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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1940

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 .
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 81ST, 1939
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letters of Transmittal 5, 6
Reports—
Game Commission      7
Game Wardens, "A" Division     9
Officer Commanding " B " Division  12
Officer Commanding " C " Division  19
Officer Commanding " D " Division  32
Game Wardens, " E " Division  35
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-39, inclusive  38
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game)  Tags  39
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms Licences  41
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences  42
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  44
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on Fur  45
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921—39, inclusive  46
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been collected, 1921-39, inclusive  47
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected
during Year 1939  48
List of Confiscated Fur, 1939  49
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1939, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur and
Firearms  49
Bounties paid, 1939 .  50
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-39, inclusive  50
Revenue—Big Game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1939  51
Prosecutions, 1939 :   56
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1939    58
Statement—Migratory and Non-game Birds banded during 1939 by Representatives
of the Game Commission .  59
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1939 59-73
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special  (Trapping)  Firearms Licences, Season
1938-39 . . _.._.... 74
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1939  74
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1939  75
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1939  76
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1939, also showing Revenue from Sale of
Bird-bands '.  77
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1939  78
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1939  81  To His Honour E. W. HAMBER,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
GORDON S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1940. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1940.
Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
31st, 1939.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
Members, Game Commission. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1939.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
There has been no change in so far as administration of the Department is concerned;
and for administrative purposes the Province is divided into five divisions, with an Inspector
in charge of each division having supervision over the Game Wardens and Fishery Officers.
More or less constant patrols have been carried out in every section of the Province, with
surprise or special patrols being made from time to time into remote or isolated portions of
each division.
All members of the British Columbia Police are ex-officio Game Wardens and Game
Wardens are ex-officio Provincial Constables, so that the two Departments work very harmoniously together at all times, thereby providing much better services to the general public
and also making it possible to provide full co-operation in the enforcement of all laws or
regulations.
Many meetings, both monthly and special, of Game Associations and other organizations
have been attended throughout the year. Our moving-picture programme has necessitated
our attending many meetings and the results obtained have been most gratifying. During
the year our educational films were shown to fifty-two organizations, schools, etc., and to
approximately 9,354 people.
We have prepared and shown a particularly interesting educational film of some 1,600
feet on our game-fish culture-work. This film shows every phase of hatchery and other work
necessary to successful trout propagation. Wherever this film has been exhibited it has been
well received.
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES.
We feel quite safe in saying that the steady improvement in the stand of our valuable
fur-bearing animals is mostly due to the regulations covering the registration of trap-lines.
Years ago, or at least prior to 1925, trappers had no assurance that the trapping territory held by them in any year would be theirs to trap the following year. This state of
affairs led the trapper, once he was on a trap-line, to take as many animals as possible.
Under the present system, however, this condition does not exist any longer, as a trapper
now has the assurance that he will have the same trapping territory from year to year,
provided he abides by the game laws and regulations and does not overtrap. In other words,
a registered trapper is now a " fur-farmer " and is only taking off a limited number of
animals from his trap-line each year,.leaving plenty of animals for breeding purposes.
The results accruing from our trap-line registration system is most gratifying and we
wish to take this opportunity to thank all trappers for their co-operation in our game conservation programme.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
Consideration has been given to changing the regulations covering the registration of
guides. There is no doubt that more strict supervision should be had over all big-game
guides, but the whole problem is one requiring very careful thought before any move is made
to request any drastic changes in the regulations. This matter is still under consideration
and it may be some little time before any action can be taken in improving the present
existing regulations.
FUR-FARMING.
Even with a state of war existing in our country and the resultant possible adverse
effect on the fur market, there does not appear to have been any curtailment in fur-farming.
As a matter of fact, our records indicate a fairly substantial increase in fur-farming permits
issued during the year. The majority of fur-farmers are successfully breeding foxes and
mink.
BIRD-BANDING.
The policy of banding migratory game birds at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve,
near  Chilliwack,  has  been  continued  and  the  scientific   data  obtained  are  not  only  most L 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
interesting but most helpful in formulating open seasons, etc. During the year 2,613 birds
have been banded at this reserve in co-operation with the National Parks Bureau of Canada
and the U.S. Biological Survey.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
On page 50 will be found particulars of bounties paid during the year and another
statement furnishes information of bounty payments over a period of years.
It is interesting to note, on examining these statements, the very decided decrease in
cougar bounty payments on Vancouver Island compared to past years.
We have again supplied numerous Game Associations with shotgun ammunition for use
in the destruction of noxious birds, with very excellent results, but it is very doubtful if we
will be able to continue this policy during the coming year owing to the increased cost of
ammunition and the possible curtailment of expenditures.
All Game Wardens have paid particular attention to vermin destruction in their
respective districts. Later on in this report will be found a statement of the vermin destroyed
by these officials.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
Replies to our advertisements on hunting and fishing in the Province flowed steadily
through our offices over a period of months, and it would seem that British Columbia each
year is attracting more attention as a hunter's and fisherman's paradise. A very large
amount of money is left in the Province each year by non-resident fishermen and hunters.
Our own citizens also spend considerable sums annually in following the sport of hunting
and fishing.
The whole-hearted co-operation of all branches of the Department of Trade and Industry
in assisting us in advertising the hunting and fishing possibilities of the Province is greatly
appreciated.
GAME PROPAGATION.
We have had to again advise all licensed game-bird farmers that we cannot continue
to purchase or take over all the pheasants they might raise. The number of pheasants purchased and liberated during the year was 17,254, an increase of 1,324 over the preceding year.
Some 201 European or Hungarian partridges were also purchased and liberated.
Details of game-bird liberations are to be found on page 76 of this report.
We have again carried out the policy of trapping beaver alive on the Bowron Lake Game
Reserve and liberating these animals in various sections of the Province. According to
numerous reports the transplanting of beaver by the Department has been most successful.
We have found that trappers and others have gone out of their way in ensuring protection
for the animals liberated.
Our game reserves, according to authentic reports, are still proving their value in acting
as seeding or propagation areas for all wild life, with the resultant improvement of conditions
in game in the areas adjacent to these reserves or sanctuaries. Our personnel will not permit
of continuous patrols of these reserves, but everything possible has been done to see that the
boundaries of all reserves and sanctuaries have not been violated.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
We are again very pleased to report that a decided improvement in all migratory game,
non-game, and insectivorous birds has been noticed in nearly every district of the Province.
After lengthy correspondence with the National Parks Bureau of Canada we were finally
successful in having the hunting season increased from two months to two and one-half
months. This lengthening of the hunting season in no way affected our supply of migratory
game birds. Every possible step was taken to see that the regulations pertaining to the
hunting of these birds was strictly observed in every section of the Province.
REVENUE.
A large number of non-residents, especially those interested in angling, left the Province
when war was declared or did not come into British Columbia after making arrangements.
Many reservations for accommodation at fishing resorts in the Interior were cancelled as soon
as Canada entered the war.
I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 9
Notwithstanding the curtailment of non-resident fishermen and hunters entering the
Province, we are very pleased to report that our revenue increased $5,369.59 over the year
1938, and thereby established a record. In the history of the Department our greatest annual
revenue was during the year 1939, the total revenue, exclusive of fines, was $242,357.53.
GAME-FISH CULTURE.
Statements dealing with trout liberations are to be found on pages 59 to 73 of this report.
On examination of these statements it will be noted that there was a most decided increase in
the liberations this year over the preceding year.
Particulars of our game-fish cultural activities are covered more or less in detail in the
reports submitted by Inspectors C. F. Kearns and R. M. Robertson, and which are included in
another section of this report.
We have endeavoured, in connection with our planting operations, to confine our restock-
ing-work to lakes which are heavily fished and leaving in reserve many barren lakes in the
various districts until such time as our investigations as to their suitability for trout propagation have been concluded, or until it is necessary to stock some of these lakes with trout so
that we may build up lakes that have been too heavily fished.
The scientific research in connection with trout diseases being carried on at our Stanley
Park Hatchery in Vancouver, in co-operation with the Fisheries Research Board of Canada
and the University of British Columbia, is still progressing satisfactorily and we hope to be
able to furnish a detailed progress report on this research-work at a later date. Unfortunately, this study was seriously curtailed owing to destruction by fire of our old Stanley
Park plant. A new and up-to-date hatchery was, however, built during the year and the
facilities now available at this hatchery are greatly improved, both in connection with our
trout-propagation work as well as carrying on our scientific studies.
With reference to our sport-fish propagation programme, we have to express our deep
appreciation of the assistance furnished during the year through the Provincial Forest
Branch of the Department of Lands. This Department readily furnished very valuable
assistance under their Youth Forestry Training Plan programme by improving the buildings
and grounds of our various hatcheries, as well as carrying on some very important trail and
stream improvement-work.
We have continued our campaign, especially in the Interior portions of the Province, of
ridding many of our fishing lakes and streams of coarse fish, such as carp, suckers, etc.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The British Columbia Police Force, as in past years, has furnished every possible
assistance during the year, and the friendly relations between the British Columbia Police,
the Forest Branch, and the Department of Agriculture, as well as other Government Departments, has been most gratifying.
We wish, in conclusion, to express our most sincere appreciation to the Commissioner of
the British Columbia Police, his officers and men; the Honourable the Minister of Fisheries
for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries, Major J. A. Motherwell; Dr.
W. A. Clemens, of the Pacific Biological Station; the Fisheries Research Board of Canada;
Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British Columbia; Dr. D. C. B.
Duff, of the University of British Columbia; and Game Associations and farmers in the
Province who have helped us so much in our work during the year 1939.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in "A" Game Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Throughout the northern and west coast sections of Vancouver Island black bear
are on the increase. In the Courtenay area these animals have been the cause of numerous
complaints of their doing damage to domestic stock.
Grizzly bear at the head of the various inlets on the mainland coast are fairly plentiful. L 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Deer.—Deer in the mainland section of the Division are not plentiful and these remarks
also apply to northern Vancouver Island. In the Nanaimo region deer are holding their own
in numbers, but elsewhere on Vancouver Island these animals are increasing. Owing to a
decided decrease in the number of cougar in the Alberni District deer have been more
numerous than for some years.
Mountain-goat.—In the Coast sections of the Division goat are not numerous. A special
patrol was undertaken in the Cowichan Lake country during the summer for the purpose of
ascertaining the results of the liberation of goat in this area some years ago, and it was found
that these animals are most decidedly on the increase in the vicinity of Goat Mountain in the
Shaw Creek Game Reserve.
Wapiti (Elk).—Due to the logging of the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, the wapiti have
moved out of this reserve and are now found to have moved north and west towards the
Nanaimo Lakes and Alberni.
In the Nimpkish River country wapiti are fairly plentiful, but these animals, it would
seem, are not in sufficient numbers to warrant any open hunting season.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
Beaver are on the increase, especially in the Courtenay, Campbell River, Alberni, and
Nanaimo Districts. Permits to trap beaver have again been issued this year, both in cases
where these animals have been doing damage and where trappers have furnished proof that
little, if any, harm would be done in taking a few surplus beaver in their registered trapping
territory.
Racoon are, generally speaking, on the increase in most sections of the Division.
Muskrats.—The Game Warden at Duncan reports muskrats have not been as plentiful,
owing to fairly heavy trapping which is mostly carried on in cultivated areas of the District.
In the Courtenay District muskrats are slightly increasing and spreading to new territory.
Mink and marten are found in most sections of the Division and are holding their own
in numbers, while some sections report these animals are on the increase.
Otter (Land).—In the west coast regions otter are to be found in fair numbers, but
cannot be classed as numerous in this or other portions of the Division.
Other fur-bearing animals such as ermine (weasel), wolverine, and squirrels, are to be
found, but only the latter animal can be found in good numbers.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—All reports indicate that the past hunting season was good, but in some
sections blue grouse are only holding their own and in the Alert Bay region are scarce.
After a close season for one year the Courtenay-Campbell River area, through which a
forest fire raged in the summer of 1938, was opened for shooting and a fairly large number
of birds were taken, but there would seem to be no cause for anxiety as sufficient birds are on
hand to repopulate the area during the coming breeding season.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Reported as increasing on Saltspring Island, but cannot be considered
as being in sufficient numbers to warrant any extended open season. The Game Wardens at
Duncan, Courtenay, Alberni, Nanaimo, Cowichan Lake, and Victoria advise ruffed or willow
grouse are increasing.
Pheasants.—Following one year's close season on Saltspring Island, these birds increased
and are now in fair numbers. Good bags were secured in the Cowichan and Victoria
Districts, but the Game Wardens at Nanaimo and Courtenay advise that pheasants are not
increasing as they should owing to increased liberations by the Department during the past
few years.
Partridge.—These birds are to be found in the southern portions of Vancouver Island,
but as they are not plentiful a close season has been in effect for some years and should be
continued.
Quail.—In the Victoria and Duncan Districts these birds are plentiful, but elsewhere,
owing to climatic conditions, are not to be found in any great numbers.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are to be found in fair numbers in the high mountain regions
of the Division. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 11
Migratory Game Birds.
Reports indicate that migratory wild fowl of all kinds were plentiful and that black
brant in late February put in their appearance at many suitable points in countless thousands.
Swans were observed in their usual numbers in different sections. Shore-birds were also
reported in fair numbers throughout the Division.
Geese shooting was excellent along the west coast. In the Courtenay region local-raised
geese showed a slight increase.
Vermin.
Game Wardens throughout the Division report predatory animals on the decrease. In
the Courtenay area bounty was paid on only ten cougar, which constitutes a record, as in
past years far more cougar were presented annually for bounty. Predatory-animal Hunter
J. Dewar has been continually hunting cougar and wolves, but owing to the unusual scarcity
of these animals only a few have been taken. Domestic cats and dogs running wild have
been a serious menace to game and a large number of these animals have been destroyed
during the year.
Game Associations and farmers have accounted for a considerable number of predatory
animals and noxious birds.
Farther on in this report will be found a statement of vermin destroyed by Game
Wardens in "A" Division during the year.
Game-protection.
All of the districts forming the Division have been consistently patrolled throughout the
year. Every effort has been made by all Game Wardens in stopping poaching or out-of-
season shooting. A number of convictions for pit-lamping have been obtained, and while this
in itself will not put an absolute stop to this illegal practice it is gratifying to note that
pit-lamping is not now carried on to the extent it was in former years.
Game Propagation.
As during the past few years, pheasants have been liberated in increased numbers in
the most suitable districts of the Division. During 1939, 3,760 pheasants were liberated,
particulars of which are to be found in a statement in another section of this report.
The fallow deer trapped a few years ago on James Island and released in certain of the
Gulf Islands and in the Alberni area are increasing. Complaints of these deer doing damage
on Saltspring Island have been received.
Game Reserves.
Close supervision has been kept over all game reserves. The Shaw Creek Game Reserve,
situated on the north-west shore of Cowichan Lake, has been logged and this has resulted in
the wapiti moving out of this area. If, however, the slashings are burned, then we may
expect, in a few years' time, to see the wapiti and other game come back to this protected
country.
The Bald Mountain. Game Reserve, situated on the south side of the North Arm of
Cowichan Lake, is an excellent breeding area for grouse and the birds raised in this reserve
repopulate the surrounding country each year.
Fur Trade.
The majority of the fur taken on Vancouver Island is sold in Vancouver or exported to
traders outside of the Province.
Fur-farming.
There has been no great decline in the number of fur-farms operating in the Division,
even though the country is at war. Mink and foxes are the principal animals being farmed.
Every assistance is and has been given to all prospective or operative fur-farmers.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system is still producing excellent results and trappers holding registered trap-lines
are operating these lines, which remain in their name from year to year, as fur-farms. L 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Guides.
As Vancouver Island is not a big-game district there are no registered guides operating
therein.
Special Patrols.
As in past years, a number of special or surprise patrols have been made by each Game
Warden in their respective districts. Joint patrols have also been carried out in some
instances and where necessary.
Hunting Accidents.
It is to be regretted that hunting accidents increased during the year; some eight accidents occurred, a few of which were fatal. A statement of these accidents is to be found in
another section of this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
From all reports to hand, game conditions throughout the Division have shown a very
decided improvement. Vermin of all kinds is on the decrease, which undoubtedly is responsible to some extent for these favourable conditions.
The British Columbia Police Force, the Provincial Forestry Department, Game Associations, farmers and sportsmen in general have given every possible assistance during the year
and their co-operation is very greatly appreciated.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
Big Game.
Moose.—These animals are prolific in the Rockies, and are now well established in the
Selkirk Mountains, east and north of Kootenay Lake, although not in sufficient numbers to
permit hunting for some years yet.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti continue to extend their range from the Rockies of the East
Kootenay and are apparently beginning to establish themselves on the Selkirk side of the
Columbia Valley as the moose have done. However, the Selkirks are not a suitable range
for these animals on account of the heavy snowfall.
Good reports are received from the experimental planting of some years ago in the
Princeton area and the wapiti at that point, as well as in the hills of the Southern Okanagan
near Naramata, appear to be well established. The several consecutive open seasons in the
Okanagan seem to have made little difference, as a relatively small number of bulls have
been killed. On account of the mild winters the wapiti have not molested the orchards as
they had done in previous years.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are maintaining their numbers well, although they
are hunted heavily in season in the Rockies. The shortening of the hunting season to October
31st should provide sufficient protection as these animals are extremely wary, except during
the rutting period in the early winter.
There is no change in the two small bands in the vicinity of Keremeos and Okanagan
Falls, which have been protected for many years and manage to survive on a very limited
range in competition with domestic stock.
Caribou.—Little change is noted in the caribou stand of the Division and the bag is small.
Other game is easier to get so that caribou hunting only attracts a few enthusiasts. They
are well distributed over the entire Division, with the exception of the Boundary and Similkameen areas.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are plentiful and increasing in the Boundary and Similkameen Districts, where they have been protected for a long time. Several were killed in
the Similkameen during the past season and possibly a close season would be in order again,
as they appear to be too easy to take on account of the open nature of the country in that
district. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 13
Mule-deer.—Mule-deer are abundant throughout the Division and show no signs of
decreasing, in spite of long open seasons and heavy hunting.
White-tail Deer.—White-tail deer are well distributed throughout the Division, with the
exception of the Similkameen District. They appear to be on the increase in the Boundary
District, where they have been protected for some years.
Bear (Black, Brown, and Grizzly).—Bear are definitely plentiful in the East and West
Kootenays, possibly the largest concentration being in that area immediately adjacent to and
north of Kootenay Lake, and somewhat less plentiful in the Boundary and Similkameen areas.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Little change is noted in the activity of the registered trappers, of whom there are
approximately 500 in this Division. The competition is keen for trap-lines and very few are
relinquished. There is a waiting-list of names at all game offices for any trap-lines that may
become vacant.
The trapping of fur-bearing animals alive, particularly marten and mink, is becoming
quite common, as these animals find a ready market amongst fur-farmers.
Lynx, marten, mink, beaver, weasel, and muskrats are the most common fur-bearers,
while fisher, wolverine, otter, skunks, badger, and foxes are comparatively scarce.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—Blue grouse have been plentiful during the past season.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Willow grouse again appear to be on the up-grade and are
generally plentiful wherever conditions are suitable. Old-timers will insist that they are not
