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THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1940

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 THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1939, TO MARCH 31ST, 1940
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  the   Thirty-sixth  Annual  Report  of  the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1940.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1939, to March 31st, 1940.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal. Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Elliott, Mrs. I., Nurse-Matron. Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In submitting the thirty-sixth annual report of the Provincial Industrial School for
Boys, we take the opportunity to express our thanks and appreciation for the many kind
services rendered by the various Government departments and officials, for the fine co-operation we have received from the Juvenile Court Judges, Probation Officers, and the numerous
private and semi-private agencies and individuals who, by their efforts, have made a real
contribution to our work on behalf of those committed to our care.
Our function seems to be the protection of society and the prevention of delinquency.
Success of the former depends largely upon the effectiveness of the latter, and this demands
that our approach to rehabilitation must be adjusted to modern scientific thought and method
and that our institution must be built up and equipped accordingly. We feel that some
progress has been made during the past year, although we are severely handicapped by lack
of equipment and inadequate facilities.
The statistics for the year show 16,479 inmate-days as against 14,445 for the previous
year. An unexpected influx of new boys during the early months of the year taxed our
building to capacity and space for an overflow had to be found by using our auditorium
building for sleeping quarters.
Continuing the policy of previous years, all available allied services have been called
upon to help us in our task. The work of the Provincial Psychiatrist and his staff has been
of immense value to us; traits of character and other important factors being revealed during
examination and plans being made for the rehabilitation of our patients.
Upon admission to the school each lad is given a thorough physical and medical examination. The services of the Provincial Laboratories and the Division of Tuberculosis Control
are called upon. We gratefully acknowledge the work of Dr. Dolman and Dr. Kincade and
their staffs. The routine health services in charge of the Essondale staff physicians have
been well taken care of and these men have been most generous in their interest on our behalf.
The Advisory Committee to the Industrial Schools has met several times during the year,
studying various aspects of our school programme and procedure, and has made reports and
recommendations to the department from time to time. The genuine interest of the members
of this group and their willingness to give of their time and effort have been most helpful
and encouraging.
We have been enabled to render considerable service to those committed to our care
through the valuable contribution made by the Welfare Field Visitors in securing social
histories and in preparing the home prior to the boy's return.
Close contact has been kept with the Department of Child Welfare and the Superintendent of Neglected Children has visited the school regularly throughout the year, becoming
acquainted with each lad personally. Her kindly interest and co-operation have made possible
many satisfactory placements.
With but few exceptions we have enjoyed whole-hearted co-operation on the part of the
police and Juvenile Court authorities, simplifying the return home and rehabilitation of
many boys.
The importance of the pre-delinquent period should be stressed. The improving of
physical and social environment is the application of common-sense rule, but does not solve
the problem. Records prove that delinquency is shared by rich and poor alike, by those who
enjoy religious, educational, and social advantages and by those who are deprived of them.
A greater use of the social services now available before the child becomes a problem would
doubtless result in fewer commitments to the Industrial School. We feel that while committal
to an institution is frequently necessary many young offenders can be treated effectively
without removal from the community.    While it is impossible to measure accurately the effect M 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of punishment upon an individual, we know definitely that in some cases, particularly in those
of tender years, removal from home and friends and confinement to an institution often results
in the development of unfavourable attitudes and behaviour rather than in the correction of
them. As allowed by the " Juvenile Delinquents Act," committal to a Children's Aid Society
for foster-home placement would be advisable in some cases.
Occasionally we have committed to our school boys who come under the subnormal intelligence group but who are not socially inadequate. Without proper facilities for segregation
we find these cases the most difficult of solution. Their commitment to our care has a
disrupting influence on the programme and disciplinary routine of our school, where the
activity is planned for the more normal delinquent group.
On the premise that most of the boys sent to us are patients requiring treatment, our
various activities form a well-balanced programme of correctional treatment in keeping with
modern methods. The number of satisfactory adjustments reported is indication of a goodly
measure of success.
Medical, surgical, and dental care has been given to all requiring same and the past year
has been fairly heavy in this respect, there being 102 days' hospitalization necessary, followed
by periods of convalescence at the school. Chest X-ray is now part of our routine examination and several boys have received special treatment and care as a result.
