.
Company office, 1351 Broadway West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Grange Consoli-   Kelly Lake, B.C.    W. L. Gilbert, President;   John Bennett, Secretary-
dated Mines, Ltd. Treasurer.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;  issued, 2,600,000.
The company owns the Grange mine, near Kelly Lake station on the
P.G.E. Railway.    Three men were employed on maintenance-work and in advancing
No. 3 adit-level.
ASHCROFT-KAMLOOPS AREA.
Company office,  404  Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
VidetteGold     Savona, B.C.    C. E. Smythe, President;   G. F. H. Long,  Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer;   R. Avison, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, no
par value;  issued, 1,104,568.    The company operates the Vidette mine,
reached by 33 miles of road north from a point on the highway 5 miles west of Savona,
B.C.    This mine milled 6,522 tons of ore, producing 3,206 oz. of gold.    The combined
lateral and inclined development footage totalled 2,036 feet, and about 900 feet of
diamond-drilling was done.    From the 470 south drift a winze was sunk 150 feet on the
70 vein, and the 570 level was opened up from this winze.    Other development-work
was confined to the 3rd and 4th levels.    Early in December a working was started from
the south wall of 35 crosscut to pass under the lake towards the Dexheimer showings.
It had been advanced 200 feet by the end of the year.    Approximately sixty men were
employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part F.]
Company office,  789  Pender  Street,  Vancouver,  B.C.    C.  S.  McKee,
MartelGold      President;   G. S. Ruddell, Secretary-Treasurer;   E. A. Jamieson, Man-
Mines, Ltd.      aging   Director.    Capital:    3,000,000   shares,   no   par   value.    It   is
reported that the equipment at the Martel mine was disposed of by
sheriff's sale which took place early in October.
Company office, 608 Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C.    Geo. F. John-
Windpass Gold    son,   Secretary.    Capital:    2,000,000   shares,   $1   par.    This  company
Mining Co., Ltd.  operated the  Windpass mine on Baldy Mountain,  overlooking Dunn
Lake, near Boulder station, on the Canadian National Railways, about
54 miles north of Kamloops.    The mine was closed early in the year.
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Hedley.
Company office, Room 2402, 19 Rector Street, New York, N.Y.;   mine
Kelowna Explora- office, Hedley, B.C.    W. Adams Kissam, Chairman;   Sewell T. Tyng,
tion Co., Ltd.     President;   John W.  Mercer,  Treasurer;   O.  P. Ebeling,  Secretary;
W. C. Douglass, Mine Manager. This is a private company. The company operates the Nickel Plate mine at Hedley, longitude 120° 04', latitude 49° 35'.
The concentrators, bunkers, machine-shops, and general offices are at Hedley, at an
elevation of 1,600 feet, and the portal of the mine is at an elevation of 5,600 feet, 4 miles
from the mill. The mine is reached by a 10,000-foot gravity plane which is operated
in two sections. Steel skips having a capacity of 6 tons are used for the transportation system and are operated and controlled by electric motors at the central and top
terminals. The portal of the mine is 1% miles north of the top terminal of the tramway, and electric trolley motor-haulage is used between the mine and the bunkers at the
top of the tramway.
Access to the mine is by an incline shaft with levels at 100-foot intervals. During
1939 development was in the lower, west section of the mine and chiefly Nos. 8 and 15
west drifts. The latter has been driven through to the surface and together with the
No. 12 drift, driven into the Mascot mine at a much lower elevation than the portal of PROGRESS NOTES. A 75
the Nickel Plate mine, cause a current of air to circulate through the mine.    There are
112 men employed at the mine, fifty-seven in the mill, and a staff of sixteen.
Company office, 1132 Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Hedley Mascot   Hedley, B.C.    Wendell B. Farris, President; V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
Gold Mines, Ltd. W. S. Charlton, Treasurer; C. W. S. Tremaine, General Superintendent.
Capital:   3,000,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 2,264,130.    The property is
1 mile north of Hedley, longitude 120° 04', latitude 49°  35'.    The concentrator and
mine offices are on the east bank of Hedley (20-Mile)  Creek and the mine, 2,795 feet
higher in elevation, is connected to the plant by a " quad " haul-back aerial tramway,
5,600 feet in length.    The flotation plant operates at a capacity of 190 tons a day.
Recent development-work comprises diamond-drilling below the 4,800 or main
haulage-level, followed by driving an adit at 4,300 feet elevation. This working was in
1,600 feet at the end of the year. Eighty-seven men were employed, forty-two on the
surface and forty-five underground.
Company office, 1132 Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Canty Gold Mines Hedley, B.C.    Wendell B. Farris, President;  V. J. Creeden, Secretary;
(Hedley), Ltd.    W. S. Charlton, Treasurer;  R. H. Stewart, Managing Director;  Charles
Bishop,   Mine   Superintendent.    Capital:    3,000,000   shares,   $1   par;
issued, 2,172,788.    The property is about 2 miles east of the Nickel Plate mine.
The mine is developed by a three-compartment vertical shaft sunk to a depth of
427 feet. Ore-pockets have been cut at the 200- and 400-foot levels and drifts run to
the north of the shaft. A vertical raise driven from the 400 to the 200 level was continued some distance above the latter. In addition, a considerable amount of diamond-
drilling was done. Underground operations were suspended during the summer with
a view towards installing a 50-ton mill. However, after cleaning a mill-site this was
deferred and there was no further work done in 1939. It is understood that an addition
is being made to Hedley Mascot Gold Mines concentrator to handle about 50 tons of
Canty ore daily.    There were fifty-six men employed when operations were suspended.
Olalla.
Company office, 206 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.    J. E. Beck,
Gold Valley      President;   Fred Norman, Secretary.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50
Mines, Ltd.      cents par.    The property is on the west side of the Keremeos-Penticton
Road at Olalla, longitude 119°  53', latitude 49°  16'.    The workings
consist of three adit-drifts known as No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 drifts.    The work has been
entirely exploratory and during 1939 consisted of extending the No. 1 or lower drift
a distance of approximately 500 feet.    The plant consists of a portable gas-driven compressor operating a drifter.    Four men were employed at the property.
[Reference:   Annual Reports, 1936, Part D, and 1937, Part D.]
SOUTHERN OKANAGAN.
Osoyoos.
Company office, Bank of Toronto Building, Calgary, Alberta;   mine
Osoyoos Mines of office, Osoyoos, B.C.    J. I. McFarland, President;   Norman Hindsley,
Canada, Ltd.     Secretary;   J. O. Howells, General Manager.    Capital:   3,000 6-percent, cumulative, redeemable preferred shares;   1,750,000 common, no
par value;   issued, 1,247,195 shares common.    This company acquired the assets of
Osoyoos Mines, Limited, on a share-for-share basis.    The property on the east side of
Osoyoos Lake, longitude 119° 27', latitude 49° 02', close to the International Boundary,
is equipped with a complete mining plant, 150-ton flotation-mill, and cyanide plant for
tailings treatment.    Power for the whole operation is provided by the West Kootenay
Power and Light Company, Limited.    The mine and mill employ sixty men.
Work was confined to a huge glory-hole on the Dividend claim, close to the flotation
plant.    The main haulage-level is connected by raises to the glory-hole. a 76 report of the minister of mines, 1939.
Fairview.
Company office, 812 Standard Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Fairview Amal-   office, Oliver, B.C.    G. T. Vaux, Managing Director;   H. D. Campbell,
gamatedGold    Secretary-Treasurer; T. A. McKenzie, Mine Manager.    Capital: 91,235
Mines, Ltd.      preferred shares, $1 par;   8,450,700 common shares of no par value;
issued, 35,100 preferred and 2,650,400 shares common.    The property,
longitude 119° 36', latitude 49° 11', is at Fairview, on a branch of the Kettle Valley
Railway, about 3 miles south of Oliver.    The company owns the Morning Star and
Fairview Amalgamated mines, where a large amount of mining development has been
done in the past.    A 150-ton flotation plant is located near the Morning Star mine, and
the Fairview mine is 1% miles distant;   the ore from the Fairvieiv being carried by
motor-truck to the mill.
The Fairview mine has been developed by two adit-drifts, known as the No. 5 and
No. 6 drifts, 2,600 feet and 1,000 feet long, respectively, and 135 feet vertical distance
between them. A large amount of stoping has been done above the No. 5 drift and
raises have been driven through from these drifts to the surface for ventilation.
Milling was suspended in May and an active programme of development was carried
on in the Fairview mine until the end of September, when operations were suspended.
Power is supplied by the West Kootenay Power and Light Company, Limited.
An average of ten men were employed at the mine.
STUMP LAKE AREA.
Company office, 506 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Consolidated     Box 759, Kamloops, B.C.    Mathew Sutton,  President;   C. J. White,
NicolaGoldfields, Secretary-Treasurer;   R. A. Petter,  Mine Superintendent.    Capital:
Ltd. 6,500,000 shares, $1 par.    The company's main operations is at the
Nicola mine, longitude 120° 21', latitude 50° 22', 2 miles west of the
Kamloops-Nicola Highway, about 30 miles north from Merritt.
During 1939, work was confined to development in the Nicola mine on the Enterprise and King William veins at depths below the 320, or the main haulage-level of the
mine. Development below the 320 level is by an inclined shaft that follows the Enterprise vein to the 900-foot level. The main developments during the year have been the
extension of drifts on the south 320, 550, 675, 800, and 900 levels, a raise from the lower
drifts to those above for ventilation, and extension of drifts on the north side of the
shaft on 675, 800, and 900 levels, all on the Enterprise vein.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part D.]
CAMP McKINNEY AREA.
This old mine, in Camp McKinney, was the largest producer in this
Cariboo Amelia,  camp in the early days.    It was optioned by Pioneer Gold Mines of
B.C., Limited.    The extensive underground workings were dewatered
for sampling and examination.    A crew of twenty men with sixteen underground was
employed with E. H. Lovitt in charge.
[Reference: Bulletin No. 6, 1940.]
KETTLE RIVER AREA.
Boomerang Group.—This group is 7 miles from Westbridge. Arthur Miller and associates shipped 33 tons of ore from this property which yielded 7 oz. of gold and 55 oz.
of silver.
This claim on Horseshoe Mountain, 23 miles north of Westbridge, is
Barnato.        owned by H. Redden, of Vancouver, and is operated under lease by
F. O. Peterson and partners.    A total of 75 tons of ore, mined by hand-
steel from shallow pits and surface trenches, was shipped to Tacoma and yielded 82 oz.
of gold and 8 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part D.] PROGRESS NOTES. A 77
Mogul.—This claim on Horseshoe Mountain, about 24 miles north of Westbridge,
is operated under lease by C. Sherdahl, who shipped to Trail 59 tons of ore yielding
58 oz. of gold and 61 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part D.]
This claim on the North Fork of the Kettle River, about 24 miles north
Maybe. of Westbridge, is owned by L. Clery and S. Berglund.    Early in the
year it was optioned to the Bayonne Consolidated Mines, Limited, who,
after carrying out a diamond-drilling programme under the direction of John Broatch,
dropped the option.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part D.]
This property, 8 miles from Westbridge, on the Beaverdell Road, was
Roadside.       operated by Arthur Miller and Ralph Gaustin, of Westbridge, who
from shallow workings and open-cuts shipped 30 tons of ore to Trail.
This ore yielded 17 oz. of silver.
BEAVERDELL AREA.
Carmi Mine.—Situated at Carmi. An option has been taken on this property by the
Highland Bell, Limited, who are engaged in dewatering the workings for sampling and
examination.
This property, situated about 9 miles from Beaverdell, is under option
Rosemont.       to the Highland Bell, Limited.    Development-work yielded 22 tons of
ore containing 10 oz. of gold and 4 oz. of silver.    Operations were temporarily suspended during the winter months.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
Jewel Lake.
Company office, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.    Nelson S.
Dentonia Mines,  Smith, President;   G. T. Vaux, Vice-President.      Capital:   2,500,000
Ltd. shares, no par value;   issued, 1,645,000.    The company owns the Den
tonia mine, near Jewel Lake. The property is operated under lease by
John Halstrom and associates, of Greenwood. Six men, five of whom worked underground, were employed throughout the year. A total of 1,809 tons of ore, mined and
shipped to Trail, yielded 977 oz. of gold and 6,576 oz. of silver.
Company office, Lancaster Building,  Calgary,  Alberta;   mine office,
GreenbridgeGold Greenwood, B.C.    W. C. Armstrong, President;   M. Featherley, Secre-
Mines, Ltd.      tary;    E.   O.   Parry,   Treasurer;    L.   M.   Mansfield,   Mine   Manager.
Capital:   4,000,000 shares, no par value;   issued, 1,864,969.    The company operates the North Star, near Jewel Lake.    Six men, with four underground,
were employed until October.    Development included 322 feet of drifting, 70 feet of
crosscutting, 40 feet of raising, and 40 feet of sinking.    A total of 141 tons of ore was
mined from the shaft and shipped to Trail, yielding 68 oz. of gold and 344 oz. of silver.
Boundary Falls.
This property is owned by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Corn-
No. 7. pany of Canada, Limited, and is operated under lease by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood. It was worked continuously throughout the
year, two to three men being employed. Hand-steel was used originally, but recently
a portable compressor has been installed. Development-work included 60 feet of drifting and 100 feet of raising. Ore totalling 47 tons mined and shipped to Trail yielded
152 oz. of gold and 4,621 oz. of silver.
PAULSON AREA.
The Berlin and Alice L., situated 8 miles east from Paulson, are oper-
Kootenay Mining ated under lease by the Kootenay Mining and Leasing Syndicate, of
and Leasing      Trail, with Rudolph Nelson in charge.    Eleven to fourteen men, with
Syndicate.       from seven to ten working underground, were employed on these properties for the greater part of the year.    Very little development-work A 78 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
was done.    A total of 467 tons of ore mined by hand-steel and shipped to Trail yielded
80 oz. of gold and 145 oz. of silver.
LARDEAU AREA.
Camborne.
This property, about 3 miles from Camborne, adjoining the Gold Finch,
Independence    was operated under lease and bond by W. T. Baker, of Trout Lake.
Group. Six men were employed chiefly on surface prospecting for the greater
part of the summer. Development-work included 32 feet of cross-
cutting and 225 feet of surface-trenching.
Company office, 416 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.    James A. Lade,
Meridian Mining President;   H. C. B. Forsyth, Secretary.    Capital:   1,750,000 shares,
Co., Ltd.        50 cents par;   issued, 895,589.    The company owns the Meridian mine
at Camborne.    Cory Menhenick and partners leased the old tailings-
dumps and mill at this property.    Concentrating by placer-mining methods, they have
shipped to Trail about 19 tons of material, which yielded 124 oz. of gold and 49 oz. of
silver.    Much  of this  material  came from  what  was  evidently  ball-mill cleanings,
classifier bed, sacks, etc., but considerable was from the tailings-dump itself.
Trout Lake.
Company office, 302 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.    A. C.
Winslow Con-    Speirs,  Manager.    The  Winslow property on Winslow Creek,  about
solidated, Ltd.    7 miles by tractor-road from Trout Lake, is worked under option by
(N.P.L.).        this company, with W. J. Scorgie in charge.    It operated continuously
throughout the year, a maximum of seventeen men, with six underground, being employed.    A camp to accommodate sixteen men and a mill of 20 tons
daily capacity were constructed.    The first mill, of the " Gibson " type, was replaced by
a small standard crusher and ball-mill.    A mechanical jig, amalgam-plate, and Wilfley
table completed the flow-sheet.    Diesel power is used.    The mill was put in operation
about October 10th and closed about December 10th.    Development-work, all done by
hand-steel, included 280 feet of drifting, 30 feet of raising, 30 feet of surface trenching,
and the retimbering of some 200 feet of old caved workings.    The 7-mile pack-trail
from the mine to the lake was widened sufficiently to permit the use of a tractor and
6 miles of a tractor-road built from Trout Lake City to the mine-landing on the lake.
A total of 7 tons of concentrates was produced and shipped to Trail.    This yielded
26 oz. of gold and 14 oz. of silver.    In addition, 46 tons of crude ore yielded 65 oz. of
gold and 61 oz. of silver.
SLOCAN AREA.
Retallack.
Company office,  535  Georgia Street,  Vancouver,  B.C.    A.  J.   Noble,
Highland Surprise Secretary.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares,  50  cents par.    The company
Gold Mines, Ltd. owns thirteen claims and fractions, including the Phoenix and Fletcher,
on Lyle Creek, 2 miles north-east from Retallack.    Three adits had
been driven prior to 1939.    Ore totalling 197 tons was shipped.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 7, 1940.]
Lemon Creek.
Chapleau.—This property, situated on Chapleau Creek, was operated under lease by
J. Welters and S. Romer, who shipped 27 tons of ore to Trail. This yielded 17 oz. of
gold and 375 oz. of silver.
This property, situated at the head of Gold Creek, above the Kilo mine,
Howard Fraction, is owned and operated by F. T. Harbour, of Slocan City.    About 3
miles of narrow tractor-road, connecting this mine with the main
Springer Creek Road, was constructed. A maximum of six men were employed. A
total of 81 tons of ore, shipped to Trail from the old dumps, yielded 7 oz. of gold and
1,000 oz. of silver. The underground workings, evidently extensive judging from the
dumps, are caved and inaccessible, but the operator plans to reopen them. PROGRESS NOTES. A 79
This property on Lemon Creek, about 9 miles from the Slocan High-
Kilo, way, was operated under lease for a short time by H. V. Dewis, of
Silverton, B.C.    Ore totalling 48 tons was mined and shipped to Trail,
and yielded 31 oz. of gold and 37 oz. of silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Company office, Seattle, Wash.    R. G. McLeod, in charge.    The com-
Barnett Mining   pany is operating the Barnett group on McGuire Creek, a tributary
Co. at the head of Lemon Creek.    It is about 14 miles from a point on the
Trans-Provincial Highway, 5 miles east of Nelson.    During 1939 a
crew of seven men was engaged in clearing out old workings and in surface-stripping
on the Barnett vein.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 7, 1940.]
AlNSWORTH.
Company office, 404 Title and Trust Building, Portland, Oregon;   Brit-
Scranton Consoli- ish Columbia office, Ainsworth, B.C.    Ben W. Scott, President;   S. 0.
dated Mining Co. Griffith,   Secretary.    Capital:    650,000   shares,   no   par   value.    The
Scranton, at the head of Woodbury Creek, about 10 miles from the
Nelson-Kaslo Highway, is operated by the company, with R. B. Mahon in charge.    A
complete small mining plant has been installed.    This equipment, together with sufficient camp and mine supplies to operate all winter on a one-shift basis, have been
packed into the mine by horses from the Main Kaslo Highway.    A contract for at least
600 feet of drifting, in which five men will participate, has been let.    A total of 275 feet
of drifting was done before the end of the year.
Silverton.
This property, situated on Memphis Creek, about 5 miles from Slocan
Batchelor.       City, was operated under lease by F. R. Jancowski and associates; four
men being engaged in underground work with hand-steel. About
three-quarters of a mile of go-devil trail from the mine to the main Slocan Highway
was built by the operators. Not much development-work was done, but 10 tons of ore,
mined and shipped to Trail, yielded 5 oz. of gold and 436 oz. of silver.
This property, owned by F. Fingland, of Silverton, is near the head of
L.H. L.H. Creek, about 5 miles from Silverton.    It was operated under lease
for several months by A. H. W. Crossley, R. Rowe, Dr. Borden, and
associates, of Nelson. From three to five men, with two working underground, were
employed during the summer months. A short 2-bucket tram was built to connect the
portal of No. 2 adit with the road and a compressed-air unit installed. Not much
development-work was done, but 216 tons of ore was mined and hauled 3 miles to the
old Silverton-Slocan City road by tractor and from there to Trail by truck. This ore
yielded 111 oz. of gold and 61 oz. of silver.
NELSON AREA.
This property, about 6 miles south of Nelson, above the Perrier mine,
Catherine.       was operated under lease by G. and L. Gormley and N. Norris, of
Nelson.    Hand-steel only was used.    A total of 26 tons of ore was
mined and shipped to Trail, yielding 29 oz. of gold and 68 oz. of silver.
Company office, 700 Insurance Building, Seattle.    G. L. Covingham,
General Lee      President;   George W. Barker, Secretary;   Sarkis Terzian, Manager.
Mining and      The company owns the Euphrates mine at Hall Siding, about 11 miles
Milling Co., Inc.  south of Nelson, on the Nelson-Salmo Highway.    It was operated for
a short time near the first of the year by leasers, a maximum of sixteen
men being engaged at one time, three of whom were on the company pay-roll.    The
company operated the water-driven compressor and sold compressed air to the leasers.
Very little development-work was done.    Ore totalling 77 tons, mined and shipped to
Trail, yielded 35 oz. of gold and 352 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.] A 80 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Toad Mountain.
Company  office,  404 Hastings  Street West, Vancouver,  B.C.    J.  Y.
Daylight Gold    Carter, President; C. L. A. Lietze, Secretary-Treasurer; W. G. Norrie-
Mines, Ltd.      Loewenthal, Managing Director.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents
par.    This company had under option the Daylight and Victoria-Jessie
properties on Toad Mountain, south-west of Nelson.    A development programme, commenced in 1938, was concluded in September, 1939, and all machinery and supplies
removed to Nelson for storage.    Development-work was done in the Victoria-Jessie
adit and in sinking on the Daylight.    A crew of twelve to eighteen men was employed.
A total of 200 tons of ore was shipped to Trail, yielding 70 oz. of gold and 54 oz. of
silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property, just east of the Daylight group, is owned by C. Riley,
Irene. of Nelson, and is operated under lease by M. and N. Rolick, who also
hold an option to purchase.    This option includes the adjoining Great
Eastern and Great Western.    Hand-steel only was used.    A total of 17 tons of ore,
shipped to Trail, yielded 8 oz. of gold and 11 oz. of silver.
This property is owned by Mrs. Wilson, of Nelson, B.C., and was oper-
California.      ated desultorily during the year by several groups of leasers.    Not
more than four men were engaged in this work at any one time.   Power
was supplied by a small gasoline-driven compressor.    A total of 131 tons of ore, shipped
to Trail, yielded 188 oz. of gold and 292 oz. of silver.
These properties on Morning Mountain, just north of Toad Mountain,
Venus-Juno.     are owned by R. Heddle, of Nelson.    They were operated spasmodically
during the year by several groups of leasers using hand-steel.    A total
of 192 tons of ore, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded 221 oz. of gold and 408 oz. of
silver. TT        _,
Hall Creek.