nearly as numerous in the vicinity of large towns, and this is a condition that can be expected
to continue. Good roads, numerous hunters, and the clearing of suitable cover all contribute
to the depletion of willow grouse. Nevertheless, it is interesting to note that these birds are
still in fair numbers in the Nelson-Trail vicinity, which supports a large and active hunting-
population.
Franklin's Grouse.—Franklin's grouse show little change, although they are noticeably
scarce in the Cranbrook area, but are well distributed elsewhere. A large concentration of
hunters, favoured by good roads and open country, may account for this local condition.
Sharp-tail Grouse.—A few flocks of sharp-tail grouse remain in the East Kootenay,
Boundary, and Lower Similkameen Districts, but are only the remnants of the flocks that
existed twenty-five years or more ago. Although these birds have been protected consistently,
it appears dubious if they will ever regain their former numbers.
Ptarmigan.—Ptarmigan are to be found on the higher mountains throughout the Division,
but are negligible as game birds.
Pheasants.—These birds flourish in the Similkameen, Boundary, and Creston areas,
where conditions are most favourable, and generous open seasons do not appear to unduly
deplete their stand. They are also doing well in the Lower Arrow Lakes District from
Nakusp to Robson.
Apparently the experimental plantings in the East Kootenay Valley, between the U.S.
Boundary and Windermere, are not as successful as we had hoped. Numbers of pheasants
have survived the winters and appear to rear broods, but they have not made the consistent
advance necessary for permanent establishment, such as in areas like Creston or Grand
Forks. Although the country appears suitable it may be that the local predators keep the
birds down too closely. The colonies that are already established will be closely watched with
a view to deciding whether or not further plantings are profitable.
Partridge.—These birds are fairly plentiful in the area between Penticton and the U.S.
Boundary, and also in the vicinity of Grand Forks where open seasons were permitted. They
are only occasional in the remainder of the Division, where flocks are noted from time to
time. Year to year at Creston they vary from plentitude to paucity, which seemingly can
only be explained by their migratory tendencies.
Quail. Quail are plentiful from Penticton to the U.S. Boundary, but this is the only
place in the Division where their introduction has been successful. L 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—The duck situation is very satisfactory and local ducks are plentiful. Owing to
the very mild winter, the usual southward migration was not noticeable and local ducks
supplied most of the shooting during the open season. The Creston area and the sloughs of
the Columbia River, from Windermere to Golden, as well as the Howser District at the north
end of Kootenay Lake, are the only concentration areas of ducks in the Division. Nevertheless, the total number that nest in small ponds and sloughs from Princeton to Fernie is
very considerable in the aggregate. Also the number of ducks wintering in this part of
British Columbia is surprising. This is particularly noticeable around Kootenay lake and
river which do not completely freeze.
In previous years grain was fed to the ducks when ice conditions made it difficult for
them to forage. It has not been necessary to feed the ducks for the last two winters, and the
present winter to the end of December has been extremely mild.
Geese.—There is a decided and noticeable increase in nesting geese in the Creston area.
This is also the case in the Windermere-Golden District, but not to such a noticeable extent.
No practical reason appears for this change, although various theories are suggested, ranging
from the presence of too many aeroplanes in the northern nesting areas to increased wheat
acreage around Creston. Whatever the reason, the fact remains that geese are decidedly
more numerous in the East Kootenay than for many years, and the hunters decidedly jubilant.
Wilson Snipe.—Wilson snipe are migratory and for a few days each fall are present in '
good numbers, particularly on the marshes.    They are not hunted to any extent by local
residents.
Coots.—Coots nest throughout the Division in large numbers, and although there is an
open season on them they are not hunted to any noticeable extent. It is doubtful if these
birds will ever be popular.    In any case not as long as there are ducks to hunt.
Swans.—These are only occasional, lingering around Kootenay Lake for a few days in
the spring, presumably resting en route northward.
Vermin.
There were 44 coyotes, 75 abandoned cats, 39 ownerless dogs, 6 eagles, 26 owls, 4 ravens,
77 hawks, 876 crows, and 109 magpies reported destroyed by Game Wardens in the Division
during 1939. This is exclusive of the bounties paid on cougars and coyotes, as well as coyotes
taken by trappers in the open season. Some of the Rod and Gun Clubs also conducted crow
and magpie shoots during the summer with much success.
Game-protection.
There were 81 convictions and 1 dismissal under the " Game Act," 8 convictions under the
Special Fisheries Act, and 4 convictions under the Criminal Code arising from hunting-
activities.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released for restocking purposes in the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand
Forks, and Creston areas, where open seasons are established. However, experimental
liberations were made at Arrow Lake points and in the Columbia Valley, where much interest
was shown by the residents, whose co-operation was assured in caring for the birds in
inclement weather during the winter.
Very little feeding was necessary during the winter of 1938-39 as conditions were very
favourable generally, with little snow or cold weather.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of Elk and Bull Rivers, also
White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vasseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are
also beneficial and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and in the Kettle River District. These are
located on the winter yarding-grounds of the mule-deer and serve as a haven for these
animals during unusual winter conditions late in the season, when they might otherwise be
too easily taken. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 15
Fur Trade.
Resident fur-traders at Oliver, Nelson, and Creston share with the Vancouver market
practically all the furs taken within the Division, very little being exported directly out of
the Province.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming appears to be consistently on the up-grade, judging by the number of new
investments in this line of business. The old-established fur-farmers are very optimistic and
apparently have been doing well with both foxes and mink. Marten appear to be in the
experimental stage at present, but it would seem that the rearing of these particularly fine
fur-bearers would soon be on the same basis as the previously mentioned varieties. Considerable success has been obtained by some breeders in recent years by successfully propagating
these animals in captivity.
The mink-farmers at present are somewhat concerned with the low price being offered
for fur-farmed mink-pelts, after the encouraging prices that have prevailed for some years.
Many farmers are refusing to dispose of their pelts at the present market valuation and it is
to be hoped that the price will shortly improve.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Nothing more clearly demonstrates the value of Provincial administration of trap-lines
than the number of applications that are continually being received at every Game Office for
trap-lines. These are at a premium at the present time, and no doubt will continue to be so,
as very few trappers are willing to relinquish their trap-lines, which are in effect large-scale
fur-farms, even though the fluctuations in fur prices are sometimes disappointing to the
trapper.
Registration of Guides.
There were forty-three licensed guides operating in the Division during the past season.
The prevailing war situation at the start of the season resulted in a recession of hunting-
parties, although the weather and game conditions were excellent. All parties that went out
were very pleased with their bags.
Special Patrols.
No outstanding patrols were made during the year, although routine patrols were quite
extensive. Patrols were carried out by car, launch, rowboat, horseback, and on foot continually during the year. A good many patrols to remote areas were in connection with the
liberation of trout fry or the planting of eyed trout-eggs.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 17th, Mike Slee, of Allen Grove, mistook Douglas McMyn, his friend, for
a deer and shot him through the left leg while hunting. McMyn recovered and Slee was
prosecuted for criminal negligence. Sentence was suspended, his firearms licence cancelled,
and the Court recommended the cancellation should be permanent on account of Slee's
defective eyesight.
On October 7th, Fred Williams, age 30, of Creston, was shot in the foot while working
in his garden. The bullet struck the ankle bone, glanced off and came out above the instep.
Subsequent investigation disclosed that three boys, age 12, had been shooting in the vicinity
with a .22. The owner of the gun was charged in Juvenile Court with carrying firearms
without a licence.
On October 13th, Carl McDougal, age 20, of Creston, while hunting pheasants, leaned
his shotgun against a fence while he spoke to a neighbour. The shotgun discharged, inflicting
a severe wound in McDougal's arm, from which he subsequently recovered. Examination of
the gun showed it to be in an unsafe condition and Mr. McDougal's firearms licence was
cancelled.
On October 22nd, George Lucien LaPoint, age 16, of Nelson, accompanied by John
Jarbeau, age 14, discharged a single-barrel shotgun while placing it in a boat, inflicting a
severe wound in his hand, from which he subsequently recovered. The boys had taken the
gun from the cabin of Mr. LaPoint, Sr., without permission. L 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
On November 5th, Ruth Wainwright, age 16, of Penticton, while shooting a .22 at a tree,
hit Miriam MacDonald, age 14, member of a picnic-party, in the shoulder. Ruth Wainwright
was subsequently charged in Juvenile Court with negligently handling firearms. Accused
was released with a warning and the rifle was confiscated.
On December 4th, Charles John Thoroughgood, while hunting rabbits with a .22 rifle,
near Kimberley, slipped on a wet log, the rifle accidentally discharged, inflicting a flesh wound
through the upper left arm.
On December 8th, Ernest Minchin, age 19, of Kelowna, member of a hunting-party of
youths, struck at a bush-rat in their cabin with the butt of his 30.30 rifle. The rifle discharged and the bullet struck Verdell Toombs, age 19, in the lower left side of the abdomen.
He was immediately rushed to hospital at Kelowna but died shortly after admission. The
matter of proceeding against Minchin and the other members of the party for criminal
negligence is being considered.
On December 29th, Robert Verrier, age 17, of Summerland, was found shot at Faulder,
near Summerland, under mysterious circumstances. Apparently he had killed a deer, and
while dragging it down the hillside had been shot in the back. His rifle, a .30 Remington,
lay near-by with a live shell in the breech. The nature of his wound precluded the possibility
of his having shot himself and again reloading the gun.    Investigation is being continued.
Game-fish Culture.
While the detailed operations of the Department Hatcheries at Kaslo, Nelson, and Summerland, as well as the subsidized hatcheries at Cranbrook and Taft, will be found in the
Game Commission's general report, still there are some interesting points that can be
profitably mentioned herein.
The reopening of Gerrard eyeing-station was the most ambitious undertaking. This is
the old Dominion hatchery which was operated from 1912 to 1932. Due to the estimated
cost of putting it into further running condition, approximately $5,000, coupled with adverse
water conditions in the Lardeau River caused by an extensive log-jam, the Dominion Government discontinued operations.
On the recommendation of Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson, formerly with the Dominion
Fisheries, the possibilities of Gerrard were again investigated. The Lardeau River is the
main spawning-stream for the large trout from Kootenay Lake, and it did seem desirable to
obtain eggs from these parent fish to improve our sport-fishing generally in the Province, as
they are the largest rainbow trout in North America.
Under instructions from the Game Commission, Fishery Officer Thompson, with two
temporary assistants, repaired and reinstalled the old fish-fences and holding-pens at Gerrard, which is at the head of the Lardeau River at the entrance to Trout Lake, and obtained
nearly three-quarters of a million eggs from the large spawners, whose live weight ran as
high as 35 lb.
Approximately half of this number was retained for distribution in Kootenay Lake
waters and the remainder was transferred to Stanley Park and Cranbrook Hatcheries. The
eggs were eyed by Fishery Officer Thompson at Gerrard and then transported to Kaslo, where
they were hatched and retained in suitable ponds until they had attained the fingerling size
before liberation.
In connection with the Youth Forest Training Project conducted by the Provincial
Forestry Department, a work-gang of young men was allotted to the Game Department and
was employed on the log-jam on the Lardeau River, one-half mile below the hatchery-site.
This jam, which is an accumulation of some twenty years' standing and extends from both
banks of the river a distance of nearly one-half mile, forms an almost impassable barrier at
the higher stages of the water. The spawning fish can get through the jam until, due to the
height of the water, the accumulation of logs and roots is lifted and pressed together so
tightly that the large fish cannot pass. This is the reason that our estimated collection of a
million eggs fell short, as when the water rose suddenly no more spawners could get up to
the traps.
Although the Y.F.T.P. crew did good work on the log-jam it is too large an undertaking
for any but experienced workmen with suitable equipment, such as a caterpillar tractor and
drag-line, to complete.    It is to be hoped that the Y.F.T.P. organization will again be in effect REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 17
during the coming season, when sufficient of the jam could be cleared so that the large
spawners may get through to the fish-traps at any stage of the river.
The value of the Kootenay Lake stock for planting purposes is amply demonstrated by
the success of our local rearing-ponds during the past season. The fry are much bigger than
similar progeny from smaller parent fish and thrive at a remarkable rate. Three-inch
fingerlings in ten weeks is an average rate of growth in the retaining-ponds at Kaslo, Mirror
Lake, and New Denver.
The Kaslo Rod and Gun Club, with the co-operation of the City of Kaslo, have constructed
an extensive rearing-pond in connection with the city park and are planning to elaborate
this pond still farther.
Mr. K. K. Bjerkness, at Mirror Lake, has also gone to a great deal of expense in providing rearing-ponds, the use of which he has donated to the Game Department through the
Kaslo Rod and Gun Club.
The New Denver Rod and Gun Club have also built and operated a retaining-pond at
New Denver.
The above rearing-ponds operated successfully during the year and liberations therefrom
presented no difficulties. The rate of growth was satisfactory,. and while the Department
contributed up to $25 of the cost of the food in each case the feeding was carried out and
augmented by the local members, under the guidance and supervision of Fishery Officer
Thompson and Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson.
These three rearing-ponds are in addition to the one already in successful operation at
Princeton, and various other Rod and Gun Clubs in the Division have signified their intention
of promoting similar undertakings at a later date.
This is in line with the policy fostered by the Game Commission, that it is better to
release a small number of fingerlings in preference to a large number of fry. The mortality
percentage is far less and the results of these liberations are proportionately better according
to the size of the fingerlings.
Regarding the growth of fry in suitable waters with abundant feed, our experience at
Boundary Lake is interesting. This lake, about 40 acres in extent, is situated in a black
muck meadow on the United States border, south of Nelson, and has no spawning-grounds.
It was stocked in 1923 and onward to 1937 by the Dominion Fisheries with speckled trout
(eastern brook). This lake was very popular with Americans and furnished excellent fishing.
This year the fishing was very poor, as the last heavy planting was in 1936.
We had some difficulty netting sufficient adults to obtain spawn, but secured enough to
liberate 100,000 well-developed fingerlings in April, 1939. On October 26th, while seining for
parent fish, the Fishery Officers were astonished at the huge haul of speckled trout from 6
to 9 inches in length.
As no little fish had been netted the previous fall, there appears to be no doubt that these
fish are the growth of our fingerlings planted seven and one-half months earlier. If this
rate of growth is continued until next May 1st, our plantings will have grown into legal-size
fish in the space of approximately a year from the time of liberation.
Boundary Lake may be the exception for rapid growth as the feed conditions are very
good, but it is an example of what may be done in waters which admit of control as it does.
Our estimate of liberations for next year in Boundary Lake is based on a 50-per-cent. reduction and further plantings will be gauged by the speckled trout population in the lake.
Note.—While parent fish are from necessity netted in Boundary Lake in the fall and
held in pens until ripe, they are of course released unharmed when spawning operations are
concluded.
The Dominion Fisheries in previous years were active in stocking barren lakes, of which
this Division has a profusion, mostly on the higher elevations. These plantings are almost
invariably most successful for from three years after the planting to about seven years, when
the lakes begin to decline, and it now seems that a ten-year cycle just about covers the life
of a barren lake where spawning-grounds are available. For about three years after the
planting the fish increase in size at a surprising rate, until after two or three spawning
seasons the fish population in the lake outdistances the food-supply, when the fish rapidly
deteriorate and become both small and thin and are no longer an attraction to fishermen.
2 L 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We are fortunate at present in having a number of barren lakes just about due for
fishing, and are restricting further plantings so that in the future we may always have the
odd lake or two wherein the angler may have the pleasure of actually wetting his line in
virgin waters, providing he is willing to hike a bit to get there.
In regard to the kokanee—whose chief virtue is as food for the larger rainbow trout—we
have extended plantings to include Okanagan Lake and Premier Lake in the East Kootenay.
The theory is that the re-establishment of kokanee trout in Okanagan Lake—where irrigation
has curtailed their spawning—will aid the propagation of the larger trout. Similarly their
introduction in Premier Lake is to endeavour to bring back the size of the trout in that
formerly very fine fishing lake.
For the past two years the Fishery Officers and Game Wardens have been experimenting
with netting or trapping predatory fish—suckers, squaw-fish, whitefish, chub, and ling—and
during the past season a considerable number of these fish were caught, ground up and fed
to the baby trout at Kaslo and Mirror Lake. The results were very satisfactory and in 1940
we hope to be able to take large numbers of coarse fish, as well as spent kokanees, and utilize
them to feed fry and fingerlings in an effort to both lower cost of raising large fingerlings
before liberation and also to reduce their enemies at the same time. To this end a freezing
chamber has been obtained at an extremely reasonable rent at Kaslo and it is sincerely hoped
that the experiment will be a success and that a new page will be turned in practical fish-
culture in British Columbia.
While coarse fish have been overlooked in the past as a sporting pastime, yet whitefish
in the Kootenay River provide fair sport for the bait fisherman, and both ling and whitefish
are very tasty eating.
In discussing fish-cultural operations it would not be amiss to remark that we are very
fortunate in having secured the services of men who have had extensive experience in this
line of work with the Dominion Fisheries. The Fishery Officers in charge of the hatcheries
at Summerland, Nelson, Kaslo, and Cranbrook are experienced men in every phase of game-
fish culture, from the taking of spawn to the final disposition of same, either as eyed eggs,
fry or fingerlings.
The services of Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson—whose twenty years' experience in
untangling field problems in the Kootenays has been invaluable—are being called upon continually to iron out the difficulties that are arising in the Okanagan and Kamloops Districts.
Such problems as the screening of irrigation-ditches, installation of coarse-fish traps, the
suitability of streams and lakes for stocking, as well as the establishment of spawning-beds
and a hundred and one incidental matters have been adequately adjusted by Fishery
Supervisor Robinson.
The fish-cultural operations in the Division have been, of course, carried out with the
approval and under instructions from the Game Commission, whose somewhat wider viewpoint and timely advice have been both helpful and encouraging to the entire Divisional staff.
Summary and General Remarks.
Game conditions continue to be satisfactory throughout the Division. The present
winter, at the end of December, shows every prospect of being as mild and as lacking in
heavy snowfall as the two or three preceding winters. The snowfall to date (December 31st)
has been negligible, even in the renowned snow belt of the Arrow Lakes—Kootenay Lake
section. The result of several successive open winters cannot be otherwise than beneficial
to game.
The deer season was shortened five days in December as a result of representations
having been made in the past that these animals were too easily killed during the latter part
of the season in any normal year. This past fall, due to the lack of snow, deer did not come
down to the lower levels at the end of the season and there was some agitation to have the
season extended. But while it was not practical to alter the season so close to the publicly
announced expiry date, it would have made no difference in any case as the identical weather
conditions continued to the end of the month. For that reason the bag of deer, both mule and
white-tail, throughout the Division has been lighter this year than for many seasons.
As previously reported, it is felt that a close control of beaver trapping in the southern
portion of the Province is desirable.    Some opposition to open seasons comes from Farmers' REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 19
Institutes and Game Associations, who feel that the water-conserving capabilities of the
beaver should be encouraged, both for agricultural purposes and for sport fishing.
The opinions of the Game Wardens in this Division support the above view-point.
Occasional suggestions are received that exotic game birds such as chukar partridge or
similar types should be released in British Columbia. No doubt these well-meaning advices
are prompted by articles in the outdoor magazines, but.as long as our stand of grouse continues to flourish as they are doing in spite of occasional cyclical periods of scarcity, there
would seem to be no reason for introducing new species.
It is true that the success of the Chinese pheasants and the Hungarian partridges provides a good argument, but it should be remembered that these introductions have succeeded
in localities where the advance of agriculture has robbed our local upland birds of their
natural habitat. Hungarian partridge and pheasants do not supersede but rather take over
and establish themselves in those communities where, due to lack of cover, there is no longer
any chance of propagating the native birds.
In a more limited manner the above remarks also apply to quail.
The Dominion Youth Training scheme which was conducted by the Forest Branch worked
out very well for the Game Department during the past season. Four additional boys were
allotted for fish-cultural work at the hatcheries and their help was greatly appreciated.
The trails which were opened to suitable hunting areas by the Y.F.T.P. work crews were
also a step in the right direction. It is to be regretted that the advent of war may curtail
these most desirable activities, which cannot but return the value expended to the Province
many times over in the increased revenue that will inevitably accrue from non-resident
fishermen and hunters and vacationists, who will, it is expected, come to British Columbia
during the next few years in even greater numbers.
Too much stress cannot be placed on the interest shown by the general public, and
particularly the school children, over the game films that have been displayed by the Game
Commission. These are educational, as well as being a very fine type of entertainment, and
it is to be hoped that this phase of publicity can be widened so that regular annual showings
may be made in the public and high schools, and also in the less populous areas of the
Province.
The writer was privileged to attend the British Columbia Exhibit at the San Francisco
Fair as a Department representative during the month of August. The queries received
were most illuminating.
Most Americans, while admitting British Columbia's great hunting possibilities, are
anxious to get some really good fresh-water fishing and, if possible, to bring their families
with them at the same time. Many who had not visited British Columbia were frankly
sceptical that our fishing was as good as the specimens on display indicated. On the other
hand, those who had been here were enthusiastic in their praises and stated they had every
intention of coming again.
Undoubtedly our fresh-water fishing is a potent lure to the average vacationist from the
United States.
Appreciation and thanks of the entire personnel is tendered to the Provincial Forestry
Service and the Provincial Police, to whom we are indebted both for personal assistance and
the use of equipment during the year. We should also include the help we have received
