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SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1938-39 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1940]

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Full Text

 SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1938-39
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Sixty-eighth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
the Province.
G. M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
December, 1939.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1938-39.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable G. M. WEIR.
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A., Ph.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
H. B. King, M.A., Ph.D.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Cranbrook.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouvei.
T. G. Carter, Penticton.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster.
*C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Prince George.
W. G. Gamble, B.A., Victoria.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay.
*T. W. Hall, Abbotsford.
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Nelson.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
A. E. Miller, Revelstoke.
*H. M. Morrison, Ph.D., Prince Rupert.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A..
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
*A. S. Towell, M.A., Pouce Coupe.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Prince
George.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
George H. Deane, Victoria. W. Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster. C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver:
A. R. Lord, B.A., Principal.
A. Anstey, B.A., Vice-Principal.
W. P. Weston, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A.
H. B. MacLean.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed.
T. R. Hall, B.A.
Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
Miss M. McManus, B.Mus., M.A.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A.
Victoria:
V. L. Denton, B.A., D.C.L., Principal.
H.L.Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Vice-Principal.
John Gough, M.A.
Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A., Ph.D.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A.
F. T. C Wickett, A.R.C.O.
Mrs. N. E. Murphy, B.Sc.
Miss Barbara Hinton.
Mrs. Ethel Reese-Burns.
Model School:
Miss Isabel M. L. Bescoby, M.A.
Miss Marian D. James.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar:  J. L. Watson, B.A.
Officer in Charge of Industrial Education:   F. T. Fairey, B.A.
Inspector of Technical Classes:   H. A. Jones.
Director of Home Economics:  Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc.
Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:   J. W. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Organizer of School and Community Drama:   L. Bullock-Webster, A.R.C.M., L.T.C.L.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:   P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk:  R. D. Smith.
Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind:   C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed.
Director, Recreational and Physical Education:   Ian Eisenhardt. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education      7
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver    36
Victoria     "•
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education    39
Report of the Officer in Charge of Industrial Education    48
Report of the Director of Home Economics     54
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver     56
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—•
Victoria     59
New Westminster    60
North Vancouver (City and District) and West Vancouver     62
Burnaby     64
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind     66
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses    68
Elementary School Courses     71
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch     72
Report on Work of Adult Education     74
Report of Director of Recreational and Physical Education     79
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust     83
Report of Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "    85
Report of Organizer of School and Community Drama     86
Statistical Returns—
High Schools (Cities)     90
High Schools (District Municipalities)  104
High Schools (Rural Districts)  109
Superior Schools (District Municipalities)  115
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  115
Junior High Schools (Cities)  121
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  129
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  131
Elementary Schools (Cities)  133
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  166
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  185
Elementary Schools (Community Districts)  204
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  206
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  209
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  212
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts     213 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION, 1938-39.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1939.
To the Honourable G. M. Weir,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Sixty-eighth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1939.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 120,360
to 120,934 and the average daily attendance increased from 106,515 to 107,660. The percentage of regular attendance was 89.02.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Community
Districts.
Total.
High Schools	
Superior Schools..
17,197
Junior High Schools-
Elementary Schools...
9,210
42,812*
4,513
591
1,663
19,093t
2,037
3,104
1,041
19,124
549
23,747
3,695
11,914
81,578
Totals, 1938-39..
Totals, 1937-38-
69,219
25,860
25,306
120,934
69,249
25,919
24,670
522
* These figures include an enrolment of 97 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include an enrolment of 61 pupils in the Provincial Model School.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the— Students.
High Correspondence School classes, regular students   (exclusive of
the 1,159 officially registered in high, superior, or elementary
schools)       1,073
Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular students     1,012
Night-schools        7,189
Adult education—
Vocational classes (Dominion-Provincial Youth Training
Plan)        1,855
Vocational classes for unemployed   (Provincial  Government)           225
Classes in Mining for Prospectors        265
High Correspondence School, Technical-Vocational courses       869
Elementary Correspondence School        149
Community Self-help Groups (adults only)      1,553
Recreational and Physical Education classes  27,865
  32,781
Normal School, Vancouver        125
Normal School, Victoria          75
Victoria College        225
University of British Columbia      2,476
Total  1  44,956 H 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
6,680
6,250
6,113
5,860
5,781
5,655
5,948
5,659
4,875
3,865
2,844
1,945
343
5,803
5,650
5,684
5,443
5,729
5,324
5,746
5,456
4,972
3,951
2,849
2,192
317
12,483
11,900
GrndeTTT,
11,797
Grade TV.
11,303
Grade V.
11,510
Craiie VT
10.979
Grpd<> VTT,
11,694
rjri^e VTTT
11,115
Grade TX\
9,847
Gra^e TT.
7,816
OrndeYT.
5,693
Grade TTTT.
4,137
660
Totals
61,818
59,116
120,934
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE DIFFERENT
CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher are shown
below:—
Schools.
o a
!5H
za
3
r. oj
»      fi
g oo
Hj'Sh
u u
OJ   CJ
O..C
Ci)i   QJ
J* o-o
s a"
> C R
CS OJ  o
High schools (cities)  	
High schools (district municipalities)-
High schools (rural districts).
Superior schools (district municipalities).
Superior schools (rural districts)	
Junior high schools (cities)	
Junior high schools (district municipalities) -
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities) *..
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t-
Elementary schools (rural districts)	
Community schools  	
Totals..
491
138
97
16
117
252
45
32
1,148
539
898
20
117
39
19
71
6
5
125
16
608
177
116
16
117
323
51
37
1,273
555
901
20
17,197
4,513
2,037
591
3,104
9,210
1,663
1,041
42,812
19,093
19,124
549
14.22
3.73
1.68
0.49
2.57
7.62
1.38
0.86
35.40
15.79
15.81
0.45
35
33
21
37
27
37
37
33
36
35
21
27
3,793
401
4,194
120,934
100.00
32
30
28
20
33
23
29
34
32
19
18
28
* These figures include 21 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 97 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 61 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 9
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class:—
Schools.
c5
QJ
<!
m
s
13
C
O
o
OJ
m
T3
U
IS
Eh
1
QJ
a
QJ
so
c
O
X
H
^QJ
S
QJ
"3
460
142
97
1
7
150
21
16
150
27
52
4
3
5
8
88
81
21
12
672
347
606
1
7
21
6
1
2
355
161
232
13
1
24
9
9
142
31
14
83
8
7
56
8
1
2
3
16
3
1
397
99
82
5
51
164
29
20
304
160
289
1
211
78
34
11
66
159
22
17
969
395
612
19
608
High schools (district municipalities)	
177
116
Superior schools (district municipalities) —
16
117
Junior high schools (cities)   	
Junior high schools (district municipalities) __
323
51
37
Elementary schools (cities)*	
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t—
1,273
555
901
20
Totals, 1938-39	
1,123
1,854
799
43
350
25
1,601
2,593
4,194
Totals, 1937-38„-	
1,062
1,717
945
48
291
24
1,557
2,535
4,092
* These figures include 21 teachers employed in the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind,
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School. H 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
CLASSIFICATION OF TEACHERS BY SEX AND EXPERIENCE.
The following table gives a classification by sex and experience of 4,035 of the 4,092
teachers in the Province for the school-year 1937-38. (This table was prepared by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics.)
City Schools.
District
Municipality
Schools.
Rural Schools
of more than
One Room.
One-room Rural
Schools.
All Schools.
'rt
QJ
§
318
594
185
279
113
184
94
124
48
57
30
61
64
85
62
120
85
121
75
102
65
100
42
76
38
73
35
59
126
246
52
103
39
83
10
22
2
4
31
28
Experience where teaching-
1 year or less .	
2 years	
3
10
11
12
13
14
15-19 years-
20-24    „    ...
25-29    „    _
30-34    ,.    _
35 years and over-
Unspecified 	
Totals-
Total-experience—■
1 year or less	
2 years	
3
10
11
12
13
14
15-19 years	
20-24    „    	
25-29    „    	
30-34    „     	
35 years and over-
Unspecified	
88
65
46
49
21
16
31
34
56
46
48
30
30
29
102
47
37
10
2
11
165
95
68
56
23
27
43
72
73
73
64
54
50
45
193
92
73
21
4
12
253
160
114
105
44
43
74
106
129
119
112
84
80
74
295
139
110
31
6
23
G3
29
23
11
8
6
15
11
11
21
13
11
8
5
20
5
2
111
57
32
34
14
13
21
22
33
20
28
18
19
10
46
11
9
1
174
86
55
45
22
19
36
33
44
41
41
29
27
15
66
16
11
1
127
45
46
17
9
14
11
18
11
192
91
75
38
20
19
25
31
26
14
10
5
4
4
102
45
15
13
8
3
4
4
3
2
191
82
38
17
11
7
10
8
4
1
2
293
127
53
30
19
10
14
12
7
798 | 1,303 | 2,101 | 271
601  772
15
58
73
25
46
71
30
54
84
40
49
89
33
27
60
34
28
62
25
37
62
26
40
66
31
45
76
42
72
114
43
56
99
34
58
92
26
60
86
44
50
94
37
237
374
69
169
238
48
97
145
48
76
124
37
32
69
11
12
23
15
20
17
13
12
17
15
6
10
14
15
13
15
16
25
18
58
34
36
28
17
15
17
22
26
23
33
22
23
16
60
33
25
7
4
2
239 | 332 | 571 | 206 | 385
15
44
18
29
27
34
18
27
21
28
14
10
12
15
11
17
17
15
10
20
18
23
9
11
9
11
3
8
21
23
3
5
4
5
2
1
3
2
4
4
59
47
61
45
49
24
27
28
32
30
41
20
20
11
44
44
49
22
13
10
12
96
71
32
28
21
17
21
15
14
1
21
7
3
1
1
10
591
140
120
54
41
31
29
30
19
20
16
10
9
4
2
24
14
6
4
1
17
Totals-
798 | 1,303 | 2,101 | 271
!    I    I
501  772
239 | 332 I 571 I 206
385
912
464
297
218
105
91
149
182
206
177
165
118
111
94
372
155
122
32
6
59
514
2,521
89
256
112
180
96
156
84
132
76
93
77
70
61
90
47
94
64
100
74
123
77
121
59
97
51
97
64
75
186
341
97
214
63
130
61
85
45
39
31
28
345
292
252
216
169
147
151
141
164
197
198
156
148
139
527
311
193
146
84
1,514    2,521    4,035 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.                                        H 11
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE.
1937-38.
The following
table gives a classification by grade, sex, and age of the total net enrolment
of pupils in the
public schools of the Province for the school-year 1937-38.    (This table was
prepared by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics.)
City Schools.
i.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
Age.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years 	
2
3
6 years	
1,198
1,166
6
4
	
7 years 	
1,665
1,554
975
1,016
13
25
	
8 years 	
358
241
1,598
1,454
791
1,040
33
41
9 years	
75
29
440
329
1,334
1,273
883
1,174
42
52
1
10 years ~
21
14
111
47
528
348
1,259
1,283
841
990
57
91
2
1
11 years  	
8
5
31
22
168
67
542
411
1,162
1,125
850
1,105
60
94
9
3
2
3
15
5
4
7
56
32
17
20
201
71
136
38
559
215
459
126
1,281
803
1,335
540
826
1,299
999
1,296
14 years	
5
2
7
2
14
5
34
23
90
40
289
176
790
608
15 years	
1
1
8
7
15
11
47
12
99
61
382
238
16 years 	
1
3
1
3
3
5
5
4
27
10
133
68
17 years	
1
1
1
2
4
2
4
1
2
4
35
15
18 years  	
3
4
3
1
4
3
1
2
6
2
19 years     ..
1
1
20 years.  	
	
	
      	
21 years 	
 1  	
11
19
15
11
10
17
  |  ........
9
Totals	
3,360   3,020 [ 3,215
1            1
2,887
2,966
2,816
3,059
3,124
2,985
2,809
3,410
3,326
3,533
3,330
Senior
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
Matricu
Total.
Age.
lation.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years...	
2
3
6 years	
	
	
1,204
1,170
7 years	
2,653
2,595
8 years  	
	
2,780
2,776
9 years —	
2,774
2,858
10 years—	
. 	
2,819
2,774
2
2,823
2,829
56
90
5
2
3,008
3,044
13 years... 	
683
941
85
122
3
6
	
3,199
3,099
14 years 	
1,202
1,328
769
888
116
120
3
5
1
1
3,320
3,198
15 years. -	
822
667
1,272
1,321
688
725
77
137
11
12
3,421
3,193
16 years 	
343
212
811
673
1,039
1,013
553
683
96
113
8
6
3,025
2,788
17 years	
74
37
291
205
570
503
688
729
449
523
31
45
2,151
2,066
18 years.—	
10
6
66
44
184
120
335
311
437
474
81
83
1,137
1,043
19 years	
1
9
3
25
22
66
53
157
105
46
67
304
252
20 years. 	
2
2
4
8
5
32
33
22
14
66
56
21 years	
1
1
3
1
13
12
15
7
32
21
Unclassified—	
Totals.
118
237
220
24
58 |  	
9
7
1
461
305
3,310
3,282 | 3,547 | 3,478
i            !
2,652 | 2,572 1 1,733
1
1,924
1,205
1
1,280 |    204
1
222
35,179 | 34,070
1 H 12                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
District Municipality Schools.
Age.
1.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
3
2
6 years 	
441
452
2
7
.
7 years	
809
703
315
376
8
11
	
	
	
	
8 years  —   	
217
161
683
601
314
398
8
27
9 years  	
48
17
266
199
607
539
295
373
14
22
2
1
10 years	
6
10
72
46
269
188
557
663
281
356
24
23
	
1
11 years	
6
2
19
7
96
44
285
209
520
496
325
379
30
36
12 years	
3
1
5
5
38
16
109
74
323
226
464
517
326
362
13 years	
1
2
2
6
13
3
36
18
148
58
325
240
459
466
14 years  	
1
2
3
3
14
1
47
26
188
90
362
250
15 years 	
1
1
1
	
3
2
4
3
25
5
48
23
165
108
16 years	
1
	
	
1
	
3
1
4
8
2
45
13
1
1
1
1
12
4
18 years.. —
1
	
	
.   .
1
19 years 	
	
	
	
1
	
	
20 years  	
—
	
21 years	
	
	
	
	
	
Unclassified 	
Totals	
10
	
	
21
13
2
6
22
2
	
11
1,547 | 1,352
1,365
1,249
1,373 | 1,218 | 1,314
!           1
1,275
1,362 [ 1,212
1
1,386
1
1,278
1,399
1,251
Senior
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
Matricu
Total.
Age.
lation.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
3
2
443
459
7 years   	
	
	
	
1,132
1,090
1,222
1,187
1,232
1,151
1,209
1,187
1
1,282
1,173
16
40
1
1,284
1,242
1.217
269
376
21
46
2
1,274
458
519
171
282
30
38
4
1
1,278
1,212
337
223
324
386
146
201
22
46
1,076
998
133
81
246
202
227
292
120
183
28
38
815
813
17 years    .
18
15
114
56
139
142
167
196
90
139
542
554
1
20
15
44
44
72
88
97
156
235
304
4
2
5
1
17
20
38
40
1
1
66
64
20 years	
1
1
3
3
7
12
11
16
21 years 	
	
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
5
6
4
13
1
1
1
	
1
5
20
43
96
Totals.	
1,233
1,260 |    904
1,003
593 |    723 |     406
1            1
539
261
388 |         6
1
22
13,149
12,770 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.                                        H 13
CLASSIFICATION OF PUPILS BY GRADE, SEX, AND AGE—Continued.
Rural District Schools.
Age.
i.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
30
32
6 years 	
672
591
5
8
  .
1
.   .
	
7 years -	
939
767
376
443
11
16
1
1
	
8 years  	
337
239
686
605
290
392
24
17
9 years	
97
54
342
238
596
616
236
313
14
26
1
39
12
23
9
132
56
81
23
382
147
261
94
541
372
570
288
223
426
313
426
24
262
25
361
1
17
1
39
11 years	
8
6
8
1
19
4
12
9
55
23
33
22
181
84
107
29
295
194
247
131
422
317
476
254
249
433
306
439
13 years -	
14 years. —
6
1
6
4
19
6
31
11
91
46
173
97
289
250
3
3
5
13
1
32
18
62
34
167
108
16 years.. 	
1
1
1
6
2
6
1
19
8
56
34
17 years 	
1
1
2
1
4
2
4
2
12
6
18 years 	
1
	
1
1
2
6
19 years.  ,
.. ..
20 years 	
1
21 years  - .	
	