Baltic.—This prospect was operated by H. Erickson, of Nelson, who did a small
amount of development-work with hand-steel.
This property, adjoining the Fern mine, was operated by a local syndi-
Bear. cate with P. H. Russell, of Nelson, as secretary.    Three miles of new
road was constructed from the main Hall Creek Road to the mine. A
maximum of seven men, with three underground, were employed under the supervision of Lafe McLellan. Development-work included 45 feet of drifting, 15 feet of
crosscutting, and 30 feet of surface-trenching. In addition, a new low-level crosscut-
adit was advanced 45 feet, and 28 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail, yielding
13 oz. of gold and 21 oz. of silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property is owned and operated by Mike Herman and associates,
Canadian Belle,   who worked it intermittently,  employing a maximum of four men,
doing some trenching and underground-work.    A total of 17 tons of
ore was mined and shipped to the customs mill at Granite Siding.    The concentrates,
shipped to Trail, yielded 10 oz. of gold and 9 oz. of silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
The new road to the Bear group passes this property and provides a
Fern. means of trucking ore from it.    The mine is owned by C. E. and L. R.
Hawley, of Spokane, and operated under lease by H. Frocklage, J. E.
Cummins, and J. E. Logan, of Nelson. Hand-steel only was used. Stoping was confined to removing remnants of ore left in the stopes and pillars by former operators.
Ore totalling 20 tons, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded 28 oz. of gold and 11 oz. of
Eagle Creek.
Company office, 521 Central Building, Seattle, Wash.    H. R.  Smith,
Livingstone      President and Manager;   R. W. Hutchison, Secretary.    This company
Mining Co., Inc.  owns and operates the Granite-Poorman on Eagle Creek, near Blewett,
B.C.    The property was operated continuously throughout the year. PROGRESS NOTES. A 81
From sixteen to twenty men were employed, with from eight to twelve working underground. In addition to the company operations, several groups of leasers worked
different parts of the mine. Practically all the ore mined by the leasers as well as that
from the company operations was treated in the customs mill at Granite Siding. Concentrates produced were shipped to Trail. Development-work by the company included
400 feet of drifting and 175 feet of raising. A total of 1,296 tons shipped yielded
719 oz. of gold and 255 oz. of silver.
Company office, Nelson, B.C.    D.  H.  Norcross,  President and Mine
Venango Gold    Manager;   J. A. Cullinane, Secretary-Treasurer.    The company owns
Mines, Ltd.      and operates the Venango, on the west side of Eagle Creek, adjoining
the Granite-Poorman.    Five men were employed throughout the year,
all working underground on occasions.    The shaft was sunk 120 feet and 400 feet of
stripping by ground-sluicing was done to trace the vein.    A new adit 294 feet below
other workings was started.    In all, 280 feet of drifting and 225 feet of crosscutting
was done.    A total of 512 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded
240 oz. of gold and 346 oz. of silver.
Sitkum Creek.
Company  office,   415  Baker  Street,   Nelson,   B.C.    James  B.   Curtis,
Alpine Gold,     President;   Barbara O'Neil, Secretary.    Capital:   500,000 shares, 50
Ltd. (N.P.L.).     cents par.    The property lies between 6,500 and 7,000 feet elevation at
the head of Sitkum Creek, about 9 miles from a point on the Nelson-
Kaslo Highway, 8 miles north-east of Nelson.    It is equipped with a Diesel-driven
mining plant and 50-ton flotation plant.    The concentrator is about 1 mile below the
mine and is connected to it with a high-speed 2-bucket Riblet tram.    Development-work
included 600 feet of drifting and 700 feet of crosscutting.    The concentrator was put
in operation on December 10th.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
This property, about 1% miles below the Alpine, is owned and operated
King Solomon    by T. L. Paris and A. D. Papazian, of Nelson.    This year a go-devil
Group. road was constructed from the main Alpine road to the mine, a dis
tance of about three-quarters of a mile. A maximum of four men were
employed and hand-steel only was used. Ore totalling 19 tons was mined and shipped
to Trail.    This yielded 13 oz. of gold and 17 oz. of silver.
This property, adjoining the Alpine, is owned by Mrs. Anna Belle Rad-
Gold Crown.     cliffe, of Nelson, and was operated under lease by S. Reese, Malcolm
Smith, and E. Sheldrith.     Hand-steel only was used and most of the
ore came from surface cuts and trenches.    A total of 3 tons, shipped to Trail, yielded
2 oz. of gold and 2 oz. of silver.
Ymir.
This property, situated on Ymir (Wildhorse) Creek, at the junction of
Colorado.       Huckleberry Creek (North Fork), is operated by a local syndicate composed of J. D. Ferguson, W. Griffiths, A. Holstrom, and S. Curwin,
with J. D. Ferguson as manager.    The mine was operated continuously until October,
employing three to four men, and development-work included 60 feet of raising and 100
feet of drifting.    No ore was shipped.
Company office, 333y2 Riverside Drive, Spokane, Wash.;   mine office,
Maple Leaf Gold  Ymir,  B.C.    Ernest  H.  Carlson,  President;    Elizabeth  L.  Johnston,
Mining Co., Inc.   Secretary - Treasurer;   J.  D.  Ferguson,  Mine  Manager.    Capital:
2,000,000  shares,  1  cent par;   issued,  348,964,  of which  10,221  are
pooled.    This company is operating the Ymir Commodore mine on Wildhorse Creek.
The mine was closed down from February to October.    Three men, all working underground, did 250 feet of drifting and 250 feet of diamond-drilling was done;   no ore
was shipped.
The company also has an option on the Porcupine group, owned by E. P. Hauke-
dahl. Development included 160 feet of drifting and 60 feet of crosscutting, all by
hand-steel; no ore was shipped.    In addition, 1,300 feet of tractor-road was built.
6 A 82 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Company office, 704 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Ymir Consolidated Ymir,  B.C.    R.  C.  McCorkell,  President;    T.   G.   Cowan,  Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd. Treasurer;   G. G. Sullivan, Mine Manager.    Capital:   1,500,000 preferred shares, no par value;   2,500,000 common shares, no par value.
Issued, 2,159,453 common shares.    This company owns and operates the Goodenough
mine on Elise Mountain.
The mine was operated continuously throughout the year, but, owing to lack of ore,
the mill was closed down on August 13th. The crew varied from a total of thirty-three
men with twenty-one underground, while both mine and mill were running, to a development crew of twenty-one with fourteen underground after the mill closed down. In
addition two to four leasers were engaged in mining ore from the old upper workings.
Toward the latter part of the summer a new low level was started. Development-work
included 2,646 feet of drifting, 535 feet of crosscutting, 459 feet of raising, and 1,219
feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 8,345 tons of ore was milled during the year. The
concentrates from this yielded 3,401 oz. of gold, 25,063 oz. of silver, and 505,967 lb. of
lead. In addition, 754 tons of crude ore shipped to Trail yielded 501 oz. of gold, 3,383
oz. of silver, and 66,354 lb. of lead.
This company also owns the Ymir mine, adjoining the Goodenough. The Ymir was
operated continuously throughout the year by two leasers with hand-steel. A total of
347 tons of ore was recovered from the dumps, surface-cuts, and underground workings.
This was shipped crude to Trail and contents are indicated in figures above.
Company office, 525 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Ymir-Yankee Girl Ymir,   B.C.    E.   P.   Crawford,   President;    R.   B.   Lamb,   Managing
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Director;   W. A. Sutton,  Secretary-Treasurer;   L. G.  Morrell, Mine
Manager.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, no par value;   issued, 2,225,005.
The company owns and operates the Yankee Girl mine on Bear Creek, 3 miles from
Ymir.    The property is equipped with a 100- to 140-ton combination flotation-cyanide
plant.
The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year. A total of about
ninety men were employed, with sixty working underground. In addition, an average
of nineteen leasers were engaged in recovering ore from pillars and remnants of stopes
as well as dumps and spill from the tramway. All this ore was purchased by the company on a basis of its gold content and treated in the mill. Attempts to discover new
ore-bodies have, on the whole, been unsuccessful, and the present policy is to recover all
the ore left chiefly in pillars, as cheaply as possible, before abandoning the mine.
Development-work included 653 feet of drifting, 469 feet of crosscutting, 2,193 feet of
raising, and 2,163 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 47,317 tons of ore was broken,
6,855 tons of this being supplied by the leasers. A total of 47,219 tons of ore was
treated in the mill, this being an increase of 10 per cent, over previous years. Total
production for the year was 12,594 oz. of gold, 76,351 oz. of silver, 1,031,294 lb. of lead,
and 677,469 lb. of zinc.
Salmo.
Company   office,   616   Stock   Exchange   Building,   Vancouver,   B.C.
Clubine-Comstock Charles F. Hunter, Secretary.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, 50 cents
Gold Mines, Ltd. par.    The   company   owns   and   operates   the   Clubine-Comstock   on
Boulder Creek, about 4 miles north of Salmo.    The property was operated continuously throughout the year, employing a total of seven men, with four underground.    Development-work included 152 feet of drifting, 12 feet of crosscutting, and
577 feet of raising.    A total of 711 tons of ore, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded
578 oz. of gold and 1,483 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part E.]
Lucky Strike.—Located near Rosebud Lake, about 10 miles south of Salmo.    Late in
the year a lease was taken on this property by G. H. Blaney and associates, of Nelson.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part E.] Sheep Creek.
Company office, 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office, Sheep
Kootenay Belle   Creek,  B.C.    Jonathan Rogers,  President;   J. A.  Clarke,  Secretary-
Gold Mines, Ltd. Treasurer;  Vere McDowall, Mine Manager.    Capital:   750,000 shares,
50 cents par;  issued, 675,200.    The property is on Sheep Creek, about
10 miles by road from Salmo.    It is equipped with a mining plant and 120-ton cyanide
plant.
The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year, employing from 142
to 164 men, with from 112 to 127 underground. A vertical shaft was sunk from the
6 level (formerly called the No. 4 adit) and two levels opened up below this. At the
end of the year a large proportion of the ore milled was being drawn from below the
6 level, mining above this being mainly in the nature of salvage. Considerable development-work was also done on the Dixie vein, across Sheep Creek from the main workings.
This vein was intersected after crosscutting some 1,400 feet and is now being developed
by raises and sub-level drifts.
Company office, 525 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office, Salmo,
Reno Gold       B.C.    K. G. Nairn, President;   W. A.  Sutton, Secretary-Treasurer;
Mines, Ltd.      W. S. Ellis, General Superintendent.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, $1
par;   issued, 1,880,000.    The company owns the Reno, Motherlode, and
Nugget mines and the Bluestone prospect, all lying between Sheep and Nugget Creeks,
about 10 miles from Salmo.
Milling ceased about March 15th, when ore reserves in the Reno mine were almost
exhausted. Twenty-two feet of drifting, 14 feet of crosscuts, and 1,002 feet of
diamond-drilling was done in the Reno mine. Development was continued in the old
Motherlode mine, the new 4,900 adit being extended 1,172 feet to intersect the Mother-
lode vein, on which 1,893 feet of drifting, 241 feet of crosscutting, 254 feet of raising,
and 66 feet of slashing was done. A crosscut from this level was driven 1,376 feet
toward the Nugget vein. The 4,900 level was connected to the mill with a 2,000-foot
2-bucket Riblet tram. A new bunk-house and dry were built and the concentrator
thoroughly overhauled. Development was also done on the Bluestone, consisting of
1,150 feet of drifting, 196 feet of crosscutting, 13 feet of raising, and 1,255 feet of
diamond-drilling. A complete 40-man camp was built and the old Reno tram cut and
a new terminal built. The number of men employed varied from forty to 107. A total
of 16,421 tons of ore was treated and yielded 7,206 oz. of gold and 2,650 oz. of silver.
The Nugget mine was operated continuously throughout the year by two leasers
with'hand-steel. A total of 1,245 tons of ore was mined and shipped direct to Trail.
This yielded 1,075 oz. of gold and 796 oz. of silver.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Gold Belt Mining office,   Sheep  Creek,  B.C.    A.  E.  Jukes,  President;    Jas.  Anderson,
Co., Ltd.        Secretary-Treasurer;  H. E. Doelle, Mine Manager.    Capital:  3,000,000
shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 2,535,000.    The property is on Sheep
Creek, adjoining the Reno and about 14% miles from Salmo.    It is equipped with a
mining plant and 150-ton cyanide plant.    Development-work included 4,704 feet of
drifting, 1,051 feet of crosscutting, 1,501 feet of raising, and 345 feet of diamond-
drilling.    A total of 57,838 tons of ore was mined and milled and the bullion yielded
16,569 oz. of gold and 6,158 oz. of silver.    One hundred and fifteen men were employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part E.]
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine
Sheep Creek     office, Sheep Creek, B.C.    R. W. Bruhn, President;   Jas. Anderson,
Gold Mines, Ltd.  Secretary-Treasurer;   H. E. Doelle, General Superintendent and Managing  Director.    Capital:   2,000,000  shares,  50  cents par;    issued,
1,875,000.    The company owns and operates the Queen mine on Waldie Creek, a tributary of Sheep Creek.    It has options on adjoining properties.    The Queen mine is
equipped with a complete mining plant and 150-ton cyanide plant.    Development on the
Queen mine included 3,980 feet of drifting, 4,437 feet of crosscutting, 647 feet of
raising, and 1,022 feet of diamond-drilling. A crosscut is being driven from the 5 level in the Queen toward the Ore Hill, held
under option; 550 feet of trenching and 191 feet of crosscutting being done on this
property. Development on the Midnight included 492 feet of drifting, 225 feet of
crosscutting, and 125 feet of diamond-drilling. Development on the Bonanza, held
under option from C. Donaldson, of Salmo, included 676 feet of drifting, 216 feet of
crosscutting, and 60 feet of trenching. A total of 55,558 tons of ore was treated,
yielding 27,750 oz. of gold and 10,116 oz. of silver. One hundred and fifteen men were
employed.
Erie Creek.
Company office, 626 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Relief-Arlington  Erie, B.C.    Bert F. Smith, President and Managing Director;   D. G.
Mines, Ltd.      Marshall, Secretary-Treasurer;   S. M. Manning, General Superintendent.    Capital:  3,000,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 3,000,000.    The company is controlled by Premier Gold Mining Company, Limited, which holds 1,530,000
shares.    The company owns and operates the Relief mine on Erie Creek, 13 miles by
road from Erie.    The property is equipped with mining plant and 75-ton cyanide plant.
The mine and mill operated continuously throughout the year, employing an average of
122 men.    The ore is hand-sorted, about one-third being rejected, before being treated.
Development-work in the mine included 1,726 feet of drifting, 475 feet of cross-
cutting, 1,326 feet of raising, and 214 feet of sinking.    The main shaft was put down
to the 11th level, 200 feet below the 10th.    Across Erie Creek 1,015 feet of drifting,
260 feet of crosscutting, 66 feet of sinking, and 257 feet of surface-trenching was done
on the Inez vein, and 137 feet of crosscutting and 137 feet of raising on the Rand vein.
A total of 51,700 tons of ore was mined and 31,498 tons milled.    The bullion produced
yielded 14,758 oz. of gold and 2,557 oz. of silver.    In addition, refinery slag and amalgam yielded 139 oz. of gold and 1,126 oz. of silver.
This property, owned by E. Ballanger, of Salmo, and operated under
Harriett.        lease by S. Curwin and associates, is situated on Craigtown (East Fork
of Erie) Creek, about 3 miles from the road to the Second Relief. Four
men were employed underground, using hand-steel until late in the year, when a small
gasoline-driven compressor was installed. In addition to about 40 feet of sinking and
considerable open-cut work, a new low-level adit is being driven to give about 90 feet
of added depth on the vein. About 1% miles of truck-road from the Second Relief road
was also completed. A total of 35 tons of ore, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded
57 oz. of gold and 11 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property on  Keystone  Mountain was  operated under lease by
Keystone.       W. S. Harris and associates for a short time during the summer.   Work
was confined to sorting and shipping from the old dumps, although it is
understood that the winze underground was dewatered for sampling and examination.
A total of 111 tons of ore, shipped to Trail, yielded 43 oz. of gold, 143 oz. of silver, 3,193
lb. of lead, and 2,623 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated on Keystone Mountain, 3 miles north of Erie,
Arlington.       is owned by Relief-Arlington Mines, Limited, and is leased to Roger
Osearson, of Spokane. Thirteen men were employed under the supervision of A. J. Johnson. Hand-steel only was used and development included 141 feet
of drifting, 77 feet of crosscutting, 535 feet of raising, and reconditioning of 530 feet
of drifts and 20 feet of raises in the old workings. A total of 783 tons of ore shipped
to Trail yielded 1,193 oz. gold, 2,247 oz. silver, and 41,548 lb. lead.
Company office, Baker Street,  Nelson,  B.C.;   mine office, Erie, B.C.
Law-Mac Mines, Roderick J. Mackay, President; Leonard Hayman, Secretary-Treasurer;
Ltd. R. J. Mackay, Mine Manager.    Capital:  200,000 shares, 50 cents par;
issued, 105,990. This company's property, on the Salmo-Trail Road,
near Erie, was operated for a short time during the summer and about 60 feet of underground work done. A maximum of seven men were employed with three underground.
A small Ingersoll-Rand portable compressor was used. Ore totalling 14 tons, mined
and shipped to Trail, yielded 1 oz. of gold and 28 oz. of silver. PROGRESS NOTES. A 85
Pend-d'Oreille River.
Company office, 675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.    Harry Burns,
Waneta Gold     President and Managing Director; Eric P. Dawson, Secretary.   Capital:
Mines, Ltd.      1,500,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The company owns the Bunker Hill,
on Limpid  (16-Mile)  Creek, longitude 117° 23', latitude 49° 3', and
leased it to James Grant, Jack Pendray, and Duke Hurd.    A total of 45 tons was mined
by hand-steel and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 8 oz. of gold and 8 oz. of silver.    The
operation ceased in May and late in the autumn the small mining plant was removed
from the property and sold.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part E.]
SOUTH KOOTENAY LAKE AREA.
Company office,  308 Pacific Building, Vancouver,  B.C.;   mine office,
Bayonne Consoli- Bayonne, B.C.    W. C. Ditmars, President;   H. T. Wilson, Secretary-
dated Mines, Ltd. Treasurer;  John Broatch, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,500,000 shares,
no par value;   issued, 2,500,000.    The company owns and operates the
Bayonne mine on Summit Creek, 23 miles by road from Tye.    The property is equipped
with a mining plant and a 50-ton cyanide plant.
During 1939 a development campaign was undertaken in an attempt to locate new
ore-bodies in the same general areas from which the former production was made.
During the early part of the summer hand-steel was used but, later, part of the power
plant was put in operation and compressed air used for development. Development-
work included 335 feet of crosscutting and 666 feet of surface-trenching. The mill and
power plant have not been dismantled and could be put in operation at short notice
should a supply of ore become available. Some clean-up material from the old workings
was washed and concentrated by placer methods. A total of 114 tons yielded 516 oz. of
gold and 1,514 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
This property, owned and operated by R. M. and K. K. Laib, of Bayonne,
Spokane Group. B.C., is on Wall Mountain, 18 miles by road from Tye. Five men were
employed for the greater part of the year, with three working underground. Surface construction undertaken this year includes a 1,750-foot 2-bucket
jig-back tram from the lowest adit-portal and 1,500 feet of new road to connect the
lower tram-terminal with the main Bayonne road. A truck of 5 tons capacity was
also purchased. Very little development-work was done, but 16.8 tons of ore, shipped
from the dumps and underground workings, yielded 96 oz. of gold, 2,467 oz. of silver,
and 68,986 lb. of lead.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part E.]
CRANBROOK AREA.
This property, beside the highway near Aldridge, is owned by John
Midway Mine.    Leask, of Cranbrook.    Towards the end of 1939, George Whitehead, of
Moyie, took a lease on it and shipped a car-load of ore.    Development-
work done to date consists of an adit about 1,400 feet in length, a " stope raise " started
near the portal, and a small winze.    Recent operations were carried on near the mine
entrance.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1934, Part E.]
ROSSLAND AREA.
Mount Roberts.
This property is owned by Mrs. Laura Gilmour, of Rossland, and oper-
Midnight.       ated under lease and bond by B. A. Lins and associates.    Four men,
with two working underground, were engaged throughout the year.
Development-work included 150 feet of drifting. In addition, 1,500 square feet of
timber crib and 600 feet of riprap was built on the surface.    Compressed air was used underground.    A total of 60 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 902 oz. of
gold and 189 oz. of silver.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1935, Part E.]
This property is operated under lease by John Hendrickson and asso-
O.K. ciates,  of Rossland.    Hand-steel  only was used by the three men
working underground.    Late in 1939 the leasers opened up an area on
the O.K., which was accessible only through the No. 3 level of the I.X.L.    A total of
24 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 47 oz. of gold and 32 oz. of silver.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1935, Part E.]
This property was operated first by the I.X.L. Leasers, with K. Jorgen-
I.X.L. sen in charge,  and later by K.  Jorgensen and associates under a
separate lease.    No development was done by the I.X.L. Leasers, but
Jorgensen and associates plan to reopen some of the old workings.    A total of 119 tons
of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 99 oz. of gold and 50 oz. of silver.    In addition, a lease on the dumps was held by Alex. Malcolm and associates.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1935, Part E.]
This property is owned by Mrs. M. D. McKinnon, of Beverley Hills, Cal.
Gold Drip.       It was operated under lease by S. J. Hackney and partner.    Some of
the old workings have been reopened.    A total of 6 tons of ore mined
and shipped to Trail yielded 1 oz. of gold and 14 oz. of silver.
Company office, 8655 West Marginal Way, Seattle, Wash.;  mine office,
Velgo Mining,    Rossland,   B.C.    Arch   Wilson,   Secretary - Treasurer   and   Manager.
Inc. Capital:   40,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 30,153.    The company owns
the Velvet mine, on the Cascade Highway, 13 miles west of Rossland,
which was operated under lease by the Velvet Leasing Syndicate, consisting of Harold
Elmes, Renaldo Bielli, and Ole Osing, of Rossland, with Ole Osing in charge of mining
operations. The mine and mill were operated continuously for the greater part of the
year, employing an average of twenty men, with from eight to ten working underground. Development-work included 50 feet of drifting, 50 feet of crosscutting, 350
feet of raising, and 250 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 7,000 tons of ore was
mined and milled and the product, a gold-copper concentrate, was shipped to Tacoma.