from individuals and groups of the various Rod and Gun Clubs in the district, who were
always ready to assist in measures designed to augment either fishing or hunting.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C "
Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1939.
Big Game.
Moose.—Moose in the Bowron Lake area were fairly scarce. On the other hand, they
were reported quite numerous around Quesnel, Williams Lake, Clinton, and Kamloops. They
have been seen around Tunkwa and Dairy Lakes in the Kamloops area.    Reports vary in L 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
different districts on the bag-limit taken by hunters. On account of the entire absence of
snow up to December 31st, moose in certain districts were hard to obtain. As a whole,
however, the interior of British Columbia is well stocked with splendid specimens of this
variety of big game. They are reported as far south an Batannie Creek, also north of
Salmon Arm.
Caribou.—The season should be considerably shortened on caribou everywhere, especially
in Clearwater Park, where from now on, due to the increased tourist attractions, a heavier
influx of tourists and hunters can be expected. Practically every officer in whose Detachment caribou exist reports a scarcity, especially in the Williams Lake Detachment.
Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth was sent into the Clearwater area during the
latter part of November, but on arrival there did not find any snow which would assist him
in killing cougar allegedly destroying caribou calves. In the spring of 1940 this will be
kept in mind.
Wapiti.—These animals are very slowly proceeding northward from the head of Adams
Lake, and they have also been seen over a very wide area in all directions from their point
of liberation in 1927. They are doing comparatively well under varying weather conditions.
Wapiti are reported in the Bridge River country at the head of Laluwissen Creek; west of
the Fraser River near Pavilion, and in the Yalakom Game Reserve. A band of twenty-five
is reported to have wintered at the head of Hurley River.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are numerous in the vicinity of Bowron Lake Game
Reserve and the Momich River in the Adams Lake District east of Kamloops. They also
frequent the territory east of Azure Lake and on the east side of the Williams Lake Detachment and the Cayoosh Creek District, where they are in fairly large numbers. Few were
hunted this year.
Rocky Mountain Sheep.—These animals are increasing at Deer Park Ranch, near Williams Lake. They are scattered through the Bridge River drainage-basin and into the Whitewater country. One guide reports seeing 150 in the latter area in one day. A cougar hunter
reported seeing a band of twenty on the Yalakom Game Reserve during the latter part of
December. Spences Bridge has been remarkably free from damage to farm crops by
mountain-sheep. Another area where they are to be found is at the head of Laluwissen
Creek and west of Pavilion, on the west side of the Fraser River. Another band is reported
on the Marble Range, although they are not increasing.
Grizzly Bear.—In the Lillooet Detachment, west of the Fraser River and above the
timber-line, grizzlies are fairlv numerous. They are common in the Barkerville and Bowron
Lake areas and on the Aitcha Mountain, west of the Fraser River. The salmon-run attracted
quite a number of black bears to various rivers. Eleven grizzlies were taken out of the
Williams Lake Detachment during the year. The black bear is becoming far too prevalent
around Kamloops, Ashcroft, and Chilcotin. They have acquired the habit of molesting cattle
and sheep, and many have been destroyed as a result. The use of bait as a lure is most
effective where they are destroying stock. Some wool-growers and cattle-growers themselves
are partly to blame for damage to their stock by coyotes and black bears. The leaving of
sheep and cattle carcasses on the range without burning or burying them has taught those
animals a liking for fresh meat.
Mule-deer.—The first heavy snow brought these animals down to lower levels, which
resulted in easily obtained bag-limits. Reports vary in this Division. In some districts
hunters had to go to timber-line for good hunting. There is an unfortunate feature arising
where tie camps are established in this Division. Feed in the shape of moss from fallen
trees is easier to obtain and unusually large numbers of deer wintered around the slope in
the vicinity of the C.P.R. tie camp near Kamloops. The bag-limits on deer were so easily
obtained that little skill was necessary. A considerable shortening of the season should be
seriously considered in order to prevent inequality of bucks to does in the vicinity of the tie
camp. One doe deer killed in this area had horns measuring 8 inches in length with two
points.
Fur-bearing Animals.
This season has been similar to the previous one in that conditions are absolutely against
even a fair fur catch. In many districts there has been an entire absence of snow and unusually
warm weather has prevailed everywhere.    Squirrels have suffered more than any fur-bearer REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 21
and the drain on the squirrel population has been unusually heavy. In fact there has been
an actual increase in the number taken. There is an enormous increase in numbers of
snow-shoe rabbits, which augurs well for next year's fur catch, provided that conditions are
suitable.    This could be described as the peak year for snow-shoe rabbits.
I   again   submit   herewith   comparative   statistics   on   the   estimate   of   beaver   left   on
registered trap-lines in this Division, exclusive of Indian trap-lines:—
Season.
No. of
Trappers
submitting
Returns.
Estimate of
Beaver.
Average per
Trapper.
1934-35-  	
275
343
367
345
307
4,789
6,392
6,347
5,945
5,315
17.41
1935-36...	
18,60
1936-37  _.   .
17 29
1937-38 	
17.23
1938-39   .... ....	
17 30
Actually the above figures show a variation of 1.3 beaver per trap-line over a period of
five years, and taken during a low pelt-price period the figures should show a definite increase
rather than a stationary estimate, since trappers worthy of the name are allegedly conserving
their fur. In my opinion, the trapping of the female beaver and her kits, due to ignorance,
and the provision of trapping seasons that are too late may, to some extent, be responsible
for the apparent stationary estimates. The average price per beaver-pelt for the season
1938-39 was around $13, and this again may be responsible for trappers taking the natural
yearly increase.
The Bowron Lake Reserve is still the sanctuary for beaver. Trappers whose lines surround this reserve report increased catches. The existence of this beaver sanctuary is
necessary if we are to save the beaver in this area. Restocking of certain trap-lines depleted
through poaching should continue as a fixed policy of the Department. Conserving water in
the Dry Belt is of immense value during the unusually dry year. Watersheds well stocked
with beaver need never be short of water, ducks, muskrats, and even fish.
Some educational features, showing pictures covering the entire life-history of these
animals, have yet to be taken and shown to trappers. More pictures taken of a valuable
fur-bearing animal, such as the beaver, and methods of conservation which, even among old
trappers, are little understood would be a capital and lasting investment. Beaver liberated
during the last few years on lines and streams are now well established.
Some study should also be made of the fisher and its preservation as a fur-bearer. The
unusually high price paid for this pelt may be one factor in its gradual reduction in population. If the price factor cannot be controlled there is little that can be done toward saving
this valuable fur-bearer. The highest number of pelts on which royalty has been paid on
fisher was in the years 1926 and 1927, when 1,038 and 1,149 pelts were taken. In the year
1938 a total of 502 fisher were taken, which shows a pronounced reduction. In fairness to
the figures shown, the average take of fisher for a period of eighteen years—from 1921 to
1938, inclusive—works out at approximately 704. Any animal such as the fisher with its
high market value is bound to be the target for concentrated effort, especially if those animals
are in the habit of crossing several trap-lines.
Upland Game Birds.
European partridge are on the increase in the Kelowna District. This species migrated
to the Williams Lake area for the first time last summer, presumably from the shipment
made to Wright, B.C., by the Game Commission several years ago. Around seventeen were
seen last summer at Lac la Hache, apparently belonging to the same batch from Wright.
The unusually severe winter of three years ago did not have the same effect on Hungarian
partridge as on other species, but at that time it was felt that the severe conditions were too
much for them. I have seen large numbers of small holes burrowed in the snow-banks in
which Hungarian partridge have taken shelter from the elements. Their ability to withstand
severe winter conditions is remarkable, although I do think they are more a bird for the
grain-fields. In other places in this Division this species seems to come and go and reports
of their condition, numbers, and appearance in various localities constantly change. L 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Stocked a number of years ago adjacent to the Jones Ranch in the Lillooet District, the
California quail have increased to a fairly remarkable extent. They have, according to Game
Warden Atwood, migrated down the Fraser River Valley. A further shipment of these game
birds would add new blood.
California quail were released near the Marston Ranch at Ashcroft. This is a species
of game bird against which not one complaint has ever been made by a farmer in my twenty
years' experience. At Tranquille, the flock of 200 seen previously has not been in evidence,
but observers have seen coveys of quail in other parts of the Kamloops District, which shows
they have a tendency to spread out.
Blue grouse, willows, and Franklin's are about the same as in previous years. Kamloops
reports a good year for all classes of upland game birds and several other Detachments have
indicated a fairly good season.
The original stocking of bob-white quail in the Lillooet District is still showing signs of
further propagation. These birds have extended north along both sides of the Fraser River
and their numbers are hard to estimate.
No trapping of pheasants, either at Kelowna or Kamloops, has been carried out during
the last two months of 1939 owing to the entire absence of snow. During the early months
of this year, sixty-two pheasants were trapped at Tranquille and liberated in various parts
of the Kamloops District. This Division as a whole is well supplied with new blood in the
form of fresh stock from the various ranches. There are no outstanding complaints of
badly nourished birds from the various game farms, and no complaints of disease have come
to hand to my knowledge. The suggestion that certain game birds, especially pheasants, may
carry seme form of disease is not borne out, as a thorough test for this was made by experts
and their report states that all birds obtained were in a healthy state. Periodic examinations
of the pheasant farms for sanitary conditions is imperative. Some confusion took place in
this Division when Coast hunters found themselves in trouble while hunting pheasants long
after the 4 p.m. closing-time of the Interior. There should be some uniformity of closing-
time and a desire to give pheasants a chance to feed and nest.
Migratory Game Birds.
Around Kamloops the water-fowl situation improved considerably. A census taken on
nine small lakes by Game Warden Sandiford showed a total of 2,301 ducks. The first ducks
to arrive on the South Thompson River was a flock of eighty-six canvasbacks on February
28th.    All of these birds had gone north by March 30th.
A most unusual occurrence in the spring was the almost entire absence of local ducks
around Kamloops, and especially in the Cariboo. Later in the season large numbers of
mallards appeared, but few of the other water-fowl species showed up until the opening of
the hunting season. The season was very mild up to the end of December and the few small
lakes that did freeze reopened again shortly after. Heavy rains created some damage in
various parts of the Division and many nests were destroyed. Large flocks of Hutchison's
geese, a few snow geese, Canada geese, and the unusual appearance of large numbers of
whistler swans on the South Thompson River gave an animated appearance to this body of
water extending from Tranquille, west of Kamloops, to Sicamous, a distance of 84 miles east.
These birds were brought in by a storm from the north-west during the latter part of the
season. Three hundred and ten whistler swans were observed by Game Warden Sandiford
between Kamloops and Pritchard, a distance of over 25 miles. Twenty-six white pelicans
were seen by Game Warden Sandiford on Napier Lake on May 5th.
From a census taken by officers in this Division during the last four years there are
definite signs of an increase in the number of water-fowl. I am of the opinion that the
bag-limit is far too high. Many ducks killed in the Interior during the early part of the
season quickly spoil because of warm weather. It is unfortunate that the Eastern District
has no definite closing-time for water-fowl. Sportsmen in the Eastern District insist that
pheasants be given a breathing-spell, and a definite closing-time to enable these birds to feed
in peace has been arranged. I would recommend the same arrangement be carried out for
water-fowl with the approval of sportsmen interested.
The heaviest drain on the water-fowl population comes not so much from the lack of
water but rather from the ever-increasing number of guns and an excessive bag-limit
allowance.    The so-called northern flight in the fall of each year is largely a flea-bite com- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 23
pared to the spring migration of water-fowl. The flight south either passes overhead in the
night or takes a more westerly route. This observation has been made over a period of years
covering the width of this Division. The entire absence of snow up to the end of the year
may reduce the water-levels, but British Columbia is fortunately situated and the water
problem is not so acute as in other Provinces.
Vermin.
Eight Game Wardens destroyed the following predators:—
Crows  1,074 Coyotes        90
Magpies     944 Cats     103
Hawks       90 Dogs  (ownerless)        23
Owls        54
Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth destroyed fifteen bears doing damage to stock
and he also killed nine cougar. Game Warden Maxson destroyed forty-one coyotes, and
Game Warden Jobin, twenty-one. Game Warden Sandiford destroyed 312 crows and 193
magpies. It should be stated here that some Detachments are almost free from crows and
magpies, therefore the returns would be much lighter. Others active in the respect were
Game Wardens Mottishaw and Cameron. I would suggest that a still higher bounty be
placed on coyotes, especially during the months of May and June, in the districts where
domestic sheep are raised. It would be better to cut the time during the summer months
from roughly four months to two and one-half months and raise the bounty $1 from the
present bounty of $2, which would be at a time when coyotes would be concentrated around
their dens and the chances of greater distraction would be enhanced. The cost to the
Government would not be any greater since the time-limit would be cut.
In the Quesnel area, residents were responsible for the destruction of the following
predators:   Wolves, 30;   cougar, 11;   and coyotes, 103.
The Quesnel Rod and Gun Club destroyed the following: Crows, 387; owls, 21; and
hawks, 17.
Game-protection.
I am not in favour of the wholesale destruction of predators, except where they are the
cause of extensive damage to game locally. Too large an increase of game animals is not
desirable if the food-supply in winter feeding-grounds is limited. Disease invariably creeps
in when overcrowding takes place, or, at least, the two factors appear to have some relationship to each other. Large numbers of deer have pus pockets in various parts of the body,
and at times are so objectionable that the carcasses are simply left to rot. We have been
so far unable to ascertain the true cause of this condition, but the fact remains that it is in
the winter feeding-grounds and where there are unusually large numbers of deer that this
condition is more prevalent.
The black and grey timber-wolves are definitely increasing and finding their way into
the southern part of this Division. They are now reported in the Kamloops area. Efforts
will be made to concentrate on this problem once their habits are definitely known. Cases
are far too frequently reported of extensive damage to game and farm stock. These animals
range for considerable distances and are now travelling in packs of from five to thirty. A
considerable amount of meat must be consumed to keep large packs of wolves going. These
animals are quite fearless and measure roughly from 6 to 7 feet long from tip of tail to nose.
There is one report of a young wolf cub being caught in a trap in the Clinton Detachment.
As the trapper approached the set the wolf broke the chain or toggle and attacked, him,
gashing his hand and leg.
Six covered pheasant shelters have been erected at Kamloops. One pheasant shelter erected
at Tranquille is capable of feeding 100 birds. More shelters are being erected, and the saving
in wheat alone makes the project well worth while. Thanks for the completion of this work
are largely due to Game Warden Sandiford and the boys of the Junior Fish and Game
Protective Association in which he takes an outstanding interest. One hundred and sixteen
prosecutions were carried out in this Division, two of which were Provincial Police cases.
Kamloops, Vernon, and Williams Lake were most active in this respect. L 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Propagation.
There is no need for new pheasant blood either at Vernon or Kelowna. Those districts
are well supplied with breeding stock. Sixty-two pheasants were trapped and liberated
mostly around Kamloops, and a few at Chase, during the latter part of 1938 and the beginning of 1939. One thousand and eighty-five pheasants were liberated in this Division during
1939. The season was by far the best that sportsmen have had for many years. Eighty-
four Hungarian partridge were released, together with twenty California quail.
Seventeen beaver were trapped at Bowron Lake and liberated in various parts of this
Division, both to restore depleted trap-lines of long standing and to hold irrigation-water
in many districts where the run-off is too rapid. There are good reports coming in from
trappers and farmers alike of the benefit received.
Game Reserves.
Bowron Lake sanctuary has been responsible for the supply of beaver to restore and
hold the too rapid dissipation of water-supply. A check-up in places where those animals
have been liberated in the past reveals a situation in most cases that is highly satisfactory.
Some charge should undoubtedly be made for beaver supplied, either to trappers or farmers,
as a truer appreciation of their worth would be more in evidence.
The unfortunate feature is one of enforcement of protective measures, which is difficult
under the circumstances. We have to largely depend on the trappers and farmers themselves
to protect a valuable asset. Where complaints come to hand of poaching on either trap-lines
or irrigation storage, prompt action is taken. The metal containers carrying these animals
over long distances are very satisfactory. Minor improvements have yet to be made, which
will be done in the near future.
One band of twenty-seven Rocky Mountain sheep were seen in the Yalakom Game
Reserve, also a considerable number of deer .and numerous signs of moose and wapiti. There
is a cougar hunter on the Yalakom Reserve at the present time for the purpose of clearing
out a few cougar reported there. In the Tyaughton deer sanctuary large numbers of mule-
deer are in evidence.
Fur Trade.
All pelts are forwarded to Vancouver and a few are bought locally and sent to the Coast
from various small centres.
Fur-farming.
While we have no actual figures at the moment of writing, there are roughly sixty
fur-farms in this Division and the number is rapidly increasing. There is a danger, however,
that this business, which is becoming quite an industry, may take a serious slump because of
the war and low prices.
There is now in this Division one fox-farm handling platinum foxes, the colour of which
varies from the usual silver fox. Some direct supervision and assistance should be rendered
farmers already in the business or contemplating such. The industry has grown to the
extent that the Department should, if finances will permit, have an expert on the job giving
advice and assistance to those seriously considering establishing themselves during normal
times in a profitable industry. I would suggest that the fur-farmers be met in conference
with Provincial and Dominion authorities in a broad general scheme of placing this on a
secure footing. We are in the vanguard of an up-and-coming industry which will meet with
opposition from abroad.    Supervision and planning along national lines is really imperative.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The amount of trouble encountered over boundary-lines, especially where there is no
survey, is so small that it is hardly worth mentioning. There are 433 white registered
trappers provided with lines, the value of which is shown by their prompt application for
renewals of licences, 97 per cent, being obtained before the end of the present year. Many
Indian tribes are now possessors of large blocks of territory for trapping purposes. It is my
intention to register individual lines within the block instead of allowing Indians to trap
anywhere they please within that area. Its administration by the Game Department is just
as important for Indians within a confined area as it is for white trappers having fair-sized
or small-sized blocks of territory or trap-lines of their own. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 25
Registration of Guides.
There are seventy-three guides in this Division. Every guide received a questionnaire
during the past year and some very interesting and informative replies were received. There
is a general feeling that something of a constructive nature should be inaugurated for the
benefit and protection of guides. The prevention of overcrowding and improving the qualities
of the guides is no doubt being considered. It is to be hoped that meetings will be held in
numerous towns of the Interior to consider ways and means of giving satisfaction, through a
capable and well organized system of guides and guiding, to the hunters and anglers coming
to our Province. As the scheme is now before the Game Commission, no doubt it will receive
mature consideration in the immediate future. We should proceed slowly in the matter of
major improvements.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Wardens Stewart, Atwood, Martin, and Shuttleworth
into the Churn Creek area to investigate a report of Chilcotin Indians killing deer. Muskrat
remains were found in one camp already deserted. Another was made by Game Warden
Mottishaw to the headwaters of the Nazko River.
Constable French and Game Warden Atwood patrolled to the headwaters of Pavilion,
Maiden, and Minch Creeks on a complaint of large numbers of Indians killing deer. Four
camps were located which had been occupied earlier, but no evidence was found to warrant
further action.
Hunting Accidents.
This year was a particularly bad one for hunting accidents, and I am sorry to report an
increase, many of which were caused through lack of proper observation, apparent carelessness, and ineffective firearms.
Matthew Neilson King, age 19, of Coquitlam, B.C., was shot in the left thigh by Robert
Donald Boud, on Sunday, October 8th, at Blue Grouse Mountain in the Lillooet District. The
latter was walking up a slight grade behind deceased, and the 30.30-calibre rifle which Boud
was carrying under his arm accidentally discharged. Mr. King died as a result of the injury
sustained. At the inquest, a verdict of death from gunshot wound by a firearm carried by
Robert Donald Boud, which was accidentally discharged, was rendered by the Coroner's jury.
On October 17th, Hugo Kneller died in the Kelowna Hospital as a result of a gunshot
wound in the head. Lawrence, a brother of Hugo, observed a pheasant and both brothers
ran to get a shotgun which was lying in the kitchen. There was only one shell in the house,
which they obtained. By the time they had loaded the gun the bird had disappeared.
Lawrence was attempting to unload the gun when it accidentally discharged, the shot striking
Hugo in the head.    Hugo was rushed to the hospital, where he died shortly after his arrival.
On October 8th, Alfred Pryce, of Glenemma, B.C., was accidentally shot by Arthur Waite
in mistake for a deer. The shooting took place in the Pinaus Lake area. The deceased died
instantly. The jury gave the verdict of accidental death caused by a gunshot wound from a
rifle in the hands of Arthur Waite while deer hunting.
A hunting accident took place on December 4th, near Loon Lake, involving Wallace Hall,
of Vernon, Washington, U.S.A., and Guide E. G. Dougherty, of Clinton, B.C. While returning to camp in the evening of December 4th, both parties, who were riding horses, dismounted
to take a shot at a deer. They were just going to mount again and go over to where the
deer was seen last when the gun on Dougherty's horse went off in the scabbard. The shot
struck Mr. Hall on the left hand and severed the thumb and the first two fingers and creased
his right leg. Mr. Hall was taken to the Ashcroft Hospital for treatment. He was able to
leave after a brief stay.
Douglas Fvlton, of Vinsulla, B.C., was killed in mistake for a deer by Cyril Calder, on
December 3rd, at Knouff Lake, B.C. Deceased was accompanied by his son at the time of
shooting. Cyril Calder had previously shot and wounded a deer, and after a brief period
commenced to search for the wounded animal. Thinking that he had the animal lined up, he
fired a shot and, on investigating, found that he had accidentally shot Douglas Fulton. The
son of the deceised shouted to Calder not to shoot again as he had apparently injured his
father. Douglas Fulton died almost immediately from the gunshot wound in the chest.
Deceased was wearing a khaki coat with beret. Cyril Calder is appearing before a higher
Court on a charge of manslaughter. L 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
On December 9th, Verdell Harold Toombs, 19, of Kelowna, E.C., died in the Kelowna
Hospital as the result of a gunshot wound sustained in a shooting accident which occurred
in an old cabin about 4 miles from Beaverdell. The deceased, with three companions, was