The programme of after-care has assumed such proportions that the splendid work of
our follow-up officer is particularly heavy and it is impossible for her to keep up with the
demands made upon her time without further assistance.
In closing I wish to pay tribute to our staff who have worked together very harmoniously,
credit being due them for the genuine interest displayed and the whole-hearted co-operation
I have enjoyed.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1939, TO MARCH 31st, 1940.
Number in school, March 31st, 1939—  42
Number on parole, March 31st, 1939  44
Number in foster-homes, March 31st, 1939  7
Number on extended leave, March 31st, 1939  2
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1939  6
Number of new commitments during year  67
Number committed for second term  6
174
Number of boys released  57
Number at present on parole  36
Number at present in foster-homes     7
Number transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm     1
Number at present on extended leave     6
Number escaped and not returned     7
— 114
Number in school, March 31st, 1940     60 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS,
1939-40.                    M 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1939, TO MARCH 31st, 1940.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1704
1705
1706
1707
1708
1709
1710
1711
1712
1713
1714
1715
1716
1717
1718
1719
1720
1721
1722
1723
1724
1725
1726
1727
1728
1729
1730
1731
1732
1733
1734
1735
1736
1737
1738
1789
1740
1741
1742
1743
1744
1745
1746
1747
1748
1749
1750
1751
1752
1753
1754
1755
1756
1757
1758
1769
1760
1761
1762
1763
1764
Lloydminster, Alta 	
Vanderhoof, B.C	
Years.
2
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
11
Life.
9
14
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
14
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
15
7 mos.
5
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
11
Life.
9
14
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
Life.
15
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
English-Canadian   	
Canadian 	
Vancouver, B.C 	
New Westminster, B.C	
Victoria, B.C 	
Fulford Harbour, B.C	
Ridgefleld, Wash	
English-Canadian    	
Bilt, Holland      	
Kriva, Czecho-Slovakia	
Dollarton, B.C.                 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Trail B C.
Victoria, B.C	
Russian 	
Penticton, B.C	
Moricetown, B.C	
Antler, Sask. - —	
Irish-French 	
Calgary, Alta	
Rochester, New York	
North Battleford, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C.-	
Vancouver, B.C -	
Negro 	
Ukrainian __	
Trail B C.
Chilliwack B.C.
Pincher Creek, Alta.— 	
Canadian 	
Life.         1         Life.
Rutland, B.C.—  	
Alexis Creek, B.C	
Orford Bay, B.C	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
6
6
Life.
2 mos.
Life.
Life.
4%
Life.
9
Life.
Life.
7
7
7
6
9
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
13
Life.
11
Life.
Life.
4%
Life.
Life.
Life.-
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Irish-Canadian	
Vancouver, B.C   	
Vancouver, B.C	
Morgentaury, Russia	
Bishop Auckland, England 	
Dutch-Canadian.—	
Russian _ _	
English  	
Chinese-Indian 	
Edinburgh, Scotland 	
Vancouver, B.C.-	
Czecho-Slovakia	
British Columbia	
Lethbridge, Alta 	
Summerland, B.C	
Indian     	
Canadian-Irish 	
Mondare, Alta.___	
Mondare, Alta	
Austrian	
Austrian  .,  	
Canadian  . 	
Canadian-American  	
Swedish  _•  .	
Biggar, Sask —	
Kenora, Ont 	
* M
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Boys committed—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British                Canada.
Columbia.
1765
1766
Sweden..   - —
Genier, Ont 	
Winnipeg, Man  	
Winnipeg, Man   —-	
Brandon, Man - 	
Stratford, Ont	
Brancepeth, Sask	
Swedish —-	
Years.
10
4
1 week.
1 week.
1 week.
1 week.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Years.
10
Life.
1767
Life.
1768
1769
1770
1771
1772
English  	
Ukrainian   	
Canadian  	
Canadian -	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
1773
1774
1775
Tappen, B.C.-	
Prince Rupert, B.C   -
Prince Rupert, B.C 	
American - -	
Scotch  	
Life.
Life.
Life.
1776
Maillardville, B.C	
Life.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both)
Austrian (both) .