This yielded 1,462 oz. of gold, 1,016 oz. of silver, and 192,768 lb. of copper. In addition
two cars of crude ore were shipped to Tacoma.
HOPE AREA.
Northwest Ventures, Ltd.—This company was operating the Aufeas mine, on the lower
slopes of Silver Peak, 3 miles from Hope. Stoping operations were being carried out
from a single drift.    There were two stopes.    About fifteen men were employed.
SQUAMISH AREA.
Company office,  602  Hastings  Street West, Vancouver,  B.C.    T.  G.
Ashloo Gold     McConville, President;   K. T. Robinson, Secretary;   Chas. T. White,
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer;   W. V. Smitheringale, Mine Manager.    Capital:   1,000,000
shares, $1 par;   issued, 735,005.    The company owns and operates the
Ashloo mine, on Ashlu Creek, 28 miles by road and trail from Squamish.    Some development-work was done on the 1,000 level and stoping was carried on from the 1,100 level
up to the surface.    The mine closed down early in October.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1935, Part F.]
TEXADA ISLAND.
Company office, 1604 Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Gem Gold Mines, Vananda, B.C.    Ralph A. Logan, President;   R. E. Logan, Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;  W. J. Sclater, Mine Manager.    Capital:  2,000,000 shares,
$1 par;   issued,  1,669,628.    The company owns the Gem mine on
Texada Island, 5 miles from Blubber Bay.    A new 2-compartment shaft has been sunk
to the 250-foot level, and crosscutting has commenced to cut the Nos. 1 and 2 veins,
which were met on the 150-foot level of the old shaft.    Fourteen men are employed. PROGRESS NOTES. A 87
Company office, 325 Standard Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Seccondee Mines, office, Vananda, B.C.   John Morgan, Secretary.    Capital: 50,000 shares,
Ltd. $1 par;   company in voluntary liquidation   (February,  1940).    The
company was operating the old Marjorie property on Texada Island.
They were dewatering a shaft which is about 120 feet deep and had about 60 feet of
this shaft dewatered.    An inclined drift from the surface enters this shaft about 50
feet down and some ore has been stripped from this drift.    No other work has been
done.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Zeballos.
Company office, 606 Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C.;   mine
Privateer Mine,   office, Zeballos, B.C.    D. S. Tait, President; W. P. Marchant, Secretary-
Ltd. Treasurer;  T. W. Murray, Mine Manager.   Capital:  2,500,000 shares,
no par value;   issued, 2,454,080.    The company operates the Privateer
mine, in Spud Valley, 4 miles by road from Zeballos.    The property is equipped with a
75- to 85-ton amalgamation and cyanide mill.    Stoping has been carried out on all the
levels from the 1,100 level up to the 600 level.    On the 900 and 800 levels crosscuts were
driven to the No. 2 vein and drifting commenced on these levels on the No. 2 vein.    A
3-compartment shaft is being sunk from the 1,100 level and was down 128 feet at the
end of the year.    Preparations were being made to start the 1,200 level off this shaft.
During the year there has been 128 feet of sinking done, 850 feet of crosscutting, 1,611
feet of drifting, 1,075 feet of raising, and 4,126 feet of diamond-drilling.    A little over
130 men are regularly employed.
The company also operates the Prident mine adjoining the Privateer. Two levels
—the 200 and 400 levels—have been opened up and a raise connecting these levels has
been completed. Formerly the ore from this property was shipped to Tacoma; it is
now put through the Privateer mill.
[Reference: Lode Gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office, 1001 Federal Building, Toronto;   mine office, Zeballos,
Mount Zeballos   B.C.    F. M. Connell, President;   A. Cockeram, Secretary-Treasurer;
Gold Mines, Ltd. W. S. Hamilton, Mine Manager.    Capital:   1,500,000 shares, $1 par;
issued, 1,100,000.    The company operates the Mount Zeballos mine, on
the west side of Spud Creek.    There are four levels—1,900, 1,800, 1,600, and 1,500—all
started from the surface.    Stoping is being carried out on the 1,800, 1,600, and 1,500
levels, shrinkage and cut-and-fill methods being used.    A 35- to 50-ton mill was built in
1939, amalgamation-flotation type, and is in operation.    The ore is brought to the mill
from the mine on an inclined tramway.    Sixty-five men are employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Company office, 814 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
White Star      Zeballos, B.C.    R. P. Stockton, President; Marion Metchen, Secretary;
Mine, Ltd.      T. D. Pickard, Manager.    Capital:  200,000 shares, $1 par.    The company operates the White Star, on Spud Creek, adjoining the Privateer.
During the year 780 feet of drifting on the Nos. 1 and 2 veins has been done and 24
feet of raising.    Two stopes have been started and about 360 tons of ore has been
shipped to Tacoma smelter.    An overhead tram-line brings the ore from the mine to the
highway, where it is trucked to the wharf.
[Reference: Lode Gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office, 703 Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.; mine office,
Spud Valley Gold Zeballos,  B.C.    P.   F.  Knight,   President;    J.  R.   Pyper,   Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer;   W. Elliott, Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,500,000 shares, $1
par;  issued, 2,100,000.    The company operates the Spud Valley mine,
in Spud Valley, 7 miles from Zeballos, B.C.   The claims extend across the ridge between
Spud Creek and Gold Valley Creek.    A great deal of development-work has been carried
out during the year.    In all, five tunnels are operating, Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, and the
Roper tunnel.    Most of the work has been done on what is known as the Goldfield vein,
with a certain amount of drifting on the Spud vein, which intersects the main vein on
each of the levels.    The Roper tunnel is on the same elevation as No. 4 tunnel and is being driven from the Gold Valley side of the property. Stoping is being carried out
on all levels from the No. 4 level up. The mill is the amalgamation-flotation type and
is handling from 60 to 70 tons per day. The total tonnage milled during the year
amounted to 20,950 tons.    Eighty men are employed.
[Reference:  Lode Gold Deposits, Zeballos Area, 1938.]
Company office,  815 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Central Zeballos office, Zeballos, B.C.    A. J. Hendrey, President;   R. R. Steeves, Secre-
Gold Mines, Ltd.  tary-Treasurer;    N.  F.  Brooke,  Mine Manager.    Capital:   2,500,000
shares,   $1  par;    issued,   1,450,000.    Reno   Gold   Mines,   Limited,   in
March,  1939, acquired a 40-per-cent. interest in the company for financing $30,000
development-work.    Active development-work has been carried out since.    There has
been 943 feet of drifting, 344 feet of crosscutting, 95.5 feet of raising, 100 feet of
sinking, and 1,504 feet of diamond-drilling.    Most of this development-work has been
carried out in the lower west drift.    A 25- to 40-ton mill was built and was ready for
operation by the end of 1939.    A power plant developing a total of 235 horse-power has
been built and a new road has been built into this property.    Forty-nine men are
employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part F.]
Alberni.
Company office, Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C.;   mine office,
Havilah Gold     Port Alberni, B.C.    J. A. Burchett, President;   D. S. Tait, Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer;  J. P. Murray, Mine Manager.    Capital:  2,000,000 shares,
no par value;   issued, 1,620,000.    The Havilah mine is at an elevation
of 3,800 feet, at the headwaters of McQuillan Creek, a tributary of China Creek, 14
miles south-west of Port Alberni.    Prospecting and development-work was begun in
the early part of July, 1938, and continued steadily until August, 1939, when all operations were  suspended.    During this period,  in  addition to a diamond-drilling programme, the principal work consisted of 1,822 feet of drifting, 50 feet of crosscutting,
and 200 feet of raising on the Gillespie vein, in the course of which 1,038 tons of ore
was mined and hauled by truck a distance of 15 miles to Port Alberni and then shipped
to Tacoma smelter for treatment.    An average of eighteen men was employed.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part F.]
Company office, Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C.    R. A. Pitre,
United Prospec-   General Manager.    Capital:   100,000 shares, no par value.    The com-
tors, Ltd.  ,     pany owns the Thistle mine, at an elevation of 2,500 feet, on the headwaters of the North Fork of Franklin River, and reached by means of
an old logging-railway grade, a distance of 12 miles, between Underwood Cove, on the
banks of the Alberni Canal, and the mine.    Some surface work was done from September to November, inclusive, in 1938;   this was confined to cleaning over the old
dumps, from which 80 tons of ore was sacked and shipped.    Operations were resumed
in April and continued right through to the end of the year, with a crew of fourteen
men employed.    All work was of the open-cut and " glory-hole " method of mining, and
1,840 tons of ore was produced and hauled by trucks and shipped to the Tacoma smelter
for treatment.
These claims, owned and operated by Walter Harris, of Port Alberni,
Red Panther and  are located at an elevation of 2,900 feet on the headwaters of the West
Black Panther.    Fork of the Nitinat River, and are reached by a good pack-trail, 2 miles
in length, connecting with the truck-road at the Thistle mine.    A crew
of four men  was  engaged  constructing the  trail  and  prospecting  during  October,
November, and part of December.    Some drifting and crosscutting was done on both
claims, but no shipments of ore were made.    Two roomy log cabins provide suitable
accommodation for the men engaged at this property.
Company office, 602 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.    Victor
Vancouver Island MacLean,   Secretary - Treasurer;    A.   Kurtzahls,   Manager.    Capital:
Gold Mines, Ltd.  4,500,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The company's property is at an elevation of 2,700 feet on Mineral Creek, a tributary of China Creek, and is reached by following the Alberni Pacific Lumber Company's old logging grade for a
distance of 9 miles from Port Alberni and then by a caterpillar trail 2 miles in length
to the mine. After having been closed down since September, 1936, work was resumed
in the early part of July, 1939, and continued until October 31st, with a crew of four
men engaged in cleaning up and repairing the lower and upper Mac adits and also doing
some stoping in the 279 raise. Some open-cutting and drifting was done on the south
Mac vein prior to the suspension of operations at the end of October. Forty-eight tons
of ore was shipped to the Tacoma smelter for treatment, yielding 34 oz. of gold. Following the stoppage of work by the company, G. Moffatt undertook to operate under a
lease on a small scale for the balance of the year.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part F.]
Nanaimo.
Company office, Room 10, Herald Building.    F. A. Whitehouse, Secre-
Nanoose Bay     tary and Manager.    Capital:   50,000 shares, $1 par.    The company is
Gold Mines, Ltd. developing a gold prospect, approximately 20 miles north of Nanaimo,
within a quarter of a mile from the main Island Highway.    The
prospect-shaft on this property was sunk a further 30 feet, making a total depth of
60 feet.    Work was suspended in November.
GOLD-COPPER DEPOSITS.
KAMLOOPS AREA.
This property, consisting of nine Crown-granted claims and fractions,
Copper King     owned   by   Baroness   Sartorio,   of   Kamloops,   and   under   option   to
Group. James T. McKelvie and brothers, of Grand Forks, is 16 miles west of
Kamloops and adjoins the highway on the north side of Cherry Creek.
The property is equipped with a 35-ton mill and at mid-December was operating two
weeks a month with a crew of seven men. During 1939 a total of 4,140 tons of ore was
milled and yielded 367 oz. of gold, 730 oz. of silver, and 108,140 lb. of copper. In addition, 36 tons of ore was shipped to Tacoma. A report on this property may be obtained
from the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C.; cost, 25 cents.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1935, Part D.]
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Company office,  208 Yorkshire Building,  525 Seymour Street, Van-
Red Buck Mines, couver,  B.C.    R.  J.   G.  Richards,   President;    Allan  A.  Drummond,
Ltd. Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:   2,500,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The
Red Buck mine is 11 miles south of Princeton, on the west side of the
Similkameen River, longitude 120° 34', latitude 49° 19', about iy2 miles north of the
Copper Mountain main adit. The mine is reached by a winding trail down the side of
the mountain from the Hope-Princeton Highway to the river-bank, where the mine
camp and surface plant are located.
During 1938 a 100-ton flotation mill was installed on the opposite side of the river
from the mine and near the branch of the Kettle Valley Railway that runs to the coarse
crushing plant of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company,
Limited, at Copper Mountain. The mine is connected to the concentrator by an aerial
tramway. The concentrator went into operation during the latter part of 1938, and,
after operating a short time, all work at the mill ceased during the early part of 1939.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part Dr] A 90 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
VANCOUVER ISLAND AREA.
Company  office,   640  Pender  Street West,  Vancouver,  B.C.    James
Sheep Creek Gold Anderson, Secretary;   F. Hemsworth, Manager.    Capital:   2,000,000
Mines, Ltd.      shares, 50 cents par.    This company acquired the old Tyee and Lenora
mines from Tyee Consolidated Mining Company, Limited, and commenced development-work on December 7th.    The properties are on Mount Sicker,
15 miles by road from Duncan.    A crew of five men commenced cleaning up and repairing the Lenora No. 2 adit and part of the Tyee workings.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
Phoenix.
This property at Phoenix is owned by Robert Forshaw and operated
Brooklyn.       under lease by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood, B.C.    The mine was
operated continuously throughout the year, sixteen to twenty-two men
being employed there and at the mill in Greenwood. Approximately 18,000 tons of ore
was mined and concentrated and the product shipped to the Tacoma smelter. Early in
the year the mine was dewatered to the 250 level and the ore-bodies were found to
terminate on a bed of limestone. Two hundred feet of raising was done from this level
to the 150 and several raises run from the 150 to the 80. New equipment installed
during the year included a Gardner-Denver compressor, steel-sharpener, and Ford V-8
gasoline-power unit to operate the hoist. A total of 2,473 tons of concentrate, which
included a small tonnage taken from the Granby mine, yielded 2,481 oz. of gold, 4,265 oz.
of silver, and 292,901 lb. of copper.
This property is owned by W. E. McArthur, of Greenwood;  payments
Granby.        on the option having been completed in October.    A small tonnage was
mined from the glory-hole of this property early in the year, about
six men being employed. Toward the end of the year some 1,800 feet of the No. 3
level was reopened and reconditioned preparatory to stoping. A rather interesting
problem in connection with the reopening of the old adit was the removal of about
900 feet of ice, which was done by cutting the ice in strips by laying steam-pipes on top
of it and hauling the strips out in sections.
Athelstan.—This property, in the Wellington camp, near Phoenix, is operated under
lease by W. E. McArthur. A small amount of ore was recovered from surface cuts and
shallow workings.    One man was employed.
ROSSLAND AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street West, Montreal, Quebec;  mine
ConsolidatedMiningoffice, Trail, B.C.    Sir Edward Beatty,  Chairman;   S. G. Blaylock,
and Smelting Co.   President  and  Managing  Director;    J.   E.   Riley,   Secretary;    Jas.
of Canada, Ltd.    Buchanan,   General  Manager;    R.  W.   Diamond,   Assistant  General
Manager. Capital: 4,000,000 shares, $5 par; issued, 3,271,669. The
company owns the War Eagle, Le Roi, Centre Star, Josie, Iron Mask, Annie, Columbia,
and Kootenay, at Rossland, B.C. These properties were operated continuously throughout the year by leasers. About seventy men were engaged in mining ore from surface
and underground operations on twenty-three leases. The work was carried on under
the supervision of J. K. Cram, of Trail. A total of 9,434 tons of ore was mined and
shipped to the smelter. This yielded 5,915 oz. of gold and 6,694 oz. of silver. In July
the company commenced a complete re-examination, including a geological survey, of all
the Rossland properties, with a view to ascertaining the possibilities of developing new
ore-bodies. PROGRESS NOTES. A 91
SILVER-GOLD-LEAD DEPOSITS.
GREENWOOD-GRAND FORKS AREA.
Greenwood.
Operations at this property, about 1 mile north of Greenwood, by W. E.
Providence.      McArthur and associates, commenced in September and nine men were
employed from then on to the end of the year. A crosscut from the
third level some 35 feet in length encountered a vein which has been drifted on for
approximately 105 feet. In order to work this section of the mine economically, the
old main shaft was reconditioned and a new head-frame with ore- and waste-bins
erected. Ore to the amount of 81 tons was mined and shipped to Trail, yielding 28 oz.
of gold, 7,975 oz. of silver, and 2,716 lb. of lead.
Situated 2 miles north of Greenwood. Owned by George Walters, of
Gold Bug.       Greenwood, and operated under lease by R. Mitchell and S. Wickwire.
About 60 feet of underground development-work was done, using hand-
steel methods.    Four tons of ore, shipped to Trail, yielded 4 oz. of gold, 112 oz. of silver,
and 186 lb. of lead.
Grand Forks.
This property, 13 miles north of Grand Forks, was optioned by L. E.
Simpson Mine. Hanley, of Wallace, Idaho, and developed under the direction of L. A.
Grant. Seven to eleven men, with four to eight working underground,
were employed for about five months. A complete small mining plant was installed.
Development-work included 286 feet of drifting, 370 feet of crosscutting, 10 feet of
sinking, and 6 feet of raising. The property was closed in September. A total of 364
tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 259 oz. of gold and 90 oz. of silver.
Situated on the Granby River, about 12 miles above Grand Forks, this
Little Bertha,     property is operated under lease by G. H. Gepman and Henry Doreen,
who mined 129 tons of ore by hand-steel.    This was shipped to Trail
and yielded 21 oz. of gold and 229 oz. of silver.
Company office, Room 40, Williams Building, Vancouver, B.C. George L.
Regal Mines, Ltd. Mclnnis, Secretary. Capital: 5,000,000 shares, no par value. The
company owns the Yankee Boy mine, 4 miles from Grand Forks, B.C.
It is operated under lease by W. M. and W. L. Schwarz and associates. Five men, all
working underground, were employed, using hand-steel. Practically no development-
work was done, but 463 tons of ore, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded 345 oz. of gold
and 315 oz. of silver.
NELSON AREA.
This property, on Active Creek, 7 miles from Ymir, owned by J. F.
Howard.        Duthie, of Seattle, was operated under lease by John Linstrom and
C. Peterson.    Ore was recovered from remnants left in the stopes,
pillars, and from the dumps.    Hand-steel was used as the entire mining plant has been
removed.    A total of 196 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded 102 oz. of gold, 1,774 oz. of
silver, 75,036 lb. of lead, and 52,708 lb. of zinc.
SILVER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
SLOCAN LAKE AREA.
Company office, 504 Empire State Building, Spokane, Wash.    Percy G.
Slocan Silver     Morey, Secretary.    Capital:   500,000 shares, $1 par.    The company
Mines, Ltd.      owns the McAllister, on London Ridge, near Three Forks.    The property was operated under lease by Geo. Allen, who employed a crew of
four men, with three working underground, during the summer months.    No develop- A 92 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
ment was done, but 148 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail.    This yielded 3 oz.
of gold and 25,328 oz. of silver.
Jo-Jo.—This property adjoins the McAllister. J. Tier and W. George did a small
amount of development-work with hand-steel.
Company office, 204 Howard Street, Spokane, Wash.    John Stanford,
Slocan Idaho Mines Manager.    The company operates the Molly Hughes, on Slocan Lake,
Corporation.      about 1 mile north of New Denver.    An average of eighteen men,
with  eleven  working  underground,  were  employed  throughout  the
year.    The main shaft from the No. 2 to the No. 4 level, originally sunk as a winze,
was straightened and retimbered.    On the completion of this it was continued down
to the 5 level.    A new single-drum electric hoist, equipped with all safety devices
necessary to handle men, and a 10-horse-power electrically driven centrifugal pump
were installed.    Development-work done during the year included 397 feet of drifting,
145 feet of crosscutting, 163 feet of sinking, and 50 feet of raising.    In addition, 200
feet of old drift was retimbered.    A total of 191 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail
yielded 98 oz. of gold, 26,148 oz. of silver.
ROSSLAND AREA.
This property is operated under lease by the Mayflower Mining Syndi-
Mayflower.      cate (Lloyd R. Smith and associates, of Penticton), with Frank Brin-
son as mine foreman.    A total of five men was employed, with three
underground.    A small mining plant was installed and low-level crosscut was commenced  and  driven to  intersect  the  downward   extension   of the   upper   showings.
Development included 210 feet of crosscutting and 60 feet of drifting.
Phoenix.—This property is operated under lease by W. C. Holm and two partners.
A total of 11 tons of ore, mined from a shallow winze by hand-steel and shipped to Trail,
yielded 7 oz. of gold and 24 oz. of silver.
SILVER-LEAD-ZINC DEPOSITS.
SMITHERS.
This property on Hudson Bay Mountain, adjoining the Mamie, Duthie,
Coronado Group, and Victory groups, is owned by the R. J. McDonell Estate.    It is 16
miles by road from Smithers.   The property was leased to H. Orm and
Fred Griffin, who shipped 46 tons of ore to the Trail smelter.    Stripping and open-
cutting was done in the southerly part of the property and two converging adits started.
Test samples were sent to the sampling plant (see page 57).
[Reference: Annual Report, 1914.]
This group of six claims, owned by Mrs. M. C. Simpson, of Smithers,
Victory Group,    adjoins the Coronado group on Hudson Bay Mountain.    Mrs. Simpson
and two miners did further development-work with the object of determining the possibility of selectively mining and cobbing a shipping-grade ore.    Several
test and three tonnage samples were sent to the sampling plant (see page 56).
[Reference: Annual Report, 1928.]
TOPLEY.
This group, owned by D.  Heenan,  of Topley,  and the C.  Matheson
Golden Eagle     Estate, is about 7 miles northerly from Topley by road.    D. Heenan
Group. continued selective mining from open-cuts on No. 1 and No. 2 veins,
chiefly at the easterly open-cut on the latter.    Four small shipments
were made to the sampling plant (see page 58).
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1937, Part C] PROGRESS NOTES. A 93
NORTH THOMPSON AREA.
This group of eight located claims, formerly known as the O.K. group,
Iron Cap.        owned by Nick Forsberg and associates, of Barriere, B.C., is in the
valley of Birk Creek,  %  to  l1/^  miles from the end of the North
Barriere Lake Road.    Development-work to date consists of ten short adits and one
160 feet long.    A report on this property may be obtained from the Department of
Mines, Victoria, B.C.;  cost, 25 cents.
This group of nine claims is owned by Nick Forsberg, Carl Johnson,
North Star.      and associates, of Barriere.    The property is 8 miles up Birk Creek
from the end of the North Barriere Lake Road.   Since 1936, a new adit
140 feet long has been driven and several open-cuts made.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1936, Part D.]
BEAVERDELL AREA.
Company office, Penticton, B.C.;   mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.    F. V.
Highland Bell,    Staples,  President;   Miss A.  H.  Doyle,  Secretary-Treasurer;   R. B.