in a cabin near Beaverdell on December 5th while on a hunting-trip. On December 8th,
some target-shooting took place inside the cabin. A few minutes later a bush-rat ran out
and went into another room. The party followed with a flash-light. One companion, Ernest
Minchin, was in the lead, followed by the deceased, and another companion stood at the door.
Ernest Minchin reversed his rifle, which was apparently cocked, and on striking the log with
the butt of his rifle about where the rat had previously disappeared, the weapon discharged.
The shot struck Verdell Toombs in the abdomen.
On November 8th, near the 150-Mile House, B.C., Father Edward Moore, of Williams
Lake, B.C., was accidentally shot with a firearm in the hands of Father John Hennessy.
After they had crossed a fence, with the deceased in the lead, the gun belonging to Father
Hennessy was apparently left against the fence. Father Hennessy took hold of the gun by
the muzzle and pulled it towards him, suddenly discharging the shotgun, the charge striking-
Father Moore in the abdomen. As a result of the accident, Father Moore died in hospital
the following morning.
During the forthcoming hunting season, the Ishihara chart will be utilized by way of
experiment in this Division as a.means of testing hunters for colour-blindness. Failure to
distinguish colours may result in accidents. Poor eyesight is no doubt another cause. All
firearms should undergo a careful test for weight of trigger-pull. Too light a trigger-pull
is just as criminal as having practically no brakes on a car. Hunters should hunt in pairs—
one to observe by means of field-glasses while the other kills his fame. They should never
separate. Mistakes will be a thing of the past if this system is used. Hunte" s nowadays are
hesitating about going into the hills in view of so many accidents. Some form of compensation should be provided for those bereaved, especially where the accident is one of straight
carelessness on the part of others while hunting. The necessary action is being taken against
those considered criminally negligent in the use of firearms.
Game-fish Culture.
Due to a very early spring, conditions affecting game fish were very much ahead of those
of the previous year. Most of the well-patronized lakes in the Kamloops District were free
of ice between April 4th and April 20th. The spawning period on those lakes ranged from
April 16th to May 4th, much earlier and with a greater run, especially in Knouff and Paul
Lakes and Lac le Jeune. Ta-Weel Lake should here come in for favourable mention as, comparatively speaking, it is one of our virgin lakes. Seven streams continually run into this body
of water the year round. This lake will not require stocking for several years to come.
Most of the lakes in the Kamloops area are fairly well supplied by nature with spawning-
beds. Unfortunately the irrigation systems providing water-supply for farm lands do not
enhance the spawning facilities. Consequently a large proportion of eggs are lost. Some
considerable work lies ahead in the improvement of spawning-streams, especially where gravel
is lacking, by the clearing of debris and other obstructions, etc.
One outstanding difficulty is the question of supplying Indians, who for years have been
in the habit of taking spawning fish from our streams, with trout to augment their food-
supply. In some cases the giving of spawners under supervision of Game Officials would
be a benefit to the lake, especially where there is a possibility of under-fishing. In many
lakes away from reach of anglers the thinning-out of spawners would in no way injure the
crop. It is purely a matter of control and discretion. Fishing conditions varied from
" exceptionally good " to " poor." Heavy rains during June slowed up fly-fishing to some
extent. The fly hatch was later than in former years. Fishing was unusually good over the
whole Division during the latter part of the season. Of the dozens of lakes in the Kamloops
and Merritt areas, the following were outstanding: Ta-Weel, Knouff, Pinantin, Jeune, Paul,
Devick  (Beaver), Peterhope, Little River at Shuswap, Hi-Hiume Lake, and Hammer, etc.
The trout averaged from 2 to 9 lb. in weight. Peterhope Lake require? some attention
in order to bring it back to its standing of two years ago. A heavy influx <~>f tourists came
over the whole Division during the year. Almost every lodge-owner who was " up to the
minute " in catering to the visitors reported a splendid season. Both hunt'ng and angling
are two of British Columbia's greatest attractions, and if we conserve wisely by means of a REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 27
careful and scientific plan the attractions provided will draw visitors to this hunters' and
anglers' paradise for many years to come. Particular attention should be paid to the possibility of overstocking lakes. Evidence of a good run of spawners in various streams should
be sufficient in place of additions in the form of eggs or fry from the hatcheries. The obstacle
here is one of insufficient protection against raids by Indians and whites on the spawning-
streams. The posting, for a period of several days, of men who are on relief to watch and
protect the spawners would be well worth the small financial outlay. A suggestion has been
made that the fluctuating water-supply in some of our streams should be barred to spawning-
trout and that a policy of restocking from the hatcheries should supersede the natural spawning. It has been observed that in some lakes where no spawning facilities are provided the
trout are not in condition, and in many cases throughout the entire summer this lack of
condition is no attraction to the pleasure-seeking angler and his family.
In the Clinton Detachment the following lakes were well patronized: Hi-Hiume, Loon,
Kelly, Horse, Deka, Bridge, Lac la Roches, and Canim Lake. There are many other lakes,
which may be classified as alternative lakes, under preparation adjacent to the aforementioned.
The Lillooet area did not receive a heavy stocking of eggs or fry. Owing- to a transfer
of officers, no detailed report covering most of the lakes was available. In Ferguson Lake,
near Bralorne, it is reported that no suitable spawning-beds could be observed. There appears
to be fine lava-ash in the streams adjacent which keeps continually on the move. Even the
placing of gravel in this stream is soon covered by volcanic silt. The lake has abundant feed
to support fish life. Further investigation is necessary. Big and Little Gun Lakes are well
stocked with trout, but the fish are reported as being a little on the small side. The introduction of additional feed is under consideration.
Tyaughton Lake, McDonald, Marshall, Seton, and Anderson Lakes should receive early
consideration for the forthcoming season. Their individual problems should be given very
close study. It is reported that a salmon reserve exists in Anderson Lake. This may have
to be considered if it is intended that trout eggs or fry should be planted there.
In the Kelowna Detachment, many lakes and streams were stocked with Kamloops and
eastern brook trout. The latter trout have been planted in several of the smaller streams
and latest reports indicate that they are doing well and will provide some excellent fishing
in the near future. Several barren lakes have been stocked during the last few years with
Kamloops trout and have grown to such a size that anglers have lost considerable tackle.
This statement alone should attract some ardent anglers to the district. The Kelowna
rearing-ponds, which were started a few years ago by members of the Kelowna Rod and Gun
Club and partly subsidized by the Game Department, are now under the exclusive control of
the Department. While this project has not fully demonstrated its worth at present, it is
reported, however, that the fishing in Okanagan Lake opposite the rocky shores in the
Kelowna area has improved since the ponds have been in operation. While the leakage from
the ponds was well known, resulting in a loss of fry and fingerlings, yet it could not be
described as a dead loss since most of the fry and fingerlings found their way into Okanagan
Lake. The progress of this project will be watched with interest. There are some detrimental factors connected with this problem, and a full realization of this must be taken into
consideration when a final decision as to its merits or demerits is given. These are ponds
with mud and gravel bottoms.
In the Merritt Detachment, Glimpse Lake and its spawning facilities require investigation. This lake has an abundance of feed, but the coarse-fish problem will have to be given
serious consideration before it can take its place as one of the outstanding bodies of water.
Nicola Lake is much like Glimpse Lake, but here again the coarse-fish trapping becomes
necessary. Several of the smaller lakes were stocked two years ago and also this year, and
already ijhow signs of providing real sport in the near future.
Surrey, Sussex, and Bob lakes still continue to afford good catches. Unusually large
trout have been caught in these lakes and are the rule rather than the exception. Alleyne
Lake is a body of water well worth departmental attention during the coming year. Pemainus
Lake, apparently recently named, is now coming to the fore as one of the major lakes to
attract the angler. To the inquiring angler, who is continually looking for new fields to
conquer, I would advise the purchase of the Geographical Gazetteer of British Columbia, to
be obtained from the Department of Lands at Victoria, B.C.    This gazetteer gives the ap- L 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
proximate location of the various lakes, and with proper maps, which can be obtained from
the Department mentioned herein, one need never be at a loss to locate on the map where the
various streams and lakes are to be found. The cost is very moderate and well worth the
expenditure. I would like to see a series of maps arranged after the style of North Thompson Pre-emptor's Sheet. This sheet shows all lakes in colour and takes in the area from the
East Arm of Quesnel Lake to the south end of Adams Lake, east of Kamloops. This series
would be a real help to the tourist and angler, and if backed with linen would last for years.
The Topographical Survey sheets cover only certain sections of our Province, but those now
out are very accurate.
In the Quesnel area the reduction of coarse fish is receiving attention in some of the
lakes. Puntataenkut Lake is very popular for sport-fishing and is situated 29 miles west of
Quesnel on the Nazko Road. This lake has tourist accommodation and is frequented by
American visitors as well as local anglers.
There are many lakes in various parts of this Division under consideration for stocking
with Kamloops trout. Many of these lakes are strategically located, while others again are
well inland and away from transportation. Might I suggest that a reserve number of lakes
at present unstocked be held for future consideration or until such time as the Department
has developed a well-tried and dependable policy of trout propagation and conservation in
each of the lakes at present in use. Resort-owners, including those contemplating building
lodges, etc., adjacent to various bodies of water, either stocked with trout or under consideration for stocking, are the logical and immediate protectors of spawning trout. The question
of control both inside the Forest Reserve and outside of its boundaries in the matter of
regulating the number of applicants for sites on which to build lodges or cabins for commercial purposes is a matter for serious consideration between the Game Department, the
Forestry Department, and the Department of Lands.
Limitation of the number of applicants for sites inside the Forest Reserve under Special
Use Permits (Commercial) is being wisely followed by the Forestry Branch in this Division
in co-operation with the Game Commission. The overcrowding of applicants for commercial
sites in various lakes is neither good for fish conservation nor business.
A policy has yet to be formulated in conjunction with the Department of Lands and
similar limitations 'as now followed inside the Forest Reserve should be the aim of both the
Game Department and the Department of Lands. The right to do business in connection
with a project formulated by the Game Department in bodies of water throughout the Interior
—i.e., sport-fishing and its propagation—should be under control of the Game Department.
There are hundreds of examples, all of which await a policy of control and co-ordination.
Might I suggest that where only one applicant is given the exclusive right to build cabins
or a lodge adjacent to a designated body of water outside the Forest Reserve and near a body
of water where it is deemed advisable to admit only one applicant, that the question of survey
regulations be modified so as not to make it impossible or difficult for the applicant to make a
start in business.
The question of sites on the shores of those lakes is one for the consideration of the
Forestry Department. The keeping of the hundreds of lakes in a reasonably attractive
condition can be done with the co-operation of prospective lodge-owners, Game Department
and Forestry officials. Even the Water Rights Branch and at times the Public Works
Department are asked to co-operate in matters connected with the propagation of sport-fish.
There is a co-ordination of Departmental duties, and I am pleased to say they are all
functioning 100 per cent.
The building of roads to as many fishing lakes as possible should be given negative
encouragement. Were this policy to be formulated it would spell the end of first-class
angling and develop an asset into a mediocre tourist attraction. There are hundreds of
lakes which abound with sporting fish to which first-class roads lead. These lakes and roads
serve their purpose. It is easier to build a road to a lake than it is to abolish it once it is
built. There are thousands of tourists and residents of this Province who like the privacy
of the wilds and are prepared to pay for it. We should see that their desires are satisfied.
Straight commercialization of our fishing attractions should not be our sole aim. Those
things are fine up to a point, but the leaving of our forests and streams as nature left them
is what really attracts people to our Province. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 29
The following report is herewith submitted covering the fish-cultural operations at Lloyds
Creek Hatchery and Penask Lake and Beaver Lake eyeing-stations:—
Lloyds Creek Hatchery.—The following table comprises the number of eggs collected at
the various lakes and the dates of the first and last collections at each point:—
Lake.
Females.
Males.
Dates laid down.
Eggs collected.
543
680
425
1,533
566
687
444
1,573
April 21 to May 20
April 24 to May 18
May 2 to May 23
May 17 to June 4
1,103,500
1,352,500
925,500
Lac le Jeune   	
1,642,000
Total	
5,023,500
In addition, 225,000 eggs were transferred from Penask Lake Hatchery on June 19th,
making the total number in hatchery 5,248,500.
The above shows a substantial increase in the number of eggs collected over the previous
year and, broadly speaking, was evidently due to the larger number of parent fish that were
able to reach the spawning-grounds and traps as a result of the mediocre angling returns of
the previous season.
The ice in Paul Creek went out about a week earlier than usual, the first collection of
eggs being made on April 21st. We had some trouble with Indians making raids on the trap
at Paul Creek. In one raid they got away with 250 fish. Additional padlocks were placed
on the trap, thereby preventing further depredations. Unfortunately the Indian Reserve
adjoins the creek. The task of patrolling this creek has its difficulties. Some protection will
be provided for the forthcoming year.    One tagged female trout was captured, No. 851.
Pinantan Lake.—As in the case of Paul Lake, Pinantan Creek was free of ice earlier
than usual. The fences in the Upper and Lower traps were put in on April 14th. The
first collection of eggs was taken on April 24th.
Some damage by muskrats was done under the floor of the main trap, and this trap was
patched up in order to prevent the escape of fish. Quite a large number of ripe fish were
taken from the renovated trap. The main trap has since been solidly repaired and made
impervious to rats. The presence of dace has been definitely established by the collection of
specimens during the late summer.
Knouff Lake.—The fence at Knouff Creek was installed on April 18th, all ice having
disappeared. Three weeks later the spawning run showed up in large numbers. On May
14th the new trap began to prove its worth and by the end of May the collection had exceeded
by 250,000 any previous collection, and would probably have been considerably larger had
certain parties who broke the beaver-dam in the upper lake used a little more discretion.
Part of the fence was washed out in the ensuing flood, thereby allowing the balance of the
run to escape. The employment of the resort-owner for a short period of time to protect
equipment and remove debris would be worth considering.
Lac le Jeune.—The initial collection of eggs was taken on May 17th at this lake. A
total of 1,600,000 eggs was collected when operations were curtailed owing to the fact that
the accommodation at Lloyds Creek was exhausted. It would have been possible to have
collected 2,000,000 eggs otherwise. Seventy-five per cent, of the collection was obtained from
the new trap installed at the outlet of the lake in 1938.
It has been suggested that the small lake be thrown open to anglers about the middle
of August each year, when most of the spawners will have regained their normal features;
previous to the date mentioned, the majority of the spawned fish are impounded in the small
lake for the benefit of the anglers in that they are kept out of the larger lake during their
rehabilitation. The advisability of this suggestion for adoption should be one for careful
study before coming to a final decision. The alteration of an established policy of conservation is one which we should either leave alone or in which we should proceed slowly.
The Forestry Branch were again kind enough to place their cabin at our disposal during
hatchery operations.
Recommendations.—There is some room for improvement in the matter of bag-limits.
While there is something to be said in favour of the present system because of fluctuations
in the size of trout, I am of the opinion, on the other hand, that the taking of the limit as L 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
provided in the Fishery Regulations is detrimental to a lake newly thrown open for fishing.
One cannot depend on the angling enthusiast to use discretion. The habit at present where
a road leads to a lake is to consistently take all the big fish out in the first two years.
Pillar, Peterhope, and McConnell Lakes are instances of where heavy fishing has spelled
and is spelling their ruination as Class "A" lakes. It is difficult to close the season on lakes
where capital of an extensive nature is invested and on which we are now encouraging a
policy of providing accommodation and boating facilities. Where lakes are being overfished,
perhaps the logical thing to do would be to rest the lake for a year or two. In many cases
this can be done without hardship. The principle of making the bag-limit 15 lb. and one fish
would work well on lakes that are newly thrown open and would prevent the cleaning-out of
these lakes where it is reported that the fish are of unusual size. Anglers might catch this
limit in a very few minutes and their sport for the day at that lake would be finished.
There might be some anglers under those circumstances who would angle for trout
without taking them out of the water, but there is the danger of injuring and destroying the
fish, especially in the hands of the inexperienced. Most lakes in British Columbia have
alternative lakes within easy reach of the main lake, on which accommodation is at present
provided. The varying of the bag-limit to one of weight plus one fish would also work well
on lakes having a large number of small fish. This depends again on how heavily that lake
is fished. It is largely one of close observation by the fishery officer and also by members of
the various Game Associations conscientious enough to make conservative recommendations
on bag-limits, keeping in mind at the same time the interests of those who have invested their
capital in order to accommodate the visitors to the lakes in question.
The present regulation in the matter of bag-limits is, in some cases, against a policy of
Class "A" conservation. While it is true that there would be some confusion if a change
were to be made along the lines suggested, I am of the opinion that a list of the bag-limits
on certain lakes, placed in alphabetical order and giving the official and native names of the
lakes, would be a very simple matter which could be easily understood by the average angler.
The assistance of the various Game Associations is highly appreciated, but I hold the view
that quantity and size of fish in the lakes could be better judged by members of the Game
Association, most of whom visit our lakes regularly, to serve as a guide, together with a creel
census from the various lodge-owners and estimate of the number of boats on the lakes from
day to day, for the benefit of the Game Department, so as to enable them to arrive at an
intelligent estimate of a lake's requirements and available food-supply. The extent and
success of the spawning facilities on each lake would have to be a part of this scheme. The
lake's requirements would then be a matter for the trained fishery officer and his recommendation based also on his own observation would then be submitted to the Game Commission for
proper and final consideration. The number of fry or eggs to be planted should be left almost
solely to the discretion of the Department and its officers, since the responsibility for the
success of its programme rests largely with them.
I would suggest that close scrutiny be made as to the suitability of any lake for stocking
with fish. While the analysis of the water should be carried out, the question of expense
arises. For the present the observations of the Fishery Supervisor will have to be relied
upon. There are several lakes in this Division which, in the past, have been stocked quite
heavily and which to all appearances were good prospective habitats for fish that so far have
shown negative results. I would advise that no " rush requests " for barren lakes be filled,
even if they have the backing of some interested Game Associations, without a thorough
survey as to its suitability for fish propagation.
There is one lake in the Kamloops area which could be considered as a model for other
lakes of a similar size and type, and where similar control could be obtained. The restocking
is judged according to the creel census taken during the open season which is known exactly.
The spawning facilities are controlled and regulated every year. A gentleman's request is
made in the matter of bag-limits and the request is always obeyed by visitors. To-day, the
fish are large, healthy, and in numbers available for a moderately good influx of visitors.
Without this control the lakes would be fished out in a comparatively short space of time.
This lake has been a producer of good fishing for many years, and would come into the Class
"A" category. Even a rough attempt on a similar scale in many of our lakes, especially
where similar control could be exercised, would be something at which to aim and of which REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 31
to boast. It is a splendid example of what can be done by common sense methods and
accurate observation.
The inclement weather conditions during the early part of the year did not help the
angler and as a result the fluctuations in fishing were a disappointment to many. The trend
of opinion amongst anglers is that a fair catch of fish averaging around 2 lb. is better than
having to spend many hours in the hopes of landing one big fish. Nevertheless, there are
many lakes where big trout are the rule rather than the exception.
In conclusion, I wish to express my sincere thanks to Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson,
of Nelson, B.C., for the splendid assistance and advice he has given to the Wardens of this
Division. The highly efficient work done by Fishery Officer F. Pells and his staff at Lloyds
Creek is worthy of mention. The operations at Penask Lake and Beaver Lake Hatcheries
were also successfully carried out by Fishery Officers E. M. Martin and R. A. McRae. The
Game officers also worked well and efficiently, considering their limited experience in fishery
operations. The Game Associations in many cases rendered valuable assistance to Department officers and their efforts were greatly appreciated by our staff.
Summary and General Remarks.
The pheasant season during 1939 was considered by many hunters to be about the best
they have had for many years. The nesting season was not any too good because of the
heavy rains.    The same thing could be said of grouse and, in fact, all upland game birds.
Caribou are not as numerous around Clearwater as formerly. There should either be a
much shorter season or it should be closed for two or three years.
An effort will be made during the coming year to supply beaver to other Divisions, both
for irrigation projects and the restoration of depleted trap-lines caused through poaching.
There are also many areas in the Province where the presence of beaver would be of considerable value. Unless adequate protection is assured for these animals, however, it would
be a waste of time transplanting them. By all means keep beaver away from farm property
where they will do. more damage than good.
In the matter of hunting accidents I am convinced that there are far too many firearms
in use to-day in a bad state of repair. The trigger-pull is far too light, both in shotguns and
rifles.    The use of those worn hair-trigger firearms should be carefully scrutinized.
The wolf situation appears to be more in evidence than ever. No doubt remedies will be
found where they are doing damage to stock. The greatest destroyer of coyotes is not the
trapper, but disease. Mange has taken a heavy toll of coyotes in certain sectors, and it is
quite possible that this disease may affect the wolves in time. The remains of big-game
animals long since buried and uncovered in earth-slides show that they roamed over areas
in the past that are now entirely barren. No doubt wolves followed these animals as they
are doing to-day. It appears to be another cycle of game and predatory movement that has
no doubt taken place many times in the past.
A combined total of forty-seven days was spent by the Game Wardens in this Division
assisting the Provincial Police during the year just passed, and over 2,110 miles were covered
during this time. We also received generous assistance from the Provincial Police, under the