Canadian (both)
Czeeho-Slovakian (both) 	
English (both)   4
German (both)   1
Greek (both)   1
Indian (both)   6
Mulatto (both)   1
Negro (both)   1
Russian (both)   3
Scotch (both) _   2
  1
  2
  4
  1
  1
Serbian (both) 	
Swedish (both) 	
Ukrainian (both) __.
American-Canadian
American-English __.
Canadian-American      2
Canadian-English      1
Canadian-Irish      1
Canadian-Scotch
Chinese-Indian _..
Dutch-Canadian
English-American 	
English-Canadian   5
English-Irish   1
French-Canadian   2
Hawaiian-Irish   1
Irish-Canadian   2
Irish-French  1
Norwegian-Indian   1
Roumanian-Canadian   1
Scotch-American _
Scotch-Canadian _
Swedish-American
Russian-Canadian -
Welsh-Canadian _.
Unknown 	
Total
1
1
1
1
1
1
73 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1939-40.
M 9
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION, 1937-38,
1938-39, 1939-40.
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta	
Belgium 	
British Columbia
Czecho-Slovakia _
England   	
Holland 	
Ireland 	
Manitoba 	
New Brunswick __.
Nova Scotia 	
Norway 	
Ontario 	
Poland 	
Quebec 	
Russia 	
Saskatchewan 	
Scotland  	
Sweden  	
1937-38.
5
1
50
1
1
1
7
2
1
1
11
3
1938-39.
10
35
10
1
1939-40.
7
43
2
1
1
United States of America
Totals	
87
67
73
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
1937-38.
.     46
Theft 	
Breaking and entering      10
Breaking and entering and stealing       6
Retaining stolen property       2
Wilful destruction of stolen property       2
Being in possession of stolen property     	
Attempted theft     	
Attempted breaking and entering     ____
Assault 	
Vagrancy  	
Hold-up  	
Sexual immorality	
Carrying concealed weapons 	
Obstructing railway tracks   1
Being in a state of intoxication  2
Indecent act   1
Indecent exposure  —
Indecent assault  —
Attempted rape  1
Violation of probation  —
Supplying liquor to minor   —
Being unsatisfactory ward  —
Escaping from custody   —
False pretence	
Murder   —
Incorrigibility    5
1938-39.
32
11
1939-40.
28
1
22
3
4
1
1
Totals
87
67
73 M 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE  STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Indefinite
J.D.A. __
3 months
4 months
6 months
months
year —
years _.
years _..
years _
1937-38.
43
3
1
2
1
3
31
3
1938-3
24
23
1
4
2
1
11
1
1939-40.
34
16
6
1
3
10
1
2
Totals .
87
67
73
AGES OF BOYS.
1937-38.     1938-39.
9 years _
10 years .
11 years .
12 years .
13 years .
14 years .
15 years .
16 years .
17 years .
18 years .
Unknown
20
20
22
1
1
1
3
3
12
12
17
17
1
1939-40.
1
1
1
2
7
19
12
18
11
Totals .
87
67
73
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
1937-38.
Abbotsford ...
Alexis Creek
Armstrong _
Barkerville _
Burnaby 	
Campbell River
Chilliwack 	
Cloverdale 	
Cobble Hill	
Coquitlam 	
Courtenay 	
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Duncan 	
Enderby  	
Fernie 	
Fort St. John	
Grand Forks 	
Harrison Hot Springs
Harrison Mills	
Hazelton 	
Kamloops	
Kaslo 	
1938-39.
1
1939-40.
1
1
1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS,
1939-40.
M 11
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—C
Places of Apprehension—Continued.
1937-38.
Kelowna          .   .    . .   ..                            .      ,        3
'ontinued.
1938-39.
1
1
1
1
3
4
3
3
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
15
2
67
1938-39.
3
1
1
16
1
1939-40.
1
2
1
1
4
6
1
2
2
1
1
1
4
2
4
3
4
9
2
4
73
1939-40.
1
9
5
2
Ladner       ..       . _.   ...
T<illooet        . -            ..          1
Maillardville  	
Masset      . -      .    	
Matsqui
Mission        1
Moricetown ..__   . _ ....    .     ...               _         	
McBride      	
Nanaimo                 __      __.......