Ltd. Staples, Managing Director.   Capital: 1,500,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
1,315,856. The company owns and operates the Highland Bell, on
Wallace Mountain, about 5 miles from Beaverdell. The mine was operated continuously
throughout the year, employing thirty-six men, with twenty-seven working underground. Development-work included 300 feet of drifting, 400 feet of crosscutting, and
100 feet of raising. A total of 6,706 tons of ore was mined and shipped to Trail and
yielded 206 oz. of gold, 886,010 oz. of silver, 550,276 lb. of lead, and 720,973 lb. of zinc.
Company office, Penticton, B.C.; mine office, Beaverdell, B.C. S. J.
Sally Mines, Ltd. Crocker, President; H. B. Morley, Secretary-Treasurer; R. C. Mc-
Landers, Mine Manager. Capital: 1,000,000 shares, $1 par; issued,
1,000,000 shares. The company owns and operates the Sally, on Wallace Mountain,
adjoining the Highland Bell. A small section of ground adjoining the Wellington is
being mined. Under an agreement with the management of that property all ore and
waste is being handled through the 5 level of the Wellington. Compressed air is used
and is conducted through the new Sally shaft to the present operation. An exploratory
programme from this shaft is being considered. Total development-work amounted to
170 feet. Five men were employed, with four working underground. Sixty-three tons
of ore, shipped to Trail, yielded 5 oz. of gold, 9,867 oz. of silver, 8,052 lb. of lead, and
13,795 lb. of zinc.
Company office, Greenwood, B.C.;   mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.    Jas.
Beaverdell-      Kerr, President;  G. S. Walters, Secretary-Treasurer;  A. J. Morrison,
Wellington Syndi-Manager.   Capital: 50,000 shares, $1 par; issued, 50,000.   The company
eate, Ltd.        owns the Wellington, on Wallace Mountain, near Beaverdell.    A small
amount of work was done on this property, as the main activities of
the company were concentrated on the Bounty and Bounty Fraction.    Development on
the Wellington included 50 feet of raising and 140 feet of test-holes.    A total of 125
tons of ore, mined and shipped to Trail, yielded 4 oz. of gold, 18,656 oz. of silver, and
15,831 lb. of lead.    Late in 1939 a lease was taken on the property by A. J. Morrison
and associates.
The company also operates the Bounty and Bounty Fraction, on Wallace Mountain,
in conjunction with the Wellington. During the early part of the year twelve men,
with five underground, were employed, but this was reduced to five, with two underground, and the work was confined chiefly to development. This included 315 feet of
drifting, 30 feet of sinking, 50 feet of raising, and 140 feet of test-hole drilling.
Company office, Box 609, Kelowna, B.C.;  mine office, Beaverdell, B.C.
Beaver Silver     R. B. Staples, President; J. C. Ralston, Secretary.    Capital:  2,000,000
Mines, Ltd.      shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,600,000.    Controlling interest in the
company is held by the Highland Bell, Limited.    The company owns
the Beaver claim, adjoining the Highland Bell, on Wallace Mountain.
The property was worked under lease, during the first half of the year, by H. S.
Nordman   and   associates.    Five   men   were   employed,   four   working   underground. A 94 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Development-work included 105 feet of drifting and 45 feet of raising. A total of
157 tons of ore, shipped to Trail, yielded 5 oz. of gold, 11,916 oz. of silver, and 8,673 lb.
of lead. This work was discontinued during the summer and a lease taken on the
dumps by C. Staples.
This property, situated on Wallace Mountain, is owned by the Wm.
Tiger. Law Estate and is operated under lease by J. L. Nordman and partner.
Compressed air, piped from the Beaver Silver about 1,500 feet away,
is used for underground work. Development included 100 feet of drifting, 120 feet of
crosscutting, 25 feet of raising, and 25 feet of sinking. Fifty-three tons of ore shipped
to Trail yielded 1 oz. of gold, 6,721 oz. of silver, 6,651 lb. of lead, and 12,171 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated on Wallace Mountain, adjoining the Highland
Revenge.        Bell, is under lease to R. C. McLanders, two men with hand-steel being
employed. A total of about 200 feet of underground work and surface
stripping was done in an attempt to locate a faulted segment of ore overlooked by the
former operators.
This property, situated on Wallace Mountain, adjoining the Highland
Highland Chief.   Bell, is owned by Mark Smith, of Beaverdell, and is leased by Alex. Bell
and associates. Three men were employed and all the work was done
by hand-steel. Development-work included 234 feet of drifting, 287 feet of cross-
cutting, 48 feet of raising, and 120 feet of surface-trenching. Five tons of ore mined
and shipped to Trail yielded 450 oz. of silver and 498 lb. of lead.
British Silver and Gold Mines Syndicate.—Prospecting on the British claim, on Wallace
Mountain, adjoining the Wellington, for the possible continuation of the Wellington
vein has been continued this year, efforts being directed to exploring favourable areas
by crosscutting.    Two men were employed using hand-steel.
LARDEAU AREA.
Company office, 804 Guaranty Trust Building, Windsor, Ont.;   mine
New True Fissure  office,  Ferguson,  B.C.    David  I.  Hubar,  President;    J.  G.  Brislin,
Mining and Milling Secretary;   Dr. A. Oven, Treasurer;   G. O. Kelly, Superintendent.
Co., Ltd. Capital:  3,500,000 shares, $1 par;  issued, 1,976,000, of which 750,000
pooled. The company owns the True Fissure mine, on Great Northern Mountain, about 3% miles from Ferguson. The property is equipped with a 75-ton
mill. A contract let in November, 1938, to the Interior Contracting Company, of
Penticton, was completed in April, 1939. In all, 836 feet of drifting, 516 feet of cross-
cutting, and 76.5 feet of drifting were done, chiefly in the Morgan and C. level adits.
A total of twenty-three men, with eleven working underground, were engaged in this
work.    The property was closed down on completion of the contract.
SLOCAN.
Kaslo-Three Forks.
Lucky Boy.—This property, about 12 miles from Kaslo, on the Kaslo-New Denver
Highway, is owned and operated by Charles Lind and sons, of Kaslo.
Company office, 303 Maclean Block, Calgary.    W. S. Davidson, Secre-
Sturgis Creek    tary-Treasurer.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares.    The company owns the
Mines, Ltd.      Revenue, at the head of Sturgis Creek, a tributary of Keen Creek.    It
was operated under lease for a short time by H. E. Singel and two men.
A total of 55 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 4,681 oz. of silver, 23,775
lb. of lead, and 13,282 lb. of zinc.
Caledonia.—This property is situated at Blaylock, and is operated by George Mc-
Cready, who shipped 18 tons of ore to Trail. This yielded 1,020 oz. of silver and 23,529
lb. of lead.
Whitewater.—Situated at Retallack and operated under lease by Ole Larsen, of
Kaslo, who milled 400 tons of ore, and with 17 tons of crude ore yielded 11 oz. of gold,
4,825 oz. of silver, and 65,786 lb. of lead. PROGRESS NOTES. A 95
Sandon-Three Forks.
Company office, Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.    R. H. Stewart,
Ruth Hope       President;    R.   S.   Lennie,   Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:    2,500,000
Mining Co., Ltd. shares, $1 par;  issued, 1,500,000.    The company owns the Ruth Hope
mine at Sandon.    It is equipped with a 50-ton mill.    The Ruth Hope
was operated by two groups of leasers—namely, A. T. Forsyth and two partners, who
have a lease on the ground from the 3 level to the surface, and C. Stewart and sons,
who have a lease on the dumps and on the ground between the 3 and 5 levels.    On the
upper lease hand-steel only is used and the crude ore is shipped to Trail.    On the lower
lease, power is obtained from the water-driven compressor located in the mill, and the
ore mined underground and from the dumps is concentrated by a system of mechanical
jigs.    A total of 174 tons of ore yielded 14,862 oz. of silver, 19,935 lb. of lead, and
28,479 lb. of zinc.
Company office, Sandon, B.C.   R. A. Grimes, President; D. D. Townsend,
Silver Ridge      Secretary-Treasurer.    Capital:  2,000,000 shares, 50 cents par;  issued,
Mining Co., Ltd. 760,000, of which 260,000 pooled.    The company owns and operates the
Sunshine group, on Silver Ridge, about 4% miles from Sandon;  fifteen
men being employed, with an average of seven underground.    The main low-level crosscut was extended 1,820 feet and 100 feet of drifting done on veins intersected by it.    In
addition, some 3,000 feet of surface-stripping by tractor and bulldozer was accomplished.    A mile and a half of road was built to connect the lower camp to the main
road to Sandon, to avoid areas frequently swept by snowslides.
This property, on the Silver Ridge Road, about 3 miles from Sandon,
Silver Ridge      is owned by J. H. Cory, of New Denver, and is operated under lease by
Mines. F. Walters, Joe Francina, and Emil Battelle.    Hand-steel only is used.
Development included 324 feet of drifting and crosscutting, 15 feet of
raising, and 10 feet of sinking.    A total of 7 tons of ore, shipped to Trail, yielded 794
oz. of silver, 7,600 lb. of lead, and 361 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated about 3 miles from Sandon, is owned by Mrs.
Victor. D. Petty, of Nelson, and is operated under lease by E. Doney and son.
Hand-steel only is used. Sixty-five tons of ore, shipped to Trail,
yielded 20,428 oz. of silver, 78,745 lb. of lead, and 363 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated at the head of Dardanelles Creek, near Three
Dardanelles.     Forks, was optioned by S. Ross and H. Lazier, of Nelson, and P. Johnson,
of Silverton, with S. Ross in charge of operations.    The main shaft,
some 500 feet deep, was dewatered for examination and sampling.    Nothing further
was done with the property.    Six men were employed for several months during the
summer.
Silverton-New Denver.
Company office, 616 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.    S. W.
Galena Farm Con-Miller,   President;    Jas.   Anderson,   Secretary - Treasurer.    Capital:
solidated Mines,   2,500,000 shares of no par value;   issued,  1,602,203.    The company
Ltd. owns the Hewitt mine, 6 milee by road from Silverton, which is oper
ated under lease by George Mathews and partners. A total of 230
tons of ore was shipped to Trail and yielded 8,927 oz. of silver, 20,486 lb. of lead, and
66,852 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated on Slocan Lake, between Silverton and New
Bosun. Denver, is owned by C. J. Campbell and is operated under lease.    Six
men were engaged throughout the year.   A total of 90 tons was shipped
to Trail, chiefly from pillars and remnants of former ore-bodies.    This yielded 6,779
oz. of silver, 25,690 lb. of lead, and 52,226 lb. of zinc.
This property, situated on Mount Carpenter, above New Denver, and
Capella.        owned by the Wells Estate, was leased by Chas. Stedile and partner,
who shipped 14 tons of ore to Trail.    This yielded 2,341 oz. of silver
and 342 lb. of lead. A 96 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Slocan City.
This property, situated on Springer Creek, about 7 miles from the main
Arlington.       Slocan Highway, was operated under lease by F. W. Jancowski and
associates for a short time during the early part of the year.    A total
of 202 tons of ore, chiefly sorted from the old dumps, was shipped to Trail.    This
yielded 5,034 oz. of silver, 7,367 lb. of lead, and 4,438 lb. of zinc.    The underground
workings are in very bad condition and are, for the most part, inaccessible.
Company office, 401 Sherwood Building, Spokane, Wash.   C. R. Thomas,
Ottawa Silver Min- President;  J. J. Bigger, Treasurer.    Capital:  2,500,000 shares, 1 cent
ing and Milling Co. par;   issued,  2,150,000.    The company  owns the  Ottawa mine,  on
Springer Creek, about 5 miles from Slocan City.    The property is
equipped with a 100-ton flotation plant.    The mine was operated almost continuously,
under lease, by W. Hicks and associates throughout the year.    Hand-steel was used to
mine ore from the 8 level as well as from the old upper workings.    A total of 283 tons,
crude and concentrates, shipped to Trail yielded 15,991 oz. of silver.    Five men were
employed.
This property, situated at the head of Tobin Creek, a tributary of
Meteor.        Springer Creek, was leased by G. Larsen and C. Lindstron, of Slocan
City, who mined 33 tons of ore with hand-steel and shipped to Trail.
This yielded 11 oz. of gold and 3,534 oz. of silver.
Ainsworth.
Krao.—A small amount of work was done on this property under the direction of
Joe Gallo. A total of 12 tons of ore shipped to Trail yielded 543 oz. of silver and
1,958 lb. of lead.
Coffee Creek.
Crescent and Eden.—A total of 292 tons of ore, all mined in 1938, was shipped to and
treated in the customs mill at Granite Siding.    The concentrates were shipped to Trail.
This property, 9 miles up Coffee Creek from the Nelson-Kaslo High-
Olsen Group,     way, is owned by Alex. Grabt, of Ainsworth, and is held under lease
and bond by W. Rozan and associates.    Three men, using hand-steel,
were employed for four months.    In addition to reconditioning the old workings, 7
miles of the main trail was rebuilt and 2 miles of new trail constructed.    A total of
9 tons of ore mined and shipped to Trail yielded 1 oz. of gold, 878 oz. of silver, and
1,897 lb. of lead.
NELSON AREA.
Salmo.
Company  office,   6  Royal  Bank  Building,   Nelson,  B.C.    Stewart  M.
Iron Mountain,   Marshall,   President.    This  company  operates  the  Emerald,   on  the
Ltd. south side of Sheep Creek, 8 miles from Salmo and 4 miles from the
Sheep  Creek Road.    Three men,  all of whom worked underground,
were employed throughout the year.    Hand-steel only was used.    Development included
71 feet of drifting and 274 feet of crosscutting.    No ore was shipped.
CRANBROOK AREA.
Company office, 215 St. James Street, Montreal, Quebec;   mine office,
Consolidated Mining Trail, B.C.    Sir Edward Beatty, Chairman;   S. G. Blaylock, President
and Smelting Co.   and Managing Director;   J. E. Riley, Secretary.    Sullivan mine office,
of Canada, Ltd.    Kimberley, B.C.    William Lindsay, General Superintendent.   Capital:
4,000,000 shares, $5 par; issued, 3,271,669. The company owns and
operates the Sullivan mine at Kimberley. The concentrator at Kimberley treats 6,000
to 6,500 tons per day. The total output amounted to 2,091,064 tons, this exceeding the
tonnage milled by 2,829, with the mine and concentrator operating 282 and 324 days,
respectively. The development-work done included 4,860 feet of drifting and cross-
cutting, 5,280 feet of raising, and 10,164 feet of diamond-drilling. One raise, 512 feet
in length, was driven to the surface from a stope in the 1-15 block. CORRIGENDUM.
Page A 96, line 7 of last paragraph: For " The total output amounted to
091,064 tons, thus exceeding the tonnage milled by 2,829," read " The total
itput amounted to 2,097,124 tons, thus exceeding the tonnage milled by 6,060." PROGRESS NOTES. A 97
In some parts of the mine, difficult back conditions led to the experimental substitution of sub-level mining with slashing, sub-level drift-mining and shrinkage
stoping for the open stope-and-pillar method of extraction heretofore in general use,
this having been carried out with a considerable measure of success. A start on pillar
recovery was made in the X-9 block. The filling of worked-out stopes continued, a total
of 304,545 cubic yards, equivalent to 1,095,000 tons of ore in the solid, having been
placed in the course of the year. Of this, 212,000 cubic yards was obtained from the
surface, the stowing material being dropped in the mine through raises. These operations necessitated the construction of twelve concrete and seven timber bulk-heads.
The maximum number of persons on the pay-roll in the course of the year was
1,192, of whom 540 were employed underground, 303 in various capacities around the
mine, and 257 at the mill.
Company office, 25 King Street West, Toronto, Ont. W. S. Morlock,
St. Eugene Mining President; W. B. Malone, Secretary-Treasurer. Capital: 3,000,000
Corporation, Ltd. shares, $1 par; issued, 1,450,005. The company acquired the holdings,
of the St. Eugene Extension Gold Mines, Limited, at Moyie. A geological investigation of the company's holdings was made in the course of the summer
and some of the prospect adits on the west side of Moyie Lake were reopened to permit
an underground examination.
This group of sixteen claims, 7 miles east of Wasa, on the Canadian
Ehlinger Group.   Pacific Railway, is reached by a truck-road.    The claims lie between
3,800 and 6,000 feet elevation.    They are held by location by John J.
Ehlinger, of Spokane, Wash.
Up to 1939 the following work has been done: On the Golden Fleece claim, two
adits, 64 and 80 feet. On the Stanley claim, several small workings and open-cuts. On
the Tiger claim, an adit 206 feet long, a short adit, and several open-cuts. On the
Wanda B. claim, a vertical shaft 76 feet deep and an adit 213 feet long towards the
bottom of the shaft. On the Larchwood claim, three adits totalling 370 feet. On the
Emily claim, a drift 163 feet long.
A report on this property may be obtained from the Department of Mines, Victoria;.
B.C.; cost, 25 cents.
GOLDEN AREA.
Company office, 350 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.; mine office, Field, B.C.
Base Metals Mining J. H. C. Waite, President;  G. C. Ames, Secretary-Treasurer; John D.
Corporation, Ltd.   Galloway, Mine Manager.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, no par value;
issued, 2,330,714.   The company operates the Monarch mine, on Mount
Stephen, 3 miles east of Field.    The property is equipped with a 300-ton concentrator.
Operations were resumed at this property late in December, 1939, after having been
suspended entirely for nearly a year, following a period during which they had been
limited to development-work in the part of the mine known as the East Monarch.   Some
difficulties had to be surmounted before the plant could be brought back to full working
order, but rapid progress was made and the mill was soon operated on a basis of 300
tons per day.    A total of ninety men is employed, forty-four of them underground.
[Reference:  Annual Reports, 1935, Part E, and 1938, Part E.]
COPPER DEPOSITS.
PORTLAND CANAL AREA.
Anyox.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—D. Matheson, Superintendent.
After doing a considerable amount of drifting and diamond-drilling adjacent to the old
Hidden Creek mine, the company has apparently abandoned the property. All plant
and equipment has been sold.
7 A 98 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
SIMILKAMEEN RIVER AREA.
Princeton.
Company office, 675 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Granby Consolidated office,  Copper  Mountain,  B.C.    Julian  B.  Beaty,  President;    A.   S.
Mining, Smelting &Baillie, General Manager;   B. E. Perks,  Secretary;   A. W. Seaton,
Power Co., Ltd.    Treasurer;  W. R. Lindsay, Mine Manager.    Capital:   600,000 shares,
$5 par; issued, 450,260. The company owns and operates the Copper
Mountain mine, 12 miles south of Princeton, longitude 120° 30', latitude 49° 28'. The
property is equipped with complete mining, flotation, and power plants. The coarse
crushing plant is at the portal of No. 6 main haulage-adit, elevation 3,200 feet. The
fine grinding and flotation plant with a capacity of 4,000 tons per day is situated at
Allenby, 8 miles distant. The ore is conveyed in standard-gauge railway-cars from the
coarse crushing plant to the concentrator. Machine-shops and a new electric foundry
are also at Allenby. The power plant is situated near Princeton, 3 miles from Allenby.
It is a steam-electric generating plant with a total capacity of 7,500 k.w. The coal
mine is at Bromley Vale. The power is distributed to the mine, concentrator and
shops, and the coal mine. Improvements were made to the concentrator and camp
at Allenby.
Exploration and development included 13,183 feet of drifting and crosscutting,
12,980 feet of raising, and 19,906 feet of diamond-drilling. A total of 1,450,352 tons
of ore was treated at the concentrator. Eight hundred and nineteen men were employed as follows: 428 at the mine, Copper Mountain; 170 at the concentrator and
shops, Allenby; 36 at the power plant, Princeton; 110 at the coal mine, Bromley Vale;
75 in other departments.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Howe Sound.
Company office, 730 Fifth Avenue, New York City;   mine office, Bri-
Britannia Mining tannia Beach, B.C.    E. B. Schley, President;   C. P. Charleton, Secre-
and Smelting     tary-Treasurer;   C. P. Browning, General Manager.    Capital:   100,000
Co., Ltd. shares, $25 par; issued, 91,966; all owned by Howe Sound Co. The
company operates the Britannia mine at Britannia Beach, on Howe
Sound. The property is fully equipped with mining and milling plant having a daily
capacity of 6,500 to 7,000 tons.
Development-work totalled 32,203 feet, or 6.1 miles, made up as follows: Drifting,
10,282 feet; crosscuts, 4,634 feet; raises and winzes, 12,604 feet; powder blast workings, 4,460 feet; No. 6 shaft raise, 73 feet; and No. 2 Victoria shaft, 150 feet. A total
of 12,665 feet of diamond-drilling was done.
A new raise system was driven between the 4,100 level and the 2,700 level to handle
the ore to the new primary crusher installed above the 4,100 level, and control chutes
built at the crusher on the 3,900 level, at the 3,800 level, the 3,500 level, and the 3,100
level. Most of the ore is now handled through this raise, and after passing through
the crusher is loaded into 20-ton roller-bearing cars in the 4,100 tunnel and transported
to the mill-bunkers in 20-car trips by electric locomotives.
The total ore mined was 112,784 tons of ore, and the recovery of metals was augmented by the operation of the copper precipitation plant, which continued to treat the
copper-bearing portion of the mine drainage-water. Total metals produced were:
37,059,210 lb. of copper, 22,238 oz. of gold, 203,019 oz. of silver, and 105,418 dry tons
of pyrite.    About 1,250 men were employed. CORRIGENDUM.
Page A 98, line 1 of last paragraph:   For " 112,784 tons " read " 2,112,784 tons." PROGRESS NOTES. A 99
COPPER-SILVER DEPOSITS.
TELKWA.
Company office, 86 Richmond Street, Toronto, Ont.;   B.C. office, 5141
Conwest Explora- Royal Bank Building, Vancouver, B.C.    F. M. Connell, President; Alan
tion Co., Ltd.     Cockeram, Secretary-Treasurer;   Gordon F. MacDonnell, in charge of
B.C.  operations.    Capital:   2,000,000 shares, no par value;   issued,
1,250,007 shares.    This company took an option on the Hunter group in Hunter Basin,
longitude 127° 10', latitude 54° 30', late in the year and contracted for 100 feet of
tunnelling.    The property is reached by road from Telkwa for 8V2 miles, thence sleigh-
road for 4 miles, thence trail for 4% miles to the camp at 4,900 feet elevation.
This group of two adjoining claims is owned by K. Nysven, J.  G.