able command of Inspector J. Shirras. Staff-Sergeant Harvey and the various Sergeants
were a source of reliable advice and help, and their efforts were also highly appreciated.
To the Forestry Department I am indebted in a variety of ways, and their proximity to
this Department and the co-operation existing for our mutual benefit was of considerable
value.
Additional policies now developing will take us more in contact with other governmental
departments, and I feel sure that the same harmony will develop as now exists with other
units of the Government Service.
To the Wardens co-operating in our work I can only express my deep appreciation for
their untiring efforts. To Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British
Columbia, I would like to express thanks for assistance and information supplied in connection with our duties. L 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"D" DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE
RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith, I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
Big Game.
Moose, Caribou, Wapiti, and Deer.—Light snowfall and unusually high temperatures
during the past winter created very favourable conditions for all animals of the deer family.
Food was easily obtained and, owing to light snowfall, all animals could easily escape their
greatest enemy, the wolf. A great increase in the numbers of all species of the deer family
is anticipated.
Bear (Black).—These animals are very numerous, and suggestions have been received
advocating that they be classed as predatory animals and a bounty allowed for their hides.
Bear (Grizzly).—These animals are of great value from a trophy point of view and very
highly prized by the big-game hunters, and as they live mostly in the densely wooded and
mountainous parts of the Division they are not coming in contact with the settlers; therefore
no complaints regarding possible depredations by these animals have been received. The
bag-limit of one per season should be maintained.
Mountain-sheep.—Mild weather prevailing during the past winter has been beneficial to
these animals, but as they suffered great losses during the two previous winters, 1937-38 and
1938-39, a small bag is again suggested.
Mountain-go at.—These animals are to be found in great numbers on all our mountain
ranges. As very few are killed each year there is no danger that they will become greatly
reduced in numbers.    The bag-limit, set at two last season, should be maintained.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Land Animals.—Reports received last year as to the increase of all fine fur-bearers have
been substantiated by a very good catch this winter, which will be slightly in excess of the
average.
The open season, from November 1st to February 28th in each year, is satisfactory and
meets with the approval of all trappers.
Water Animals.—The beaver is the most important of the water animals, and I beg to
draw your attention to the number of pelts produced over a period of ten years in this
Division which, with little fluctuation, averages around 5,200 pelts per annum, the bulk being
secured by white trappers.
The matter of educating our natives is again brought to your attention. At present the
Indian, imbued with the idea that if he does not catch the beaver, rats, or other fur-bearers
on his line, somebody else will, kills at all times every animal that comes his way, resulting
in eventual shortage of fur-bearers on the Indian trap-lines.
The younger generation should be taken in hand when still of school age and disabused
of the ideas and practices now held and practised by their elders.
The Indian Department, being the guardian of these people, should be the most concerned
with their education. Should the fur-bearers become depleted to such an extent that the
Indians can no longer make a living from trapping, they will naturally turn to the Indian
Department for relief. This could be avoided by adopting educational measures, as set out
in my last year's report.
The Northern Indians should receive immediate attention, as they depend entirely on the
fur-bearer for their living.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Owing to favourable weather during the last two breeding seasons, a substantial increase in the numbers of all species is noticeable. However, in order to fully
re-establish the various species to their former great numbers, the small bag-limit set last
season is again recommended.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are very numerous and not many are being killed, so they are
not in danger of becoming greatly reduced in numbers; therefore no special regulations are
required. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 33
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—A noticeable increase in the number of locally bred ducks and geese is
reported from every section of " D " Division.
The longer hunting season, ten weeks, allowed last year was quite justified and greatly
appreciated by all sportsmen.    A similar season is suggested for the coming year.
Vermin.
Timber-wolves.—The northern part of " D " Division reports fewer wolves compared with
past years. The southern part, however, reports an increase, especially in the Ootsa-
Tetachuck Lake (Tweedsmuir Park) area, where they are fast becoming a menace to the
domestic animals of the settlers.
The Department of Agriculture will no doubt be appealed to by the farmers in order
to obtain help in the eradication of the pests.
A number of pelts produced at this office for bounty showed decided signs of mange, and
the spreading of the disease among the predators will in due time bring their number down
to normal.    The use of poison should, however, not be considered.
Coyotes.—The numhers of these predatory animals have been reduced by hunger, disease
(mange), etc., but owing to the increase in the rabbits it is expected that the coyote will also
make a recovery; therefore the summer bounty of $2 should be maintained, but the Bounty
Regulations should be amended, extending the period of payment from April 1st to October
31st in each year.
Cougar.—Due to high temperatures during the past winter, these animals wandered
farther north than usual, but a severe winter, 40° below zero over a period of from two to
three weeks, will kill practically all cougars that ventured too far north. Therefore the
Bounty Regulations in force are satisfactory in so far as this Division is concerned.
Game-protection.
The usual patrols were undertaken in the enforcement of the " Game Act" and Regulations, resulting in eighty-six prosecutions. Every mode of transportation was made use of,
as follows:—                                            Mi]es. M;Ie^
Train        5,650 Boat      13,699
Auto       66,986 Plane        4,345
Foot (including dog-team)    10,309 	
Horse   (including  sleigh)      3,167 Total  J__ 104,156
Game Propagation.
Hungarian partridge were introduced at McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Smithers,
and Terrace.
Owing to improper crating, 14 per cent, of the birds purchased were found dead in the
crate or died soon after arrival. The surviving birds were liberated in the vicinity of well-
established farms. A number of coveys were reported last autumn in the vicinity of Prince
George and Smithers.
No further birds of this species should be liberated until it is definitely established that
they will survive the rigours of our winters.
Game Reserves.
The only reserve in " D " Division, " Kunghit Island," the southernmost island in the
Queen Charlotte group, has as yet not been reported upon. When opportunity offers a patrol
of same will be undertaken.
Sanctuaries established at Prince George, Lake Kathlyn, Terrace, and Prince Rupert
have been regularly patrolled.
A number of ducks visited the Prince George and Lake Kathlyn sanctuaries during their
seasonal flight north or south.
Fur-trade.
From all reports received, the fur-traders handled a greater number of pelts than the
last two or three years.    Prices paid were higher and the pelts of better quality.
3 L 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
No complete data are obtainable covering the quantities of fur produced in the Division,
as a great deal of the catch is shipped to Vancouver. It is safe, however, to estimate the
production of pelts in this Division at two-thirds of the fur produced in the Province.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farming industry is increasing from year to year, but most persons starting in
the business of farming fur-bearing animals are in need of expert advice, and I respectfully
suggest that the recommendation submitted last year—that an animal pathologist be attached
to the Department—be given serious consideration.
Some 150 fur-farms are established in the Division, and the services of a pathologist,
experienced in the diseases, care, and breeding of fur-bearing animals, would be greatly
appreciated by all.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The work of registering all trap-lines is progressing very favourably. Owing to remoteness of trap-lines in the north-eastern part of the Division the registration-work is progressing very slowly in that area, but it is expected that the work will be completed in from two
to three years.
In view of the great number of transfers of trap-lines, I suggest that the regulations be
amended to include the payment of a fee of $2.50 to cover the cost incurred by the Department
in transferring a trap-line from a registered owner to a new applicant, or to include the
transferred trapping area within the limits of another registered trap-line. Such a fee
would tend to reduce the number of transfers to a minimum and provide a substantial
increase in our revenue.
About 1,800 trapping areas were registered and in good standing at the end of the year
under review. _ _
Registration of Guides.
Recommendations submitted last year in regard to amendments to the " Registration of
Guides' Regulations " are again submitted for your consideration, as a number of big-game
hunters did not get satisfaction and the blame must rest with the guides.
It is again recommended that no person should be registered as a guide unless he has
served a specified time with a registered guide as an apprentice. On completion of such
specified services, and on production of certificates of same signed by the registered guide in
■whose employ the apprentice served his time, and on passing an oral or written examination
set by regulation, and if the Department is satisfied that such person is of good character
and qualified, a certificate of competency would be issued and the person registered as a guide.
In view of the increasing numbers of big-game hunters visiting the Province each succeeding year, it is of the utmost importance that the " Registration of Guides' Regulations "
be amended, and the above recommendations are respectfully submitted for your consideration.
One hundred and twenty big-game hunters visited " D " Division, obtaining 176 trophies
—namely, 39 caribou; 2 mule-deer; 33 mountain-goat; 38 mountain-sheep; 36 moose; 18
grizzly bear;  and 10 black bear.
Special Patrols.
Every Game Warden, and some of the Constables of the B.C. Provincial Police in " D "
Game Division, have made patrols of a special nature. It is quite difficult to mention any one
Game Warden in particular in connection with special patrol-work.
The Game Wardens stationed at Finlay Forks, Fort Nelson, and McDame Creek, by the
very nature of the country and the geographical situation of their districts and the equipment
available, make patrols which in any other district of the Province would be commented upon
by the Press and the public in general, but these men perform their patrols, at times very
dangerous, unheralded and unnoticed.
The work of these three Game Wardens is brought to your attention. Copies of reports
received from them and covering the most outstanding patrols of the year are attached hereto
for your information and edification.
Among the B.C. Police Constables who performed patrols of an outstanding nature and
of interest to the Game Department, I have the pleasure of bringing to your attention the
patrol undertaken by Constable Blakiston-Gray, i/c Telegraph Creek Detachment, B.C.P.P.,
during the month of June, 1939, when he visited the new goldfields of Boulder Creek, B.C.,
covering 437 miles, mostly with pack and saddle horses. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 35
The patrol made by Constable W. Aylward, i/c Bella Coola Detachment, when, during
the month of August, 1939, he visited the Anahim Lake—Hanceville area. Copy of this
report was forwarded to your office on September 1st last, and is hereby again brought to
your attention.
Hunting Accidents.
On February 3rd, 1939, Berton Eugene Goodvin, of Taylor, B.C., was killed by Henry
Edward Vogel, of Taylor, B.C., in mistake for a moose. No action taken, as Coroner's jury
found shooting to be accidental.
On February 8th, 1939, George Campbell, of Cale Creek, B.C., was accidentally killed by
his uncle, Arthur Damms, of Cale Creek, B.C. The latter was charged with manslaughter
and the case dismissed.
On September 23rd, 1939, Robert Weisbrod, of Chief Lake, B.C., was shot by Stephen
Harkins, who pulled the trigger, not realizing that the rifle was loaded. Coroner's jury found
the shooting to be accidental.
On November 19th, 1939, Leslie Clayton Rhindress, age 10, of Mapes, B.C., was shot near
his home by W. F. Pebernat, age 9, by the accidental discharge of a firearm. In view of the
tender age of the boys concerned, no action was taken.    The boy recovered.
On November 21st, 1939, Alfred Deane, 11 years of age, of Port Simpson, B.C., was
accidentally shot by Donald Deane, age 14, also of Port Simpson, and brother of Alfred.
Owing to Coroner's jury finding the shooting accidental, no action was taken.
On November 26th, 1939, William Wilson was accidentally shot in the foot by Daniel
McDonald, both of Prince Rupert. William Wilson recovered. No action taken. Shotgun
has been repaired.
Summary and General Remarks.
The majority of shooting accidents were caused by juveniles. Should the number of
accidents of this kind increase, it would be advisable to refuse licence to boys and girls under
the age of 18 years.
The happy relationship and co-operative spirit between the Police and Game Departments
has been maintained, and I wish to extend my thanks to all ranks of the two Departments for
the assistance they rendered in bringing the two forces closer together. This close co-operation has been the means of bringing various criminal and game cases to a successful ending.
To the Rod and Gun Clubs in " D " Division we are indebted for the fine spirit of
sportsmanship shown at all times, and great interest taken in all our work, especially the
Clubs in McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Smithers, and Prince Rupert for the fine work
carried on by them in the propagation of Kamloops trout through their respective fish-
hatcheries.
"E" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Grizzly bear are not overabundant in this Division, but can be found at the head
of Jervis, Toba, or Bute Inlets, as well as in certain isolated sections of the Chilliwack
Detachment.
Reports again indicate the abundance of black bear. Complaints of these animals doing
damage to domestic stock and orchards are continually being received and are dealt with as
speedily as possible.
Deer.—Owing to a very mild fall successful deer hunting was very difficult in most
sections of the Division, but from reports to hand deer were and still are fairly plentiful and
nearly every Game Warden reports deer on the increase. Complaints have also been received
of deer doing damage to crops in some sections of the Division.
Moose.—In the Pemberton District these animals, through protection by a close season,
are increasing. Moose are fairly common in the Bella Coola District where an open hunting
season is in effect on bull moose each year. Due, however, to the difficulty of reaching this
area they are not hunted to any great extent.
I L 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are found in many remote sections of the Division, and
as they are not heavily hunted they are not decreasing in numbers. Goat are to be found at
the heads of Coquitlam, Pitt, Allouette, Stave, Harrison, and Chilliwack Lakes, as well as in
the Powell River and Skagit areas. On the Goat Island Game Reserve and the mountains
bordering Powell Lake mountain-goat are decidedly on the increase, due no doubt to the fact
that in the latter-mentioned area they are not hunted to the same extent as in former years.
Wapiti (Elk).—Nearly every year or two some of these animals are liberated in a section
of the Howe Sound District. From reports to hand these liberated animals have adapted
themselves to their new home and are slightly increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Even though most of this Division is near the centre of the main population,
beaver are still to be found in fair numbers.
Fox (Red).—Throughout the Lower Mainland these animals are not protected, but this
continual open season does not seem to keep their numbers down as one would expect. Game
Wardens and trappers have, however, accounted for a fairly large number of these animals
during the year, especially in the Chilliwack sector.
Muskrats.—This is one of the principal fur-bearing animals on the Lower Mainland and
according to reports at hand they appeared or were taken in fair numbers this year. Musk-
rats, however, owing to the heavy trapping in the dyked or farming areas will never be
permitted to increase in any great numbers in the Lower Mainland section.
Other fur-bearing animals such as mink, marten, otter, racoon, skunk, and weasel are
fairly plentiful.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Generally, Game Wardens report ruffed and blue grouse as not being very
plentiful, but in most sections there has been no marked decrease in the stand of these birds.
Pheasants.—Pheasants were fairly plentiful but again reports have been received of
adverse weather conditions during the breeding season which seriously affected the young
bird crop. This loss, however, was offset by the liberation of an increased number of
pheasants and hunting was fairly good during the open season provided on these birds.
During the year, 11,974 pheasants were purchased and liberated by the Game Department
in this Division.
The law prohibiting the hunting of pheasants before 12 o'clock noon on the first two days
of the open season is undoubtedly a good conservation measure, but one that is very difficult
of strict enforcement.
California Quail.—In the Delta District, or at least that portion in the vicinity of Ladner,
was provided with a short open season on these birds without any noticeable harmful results.
Quail are fairly plentiful in the area mentioned, but should a severe winter be encountered
then their numbers will be again seriously curtailed.
Hungarian Partridge.—These birds are not plentiful in any section of the Division. If
finances would permit the purchase and release of a large number of partridge over a period
of years, then these birds would probably take hold and provide good sport for many years.
Migratory Game Birds.
The Game Warden at Port Coquitlam reports that during the hunting season migratory
game birds were more plentiful than for some years past, but most of these birds left the
district by the 10th day of November, for some unaccountable reason. In the Chilliwack
District, due to a very open and mild winter, hunting of ducks was poor compared to past
years. The Game Warden at Ladner, however, reports ducks as being very plentiful, but
owing to fair weather birds remained out off the mouth of the Fraser River and did not very
often flight into the fields in the Delta region.
Canada geese were to be observed in the Pitt Lake region during the latter part of the
hunting season. Snow geese were in their usual numbers off the foreshores of Lulu and Sea
Islands as well as Boundary Bay.
Shore-birds did not seem as plentiful as in previous years, but this was probably due to
the open winter as the birds were scattered over a greater range of suitable feeding areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 37
Swans were observed in greater numbers. For about two weeks some twenty-seven of
these birds were resting on Burnaby Lake, while many other birds were noticed flying through
the Division from time to time.
Band-tailed pigeons have been fairly plentiful.
Vermin.
Cougar were taken in most sections of the Division, while wolves were reported as being
observed in the Coquitlam, Pitt, Allouette, and Stave Lake areas. Wolves would seem to be
in greater numbers in the upper Pitt Valley.
Coyotes have been observed from time to time, but cannot be considered as being
plentiful.
Domestic cats and dogs running at large have been, and still are, a serious menace to
game of all kinds and a number of these animals have been destroyed by Game Wardens
during the year.
Regular crow shoots have been conducted by Game Associations and Game Wardens,
resulting in a fairly large number of crows being destroyed.
Game-protection.
Patrols have been constantly carried on throughout the Division. Very valuable and
welcome assistance has been rendered during the year by all members of the B.C. Police and
Game Associations as well as farmers. Sportsmen generally have observed the game laws
during the year.
Game Propagation.
Particulars in regard to game bird liberations are to be found in another section of this
report.
Game Reserves.
Patrols have been made from time to time during the year of all game reserves in the
Division. There is no doubt that these reserves are responsible for a good stand of game in
the surrounding or adjacent districts. On the Goat Island Reserve in Powell Lake, mountain-
goat are increasing.
Fur Trade.
There has been a slight increase in the fur catch in the Division.
Fur-farming.
An increase has been noted in the number of fur-farms in the Division. Mink is the
principal fur-bearing animal farmed. War conditions have had some effect on fur-farming,
but not to any marked degree.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Registered trappers are conserving the fur on their trap-lines, and the system of trap-
line  registration  continues  to  function  very smoothly  and  registered  trap-lines  are  at a
premium. _ _
Registration of Guides.
Only a few registered guides are operating in this Division.
Special Patrols.
A number of special or surprise patrols have been made during the year with very
beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
Three fatal hunting accidents occurred in the Division during the year. There were
some minor accidents as well and particulars covering these accidents can be found in a
statement farther on in this report.
Game-fish Culture.
The increase in the planting or liberation of trout during the past few years in the
Lower Mainland and Powell River sections of the Division is beginning to produce excellent
results. Steelhead trout fishing in the Coquitlam River and other rivers on the north bank
of the Fraser River has considerably improved. L 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Associations, farmers, and others interested in game and fish conservation have
rendered every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout the Division.
Officers and men of " E " Division of the B.C. Police have again given every assistance in our
work and this assistance is very greatly appreciated.
Game conditions have been fair, but in some sections good hunting has been obtained,
especially on pheasants.
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Calendar
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913       	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
859
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
61
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
A9.
$4,417.60
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.60
5,729.50
4,776.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148.689.64
157,674.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
1914
1915       -    -
1916                	
1917       _
1P1R
1919              	
1920 -	
1921                	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
1922	
1923	
1924                 ...    .
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
1925	
1926	
1927  	
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
1928.	
1929	
1930         	
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
1931  .
1932      	
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
1933 -
1934.     ..
1935 	
1936	
1937 	
1938	
1939...  	
547         |         526
21         |           21
Totals	
10,922
10,160
734
717
$153,715.57
$3,482,326.47
$966,995.84 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 39
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L 41
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Resident Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
816
159
148
1,400
923
724
649
102
161
154
51
1,325
195
1,039
324
293
1,078
2,221
101
3,151
151
1,075
446
2
760
6
337
1,339
299
5,179
1,115
1,613
240
$816.00
159.00
42
6
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17
10
2
14
4
1
2
31
16
3
11
1
3
3
6
3
31
10
63
16
1
26
46
128
169
21
52
34
37
48
1
228
22
111
67
23
36
99
554
22
71
123
40
81
31
30
130
64
3
168
62
85
316
191
48
6
35
10
28
23
47
2
3
1
20
2
20
39
22
55
21
12
88
11
4
62
33
11
33
25
2
109
33
112
154
46
17
1
58
49
223
39
42
41
1
$12.00
3.00
$828.00
162.00
Atlin  	
Clinton 	
Cranbrook  	
148.00
1,400.00
923.00
724.00
649.00
$210.00
30.00
2.00
3.00
360.00
1,433.00
923.00
724.00
35.00
85.00
50.00
1.00
1.00
685.00
86.00
Golden	
102.00
161.00
154.00
51.00
1,325.00
195.00
1,039.00
324.00
293.00
1,078.00
2,221.00
101.00
3,151.00
151.00
1,075.00
152.00
161.00
10.00
164.00
3.00
23.00
54.00
70.00
1,418.00
195.00
6.00
6.00
7.00
9.00
1,045.00
20.00
350.00
300.00
1,078.00
5.00
2,235.00
101.00
8.00
3,159.00
151.00
Penticton 	
Pouce Coupe.	
10.00
155.00
4.00
7.00
1,089.00
162.00
446.00
446.00
80.00
15.00
49.00
3.00
6.00
39.00
129.00
2.00
760.00
6.00
337.00
1,339.00
299.00
20.00
766.00
55.00
5.00
100.00
342.00
1,339.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
1.00
2.00
315.00
17.00
30.00
Vancouver	
5,179.00
1,115.00
1,613.00
73.00
7.00
5.00
11.00
1.00
5,267.00
1,122.00
1,618.00
155.00
50.00
166.00
Windermere -   	
240.00
291.00
Totals..—  	
27,576
$27,576.00
223
$1,115.00
3,253
1,534
$292.00
$28,983.00 L 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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L 43
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0 L 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
(Minors).
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
Alberni                  	
2
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
3
9
2
27
2
1
8
52
3
3
11
93
25
1
1
3
1
12
4
2
$1.00
1.00
8.00
3.00
9.00
2.00
27.00
2.00
$1.00
1.00
Atlin                        	
Clinton 	
8.00
Cranbrook   	
3.00
9.00
Duncan  	
2.00
	