	
	
3
24
11
	
3
2
Totals	
2,152 j 1,727
1
1,628
1,448
1  KS>9
1  Ail
1,501
1,343
1,283
1,208
1,287 1 1,262
1,225 | 1,189
1
1
Senior
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
Matricu
Total.
Age.
lation.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Boys.
Girls.
Under 6 years	
30
32
677
600
7 years 	
1,327
1,227
1,337
1,253
9 years	
1
1,285
1,249
10 years 	
1,342
1,274
11 years  	
1
1
1
1,293
1,242
12 years...	
30
49
1
1,260
1,238
13 years  ,.
221
308
16
33
2
1,300
1,226
14 years... —
369
430
133
158
14
22
1,131
1,025
267
254
174
230
88
136
13
17
822
803
16 years —
134
110
118
130
120
165
71
90
15 |       17
1
548
558
25
32
50
37
74
81
81
76
58 |       59
1
309
300
18 years— -	
3
3
13
9
29
27
46
31
61 1       65
2
2
156
146
19 years... 	
1
1
13
6
8
6
23 j       21
1
	
46
34
1
1
4
1
1 |         9
2
9
11
21 years 	
1
1
6 |         2
1
8
3
17
7
3
9
12
— I   	
43
48
Totals	
1,068 | 1,196 |     506 1     602
1            1            1
350 |     450
1
223 |     221
1
164 |     173
1
7 |         3
12,923
12,269 H 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
NEW SCHOOLS.
High schools were established in Bralorne, Castlegar, Fort Fraser, Lillooet, and Wood-
fibre School Districts; junior high schools at Coquitlam, Creston Valley United, Delta,
Mission, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Rossland, and Trail-Tadanac; and superior schools at
Alert Bay, Mayo, Mountain, Mackenzie United, Pender Harbour, Sechelt United, and Swan
Lake (Peace River).
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in the following districts:—
Name of School District.
Carmi	
Casino	
Port McNeill	
Relief-Arlington-
Shaw Creek	
Silver Sands	
Zeballos	
Electoral District.
 Grand Forks-Greenwood.
 Rossland-Trail.
 Comox.
 Nelson-Creston.
 Cowichan-Newcastle.
 Mackenzie.
 Alberni-Nanaimo.
The following districts were created but no school was opened:—
Craigflower Partly in Saanich and partly in Esquimalt.
La France Creek Nelson-Creston.
Mount Aberdeen North Okanagan.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and also the
cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
tn-6
J.  QJ
111
£8 8
o
Xi
o.S
oj±i
■+j s
cd QJ
ii a
QJ M
b 9
bD Jh
b» fi
QJ
U
Z         1
»   j.   tJ
Percentage of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total-
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
67,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
63.49
61.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
$48,411.14«
60,768.75*
113,679.36»
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28$
3,532,518.95$
3,765,920.69$
3,743,317.08$
3,834,727.19$
4,015,074.37$
2,849,972.02$
2,611,937.80$
2.835,040.74$
2,972,385.04$
3,277,660.23$
3,524,962.69$
3,630,670.78$
18S2-R3
1887-88. . .                            	
1892-93     .   .
$215,056.22$
1897-98     .          	
425,555.10
1902-03	
604,357.86
1907-08
1,220,509.85
1919-13
4,658,894.97
1913-14  	
1917-18     ..
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
1922-23 .                  	
7,630,009.54$
9,261,094.98$
11,149,996.27$
10,008,255.66$
1927-28...             	
1928-29	
1929-30              	
1930-31...         _          .. .
10,061,387.99$
9,719,333.81$
8,941,497.34$
8,213,369.04$
8,458,156.00$
8,775,353.78$
9,593,562.64$
10,193,367.08$
10,640,740.47$
1931-32       .           	
1932-33	
1933-34	
1934-35             	
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38 .   .	
1938^39
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure   (not available)   made for incidental expenses in  city school
districts.
% This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 15
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage
at High
Schools of
the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1927-28...              	
13,516
14,545
14,675
16,197
18,134
18,552
18,932
19,969
21,119
22,338
22,582
23,747
94,663
95,013
96,342
97.717
97,785
98,264
96,860
97,264
95,603
96,093
97,778
97,187
108,179
109,558
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
12.49
13.27
13.22
14.21
15.64
15.80
16.35
17.03
18.09
19.71
18.76
19.63
26.92
28.32
28.07
28.03
29.62
21.55
19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
31.74
1928-29	
33.03
1929-30                	
32.79
1930-31...
32.74
1931-32.-	
1932-33	
1933-34	
33.18
23.98
21.85
1934-35	
1935-36   ...
1936-37	
1937-38 _ 	
1938-39..                         - .
23.47
24.46
26.10
27.18
27.92
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1938-39.
Grand total cost of education	
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College .
General grant to Victoria College .
. $10,640,740.47
Grant to University of British Columbia .
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Cost of Night-schools :	
Correspondence Schools—
High School 	
Elementary School
Adult education 	
$4,270.90
5,000.00
408,590.03
33,705.26
34,421.29
15,782.76
41,621.12
13,433.79
68,141.51
624,966.66
Net cost for total enrolment of 120,934 pupils $10,015,773.81
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  82.82
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on total enrolment  .43
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 107,660 pupils  93.03
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on average daily attendance  .49
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 120,934 pupils for year
($3,630,670.78 — $624,966.66)         3,005,704.12
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  24.85
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day  (191 days)  on total
enrolment   .13
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance. 27.92
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (191 days) on average
daily attendance   .15
Cost per capita for year on population of 761,000 (1938 estimate)   *13.16
Cost per capita per school-day (191 days) on estimated population of 761,000.  *.07
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on estimated population of
761,000  f3.95
Cost  to  Provincial   Government  per  capita  per  school-day   (191   days)   on
estimated population of 761,000  f .02
* Computed on net total cost of $10,015,773.81.
t Computed on net cost to Provincial Government of $3,005,704.12. H 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows:—
School.
CO
OJ
3
QJ
CO
QJ
c
p.
1-J
EJJ
3
T3
a
w
Cjj
O
o
s
a
o
Q
1    CO
§1
CJ  cJ
ta fi
GQ
CJJ
i
to
Oh
03
C
1
Jh
QJ
a
.fi
g
H
274
62
131
963
82
49
717
106
478
1,974
1,474
611
8
30
13
113
58
20
17
56
8
126
3
331
544
271
114
197
1,038
481
626
11
9
36
32
58
48
15
58
247
86
168
114
53
117
752
882
629
44
4
57
City elementary schools 	
173
78
74
Totals -	
1,561
5,360
242
1,085
2,727
146
622
2,547
430
School.
CD
a
V
"E
§
<
fi
a
'C
-JJ
CJJ
3
<
ca
S
a
E
m
fi
S
M
m
fi
3
l-H
—    CJJ
fi
.2
|S
'3
w
iH
Hi
-4->
o
aj
129
17
72
228
59
81
29
10
47
68
16
45
49
75
21
89
108
96
70
16
72
288
92
118
197
38
230
1,002
108
434
51
25
71
325
137
208
213
63
204
930
406
522
2,242
684
1,785
8,352
Elementary schools in district municipalities	
Rural elementary schools	
4,102
4,070
544
586
215
438
656
2,009
817
2,338
	
21,779
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which schools
were in operation during all or some portion of the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38:—
1938-39. 1937-38.
City school  districts     33 33
District municipality school districts    24 24
Rural school districts  660 680
Community school districts       4 4
Totals..
721*
741
* At the time this Annual Report was prepared 307 school districts were under the administration of Official
Trustees.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 17,197. Of this number, 8,558
were boys and 8,639 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment for 1938-39 and for 1937-38 in each city are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
1
1
1
1
1
6
4
14
4
7
8
4
16
4
10
202
132
503
88
216
187
120
Armstrong	
Courtenay.  	
82
203 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 17
High Schools—Cities—Continued.
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
4
4
2
5
3
2
8
1
7
7
2
6
8
27
3
2
*
6
7
3
5
1
8
276
15
7
35
4
4
2
10
3
2
11
1
7
9
3
12
9
34
3
4
4
8
9
5
5
1
9
338
17
8
44
109
127
50
135
88
20
260
30
197
200
73
228
282
945
69
36
117
174
186
81
148
18
249
10,260
533
215
1,226
98
120
Enderby 	
50
115
79
Greenwood _ _	
Kamloops   	
Kaslo _ 	
Kelowna    	
Ladysmith.	
20
226
27
185
147
77
Nanaimo   ___
Nelson    _	
194
240
884
65
23
Prince George 	
108
301
161
106
Slocan.  	
12
9,781
561
Vancouver, North _„_    ,
1,171
Totals    	
44
493
608
17,197
16,420
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools for the year was 4,513. Of this
number, 2,066 were boys and 2,447 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1938-39 and 1937-38 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Abbotsford :    Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford  Educational
1
2
8
30
4
5
2
8
9
5
10
2
6
6
18
4
14
6
11
38
5
7
2
10
9
7
15
2
11
8
20
5
16
11
264
1,174
111
115
45
271
268
146
337
16
218
193
518
92
487
258
224
Burnaby        	
1,088
144
125
Kent
287
252
190
Oak Bay  	
364
17
Penticton...   	
189
158
551
95
431
218
19
137
177
4,513
4,380 H 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 2,037. Of this number, 963
were boys and 1,074 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1938-39 and 1937-38 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Athalmer-Invermere....
Blakeburn 	
Bralorne   . 	
Britannia Mine	
Castlegar     	
Cobble Hill 	
Comox
Cowichan Lake 	
Creston Valley United .
Dawson Creek	
Dewdney   	
Fort Fraser -
Golden _	
Harewood 	
Hedley    ..... 	
Howe Sound	
loco .    . 	
Keremeos 	
Kimberley   	
Lillooet  —
Lumby     	
Michel-Natal  	
Nakusp 	
New Denver	
North Bend -	
Ocean Falls	
Oliver   	
Oyama	
Parksville  	
Powell River	
Princeton 	
Qualicum Beach
Quesnel _
Robson	
Rolla 	
Rutland 	
Saanich, North, Consolidated	
Saltspring Island United (formerly Saltspring Island
High School Area)    	
Smithers  	
Squamish -... 	
Telkwa   _ 	
Terrace (formerly Kitsumgallum).
Tsolum	
University Hill	
Vanderhoof   	
Wells    	
Westbank   	
Woodfibre  	
Totals..
48
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
5
1
2
1
2
4
1
1
2
2
5
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
5
3
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
97
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
9
1
2
1
2
6
1
1
4
2
8
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
6
3
2
2
1
1
2
4
2
3
2
1
2
2
5
1
2
2
2
116
42
12
23
45
23
41
48
30
137
27
32
17
24
81
27
35
34
29
146
26
34
73
36
18
13
34
79
27
34
153
69
35
34
10
18
50
35
46
63
36
18
38
41
53
26
39
20
26
2,037
41
18
38
40
43
29
143
12
35
31
60
18
35
33
29
121
28
64
36
21
16
36
52
25
34
131
92
41
25
15
18
39
46
41
63
'35
14
31
32
52
25
27
17
1,782 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 19
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was 591. Of
this number, 321 were boys and 270 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1938-39 and 1937-38 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Abbotsford:  Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsf ord Educational
2
1
12
4
12
4
445
146
444
289
Delta                   -—	
145
3
16
16
591
878
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools for the school-year was 3,104. The number
of boys was 1,572, of girls 1,532.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38 :—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Alert Bay	
Ashcroft	
Bowen Island	
Bralorne	
Brechin	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Canal Flat	
Castlegar	
Cedar, North	
Chase    	
Coalmont	
Copper Mountain
Falkland 	
Fort Fraser 	
Fort St. John	
Fruitvale    	
Gabriola United ....
Hazelton	
Hazelton, New	
Hope	
James Island	
Kaleden	
Lantzville	
Lillooet  -
Malcolm Island	
Mayo  -	
Mountain —
McBride 	
Mackenzie United .
Oyster, North	
Peace—
Pouce Coupe....
Swan Lake	
Pender Harbour	
Pender Island	
Pioneer Mine —
68
95
194
65
86
50
66
73
49
86
53
60
196
45
54
112
43
50
68
78
63
43
54
54
46
74
36
35
52
64
35
95
170
60
88
41
146
59
79
43
64
58
33
74
157
43
48
24
111
45
47
57
103
77
59
55
61
59
62 H 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Superior Schools—Rural Districts—Continued.
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
3
2
3
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
4
3
3
82
38
113
71
28
96
86
59
77
71
107
76
88
82
39
104
Sechelt United    	
38
Sooke _  	
84
83
62
60
74
105
Woodfibre-   .	
Yahk United	
108
74
Ymir      	
83
Totals
43         1       117         1       117         1         3.104
3,137
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 9,210. The number of boys was 4,732,
of girls 4,478.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
193.7-38.
6
6
9
2
9
10
10
26
4
9
5
11
114
12
9
16
6
6
11
2
12
10
14
32
4
166
188
317
30
368
286
355
994
68
157
217
Kamloops , -
Kaslo.—   - 	
Kelowna    	
Nanaimo   ,	
Nelson _	
306
32
333
309
365
988
78
10                       330
5                       163
15                       414
150                   4,212
14                       397
12                       339
20                       583
4,344
Vancouver, North  * .-,    	
Vernon , ,   _
386
371
551
Totals  	
21
258
323
9,210
8,437 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 21
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools was 1,663. Of this
number, 852 were boys and 811 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1938-39 and 1937-38 are given in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
4
6
6
9
12
8
5
6
6
11
15
8
148
161
229
341
488
296
Delta   	
Penticton  	
328
430
293
Totals	
6
45
51
1,663
1,051
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS-
RURAL DISTRICTS.
The number of boys was 540,
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 1,041
of girls 501.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school
years 1938-39 and 1937-38 are given in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
7
3
9
3
2
6
2
7
5
12
3
2
218
35
255
85
276
109
63
38
228
63
Powell River____        	
Princeton  	
290
57
Totals 	
*
32
37
1,041
676
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
• Attendance.
Number of Pupils in Grades.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
fi
h 2 j
ore
'3-5.2
oj *£
%2s>
High schools:
17,197
4,513
2,037
8,558
2,066
963
8,639
2,447
1,074
14,794.96
3,895.36
1,977.09
4,051
1,278
520
5,462
1,443
636
4,133
983
488
2,986
744
379
565
District municipalities	
65
14
23,747
11,587
12,160
20,667.41
5,849
7,541
5,604
4,109
644
Junior high schools:
Cities .—  	
District municipalities	
9,210
1,663
1,041
4,732
852
540
4,478
811
501
8,331.19
1,473.84
926.22
3,306
595
377
3,179
555
356
2,725
513
308
11,914
6,124
5,790
10,731.25
4,278 | 4,090
3,546 |
........ |      ......
35,661
17,711
17,950
31,398.66
4,278
4,090
9,395
7,541
5,604
4,109
644 H 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 42,812. Of this number, 22,049 were
boys and 20,763 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1938-39 and 1937-38 are given in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4 ■
2
6
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
53
1
3
1
14
6
11
21
9
14
11
11
4
9
10
2
15
2
18
9
7
18
19
48
15
7
5
8
15
14
13
4
2
34
669
11
23
19
85
6
13
21
11
14
11
11
4
9
10
2
15
2
18
9
7
18
20
48
16
7
5
8
15
14
14
4
2
35
751
21
23
20
89
243
469
911
361
512
394
417
106
297
337
55
523
58
696
331
216
592
696
1,929
601
227
185
317
591
428
465
148
66
1,292
24,485
97
802
779
3,196
235
460
483
Courtenay.   —	
351
526
407
425
121
316
353
Greenwood-   ,   	
Kamloops   	
52
559
45
715
357
236
Nanaimo    ■	
Nelson   	
647
710
1,940
560
267
166
Prince Gporfjp
323
803
Revelstoke    	
469
554
144
65
1,514
25,496
89
Vancouver     	
858
3,400
Totals	
119
1,168
1,273
42,812
44,392 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 23
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 19,093.    The number
of boys was 9,945, of girls 9,148.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Abbotsford :   Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford  Educational
12
19
1
15
2
5
2
9
1
2
15
7
9
2
1
1
1
7
15
8
1
23
5
2
28
113
7
34
3
14
2
14
10
6
30
32
18
17
2
18
6
35
50
10
8
53
20
14
28
117
7
37
3
14
2
14
10
6
30
32
18
18
2
19
6
35
50
10
8
55
20
14
1,077
3,982
259
1,066
89
492
71
392
341
217
1,206
1,067
532
639
53
691
196
1,233
1,683
273
290
2,015
673
556
1,084
Burnaby 	
Chemainus - 	
Chilliwack   	
4,196
1,400
92
537
Cowichan, North 	
Delta  	
Esquimalt   	
Kent  	
Langley      	
Maple Ridge	
Mission 	
Oak Bay   	
70
495
367
218
1,177
1,086
642
613
67
Penticton   	
694
194
Richmond 	
1,240
1,673
289
Summerland   - - 	
313
1,938
Vancouver, North  	
676
549
Totals  	
165
544
555
19,093
19,610
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the rural districts was 19,124. The number
of boys was 9,938, of girls 9,186.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
685
894
901
19,124
19,075
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the elementary schools of the community school districts was 549. Of
this number, 282 were boys and 267 were girls.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1938-39 and 1937-38 :—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1938-39.
Enrolment,
1937-38.
Community school districts..
20
20
549
522 H 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS OF EACH CLASS AND NUMBER OF TEACHERS IN EACH
CLASS OF SCHOOL.
Class of School.
NO.   OF
Schools.
No. of Teachers.
1938-39.
1937-38.
1938-39.
1937-38.
High schools:
Cities  	
44
19
48
3
43
21
6
7
119
165
685
12
44
20
45
4
43
18
3
5
118
163
698
11
608
177
116
16
117
323
51
37
1,273
555
901
20
576
159
97
Superior schools:
22
118
Junior high schools:
291
District municipalities 	
35
25
Elementary schools:
Cities    - 	
District municipalities.  	
1,289
558
902
20
Totals                 	
1,172
1,172
4,194
4 092
SALARIES.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average yearly salary   (quoted in
dollars only) paid to teachers during the school-year 1938-39:—
High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Junior High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Alberni	
Armstrong —_
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland-
Duncan 	
Enderby	
Fernie 	
Grand Forks..
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt 	
Nanaimo	
Nelson 	
New Westminster -
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert ——
Revelstoke _	
Rossland 	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan  -	
200
100*
700
860
600
180
417
900
100
518
950
800
515
950
000
507
600
422
450*
750
800
750
000
700
750
100*
200
$1,400
1,200*
1,200
1,475
1,200
1,250
1,200
1,400
1,300
1,200
. 1,575
1,800
1,300
1,200
1,200
1,530
1,850
1,597
1,300*
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,400
1,500
1,250*
1,200
$1,650
1,510*
1,368
1,789
1,350
1,510
1,308
1,715
1,666
1,359
2,027
1,800
1,659
1,368
1,466
1,811
2,422
2,570
1,716*
1,383
1,500
1,375
1,471
1,828
2,050
1,632*
1,200
$1,480
1,500
1,525
1,300
2,200
1,572
3,000
2,920
1,100
1,553
1,550
$1,100
1,250
1,200
1,250
1,175
1,125
1,450
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,350
$1,171
1,358
1,369
1,275
1,365
1,421
1,971
1,642
1,100
1,215
1,450
$1,800
1,900
2,000
1,950
2,700
1,875
1,850
1,417
1,250
1,900
1,200
2,350
1,000
2,000
1,760
1,160
1,410
2,900
2,555
2,450
1,300
1,250
2,000
1,800
2,290
2,300
1,848
1,150
$900
950
780
780
1,028
830
800
780
1,100
900
850
1,100
1,000
975
850
1,000
935
1,100
892
1,020
850
900
850
960
984
950
1,170
900
$1,108
1,211
1,121
1,167
1,352
1,185
1,023
981
1,188
1,130
983
1,402
1,000
1,238
1,156
1.051
1,283
1,503
1,349
1,261
1,007
984
1,141
1,236
1,258
1,178
1,339
1,025
* These figures refer to High School area. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 25
Salaries—Continued.
High Schools.
JUNIOE
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
$3,650
4,070
2,500
2,713
3,612
$1,600
1,378
1,200
1,400
1,474
$2,205
2,540
1,834
1,749
2,427
$2,900
4,070
2,170
1,575
2,972
$1,200
1,142
1,100
1,200
1,470
$1,650
1,998
1,503
1,425
2,041
$2,400
3,681
1,800
2625
2,880
$950
866
900
950
1,000
$1,290
1,672
1,327
1,218
1,710
$4,070
$1,200
$2,291
$4,070
$1,100
$1,814
$3,681
$780
$1,530
District Municipalities.
Abbotsford:    Matsqui-Sumas-
Abbotsford Educational Ad-
$1,450
2,687
$1,250
1,200
$1,299
1,597
$1,150
2,430
1,500
1,380
1,125
1,250
1,250
1,600
2,515
1,300
1,100
1,550
1.395
3,000
1,000
1,980
1,100
1,975
1,800
1,100
2,100
1,244
1,850
2,160
$800
780
850
780
900
800
1,000
780
800
850
780
780
800
950
850
900
820
780
800
800
900
780
950
1,215
$875
1,217
1,081
1,073
$1,600
1,500  .
$1,100
1,100
1,008
$1,262
999
1,125
Delta   	
1,800
2,336
1,450
1,900
1,900
2,250
3,100
1,300
2,670
2,100
2,600
1,800
2,100
1,350
1,500
1,350
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,830
1,200-
1,200
1,500
1,784
1,400
1,287
1,380
1,564
2,399
1,250
1,686
1,366
961
1,389
Kent   	
1,000
885
1,300
1,100
967
Mission	
Oak Bay	
1,166
1,023
1,598
1,700
1,500
925
1,166
1,371
1,262
1,129
911
Richmond 	
1,250
1,200
1,602
1,760
1,100
1,099
1,075
910
1,250
1,200
1,475
1,373
1,156
908
1,250
Vancouver, West	
For   all   district   munici
2,709
1,607
2,138
1,888
1,312
1,677
1,508
palities 	
$3,100
$1,200
$1,623
$1,888
$1,100
$1,359
$3,000
$780
$1,095
Rural Districts.
$3,200
$1,200
$1,527
$2,100
$1,100
$1,380
$2,350
$780
$915
Community Districts.
|
	