D. and N. Group Donaldson, and J. Oakes, of Telkwa.    It is at about 4,400 feet eleva-
(Last Chance),    tion, on the north-western slope of Grouse Mountain, longitude 126°
43', latitude 54° 38', about 9 miles by road from Quick station on the
Canadian National Railways.    It is reached by motor-road from Quick for 4% miles to
Wakefield's ranch;   thence 4y2 miles by winter-road to the new camp at 4,515 feet of
elevation.    A vein has been explored by a 51-foot adit and several open-cuts.    Further
work was done at the southerly end of the previous workings.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1937, Part C]
ANTIMONY DEPOSITS.
This company owns an antimony property on the south shore of Stuart
St. James       Lake, at a point 12 miles west of Fort St. James.    The workings (as
Antimony Co.    of June 12th, 1939) are on the Snowbird mineral claim.    As of June
12th, 1939, the workings consisted of (1) an open-cut and an incline
shaft that extends for 20 feet on a 20-degree slope, both lying 80 feet south-westward
of the main stibnite body, (2) two open-cuts and an incline shaft driven for 28 feet on
a 45-degree slope on the main stibnite lens, (3) a stripping 185 feet in length that
extends north-westerly and south-easterly from (2). Considerable work is reported to
have been done since June, 1939. Fifty tons of ore was shipped to the sampling plant
(see page 56).
This antimony property, owned by R. H. Davis, Royston, and asso-
Silver Bell Mine,  ciates, is situated on the north-west arm of Home Lake.    A good road
connects the main Island Highway at a point north from Qualicum
Beach to the terminus at the lake, where a boat connection is made for the remaining
6 miles up the lake to the property. Operations were begun in March, 1939, and carried
on fairly steadily until November 15th, when work was suspended. During the above
period an adit was driven for a distance of 100 feet.
MERCURY DEPOSITS.
FORT ST. JAMES AREA.
Pinchi Lake.
E. Bronlund, Superintendent.    The company owns the cinnabar prop-
Consolidated Mining erty on the north side of Pinchi Lake, north of Fort St. James.    Con-
and Smelting Co.   siderable prospecting was done on the property during  1939.    It
of Canada, Ltd.    comprised 232 feet of drifting, 319 feet of crosscutting, 26,395 feet
of trenching, and 3,289 feet of diamond-drilling.    The average number of men employed during the year was 11.
[Reference:   Department of Mines, Bulletin No. 5, 1940.] A 100 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
Company office, 2050 Eighteenth Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Empire Mercury  office, Minto, B.C.    C. P. Riel, President;   S. W. Taylor, Secretary-
Mines, Ltd.      Treasurer.    Capital:   3,000,000 shares, 50 cents par.    The company
owns the Manitou mine, on Mud Creek, near Minto.    A small production was recorded in 1939, but the property was inactive most of the year.    A watchman lives at the mine.
[Reference:   Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
This group, owned by A. Young and associates, of Lillooet, is located
Golden Eagle    on the Yalakom River, 24 miles by road, and 4 miles by trail from the
Group. town of Lillooet.    The property was leased to Tacoma interests late
in 1939, and preparations were being made to install a small plant.
Work was confined to trail-construction and surface-stripping.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
This property is located directly across the Yalakom River from the
Red Eagle Group. Golden Eagle group and is owned by J. Thompson and associates, of
Vancouver.    In addition to surface-stripping, an exploratory adit was
driven 24 feet in 1939.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 5, 1940.]
MOLYBDENUM DEPOSITS.
This property, 17% miles north-west of Littlefort (Mount Olie), is
Anticlimax.     owned by C. A. Reid and associates, of Littlefort.   Considerable open-
cutting and stripping was done by D. S. Tait and associates, of Victoria.    The option was dropped early in 1939, and work on the property stopped.
[Reference:  Department of Mines, Bulletin No. 9, 1940.]
Little Keen.—This property on Sheep Creek, 8 miles from Salmo, is owned by Jack
Sapples, of Salmo.    H. L. Batten and associates, of Vancouver, optioned the property,
did considerable surface work and then dropped the option.
[Reference: Department of Mines, Bulletin No. 9, 1940.]
This property on Silver Creek, east side of Harrison Lake, is owned
H.L.M. by Mrs. Minnie Peterson, of Louis Creek.    Considerable surface work
and exploratory prospecting was done in 1938 by H. L. Batten and
associates before dropping their option in the early part of 1939.
[Reference:  Department of Mines, Bulletin No. 9, 1940.]
Stella.—This property is 7 miles south of Endako and is owned by A. Langley, C. H.
Foote, and associates, of Endako. They are reported to have made a number of open-
cuts during 1939.
[Reference: Department of Mines, Bulletin No. 9, 1940.]
PYRITE DEPOSITS.
ECSTALL RIVER.
Company office, 744 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine
Northern       office, Port Essington, B.C.    R. H. Stewart, President;  Sherwood Lett,
Pyrites, Ltd.      Secretary-Treasurer;  E. E. Mason, Mine Manager.    Capital:  1,100,000
shares, 50 cents par;   issued, 1,050,716.    The property is on the east
side of Ecstall River, about 45 miles from Port Essington, and is reached by small river-
boat from that point.    The main crosscut adit which was started in 1938 is now in
2,008 feet, of which 1,876 feet was driven this year.    In addition, three crosscuts,
totalling 239 feet, were driven from the main adit.    Operations were suspended for the
winter on November 8th.    An average of nineteen men was employed. PROGRESS NOTES. A 101
TUNGSTEN DEPOSITS.
WELLS.
Company office, 61 Broadway, New York, N.Y.    Fl. Hewitt, President;
Columbia Tung- A. E. Pike, Mine Superintendent.    The company owns and operates
stens Co., Ltd.    the Hardscrabble mine on Hardscrabble Creek, 5 miles north of Wells.
The property is equipped with a 50-ton pilot mill. Small-scale operations were carried on in 1939. During the first three months a crew of four men was
employed in completing the power plant installation, keeping the mine dewatered, and
salvaging and reconditioning equipment from the fire of the previous summer. During
the next three months the pilot mill was under construction and a hoist and hoisting
equipment were installed.
Underground development was resumed in June on a single-shift basis and the mill
was started about the end of July. It was fed largely from two small stopes, until it
was closed with the advent of cold weather in the late autumn. About 4% tons of
scheelite concentrate was shipped. Only shaft sinking was in progress at the end of
the year. Mine-development consisted of 112 feet of drifting, 47 feet of crosscutting,
60 feet of raising, and 18 feet of shaft sinking. Maximum employment of twenty men
was reached in July during mill-construction.    The average for the year was ten men.
PLACER-GOLD DEPOSITS.
ATLIN AREA.
Spruce Creek*
John W. Noland is the owner and operator. No. 1 shaft is the farthest
Dream Lease,     up-stream and the deepest shaft on Spruce Creek.    The shaft is 208
feet deep and two drifts have been carried up-stream approximately
900 feet from it. Crosscuts are driven between the drifts and out to the rim on both
sides to determine rim location and values.
Company office, 615 Credit Fonder Building, 850 Hastings Street West,
Spruce Creek    Vancouver, B.C.    J. G. Wheeling, Manager.    Capital:   50,000 shares,
Mining Co., Ltd.  $1 par.    Workings from No. 1 shaft are being operated on a " lay " by
John Clee and partners. Four men are working single shift, drifting
up-stream just clear of the old workings. Tailings from No. 2 and No. 4 shafts were
resluiced during the summer. Workings from No. 4 shaft are operated by the company. This shaft is adjacent to shafts on the adjoining Clydesdale and Wolf leases, but
they are not connected. There has been considerable difficulty with excess water in the
three shafts. The No. 4 shaft of the Spruce Creek Mining Company was idle from
June until November, and the Clydesdale and Wolf shafts were idle the rest of the year.
It was a season of abnormal high water in the creek and the excess water underground
is due to seepage, when the creek is high, through caving-in of old workings. Workings
from No. 4 shaft were being worked on November 21st with four places working double
shift.    Twenty-two men were employed.
Fred Ohman and partners, lay-men. The lay-men are driving a drain-
Croker Lease,    age working from the upper end of the Poker lease through to the
Croker lease workings, approximately 700 feet distant. This drain is
now up about 450 feet. In the meantime, the Brown workings have been permitted to fill
with water until the working is completed. They will then be unwatered and the connection made.    Five men are employed, working two shifts.
Wright and Brown, lay-men. This property is also idle owing to
Friendship Lease, excess water.    Considerable time and money was spent fluming the
creek, but apparently the flume was not carried far enough up-stream
* Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part B. A 102 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
to be effective. Through this stretch, including the claims operated by Nelson and
Johnson, there is less than 50 feet of cover, mainly loose gravel and the creek water
percolates freely through it. These are the only places in the district where breast-
boards are required in driving.
Nelson and Johnson, lay-men.    There are two shafts on this property.
Rose Claims.     The upper shaft was sunk first to a depth of 47 feet.    After considerable difficulty with water, a drain connection was made from downstream and the creek was also flumed by extending the flume of Wright and Brown,
operating the Friendship lease immediately up-stream.    The fluming and the Friendship workings have taken most of the water so that they are now in good shape.
When Columbia Development Company, operating a steam-shovel on the Olalla
lease down-stream, reached the Olalla and Rose lease-line, Nelson and Johnson sank
another shaft, 43 feet deep, close to the boundary-line and made connection through to
their upper shaft. They are now working out the area around the lower shaft and
down to the lease-line.    Eighteen men were employed.
James Eastman, Manager. The company is working on the Olalla
Columbia Develop- lease. This is a steam-shovel operation, the only surface operation on
ment Co., Ltd. the creek. One cut has been worked up to the boundary lease-line and
a second cut is now being advanced along the north bank of the creek.
It was necessary to flume the creek and connect with Nelson and Johnson's flume to
keep the creek water out of the shovel pit. Thirty-two men were employed. Some
drilling was done on the Baldwin lease farther down-stream.
I. Matthews, owner.    These are bench leases on the south bank and
Joker and Poker adjoining the Olalla and Rose leases.    Two groups of lay-men—Ivanic
Leases. and partners, and Troha and partners—are operating on these leases,
drifting up-stream.    There is a bed-rock drain through these leases so
that they are free of water.
Keno and Star Leases.—Gus Holgren, lay-man. This is a bench lease on the south
bank, next below the Poker. Holgren is working alone, drifting up-stream, trying to
reach some pillars left from an earlier operation.
Peterborough Lease.—Otto Miller and sons, owners. The owners are working around
old workings made in the early days.
Hardscrabble Lease.—Buntzen and Bachlund, lay-men. This is a bench lease on the
south bank.    The lay-men are drifting up-stream and also into the bench.
This is a bench lease on the north bank of Spruce Creek. J. Hoking,
Elk Lease. lay-man, is working alone, drifting up-stream at the upper end of the
lease. In the lower part Crowe and partner, lay-men, are drifting
up-stream along old workings. These old workings are standing in remarkable shape
considering that they have been idle for over twenty years. Very few timbers are
down, and in some instances arched roadways without timber are standing just as they
were when driven.
This creek lease is owned by C. McKinnon, who is working alone,
Key Lease.      drifting up-stream.    In the lower section of the lease Brandes and
Howes, lay-men, have started an open-cut to reach the bank before
starting to drift into the bench.
Erickson Lease.—John Walton, lay-man, is working alone, drifting into the south
bench.    He has not yet located bed-rock.
Jewel Lease.—John Lox and partners, lay-men. Two men are drifting up-stream
and into the bench on the south side.
St. Quentin Lease.—D. Falconer, owner, is working, drifting into the bench on the
south side.
Company office, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.    Laura L.
Sullivan Gold     McGhee, Secretary;   J. Jebne, Manager.    Capital:   500 shares, $100
Mines, Ltd.      par;   1,500 shares, no par value.    The company, originating in San
Francisco, has taken an option on eighteen leases in the Blue Canyon
section on Spruce Creek.    Some Keystone-drilling was done during the season. PROGRESS NOTES. A 103
Pine Creek.*
Acheson and sons, owners and operators. This is a hydraulic opera-
Blackburn Lease, tion. The depth from surface to bed-rock of about 32 feet consists of
about 10 feet of surface gravel, 15 feet of glacial clay, and 7 feet of
pay-gravel on bed-rock. Bed-rock is about 7 feet below drainage-level. The method of
operating is to hydraulic off the surface gravels and glacial clay down to the pay-gravel.
When a sufficient amount of pay-gravel is uncovered, an hydraulic elevator is used to
lift the bed-rock gravels to sluicing-level. The glacial clay is extremely tough and
wearing it out with water is a slow process. Bank-blasting, using 3-inch drill-holes, is
proving satisfactory in breaking up the clay.
Bessborough Lease.—Gus Boquist, lay-man. This is an underground operation employing three men drifting in the bench and up-stream.
Buster Lease.—E. Woodean, owner, is sinking a small shaft.
Williams Lease.—A. Smith, lay-man. This is an hydraulic operation employing four
men and using one monitor in the creek-bed.
Evening Star, Bur-Min, Stephen Dyke, and Lucky Leases.—Two men are engaged on " lay "
on each of these leases.    They are all surface operations shovelling into sluice-boxes.
[* Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part B.]
Birch Creek.
Four groups of two men each are engaged in ground-sluicing on this creek.
Ruby Creek.
Surprise Lake Mining Co., Ltd—P. Matson and partners, lay-men. Five men, all partners, are engaged in this hydraulic operation.
Wright Creek.
Hodges and Moran, lay-men.    This is an hydraulic operation employ-
Arctic Lease,     ing five men.    Very little water is available, there being only sufficient
for four runs of one-half hour each, daily.    Six other men are engaged
on three separate leases ground-sluicing farther up-stream.
O'Donnel River.
Owned by N. Murphy and son.    Four men are engaged on this prop-
Ethel M. Lease,   erty, which is an underground drifting operation in the bench.   There
has been considerable prospecting on this creek by various individuals,,
but none, so far, have struck any definite pay-streak.
Otter Creek.
Capital:    85,000  shares,   100  francs  par.    Walter   Sweet,   Manager;
Compagnie Fran- Sweet and Partners, Lay-men.    This underground operation operated
caise des Mines   by lay-men employs eight men drifting up-stream.    An option on this
d'Or du Canada,  property has been taken by Walter Johnson & Company, San Francisco.
The  company  has  done  a considerable  amount  of  prospecting  and
sampling and at present is engaged in sinking a prospect-shaft about 1 mile up-stream
from the present workings in order to do some further prospecting underground in that
area.    A layer of sand or silt, encountered at 103 feet in depth, was causing considerable difficulty.    A drill was being set up in order to determine the thickness of sand
before deciding on the method to be used in getting through it.    The engineer in
charge is Mr. Dorflinger.
McKee Creek.
Hydraulic operations have been abandoned on this creek owing to deep overburden and lack of water. Three underground operations have been started by laymen. George Watts and four partners were engaged in cleaning up and sluicing
tailings from the old hydraulic operations. A 104 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Boulder Creek.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—McLeod White, Manager. The
company is operating an hydraulic mine, employing sixteen men working three shifts.
Fourth of July Creek.
Three groups of men are engaged prospecting underground in the benches on this
Squaw Creek.
About twenty men were engaged in prospecting and ground-sluicing on this creek
and approximately 150 oz. of gold was produced.
TURNAGAIN RIVER AREA.
Wheaton (Boulder) Creek.*
This creek is about 9 miles in length and runs into the Turnagain River from the
south. The creek is about 45 miles east of the south end of Dease Lake, and the junction with the Turnagain is at approximately longitude 129°, latitude 58° 30'.
S.  C. Barrington,  Manager;   Joe Walsh,  Superintendent.    Capital:
Boulder Creek    50,000 shares, no par value.    The company owns the Peacock, Amanda,
Mines, Ltd.      and Philippon leases.    The operation on the Peacock uses a drag-line
shovel with a %-yard bucket on a 47-foot boom.    Fifteen men were
employed.    Boulders on the surface were blasted and handled by bulldozer and those
in the pit were hoisted out by the drag-line shovel.    The depth to bed-rock, in what
appears to be the trough, is about 25 feet.    The gravel and clay are hoisted above
creek-level to a raised flume which can be moved in any direction to suit dumping
requirements.
[* Reference: Bulletin No. 2, 1940.]
These creek leases are owned by J. Wheaton, of Telegraph Creek.
Johnson, Ryan,   Three lay-men, employing one other man, were working a ground-sluice
and Elvira Leases, cut in the creek-bottom on the Elvira lease.    In the autumn two other
lay-men were working on the east side of the creek on the Elvira lease
and two on the Ryan lease.
[Reference: Bulletin No. 2, 1940.]
This creek lease, immediately up-stream from the Peacock lease, is
Roosevelt Lease,  owned by F. Bobner, of Juneau, Alaska.    Bobner and his partner were
attempting to reach bed-rock in a ground-sluice cut.    The cut was
abandoned and a 26-foot shaft was sunk in the creek-bottom without reaching bed-rock.
[Reference:  Bulletin No. 2, 1940.]
Alice Shea Creek.
Sluice Box, Rainbow, Nugget, and Sunset Leases.—The four creek leases On Alice Shea
Creek, a tributary of Wheaton, are owned by V. Shea, of Telegraph Creek. Shea employed three men during the summer and cleaned up about 300 feet along the creek on
the Nugget lease.
[Reference: Bulletin No. 2, 1940.]
MANSON CREEK AREA.*
Lost Creek.
Dunsmore Gold Mines, Ltd.—Company office, 209 Northern Investment Building,
Toronto, Ont.; B.C. office, 601 Bank of Toronto Building, Victoria, B.C. Capital: 350
shares, $100 par. This is the only underground operation in the area. Operations
were suspended in the early summer and have not been resumed.
Company office, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.    Bert McDonald,
Lost Creek Placer Manager.    Capital:   100,000 shares, $1 par.    This company has been
Gold, Ltd.       engaged all summer building a ditch and flume approximately 6 miles
in length to bring 40 second-feet of water from Manson Creek.   Twenty-
* Reference: Annual Report, 1936, Part C. PROGRESS NOTES. A 105
two men were employed and they anticipated getting water through before the end of
the season.
Several groups of men were engaged " sniping " along the banks of Manson Creek.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part C]
Germansen Creek.
Company  office,   Stanley  House,   Hardinge   Street,   Nairobi,   Kenya
Venture Explora- Colony;   B.C. office, Prince Rupert, B.C.    A. A. Lawrie, Secretary;
tion Co. (East    W. H. Eassie, Manager.    Capital:   3,000 shares, no par value.    This
Africa), Ltd.     property was in full operation, running three pits, two of which are
hydraulic and the third operated by drag-line shovel.    Approximately
1,000,000 cubic yards of gravel was moved.    Sixty men were employed.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part C]
Company office, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.      R. C.
Germansen      McCorkell, President;   M. A. Manson, Secretary;   A. A. McCorkell,
Mines, Ltd.      Manager.    Capital:   750,000 shares, 50 cents par.    This company has
been engaged in building a new ditch from the South Germansen River
to the workings on Germansen Creek.    No mining was done.    Forty-five men were
engaged in ditch and flume construction.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1936, Part C]
Tom Creek.
Tom Creek Placers, Ltd.—Company office, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
T. A. Kelley, President; Laura L. McGhee, Secretary; J. J. Warren, Manager. Capital:
250 shares, $100 par. This is a steam-shovel operation which worked two shifts for
most of the season.    Fourteen men were employed.
CARIBOO AREA.
Barkerville-Wells.
Company office, Rust Building, Tacoma, Wash.;   mine office, Barker-
Lowhee Mining   ville, B.C.    C. W. Lea, President and General Manager;   Paul Barker,
Co., Ltd.        Secretary-Treasurer;   Henry Lea, Superintendent.    Capital:   750,000
shares, $1 par;   issued, 635,156.    The company operates an hydraulic
mine on Lowhee Creek, near Barkerville.    An ample supply of water enabled these
operators to put approximately 150,000 cubic yards of gravel through the sluice-boxes
during 1939.
Company office, Royal Trust Building, Vancouver, B.C.    J. A. Wright,
Barkerville Gold  Secretary; C, A. McPherson, Superintendent.   Capital: 200,000 shares,
Mines, Ltd.      $1 par.    The company operates the Waverly Placers on Grouse Creek,
about 4 miles south of Barkerville.    About four men and a No.  6
monitor are employed in cleaning up old workings.    The monitor was operating under
a head of about 100 feet.
French Creek Placers.—During 1939 a small crew of men in charge of G. Stevenson
were attempting to locate the old French Creek channel by hydraulicking through the
rim.    Operations were terminated early in the season.
These placers, which are operated by Duncan Mclntyre, of Barkerville,
Guyet Placers,    are located on the east side of Mount Guyet, about 6 miles southerly
from Barkerville.    In July, five men were employed and a 5-inch nozzle
was operating under a head of 175 feet.
Alert Placers.—A. F. Curtis, Manager. This property is situated across Williams
Creek from the town of Barkerville.    Two men were doing development-work.
This company, with H. Lea as superintendent, was operating the Red
Lowhee Mining   Gulch Placers about 1 mile north-west of Wells, B.C.    Shortly after
Co., Ltd.        July 12th the property was leased to J. J. Gunn, who operated on a
small scale for the remainder of the season.    The Lowhee Company
employed an average of nine men on three shifts between two pits, and piped approximately 50,000 cubic yards of gravel through the sluice-boxes during the period of their
operation. A 106 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Triple Hydraulic Placers.—This operation is located on Cooper Creek, a tributary of
Sugar Creek, about 10 miles north-east of Wells. Three men, using a No. 2 monitor
under a 100-foot head, were employed to do development-work on this property.
Antler Creek.
Antler Gold Mines, Ltd.—This company conducted drilling operations during 1939 on
ground leased on lower Antler Creek.
Wells-Stanley.
The company and R. MacDougall worked the Ketch Placers alongside
Ketch, Ltd.      the Quesnel-Barkerville Road, about 5 miles west of Wells.    Using a
No. 4 and a No. 5 monitor, with a No. 1 for clean-up, a crew of men,
ranging from fifteen at high water to six at low water, were employed at this operation.
A new pit was opened in the autumn and new No. 4 pipe-line and sluice-flume installed
to operate it. The pipe-line is designed to utilize to best advantage the water available
in the spring. Both pits will be operated and the water alternated from one to the
other as required. The banks of the old pit are decreasing in height and those of the
new pit are still low.    A 10-oz. nugget was found in the old pit in 1939.