Fort Fraser _	
2.00
Golden   .'_	
$6.00
6.00
Grand Forks  _ -	
1.00
1.00
Hope   	
Kamloops    	
Kaslo      	
3.00
8.00
52.00
3.00
3.00
11.00
11.00
Kelowna   	
52.00
Merritt	
3.00
	
Nelson  	
11 00
New Denver                .
New Westminster  	
93.00
25.00
1.00
93 00
12.00
Pouce Coupe  „	
12.00
Prince George   	
1.00
1.00
Princeton-  	
Quesnel  	
6.00
3.00
3.00
Revelstoke 	
1.00
Smithers 	
Telegraph Creek.	
6.00
12.00
3.00
4.00
Williams Lake 	
a on
2.00
Totals     	
13
$39.00
273
$273.00
$312.00 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 45
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Government
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-trader.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
2
2
1
2
23
1
3
1
3
3
3
29
12
12
12
7
7
47
2
3
12
1
$50.00
i
10
2
7
1
28
10
19
9
113
11
1
16
8
1
17
$15.65
11.47
153.68
.65
258.98
50.35
142.20
39.25
1,393.11
69.50
1
:::
1
6
3
....
$65.65
11.47
Atlin
50.00
25.00
50.00
	
203.68
	
25.65
308.98
50.35
142.20
39.25
575.00
25.00
1,968.11
94.50
.75
.75
Hope 	
Kamloops 	
75.00
116.95
$2.00
193.95
52.11
10.45
121.00
18.40
248.78
56.95
52.11
25.00
75.00
75.00
35.45
196.00
5
48
16
5
259
88
49
6
11
3
2
20
7
722
4
91
15
10
18.40
	