$1,135
$825
$965 H 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Salaries—Continued.
Superior Schools.
Highest
Lowest
Average
Salary.
Salary.
Salary.
$1,300
$820
$935
1,260
950
1,053
1,650
1,200
1,350
1,500
850
1,014
1,500
950
1,133
1,750
1,200
1,400
1,200
950
1,075
1,200
780
943
1,300
1,000
1,100
1,100
950
1,025
1,500
900
1,150
1,175
875
1,025
1,100
780
906
1,260
900
996
1,100
780
940
1,200
800
1,000
1,600
950
1,125
1,450
1,100
1,275
1,250
800
1,025
1,200
930
1,022
1,100
900
1,000
1,102
841
928
1,100
780
893
1,100
850
975
1,300
800
1,000
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Abbotsford: Matsqui-
Sumas-Abbotsford Educational Administration
Area  	
Alert Bay 	
Ashcroft 	
Brechin  	
Burns Lake  _
Campbell River  	
Canal Flat	
Cedar, North  	
Chase 	
Coalmont  	
Copper Mountain	
Falkland 	
Fort St. John	
Fruitvale 	
Gabriola United	
Hazelton	
Hope 	
James Island 	
Kaleden 	
Kennedy (Delta) 	
Lantzville 	
Malcolm Island	
Mayo  _
Mountain 	
McBride	
Mt. Lehman:   Matsqui-
Sumas-Abbotsford Educational Administration
Area 	
Mackenzie United 	
Oyster, North	
Peace:
Pouce Coupe — _
Swan Lake 	
Pender Harbour.... 	
Pender Island	
Pioneer Mine	
Port Alice .	
Procter 	
Salmo 	
Sechelt United	
Silverton 	
Sooke  	
Stewart  	
Stillwater United...	
Wellington  	
Wellington, South 	
Williams Lake 	
Yahk United	
Ymir. 	
For all superior schools
$1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,100
1,250
1,500
1,260
1,300
1,100
1,100
1,200
1,700
1,200
1,360
1,100
1,550
1,200
1,150
$1,750
$950
1,050
780
830
780
850
850
950
850
880
900
780
1,000
900
1,100
900
960
850
950
930
850
$780
$1,000
1,075
940
953
940
975
975
1,050
1,100
1,070
1,066
946
1,050
1,000
1,300
1,050
1,160
933
1,150
1,076
950
$1,041
The average yearly salary paid to teachers employed in all public schools (high, superior,
junior high, and elementary) of the Province for the school-year 1938-39 was $1,439; to
teachers employed in all high schools, $2,066; to teachers employed in all superior schools,
$1,041; to teachers employed in all junior high schools, $1,695; to teachers employed in all
elementary schools, $1,230;  and to teachers employed in all community schools, $965. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 27
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
The following table shows the number of teachers in the Province receiving the annual
salary indicated:—
Salary.
No. of
Teachers
Salary.
No. of
Teachers
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Salary.
No. of
Teachers.
Below
$780.
781-
801-
821-
841-
861-
881-
901-
921-
941-
961-
981-
1,001-
1,021-
1,041-
1,061-
1,081-
1,101-
1,121-
1,141-
1,161-
1,181-
1.201-
1,221-
1,241-
1,261-
1,281-
1,301-
1,321-
1,341-
1,361-
1,381-
1,401-
1,421-
1,441-
1,461-
1,481-
1,501-
1,521-
1,541-
1,561-
1,581-
$780..
■ 800...
• 820-
• 840-
• 860...
• 880-
900..
920..
• 940-
960..
■ 980-
1,000-
■1,020-
1,040.-
•1,060..
■1,080-.
■1,100-
■1,120-
•1,140.
•1,160-
•1,180..
■1,200..
■1,220.-
■1,240-
1,260..
■1,280-.
•1^300-.
•1,320 .
1,340..
1,360..
1,380..
1,400.-
1,420 .
■1,440-
1,460...
1,480-
1,500.
1,520..
1,540-
1,560 .
1,580.
■1,600..
302
133
40
99
111
44
152
27
60
119
38
124
24
28
78
33
115
31
33
61
27
152
47
30
92
18
102
16
21
73
19
88
22
43
39
38
78
12
25
37
48
35
$1,601-
1,621-
1,641-
1,661-
1,681-
1,701-
1,721-
1,741-
1,761-
1,781-
1,801-
1,821-
1,841-
1,861-
1,881-
1,901-
1,921-
1,941-
1,961-
1,981-
2,001-
2,021-
2,041-
2,061-
2,081-
2,101-
2,121-
2,141-
2,161-
2,181-
2,201-
2,221-
2,241-
2,261-
2,281-
2,301-
2,321-
2,341-
2,361-
2,381-
2.401-
2,421-
■1,620-
■1,640-
1,660-
■1,680-
•1,700-
■1,720-
■1,740-
■1,760..
■1,780..
■1,800..
•1,820..
■1,840-
■1,860-
■1,880-
■1,900..
■1,920-
-1,940-
■1,960..
■1,980..
-2,000-
■2,020-
■2,040-
■2,060-
■2,080-
-2,100..
■2,120..
■2,140-
■2,160-
•2,180..
■2,200-
2,220..
•2,240-
2,260..
2,280-
2,300..
■2,320-
2,340..
2,360-
■2,380-
■2,400..
2,420 .
2,440..
24
20
47
383
26
9
14
45
2
29
56
9
14
4
6
38
10
24
9
34
5
2
16
3
23
10
9
12
32
4
6
4
13
39
7
3
6
15
19
1
$2441-
2,461-
2,481-
2,501-
2,521-
2,541-
2,561-
2,581-
2,601-
2,621-
2,641-
2,661-
2,681-
2,701-
2,721-
2,741-
2,761-
2,781-
2,801-
2,821-
2,841-
2,861-
2,881-
2,901-
2,921-
2,941-
2,961-
2,981-
3,001-
3,021-
3,041-
3,061-
3,081-
3,101-
3,121-
3,141-
3,161-
3,181-
3,201-
3,221-
3,241-
3,261-
-2,460—
•2,480	
•2,500	
-2,520	
■2,540.	
■2,560	
•2,580	
■2,600	
■2,620	
■2,640	
•2,660	
•2,680.	
■2,700	
-2,720	
■2,740'	
■2,760.	
•2,780'	
■2,800	
■2,820	
■2,840    --
■2,860	
■2,880	
■2,900	
■2,920	
■2,940	
•2,960	
■2,980	
■3,000'	
•3,020	
■3,040	
■3,060	
■3,080	
■3,100	
•3,120	
■3,140	
•3,160	
•3,180	
■3,200	
■3,220-	
•3,240	
3,260	
3,280	
14
4
28
3
2
5
2
11
4
36
5
2
9
7
11
1
4
11
3
13
6
85
2
1
2
16
$3,281
3,301
3,321
3,341
3,361
3,381-
3,401
3,421
3,441
3,461-
3,481
3,501-
3,521
3,541
3,561
3,581
3,601-
3,621-
3,641
3,661
3,681
3,701
3,721
3,741
3,761
3,781
3,801
3,821-
3,841-
3,861
3,881
3,901
3,921-
3,941-
3,961-
3,981-
4,001-
4,021
4,041-
4,061-
3,300-
320.
340..
360..
380-
400-
420-
440.
460...
480...
500-
520..
540..
560...
580...
600-
620-
640...
660...
680-
700...
720'..
740-.
760...
780-
800-
820-
840...
860-
900
920
940
960
980
000
020
,040
060
080
•Total-
2
10
4,128
* Exchange and part-time teachers not included. H 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1938-39.
Minister's Office:
Salaries       $3,285.00
Office supplies          215.16
Travelling expenses        1,844.75
  $5,344.91
General Office:
Salaries    $24,189.39
Office supplies   1,878.15
Travelling expenses   537.07
  26,604.61
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc. r  54,604.40
Correspondence Schools—High:
Salaries   $33,090.97
Office supplies  .  12,556.02
Revision of courses  2,526.40
Travelling expenses   136.90
Science equipment   1,311.05
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services  180.00
Incidentals   455.90
$50,257.64
Less fees        8,636.52
Correspondence Schools—Elementary:
Salaries    $11,294.61
Office supplies  1      2,139.18
Industrial Education:
Salaries    $13,046.68
Office supplies        1,968.20
Travelling expenses        4,286.05
Grants in aid     12,981.63
Night-schools       15,782.76
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries    $83,263.06
Office supplies   9,961.68
Travelling expenses   24,838.99
$118,063.73
Less amount paid by School Boards       8,990.03
Normal School, Vancouver:
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)  $36,226.68
Office supplies   1,144.40
Travelling expenses   815.20
Fuel, light, and water  2,344.93
Books, binding, periodicals  2,659.09
Allowance to Demonstration School  1,700.00
Desks and furniture  397.41
Maintenance and repairs  (by Public Works)  1,353.11
Incidentals   1,729.44
$48,370.26
Less Normal School fees     14,665.00
41,621.12
13,433.79
48,065.32
109,073.70
33,705.26 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 29
Normal School, Victoria:
Salaries  (part by Public Works)  $34,259.68
Office supplies   1,806.59
Travelling expenses   649.17
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)  2,314.09
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  2,127.26
Furniture (by Public Works)   1,155.95
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  359.10
Incidentals   264.45
$42,936.29
Less Normal School fees       8,515.00
$34,421.29
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (Jess deduction for rent, etc., $3,844)   $34,130.37
Office supplies   447.28
Laundry and janitor supplies  1,114.64
Travelling expenses   286.73
Fuel, light, and water  2,578.33
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   1,316.05
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment  1,721.36
Provisions   4,593.79
Special apparatus r   182.33
Incidentals   540.26
3,911.14
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta   637.50
  46,273.64
High. Superior.        Junior High. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities $316,285.04           $173,154.83       $556,513.46     1,045,953.33
Salary grants to district municipalities      101,328.30    $10,101.20        39,956.68 360,635.60        512,021.78
Salary grants to rural school
districts       80,625.86      76,347.37        26,693.20 594,505.43        778,171.86
Salary grants to community
school districts                   12,382.12 12,382.12
$498,239.20    $86,448.57    $239,804.71    $1,524,036.61
School buildings, erection and maintenance, and special aid to school districts _ 231,659.64
Educational administrative areas  8,832.59
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses  14,865.50
School tests, High School and Senior Matriculation examinations  $34,056.91
Less fees for examinations and certificates     31,479.65
  2,577.26
Conveying children to central schools :         102,049.66
School libraries         .   10,125.18
Summer schools and teacher-training for special certificates  $25,375.88
Less summer-school fees     20,837.85
  4,538.03
Official Trustee, Community School Districts:
Salary      $2,400.00
Expenses   745.23
$3,145.23
Less paid by districts       1,572.62
1,572.61 H 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Board of Reference
Less fees 	
$389.32
90.00
Adult education:
Extension and adult education and education of the unemployed $27,079.69
Recreational and physical education for youths over school age..   41,061.82
School radio broadcasts	
Curriculum revision and educational research
Incidentals and contingencies	
University of British Columbia	
Special grant to Victoria College	
$299.32
68,141.51
877.41
5,222.24
4,642.67
408,590.03
5,000.00
Total cost to Government   $3,630,670.78
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High. Superior.        Junior High.
Cities    $1,620,669.89         $699,645.08
District municipalities .       291,209.19     $12,734.82     118,481.70
Rural school districts       175,112.82     112,232.51       75,474.36
Community school districts 320.00      1      	
Elementary.
$2,601,294.12
638,379.94
651,640.43
12,874.83
4,921,609.09
1,060,805.65
1,014,460.12
13,194.83
2,087,311.90   $124,967.33   $893,601.14   $3,904,189.32
Grand total cost of education
$10,640,740.47
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATIONS, 1939.
The following are the results of the examinations held in the various high schools
throughout the Province:—
June, 1939.
Total
No. of
Candidates
Writing.
Writing the Full Examination.
Writing Partial
Examination.
No. of
Candidates.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
No. of
Candidates.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade XII.   .               _   .           	
5,107
1,184
694
472
409
274
281
198
4,413
692
3,002
KSS
Totals.	
6.291          I        1.166
683
479          1         5.105
3,537
August, 1939.
No. of
Candidates
Writing.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade XII 	
1,129
459
698
282
156
68
Totals.    	
1,588
980
224
Junior Matriculation.
Of the 454 Grade XII. candidates who secured " complete" standing in the August
Examinations, 1939, 184 had written a full examination for the first time in June, 1939, and
obtained partial standing. Thus, of the 694 candidates who wrote the full examination for
the first time in June, 1939, 409 + 184, or 593, completed their standing in one year (1939).
This is 85.4 per cent. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 31
Senior Matriculation.
Of the 123 Senior Matriculation candidates who secured " complete " standing in August,
1939, 89 had written the full examination in June, 1939, and secured partial standing. Thus,
of the 472 full Senior Matriculation candidates writing the examination for the first time in
June, 1939, 274+89, or 363, completed their standing in one year (1939). This is 76.9 per
cent.
Scholarships.
Grade XII.
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded in June, 1939, by the University of British
Columbia to the students who ranked first and second in their respective districts were won
by the following:-—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
Province .
No. 1	
, 2..
,   3.
, 4-
, 5.
, 6.
,   7-
*Carl Eric Pearson  	
♦Beverly Marie Witter  	
(1) Charles Walter Cooper _	
t (2) Mar jorie Ann Aldritt	
t        Arthur Stanley Rashleigh	
(1) Geoffrey Caine  	
(2) Hiroji Richard Yamanaka	
(1) Edgar James Lovick .	
(2) Daima Edwards 	
(1) Hugh Upham Hall. 	
(2) Neil Leslie Wilson	
(1) Norma Anna Erickson	
(2) Minoru Saito — 	
(1) Blanche Mildred Paul 	
(2) Catherine Mary Jocelyn Ormsby
(1) John L. Tiedje 	
(2) Isaac Haile  _ 	
John Oliver, Vancouver  — 	
John Oliver, Vancouver  -
Victoria   	
Oak Bay    - 	
Mount Newton, Saanich 	
Baron Byng, Prince George	
Prince Rupert 	
St. Patrick's (Private), Vancouver....
Crofton House (Private), Vancouver
Prince of Wales, Vancouver	
Prince of Wales, Vancouver  -
Langley  	
MacLean, Maple Ridge 	
Princeton    	
Vernon -   	
Trail  	
Fernie — -   	
95.0
95.0
93.3
92.2
92.2
93.5
90.0
92.9
92.2
94.2
94.0
89.0
88.7
92.2
87.2
90.5
$175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
175
* These two students tied for leading place in the Examination,
t These two students tied for second place in District 1.
Senior Matriculation.
The winners of the scholarships awarded in June, 1939, by the University of British
Columbia on the results of the Senior Matriculation examination to (1) the two students
obtaining the highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining the highest standing
in districts other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster, were:—
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Scholarship.
Duke of Connaught, New Westminster .	
89.2
88.4
86.6
$175
175
175
The three additional scholarships established by the University of British Columbia for the
students obtaining the highest standings in Districts Nos. 2, 5, 6, and 7, were awarded to the
following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Scholarship.
No 2
85.6
85.2
86.2
$175
175
„   5
Alfred Louis Bonutto   	
Trail                -	
175
The conditions under which these scholarships are awarded are fully outlined in the
Calendar of the University of British Columbia. H 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
PROGRESS CARDS.
During the school-year 1938-39 fundamental revision was made in the forms used by
teachers and issued to parents for the purpose of informing them of each pupil's progress in
school. New forms were devised to be used in Grades I, II., III., and in Grades IV., V., and
VI.    New forms for the higher grades are being prepared.
These new progress cards are accompanied by a letter to the parent which explains the
purpose of the report given and requests sympathetic co-operation. The letter issued with
the report card for Grades IV., V., and VI reads, in part, thus:—
" Progress in the fundamental school subjects is of great importance, but each child has
his own rate of growth. His progress, therefore, should be considered in relation to his own
ability. This report, accordingly, avoids the making of comparisons between one pupil and
another. It stresses rather the development of the child's own personality and his progress
in school subjects and skills. Stress is laid upon growth in such matters as health habits, the
ability to work and play with others, the ability to think for oneself and to stay with a task,
and the ability to distinguish between right and wrong.    .    .    .
" . . . If the report is a good one, please give your child a word of praise; if the
report is not good, please confer with the teacher or principal and help to find the remedy for
whatever is unsatisfactory in work or conduct."
REVISION OF CURRICULA.
The revised Programme of Studies for Elementary Schools (Grades I. to VI.) and for
Junior High Schools (Grades VII. to IX.) went into effect in September, 1936. In Senior
High Schools the revised Programme for Grade X. came into use in September, 1937; for
Grade XI. in September, 1938;   and for Grade XII. in September, 1939.
For use, beginning in September, 1939, there has been provided also a course in Drama
and Oral Expression to be taken in Grades XI. and XII. In addition, in September, 1939,
revised courses in Agriculture—designated Agriculture I. and II.—for Grades X. and XL, or
XI. and XII were issued, and new courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics were added to
the Programme for Grade XII. These new courses, to be known as Biology I., Chemistry I.,
and Physics I., may be taken in Grade XII., or in the Senior Matriculation year. A prerequisite to these three courses is the completion of General Science V.
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS.
The British Columbia radio school extended its services in several directions during the
year. Programmes were presented in new fields of school activity, additional radio stations
accepted them for release, and something over 450 schools received them.
Broadcasts were arranged in three groups, one during the autumn, one during the
winter, and a third after the Easter vacation. The first and second series followed the same
general pattern: Monday, Social Studies (Grades IV., V., and VI); Tuesday, Junior Music,
"Mother Goose" (Grades I. and II.) and "Alice in Melody Land" (Grades III. and IV.);
Wednesday, Elementary Science (Grades VII., VIII., and IX.) ; Thursday, Senior Music,
"Musical Pathways" (Grades V. to IX.); Friday, Literature and Poetry (High School
Grades).
The third series was experimental both in the subjects offered and the media of presentation employed. Programmes were given in Health Education, in Physical Education, in
Safety, in Guidance, and in Composition, none of which had previously been attempted.
Health Education proved particularly popular.
As a result of the year's experiences it has been decided to confine the radio school's efforts
during 1939-40 to Music (both Junior and Senior), Social Studies, Elementary Science,
Health Education, and English for Grades I. to IX. The latter decision was reached because
few high schools seemed to have either the time or the facilities to avail themselves of radio
broadcasts.
The five stations which comprise the CBC's British Columbia network—CBR (Vancouver,
1100 kc), CHWK (Chilliwack, 280 kc), CFJC (Kamloops, 880 kc), CKOV (Kelowna,
630 kc), and CJAT (Trail, 910 kc.)—all received and released programmes, thus giving
coverage to most schools in the southern part of the Province.
During the summer arrangements were completed to have a transcription made of each
programme.    This was loaned first to CFBR  (Prince Rupert, 580 kc.)  and, two weeks later, REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 33
to CFGP (Grand Prairie, Alberta, 1,200 kc). Reception from these stations is possible along
most of the northern coast and on adjacent islands and throughout all the Peace River area.
Bulletins were mailed to all schools where receiving sets had been installed. These supplied full details of all broadcasts and suggested preliminary and " follow-up " activities.
Two questionnaires were also sent out. While the number of these returned was not complete
it was revealed that at least twelve thousand pupils " listened in " and that the service was
proving of real value.
Mr. Ira Dilworth, now CBC Regional Supervisor, prepared and presented the High School
Literature Series. Miss Mildred McManus and Mr. Burton Kurth accepted full responsibility
for Music, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Lee for Health Education and Safety, Mr. J. W. B. Shore for
Elementary Science, and Mr. Arthur Anstey for Social Studies. At least a score of other
teachers assisted from time to time.
The staff of the local station, CBR, was unfailing in courteous assistance.
The Carnegie Corporation of New York made a generous contribution of $3,000.
To all of these the Department of Education extends its grateful appreciation.
CRITERIA FOR THE ACCREDITING OF HIGH SCHOOLS.
For the school-year 1938-39 the following regulations were issued:—
I. General Policy which should be followed in Accrediting a High School for the Year
1938-39.— (1.) The school shall be so organized and the work in it so planned and conducted
as to achieve the aims of education set forth in the various manuals issued by the Department