Nelson        1
New Westminster -          .                                                       5
North Vancouver       .....                                        1
Lake Cowichan        	
Penticton 	
Port Alberni                _           _   . ..         1
Port Moody                                       1
Port Simpson       ,                             1
Powell River  _ .          ..     ....     _                ..       2
Pouce Coupe 	
Prince George       .          „     . .                       ...      3
Prince Rupert                                                               .10
Princeton   . ...                __   ... . _    _
Red Pass                      -             ,.   	
Revelstoke    .   . .         .    -     .      ,,        ...
Richmond          .....     _. _   . _                        .        .      1
Saanich     ._          .      1
Sidney      ..      .     	
Summerland    .....      ....
Terrace            .	
Trail  ,.      3
Vernon                     _        ..                  1
Totals                                     87
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
1937-38.
All Saints         ,'        1
Baptist                                         .     .                                       4
Chinese   	
Christadelphian   	
Church of England                         10
Greek Orthodox                        -
Free Methodist         .    .    ..        '  .     -   -      1 M 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL INFORMATION—Continued.
Religious Statistics—Continued.
1937-38. 1938-39. 1939-40.
Interdenominational   __ .... 1
Lutheran        1   2
Mission       1
Moravian   __ 2
Pentecostal         2 14
Plymouth Brethren        1
Presbyterian   14 5 6
Roman Catholic  22 16 18
Salvation Army    2 3
Seventh-day Adventist        2   1
United   21 8 11
Non-denominational     11 10
Totals  87 67 73
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
1937-38. 1938-39. 1939-40.
With both parents living  66 42 38
With both parents dead       3 13
With father living and mother dead       3 5 6
With mother living and father dead       8 4 8
With both parents living but separated  .... 8 10
With father living and stepmother       2 2 3
With mother living and stepfather       5 15
With foster parents     1
With parents whose whereabouts are unknown  .... 3
Totals  87 67 73 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1939-40. M 13
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" SIR,—During the year ended March 31st, 1940, the mouths of all the boys entering the
school were carefully examined and record charts made. Of the seventy-two examinations,
only two boys were found to have healthy mouths, many having had no previous dental
attention.
" It was necessary to extract thirty-nine hopelessly diseased teeth with local anaesthetic.
A total of 229 teeth were filled. Twenty-two were treated for gingivitis, twenty minor treatments given for relief of pain, and three teeth were devitalized and the roots filled.
" As far as possible the boys leaving the institution had the dental work completed and
this service should contribute much toward improved health and the making of better citizens.
" Emery Jones, D-D.S."
Medical Report.
" Sir,—During the year we have inaugurated a new system of keeping medical records
of the various boys coming under our care. This is a compact sheet on each boy, showing the
height and weight upon admission and the results of the Kahn test and the chest X-ray which
we now give as a matter of routine. To this is added a record of any illnesses, operations,
special tests required, a notation as to the dental-work done and a monthly check-up on height
and weight. In cases of undernourishment, cod-liver oil has been given, resulting in satisfactory gains in weight.
" In December of last year we were visited by the Travelling Clinic of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control. Skin tests were given to all our inmates and a number of the members
of the staff. Any positive reactions noted were followed up by X-ray. We are now giving
each lad on admission a chest X-ray. These examinations have shown that several of the
boys must be re-examined at various times in the future, while one boy, who spent a year in
Tranquille Sanatorium previous to his commitment here, is being given special care.
" We are pleased to report that we have been free from venereal disease with the exception of one case, which required hospital treatment.
" Seven boys were given eye tests and of this number four were found to require and were
provided with glasses.
" Hospitalization for the past year included the following:— Cases.
Tonsillectomies  '.     9
Circumcision      2
Treatment for infected hand     1
Treatment for gonorrhoea     1
Treatment for broken limbs      3
" I should like to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation for the assistance
that has been given me in my first year at the Boys' Industrial School by the members of the
medical staff at the Provincial Mental Hospital and the doctors taking charge of our boys
while in hospital. " Isobel Elliott,
Nurse-Matron."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
It has been our aim in this department to serve to the boys and staff as balanced a diet
as possible. Our experience with this type of lad shows an overeagerness for starchy foods.
As much as possible we have pointed out to the boys the necessity of a more balanced diet,
with emphasis placed on consumption of fruits and vegetables. Our chef, Mr.' Hoffman, has
been most co-operative and in this way the health of the boys has been much improved.