This property, owned and managed by R. MacDougall, is located on
Dragon Creek    Dragon Creek, about 5 miles northerly from the Ketch Placers.    At
Placers.        the time of inspection, D. 0. Smith was in charge of a four-man crew
and was using a No. 2 monitor, but intended to change to a No. 4. A
new pit has since been opened up-stream, but the lack of dump space for the tailings is
proving troublesome.
Owned and operated by Wm. Hong, of Barkerville. This property is
Sangdang Placers, located on Slough Creek benches,  about a mile north of the Ketch
Placers. As the benches were worked back from the creek this year,
the banks were reduced from 80 to 30 feet in height and the head of water from an
average of 150 feet to an average of 125 feet. A crew of fifteen men on three shifts
was employed throughout the season, and a No. 5, No. 2, and a No. 1 clean-up monitor
were used. About 8 acres of gravels and overburden averaging 60 feet in thickness
were removed, considerable dead-work being done on the overburden. About 1,600
hours water instead of the usual 800 were available.
Owned and operated by Wm. Hong and located about 1 mile south of
Montgomery the Dragon Creek Placers. The pit here is in the development stage,
Creek Placers,    and is being opened up by two men, using a No. 1 monitor.    The banks
are now about 65 feet high. A No. 2 pipe-line, dropping 100 feet in a
distance of 1,400 feet, with a 30-inch intake and a 9-inch outlet, was installed. Five
hundred feet of sluice-flume was also built.
Last Chance Placers.—Owned and operated by Wm. Hong and associates. This operation, located near Stanley, was finished in July, but further prospecting may be carried
out on the benches.
Coulter Creek Placers.—Owned by Julius Powell and John Roth. This property is
located about 2 miles west of the Sangdang Placers. Operating a small hydraulic plant
with a crew of three men, about 20,000 yards were put through the sluice-boxes.
Stanley- Wingdam.
Donovan Creek Placers.—This operation is on the south side of the Wells-Quesnel
Highway, about midway between Stanley and Wingdam. Magnus Sundberg, the owner
and operator, was cleaning up preparatory to turning the property over to other interests.    The deal later fell through.
Company office, Saunders Avenue, Wells, B.C.    H. B. King, Secretary;
Langford Placer   K.  K.  Langford,  Manager.    Capital:    100,000  shares,  $1  par.    The
Mines, Ltd.      company is working the Langford Placers, a mechanical placer operation, located 7 miles north of the highway at Beaver Pass.    After
several seasons of extensive testing with a 6-inch aeroplane-drill, the best site to start
operations was selected and production started late in 1939.    The present plant con- PROGRESS NOTES. A 107
sists of a 50-horse-power caterpillar bulldozer, with an 8-foot blade, to move bench-
gravels to a grizzly and into the sluice-boxes, which are lined with 60-lb. rails in 3-foot
sections; a paramount centrifugal pump, operated by a 68-horse-power Deutz-Diesel,
and capable of delivering 4,000 gallons per minute to the sluice-boxes from Tregillus
Creek, against a head of 10 feet; and a 68-horse-power caterpillar Diesel, operating a
drag-line scraper, to remove the tailings from the sluice-flume. The operating crew
consists of foreman, three operators, sluice-tender, and blacksmith.
Held on a twenty-year placer lease by F. A. Oldfield and Thomas Fry,
Fry's Placer.     and operated by the latter, this hydraulic operation is located on Larsen
Gulch, opening on Rucheon Creek, and is about 4 miles west of the
C.B.A. Placers. Using a No. 2 monitor working under a 150-foot head, Mr. Fry was in
charge of a crew of four men. This property is still in the development stage. A slide
was slowly creeping into the pit from low banks on the south and east sides. Banks up
to 80 feet high on the north side of the pit stood up well. The work to date has been
in the upper gravels.
Operation of E. M. Falck.—Located on Kee Khan Creek, Beaver Pass Valley. This is
an hydraulic and open-sluice operation, and water is obtained by means of a boomer-
dam.    About 4,200 yards of dirt was moved in 1939.
Hyde Creek Placers.—This is a small hydraulic operation near Beaver Pass Valley,
operated by Dr. O. R. Hougen, of Mission City, B.C. It is still in the development stage
and it is reported that 40,000 yards were moved in 1939.    It was not inspected.
Company office, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.    A. M. Stamatis,
Wormald Placers. President;   Wilma M. Berry, Secretary.    Capital:   100,000 shares, $1
par. The company operates a small hydraulic mine on Wormwold
Creek.    It is reported that 3,000 yards of gravels were moved by hydraulicking.
Company office, Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver, B.C.;  mine office,
Consolidated Gold Wingdam, B.C.    J. E. Thompson, President;  R. B. W. Pirie, Secretary-
Alluvials of B.C., Treasurer;  E. E. Mason, General Superintendent.    Capital:   5,000,000
Ltd. shares, $1 par;   issued, 3,753,728.    The Sanderson mine at Wingdam,
property of this company, was closed on April 29th and the workings
allowed to fill with water. The abandonment of the mine was brought about by the
failure by exploratory headings, to the north, to find pay-gravels before an additional
ventilation raise to the surface had to be driven. During the period of operation,
52,435 yards of gravel, chiefly from scavenging operations on the outskirts of the
earlier workings, were mined and treated. From this yardage 1,931 oz. of gold was
recovered, the average value per yard being about $3.60. Scavenging operations and
exploratory headings together accounted for a little over a mile of workings. Since the
property closed, employees of the company have been allowed to carry on " sniping "
operations on the company's property, and some are doing fairly well at this work.
Quesnel-Wingdam .
Jamieson's Placer.—Located on Gagen Creek, about 2 miles above its confluence with
Lightning Creek. H. G. Jamieson, owner and operator, carried out drag-line operations on shallow creek and bench gravels with a small crew of men.
This property is operated on an annual rental basis by Slade Placers,
Slades Placer.    Limited;   Maury Caldwell, Superintendent.    With an average employment of six men and using a No. 4 and a No. 3 monitor about 75,000
yards were put through the sluice-boxes.    A new pit was opened up.    The banks were
about 70 feet high, and the pressure-head 200 feet in the pits.
Quesnel-Prince George.
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.    J. W. Phillips,
Cariboo Cotton-  Manager.    Capital:   250,000 shares, $1 par.    This property is located
wood Placers,    about 7 miles up the Cottonwood River from the Prince George-Quesnel
Highway at Cinema, 20 miles north of Quesnel.    Since development-
work started this year, 3 miles of ditch, 2% feet deep and 11 feet wide at the bottom,
and 2% miles of flume, 3 feet deep and 6 feet wide, have been completed.    A bulldozer A 108 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
moved some 120,000 yards of dirt in making grade for the ditch and flume. Two sawmills were erected and cut about half a million feet of lumber for the flume. Many
miles of road were built to give transportation to and from the camps, mills, and flume.
These roads are now impassable in many places and require gravelling. A shovel was
recently rented from the Bullion Placers to finish the ditch as the mud proved too difficult for the bulldozer's. During the latter part of October, November, and December,
fifty-six men were on the pay-roll, but this number was reduced to thirty at the end of
the year.    Comfortable camps were established for the men.
Property of Jones, Burt, and Ayton.—At this property, located on the Cottonwood River,
7 miles below Cottonwood House, test-pits were sunk in shallow gravels by means of
small " caissons."
Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.    F. K. Frost,
Hixon Quesnelle  Secretary.    Capital:   50,000 shares, $1 par.    The company owns and
Placers, Ltd.     operates two placer leases on Hixon Creek, about 40 miles north of
Quesnel. Brian Briscoe controls the stock and is in charge of operations. This year these operations merely consisted of hydraulicking upper gravels in
an attempt to expose the pay-gravels. A new pit was opened where the pay-gravels
were thought to be at shallow depth, but the lack of dump space makes the operations
difficult. This could probably be overcome by breaking into the channel below the falls
on Hixon Creek. Five men on one shift and a No. 4 monitor under a head of about
100 feet were employed.
Company office, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.   H. D. Young,
Canamco Mining Secretary;   E. B. Skeels, Manager.    Capital:   100,000 shares, $1 par.
Co. The equipment of this company, consisting of a drag-line bucket and
Ainlay bowl plant on a small dredge, was all moved to leases on the east
bank of the Fraser River at Woodpecker. Some 78,000 yards are reported moved, but
latterly operations have been confined to testing the ground by drilling. An average
of seven men were employed.
QUESNEL-WlLLIAMS LAKE.
A. P. Himmelman has a drag-line plant in operation on a large bench
Operation of     15 feet above river-level on the left bank of the Fraser River, immedi-
A. P. Himmelman. ately up-stream from the Alexandria Ferry.    At this point the depth
of pay-gravel is about 11 feet and there are few boulders. The digging
unit is a gasoline-operated boom drag-line, with bucket of % cubic yard capacity The
recovery unit is mounted on skids and comprises a receiving hopper, a grizzly system,
screening to % inch, and sloping tables covered with Brussels carpet overlain by expanded metal screen. This unit has several new features for the recovery of gold from
river-benches in the Cariboo district. Wash-water is pumped from the river by a
centrifugal pump of 800 gallons per minute capacity operated by a Fordson Diesel-
engine. The capacity of the plant is stated to be 400 cubic yards per shift of eight
hours, and a total of four men per shift are required for its operation.
Quesnel River.
The property consists of an extensive bench flanking the north bank of
Operations of    the Quesnel River, 75 feet above river-level, somewhat down-stream
H. Craig, Munn, from a point opposite the mouth of Buxton Creek, where a cable-ferry
and E. J. Reese,   across the river has been constructed.    Pay-gravel, in which are some
large boulders, is from 10 to 15 feet thick and immediately overlies slum.
On the steep bank of the river the receiving and washing bin, screening plant, and
sluice-flume is constructed, and the oversize and tailings discharge into the river.    The
top of the plant is level with the bottom of the pay-gravel, and gravel is pushed to the
plant by a 60-horse-power caterpillar tractor with Le Tourneau bulldozer attachment.
This equipment permits an economic range of operation to within about 200 feet of the
receiving-bin.    Within this range the capacity of the plant is about 500 cubic yards per
eight-hour shift.    For conveyance of gravel outside this range it is proposed to employ
a Fresno scraper.    The sluice-flume is riffled with 20-lb. rails laid longitudinally on PROGRESS NOTES. A 109
2- by 4-inch sills.    Wash-water is pumped from the river by centrifugal pump with
8-inch discharge-pipe operated by a 42-horse-power Diesel engine.
Likely.
L. S. Ferris, Manager.    This hydraulic operation is located on More-
Priority Mines,   head Creek, about 3 miles below Morehead Lake.    The property is still
Ltd. in the development stage and hydraulicking operations are confined to
the upper gravels. The water is controlled by a series of small dams,
and is used for ground-sluicing and for operating a medium-sized monitor under a
head of 150 feet.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part C]
Company office, 917 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, B.C.    R. F. Sharpe,
Bullion Placers,   President  and  Mine  Manager;    H.  Ray,   Secretary-Treasurer.    The
Ltd. company owns and operates the Bullion mine on the South Fork of the
Quesnel River.    It is estimated that 1,135,000 yards of gravel were
piped during 1939 in the Bullion and South Fork pits.    An average of forty-three men
was employed, largely on maintenance-work along the ditch-lines.
Perseverance Gold Mines, Ltd.—L. O. Gosling, Manager. The company is operating
the Perseverance mine on Blackbear Mountain, above Spanish Creek. A crew of four
men were engaged in driving an adit through rim-rock to intersect a placer channel.
Lease of Wm. Johnson and Nigel Campbell.—This lease is located on the Cariboo (North
Fork of the Quesnel) River, about midway between Keithley and Likely. With two
hired men the partners have advanced an adit 70 feet in search of an old channel on
the north bank of the river.
This company, of which J. G. G. Kerry, of the firm of Kerry & Chase,
Quesnel Mining   Montreal, is president, and Chas. S. Buck, manager, holds twenty-one
Co., Ltd.        placer-mining leases, situated on the south bank of the Cariboo River
(formerly named the North Fork of the Quesnel River) and extending
south of the river in the region contiguous to Spanish Creek.    The property includes
that formerly named the Standard Group.    The property is 8 miles from Likely.    The
company's camp buildings are at Spanish Creek, beside the Likely-Keithley motor-road.
A report on this property may be obtained from the Department of Mines, Victoria;  cost, 25 cents.
Keithley.
Company office, 504 Randall Building, Vancouver, B.C.;   mine office,
Placer Engineers, Keithley Creek, B.C.    George Harrison, President;   George V. F. Hud-
Ltd. son, Secretary-Treasurer;   E. Lang, Superintendent.    Capital: 750,000
shares, no par value; issued, 541,452. The company is operating an
hydraulic mine on Keithley Creek about 4 miles from the town of Keithley. The
property is worked on a three-shift basis with a crew of twelve men. During the early
part of the season two monitors were employed in last year's pit. This was later abandoned and one monitor employed in advancing a new pit, known as the China pit,
towards the old Onward workings.
Company office, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.   B. Boe, Manager.
Burrard Placers, Ltd.Capital:   2,000 shares, $1 par;   issued, 2,000 shares.    At Pine Creek,
5 miles east of Keithley, the company employed a maximum of ten
men and it is reported that 300,000 yards were hydraulicked.
Company office,  555  Burrard  Street,  Vancouver,  B.C.    At  Harvey
Harvey Creek    Creek, about 5 miles north-east of Pine Creek, part of the tailings-
Mines, Ltd.      flume was buried by slides during the winter, and little work was
accomplished during the early part of the season.    A crew averaging
five men was employed in ground-sluicing operations in an attempt to reach pay-gravels
down-stream from the old operation, 200,000 yards of dirt being handled.    This property is in the development stage.
Moore's Creek Dredging Co.—The Moore's Creek Dredging Company, of Boise, Idaho,
leased directly or had options on ground on Swift River, Peters Creek, Antler Creek,
and Cunningham Pass.    Extensive testing operations were carried out in 1939. A 110 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Horsefly.
These leases are located on Black Creek, about 1 mile above its conflu-
Leases of       ence with Horsefly River and 19y2 miles from the town of Horsefly.
S. Johnson and   In May, the partners had built 400 feet of flume, installed a pipe-line,
Associates.      and were operating a No. 4 monitor under a head of 86 feet.    They
were experiencing some difficulty with large boulders, many of which
required blasting before they could be moved.    The banks were then only 80 feet high
and the channel proper had not been entered.    The venture was later abandoned.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part C]
NELSON AREA.
This property,  situated on  Hall  Creek,  about 2%  miles above the
Hall Creek      Nelson-Salmo Highway, reverted to the owner, T. E. Levasseur, of
Placers. Nelson, at the termination in 1938 of the operations of the J.D. Mining
and Prospecting Company, Limited.    The equipment still remains the
property of this company.    Several groups of leasers operated the mine spasmodically
in the summer, renting the equipment from the above company and leasing the ground
from the owner.    No attempt was made to recover the black sands.
[Reference:  Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Situated on Forty-nine Creek, about 8 miles from Nelson, and operated
Nelson Placers,   by H. W. Robertson, of Nelson.    Four men were employed during the
Ltd. season.    Work was confined to  small areas  of gravel left by early
operators.    The  equipment consisted  of 4,000  feet  of  2- by  2-foot
lumber flume, 16- to 8-inch pressure-pipe, and two 4-inch monitors.    Gravel was washed
in standard sluice-boxes.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part E.]
Pend-d'Oreille River.
Several small operations, conducted by one or two men, were active along the river
throughout the season.
The A. H. Green Company, of Nelson, did some preliminary work with
A. H. Green      the idea of investigating the possibility of bench-gravels on the south
Placers. side of the Pend-d'Oreille River, about 1 mile below the Red Bridge.
This work included the building of about 2 miles of road in order to be
able to get machinery to the site, digging two or three shallow test-pits, and the building of a timber chute from the top of the bench to the flat just above the river. Equipment put on the ground included a %-yard gasoline-shovel, Diesel tractor and bulldozer,
and two trucks. The operators plan to excavate the gravel by bulldozer and shovel and
convey it to the chute with the trucks. This chute will serve to carry it to the flat
above the river, where it will be washed in standard sluice-boxes, the water being
provided by pumping from the river.
BIG BEND AREA.
This property, situated on McCullough Creek, a tributary of the Gold-
Boulder Lease,    stream, is owned and operated by C. M. Williams and D. M. Fulmore,
No. 202.       of Revelstoke.    This is a drifting operation in which there are about
300 feet of underground workings.    The face of the drift, which has
followed the bed-rock, is about 30 feet below the bed of the present creek.    An interesting feature of the operation is the large amount of native lead which is collected in the
sluice-boxes.
This property, situated on the Big Bend Highway, 62 miles north of
Hail Columbia Lease. Revelstoke, is owned and operated by Alex. McCrae and sons.    Additional equipment installed this season includes 400 feet of wood-stave
pressure-pipe and a single-drum gasoline-powered hoist.    The gravel is ground-sluiced
by booming. PROGRESS NOTES. A 111
LARDEAU AREA.
Situated on Lardeau Creek, about 1% miles above Trout Lake.    This
Universal       operation was conducted by the Universal Placer Mines, Limited, with
Placer Lease.     W. L. Baker in charge.    An attempt was first made to work a section
of the bed of Lardeau Creek by carrying the stream over it in a flume,
but this was abandoned after the flume was carried out by high water.    Subsequent
efforts were directed to working the bed-rock gravels on the creek banks, the water for
sluicing being pumped from the creek.    Mechanical equipment included a 125-gallon-
per-minute pump powered by a 2-horse-power gasoline-engine, a pump of 500-gallons-
per-minute capacity powered by a Model T Ford engine, and a 4-horse-power Fairbanks-
Morse power-winch.
CRANBROOK AREA.
The Nero, Reno, Zero, and Coronation placer leases are held by J. Ewen
Nero Placers,     and D. Oscarson.    The camp is on the Moyie River, just west of the
mouth of Nigger Creek and of the town of Lumberton. It is reached
from Lumberton by 5 miles of road which follows along the north side of the Moyie
River. Gold is being recovered from gravel mined from a buried channel of the river.
Underground workings have crosscut the channel from rim to rim and the channel has
been drifted for 200 feet along its length.
GREENWOOD AREA.
Situated on Boundary Creek, about 2 miles from Midway.    Four men,
Trail and Baird   with W. H. Trail in charge, were employed through the season on this
Placer Lease,     lease.    Bed-rock gravel along the creek banks was mined by sinking
shallow pits which were kept dry by pumping.    The gravel was washed
in standard sluices.
ROCK CREEK AREA.
Situated on Rock Creek, about 3 miles from Camp McKinney.    V. J.
Jolly Creek Placers. Melsted and two partners were engaged in drifting parts of the old
channel of Rock Creek which had not been touched in the early operations.    About 600 feet of drifting and crosscutting was done in 1939.
[Reference:   Annual Report, 1938, Part D.]
BRIDGE RIVER AREA.
With V.  M.  Germain in charge, this company is developing placer
Arangee Mining leases on Marshall Creek.    These are located several miles to the north
Co., Ltd.        of the Bridge River Highway, about midway between Shalalth and
Minto.    About 3 miles of road was built over the existing trail up
Marshall Creek, and a dam and pipe-line constructed.
CLAY AND SHALE.
NEW WESTMINSTER AREA.
Company office, 850 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.    W. C.
Clayburn Co.,    Cummings, Secretary-Treasurer;  J. W. Ball, Manager.    Capital: 4,000
Ltd. shares, $100 par.    The mines and plant of this company are situated
about 50 miles east of Vancouver.    Fireclay, firebrick, sewer-pipe, and
common brick are produced at this plant.    The fireclay deposits are at Kilgard and are
worked by underground methods similar to coal-mining.    Twelve men are employed
underground.    The production for the year amounted to 11,547 tons fireclay and 1,144
tons of shale.
I A 112 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
GABRIOLA ISLAND.
Gabriola Shale Products, Ltd.—Charles T. DeLong, Manager. Operations were resumed
for the season in June at this property and continued steadily until the middle of
November, with a force of twenty-four men engaged. Brick is produced and shipped
principally to Vancouver.
GYPSUM.
FALKLAND AREA.
Company office, Paris, Ont.;   B.C. office, 804 Richards Street, Van-
Gypsum, Lime,   couver, B.C.    R. Haire, President;  S. H. Reid, Secretary; Alex. Jessi-
and Alabastine,   man, Superintendent.    Capital:   100,000 shares, no par value.    The
Canada, Ltd.     company owns and operates four gypsum quarries, situated on the
north side of the Kamloops-Vernon Highway, at Falkland, longitude
119° 33', latitude 50° 30'.    The gypsum is transported from the quarries to the Okanagan branch of the Canadian National Railways by a 3,500-foot aerial tram.    It is
shipped to Port Mann, where the calcining and borax plants are located.    Nos. 2 and 4
quarries were operated during the year.    Twenty-three men were employed.
LIMESTONE.
* 	
KOEYE RIVER AREA.
There are two small quarries owned and operated by Pete Christenson,
Koeye River     on Koeye River, longitude 127°  52', latitude 51° 47', about 7 miles
Quarry. south of Namu, on Fitzhugh Sound.    They supply the entire lime
rock requirements of Pacific Mills, Limited, at Ocean Falls.    Eight
men were employed and a total of 12,642 tons was produced.
GRAND FORKS AREA.
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—The Company owns the Fife limestone quarry at Fife, longitude 118° 12', latitude 49° 05'. Development included 160
feet of drifting and 160 feet of raising. About 24,000 tons of limestone was mined
and shipped to the company's smelter at Trail. An average of eighteen men was
employed.
TEXADA ISLAND.
Pacific Lime Co.—O. Peele, Manager. Work has been fairly steady throughout the
year at the two quarries operated by this company at Blubber Bay. The plant produces
quicklime, hydrated lime, and other limestone products. Twenty-six men are regularly
engaged in the quarries.
B.C. Cement Co.—This company operates a quarry on the opposite shores of Blubber
Bay from the Pacific Lime Company. The limestone from the quarry is shipped to the
Bamberton cement plant.    Robert Hamilton is in charge.
Van Anda Quarries.—Operated by F. J. Beale at Vananda. Work has been good here
throughout the year, with an increase of production of limestone and limestone
products.    Twenty-seven men are employed.
VANCOUVER ISLAND.
B.C. Cement Co.—Office, Belmont Building, Victoria, B.C. Capital: 32,000 shares,
$100 par. The company operates two limestone quarries, one at Bamberton, the other
on Texada Island, and a cement plant at Bamberton. The total crew for the whole
operation is more than 100 men. PROGRESS NOTES. < A 113
STONE, SAND, GRAVEL.