of Education for the guidance of teachers; teaching procedures and the organization and
content of the various subjects of instruction shall be in harmony with the Programme of
Studies; and the authorized time allotments shall be observed. The testing and promotion of
pupils shall be in accordance with the principles laid down in Bulletin I. of the Senior High
School Programme of Studies (1937). In the school-year 1938-39 the course in Guidance
outlined in Bulletin I. of the Senior High School Programme of Studies (1937) shall be taught
regularly in Grades IX. and X.
(2.) The social organization of the school shall be such as to promote desirable social
attitudes and the ability to lead and to co-operate in the duties and responsibilities of
democratic citizenship.
(3.) The school must, in general, make due provision for the varying individual needs
and abilities of its students, and shall provide courses not only in the traditional academic
subjects, but also in the Fine and Practical Arts and in the Commercial subjects; in the case
of smaller schools, however, these courses may be provided through the High School Correspondence Department.
II. School Buildings and Grounds.—The grounds, lighting, ventilation, and sanitary conditions of the school shall be such as to afford a healthful environment for the pupils.
III. Health and Physical Education.—The school shall have a room or gymnasium suitable for Physical Education and shall have adequate equipment for gymnastic work and
games; it shall give a regular course in Health and Physical Education to all pupils enrolled
in Grades IX. to XII., except in the case of pupils who have been exempted from the work in
Physical Education upon the advice of a medical practitioner.
IV. Library.—There shall be a library of reference and other books adequate to the needs
of the school. (See Bulletin I., Senior High School Programme of Studies.) These books
shall be properly classified and the library shall be conducted upon approved library principles. The students shall be trained in fundamental library skills. There must be evidence
that the teaching procedures in the various school subjects are such that the class-room and
the library are brought into functional relation.
V. Science Laboratories, Home Economics Laboratories, S/iops.—Laboratories and shops
shall be equipped for efficient teacher-demonstration and required pupil-experimentation and
activities.
VI. Qualifications of Teachers and the Staffing of Schools.— (1.) In general there shall
be at least four regularly qualified teachers in a high school enrolling pupils from Grades IX.
to XII., and three in schools enrolling pupils from Grades X. to XII. There must be at least
one more than these numbers if the school has a Grade XIII. or Senior Matriculation class.
Notwithstanding these conditions, a high school having only three teachers may also be fully
accredited, provided that, by reason of the outstanding merit of the staff, it is adjudged H 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
worthy of this distinction, and provided further in respect of other criteria set out above, it
satisfy the Accrediting Board.
(2.) In the final courses in English, Social Studies, Science, Mathematics, and the
Foreign Languages, a teacher of these subjects shall have two years of teaching experience
in a secondary school, and in each such subject in which he teaches the final course he shall
have the standard of qualification which is represented by a minor in the University of British
Columbia, except in the case of teachers who have had five years' satisfactory experience in
a secondary school or are reported by the Department of Education as being satisfactory
teachers of the subject or subjects.
(3.) There shall be evidence of growth in scholarship and professional knowledge and
skill on the part of the principal and staff.
VII. Teaching Load.—The teaching load shall be in accordance with the prescriptions of
the Department of Education, and shall not exceed 35 periods a week.
VIII. Records.— (1.) The school shall have available for inspection complete permanent
records of the progress of all pupils enrolled in the school. These records shall include the
pupils' progress cards and their medical cards. They should show the pupils' standing as
measured by classification tests given twice a year and their scores upon Standardized
Achievement Tests and Intelligence Tests. Copies of pupils' test papers and samples of their
work collected from time to time should be kept on file for inspection. A separate folder for
each pupil is desirable for this latter purpose.
(2.) (a.) Qualitative Interpretation of Grades: "A" means Excellent or Outstanding;
" B " means Very Good; " C+ " means High Average; " C " means Average; " C— " means
Low Average;  " D " means Weak or Poor;  " E " means Failure;  " I " means Incomplete.
(6.) Quantitative Interpretation of Grades: In a large school "A" may be obtained by
from 5 to 10 per cent, of the pupils. " B " by approximately the next 20 per cent.; " C+ "
by the next 15 per cent.; " C " by the next 20 per cent.; " C— " by the next 15 per cent.;
" D " by the next 20 per cent.; " E " by the lowest 5 per cent.; but these percentages may
vary with the numbers of students and with the degree of selectivity in the group. When the
rigid application of the percentages given above conflicts with the realities of the situation,
the percentages should be varied in accordance with the qualitative interpretation of grades
defined in (a) above.
Note.—An interpretation of the approximate relation between letter and numerical
grades may be expressed as follows:—■
A     = 90-100 C+ = 65- 74 C— = 45- 54
B     = 75- 89 C     = 55- 64 D     = 35- 44
IX. (1.) High School Graduation.—High School Graduation shall be granted to a student
of an accredited or a non-accredited high school on completion in 1939 (with a grade not lower
than " D " in any course) of 120 units of credit earned in Grades IX., X., XL, and XII.
(English, Social Studies, Health, and Physical Education being the required subjects as provided in Bulletin I. of the Senior High School Programme of Studies for 1937). While the
general principle should be followed that only work taken above Grade VIII. is recognized,
standing obtained in a junior high school in French and Latin shall be given the same credit
which it would receive if the work had been taken above Grade VIII.
(2.)   University Entrance.—In June,  1939, the subjects for the University Entrance
Examination will be as follows:—
(1.)  English VI.
(2.)  Social Studies (History V. or VI.).
(3.)  Mathematics IV.
(4.)  Chemistry II. or Physics II. (or, under certain conditions, Biology II. or General
Science V.).
(5.)  Latin III. or IV. or French (III. or IV.).
(6.)  One of the following:   Greek I., German I., Agriculture IL, Geography IL,
*Home Economics (A or B or CC), *Technical (A or B), Music IV.  (Pianoforte or Violin), or a subject from 4 or 5 not already taken.
Note.—Three languages without a science may be taken.
The principal of a high school accredited for the year 1938-39 may recommend his
students for University Entrance standing in the University Entrance subjects listed above
on the following conditions: — REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 35
A grade of not lower than C+ in general shall be required. Grades of C and C—, however, will be accepted if compensated for by grades higher than C+ in other University
Entrance subjects. A student who has not met these requirements will be granted University
Entrance standing in each such subject in which he has obtained a standing not lower
than C + .
Compensation shall be determined as follows:—
(a.)  The  grades   in   the   University   Entrance   subjects   mentioned   above  will  be
assigned the following numerical values: A = +2; B = +1; C+=0; C = — 1;
C- = -2.
(6.)  The sum of the numerical values of the grades obtained in the subjects referred
to in (a) must not be negative.
* Note.—Recommendations for University Entrance standing in Home Economics and
Technical subjects shall also be approved by the Director of Home Economics or by the
Director of Technical Education, as the case may be.
X. Accrediting shall be for a period of one year. A school which considers that it can
meet the requirements for accrediting shall apply for accrediting in time to have its claim
investigated.
In June, 1939, forty-two of the high schools of the Province were accredited under these
regulations.
CHANGES IN THE STAFF.
On August 31st, 1939, Mr. A. E. Miller, after more than thirty years' service as
Inspector of Schools, retired on superannuation. Prior to his appointment in January, 1909,
Mr. Miller was Principal of the Revelstoke Elementary School. With the exception of one
year, when he was located at Vancouver, Mr. Miller maintained his headquarters as Inspector
of Schools also at Revelstoke. Over that long period, by his kindly counsel he has given
invaluable assistance and encouragement to the many teachers whose class-rooms he has
visited, and by his outstanding administrative ability he has gained and held the highest
esteem of the Department of Education.
The same date brought retirement to another highly esteemed official of the Department—
Mr. Arthur Anstey, B.A., Vice-Principal of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver. For
over a quarter of a century Mr. Anstey, who was appointed to the office of Inspector of
Schools in July, 1913, has given untiring and most highly efficient service. In January, 1923,
he was promoted from the Inspectorial staff to the staff of the Provincial Normal School at
Vancouver and became Vice-Principal.
On December 1st, 1938, C. B. Conway, M.S., D.Paed., Instructor in Statistics, Ontario
College of Education, University of Toronto, was appointed Inspector of Schools. Dr. Conway
was given headquarters in Victoria and assigned to the Bureau of Educational Research,
Department of Education.
In August, 1939, Dr. H. M. Morrison, Inspector of Schools, Prince Rupert, was appointed
to the staff of the Provincial Normal School at Vancouver.
To fill the vacancies caused by the retirement of Mr. A. E. Miller and the transfer of Dr.
Morrison, and to provide for an additional Inspector of Schools, three appointments were made.
On August 16th, 1939, Alexander Turnbull, B.A., Principal of the John Robson Junior High
School, New Westminster; J. F. K. English, M.A., Principal of Kamloops Junior-Senior High
School; and J. N. Burnett, B.A., Principal of the Charles Dickens Elementary School, Vancouver, were appointed Inspectors of Schools. Mr. Turnbull was stationed at Prince Rupert
and Mr. English was placed in charge of the Peace River Educational Administrative Area,
with headquarters at Pouce Coupe. Mr. Burnett, as an officer in the Irish Fusiliers, was
called into service and Mr. H. D. Stafford, B.A., Principal of Kimberley Elementary School,
was appointed temporarily as Inspector of Schools at Prince George.
On September 19th, 1939, H. B. King, M.A., Ph.D., who has been acting in the capacity
of Technical Adviser, was appointed Chief Inspector of Schools.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. WILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. H 36
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The attendance at the thirty-eighth annual session of the Vancouver Normal School was
as follows:—
Full-course students   106
Three-month students     17
Partial students      2
Total
125
Thirty-four of this total enrolment of 125 were men and ninety-one were women.
Of the 106 full-course students one withdrew during the year, thirteen failed to qualify,
and ninety-two were granted diplomas.
Regularly qualified teachers from other Canadian Provinces who desire to secure British
Columbia certificates are required to attend for three months, commencing at the opening of
the autumn term.    Sixteen of these were from Saskatchewan and one from Ontario.
Partial students are Normal School graduates, with or without teaching experience, who
desire to specialize, usually in Music or in Primary Education.
It is with more than ordinary regret that the retirement of another member of the staff
is recorded. Mr. Arthur Anstey, Vice-Principal and Instructor in Social Studies, was
appointed to the Normal School in January, 1923, after many years of experience as a teacher
and principal in Vancouver and as an Inspector of Schools in the Okanagan and in the Fraser
Valley. Quiet, dignified, an outstanding teacher, a scholar, and a gentleman, Mr. Anstey's
services have been invaluable. He will be greatly missed. Mr. T. R. Hall succeeds him as
Vice-Principal, and Dr. H. M. Morrison, recently Inspector of Schools at Prince Rupert, as
Instructor in Social Studies.
An important change has been made during the year whereby the Normal School was
brought within the scope of the Metropolitan Health Committee of Vancouver. Dr. K. F.
Brandon was appointed Director and Miss M. Henderson, Nurse in Charge. The services
given include: (1) Physical examination of all students, (2) consultation services, (3) first-
aid and emergency, (4) immunization, (5) sanitary inspection, (6) assistance by lectures and
consultation in the general Health programme.
The Director states in his report:—
" The general health of the students might be termed as good with few serious disabling
conditions noted. Where defects existed which called for remedial measures the students
were so advised; in the majority of instances steps were taken to have conditions corrected
immediately.
" The following table summarizes immunization findings:—
NO.   PREVIOUSLY
PROTECTED BY :
No.
potentially
Susceptible.
No.
tested for
Immunity.
No. not
Immune.
No.
immunized.
No. now
Immune.
Per Cent,
of
Disease.
Immunization.
Students
now
Immune.
Smallpox  	
2
64
15
3
35
86
98
45
44
41
27
7
34
22
73
49
25
72
48
25
" Fifty-two per cent, of this year's class are going forth as teachers unprotected against
diphtheria and potentially susceptible; 75 per cent, are still potentially susceptible to scarlet
fever and 28 per cent, to smallpox. It is to be hoped that in subsequent years increasing
numbers of protected individuals will be found."
The Metropolitan Health Committee has recently organized a Division of Mental Hygiene,
under the direction of Dr. G. H. Gundry. The Normal School anticipates valuable assistance
from this Division since both lectures and opportunities for consultation will be available. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS. H 37
The principal and staff of the Model School continue to provide facilities for demonstration and participation with increasing success. The ungraded class-room, under the direction
of Miss Manning, has become an indispensable part of our organization but, unfortunately, one
which is asked to carry far too heavy a load. Officials, principals, and staffs of Vancouver,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, and West Vancouver are generous and gracious in their
assistance.    To all of these we express our grateful thanks.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF V. L. DENTON, B.A., D.C.L., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1938-39 opened on September 12th, 1938, and closed on June 15th, 1939.
During the year, seventy-five students were in attendance. Of these, five were repeating the
course and twelve took refresher courses in order to qualify for a British Columbia certificate.
Diplomas were awarded to sixty-seven students, of whom four received honour standing.
The following table presents a summary of enrolment:—
Women.
Men.
Total.
43
5
1
24
1
1
67
Failed       	
6
Withdrew     -     	
2
Total—       	
49
26
75
The staff of the school feel that during the past year very considerable progress has been
achieved in adapting the training of normal students to meet demands of the new Course of
Study.    Several of these adjustments should be mentioned.
The initial work in the Primary Grades has been very ably conducted by Miss Marian
James, of the Model School. Lectures and class discussion periods were held on alternate
days during the first five weeks of the term. Subject material and methods pertaining to
Grades I. and II. were discussed and illustrated. Demonstration lessons were introduced from
time to time and by this means theory was at once illuminated and explained by practice.
Discussion periods followed each demonstration. Upon the conclusion of this period the
Normal students were assigned for one week to Grades I. and II. class-rooms in city and
suburban schools, where they endeavoured to put into practice the excellent methods which
they had been observing.
Victoria Normal School is fortunate in having a small Model School situate within the
building and under complete control of the Department of Education. A substitute on part-
time basis was provided for Miss James, who, in all other respects, carries the full load of
thirty-six pupils in three grades.
A course in Practical Arts was arranged, synchronizing as far as possible with the
work initiated by Miss James and covering the first three years of material outlined for
the Primary Grades.
The course in Elementary Science was covered in a similar manner. More time was
devoted to Elementary Science during this Normal School year than is customary, in the belief
that it was most essential in view of the lack of training received by the students in some
features of the work now prescribed by the new Course of Study.
Integration of subject-matter, demonstration teaching, and group discussion, followed by
two weeks of continuous teaching practice, were continued at intervals throughout the
remainder of the year. This permitted the students-in-training to progress gradually through
Grades IV., V., and VI., and then through VII. and VIII. The final weeks of teaching practice were conducted in outlying one- and two-roomed schools. May I, at this time, express
the thanks of the staff to the Inspectors of Schools on the Island who made arrangements for
this valuable experience. Staff and students alike received every help and courtesy from the
critic teachers of Victoria City and surrounding municipalities. The kindly support and
genial welcome given us by the critic teachers of this district is deeply appreciated. H 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Mention should also be made of the valuable assistance received from Miss Isabel Bescoby,
Principal of the Model School. Her classes were used for demonstration teaching, try-out
units in Elementary Science were carried through under her practical hand and, toward the
end of the term, lectures on Modern Trends in Education were given by Miss Bescoby to the
Normal Students.
This year three issues of the School magazine " Anecho " were arranged, mimeographed,
and bound by editorial boards elected by the student body. We find that a larger number of
our students each year have had training in this type of activity and that they enjoy the
outlet which a school magazine provides. We believe that it will not be long until every school
in the Province has some kind of news-sheet, prepared by the pupils and parents. Efforts
were made by the Editorial Student Board to get exchange courtesies with other Normal
Schools in Western Canada, and we hope to have representative issues on our library table.
The class in Life-saving was conducted again this year under the direction of Mr. D. E.
Smith, B.A., of Victoria High School. This class is a purely voluntary extra-curricular
activity and instructor's time and experience are given without remuneration. We desire to
thank the instructor who assisted so willingly in this fine and worth-while endeavour. It is
hoped to make arrangements for a course leading to a St. John Ambulance First-aid Certificate. We believe that every Normal Student should be given the opportunity to acquire one
of these parchments.   SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
H 39
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
No. 23.
No. 34.
No. 62-3.
No.     74.
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR.