323.78
	
56.95
75.00
725.00
5.25
5,352.21
80.25
Pouce Coupe -
5.00
6,082.21
Prince George — ...
Prince Rupert
300.00
300.00
1,222.08
689.10
23.75
104.20
16.20
1,522.08
989.10
23.75
Quesnel  	
300.00
404.20
2
1
16.20
3.60
1,045.24
52.80
32,653.51
44.05
163.30
67.74
34.74
3.60
175.00
175.00
1,175.00
50.00
75.00
300.00
25.00
1,220.24
Telegraph Creek—-
Vancouver	
227.80
$200.00
21.00
$10.00
5.00
84,059.51
99.05
6.00
244.30
367.74
59.74
Totals
188
$4,700.00   |       1   |   $200.00
1,614
$44,238.00
11
$34.00
3     |   $15.00   |  $49,187.00
1                  1 L 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1939, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921-    '	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56.045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4 949.00
$30,790.80
1922   _	
57,458.89
1923       	
67,524.18
1924   _	
62,446.68
1925	
66,287.78
1926             _ 	
62,535.13
1927  	
71,324.96
1928                                                	
58,823.07
1929 	
47,329.89
1930	
45,161.11
1931 - -	
45,981.08
1932  	
40,363.79
1933                                                           	
44,167.48
1934	
47,102.81
1935     _.      -	
49,831.95
1936 	
52,196.50
53,697.48
1937 	
1938 	
44,963.87
49.187.00
1939                                               - 	
'                                   '
$873,510.45
$113,664.00
$987,174.45 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 47
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Particulars of Various Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid,
January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
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Ashcroft..	
Atlin 	
64
	
	
1
28
	
32
14
55
71
6
196
158
15
Clinton	
1
	
83
	
—
Cranbrook	
57
149
1
3
	
23
88
38
949
4
228
186
....
Cumberland	
1
464
	
1
—
—
140
426
7
3
1
31
510
38
2
156
51
35
27
8
6
202
49
1,303
20
4
4,085
108
14
2
2,034
53
1,234
75
Golden 	
3
Grand Forks	
	
—
3
Hope 	
Kami oop s 	
6
301
	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna	
160
2
9
22
....
17
_..
Lillooet.	
10
15
....
Merritt 	
484
28
114
	
6
105
71
17
1
1
1
2
44
290
494
467
1
5
240
224
New Denver _
—
New Westminster
—
Oliver __  	
Penticton	
5
40
....
15
3,158
40
10
74
135
189
1,215
392
4,017
32
13
5,391
23,397
23
Powell River	
Prince George	
174
415
20
21
15
13
6
9
58
428
903
8
14
5,905
21,737
3
Prince Rupert
4
348
8
2
2
5
3
171
373
218
19
8    ....
227
129
5
Princeton. 	
55
	
Quesnel  -
1
5
4
8
2
12
37
1,651
—
Revelstoke	
1
	
158
	
Rossland 	
	
Salmon Arm  ,
36
—
Smithers	
16
400
30
	
25
26
7
278
197
1,955
4
4
2,813j      650
7
Telegraph Creek
2
10
1
1
1
34
1
—
 1    - -
1
Vancouver 	
201
13,625
401
1,665
379
366
40
811
6,791
22,084
73,644
582
2,082
289
32,894
13,295
133
Vernon 	
69
	
	
Victoria	
29
195
6
7
754
6
13
50
Williams Lake..„_
13
	
2
2
35
5
	
83
50
1
Windermere	
1
3
68
.....
1
4
10
1
2
8
Totals
456
18,748
538
3,312
552
628
472
1,125
9,038
27,579
85,553
667
2,107| 329|50,197|62,797
1         1             1
191 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 49
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
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Jan.   27.—	
Feb.      1 __
Anderson, Axel  	
Borden, Richard—	
Reade, Wm 	
Nelson, Louis	
Hockstenier, Wm 	
Appleton, 0. P  	
Cherbonnean, A...	
Olsen, Laris A 	
Remizoff, P. —	
Brewer, Arthur 	
Smith, D. W- —	
Hughes, David —_	
Clay, Chas  	
Paul, Tom  -..._.
Ocean Falls   _
1
1
8
1
6
13
13
2
4
i
i
6
4
100
4
3
1
300
16
23
84
43
84
i
29
2
1
8
6	
6	
McBride   	
„     10 -
„     15	
Penticton  _
„     24 —..
Mar.     1   	
Apr.     1.	
Prince George	
Dawson Creek 	
„     12	
,'f     12_-	
Vernon ..,  	
„*    14	
„     14	
„     24 —-.
„     26—	
Merritt—— 	
Creston 	
Victoria    	
Fort St. John	
Clinton __   _
Fort Nelson _	
May      4	
June    1	
„      27-.	
Sitybell, John 	
Francis, Old 1  	
Sutherland, J. W 	
Loots, Dan  	
Krestenauck, Paul _ _
Totals __	
„      30	
July   27.-	
Aug.   15	
McDame Creek 	
Williams Lake	
-
1
29
13
2
4
2
117
551
41
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.     28 	
Mar.     10. 	
Howie, Henry ...  —  	
Ingram (Jr.), Wm._  	
Hagf ors, Arthur  	
Cloverdale 	
1        |
1
April      6	
1
July       7 	
1        |
26             	
Brighouse   _ _ 	
Aug.     17	
Ivey, Richard ,    	
1
1
1
1
i
17               ..   _
Vancouver  	
Sept.    12  _
Springgay, L. J.__. 	
25                 .
Vernon   .„..	
Williams Lake.  	
Wyndell....	
Burnaby    	
North Vancouver  	
North Vancouver    	
Burnaby.   _	
Celista	
28             ....
Ctrt           14
18
1
„       19           	
Chapman, Frank   ,  	
1
19
1        |
Nov.    29
1      ■ 1
Dec.       6
McKeown, Raymond 	
i
„       11
Creston    	
Mission. ___    .,
Vancouver.... __	
Vancouver   —
Victoria — 	
i
14	
15	
15 	
20 	
Deroche, E. I. 	
Marshall, W. K _-	
Grady, J  	
Garrett, Gordon  	
Totals— 	
i
i
1
1
18          !            3
Note.—Revenue derived from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and confiscated firearms during the
calendar year 1939 amounted to $647.38. L 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1939.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
9
136
256
37
169
8
13
31
95
2
53
16
107
20
104
21
102
5
20
103
7
42
30
18
6
76
361
124
1
81
1
3
54
1
132
1
354
117
30
1
34
261
59
29
5
18
12
22
1
13
1
7
51
4
15
20
8
17
4
7
4
1
12
2
17
17
1
4
48
15
20
20
$115.00
Atlin                                               	
1,168.00
642.00
512.00
285.00
440.00
94.00
1 358.00
Golden
51.00
26.00
202.00
1,210.00
4.00
186.00
332.00
614.00
160.00
380.00
80.00
348.00
1,777.00
35.00
5,069.00
1,580.00
380.00
926.00
14.00
119.00
577.00
3,581.00
•1,647.00
352.00
1,487.00
648.00
1,971
1,159
366
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1939.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
1923                       	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924                            ..          	
172
20,398.40
1925                                   .    .    .
24,397.00
1926                           	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
2,487
65,377.95
1928                      	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929                         -	
42,122.00
1930                         	
36,090.25
1931                         	
3,427
	
42,036.15
1932                                        	
80.00
1933                                         	
6,285.00
1934                             	
	