During the year a number of boys have had the opportunity of working in the kitchen.
Of these, three have been given definite instructions in cooking and the preparation of meals.
One boy particularly has been outstanding in his good work and we feel that this training
may prove of real value to him when he seeks employment.
The following sample menus illustrate the type of meals served to the boys:—
Breakfast.—Cream of wheat porridge, buttered toast, coffee, and milk.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, cabbage, carrots, bread, rice pudding, milk.
Supper.—Cold meat, vegetable salad, bread and butter, stewed rhubarb, cookies, tea, and
milk. M 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
1937-38.
1938-39.
1939-40.
$977.85
2,085.63
333.75
$914.73
2,284.32
628.32
1,023.85
908.50
392.84
78.06
532.49
874.00
2,400.00
483.48
7,656.44
1,656.93
600.00
820.48
89.68
NU
700.87
925.49
26,540.73
$880.39
(2)   Travelling expenses  _ _  ,	
1,909.74
619.39
991.83
450.69
185.71
403.10
822.00
2,400.00
439.65
8,506.35
1,435.87
600.00
999.65
330.65
NU
353.74
1,256.08
27,621.84
2,155.46
389.45
(4) Janitor supplies and maintenance of grounds _
(5) Light   --	
Heat  	
1,057.61
808.00
2,400.00
727.07
7,359.45
(7)   Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and opera-
1,729.26
600.00
1,186.57
Nil
Nil
(11)   Vocational supplies for various departments
306.52
1,753.73
26,352.92
Total expenditure „   ■	
$50,194.39
$49,511.21
$50,235.56
651.65
3,166.28
129.16
3,939.74
211.39
$49,583.91
5,145.76
Total expenditure for year 	
Total revenue for year—
$53,489.83
$1,539.19
3,888.80
$53,662.34
$54,729.67
Rent  _	
$120.00
$375.00
15.00
$48,061.84
$53,542.34
$54,339.67
$2.86
$3.71
$3.30
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—We divided the boys attending school into two groups as in previous years. The
seniors attended classes in the morning and the juniors in the afternoon. The number of
names placed on the register during the year was forty-two. Twenty-eight discontinued their
studies during the year for various reasons, leaving fourteen on the roll as at March 31st,
1940. For the first time in at least ten years, no boy completed his Entrance year, the last
one having left at the end of the Christmas term.
" Intelligence tests were given to each new admission to the institution. The average
intelligence quotient was 82.
" Library work was continued with fair success. We added 100 new volumes to our
shelves. We must replace our old books as soon as possible with modern types. The average
boy at the school to-day is more interested in stories dealing with aeroplanes and other modern
inventions than those that interested boys of a decade ago.
" Eric W. Blagburn." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1939-40. M 15
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—The following is my report of the work done in the tailoring department for the
year 1939-40:—
" Thirty boys have received instruction in sewing and general repairing of clothing. All
year two and three boys have worked steadily in the tailor-shop.
" The year's work consisted of the making of the following articles: 95 pairs of denim
pants, 62 pairs of tweed pants, 187 pairs of shorts, 24 khaki aprons, 2 curtains, 48 tea-towels,
111 pillow-covers, 150 hand-towels, 144 sheets, 12 table-cloths, and 45 pillow-ticks. In addition, 28 suits and 59 pairs of pants were pressed. A great variety of odd jobs—for example,
repairing of gym mats and mattresses and attaching number-tags to purchased garments—
has been completed in the tailor-shop this year.
" With the closing of our shoe-shop at the beginning of the year, the checking of the shoes
once each week for necessary repairs was detailed to the tailor-shop.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—The past year in this department has been very satisfactory, with the attendance
of the boys showing the interest they take in this branch of our shop programme. Large
classes were registered every month, punctuality was noticeable and very few absentees had
to be reported. We have increased our class periods to six hours per week in order to take
care of the number of boys who have enrolled for instruction in motor mechanics.
" I have mentioned in previous reports how fascinating this trade is to the majority of
boys and, realizing the benefits to be derived from it in our machine age, I hope that this
branch of instruction will continue to be available to them.
" D. W. Munro,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" Sir,—All admirers of garden and greenhouse produce agree that regardless of the toil
necessary in obtaining results, it is well worth the effort.