A Provincial Summer School of Education for Teachers was held in Victoria and Vancouver from July 4th to August 5th, 1939.
A number of courses, not previously offered in Summer School, were included in the
programme, and others, offered previously, were discontinued for the time being at least.
The new courses were:—
No.      5. The Evolution of Modern Education.
No.     22. Child Guidance.
Materials and Methods in Safety Education.
Principles and Methods of Visual Instruction.
Club-work for Elementary Schools.
Dramatic Art in Schools.
Elementary Directing and Production.
95. Fine and Industrial Arts and Play Materials.
165. Applied Anatomy and Physiology of Exercise.
166. School Athletics.
190. Drawing and Painting.
192. Design and Colour.
COURSES AND ENROLMENT.
The Summer School of Education conducted courses in Victoria and Vancouver. The
departments of the School operating in Vancouver were: Art, Commercial, and Industrial
Arts Teacher-training. The courses, Educational Psychology and Principles and Technique
of Teaching, which are required for permanent certification, were offered in Vancouver and
in Victoria.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
75.
Courses.
Instructors.
Enrolment.
34
45
14
28
195
Totals for 1939	
79
75
42
44
Totals for 1938	
1,048
The courses offered were grouped into divisions or fields.
were as follows:—
The courses and enrolments
History and Philosophy of Education:
No. 1. Principles and Technique of Teaching (Section A)„_
No. 1. Principles and Technique of Teaching (Section B) —
No. 1. Principles and Technique of Teaching (Vancouver) .
No. 5. The Evolution of Modern Education	
Enrolments.
  115
     37
     26
     16
Psychology and Measurement:
No. 10. Educational Psychology 	
No. 10. Educational Psychology  (Vancouver)—.
No. 11. Measurement in Elementary Education
Individual Development and Guidance:
No. 20. Growth and Development of Children	
No. 21. Mental Hygiene and Behaviour	
No. 22. Child Guidance 	
No. 23. Materials and Methods in Safety Education..
237
30
15
60
62
84
16 H 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Organization and Administration: Enrolments.
No. 30. Modern Trends in Class-room Practices  41
No. 31. Rural School Problems  48
No. 33. Introduction to Educational Supervision  26
No. 34. Principles and Methods of Visual Instruction  31
Practical Arts:
No. 60-1. Practical Arts   87
No. 62-3. Club-work for Elementary Schools  21
English :
No. 70. The Language Arts  37
No. 71. The Teaching of Reading and Literature  18
No. 72-3. Senior Matriculation English  29
No. 74. Dramatic Art in Schools  18
No. 75. Elementary Directing and Production  19
Primary Education:
No. 90. Principles of Primary Education  29
No. 91. Primary Observation and Laboratory  50
No. 92. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  75
No. 95. Fine and Industrial Arts and Play Materials  79
No. 96. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  58
Social Studies :
No. 113. Senior Matriculation History  34
No. 116. Early Civilizations   53
Commercial Education:
No. 120-2. Stenography Principles and Methods  10
No. 121. Stenography Practice        9
No. 123. Typewriting Theory and Methods  12
No. 124. Typewriting Practice   10
No. 125-7. Book-keeping Theory and Methods  14
No. 126. Book-keeping Practice   16
No. 128-9. Business Law, Correspondence, Filing  31
No. 130. Commercial Arithmetic   13
Music Education:
No. 140. School Music in the Primary Grades  66
No. 141b. School Music in the Junior High School Grades  16
No. 150. Practice-teaching under Supervision  18
No. 144. Introduction to Music Literature and History  38
No. 146. Advanced Choral Music and Conducting  31
No. 148. Choral and Instrumental Ensemble  16
School Physical Education:
No. 163. Child and School Hygiene  24
No. 175. Advanced Folk and Character Dancing  35
No. 173. Primary Games, Rhythmics, and Folk-dancing  81
No. 165. Applied Anatomy and Physiology of Exercise  23
No. 166. School Athletics   35
No. 176. Physical Education Activities  79
Recreational and Physical Education Branch:
No. 301. Adult Physical Education Activities  20
No. 302. Recreational and Physical Displays ;  24
Art Education:
No. 181. Drawing and Painting  15
No. 182. Design and Colour  14
No. 190. Drawing and Painting  12
No. 192. Design and Colour  17   SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. H 41
Heme Economics : Enrolments.
No. 200. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  25
No. 201. Problems in Dress Design  35
No. 20lB. Appreciation in Dress  33
Library Science:
No. 210. School Library Organization and Administration  37
No. 211. Functions of School Library  24
Industrial Arts:
No. 220. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in Junior High School.. 74
No. 223. Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  21
No. 224. Freehand Sketching Applied to the Industrial Arts  30
No. 225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  3
No. 227. Elementary Woodwork  13
No. 231. Elementary Electrical Theory  37
No. 232. Elementary Electrical Shop-work  36
No. 235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  12
No. 236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  28
No. 237. Application of Basic Operations in Pupils' Projects  1
No. 241. Practical Geometry        1
No. 242. Freehand Sketching   4
No. 243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork       1
No. 245. Advanced Woodwork  (Bench-work)  5
No. 246. Advanced Wood-turning   3
No. 247. Practice in the use of Woodworking Machinery       1
No. 248a. Farm Mechanics       1
No. 248b. Farm Mechanics   14
No. 249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work       6
No. 250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  5
Total of Student Courses in 1939  2,580
Total of Student Courses in 1938  3,438
Total of Student Courses in 1937  2,718
REGISTRATION.
An analysis of the registration reveals the following information concerning those in
attendance:—
Teaching Experience:
Less than 1 year  46
From 1 to 3 years  415
From 4 to 6 years  95
From 7 to 9 years  82
From 10 to 12 years  101
More than 12 years  167
Not reported  83
Total  989
Class of Certificate:                                                  Interim        Permanent. Total.
Academic       14                 38 52
First-class   269               256 525
Second-class       73               171 244
Third-class                     4 4
Special      13                 17 30
Not reported                    134
Total  989 H 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
University Degrees:
Bachelor of Arts  71
Bachelor of Science  34
Master of Arts  3
Bachelor of Commerce  2
Total  110
Class of School:
Teaching in Rural Schools  384
Teaching in District Municipality Schools  181
Teaching in City or Town Schools  310
Not reported  '.  114
Total  989
Attendance at Summer School.—The following numbers of teachers reported that they
had attended Summer School last in the years indicated:—
Previous to 1930 :     71
In the period 1930 to 1932, inclusive     92
In the period 1933 to 1935, inclusive  137
In the period 1936 to 1938, inclusive  549
Specialist Certification.—The following numbers of teachers indicate that they are
seeking Specialist Certification in the following:—■
Primary   94
Art   36
Commerce   29
Music   53
Library   35
Home Economics   36
Industrial Arts   86
School Physical Education  82
Recreational Physical Education     8
FACULTY.
A very able group of lecturers was engaged for the session. All but four of these were
members of the teaching profession in British Columbia.
The visiting lecturers were: J. G. Althouse, M.A., D.Paed., Dean of the Ontario College
of Education, University of Toronto; A. S. Raubenheimer, M.A., PhD., Dean of Letters,
Arts, and Sciences, University of Southern California; George A. Davidson, M.D., M.R.C.P.,
F.R.C.P., Psychiatrist, Vancouver; R. K. Cutler, B.Ed., M.S., Professor of Physical Education, University of Oregon.
Members of the Faculty were as follows:—
Abercrombie, W. T., B.A Vice-Principal,  Grandview  High   School
of Commerce, Vancouver.
Alsbury, A. T., B.A Magee High School, Vancouver.
Althouse, J. G., M.A., D.Paed Dean, Ontario College of Education, University of Toronto.
Anderson, Dr. J. L. Murray School Health Supervisor, Victoria.
Barclay, Miss Jean Henry Hudson School, Vancouver.
Bollert, Miss Grace, B.A Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Campbell, H. L., B.A., M.Ed Director of Summer School.
Clark, Lewis J., B.A., M.Sc Victoria High School, Victoria.
Conway, C. B., B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed—Inspector of Schools, Department of Education.
Curtis, Mrs. A. M Secretary, Summer School of Education.
Cutler, R. K., B.Ed., M.S Assistant Professor of Physical Education, University of Oregon.   SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. H 43
Darling, Gordon, B.Sc Technical School, Vancouver.
Davidson, George A., M.D., M.R.C.P.,
F.R.C.P Psychiatrist, Vancouver.
Ewing, J. M., B.A., D.Paed Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Fairey, Col. F. T Director, Industrial Education, Department of Education, Victoria.
Fraser, J Technical School, Vancouver.
Gatewood, Miss Frances, Dip.
V.S.D.A.A Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Gibbard, John E., M.A. Magee High School, Vancouver.
Green, Mrs. Irene V., B.Sc John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Hall, T. Roy, B.A Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Henderson, Miss Florence M Dawson School, Vancouver.
Herbert, Miss E. J Director of Nursing, Victoria.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A Commercial Specialist, Victoria High
School.
Hinton, Miss Barbara Graduate,   Sargent   College   of   Physical
Education, Boston University, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Horsfield, Mrs. Joan Provincial Recreational Branch, Victoria.
James, Miss Marian 1 Primary   Specialist,  Model   School,  Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Jones, H. A Inspector of Technical  Classes,  Department of Education, Victoria.
Kurth, Burton L Chief   Supervisor   of   Music,   Vancouver
Schools, Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S Librarian, Technical School, Vancouver.
Lister, Fraser, M.A. Instructor, Dramatic Activities, Oak Bay
High School.
Melvin, Miss Grace W., D.A Head, Department of Design, Vancouver
School of Art, Vancouver.
Murphy, Mrs. Nita E., B.Sc Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
MeAlpine, Miss Ruth, B.Sc Junior High School, Nelson.
McArthur, Harold, B.A Inspector of Schools, Kamloops.
McManus, Miss Mildred, Mus.B.,
M.A Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
MacKenzie, H. H., B.A Inspector of Schools, Vancouver.
Parkes, Miss Jessie F. B. Supervisor of Needlework, Vancouver.
Pottinger, Miss Muriel Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Quayle, Thomas Philip Sheffield High School, Abbotsford.
Raubenheimer, A. S., M.A., PhD Dean of the College of Letters, Arts, and
Sciences; Director of the Educational
Programme, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles.
Ridley, J. E Templeton Junior High School, Vancouver.
Rogers, Miss Bertha M., B.Sc Oak Bay High School.
Scott, Charles H., Dip. G.S.A Director, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Smith, Harry L., M.A Principal, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Whitaker, Miss Geraldine, B.A. Lord Kitchener School, Vancouver.
White, J. S Junior Hig1.! School, Victoria.
Williams, W. J T. J. Trapp Technical High School, New
Westminster.
Wishart, Alfred Technical School, Vancouver. H 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
HEALTH SERVICE.
A feature new to the Summer School of Education was the establishment of a complete
Health Service for teachers in attendance.
Realizing that the health and efficiency of teachers is closely related and that many
teachers spend ten months of the year in districts which are remote from existing health
services, the Department of Education, in co-operation with the Provincial Health Department, provided the service under the direction of Dr. J. L. Murray Anderson, assisted by
Miss E. J. Herbert.
The following programme formed a part of the service:—■
(a.)  301 routine physical examinations.
(6.)   76 tuberculosis diagnostic tests.
(c.)  40 first-aid treatments.
(d.)   11 vaccinations.
(e.)  50 students took the course and secured the St. John Ambulance First-aid
Certificate.
(/.)   16 students consulted the physician on medical problems.
(g.)  An extensive display and distribution of health literature formed an important
part of the service.
(h.)  Conferences were held on special aspects of health education.
In general, this new feature of the Summer School of Education programme has proved
very successful and has apparently met a definite need of the student group.    Its expansion
might well be considered.
SPECIMEN SCHOOL LIBRARY.
Realizing the difficulty many teachers in rural schools have in deciding which books to
buy first for a small school library, a representative group of School Librarians kindly
provided a list of worth-while children's books which might constitute a $50, $100, and $150
school library.
These books were on display in the Summer School of Education and lists of the books
containing prices, publishers' names, and addresses were available for free distribution.
SATURDAY AND EVENING TEACHER-TRAINING CLASSES.
In October, 1937, the Department of Education authorized the organization and operation
of Saturday and evening credit courses for the in-service training of teaching.
All such courses were under the direction of the Summer School of Education but were
operated by the local School Administrator. He undertook to provide a suitable place for the
conduct of the course and an instructor acceptable to the Department of Education. All
courses offered for credit were parallel in content and quality of work done with those given
in the Summer School of Education.
The following courses were in operation during the winter of 1938-39:—
In Vancouver: Enrolment.
No.      1. Principles and Technique of Teaching  15
No.    10. Educational Psychology   47
No. 60-1. Practical Arts   46
No. 167. Elementary Physical Educational Laboratory  26
No. 170. Fundamental Rhythm   (women)  36
No. 181. Drawing and Painting     5
No. 190. Drawing and Painting     6
No. 191. Composition and Principles    3
No. 193. Commercial Art      4
In Victoria:
No. 11. Educational Measurement   17
No. 72. Senior Matriculation Literature  14
No. 73. Senior Matriculation Composition  12
No. 76. Remedial Reading   12
No. 94. Problems in Primary Methods  13 Class in Physical Training in Course No. 176, Physical Education Activities.
Grades I. and II. children in the Laboratory and Observation Class.  SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. H 45
In New Westminster:
No. 160. Introduction to Physical Education  31
No. 160h. Introduction to Physical Education  16
No. 161H. Materials and Methods in Health Education  18
No. 167. Elementary Physical Educational Laboratory  22
No. 168. Advanced Physical Educational Laboratory     9
No. 172H. Display Programmes   22
EXHIBITION OF PROJECTS.
During the final week of the session, a number of exhibitions of hand-work were held by
students from the courses in Practical Arts, Club-work and Industrial Arts and Play
Materials. These exhibitions were appreciated greatly by those who had been unable to enrol
for the particular courses in which the work was done.
TRANSPORTATION REFUNDS.
With a view to reducing the costs of attendance at Summer School to teachers in
districts remote from Victoria, the Department of Education extended this year the principle
of refunding a portion of the transportation costs. The following regulations governed these
refunds:—
" Students whose one-way steamship or railway fare (exclusive of berths and meals on
the train) (as the ' fare'and one-third ' is not applicable on coast-wise steamships whose fares
are inclusive of berth and meals, the one-way fare on such steamships shall include berth and
meals) exceeds twenty dollars ($20) may claim a refund of their own class fees to the
amount of such excess."    No refund shall exceed $30.
The refunds made to teachers under this regulation amounted to $934.68.
LABORATORY SCHOOL.
A demonstration class of Grade I. and Grade II. children was in operation for the duration of the session. In this an attempt was made to create a class-room situation in harmony
with the ideals of the curriculum. The techniques of instruction were those advocated in the
methods courses and in the Programme of Studies.
For an hour and a half each day teachers observed the work of this class and during the
session each teacher made a detailed case-study of two of the pupils. The observation period
was followed by a discussion period.
BOOK AND MAGAZINE DISPLAYS.
A book display comprising the text-book, reference book, and professional book offerings
of leading educational publishers was held in the school for the duration of the session. Over
1,094 visits to the room by teachers and faculty members are recorded.
An educational magazine display comprising the leading Canadian, British, and American
educational periodicals in both general and specific fields was held in connection with the book
display.    Over 100 educational periodicals were available for examination.
The following firms submitted exhibits of educational books and equipment:—
Allyn & Bacon. Thomas Nelson & Sons.
Anglo-Canadian Music Co. The John C. Winston Company, Ltd.
Clarke, Irwin & Company, Ltd. Copp, Clark Company.
J. M. Dent & Sons (Canada), Ltd. Samuel French Publishing Company.
W. J. Gage & Company, Ltd. Ivan Bloom Hardin.
Educational Test Bureau. Dramatic Publishing Company.
Doubleday, Doran & Company. McClelland & Stewart.
Longmans, Green & Company. W. M. Collins Sons & Company.
Ginn & Company. Holiday House, Inc.
George Hendry & Company. Chas. Scribner's Sons.
A. S. Barnes & Company. Houghton, Mifflin Company.
J. B. Lippincott & Company. The Junior Literary Guild.
Little, Brown & Company. Thomas Y. Crowell Company.
The Macmillan Company of Canada, Frederick A. Stokes Company.
Ltd. The Vanguard Press. H 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Harcourt, Brace Company.
E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc.
D. Appleton-Century Company.
Macrae-Smith Company.
Reynal and Hitchcock.
Harper & Brothers.
The John C. Winston Co., Inc.
Frederick Warne & Co., Ltd.
Oxford University Press.
Blue Ribbon Publishing Co.
Denoyer-Geppert Company.
Clarke & Stuart Company, Ltd.
LIBRARY.
Before the opening of the session each instructor was required to submit a list of the most
important reference books for his course. These books were borrowed or purchased and
placed " on reserve " in the Library and might be taken out by students for one-hour periods
or for overnight.
The Library contained over 2,000 volumes of the most important reference books and
remained open from 8 o'clock in the morning until 10 o'clock at night.
Thanks are due to those in charge of the following institutions for their generosity in
lending books to the Summer School Library:—
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Provincial Legislative Library.
Provincial Library Commission.
Victoria Public Library.
Victoria Teachers' Professional Library.
Victoria High School Library.
Office of Provincial Director of Home Economics.
Office of Curriculum and Technical Adviser.
EXTRA-CURRICULAR FUNCTIONS AND ACTIVITIES.
A rich and varied programme of lectures, concerts, dramatic performances, and social
functions was provided from the Activity Fund. Each registered student paid an activity
fee of $1.50, which admitted him, without payment of an admission charge, to the following
extra-curricular functions and activities:—■
First Week:
Tuesday.—Opening exercises.
Wednesday.—Steven Kennedy, lyric baritone, New York.
Thursday.—Original Monologues in Costume, Soo Yong, Chinese actress.
Friday.—Lecture, " Decorative Arts of the Ancient Egyptians," Mr. John Kyle.
Friday.—Opening Dance.
Second Week:
Monday.—Vocal recital, Pierre Timp, baritone.