VANCOUVER AREA.
Burrard Inlet.
Coast Quarries, Ltd.—T. Burrows, Superintendent. The quarries of this company are
situated at Granite Falls, near the head of Burrard Inlet. The stone is used in general
construction-work.    From seven to ten men are employed.
North Vancouver.
Deeks Sand and Gravel, Ltd.—Company office, 101 First Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. H. S.
Armstrong, Secretary;  T. 0. Burgess, Superintendent.    Thirteen men were employed.
Cascade Sand and Gravel Co.—Company office, 470 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
W. J. Timlick, Secretary-Treasurer; W. A. McCullum, Manager. Capital: 1,000
shares, $100 par. Fifteen men are employed at this plant. General repair-work was
carried out on the equipment.
B.C. Sand and Gravel Co.—Company office, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
W. J. Morrison, President; G. E. McCrosson, Secretary; C. Eyre, Manager. Capital:
1,000 shares, $100 par.    A new screening plant was erected.    Five men were employed.
Road Materials Co.—Company office, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C. A
Ellis, Secretary and Manager. Capital: 100 shares, $100 par. Six men were employed at the plant and in the gravel-pit.
Gilley Bros. Quarry.—The plant and quarry of this company are situated at Silver
Valley on the Pitt River.    From twenty to thirty men are employed.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Quarry.—Operated by Gilley Bros., Limited, and situated on
the banks of the Fraser River. About sixteen men were employed. Plant and equipment kept in good condition. '
Nelson Island.
Vancouver Granite Co.—This company operates a dimension stone granite quarry on
Nelson Island.   Work has been intermittent throughout the year. A 114 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in District.
Coast Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster,
Yale, and Nanaimo.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel,
Cariboo, Peace River, and that portion of the Omineca east of the
123rd degree of longitude.
Interior Similkameen, Osoyoos, Nicola, Vernon, and Kamloops.
East Kootenay and Boundary Greenwood, Grand Forks, Trail Creek,
Nelson, Slocan City, Slocan, Arrow
Lake, Ainsworth, Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort Steele, Windermere, and
Golden.
Northern Queen Charlotte Islands, Bella Coola,
Stikine, Portland Canal, Skeena,
Atlin, and that portion of Omineca
west of the 124th degree of longitude.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their
respective districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson..... Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard  Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an
examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to
coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for
a period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard NichoL... Nanaimo Station.
James L. Brown , Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould..— Princeton Station.
John T. Puckey Fernie Station.
The District Inspectors of Mines have their headquarters in the different mining
areas as follows: John MacDonald, Nanaimo; James Strang, Victoria; Edward R.
Hughes, Cumberland; James A. Mitchell, Lillooet; John G. Biggs, Princeton; Hamilton C.
Hughes, Nelson; H. E. Miard, Fernie;  and Charles Graham, Prince Rupert.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended
December, 1939, was 1,477,872 tons, being an increase of 168,444 tons or 12.8 per cent,
over production of 1938.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton, and the
Northern Districts, produced 915,914 tons, an increase of 40,554 tons or 4.6 per cent,
over 1938. New passenger-car, built by the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, for use at
Britannia Mines.
■■■'■;-   -■■:■■
Curran-Knowles by-product coke-ovens with coke-pushing machine, right foreground, and bee-hive coke-ovens
in background—Michel Colliery of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited.  INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 115
Vancouver Island collieries produced 717,334 tons, an increase of 32,936 tons or
4.8 per cent, over 1938.
The Northern District produced 4,768 tons, an increase of 778 tons over 1938.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 193,812 tons, an increase of 6,840 tons or
3.6 per cent, over 1938.
The East Kootenay District produced 561,958 tons, an increase of 127,890 tons or
29.4 per cent, over 1938.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the
year of the various mines:—
Colliery and Mine.
cj oj u
ceS
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Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine).
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)..
Northfield Colliery —
South Wellington (No. 10 mine).
Reserve Colliery.—	
Lantzville Colliery	
Fiddick mine  	
Chambers' mine.  	
Beban's mine 	
Loudon's mine...  	
Cassidy mine	
Biggs' mine 	
Lewis' mine 	
Sunshine (Clifford) mine..
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd	
Middlesboro Colliery 	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co., Ltd-
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co 	
Black mine (Glover) 	
Hat Creek Colliery	
Bulkley Valley Colliery	
Aveling Colliery   	
Coal Creek Colliery.  ——	
Michel Colliery :	
246,
81
132,
82,
146,
4,
2,
17,
,074
,403
.860
.695
.367
,342
108
677
464
30
710
692
840
272
1,857
!,088
),428
5.026
12
401
,,675
93
103,
458,
375
583
244
204
242
247
261
246
94
194
203
19
190
190
273
119
194
147
241
233
103
205
18
158
244
617
219
308
230
350
17
4
7
56
2
2
2
3
1
164
99
113
32
2
12
2
152
579
1.63
1.82
1.78
1.45
1.60
1.03
0.28
1.90
1.53
0.79
4.50
1.82
1.02
2.28
2.35
1.51
2.95
2.15
1.29
1.90
2.55
4.30
3.25
372
431
359
418
255
27
368
312
15
855
346
280
272
456
223
711
501
6
133
680
793
485
193
271
199
132
12
4
6
35
2
2
2
91
64
89
24
2
2
113
425
2.07
2.07
2.02
1.69
4.24
1.47
0.28
2.16
2.45
0.79
4.50
1.82
1.02
2.28
4.23
2.34
3.74
2.86
1.94
2.84
2.55
5.79
4.42
507
422
490
419
1,109
362
27
429
499
15
855
346
280
272
822
345
903
668
6
200
915
1,079
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island Collieries was 717,334 tons. Of this amount,
71,018 tons or 9.9 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 47,105 tons or
6.5 per cent, was consumed by producing companies as fuel; 611,615 tons was sold in
the competitive market, of which 12,404 tons was taken from stock; thus 83.5 per
cent, of the output was sold.
Of the amount sold in the competitive market, 570,730 tons or 93.3 per cent, was
sold in Canada and 40,885 tons or 6.7 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries of the Nicola-Princeton District.
Of the gross output of 193,812 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-
Princeton District, 14,814 tons or 7.7 per cent, was consumed by producing companies
as fuel and 178,998 tons or 92.3 per cent, was sold in the competitive markets in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries in the East Kootenay District was 561,958 tons. Of
this amount, 25,751 tons or 4.5 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market; 15,763
tons or 2.8 per cent, was used by the producing companies as fuel; 78,228 tons or 13.9
per cent, was used in making coke;   and 442,526 tons was sold in the competitive A 116
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
market.    Of this amount, 384,706 tons or 86.9 per cent, was sold in Canada and 57,820
tons or 13.1 per cent, was sold in the United States.
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the
past five years. Similar figures for the years prior to 1935 are shown in previous
Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of Tons of Coal
Employees mined per
at Producing ■   Employee for
Collieries. Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
1935
1936
1938
1939   J
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province...	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District-	
Whole Province 	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District-—	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District
Coast District	
Whole Province 	
407,110
780,858
1,187,968
470,606
875,865
1,346,741
459,136
985,551
1,444,687
434,068
875,360
1,309,428
561,958
915,914
1,477,872
819
2,152
2,971
606
2,208
2,814
628
2,525
3,153
693
2,269
2,962
731
2,245
2,976
497
363
399
776
396
478
731
390
458
626
386
442
768
468
496
614
1,531
2,145
459
1,556
2,015
462
1,824
2,286
467
1,621
2,088
538
1,629
2,167
663
510
554
1,025
563
668
972
540
632
972
540
676
1,044
562
682
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various
collieries and districts, compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 117
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
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LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1939, 2,976 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the
Province, an increase of fourteen men over 1938.
Taking the average of all the mines in the Vancouver Island District, about 22 per
cent, of the working-days was lost through lack of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton
District the different collieries worked on an average of 68 per cent, of the working-
days.    In the East Kootenay District the average for the year was about 67 per cent.
The table on page 118 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and about
the mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground and
above ground, compiled from returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1939 imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled
192,300,000 gallons; in addition to this, 28,000,000 gallons was imported duty free for
use in ships' bunkers.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1939 the importation of coal into British Columbia consisted of 2,441 tons
of bituminous coal and 1,785 tons of lignite coal from the United States. There were
no other imports of coal during the year.
Alberta coal sold in British Columbia amounted to 239,227 tons. In addition to
this, 68,871 tons of Alberta coke and 3,516 tons of Alberta briquettes were sold in this
Province.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia
during past years:—■
Year. Short Tons. Year. Short Tons.
1930  227,385 1935  221,748
1931  193,060 1936  244,928
1932  136,188 1937  269,023
1933  119,026 1938  238,435
1934  123,968 1939  239,227
Of the 1,237,752 tons of British Columbia coal marketed, 87,034 tons was sold for
domestic and industrial use in the Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and
Ontario, and 197,232 tons was sold for railroad consumption in these Provinces; 8,073
tons was sold for use on U.S. railroads and 183,278 tons was sold for railroad use in
British Columbia; 98,705 tons was exported to the United States and 222,932 tons was
sold for ships' bunkers. The tonnage of coal used in the Province being 623,818 tons
of British Columbia coal, 311,614 tons of Alberta coal, coke, and briquettes, and 4,226
tons of imported coal.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1939, 2,976 persons were employed in and around coal mines. Two fatal
accidents occurred during the year as compared with ten for 1938.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 0.67 as compared with
3.37 for 1938. In 1937 the ratio was 3.17; in 1936, 2.84; in 1935, 1.67; in 1934, 2.07;
in 1933, 0.97; in 1932, 2.21; in 1931, 1.22; and in 1930, 11.62. The average for the
ten-year period being 3.34.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1939 was 1.35;
during 1938 the figure was 7.63; in 1937, 6.92; in 1936, 5.94; in 1935, 4.21; in 1934,
4.45; in 1933, 2.37; in 1932, 5.21; in 1931, 2.81; and in 1930, 28.64. The average for
the ten-year period being 7.65 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined. A 120
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred
during 1939 and comparative figures for 1938:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1939.
1938.
Western Fuel Corporation, Ltd...
F. Beban Lumber Co :.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd —
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.— -.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.,.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd—
Totals	
No. 1 mine	
Beban mine-
No. 5 mine	
No. 4 mine.—.
Coal Creek.	
Michel	
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents in 1939 and their
percentage of the whole, with corresponding figures for 1938:—
Cause.
No.
Per Cent.
1938.
No.
Per Cent.
By falls of roof and coal—
By mine-cars and haulage...
By mine explosions	
By bumps —-
Miscellaneous	
50.00
50.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
10.00'
Totals..
100.00
10
100.00'
i
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident
in their respective classes in the years 1939 and 1938:—
Cause.
By falls of roof and coal	
By mine-cars and haulage..
By mine explosions	
By bumps.. 	
Miscellaneous ,—n_
Totals ....
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
1938.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
1,477,872
1,477,872
738,936
Tons of Coal
mined per
Fatal Accident.
10'
436,476
436,476
436,476
1,309,428
130,942
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1939 was 738,986 tons compared with 130,942 tons in 1938.    The average for the ten-year period was 130,702 tons.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during
the year 1939 compared with 1938, according to Inspection Districts:—
i
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Total.
,'                               District.          :   ,  ,
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-
cars and
Haulage.
Mine
Explosion.
Bumps.
Miscellaneous.
1939.
1938.
1
1
—
—
—
1
1
8
i
	
Province (1939), -  -     	
i   I    i   j   —   j   —
—
2
Province (1938)  - !-
10 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 121
Ratio of Accidents.
District.
Accident Death-rate.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons of
Coal mined.
1939.
1938.
1939.
1938.
0.55
2.42
0.54
2.41
11.54
1.39
5.15
1.46
5.34
18.43
0.67
3.37
1.35
7.63
Vancouver Island-
Nicola-Princeton—
East Kootenay-	
Northern	
Totals (1939).
Totals (1938)..
The details regarding the occurrences of the fatal accidents in coal mines during
1939 are as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to Otis Barrett, driver, Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.,
on May 16th, was due to deceased being caught and thrown down on the floor by the
first car, which was derailed, of a four-car loaded trip he was taking from a parting to
the main slope. There were no witnesses to this accident and deceased was dead when
found.
There was ample width and height on this level and there was so little grade that
the horse had to pull the trip all the way. When the accident was discovered, the horse
was uncoupled from the trip and standing 12 feet in front of it.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alexander Webster, miner, Beban mine, on
October 17th, was due to a fall of coal in his working-place. This place was in disturbed ground with numerous slips in the seam and roof, and the coal fell from one of
these slips ahead of the actual working-face.
Efficient spragging to meet the known conditions in this place would have averted
this fatality.
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during
1939, together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of
explosive used, and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities
include all explosives used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines) :—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
50,558
26,900
55,916
37,300
25,842
5,600
250
1,700
14,000
20
450
300
700
125
246,074
81,403
132,860
82,595
146,367
4,342
108
2,577
17,464
30
1,710
692
840
272
75,018
52,200
75,424
44,038
37,958
8,200
400
3,700
23,000
15
1,100
400
1,000
150
4.86
3.02
2.37
2.21
5.66
0.77
0.43
1.51
1.24
1.50
3.80
2.30
1.20
2.17
0.67
0.51
0.74
South Wellington (No. 10 mine) 	
0.84
0.68
0.68
0.62
0.46
0.61
Loudon's mine    -	
Cassidy mine. —	
1.33
0.41
0.75
0.70
Sunshine (Clifford) mine— —- 	
0.83
219,661
717,334
322,603
3.26
0.68 A 122
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosives
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
i
24.795              74.857
36,500
7,725
19,900
7,150
3.01
4.45
4.74
4.93
1.33
0.67
Middlesboro Collieries  __ 	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co., Ltd.
4,950
16,950
3,250
22,088
80,428
16,026
12
401
0.64
0.86
0.45
Hat Creek Colliery  ' _
300
600
0.50
50,245
193,812
71,875
3.85
0.69
Northern District.
1,700
44
4,675
93
2,500
47
2.75
2.11
0.68
0.93
1,744
4,768
2,547
2.73
0.68
East Kootenay District.
1
41,212
1     103,375
458,583
4
57,850
103,375.00
11.12
0.25
Michel Colliery   	
0.71
41,213
|     561,958
57,854
13.63
0.71
312,863
1,477,872
454,879
4.72
0.68
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Lb.
Monobel of different grades  275,953
Permissible rock-powder —     36,910
Total  312,863
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable the Minister of Mines, under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause
(i), " Coal-mines Regulation Act ":—
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
Polar Monobel No. 7.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1939, mining-machines produced approximately 921,225 tons or
62.3 per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type
of machine used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Chain Under-
cutting.
Puncher
Type.
Vancouver Island  - —	
28
24
29
19
2
9
24
27
Totals                            	
81
21
60 INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 123
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,249 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this
number, 215 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,034 were electric lamps of
various makes, as follows:  Edison, 1,974;  Wolf electric, 60.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking,
and illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery and Mine.
Method of Locking.
Magnetic
Lock.
Automatic
Clip.
Illuminant used.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Comox Colliery (No. 5 mine)-.
Comox Colliery (No. 8 mine)-
Northfield Colliery	
South Wellington (No. 10 mine).
Reserve Colliery	
Lantzville Colliery	
Fiddickmine 	
Chambers' mine	
Beban's mine  —
Loudon's mine ,	
Cassidy mine 	
Biggs' mine-    	
Lewis' mine.  	
Sunshine (Clifford) mine-
Totals for district..
40
25
22
10
12
2
2
2
7
1
2
1
1
3
291
212
292
105
190
12
4
10
79
2
5
4
2
130
1,216
40
25
22
10
12
2
2
2
7
1
2
1
1
130
291
212
292
105
190
12
4
10
79
2
5
4
2
8
1,216
Nicola-Princeton District.
6
8
6
1
1
2
99
68
93
34
2
6
6
8
6
1
1
2
99
68
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co.
Ltd	
93
34
Black mine (Glover)    -~
2
6
24
302
24
302
Northern District.
i
2
9
1
2
9
3
9
1
3
9
East Kootenay District.
12
46
130
377
12
46
130
377
58
507
58
507
215
2,034
215
2,034
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the
1930 Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18, and
is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. A 124 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp
approval given under Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp
carries the symbol BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the
General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18h of the United States Bureau of
Mines. This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States
Bureau of Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol
BM-18H and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric
Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and
is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and
is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.    This lamp is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
No. 13.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Koehler Manufacturing Company,
and known as the Super-Wheat Model " W " electric safety cap-lamp under Approval
No. 20 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the
Department of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all
persons underground in the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by
the officials of the mines in the carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at twelve mines and underground at five.
The purpose for which it was used, together with the amount of horse-power in
each instance, is shown in the following table:—
Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Above ground—
Winding or hoisting  2,238
Ventilation   945
Haulage  366
Coal-washing  476
Miscellaneous   5,704
Total horse-power     9,729
Underground—
Haulage .'.     1,190
Pumping      1,330
Coal-cutting	
Miscellaneous     1,045
Total horse-power      3,565
Total horse-power above and below ground  13,294
Of the above amount, approximately 1,183 horse-power was operated as direct current and 12,111 as alternating current. INSPECTION OF MINES. A 125
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the
amount of ventilation in the main airways and working splits of the different mines.
In a number of instances where the methane content of the air on the face-lines tended
to become too high the Inspectors prohibited the use of explosives until the outflow of
methane decreased or sufficient additional ventilation was provided. In such cases the
Inspector makes a further inspection before the use of explosives is again permitted.
All such instances were due to excessive methane outflows and none was due to the
volume of the ventilation reaching the minimum of 100 cubic feet per man per minute
set out by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," General Rule 2. These instances were in
Nos. 5 and 8 Mines, Comox Colliery;   and No. 10 Mine, South Wellington.
Methane Detection.
The Burrell Methane Detector was in general use throughout the year to detect the
presence of methane in percentages less than could be detected by the flame safety-lamp.
During the year the M.S.A. Methane Detector was tried and approved for use in
detecting small percentages of methane, and several are now in use at mines on Vancouver Island.    By " small percentages of methane " is meant less than 1 per cent.
The standard flame safety-lamp still remains the chief practical means of detecting
methane in the general working of the mine, and if all the information available from
the use of the flame safety-lamp in the hands of an experienced fireboss or miner is
given practical application the danger from methane can be kept at a minimum.
Although practically all workmen underground use the electric safety-lamp for
their ordinary work, efforts were made during the year to have all applying for certificates of competency as coal-miners to have previous instruction in the care of the flame
safety-lamp and its use as a methane detector. In addition, many of the older miners
at different mines were given practical instruction on this point.
Mine-air Samples.
Consistent sampling of mine-air was maintained at the various mines, this varying
in the number of samples with the conditions obtaining. During the year 381 samples
were taken, and of this number fifty-five were lost or destroyed in transit. The samples
are analysed by the Dominion Department of Mines and the analyses reports not only
form a valuable record but are a very definite aid to the Inspectors of Mines and mine
officials in the work of estimating " gas-caps " on the flame safety-lamps when tests are
made at time and place of sampling.
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
With the exception of several small operations where only a few men are employed,
all the mines in the Province had inspection committees appointed by the workmen
under General Rule 37, section 101, " Coal-mines Regulation Act," in operation throughout the year.
COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust as per the Regulations for Precautions against Coal-dust was well
maintained at the different mines throughout the year and a total of 1,424 samples were
taken; and where any sample showed less than 50 per cent, of incombustible matter
steps were taken to have that part of the mine given further rock-dust treatment.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On January 3rd a short circuit occurred in a transformer in the main pump-room
at the bottom of No. 5 shaft, Comox Colliery; the transformer was destroyed but no
further damage resulted, as the occurrence was discovered immediately.
On February 8th a small fire occurred on one of the long-wall faces at No. 5 mine,
Comox Colliery, due to a persistent attempt being made to cut through a " nigger-head "
encountered by the coal-cutting machine. Sparks of sufficient intensity and duration
were produced to ignite gas being produced from the cut.    This gas, and probably A 126 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
some of the cutting, burned until workmen in the immediate vicinity, on their own
initiative, coupled up a hose-line to a pump and extinguished the fire. This coal-cutting
machine was driven by compressed air and there was no electrical apparatus in this
area.
On February 14th, in No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, a small fire occurred in a
75-horse-power electric haulage motor, due to the trip being derailed and causing an
overload on the motor. The fire was enxtinguished by the application of the dry sand
kept at all electrical installations for this purpose.
On March 4th, while the last cage of night-shift men was being hoisted in the
Northfield shaft, the emergency brake of the hoist went into operation when the cage
was half-way up the shaft and brought the cage to rest suddenly, with a considerable
jarring of the men, although no one was injured. Careful inspection failed to reveal
any defect. This electric hoist is fitted with overspeed and overwind preventive
apparatus. Following this occurrence the overspeed was fixed at a maximum of 500
feet per minute.
On March 13th spontaneous combustion was discovered in the slope section of
No. 4 mine, Coalmont Collieries.    This section was sealed off and, later, flooded.
On March 19th, at Reserve No. 1 shaft, where one of the ropes had just been
reconed, the hoistman, while operating the hoist to adjust new station-marks on the
drum, omitted to reverse when one of the cages had been brought to the surface. When
he again started the hoist this cage was drawn up to the rope-detaching apparatus at
the overwind limit; the device operated efficiently and left the cage suspended on the
safety-hooks.    There were no men in the cage and no damage was done.
On April 7th spontaneous combustion was discovered in the inner heading of
No. 4 mine, Coalmont Collieries. This section was sealed off. About 10 acres was
enclosed by the fire seals, which remained undisturbed until the abandonment of the
mine at the end of December.
On May 5th, in the Beban mine, advance precautionary drill-holes tapped a body
of water in an area shown by the old plans of this prospect to be unworked ground.
The men were immediately withdrawn from the mine until this water was drained off
and the area of the unrecorded old workings determined. Some 4,000,000 gallons of
water was drained through the bore-holes before the water stopped running, after
which the barrier was cut through for investigation.
On May 15th, in No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, a short circuit in a 20-k.v.a. transformer caused a fire which destroyed the transformer.    No further damage resulted.
On June 6th an outbreak of fire, due to spontaneous combustion, was discovered in
No. 1 South section, Reserve mine. All men were immediately withdrawn from the
mine except a small crew to deal with the fire by sealing off the area. While this work
was being carried on a slight explosion occurred in the area, but as the sealing was
being carried on at some distance from the fire and the explosion did not extend to that
point, no one was injured. Following this occurrence the fire-fighting crew was withdrawn until a thorough inspection was made, after which the work of sealing was
resumed and completed without further trouble on June 11th.