" The garden supply of vegetables carried us well through the year. Credit for the work
must go to the boys for their exceptionally keen interest in carrying out the programme
arranged. Cultivation, weeding, and thinning are always monotonous chores, but the destruction of weeds and the increased production are incentives to carry on.
" On wet days the work in the greenhouse, especially preparing our fall display of chrysanthemums, occupied our time. There were 142 pots of beautiful blooms which required a
lot of attention.
" In our work this year a great deal of effort has been spent in trenching land to bring
more of the available plant-food into use. Our spring work is well under way, which should
bring a good harvest.
"The following vegetables were produced: Potatoes, 5,046 lb.; onions (Dutch sets),
25 lb.; onions (green), 440 lb.; onions (seed), 593 lb.; radishes, 4% lb.; beans (green),
275 1b.; beets (tops), 264 lb.; beets (roots), 2,260 lb.; carrots, 2,735 lb.; parsnips, 1,206 lb.;
cabbage, 1,976 lb.; cabbage (green), 207 lb.; leeks, 169 lb.; cauliflower, 170 lb.; peas, 23 lb.;
tomatoes, 1,194 lb.; corn (cob), 124 doz.; lettuce, 308 heads; celery, 285 sticks; raspberries,
270 lb.;   rhubarb, 252 lb. ,, D   w   Munr0j
Gardener.
Department of Manual Arts.
" Sir,—The Manual Arts Department has been very busy this past year, the February
and March enrolment showing sixty names listed for two half-days' instruction per week.
The boys enrolled for the various classes in the following numbers: Woodwork, 29; sheet
metal, 4;   draughting, 5;   electricity, 14;   forging, 8.
" Naturally, the interest in woodwork predominates. It seems to be the only subject
where the material used can be moulded to suit the needs of the individual boy. For instance,
a boy of low intelligence is quite happy, satisfied and mentally busy, whilst whittling a piece M 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of wood with a pen-knife. On the other hand an intelligent boy can, and does, turn out really
workmanlike jobs.
" Some of the projects completed in the past year were: Three tables and a magazine
end table for the office of the Superintendent of Neglected Children; three novelty tables;
repairing chesterfield; window screens; fitting the interior of the sewing-room with cupboards and cubby-holes; 175 seed-boxes for the greenhouse; vaulting box for the gymnasium;
new tool cupboards for the Manual Arts Department. In addition to these larger projects,
numerous articles were made by the boys and taken home with them.
" The sheet-metal classes have done some satisfactory work this year. As no patterns
are used, the boys have to do their own draughting, the accuracy of the drawings being
severely tested when the sheet metal is cut out and assembled.
" The sheet-metal, draughting, and forging classes have a fairly low enrolment, as at
least average intelligence is required in these studies. For example, draughting and sheet-
metal work requires visualization, which is hard even for a normal boy, while forging requires
a knowledge of mathematics and the ability to calculate. A typical forging job would be to
make a gate-hook or a link for a chain. In both cases mathematics are absolutely essential in
calculating the amount of stock required. While every effort is made to keep the work
within the scope of the boy's ability, as soon as any project is suggested which requires a little
thought the enrolment drops.
" The electricity class is showing signs of promise, several boys having finished the study
of bell wiring, magnetism, measurement of current, and related theory. They are now ready
for knob and tube work. To this end we have erected the studding of a miniature two-room
cottage, and as soon as the supplies arrive this phase of the work will be carried on.
" A photography club was inaugurated last February, one evening a week being devoted
to this work. Arrangement of pictures, backgrounds, etc., developing and printing are ideas
being worked upon and some of the boys are turning out to be camera enthusiasts.
" Throughout the year the majority of boys have shown keen enthusiasm in the work, and
while the instruction has to be adapted to cover a wide range of abilities, still the effort put
forth is more than repaid by the noticeable improvement in the boys' work and attitudes.
" Arnold Hewson,
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—The activities for the year 1939-40 were similar to those of the previous year.