Tuesday.—Lecture, " Grecian and Roman Art," Mr. John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Wednesday.—Lecture, " Some Issues in South Africa To-day," Dr. A. S. Rauben-
heimer, Dean of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, University of Southern California.
Thursday.—Dancers, David Tihmar and Dorothee Jarnac.
Friday.—Violin recital, Selma Reyes, Australian violinist.
Friday.—Weekly dance.
Third Week:
Monday.—" Listening Hour," Mr. Burton L. Kurth, Chief Supervisor of Music in the
Vancouver Schools.
Tuesday.—Lecture, " Italian and Venetian Art," Mr. John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Wednesday.—Vocal recital, Ellen Repp, contralto.
Thursday.—Lecture, " Significant Aspects of Modern Education," Dr. J. G. Althouse,
Dean of Ontario College of Education, University of Toronto.
Friday.—Illustrated lecture,  " Grass," Mrs.  A.  M.  Young,  Educational  Director,
Seattle Art Museum.
Friday.—Weekly dance.
Saturday.—Picnic outing at Thetis Lake. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. H 47
Fourth Week:
Monday.—Piano recital, Jan Cherniavsky.
Tuesday.—Lecture, " The Changing Attitude toward Mental Diseases," Dr. George A.
Davidson.
Wednesday.—Lee Foley Dance Group.
Wednesday.—Beach-party at Cadboro Bay.
Thursday.—Alfred Keller, violinist.
Friday.—Lecture, " Canadian Art," Mr. John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Friday.—Weekly dance.
Fifth Week:
Monday.—Chamber Music ensemble, with Mr. Phillip Watts, baritone.
Tuesday.—Dramatic recital, Mr. Allan Wilkie, C.B.E., and Miss Frediswide Hunter-
Watts, celebrated English artists.
Tuesday.—Teachers' Federation addresses by Mr. R. P. Steeves and Mr. A. T. Als-
bury, of Vancouver.
Wednesday.—Public Health Lecture, by Dr. Donald H. Williams, on " The Problem
of Venereal Disease Control in British Columbia." H 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF F. T. FAIREY, B.A., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
In presenting my first report on the work of this branch, I desire to pay a tribute to the
work of my predecessor, Mr. John Kyle, A.R.C.A., who for twenty-five years organized and
directed this work. It has been my good fortune to assume control of a smoothly working
organization, and it remains for me but to guide its expansion.
The report is for the school-year 1938-39, on the work of the following:—
(a.)  Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(&.)  Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in junior
and senior high schools,
(c.)  Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A" Woodwork and "B"
Metalwork—for University Entrance.
(d.)  Technical Schools in Vancouver and New Westminster.
(e.)  High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/.)  Vancouver School of Art.
(g.)  Night-schools.
(h.)   Mining Classes.
(i.)  Teacher-training.
Former reports have referred to " Manual Training."    It is pointed out that this term
has given way to one which more nearly expresses the purpose of the work, and is in conformity with the practice in most cities in other parts of Canada and in the United States.
Changes in the curriculum of the schools and the general adoption of a definite philosophy
of education have resulted in the inclusion of Industrial Arts into the general framework of
the school programme as one of the instruments through which the aims of education may be
brought about. More than ever, therefore, is it necessary that teachers of Industrial Arts
be conversant with the purpose of the work they undertake.
These changes also made it necessary for this branch to expand its facilities for the
assistance and guidance of teachers in the schools. To assist in this work Mr. H. A. Jones,
formerly of the staff of the Vancouver Technical School, was appointed as Inspector of
Technical Classes. Mr. Jones has been connected with this work for many years and brings
to his new duties great energy and a richness of experience which will be invaluable.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
(Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools.)
Industrial Arts is compulsory in all regularly organized junior high schools and in
Grades VII. and VIII. in cities of the first and second class. It is hoped that the successful
conclusion of present negotiations with one School Board will bring this regulation into full
effect.
There are fifty-four cities and districts where Industrial Arts shops are established:
Abbotsford, Alberni, Armstrong, Ashcroft, Burnaby, Chase River, Chilliwack City, Chilliwack Municipality, Coquitlam, Cranbrook, Creston, Courtenay, Cumberland, Delta, Duncan,
Esquimalt, Fairbridge, Fernie, Harewood, loco, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley,
Ladysmith, Langley, Michel-Natal, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Saanich, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Ocean Falls, Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Port Alberni,
Port Moody, Powell River, Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Richmond, Rossland, Salmon Arm,
South Wellington, Summerland, Surrey, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria,
and West Vancouver.
The policy of the Department is to encourage the establishment of the General Shop, in
which young people will find opportunity for activity in Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork,
and Electricity, and in such other media as may be found convenient, having regard to local
conditions. It is not the intention that Industrial Arts in the elementary schools or in the
junior grades of high schools shall have any vocational intent, but that it shall assist in
promoting growth and development in the pupil. As all pupils are different from one another,
no attempt should be made to regiment all along one path or to insist upon a uniform rate INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. H 49
of progress. This implies the abolition of standard courses of work and makes it imperative
to organize in such a way as to promote individual effort.
It is recognized that such a complete programme is beyond the present capacity of the
smaller schools—particular in rural areas—but even where conditions limit the work to
Woodwork and Draughting the principles set forth above are being worked out. In larger
cities and in schools in which the shop is occupied full-time, or nearly so, efforts are being
made by the teachers to broaden the programme along the lines outlined above, and the
Department lends every encouragement.
The success of such a programme demands much from the teacher. He is required to
help and direct individuals rather than whole classes, and this makes great demands upon his
time. To lighten the load, various teaching aids are made available through the operation
of an Industrial Arts Pool, established by the Inspector of Technical Classes and contributed
to by all the men teaching throughout the Province. The Pool consists of small apparatus,
jigs and special tools, and also many forms of information sheets, operation sheets, job sheets,
and drawings of suggested projects. These aids are not instructions imposed upon teachers,
but are suggestions which have resulted from the experiences of men actually in the field and
now made available to all through the facilities of the Pool.
(Senior High Schools.)
Industrial Arts is one of the free electives on the senior high school programme. Following the exploratory period spent in the junior high school grades, pupils who have shown
desirable aptitudes may elect to continue with courses of a more vocational trend. It seems
desirable that some degree of specialization be encouraged following Grade X., and the work
offered be planned with increasing emphasis upon its practical value as preparation for an
allied vocation.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS OPTIONS FOR UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE.
Industrial Arts "A" (Woodwork) or Industrial Arts "B" (Metalwork) may be offered
to make up the 15 credits required under optional courses for University Entrance.
Students exercising this option are required to write an examination on Theory, Draughting, and Design. It is also required that evidence be produced to the Director of Industrial
Education that the practical work set out in the Course of Study has been done.
In addition to those passed upon the recommendation of the principal of accredited high
schools, 188 students from thirteen high schools wrote the examination in June, 1939.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high
school shops in the Province  (of which 36 are general shops)
is         141
The total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high
school instructors is         112
The total number of pupils participating is:—
Elementary school   5,001
Junior high school   5,983
Senior high school   3,103
 14,087
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
The Vancouver Technical School continues to expand, not only in numbers of students
but in the number and variety of courses offered. Its plan has been to continue the exploratory period through Grades IX. and X., in which students are given opportunity to display
aptitude in the following shops: Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork, Machine-shop, and in the
Electrical Laboratory. Former students, now engaged in industry, testify to the value of the
general training received in the class-rooms, laboratories, and shops, particularly with reference to English, Mathematics, Draughting, Mechanics, and the Sciences. The policy of giving
a broad basic training before specialization, where theory and practice are closely allied, has
abundant evidence to justify its continuance.
Upon completion of Grade X., students are encouraged to select, as a major course, the
practical course most suited to their aptitudes and desires.    They must also continue, in the
4 H 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
class-room, those subjects which are constants in all high schools and those subjects closely
allied with the major shop chosen.
The following courses are offered:—
(1.) High School Graduation (Technical).—A diploma is granted to students who complete Grade XII, and include two years in a major shop. This certificate does not admit to
the University. Major courses are given in the following: Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork,
Machine-shop Practice, Automotive Engineering, Electricity, Mining, Lumbering, Diesel
Engineering.
(2.) High School Graduation (University Entrance).—Selected students who wish to
prepare for entrance to the University, and who ultimately expect to enter the Applied
Science department, are given opportunity to obtain shop experience and to give practical
expression to the theory taught in the class-room. In addition to the required subjects for
University Entrance, shop-work of one year's duration is given in Sheet Metal, Woodwork,
Printing, and Machine-shop.
(3.) Special Advanced Courses are offered in Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork, Acetylene and Arc Welding, Machine-shop, Automotive and Diesel Engineering, Draughting, Electricity, Cookery, and Aviation Mechanics.
Special students devote full time to the subject of their choice, except that Mathematics
and Engineering Drawing may be required as part of the course. Those permitted to enrol
for Special Courses are: (a) Students who have had at least three years' high-school work;
(6) youths and men who have been in industry and who wish further technical training; (c)
adults who desire special instruction.
The total number of students attending the Technical School in 1938-39 was 1,316.
The school conducts also a large night-school during the winter months, where men in
industry return to receive special instruction in the following: Technical Draughting, Boat
Designing, Building Construction, Bench-work in Wood, Machine Construction and Drawing,
Machine-shop Practice, Motor Engineering, Diesel Engineering, Sheet-metal Work, Acetylene
Welding and Cutting, Printing, Radio, Sign and Pictorial Painting, Technology of Iron and
Steel, Plumbing, Air-conditioning, Painting and Decorating. The students enrolled in 1938-39
numbered 803.
T. J. TRAPP TECHNICAL SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
The T. J. Trapp School is a Composite High School, which offers courses to both boys
and girls. Included in its organization is a strong and efficient technical department offering
courses on the senior high-school level. Its shops are well equipped, and good work is being
done in Woodwork, Sheet-metal Work, Draughting, Machine-shop Practice, and Electricity.
The enrolment in 1938-39 numbered 220 in technical subjects.
HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL AND AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
Commercial courses form an integral part of the school programme in many high schools
in the Province and are for distinctly vocational purposes. Students are prepared for direct
employment in the commercial world. Many high schools organize separate commercial
departments, whereas in Vancouver there are two separate commercial schools—the Fairview
High School of Commerce and the Grandview High School of Commerce.
The schools and their enrolments are as follows:—
Abbotsford       30 Kelowna      213
Alberni       60 Kimberley      102
Burnaby     400 Ladysmith        68
Cranbrook       44 Mission        34
Creston Valley     135 Nanaimo      189
Cumberland       17 Nelson      105
Delta        79 New Westminster      198
Dewdney         4 North Vancouver      164
Duncan     116 Oak Bay       36
Fernie         61 Ocean Falls        48
Kamloops        85 Penticton      104
Kaslo        15 Port Coquitlam       28 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. H 51
Port Moody 	
       48
Vancouver      ...    ...
;..,,.,  5,ii7
Prince George
...    _      12
Vernon 	
Victoria  	
98
Prince Rupert	
37
_      19
     104
     191
         5
     421
Revelstoke   	
West Vancouver _   	
     111
Total 	
Saanich 	
Sechelt   	
 8,498
Agriculture has been taught for many years in some high schools situated in centres
where such work has a local significance. The Department of Education has recently prepared courses of study giving direction to this work. These courses are to be found in
Bulletin IX.
Agricultural courses were offered in the last school-year in the high schools of:—
Abbotsford     ._
Students.
4
North Saanich 	
Richmond
Students.
2
Chilliwack 	
14
18
Creston Valley 	
39
..     .    35
Saanich 	
Salmon Arm 	
Telkwa 	
Vernon
             6
Dawson Creek   	
9
Dewdney 	
     30
2
Fairbridge 	
     96
38
Harewood 	
30
Total 	
Kelowna 	
New Westminster 	
45
     14
  382
VANCOUVER ART SCHOOL.
In June, 1939, the school completed its fourteenth year of successful work. It is staffed
by an efficient personnel, many of whom have recently visited Art centres in Europe and
America.
The school grants two certificates:—
(1.) The Diploma is granted following completion of a four years' course in one of the
following fields: (a) Drawing, Painting, Illustration; (6) Commercial Art; (c) Design and
Crafts;   (d) Interior Decoration;   (e) Art Teachers' Training.
(2.)   The School Merit Certificate is granted on completion of a two years' course.
All students are required, in their first year, to take the General Course before proceeding to one of the specialized courses. In addition, part-time courses are offered for those
who do not wish to follow the longer courses required for the Diploma or Certificate.
The school is recognized by the Department of Education as the training school for
teachers preparing themselves for the teaching of Art in the junior and senior high schools
of the Province. The evening school is organized for those who seek leisure-time occupation
and is especially useful to commercial artists, sign-writers, and designers. Junior classes are
also offered on Saturday mornings for children in attendance at regular schools during the
week.
The total enrolment in 1938-39 numbered 493.
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
A very large proportion of adult education is made available through the medium of
night-schools.
In British Columbia the organization of night-schools is the responsibility of the local
school authority, but assistance is given by way of grants from the Provincial Treasury. The
amount of the grant is based upon the salary paid to the teacher and varies from 25 per cent,
(in the case of cities of the first class) to 75 per cent, (for schools in rural communities). >
Under this arrangement classes are organized in forty different cities and towns, giving
instruction in the subjects listed below to 7,189 students.
Subjects.—Accounting, Acetylene Welding, Advertising, Aeronautics, Algebra, Architectural Drawing, Arithmetic, Armature Winding, Art, Art Appreciation, Art Crafts, Art
Metalwork, Automobile Mechanics, Book-keeping, Building Construction, Cabinet-making,
Cartooning, Chemistry, China-painting, Choral Singing, Clothing, Commercial Arithmetic,
Commercial Art, Commercial English, Commercial Law, Community Singing, Continuation,
Cookery, Current Events, Dancing, Design, Diesel Engineering, Draughting, Dramatic Art, H 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
Drawing, Dressmaking, Dress Appreciation, Economic History, Educational Measurements,
Electricity, Electrical Engineering, English, English for New Canadians, First Aid, French,
Geology, Geometry, German, Grammar, Guidance, Handicrafts, Health Education, History,
Home Economics, Income Tax Accounting, Interior Decoration, Industrial Arts, Iron and
Steel Technology, Journalism, Knitting, Latin, Leather-work, Lip-reading, Literature,
Lumber-grading, Machine Construction, Machine Drawing, Machine-shop, Mathematics,
Mechanical Drawing, Metalwork, Mineralogy, Mining, Modern Economic Theory, Modern
Merchandising, Music (Instrumental and Orchestral), Music Appreciation, Navigation,
Painting, Painting and Decorating, Photography, Physical Education, Physics, Plumbing,
Pottery, Principles of Teaching, Practical Arts, Practical Mathematics, Printing, Psychology,
Public Speaking, Pulp and Paper (Elementary and Advanced), Radio Communication, Radio
Engineering, Salesmanship, Secretarial Practice, Sewing, Shorthand, Short-story Writing,
Show-card Writing, Singing, Spanish, Speech Correction, Spelling, Spinning, Social Studies,
Stage-craft, Steam Engineering, Sheet-metal Work, Trigonometry, Typewriting, Weaving,
Welding, and Woodwork.
Summarized Statement op Attendance and Teachers in Evening Vocational
Schools for Period July 1st, 1938, to June 30th, 1939.
Municipality or School.
o
O  03
fcl
—  QJ
a 3
Eh CO
o
d
Z. tjj
_. ®
EhO
u
ca .
H a jo
. QJ
ri +j> w
Be"
o J>~
Eh So
•jjj
a
QJ
p.fi
S o s
o 05
hWo
Number op Individuals
enrolled.
Teachers.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
10
1
2
5
2
2
1
5
2
1
4
2
5
1
2
2
1
6
3
2
3
1
1
14
15
1
8
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
65
18
43
7
11
1
2
2
2
2
5
3
1
1
4
1
5
1
2
2
1
3
3
2
5
1
1
12
18
1
8
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
131
23
47
5    1
210
24
67
26
38
42
94
42
22
12
84
21
77
28
38
68
17
50
39
31
73
27
23
133
312
21
131
9
53
35
24
12
47
20
51
93
14
3,505
434
1,019
123
6,134
1,045
1,524
514
1,164
1,140
4,782
3,350
1,006
688
3,962
1,110
2,453
336
982
2,850
484
1,326
882
600
1,942
270
970
4,032
7,290
3,358
9,972
620
1,120
478
1,068
93
1,749
454
2,142
3,046
816
189,179
20,750
58,444
5,180
64
32
19
13
19
37
30
22
2
29
10
45
24
6
43
17
6
11
19
28
27
23
108
143
18
78
9
33
20
12
22
8
24
44
11
2,001
132
548
103
146
24
35
7
25
23
57
12
10
55
11
32
4
32
25
44
28
12
45
25
169
3
53
20
15
12
12
25
12
27
49
1,504
302
471
20
210
24
67
26
38
42
94
42
22
12
84
21
77
28
38
68
17
50
39
31
73
27
23
133
312
21
131
9
53
35
24
12
47
20
51
93
14
3,505
434
1,019
123
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
8
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2    |
1 |
75    |
7 |
35    j
6    1
5
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
6
10
2
1
1
1
1
....
24
1
9
-
8
1
2
2
2
2
1
Chilliwack Municipality	
2
1
1
4
1
4
1
2
9
1
9
2
4
1