6,825.00
1935                                            	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
12,374.00
20,350.00
1937                                         	
19,540.00
1938
....
21,018.00
1939  	
     1	
26,399.00
Totals  :	
7,638
7,008
68,745
69,431,
8,230
7,204
20,615
$510,413.80 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 51
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January
1ST
TO
December 31st
1939.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
j>*
N
'fH
CJj
Lh*
ti
9
tt
M
u   .
a tt
an
M o
3
o
tt
O
c
OS
11
ill
h£
ta
tt
o
O
c
tu
OJ
a
h,
"tt
HH
tt     .
o tt
tu
o
o
s
a
'tt
HH     .
tt a
tt o
0 aj
5
ti
is
Amount.
Clinton—•
'1
1
I
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
_
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
...
$15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
Bauer, Herman, Poulston, Wash 	
Crinstein, Dr. A., Seattle, Wash _ —	
Gaeth, C. J., Everett, Wash.            	
Gulgard, T., Poulston, Wash ;  	
Krebs, 0. M., Anacortes, Wash 	
Lillis, J. L., Seattle, Wash. ' 	
Marlin, J., Bellingham, Wash 	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
105.00
Miller, J. H., Long Beach, Cal.          __    ,.  	
McCulloch, J. H., Seattle, Wash.              	
Shaffer, M., Bellingham, Wash.                 	
Walters, A., Seattle, Wash.                         	
Yoris, E. W., Seattle, Wash.
Cranbrook—
Ballard, 0. K. ;   Goodwin, W. ;   and Whitney, G. W., San
40.00
Duncan—
Duthie, J. F., Seattle, Wash.      _   _           	
Fernie—
Barry, Paul E., Richland, Pa.	
Howard, Dr. W. W., Medford, Ore.— 	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Woods (Sr.), E., Memphis, Tenn   -	
Fort Fraser—
50.00
25.00
40.00
Clise, Alfred, Seattle, Wash  	
Hart, Floyd, Medford, Ore.                           	
Jolie, P., Seattle, Wash     '...
25.00
Stead, C. B., Seattle, Wash	
Golden-
25.00
Gould  F. M., New York, N.Y.                    	 L 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1939—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
%H
ti
Qi
CQ
rM
ti G
3 P
^ o
Hrr\
v u
P9 o
G
O
rO
u
ti
O
13
G
a
t-t.-G
Qi .c
VI
ti
o
O
u
OJ
Ci
Q
■B
"ti
1-
tu
o
0
s
'a
a a
tt tu
o tu
s-S
3
5
"p.
ti
Amount.
Golden—Continued.
1
2
1
....
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
l
l
i
l
i
l
l
l
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
$80.00
50.00
125.00
25.00
Mayer, Wm., Los Angeles, Cal..— __   	
15.00
25.00
25.00
McNab, J. L., San Francisco, Cal.— —	
65.00
40.00
Strom, Erling, Banff, Alberta  - 	
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Van Heek (Jr )   G J., Holland                           ■
25.00
40.00
Greenwood—
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
Howell, Chas. F., Coulee Dam, Wash.—. , ,■	
15.00
15.00
Schau  0., Seattle, Wash.                   	
15.00
30.00
Slender, B-, Seattle, Wash.                 ■
30.00
Kamloops—
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Taft, F. H., Red City, Cal.                                   	
25.00
Lillooet—
30 00
15.00
Hilen, A. R., Seattle, Wash j	
60.00
15 00
70 00
Merritt—
25 00
55 00
Brill, F. W.f Seattle, Wash   	
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash.          	
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash    	
Crow, L. V., St. Bell, Cal _	
15.00
Johnson, H. F., Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
Laramore, W., Miami, Florida	
95.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 53
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st,
Continued.
1939-
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
'u
o
u
ti
Qi
W
ti c
$&
s
o
tt
D
•tt
tt
tt
0J.J
?|
ca
cc]
o
V
C
CJ
QJ
a
'tt
HH
tt      .
o tt
sa
0)
at
o
o
s
tt
'ea
HH     .
a o,
tt 0)
o tu
tgjtt
r=i m
2
5
■0
Amount.
Merritt—Continued.
Leven, N., Portland, Ore.	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
l
i
i
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
$15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
50.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
5.00
26.00
40.00
50.00
55.00
55.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
Osten, Dr. A. M., Seattle, Wash.             	
Oliver, C. T., Kent, Wash.                         	
Rastall, B. M.f Belvedere, Cal.	
Schaefer, R. C, Redfield, N.D.                  —	
Snow, G. H., Seattle, Wash.                     	
Van Hook, M. H., Hurrington Park, Cal  	
Vockrodt, H. K., Everett, Wash.
Watchie, H. C, Seattle, Wash.                 —  	
Whitcombe, C. M., Everett, Wash.	
New Westminster—
Corboy, P. F., Seattle, Wash.                     	
Hilkert, A. W., Seattle, Wash.	
Hoff, H. B., Seattle, Wash.                            - 	
Robison, Wm. S., Concrete, Wash	
30.00
40.00
25 00
Steen W H   Seattle Wash.
25.00
40 00
25 00
25 00
25 00
Oliver—■
MacKintosh, Dr. P. G., Yakima, Wash. 	
Pouce Coupe—
15.00
30 00
Bowers, Dr. J. W., Fort Wayne, Ind    	
90.00
50.00
115.00
50.00
Dirks, C. M., Toleta, Texas                         -	
65.00 L 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1939—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
O
a
0)
m
cj   .
_B tt
S r
*  H
m o
tt
o
.Q
'h
tt
O
•tt
c
tt
CJ    ■
+3
CQ
ti
o
O
Qi
Qi
Q
G
'ti
o ti
sa
CJ
m
o
o
s
tt
'tt
tt a
tt cj
O  CJ
g*
2
5
'S
tt
Amount.
Pouce Coupe—Continued.
Doerr, Fred, Alder Flats, Alta.  	
l
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
l
l
i
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
....
$25.00
Hoensbroech, Count L., Rhineland, Germany... 	
Holland, E. New York, N.Y.            -	
125.00
25 00
Holman E., New York, N.Y.  	
105.00
65 00
Kreuger, A. W., Victoria, Texas	
Kreuger (Jr.), A. W-, Victoria, Texas 	
Lindsay, J. P., Monroe, La 	
Mendehall, Dr. T. E., Johnstown, Pa ~ -	
90.00
65.00
65.00
25.00
90 00
McKee W W., Blackwell, Okla 	
75.00
25.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
105.00
40 00
25 00
80.00
Schaurte, Dr. W. T., Lanvenburg, Germany 	
140.00
25.00
25.00
Steward, Dr. G. B., Florence, Ariz. 	
40.00
50.00
Turnham, John, Freer, Texas. — 	
Prince Georges-
Brass H W., Elkland, Pa.                                                	
130.00
65 00
Ellinger A. E., Snyder, N.Y.              	
.in no
Ellinger Mrs. E. M., Snyder, N.Y	
....
25.00
25.00
Hord E L   Washington, D.C.         ...          	
65.00
15.00
Kleinberg, Lester, Seattle, Wash _ _.	
Krech (Jr ), S., New York, N.Y	
25.00
50 00
90.00
65.00
25.00
65 00
McBride K R., Glenn Falls, N.Y.                                	
25.00
Rusten, Dr. E. M., Minneapolis, Minn..... —	
70.00
30.00
15.00
105 00
Prince Rupert—
Collison, 1. P., Port Orchard, Wash .._ 	
Mills, L. H., Portland, Ore — 	
25.00
25.00
Quesnel—
•25 00
25.00
25.00
Nicholson, E-, Oregon '  	
25.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 55
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1939-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
'u
O
SH
ca
OJ
CD
r-£
o   ■
ti G
5 S
W O
i&
DQ c
s
o
tt
o
•tt
tt
tt
o   •
„ cu
N.i3
Qi _5
Q}Hh
<J1
ti
o
O
u
Qi
Qi
Q
G
"3
h
o a
sa
cj
O
o
s
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
tt
a
HH      .
tt a
tt >u
o tu
<i in
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
H
'hh
'tt.
tt
r*
1
2
1
1
1
Amount.
Quesnel—Continued.
Ruth, W. E., Seattle, Wash.
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
i
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
S4O.00
Ward, L. B., California          ■ -	
Weiler, Herman, Oregon 	
Smithers—
Meyers, F. H., Olive, Cal.
25.00
Perrelet, Minnie L., Alhambra, Cal.	
Telegraph Creek—
25.00
Millard, H. B., Anville, Pa.
Sykes, H. C, Englewood, N.J.
Sykes (Jr.), H. C, Englewood, N.J  	
Sykes, C. W., Englewood, N.J   _	
65.00
100 00
Vancouver—
Buckley, Dr. G. E., Portland, Ore 	
25.00
25.00
Cleveland, E. W-, Cleveland, Ohio       ■ _....
25.00
40.00
25.00
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash.                                   	
25.00
Hill, J. D. G., Lincoln, 111.
30.00
Li, Dr. F. F., Hong Kong, China	
Olds, Dr. W. F., Los Angeles, Cal _ ._	
25.00
15.00
230.00
65.00
25.00
Whilfule, F., Middleborough, Va..  	
Wilken, G. C, San Diego, Cal  	
Williams Lake—
25.00
55.00
15.00
Boynton, F H., Hollister, Cal.                       	
25.00
Doatman, L. L., Los Angeles, Cal.—   ,	
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
Knudsen, T. R., Los Angeles, Cal—   —	
25.00
50.00
Thompson, Carl, Seattle, Wash   	
25.00
25.00
Windermere—
90.00
25.00
40.00
80.00
55.00
Gilbert, F. L., Seattle, Wash  	
15.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
Poole, R. B„ Riverside, Cal.— - -	
50.00
80.00
40
32
44
66
1
85
141
52
24
$10,275.00 L 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1939.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
• P
tn.z
■ a
•- a
2     CQ
: a
H >
!  Q
o o
Z'hh
3p
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
An Indian or farmer killing deer without required permit-
Exceeding bag-limit on big game..
Game on premises of a logging camp, hotel, etc. _ 	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals of female
or   having   in   possession   game   animals   during
Killing,   hunting,
close season   —   —   —
Possession of game animals under one year of age 	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season-
Possession of carcasses of untagged deer      	
Removing all evidence of sex from game animals  -	
Running deer with dogs.—  	
Setting out poison for game animals..
Selling big-game animals or portions thereof. .	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during prohibited period-
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds.
Hunting or in possession of migratory game birds during close
season     —   —
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
close  season —   - —__ —	
Hunting certain game birds with a rifle contrary to the game
regulations *. _ — — —
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours:..._.	
Hunting  migratory game birds from a  power-boat — —	
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours  	
Hunting migratory game birds over baited area  __  	
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line 	
Leaving traps set after end of open season   ..T	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping during the close season —  	
Trapping without first securing registration of a trap-line .
Unlawfully  trapping  big-game  animals   —	
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
Carrying firearms without a licence —— 	
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accom1
panied by an adult —     - — 	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence ._ — —
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence ____
Resident angling or carrying fishing-tackle without a licence	
Using another person's licence or permit or allowing same to be
used        	
Firearms.
Carrying  loaded  firearms in  or discharging  same from  an  automobile, etc     -  	
Carrying or in possession of unplugged pump, repeating, or automatic shotgun     _ 	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
28
143   144
21
23
$20.00
50.00
60.00
420.00
155.00
35.00
110.00
30.00
100.00
10.00
20.00
500.00
35.00
60.00
30.00
90.00
10.00
345.00
85.00
140.00
10.00
10.00
100.00
815.00
10.00
50.00
30.00
390.00
175.00
200.00
100.00
50.00 "
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 57
Prosecutions (Provincial Game,Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1939-
Continued.
See Foot-note.
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Penalties
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Carrying firearms or traps within boundaries of game reserves	
Carrying   firearms   in   automobile  or  launch  during  close  season
3
1
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2
5
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$10.00
10.00
Exporting pelts of fur-bearing animals without required permit	
Failing   to   submit   returns   under   Special    (Trapping)    Firearms
70.00
10.00
10.00
40.00
65.00
10.00
Unlawfully feeding game to farmed fur-bearing animals... __	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
10.00
56.00
12.50
10.00
65.00
33.00
Gaol Sentences.
$4,776.50
;rmit —.
during
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds
during
Trapping or in possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals
Totals	
92
101
119
88
126
21
526
547
Note.—^"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one week to three months. L 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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!5 .2 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 59
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by a Representative of the
Game Department during the Year 1939 at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve,
near Chilliwack, B.C.
American coot   49
Baldpate   16
Canvasback   2
Green-wing teal   22
Lesser scaup          2
Mallards   2,387
Pintail      128
Wood duck          7
Summary of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings, 1939.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
1,006,820
293,859
489,371
102,625
4,633,977
30,044
170,290
38,580
5,400,407
1,670,000
4,374,524
559,148
Totals                                     	
12,490,331
5,549,876
729,438
Summary of Game-fish Eggs and Fry on Hand at Hatcheries, December 31st, 1939.
Hatchery.
CUT-THEOAT.
Eastern Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Steelhead.
Fry.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
5,893
172,351
404,000
10,000
6,413
31,457
148,852
37,149
51,207
158,223
2,175
172,115
149,046
85,042
Totals     ,	
274,558
404,000
10,000
651,735
6,413
87,217
Eggs  	
Fry   	
Fingerlings and yearlings
Summary.
12,490,331
5,549,876
729,438
Total distributions   18,769,645
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1939     1,433,923
Total
20,203,568
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized in
connection with their Game Fish Culture operations; subsidies being granted by the B.C.
Game Department to the following: Powell River District Board of Trade; Revelstoke
District Rod and Gun Club; Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club; Princeton Fish, Game, and
Forest Protective Association;   Penticton and District Rod and Gun Club.
Eggs were also supplied to the Rupert Rod and Gun Club, Prince Rupert; Ocean Falls
Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls; Prince George Rod and Gun Club, Prince George; McBride
Rod and Gun Club, McBride.
Included in above total are 40,000 cut-throat eggs which were turned over to Biological
Board, Cowichan Lake, for subsequent liberation in Cowichan River watershed. L 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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L 63
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L 69
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L 73
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 2,167 Holders of Special Firearms  (Trapping)  Licences, showing
Game, Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1938-39.
Big
Big Game.
Bear —
Caribou
Deer 	
Moose ...
372
95
1,153
407
Mountain-goat ..
Mountain-sheep
Wapiti (elk) __
97
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   6,518
Fox   966
Fisher    283
Lynx   699
Marten   6,444
Mink   5,624
Muskrats    49,728
Otter
206
Racoon       1,009
Skunk   88
Squirrels   30,078
Weasel    30,774
Wildcat         177
Wolverine         144
Cougar
Predatory Animals.
30 Wolves
284
Coyotes    2,324
Fur-farm Returns, 1939
(Statement No.
1).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1939.
5,597
141
33,083
573
351
3,379
31
19,189
364
113
33
1,540
14
1,754
77
12,354
195
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 92;   nil returns, 10;   no returns
received, 57.
Fur-farm Returns, 1939 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Adult and
Young
(Reared)
Animals.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on
Hand as at
December
31st, 1939.
152
69
4
545
28
37
12
2
83
2
11K
3                     K4
Fiteh                                                   	
114
2
348
26
Note.—Figures in respect to beaver only approximate. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939.
L 75
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1939.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
" B."
" C."
" D."
" E."
Animals.
1
4
254
107
1,044
46
62
1
58
11
48
74
38
1
356
75
7
106
21
4
22
2
10
109
50
138
26
1,482
172
7
1,007
117
5
1
5
347
26
18
22
23
1
1
8
17
631
61
22
1,690
58
21
29
6
7
1
23
4
25
166
17
50
1,102
232
23
Birds.
4,919
377
115
1,113
Owls  	
190
96
7
1 L 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1939.
Area.
Pheasants.
Partridge.
Vancouver Island—
388
855
53
152
16
544
1,352
304
96
Cobble Hill                 	
Victoria—
Totals  .     	
3,760
Lower Mainland—■
397
1,606
1,780
1,363
1,722
1,194
522
4
1,632
1,754
30
Delta                                                                                                          	
20
31
11,974
81
Interior—
177
125
48
35
12
57
260
48
253
57
27
36
156
12
84
133
22
10
14
12
14
12
Totals    	
1,520
District.
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland ..
Interior    	
Summary.
Pheasants.
...    3,760
... 11,974
...    1,520
Partridge.
81
120
Totals .
17,254
201 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 77
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1939.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1939.
Pheasants   4,980 Ducks       6
Quail         18
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1939.
Pheasants   19,480 Partridge      10
Ducks    25
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1939.
Pheasants   1,294 Geese        2
Quail    3 Partridge     15
Ducks          21
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1939.
Pheasants   17,981 Quail   .     6
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1939.
Pheasants   6,054 Geese        2
Quail         15 Partridge      18
Ducks          40
Note.—During the year 1939 there were 184 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year nineteen of these farmers discontinued operations.
Eleven licensed game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1939—669 bands at
10 cents—$66.90. L 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1939.
Barkerville and Quesnel Districts.
Cochran, J. D Harkerville. Tibbies, F Quesnel.
Tibbies, Jack Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Youngs, Grover A Barkerville.
Dale, W. A Kersley.
Evans, Chas Quesnel.
Miller, I. E Punchaw.
Quanstrom, Wm Quesnel.
Okanagan and Boundary Districts.
Gould, Walter Summerland. Noren, Carl S Westbridge.
Haskell, Gordon Westbridge. Peterson, S. G Westbridge.
Mallory, Donald Okanagan Falls. Willis, G. E Keremeos.
Cariboo District.
Anderson, Dave Clearwater.
Archie, Geo Canim Lake.
Bell, Darwin 70-Mile House.
Bishop, C. W Clinton.
Blomberg, Chas Macalister.
Boyle, Hugh Bridge Lake.
Bradford, R. J Bridge Lake.
Butler, L. H Tatla Lake.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Colin, A. A Dog Creek.
Colin, Peter H Clinton.
Cudmore, W. S Clinton.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Daniels, Geo. A Canim Lake.
Decker, English Canim Lake.
Dewees, Richard Likely.
Dillabough, Geo Horsefly.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford Lac la Hache.
Fairchild, Cecil Williams Lake.
Gott, Joe Clinton.
Hamilton, G. G Williams Lake.
Hamilton, H. M Lac la Hache.
Hamilton, Thomas Williams Lake.
Hansen, J. F Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Hansen, W. B Bridge Lake.
Hockley, Geo Horsefly.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hooker, S. B Horsefly.
House, S. V Ochiltree.
Labordie, Eddie Clinton.
Langeler, Fred.—  Fawn.
Jenner, Ernest Horsefly.
Johnson, 0. M Fawn.
Krebs, Dick Canim Lake.
Larson, Ole Roe Lake.
Larum, Sig Fawn.
Levick, J. S Fawn.
McKort, C Alexandria.
Monkman, F. G Narcosli Creek.
Muench, Harry Lac la Hache.
Myers, Alfred Horsefly.
Odian, Ernest Lone Butte.
Ogden, Percy Lac la Hache.
Park, J. P 70-Mile House.
Parminter, J. W Horsefly.
Peters, Machel Clinton.
Pollard, J Clinton.
Prest, Charles 70-Mile House.
Rioux, Ed Roe Lake.
Rosenau, Steve 70-Mile House.
Scallon, J Big Creek.
Scheepbouwer, J. A 70-Mile House.
Scheepbouwer, J. C 70-Mile House.
Sellers, A. Soda Creek.
Shook, F. A _■„ Clearwater.
Stephenson, Allan Likely.
Thomson, Miles L McLure.
Thorsteison, Chas 100-Mile House.
Turney, Ralph Fawn.
Vaness, John J Horsefly.
Vickers, Robert  Fawn.
Walters, Gerald Likely.
Walters, Glenn Horsefly.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Weir, Dan  Chilco Lake.
Winquist, W Likely.
Young, Herbert ... Lac la Hache.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Church, R. H Big Creek.
McCormick, P Kleena Kleene.
Cassiar
Brooks, Ned Telegraph Creek.
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek.
Etzerza, Belfry Telegraph Creek.
Chilcotin District.
Mackill, C.
Kleena Kleene.
District.
Lawrence, Charles Telegraph Creek.
McClusky, Pat .-.. Telegraph Creek.
Williams, Mike Telegraph Creek. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1939.                     L 79
List of
Draney, Geo	
Guides and Non-resid
Coast
...Bella Coola.
ent Outfitters, 1939-
District.
Skuce, Herbert 	
Stanton, J. R	
•ge District.
Hooker, J. B	
-Continued.
Kimsquit.
Glendale Cove.
.__J3end.
Ratcliff, Walter	
Blackman, Chas	
Bella Coola.
Fort Geo
—Tete Jaune.
Bowman, Art	
—Tete Jaune.
Jones, Isaac H	
Lebeck, Ole	
Lonsdale, F. E	
Poole, Harold E	
Purjue, Oliver	
Reimer, Abe	
Vanderhoof.
Tete Jaune.
Snowshoe.
Mapes.
Chilco Lake.
...Tete Jaune.
Carr, S. J	
—Tete Jaune.
Chesser, C. A.
Mount Robson.
Davidson, C. B	
Davidson, L. H.	
Vanderhoof.
..Vanderhoof.
Dennison, G. M	
Foote, Hollis B	
Honeyman, James	
Hooker, G. B	
Carroll, P. J	
Mount Robson.
Fraser Lake.
Mount Robson.
Dome Creek.
Bend.
Hazelto
...Wistaria.
Reinertson, Clarence
Shankland, Geo	
Smith, J. M 	
Vanderhoof.
21-Mile Post via
Evelyn P.O.
Red Pass.
n District.
McNeill, J. W	
Munger, F. W. R	
Ootsa Lake.
....Walcott.
Clark (Jr.), J. E.
George, Thomas	
Harrison, R. B	
Laveck, Wm. J	
McNeill, Clifford
Blackman, Ted	
Ootsa Lake.
Telkwa.
Wistaria.
Nithi River.
Ootsa Lake.
Kamloo
—Valemount.
Rehill, Manlie	
Thomas, Jimmie	
Van Tine, E	
Van Tine, Meryl V.
os District.
Mobley, C. W.	
Ootsa Lake.
Telkwa.
Ootsa Lake.
Ootsa Lake.
—Tappen.
Blackman, W. M	
—Valemount.
Mobley, F. G 	
.Tappen.
Blair, Irvin     . 	
_ Kamloops.
Mobley, Howard	
Nation, Wm	
Ray, John B    ..
Salmon Arm.
Kamloops.
Clearwater Station.
Humble, Thomas W.
Little Fort.
Little Fort.
Little Fort.
Smith, Lewis H	
...Salmon Arm.
Maciejko, Jack	
Marsden, G.      -
Avola.
...Criss Creek.
Welland, Thomas	
ty District.
Nixon, D. C	
Red Lake.
. .Invermere.
Anderson, Andrew B._
Ashman, Levi	
Kootenc
Corbin.
—Waterton Lakes P.O.,
Nixon, W. J 	
— Invermere.
Baher, M. C	
Canning, Fred	
Clorac, Leon  	
Desimone, Samuel H.
Dilworth, James   	
Alberta.
Natal.
Skookumchuck.
Skookumchuck.
Revelstoke.
...Athalmer.
Nordstrom, Charles
O'Brien, James	
Natal.
-Natal.
O'Laughlin, Edward
Philipps, E. 0	
Spillimacheen.
. North Vancouver.
Philipps, F. A	
— North Vancouver.
Pommier, E 	
Rutherford, G. M.
Sheek, W. P	
Stewart, C. W	
Tegart, R	
-Skookumchuck.
Invermere.
Castledale.
Spillimacheen.
— Windermere.
Feuz, Walter	
Ford, Robert	
Harrison, Wm	
Hawley, James	
Golden.
Jiingsgate.
Edge water.
..Yahk.
Golden.
Terrion, James	
-Michel.
Krivensky, Joseph
Lake, Wm. P.   	
Natal.
...Invermere.
Thomas, Willard S.
White, J	
Parson.
...J7ort Steele.
Lawrence, C. G	
McClintick, Lee	
McKay, G. G. J.
Golden.
Golden.
Athalmer.
Wiedenman, 0. W
Wood, Nells Vernon
York, R. A	
Xeanchoil.
Invermere.
—.Invermere. L 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1939—Continued.
Lillooet District.
Campbell, Pete Big Bar.
Collins, E. M  Cache Creek.
Grinder, John Big Bar.
Land, B Shalalth.
Madden, E. E Cache Creek.
Manson, W Lillooet.
Matier, James H Ashcroft.
Michel, T Lillooet.
Peace River District.
Anatole Baptiste JFort St. James.
Artemenko, W. M Fort St. John.
Calliou, Joe Moberly Lake.
Calliou, John Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Pat Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Calliou, Peter Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Sam Moberly Lake.
Callison, Elisha O Charlie Lake.
Cameron, Patrick Moberly Lake.
Cameron, Ralph Moberly Lake.
Campbell, Al Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Campbell, Milton Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla.
Dopp, Edgar Bear Flats.
Durney, Milo East Pine.
Esswein, P. B Little Prairie.
Golota, F. W Dawson Creek.
Hambler, George Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Lamont, Al .East Pine.
Letendre, Roland Big Slough, Mt. Valley
P.O., Alta.
Logan, Robert Moberly Lake.
McCusker, K. F Fort St. John.
MacDougall, John JIudson Hope.
McLean, Wm 1 Moberly Lake.
Morton, Edmund Charlie Lake.
Parr, Frank   Dawson Creek.
Peck, Vernon Hudson Hope.
Ross, J. A Dawson Creek.
Rutledge, Leo Hudson Hope.
Sheffield, Calley Fort St. John.
Thomas, J. N. Arras.
Wanandie, St. Paul Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Westergaard, E. G Bear Flats.
Harrison, George..
Non-resident Outfitters.
..Banff, Alta. Osborn, A. L.
Pipestone Creek,
Wembley, Alta. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1939. L 81
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1939.
Attorney-General (Minister) Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Sergeant R. P. Ponder Vancouver (on active service).
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T.Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Junior Clerk F. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent A. Robertson Cultus Lake.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson     Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson Nelson.
Fishery Officer C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
Junior Fishery Officer H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Fishery Officer i J. D. Inverarity Sooke.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Qualicum.
Fishery Officer F. Pells.. Cultus Lake.        J
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae  Kelowna.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield- Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Lake Cowichan.
Game Warden W. N. Massey Alert Bay.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden j J. W. Jones Royal Oak, V.I.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Stenographer Miss M. Marapodi Nelson.
Game Warden . A. F. Sinclair Invermere.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden R. W. MacMartin Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart Nelson.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright   Creston.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Penticton.
Game Warden 1 W. H. McLean . Greenwood.
Game Warden H. V. Morgan Princeton. L 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer _■ Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden _ W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden 1 J. W. Stewart Clinton.
Game Warden G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Lillooet.
Game Warden E. H. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Quesnel.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Game Warden D. E. Ellis Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead ; Smithers.
Game Warden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Clerk  R. A. Johnson Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Corporal H. J. Engelson Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden7 : V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Finlay Forks.
Game Warden G. Davis McDame Creek.
" E" Division (Va.ncouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark { Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Jones Ganges.
Corporal R. E. Allan Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Sjiecial Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth -—Kamloops. J. Dewar Chase River.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
925-740-6273  

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