From May 1st to the end of August most of the activity took place in the field. Football,
baseball, and lacrosse were played in junior and senior divisions by all the boys. Representative teams were picked and outside games were arranged with teams from New Westminster,
Vancouver, and the surrounding communities. Some of the boys who were not interested in
these activities were allowed to work on such projects as the construction of horse-shoe pits
or other playground apparatus for their own use. Once a week the boys were allowed to go
to the lacrosse and Softball games in New Westminster and Vancouver. As swimming and
fishing were very popular at this time of the year, numerous trips to both the Coquitlam River
and Stave Falls were made. On these trips, a busy day of fishing and swimming was often
concluded with a period around the camp-fire, at which time there would be stories, stunts, and
sing-songs, with an occasional potato or weiner roast.
" In September a gymnasium programme was commenced. A system based on the
methods in use in the Y.M.C.A.'s and the Pro-Rec. centres of the Province was used, with a
view to preparing the boys for entry in similar activities when released. A stiff course in
ordinary calisthenics was first given as a groundwork for more advanced apparatus work. A
very keen interest was shown in the mat work, horse work, and work on the high bar. All the
boys were required to do the fundamental exercises on these pieces, but extra instruction was
made available to the more interested boys with very fine results.
" All the boys played basket-ball, but from the group representative teams were chosen
who played a total of twenty-five games with teams from the Y.M.C.A.'s, the High Schools,
the various churches, and the University. These games were arranged with the hope that the
boys would build up a knowledge and appreciation of the fellowship and clean fun to be had
in these groups and would, as a result, attach themselves to such organizations when the REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1939-40. M 17
opportunity was given to them. Indoor football, volley-ball, and group games were also
played in the course of the evening programmes.
" Our swimming-tank, which is one of the largest indoor, fresh-water pools in British
Columbia, was used a great deal. Swimming and aquatic games were very popular, especially
among the younger boys. All the boys who were allowed to use the tank were taught to swim
as soon as possible and the more advanced swimmers were given classes in life-saving.
" The concert party, a group of boys interested in amateur theatricals and the organization of an entertainment club, was again organized and because of the high standard of its
presentations received the same high praise that it has in previous years.
" During the winter a hobby club was formed and financed by a few of the more interested boys. The club admitted only those boys whom the members felt would fit into its
programme and live up to the standard and reputation established by the club. The programme of this club consisted of the construction of small boats, leather articles, and model
aeroplanes, and in the pursuit of other interesting hobbies. The club, which has built its own
club-room, limits its membership to from twelve to fifteen of whom they consider to be the
best boys in the school. A boy must be voted into the club unanimously and must work
through a probation period of a week to the satisfaction of the members before he is admitted.
This club has produced some very fine work and has functioned with surprising success for
the last six months.
" This organization and the photography club mentioned in a previous report will undoubtedly supply their members with a very strong interest. It is our hope that these
interests will be of value to probation and follow-up officers as a medium for bringing in contact and holding the boy on parole with the right groups and associates, and that by these
associations the boy's relations with the best in his community will be more firmly established.
" Hugh G. Christie,
Instructor."
SOCIAL WORK REPORT.
In keeping with the accepted approach to the problem of delinquency, a complete social
history is prepared on each lad before he is presented to the Provincial Psychiatrist for examination. Mr. W. G. Dixon, who has been in charge of this department, reports the following
summary of the thirty-six examinations made during the past year: —
Intelligence ratings— Cases.
Superior intelligence  1
Average intelligence   7
Dull, normal intelligence  6
Border-line   13
Moron -  8
Imbecile   1
36
Mental abnormalities recognized by clinic—
Psychopathic personality  1
Suspected psychopathic   1
Isolated personality  1
Introverted personality   1
Physical defects recognized by clinic—
Tonsils and adenoids needing attention   12
Tonsils requiring attention   3
Teeth requiring attention   5
Poor vision  1
Poorly developed   1
Suggested X-ray for tuberculosis   1
Physical picture of sub-thyroid  1
Poor hearing  1
Nasal infection  1
Circumcision recommended  1 M 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Recommendations— Cases.
Extended training and discipline   11
Country foster-home  '  9
Foster-home placement  5
Return home -.  3
Placement on boat t  2
Home or foster-home   1
Placement with relatives  1
Commitment to mental hospital  1
Farm placement  1
Further training and country placement  2
36
The foregoing represents a great deal of work on the part of the clinic staff, the Welfare
Field Visitors, and our social worker. Interviews, observation of the patient's behaviour,
reactions, contacts with committing magistrates, police, school teachers, family doctors,
parents, etc., are necessary before the data are assembled and a picture of the boy's heritage
revealed.