1
9
18
1
8
Prince Rupert..... —
Qualicum Beach . 	
1
1
2
Revelstoke—	
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
99
14
44
6
—    1
321
7,189
349,305
3,840
3,349
7,189
181     |
82
263 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. H 53
FREE MINING CLASSES FOR PROSPECTORS.
These classes are operated under the joint management of the Department of Mines and
the Department of Education. Classes operate normally during the winter months in mining
centres.
An excellent text-book has been written by the Deputy Minister of Mines, for which a
charge of 35 cents is made to cover the cost of production. This text-book is also used by the
students who take the correspondence course in Mineralogy and by the high school students
who study the subject.
The following is a list of the centres where the classes were held, together with the
enrolment:—
Abbotsford      30 Victoria     86
Kitchener     28 Yahk     30
Nanaimo     22 	
Vancouver  (Placer-mining) _    69 Total   265
TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS TEACHERS.
The requirements for teachers of Industrial Arts were revised in the early part of the
school-year.    Hereafter, the following will be the only Certificates issued:—
(a.)  The Junior High School Industrial Arts Teacher's Certificate.
(6.)  The Senior High School Industrial Arts Teacher's Certificate.
Teachers completing courses leading to these certificates are given opportunity for training in two ways: (1) Winter classes, held in the Vancouver Technical School on Saturdays;
(2) the Summer School, held during the months of July and August, also in the Vancouver
Technical School.
Both these schools operate as a branch of the Summer School of Education.
It is interesting to note the increasing number of teachers holding First-class Certificates,
who have demonstrated interest and aptitude for practical work, that are training to fit
themselves to teach Industrial Arts. With the introduction of this work into the schools in
country districts, a demand has arisen for teachers who can undertake to teach Industrial
Arts part time.
A total of 41 attended the winter classes and 96 the classes held in the summer. H 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS JESSIE McLENAGHEN, B.Sc, DIRECTOR,
During the year 1938-39 new Home Economics departments were established at Revelstoke, Creston, Ladner, Mission, Rossland, and Coquitlam, the last five being in connection
with new junior high schools. A pew Clothing-room was added to the Richmond Junior-
Senior High School and also to the junior high school in Nelson, so that senior high school
classes might be accommodated. A second Home Economics teacher was appointed in
Nelson. In Chilliwack, in the new addition to the senior high school, an excellent Home
Economics department was fitted up and opened in April. While all Grade VII. classes
from both the town and district will be accommodated in the central elementary school,
classes from Grades VIII. to XII. will attend the junior-senior high school. For the first
time, pupils in Grades VII. and VIII. from the district have had the opportunity to take
Home Economics and, though only Clothing could be offered until the new school opened,
much enthusiasm was stimulated. In Victoria, the Home Economics departments in the
Central Junior High School and the North Ward School were remodelled.
The correspondence courses in Home Economics (A) and (CC) have been revised and
the number of students registered has greatly increased. In June, twelve correspondence
students wrote the Junior Matriculation examinations in Home Economics. Here, I should
like to express the appreciation of the Department of Education of the work of Miss Isabel
Bolton and Mrs. Irene Vennell Green, the instructors in these courses. Their thorough grasp
of the problems, their careful attention to detail, and their untiring zeal have made our
correspondence work unique on this continent. I hope the time is not far distant when all
high school students unable to take Home Economics in their own school will avail themselves
of the opportunity to take this work by correspondence.
The Chair of Home Economics at the University is not yet an accomplished fact. However, some progress has been made, using facilities already available. In the Senior Matriculation programme, Home Economics has been added as an option, and this year, for the
first time, graduates in Home Economics of other universities are to be admitted to the
Teacher-training Course at the University of British Columbia. All teachers of Home
Economics must now have a year of Education before securing a certificate to teach in
British Columbia. This means that Home Economics teachers now receive equal recognition
with academic teachers.
Summer School was again well attended by Home Economics teachers. Course 200,
Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics, taught by Miss Ruth McAlpine, B.Sc, had a
registration of 26. Course 201 and 201b, Problems in Fitting, Pattern Study and Clothing
Construction, and Dress Appreciation, taught by Mrs. Irene Vennell Green, B.Sc, had an
enrolment «of 35 and 32 respectively. All students expressed enthusiasm over the work
offered.
The number of students taking Home Economics throughout the Province has increased,
though the number writing departmental examinations is less because of the number
recommended from accredited high schools.
The total number of Home Economics centres in operation during the
year was       113
The total number of Home Economics teachers was      104
The total number of pupils taking Home Economics was as follows:—
In elementary schools  4,272
In junior high schools :  5,629
Of these, the total number taking:—
Home Economics I.  (Grade VII.) was  2,148
Home Economics II. (Grade VIII.) was  2,103
Home Economics III. (Grade IX.) was  1,378
In high schools  3,124 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS. H 55
Of these, the total number taking:—
Home Economics III. was      487
Home Economics (A) was      223
Home Economics (B) was      546
Home Economics  (CC) was  1,675
Home Economics (C) was      181
Home Relations was        12
Total number of boys taking Home Economics in clubs      194
The total number of young women in normal schools taking Home
Economics was       126
The total number of young men in normal schools taking Nutrition was 55
Home Economics in Canada took a very progressive step this year and organized a
Canadian Home Economics Association, which will include as members all those who have
taken work in Home Economics and applied it in the many varied fields of the home, the
school, the hospital, and commercial firms. We hope this organization will prove that " in
unity there is strength." The executive, made up of representatives from each of the nine
Provinces, is as follows:—■
President—Miss J. L. McLenaghen, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary-Treasurer—Miss Charlotte Black, Vancouver, B.C.
Provincial Representatives—
Miss  Hazel Mclntyre,  Edmonton,  Alberta.
Miss Bertha Oxner, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
Miss Katherine Middleton, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Miss Lorna N. Faulds, Toronto, Ontario.
Miss Miriam Dunbar, Montreal, Quebec.
Miss Doris Runciman, Sackville, New Brunswick.
Miss Frances McNally, Wolfville, Nova Scotia.
Miss H. Hazzard, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. H 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1938-39 should be called a year of consolidation of policies inaugurated
in the previous two years.    There is every reason to be gratified by the progress made.
SCHOOL ENROLMENT—OCTOBER.
These figures vary from month to month. Enrolment: 1934, 39,463; 1935, 39,328;
1936, 39,418;   1937, 39,120;   1938, 38,519.
For the past five years the total enrolment (by age grade census) in all our schools has
decreased slightly. There has been an increase in the secondary-school enrolment but a
larger decrease in the elementary-school enrolment. To predict our school population it is
very necessary to take into consideration the shifting school population as well as the birth
rate statistics within the city. Below is a table giving the number of children born in Vancouver from 1927 to 1938:—
Year.
Female.
Male.
Total.
1927                                                        	
1,997
2,211
2,279
2,272
2,120
1,784
1,598
1,629
1,758
1,774
1,916
1,999
2,199
2,245
2,368
2,385
2,253
1,905
1,725
1,780
1,830
1,804
2,034
2,228
4,196
1928                                                                           —	
4,456
1929                                                            	
4,647
1930                                                            	
4,657
1931                                                        -    	
4,373
1932                                                                                                                   	
3 689
1933                                                            -	
3,323
1934                                  . -                	
3,409
1935                    —	
3,588
1936	
3,578
3,950
4,227
1937              .   .                  .                       	
1938
Totals      	
23,337
24,756
48,093
The largest annual decrease in the elementary-school enrolment took place in 1938. This
decrease was 601, while the secondary-school enrolment increased by approximately 550.
This large decrease in the elementary school can be explained by the big difference in birthrate taken from the table above when we compare the year 1932 with 1931. This difference
is 684.    The majority of children born in 1932 would enter Grade I. in 1938.
There is another factor which must be taken into consideration before forming any conclusions on enrolment. This is the problem of a moving school population. Below is a table
showing the geographical origin of new pupils enrolled in Vancouver schools, September 7th
to November 30th, inclusive, for years 1937-38:—■
Type
>F SCHOOI
Secondary Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Total, all Schools.
1937.
1938.
1937.
1938.
1937.
1938.
339
118
111
51
1
22
30
7
1
1
1
360
72
68
44
5
31
23
20
3
2
2
597
288
335
158
4
55
62
8
3
9
23
20
1
4
554
183
199
112
5
53
62
17
3
13
21
10
1
2
936
406
446
209
5
77
92
15
4
10
24
20
1
4
914
255
Rest of Empire.  	
3
16
23
10
1
4
China     — ...
682
630
2,249
1,865
'
*•"— SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
H 57
Note.—In 1936 the grand total for the same study was 2,012. This would indicate that
the Vancouver school system should expect annually approximately 2,000 students to be
enrolled from outside the city.
The secondary-school enrolment is another story. Below is a table showing the senior
secondary-school enrolment in 1929 (the year of amalgamation of Point Grey and South
Vancouver Municipalities with the City of Vancouver), 1937 and 1938:-—•
Enrolment.
1929.
1937.
1938.
733
373
585
646
374
380
759
947
230
923
1,190
966
904
1,407
498
659
961
1,448
262
1,168
1,263
1,017
879
1,502
600
736
1,061
1,510
287
1,261
5,955
9,463
10,016
From the table above the increase over a nine-year period is 4,061, an average annual
increase of approximately 450. The increase of 1938 over 1937 was slightly more than this—
553. This large increase in senior secondary-school enrolment is a healthy sign. Our school
system, however, should be able to give the necessary training suited to the varying abilities
of this large heterogeneous group of students. If our plant and equipment are deficient,
then the training of these young people to adjust themselves to adult life will be lacking.
An inadequate school plant and equipment will always handicap an excellent teaching staff.
SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION.
Overcrowded conditions in our senior secondary-schools have made it necessary for the
Vancouver Board of School Trustees to provide much makeshift accommodation, such as
temporary buildings, rooms in attics and basements, and the use of assembly halls as classrooms. Bad physical conditions in our senior secondary schools prompted the Vancouver
Board of School Trustees in 1937 to submit a by-law of $400,000 to the taxpayers for more
secondary-school accommodation. This by-law was carried by a large majority: Yes, 13,304;
no, 5,626.
Last year when the city offered these bonds for sale it was found that the price submitted was too large a discount for the Board to accept such financial sacrifice.
Early in 1938 a " Municipal Improvements Assistance Act" was passed by the Federal
Government, Ottawa, enabling municipalities in the Dominion of Canada to borrow money
at 2 per cent, on loans that could be shown to be self-liquidating. The request by the City
of Vancouver for $390,000 under this Act was accepted by the Federal Government. This
sum did not include the $10,000 in the by-law (mentioned above) for the new school-sites.
It is very gratifying to report that the Dominion Government at Ottawa, the Provincial
Government at Victoria, and the City Council of Vancouver have all endorsed the six projects
under the loan to a total of $390,000. Work has already commenced on four of the projects.
These additions will assist considerably in relieving the crowded conditions at Lord Byng,
Magee, King Edward, John Oliver, Grandview High School of Commerce, and Vancouver
Technical High Schools. The co-operation of His Worship the Mayor, the City Council, the
City officials, and other representative citizens with the Vancouver Board of School Trustees
made the success of this loan possible. Great praise is due to the members of our Ways
and Means Committee and our Secretary for their excellent work and untiring efforts in this
regard.
The extra accommodation provided for the King Edward and John Oliver High Schools
will not be sufficient to relieve the overcrowded conditions in those centres. Extra high-
school accommodation must be provided in these areas soon.    This can best be done by with- H 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
drawing Grades IX. from these schools and accommodating them in a separate building
along with a considerable number of the pupils of Grades VII. and VIII. of the elementary
schools in the respective districts. This would assist with the necessary reorganization of
our school system and at the same time provide for future increased enrolment in the elementary schools within those areas.
BUILDING MAINTENANCE.
Our Building Department deserves great credit for the way in which our school plant
has been maintained for the past years. The slight increase in our budget for this department in the year 1938 was well spent. It should be noted that we are still spending a surprisingly small sum of approximately 1% per cent, of the total valuation on maintenance.
It should also be recalled that it is not only a case of maintenance of school plant but also
one of remodelling old buildings to be used for a modern school programme. Special mention should be made of Britannia High School, where we have been able to provide an excellent library and other necessary accommodation so that that school might conform to some of
the necessary features of a modern high school.
The Vancouver Rotary Club, through the co-operation of its Boys' Work Committee,
were able to render considerable financial assistance to the Vancouver Board of School
Trustees in order that certain alterations might be made at the King George High School
for extra library accommodation. By providing the library service mentioned above, these
schools were able to meet the necessary requirements for accrediting laid down by the
Department of Education.
GENERAL.
Too much space would be required for me to mention in detail the numerous activities
and excellent work of special departments, such as Bureau of Measurements, Primary, Art,
Music, Health and Physical Education, Visual Education, Physically Handicapped, Mentally
Handicapped, Handicrafts and Industrial Arts, and Night-schools.
I cannot speak too highly of the splendid co-operation which I have received from every
member of the administrative, supervisory, and teaching staffs.
EXCHANGE TEACHERS.
The number of exchanges arranged for the school-year 1938-39 was twenty, as compared
with eighteen for the school-year 1937-38.
We are pleased to note an increase in the number of exchanges, as it is felt that this
exchanging of teachers has a very stimulating effect not only upon teachers who go abroad
but upon the teachers who visit us as well.
TEACHERS DECEASED.
Death removed from the teaching staff during the year the following teachers, who had
given faithful and efficient service: Miss Myrtle Nixon, William Wilson, Herbert H. Dunmore,
Charles Marega, Donald R. McLean, John K. Keenan, and Miss Marjorie M. Wilson.
TEACHERS SUPERANNUATED DURING THE YEAR.
The following retired from the service on superannuation; the contribution which they
made to our school system will not soon be forgotten: Miss I. Smith, Miss F. M. P. Howard,
Miss N. Bain, C. Cantell, Miss C. G. Campbell, D. S. Jackman, Miss C. H. McFarland, G. S.
Summers, R. C. Warden, and H. H. Smith.
CONCLUSION.
In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my thanks and appreciation
for the excellent co-operation which I have received from the Department of Education and
its officials.
The successful functioning of the Vancouver School Board during the past year can be
attributed to the excellent spirit which has existed among the various bodies concerned, the
Board of School Trustees and its officials, the Parks Board, the City Council, City officials,
and the members of the City school staff. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. H 59
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA.
REPORT OF GEORGE H. DEANE, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
I beg to submit the following report with respect to Victoria public schools for the
year 1938-39:—
There was a small decrease in the number of pupils attending the elementary schools.
However, conditions governing enrolment seem to be more stabilized and the steady decrease
of the past ten years will not likely continue.
Improved facilities provided during the year included the following:—
(a.) Home Economics.—Extensive improvements were made at the North Ward and the
Central Junior High School Centres. At the latter school the comprehensive changes have
provided the up-to-date accommodation necessary for the highest standard of achievement.
(6.) Libraries.—The Board is carrying out its three-year policy and at the close of the
present school-year this programme will be completed and all Victoria public schools will be
well equipped. Besides the individual school libraries, three circulating libraries have been
provided: one covering free reading material for Grades VII., VIII., and IX.; a second,
gramophone records;  and a third, professional books for teachers.
(c.) Visual Education.—With the assistance of schools concerned and parent-teacher
associations, a balopticon and four motion-picture machines (one, sound; three, silent) with
necessary accessories were provided. Further extension of these aids will necessitate more
teachers taking in-service training in the effective use of visual equipment.
(d.)  Radios and Gramophones.—Victoria schools are now adequately equipped.
(e.)  Industrial and Practical Arts.—Facilities were greatly improved.
(/.) School Lighting.—While some improvements were made, there is urgent need to
correct defects in many class-rooms.
The year was marked by progressive efforts towards achieving the aims and objectives
of the new Programme of Studies. Many teachers took professional courses at summer
schools and attended evening in-service training classes covering Remedial Reading, Primary
Methods, and Educational Measurement. In addition, a teacher's evening class in Economics
was conducted at Victoria College. In connection with these classes I wish to acknowledge
the assistance given by Mr. H. L. Campbell, Director of the Summer School, and to express
appreciation of the kindness of Dr. H. B. King, Technical Adviser, who gratuitously instructed
the class in Remedial Reading. This year the following evening courses are being given:
(1) Growth and Development of Children; (2) Dramatic Art in Schools; (3) Elementary
School Arithmetic; (4) Language and Literature in the Primary Grades; and (5) English II.
as prescribed by the University of British Columbia. Undoubtedly the opportunities provided
by these in-service training courses are doing a great deal to raise the standard of professional
efficiency in the Victoria schools. Very definite progress was made with respect to Measurements and Remedial Reading, which will be further advanced this year by organizing so as
to give more time and material for scientific diagnosis and treatment.
The policy of organizing teacher-committees or study-groups with definite responsibilities
surrounding libraries, measurements, remedial reading, and office organization proved quite
effective. The teachers comprising these groups gave their time and effort unsparingly and
contributed materially to the year's achievement. This year, committee organization has been
extended to include Music and Visual Education.
The School Health Inspector, Dr. Anderson, resumed duty after a year's postgraduate
study in Public Health and his report at the close of the year directed attention to the
following:—
(1.) There was less disability than in former years, the incidence of infectious disease
being the lowest in many years. During the school-year, four schools were entirely free of
any communicable disease.
(2.) In accordance with modern practice, efforts were made to provide a thorough
physical examination in certain grades rather than a hurried examination of all pupils.
Under this policy, the pupils of Grades I., III., VI., VIII., X., and XII. were examined, H 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
along with those whose previous examinations had revealed physical defects and those participating in athletics.
(3.) The increasing use of the school clinic by parents and children necessitated an
extension of the afternoon office hours. The clinic consultations in 1935-36 were 167; in
1938-39, 657.
(4.)   Special features of health work during the year included:—
(a.)   Tuberculosis survey of the pupils in Grade XII.
(6.)  Provision for supplying milk to undernourished children and to pupils having
lunch at school.
(c.)  A commencement was made in the field of immunization by offering smallpox
vaccinations and diphtheria toxoid immunization to pupils.
(d.) With the co-operation of Mr. C. E. McDonald, Principal of the Provincial
School for the Deaf and the Blind, a complete survey was made of all pupils
with hearing difficulty. This examination indicated that we have a relatively
small hearing problem. Six pupils were advised to study lip-reading and one to
attend the Provincial School at Vancouver.
(e.)  The number with serious defects of vision did not warrant a special sight-saving
class.
(/.)  Provision was made for the examination of pre-school children so that defective
conditions might be corrected before pupils commenced school in September.
Although in recent years there has been a very definite decrease in attendance in Victoria
elementary schools, the  enrolment in  Grades  IX.  to  XII.,  inclusive,  has  been  more  than
maintained.    While economic conditions may have contributed to this situation, the recent
revision of the Programme of Studies and resulting changes  in high  school  organization
have encouraged students to remain longer at school by providing opportunities more suited
to the general interests.    While the Grade XII. registration is still considerably lower than
the Grade IX. enrolment, the schools are progressively becoming better organized to make
adjustments based on individual differences and, therefore, it is reasonable to expect that this
falling off will be reduced in the immediate future.
In both the Victoria High School and the Central Junior High School commendable
attention was given to club-work and other pupil activities. This activity programme does
a great deal towards developing leadership and worthy attitudes which may exert a greater
influence on future success than academic achievement.
There was little change in conditions surrounding Victoria College except that, at the
close of the session, Madame Sanderson-Mongin and Miss Jeanette Cann retired after giving
very efficient and faithful service on the staff since the College was established in affiliation
with the University of British Columbia. The resulting vacancies were filled by appointing
Mr. H. Hickman, Assistant Professor of French, and Mr. W. Robbins, Assistant Professor of
English.
Certain features of the new salary schedule were not accepted by the high-school teachers
and the disagreement was settled by arbitration as provided by the " Public Schools Act."
The majority decision of the arbitrators upheld the action of the Board.
Undoubtedly the outstanding event of the year was the Royal Visit and I am pleased to
report that, with the co-operation of the City Council, arrangements were completed so that
all Victoria school children had a good view of Their Majesties.
At the commencement of the school-year the Board suffered a severe loss by the death
of Trustee John Wallace, who had zealously endeavoured to promote the welfare of the
schools and who was deservedly popular.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER.
REPORT OF R. S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1938-39 in New Westminster marked the continued development of an
excellent instructional programme, providing, as it did, for the individual pupil the opportunity to develop mentally, morally, physically, and spiritually to the utmost of his capacity. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. H 61
All departments worked smoothly and efficiently and the general environment was conducive
to maximum pupil and teacher growth.
The school organization of the city consisted of six elementary schools, forty-eight
teachers; three junior high schools, thirty-two teachers; one senior high school and one
technical high school, employing thirty-four high-school teachers.
In May the Board placed before the people a by-law for $23,000 to add two additional
rooms and a gymnasium to the Queensborough School. It was passed by a very large
majority. After consultation with the architects, Evans & Son, it was found that for this
amount a six-room school with gymnasium could be constructed, and plans were at once
drawn for the latter scheme. It is hoped the new building will be ready for the school
opening in September.
From a health standpoint, both the Medical Department—Dr. D. A. Clark and Miss
Florence Barbaree, R.N.-—and the Dental Department—Dr. R. W. Conn and Miss Doris Bews,
R.N.—worked in close co-operation with all pupil activities. Each pupil received a complete
physical inspection and the follow-up work was particularly stressed.
The Dental Clinic operated full time, giving dental treatment to pupils whose parents
were unable to pay.
This year the Provincial Tuberculosis Division of the Metropolitan Health Committee,
under Miss Vicker, examined all pupils. Positive reactors were given full clinical and X-ray
examination. This work in conjunction with the work of our own Medical Department was
appreciated.
Again this year the schools of New Westminster staged the sixty-fifth annual May Day.
The visit of Their Majesties King George VI. and Queen Elizabeth supplied the motif for
perhaps one of the most spectacular patriotic displays ever held in this city. The entire
programme was given again on the day of the Royal Visit and thousands of children from
surrounding municipalities enjoyed not only the display but a view of the Royal Party. To
the teachers, School Boards, and officials of these municipalities who so ably handled such
a great number of pupils we express our thanks. The entire display was a definite demonstration of the curricula in action.
Another outstanding demonstration of the value of our curriculum was the International
Social Studies Conference, inaugurated by the Social Studies Department of the T. J. Trapp
Technical High School and Mount Baker Union High School, Deming, Washington, U.S.A.
Thirty American students visited the T. J. Trapp Technical High School in March with
their Principal, Mr. Olmstead, and the Social Studies teacher, Mr. Morton. After a period
of entertainment, the students of the Grade XII. class met the visitors in a discussion of
world affairs as these affected Canada and the United States. The most notable feature
of the discussion commented upon by the Mount Baker High School students was the deep
loyalty shown by the Canadians as they defended the stand of Canada and Great Britain in
world affairs. In May a return visit was paid to Mount Baker by forty students of the
T. J. Trapp Technical High School, under the leadership of Mr. S. T. Moodie. The outstanding feature of this visit was the ability of the students to use their historical knowledge
in open forum discussion. These conferences were valuable, as they gave the students
participating the opportunity of sharing Canadian and American points of view on such
current problems as the Alaskan Highway, Reciprocal Trade Treaties, the Munro Doctrine,
Canadian and American institutions, and the European situation.
Another international incident worthy of mention was the assembly at the Peace Arch,
on the boundary-line at Blaine, Washington, of thousands of pupils from Surrey, Langley,
Richmond, Delta, Vancouver, and New Westminster Schools, and thousands of pupils from
the State of Washington. This assembly gave a practical demonstration of two nations
living side by side in peace.
Although the pupils engaged in many extra-curricular activities the class-room work
of the pupils showed steady improvement. We extend our congratulations to Miss Margaret
McClory, a student of the Duke of Connaught High School, for obtaining the highest marks in
the Province at the Senior Matriculation examinations.
A testing programme, capably handled by the principals and teachers, was carried out
throughout the school system. H 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
It is with a feeling of appreciation that we acknowledge the industry and foresight of the
principals, teachers, and pupils in installing public-address systems, radio connected, in all
schools.    The value of this work especially at this time need not be stressed.
Physical Development received its due consideration and definite progress was noted.
Libraries are receiving attention and are rapidly being equipped to meet the needs of
the student-body.
The congratulations of those interested are offered to Mrs. Helen Gilley, B.A., of the
Duke of Connaught High School staff, on being chosen as a representative teacher of British
Columbia to Japan, and to Mr. Alex Turnbull, B.A., M.C., M.M., Principal of the Robson-
Howay Junior High and Elementary Schools, appointed to the Department of Education as
Inspector of Schools at Prince Rupert.
Again it is a pleasure to refer to the hearty co-operation and able assistance given at all
times by the Department of Education, and to the careful attention given to all school
problems by the Board of School Trustees, keen business-men, who give of their time and
ability without remuneration.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF NORTH VANCOUVER AND THE DISTRICT
MUNICIPALITIES OF NORTH AND WEST VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The year 1938-39 saw no major changes in the organization of the school systems included in the three municipalities which comprise this inspectorate. It was marked, however,
by a steady progress and the consolidation of gains brought about through changes effected
during the past year or two. Financial strain continues to exist, particularly in North Vancouver, yet the schools throughout the area are providing educational services of a high degree
of excellence.
NORTH VANCOUVER.
The administration of the schools in the two North Vancouver municipalities is still being
carried on by a Commissioner acting for the School Boards. His ready acquiescence to suggestions for improving the school system indicates his interest in the educational welfare of
the children in this area. So far as the schools are concerned the present form of municipal
government meets with very little criticism.
The school buildings are kept in an excellent state of repair and each year a definite
programme of work is carried out, planned to keep plant and equipment in first-class order.
An effort is now being made to provide a gymnasium for the high school, the present accommodation being inadequate.
In harmony with conditions existing elsewhere, the enrolment in the elementary classes
has shown a downward trend, while that of the high-school groups has exhibited a gradual
increase. Little further increase, however, is anticipated in high-school enrolment. Because
of the reduced numbers, two divisions in the city elementary schools and one in the district
were closed at the end of the present year. In one respect this is a fortunate situation, since
it leaves a number of vacant rooms to take care of future expansion when it occurs.
WEST VANCOUVER.
The Board of School Trustees for West Vancouver has, during the past year, given considerable thought to the matter of buildings. The oldest building, Hollyburn School, has been
redecorated and lighting improvements have been made. The Director of the Health Unit
co-operated in this scheme and, as a result, the lighting and general appearance of the school
have been greatly improved. The enrolment in high-school classes is steadily mounting, with
a consequent congestion in that building. The Board plans an addition to provide further
accommodation, and it is expected that a by-law will be presented to the electorate by the
municipal council in the very near future to provide funds for this purpose. When completed
the building will have all the facilities needed to carry on a modern educational programme.
A senior matriculation class was organized at the beginning of the school-year and it
proved to be so successful that it will no doubt be permanently established.    It is a great con- REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. H 63
venience  and  decidedly  more  economical  to  those  students  desiring  first year  University
standing.
In spite of the increased building activity in the municipality the elementary enrolment
remains more or less stationary. This again is fortunate from the standpoint of building
accommodation, since there is at present little room for any considerable expansion without
the erection of new buildings.
GENERAL.
The discontinuance of the High School Entrance examinations brought with it no
problems, and met with the approval of all teachers concerned. The two senior high schools
in this inspectorate were placed on the accredited list and, as a result, time, labour, and
expense were saved through the recommendation of students who would normally have little
difficulty in passing the prescribed examinations.
As part of a scheme for teacher-training-in-service, and for bringing into effect suggestions made in the new Programme of Studies, the teaching of reading was made a major
study during the year.
The following outline of procedure indicates the plan used.
(1.)   Survey from Grade III. through Grade XIII. by means of standardized reading
tests.
(2.)  Discussion of results and procedure outlined at a meeting of Principals and
Inspector.
(3.)   Schools supplied with basic text-books on the teaching of reading, supplemented
by additional staff purchases.
(4.)   Circulars sent out from Inspector's office dealing with various phases of the
subject.
(5.)   Discussion by individual school staffs, under the direction of the Principal, of
the matter contained in circulars.
(6.)   Series of lectures given to teachers of Remedial Reading classes by Dr. H. B.
King, of the Department of Education.
(7.)   Formation of Remedial groups in the various schools.
The question of reading readiness was considered at length by the primary teachers.
The primary teacher at Queen Mary School followed a non-reading programme during the
first term and the results were extremely encouraging.
With the co-operation of the teaching staffs, the Director of the Health Unit carried on
an extensive survey of lighting and ventilation and valuable data were secured. Definite
suggestions have been made for improvements in these directions. The changes previously
referred to in connection with Hollyburn School were in accordance with these suggestions.
During the year, in North Vancouver, the Kiwanis Dental Committee continued to provide much-needed dental treatment to the school children of parents unfortunately unable
themselves to meet the cost. Liberal donations of funds by the local Kiwanis Club made this
project possible. Plans have been completed whereby this treatment will be provided by a
part-time dentist with equipment installed in one of the schools.
Other community organizations exhibit an interest in the schools of this area and give
assistance in various ways. The Junior Board of Trade co-operated actively in a Sports Meet
for school pupils of junior high-school age, and again, various local organizations assisted the
teachers of Lynn Valley School in a Field Day.
Adult education was carried on in North Vancouver through a class in Auto Mechanics,
and in West Vancouver by means of Woodworking, Commercial, and Auto Mechanics classes,
and in both areas by means of the Department's Physical Recreation Groups.
Radio programmes are now an integral part of the schools' activities, thanks to the
excellent broadcasts made available by the Department of Education. Little has yet been
done in the matter of Visual Education, but the success of this type of instruction in other
centres and the growing supply of available material warrants a move in this direction.
I wish to express my appreciation of the help given me in my work by officials of the
Department of Education, of the co-operation given by the Commissioner for North Vancouver and the Board of School Trustees for West Vancouver, and of the interest in schools
shown by the Parent-Teacher Associations. The success of the schools is mostly due, however, to the teachers themselves, who have worked loyally and harmoniously. H 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1938-39.
SCHOOLS OF THE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY OF BURNABY.
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
I submit herewith the annual report of the Burnaby District Municipality School District
for the school-year 1938-39.
ENROLMENT AND STAFF.
There has been little appreciable change from last year in the number of pupils in the
Burnaby schools. In the elementary schools 3,982 pupils were enrolled, 1,174 were enrolled
in the high schools, and 104 received permits to attend the technical schools in New Westminster and Vancouver. The teaching staff consisted of 155 teachers. Of these, 122 were
on the elementary-school staff, 33 on the high-school staff, including instructors of Industrial
Arts and Home Economics. While the general enrolment is about the same as the past year,
there is a noticeable change in the distribution of the school population. There appears to
be some falling off in the numbers attending the elementary schools, principally in the
primary grades;   on the other hand, a decided increase is noted in the high schools.
This situation has resulted in considerable congestion in the two high schools. During
the present year, three class-rooms in the elementary schools were utilized for high-school
purposes. It is anticipated that at least seven high-school classes will have to be accommodated next term in the elementary-school buildings. Plans are under way for the provision of a junior high-school programme in Burnaby which should take care of this situation.
SCHOOL ACTIVITIES.
The Burnaby schools are, to a satisfactory degree, satisfying the spirit and requirements
of the curriculum. Modern procedures are followed and the schools are progressively
developing methods and materials to render their work as