On July 20th a water-pipe on the cooling system of an underground motor-driven
compressor in No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, broke and discharged water on to a 2,200-
volt cable at a point where the cable had been spliced, causing a short circuit. The
damage was slight as only some insulation was burned.
On September 8th the main haulage-rope on the Main slope, No. 5 mine, Comox
Colliery, broke while hoisting a trip of coal-cars. A safety-car is in service on all trips
on this slope, but the safety-car had just been uncoupled at the top of the slope when
the rope broke. The trip was derailed by a safety-switch situated 100 feet below the
top landing. A new rope was installed immediately. The miners are hoisted on this
slope at the end of each shift. INSPECTION OF MINES.
A 127
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1939 there were four prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act," as follows:—
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
April 13-
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.,
No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery
Fireboss __
Failed to make the required examination for the presence of gas before
firing a shot
Fined $25 and costs.
May 6
Canadian Collieries (D.),Ltd.,
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery
Timber-packer...
Had a lucifer match in his possession while underground
Fined $5 and costs.
Oct. 25-.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.,
No. 8 mine, Comox Colliery
Fireboss 	
Fired a shot without having all approaches properly guarded
Fined $50 and costs.
Nov. 22...
Rope-rider „
Failed to have a safety-drag on a
Fined $10 and costs.
mine
trip of loaded ears
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four fully-equipped mine-rescue stations in charge
of trained instructors located in the chief mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo, Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie. At any of these stations persons engaged in mining
may be trained without cost, either on their own application or by request from any
mining company. Where a mine is some distance from the rescue-station the instructor, by arrangement, will take the rescue apparatus to such mine and give the
necessary training there;  this also without cost.
In addition to the above stations, a fully-equipped station with apparatus provided
by the Department is maintained at Middlesboro Collieries, Merritt, under the care of
the mine management, and a smaller unit of rescue apparatus is stationed at the
Premier mine, Stewart. The use of these stations and apparatus is available to any
medical practitioner, and during the year many requests for oxygen and apparatus for
administering same are received and given immediate response.
In the larger mining areas of Nanaimo, Cumberland, and the Crowsnest Pass,
experienced mine-rescue teams maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the
year and so keep ready for any emergency calls. The rescue-stations also serve as
centres for first-aid lectures and training.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual
use of oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere and instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-
work. The training itself is strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a
special physical examination before starting training and must be under thirty-four
years of age.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, twenty-three new
men took the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where trained.
1047
Nanaimo.
Wellington.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
1059
1060
1061
1062
1063
1064
1065
1066
1067
1068
1069
Cyril Hugh Poole 	
Thorn as Somerville	
1048
1049
Hugh Marr Gilmour	
Leonard Cooper	
James Wilson Dunn	
James Alexander Hamilton ... .
John Robert Neen  	
Wm. Henry Hamilton.-.	
Cumberland.
1050
1051
1052
1053
1054
Ppt.pr Qupen
Walt.pr Oftlclpy
Thomas Harkins 	
James Marshall	
Walter Bullock 	
Arthur Dempster Hales	
John Fulla 	
Colin McArthur.	
Bevan.
Bevan.
Bevan.
Bevan.
1055
1056
Andrew Dunn—	
Bevan.
1057
1058
Andrew Harvey	
Harry Pollitt.	
Nanaimo. A 128
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
MINE-RESCUE AND FIRST-AID WORK.
Mine-rescue teams carried on training at the mine-rescue stations at Nanaimo,
Cumberland, Princeton, and Fernie, and the different Mine Safety Associations were
active in promoting first-aid and mine-safety work during the year.
There are Mine Safety Associations at East Kootenay, Princeton, Vancouver
Island, Britannia, Bridge River, and Portland Canal, and it is hoped that this work
will extend to the Sheep Creek and Zeballos areas during 1940. The membership of
these Mine Safety Associations consists of mine officials and working miners who are
particularly interested in safety-work, and the Inspector of Mines for each district
takes active steps to assist in every possible way to spread this work. The Mine Safety
Associations are assisted financially by the Department of Mines, and at all the different
centres competitions in mine-rescue work, safety, and first aid were held and materially
resulted in an increasing number of miners being interested in working more safely
themselves and in spreading safety education generally.
It may be added that while this safety and first-aid movement was originally
started for the mining industry, these competitions have attracted men and teams from
the logging camps, pulp industry, military units, and several other industries where
large groups of men are employed.
In addition to male teams, large numbers of ladies', boys', and girls' first-aid teams
take part, and these also help to spread the gospel of " safety first."
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year twenty coal companies operated twenty-seven mines, employing
2,167 men underground.    In the supervision of underground employees there were
eleven managers, nineteen overmen, 103 firebosses and shotlighters, a total of 133, or
one official for every sixteen persons employed underground.
"COAL SALES ACT."
During the year a number of complaints in the Victoria and Vancouver areas were
investigated. These complaints were either on the substitution of an inferior grade
of coal for a superior grade or excessive slack in lump or nut coal.
In the Vancouver area valuable assistance is rendered by the Weights and Measures
Inspector for Vancouver City, who keeps a close check on the sale of coal in the city.
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief
Inspector of Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales
Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Colliery and District.
Producing Company.
Comox 	
Old Wellington	
Ladysmith-Wellington..
Ladysmith-Extension	
Hi-Carbon 	
Lantzville-Wellington...
Fiddick-Douglas _	
Chambers-Extension	
Wellington Big Flame..
Biggs-Wellington 	
Berkley Creek-Little Wellington..
Nanaimo Jingle Pot	
Cassidy-Wellington	
Middlesboro  _
Coalmont   .  	
Tulameen Valley Coal, Princeton.
Granby Tulameen. 	
Hat Creek .
Bulkley Valley	
Aveling    	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek..
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Nos. 5 and 8 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland)..
No. 9 mine (Wellington)  _
No. 10 mine (South Wellington).
No. 8 mine (Extension) 	
Mixture of Canadian Collieries' coal and B.C. Electric coke
Lantzville (Lantzville) 	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington).
Chambers (Extension) 	
Richardson mine  	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)  	
Berkley Creek Colliery (Extension).
Old East Wellington (Nanaimo)	
Cassidy mine (Cassidy)	
Middlesboro (Merritt)	
Coalmont (Coalmont)	
Tulameen (Princeton )	
Granby (Princeton)	
Hat Creek (Lillooet).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa).
Aveling (Telkwa)	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek)..
Michel (Michel) . 	
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.),Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.),Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Lantzville Colliery.
Fiddick mine.
R. H. Chambers.
A. Richardson.
Biggs' mine.
Hugh McLean Davidson.
Thos. Lewis.
A. H. Carroll.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Canada Coal and Development
Co., Ltd.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. A 129
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; H. E. Miard, member; and
James Strang, member and Secretary to the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Department of Mines in
Victoria. The examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the
Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929.
Two examinations were held in 1939; the first on May 17th, 18th, and 19th, and the
second on November 15th, 16th, and 17th.
The total number of candidates at the examinations were as follows: For Second-
class Certificates, 3 (1 passed and 2 failed) ; for Third-class Certificates, 18 (7 passed
and 11 failed) ;   for Mine Surveyors, 2 (1 passed and 1 failed).
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various
classes:—■
Second Class.—John H. Vaughan.
Third Class.—Muir Frame, William Hunchuk, Glyn Lewis, Thomas McCann,
Lome B. Perry, John Queen, and Daniel Chester.
Mine Surveyor.—Stanley J. Lawrence.
Harold Baird was granted a First-class Certificate without written examination,
under section 42 (2) of the Act.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under
the Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the
holder of a certificate of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed
underground in any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid,
whether by hand or machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all the coal-mining districts.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate has failed to
satisfy the Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working
knowledge of the English language.
During 1939 there were 91 candidates for coal-miner's certificates; of these 80
passed and 11 failed to qualify.
In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute certificates were issued to
those who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for
the use of their premises for holding the examinations when necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate as
a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of a coal-
miner for a period not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination
before the Board. A 130 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
Richard Nichol.
The equipment at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen
apparatus; six sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the
Burrell all-service gas-masks; two H.H. inhalators; one Sparklet resuscitator; and
seventy self-rescuers. A sufficient supply of materials to maintain the above equipment in service is kept at all times.
An 85-horse-power truck is kept at this station to permit the immediate transportation of the equipment in case of emergency.
Trained teams from the different mines underwent a monthly practice and eleven
new men took the full training course and obtained certificates of proficiency in this
work.
During the year seventeen calls for oxygen from the Nanaimo hospital, Ladysmith
hospital, and local medical practitioners were given immediate attention.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one Sparklet resuscitator;
one H.H. inhalator; and forty self-rescuers; with sufficient supplies to maintain the
equipment in service.
During the year four trained teams carried out rescue training, and twelve new
men underwent the full training course and obtained certificates.
Emergency calls for oxygen by the local hospital and medical men were attended to
at once, 600 cubic feet being supplied in response to the various calls.
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; eleven sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; twenty self-rescuers; one
H.H. inhalator;   with sufficient supplies to maintain the above in service.
During the year the Instructor from this station made a number of visits to Copper
Mountain and trained nineteen men in the use of the rescue apparatus. These men
took the full training course and obtained certificates of proficiency in this work. In
addition to the mine-rescue work a large number of men were given training in first-
aid work.
Several calls from the local hospital for oxygen treatment during the year were
given immediate attention. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. A 131
FERNIE.
BY
J. T. Puckey.
The apparatus at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen
apparatus; eleven sets of the McCaa apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service
gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; and thirty-five self-rescuers; with sufficient supplies
to maintain the equipment in service. There were no emergency calls from the mines
during the year. Several calls for oxygen from the local hospital were given immediate
response.
On April 19th an emergency call to administer oxygen to three men who had been
rendered unconscious by carbon monoxide while repairing a vat at the Fernie brewery
was received and given immediate response. The men had been using a charcoal-
burner in the vat. All recovered after treatment with the H.H. inhalator and artificial
respiration. A 132 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald and E. R. Hughes.
Western Fuel Corp. J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.;   H. R. Plommer, Vice-President,
of Canada, Ltd.    Vancouver, B.C.;   P. S. Fagan, Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo, B.C.;
John Hunt, General Manager, Nanaimo, B.C.
Reserve Mine, Nanaimo.—Wm. Roper, Manager; T. J. Wood, Overman. This was
the only mine operated by the above company during 1939 and is situated in the Cranberry district, 5 miles' south of Nanaimo. Due to the development roadways in the
" Rock Slope section " encountering faults and troubled ground in the early part of the
year, it was decided to retreat with the pillars and recover all available coal in this
district; as the bulk of the output came from this area, it was readily seen that the
ultimate life of the mine was limited unless other means of augmenting production
were discovered in the meantime. Unfortunately, an outbreak of fire in the No. 1
South section necessitated the erection of seals and isolating a number of pillars, thus
reducing the anticipated total recovery and cutting short the life of the mine. From
the beginning of the year until December 15th, the mine worked 261 days with an
average production of 502 tons per day; during the latter half of December all efforts
were concentrated on recovering material, this being completed and the mine permanently abandoned on December 31st.
The first sod was turned and sinking of the Reserve shafts began in July, 1910,
the Douglas seam being reached at a depth of 1,060 feet in May, 1913, when labour
troubles caused a suspension of operations. The seam at the point of contact was
steeply inclined and, as development-work progressed, it was found advisable to come
back up the shaft and drive crosscuts to intercept the seam at points more favourable
for haulage and shaft-bottom facilities.
The ventilation in general was fairly good throughout the year, the quantities
passing at the last inspection in December measured as follows: Rock Slope return—
10,800 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of twenty-six men and three horses; Main
return—30,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty men and five horses.
Thirty-eight samples of air were taken in and around the old workings and return airways and the analyses of these, together with frequent safety-lamp tests, showed the
methane content in the various returns to be well under 1 per cent. To offset the
danger of coal-dust, 78,000 lb. of crushed limestone-dust was distributed over 21,000
feet of roadways. One hundred and thirty-two samples of dust were collected, all of
which were above the minimum standard of incombustible content as provided for by
the Coal-dust Regulations. Regular inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee " who kindly furnished us with copies of all reports. The regulation report-
books required to be kept at the mine were examined at all inspections and found in
order. Two serious and fifty-nine minor accidents were reported from this mine, all
of these being investigated and reported on in detail.
J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.; H. R. Plommer, Vice-President,
Canadian Collieries Vancouver, B.C.;   P. S. Fagan, Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo, B.C.;
(Dunsmuir), Ltd.   John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.;  H. Baird, Assistant General Superintendent, Cumberland, B.C.
North field Mine.—A. Newbury, Manager; J. Sutherland, Overman. This mine is
situated 4 miles north of Nanaimo and has railway connections with the Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway and the Western Fuel Corporation's private lines with the bunkers
and loading-wharves at Nanaimo, where the coal is shipped to the different markets.
A description of the surface plant and method of working has appeared in previous
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines. A main pumping-station and transformer-
vault were built in the vicinity of the shaft-bottom;  these are constructed of steel and INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 133
concrete, are absolutely fire-proof throughout, and house the following equipment: In
the transformer-station, there are three 75-k.v.a. Westinghouse Inerteen transformers
for power usage and one 5-k.v.a. Inerteen transformer to take care of the lighting circuits; equipment in the pumping-station consists of two 5-inch 4-stage, 500-1.G.P.M.
Gould pumps driven by two 125-horse-power 440-volt motors. A large first-motion
hoist was also installed at the top of No. 5 Incline; this main haulage roadway having
been completed during the year. From the main siding at the top of this incline, a
drift was driven a distance of 300 feet to intercept the No. 3 Wellington seam and a
new slope driven to reach the pillars left in this area when old No. 5 mine Wellington
was abandoned; the north slope in these old workings has been repaired for a distance
of 1,200 feet in the direction of Diver Lake. This mine is at present operating the
Nos. 3 and 4 Wellington seams, from which a total of 145,440 tons of coal was produced
over a period of 252 working-days. While a portion of this output has come from
skipping and repairing roadways in old No. 5 mine, the bulk of the tonnage has been
produced from very low long-wall faces where the coal is undercut by Anderson-Boyes
coal-cutting machines. In all roadways and face-lines approaching in the general
direction of abandoned areas, a total of 7,416 feet of advance and flank drilling was
done to guard against the danger of accidentally contacting submerged workings.
Although frequent back-brushing and repairs are required in this mine because of the
low seams at present being operated and the constant crushing exerted on the roadways, working conditions in general have been found satisfactory in the course of
inspection. The ventilation has been maintained at the usual high standard, the quantities passing at the last inspection in December measured as follows:—
No. 5 Incline split: 14,400 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-six men
and four horses.
Slope split: 26,250 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty men and one
horse.
Main north return: 42,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of ninety-six men
and five horses.
Twenty-five samples of air were taken at the testing-stations in the return airways, the analyses showing the total methane content to be well under 1 per cent.
Eighty-seven samples of dust were collected off the roadways where required, all of
these being well above the minimum standard of incombustible content as set forth in
the Coal-dust Regulations; 30,000 lb. of rock-dust was used in this connection to treat
12,600 feet of roadways. Regular inspections have been carried out by the miners'
" gas committee," who always furnished us with copies of their reports. All report-
books required to be kept at the mine were examined at all inspections and found in
good order. Three serious and seventy-six minor accidents occurred during the year,
all of which were investigated and reported on in detail.
No. 10 Mine, South Wellington.—Wm. Frew, Manager; Jos. Wilson, Overman.
This mine is situated in the Cranberry district a short distance south of old No. 5 mine
and operates the Douglas seam. Beginning as a prospect in May, 1937, it joined the
producing list of mines in August, 1938, and is rapidly coming to the front as one of the
main producing mines in the district, operating 237 days during the present year with
an average production of 441 tons per day. Important additions to the surface plant
consisted of a modern Ingersoll-Rand compressor with a capacity of 1,600 cubic feet of
free air a minute and driven by a 300-horse-power 2,200-volt synchronous motor. A
new Lidgerwood single-drum hoist with a rope-speed of 800 feet per minute and driven
by a 200-horse-power 2,200-volt wound rotor induction motor was installed and began
operating in May; the controls for this hoist consist of one 2,200-volt primary panel,
one 2,200-volt reversing panel, and one 460-volt accelerating panel. Certain changes
and improvements were also necessary at the tipple and mine yards to cope with the
rapidly increasing output. During the latter part of the year, railway connections
were made with the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway, over which road the coal is now
hauled to Nanaimo instead of by truck as formerly. A La-Del troller-type fan, made
by the La-Del Conveyor & Manufacturing Company of New Philadelphia, Ohio, U.S.A.,
was installed and began operating on December 9th.    This is a high-pressure fan, A 134 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1939.
Model H-56, 5 feet in diameter, and driven by a 50-horse-power 440-volt motor; it is
equipped with adjustable pitch aluminium alloy blades and a discharge chimney 15 feet
in length. While it has a total rated capacity of 120,000 cubic feet of air a minute, it
is at present operating on the first adjustment at a speed of 1,070 revolutions a minute
and delivering 70,000 cubic feet of air a minute under a water-gauge of 3.6 inches.
This is the first of this type of fan to be installed in British Columbia.
The Main and Diagonal slopes have been developed for a further 2,000 feet, and
from these main roadways several levels and headings have been driven in each district,
all operations to date being confined strictly to development. Since the installation of
the new fan, the ventilation has been very good throughout the workings. It is divided
into two splits, the quantities passing in each at the last inspection measured as
follows:—
Main Slope split:  28,600 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-five men.
Diagonal split:  39,950 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty men.
Main return:  70,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighty-five men.
Twenty-four samples of air were taken at the testing-stations in the return airways, the resultant analyses showing the methane content to vary from 0.5 to 1.8 per
cent, in the general body of the air-currents; 100,000 lb. of rock-dust was used in treating 27,000 feet of roadways to offset the danger of coal-dust. Seventy samples of dust
were collected off these roads; all of these being above the standard of incombustible
content as stipulated by the Coal-dust Regulations. Working conditions have been
satisfactory throughout the year, except for a period of four months when the presence
of a visible gas-cap in the general body of the air in several places in the Diagonal district resulted in a suspension of blasting in this area. Following the installation of the
new fan, ventilating conditions were greatly improved and blasting was again permitted, with the proviso that the requirements of General Rule 12 of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" were strictly adhered to at all times. During the period this mine
was operating within the 500-foot barrier adjacent to old No. 5 mine, 8,000 feet of
advance drilling was done as a precautionary measure to guard against accidental contact with submerged old workings. Regular inspections were made by the miners'
" gas committee," who always forwarded copies of all their reports. All report-books
required to be kept at the mine were examined at all inspections and found in good
order. Two serious and thirty-five minor accidents occurred during the year; all of
which were investigated and reported on in detail.
G. Frater, Overman. This mine is situated in the vicinity of old
Beban's Mine. Extension No. 1 mine and is operating in an isolated portion of the
Wellington seam which had been left in this area by former operators.
The only addition to the surface equipment during the year was a coal-bunker of 40
tons capacity, which was built at the tipple for extra storage. The main development
programme was confined to the Main slope district where all places were driven to the
boundary pillar adjacent to old Extension No. 3 mine. An attempt was then made to
sink a small shaft through the fault, but the ground was so badly broken and cut up
that noxious gases leaked through from the old mine to such an extent that this project
was abandoned. While this condition prevented a direct connection being made, the
breaks in the strata were sufficient to take care of the drainage from this part of the
mine, which was quite a problem, especially during the wet season, when a heavy inflow
of surface water has to be handled. As a precautionary measure, while the workings
were advancing in the general direction of old Extension Nos. 1 and 3 mines, 16,100
feet of advance drilling was done to guard against accidental contact with the old
workings.
Although market conditions caused a suspension of operations at this mine during
August and September, it operated fairly steady for the balance of the year, working
203 days and producing 17,064 tons. The ventilation has been generally good throughout the year, usually averaging around 16,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use
of twenty-six men and three horses. Twenty-eight samples of air were taken in the
old workings and return airways, the resultant analyses showing a slight trace of
methane passing in the Main return airway.    Inspections were made regularly by the INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. A 135
miners' " gas committee," who furnished us with copies of all their reports. All report-
books required to be kept at the mine were examined frequently and found in good
order.
A fatal accident occurred in this mine when a miner was instantly killed by a fall
of overhanging coal while loading at the face; this coal fell without warning from a
slip in the roof. In addition, four minor accidents involving loss of time were investigated and reported on in detail.
R. H. Chambers, Operator;   Chas. Webber and Thos. McCann, Fire-
Chambers' Mine, bosses.    This mine is located in the vicinity of old Extension No. 1
mine, all operations being confined to the recovery of a small area of
outcrop coal left by former operators. An average crew of eight men worked 194 days
and produced 2,887 tons of coal. The ventilation is produced by natural means and
was satisfactory at all inspections. To guard against accidental contact with old
workings, 500 feet of advance drilling was done while the faces were approaching abandoned areas. All report-books required to be kept at the mine were examined at all
inspections and found in order. Two minor accidents involving loss of time were
investigated and reported on in detail.
No. 1 Mine.—J. A. Challoner, Overman. This mine is situated on the
Lantzville shore-line of the Strait of Georgia, 9 miles north of Nanaimo, and
Colliery.        operates the Wellington seam, which is reached at a distance of 270
feet from the surface by a slope dipping 30 degrees. This mine is
operated on a co-operative basis with fourteen men employed underground and five
on the surface. The coal-seam in this area varies from 24 to 30 inches in thickness
and is mined by hand on a modified long-wall method. The mine worked 246 days
during the year and 4,342 tons of coal was produced." The ventilation is produced by a
small fan which was passing 18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fourteen
men at the last inspection in December. Twelve samples of air were taken in the Main
return airway and the analyses of these showed a slight trace of methane. Working
conditions have generally been found fairly good at all inspections. No accidents were
reported from this mine during the year.
D.  Caldwell,  Fireboss.    This  prospect  slope  is  situated  on Lot  14,
Hydesville Mine. Wellington Division, and is being operated by P. Carr and associates on
a co-operative basis. This roadway has been driven a distance of 164
feet from the surface since operations commenced in June, with the intention of
developing a coal-seam presumably tapped by a bore-hole 120 feet deep which was
drilled in this area some years ago. Working conditions at this prospect have been
found fairly good at all inspections. No accidents were reported from this operation
during the year.
Jas.