Adequate after-care and follow-up upon a boy's return home is still an unsolved problem,
and this is not only desirable but necessary if the efforts of our school are to have any permanent value.
From our observation and contacts, we are impressed with the fact that there is an
evident lack of suitable spare time activity in most of the outlying districts from which the
majority of our population comes. This is particularly applicable to the Indian communities
and has a definite relationship to the problem.
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" The success of the past year in the work assigned to me has been progressively gratifying in many ways. My personal activity in the many cases coming within my jurisdiction has
appreciated measurably, as will be seen from the following itemization: —
Visits to homes    1,187
Visits to office        948
Business calls and interviews       863
Telephone calls       986
" It will be noted that a greater number of home visits were undertaken. This, I think,
has resulted from a greater sense of harmonious responsibility assumed by parents, who, in a
great many eases, are eager and anxious to give more spontaneous and desirable co-operation.
In all cases this has resulted in the achievement of better results throughout the whole chain
of effort.
" In my work this past year, as a result of a more understanding sense of responsibility
and a greater desire to assist in this invaluable work, a greater degree of effort was required
with reference to contacts with business-men. I have found that business-men generally have
demonstrated a real and a serious desire to co-operate to the end that the work in question,
in so far as their part is concerned, is facilitated. The evident desire to co-operate should
be highly commended, because in the re-establishment of these young men the facility and
rapidity wherewith they can be fitted into suitable jobs is of paramount importance. I find
it equitable, therefore, to pay this highly merited tribute to the business-men. In almost all
cases the boys themselves have responded generously in becoming good, efficient employees and
have merited the trust placed in them, which generally presents a happy picture.
" As a result of greater facilities afforded to place the boys into positions in the industrial
arena, there has not been required that degree of co-operation formerly afforded by the
forestry camp administration, in the department of the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
which is past years has been of great assistance.
" In matters appertaining to relief, assistance on my part has not been required to the
extent it was essential in previous years in so far as the boys and parents themselves are concerned and in the major number of incidents it was for and on behalf of indigent parents.    It REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1939-40. M 19
was thought wiser to give assistance in such cases in order to invite greater co-operation on
the part of the parents involved in such cases.
" A greater degree of effort was expended in endeavouring to supervise better companionship. In some cases, in order to insure non-contact with former undesirable associates,
assistance was given in moving family residences, in fostering a closer contact with the
parents and giving constant vigilance and advice to the boys in question.
" I have been very happy to note the anxious and intense interest apparent in the boys
towards entering in the militia to do their part as soldiers of our country. There are many
instances of boys below age misrepresenting their age in order to enlist for active duty. The
general interest evinced speaks well for the loyal and patriotic qualities of these boys.
" The work becomes in volume progressively greater and in this way somewhat difficult
to pursue to the meticulous degree required in order to attain satisfactory results. However,
having regard to the time and effort expended, the resultant good is incalculable, inasmuch as
the rehabilitation of a boy into society as a good citizen in the community whereof he forms
a part is a work which cannot be gauged in financial equations.
" I have also given a great deal of time, attention, and effort to preventive work, which
is a branch of service of extreme importance. This work can only be done effectively by
winning the confidence of those boys needing such assistance, by creating in their yet plastic
minds a desire to do good, and by close and constant contact with the boy, the family, and the
home.    The importance of this work cannot be overestimated or overstressed.
" The invaluable co-operation of Mr. Ross and his staff of the Boys' Industrial School,
and of Mrs. Westman and her associate attendants, together with other agencies such as the
Social Service Exchange, Social Agencies, the Department of Neglected Children, Child
Guidance Clinic, the Juvenile Court, the Chief Probation Officer, the Provincial and City
Police Departments, the Provincial and City Relief Departments, and Public and High School
Principals, and the Department of the Minister of Labour have all contributed immeasurably
in making my year of work one abundant in success and in pleasure of service for me. To
these agencies I express my sincere thanks for such co-operation and assistance as may have
been given to me.
" The year has been one of great satisfaction in its success, and while I feel that all
things which might have been accomplished have not been done, yet it augurs well for a
happier and more successful future in this highly important branch of social service.
" K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
rrinted by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.
425-840-6659     

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