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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1940

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1939
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OP  THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1940.  To His Honour Eric W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1939 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 19 UO. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-second Annual Report on the work
of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1939.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 191,0. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister   7
Statistics of Trades and Industries   7
Pay-roll     7
Comparison of Pay-rolls  8
Industrial Divisions   9
Average Weekly Wage by Industries   10
Nationality of Employees   15
Statistical Tables   16
Summary of all Tables   29
" Hours of Work Act "   3j
Comparative Figures   30
Average Weekly Hours   31
Labour Legislation   32
" Barbers Act "  (amendment)   ,_.___.___:  32
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "  (new)    32
" Weekly Half-holiday Act "  (amendment)    33
" Workmen's Compensation Act " (amendment)   34
Board of Industrial Relations   35
New or Revised Orders   35
Hours of Work Regulations   36
Statistics covering Women and Girls '  39
Summary of all Occupations   44
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees  46
Inspections and Collections   47
Court Cases   47
Comparative Wages   54
Special Licences   55
Summary of all Orders   57
List of Orders   73
Regulations     7g
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "   81
Number of Strikes and Employees affected   81
Summary of Disputes   g2
Strikes -  g2
Boards of Arbitration   g7
Organizations of Employees   102
Organizations of Employers   HI
Inspection of Factories   112
Inspections   H2
Accident-prevention  •__ 112
Factory Conditions   H3
Home-work    ^13
Elevators   ;q4
Prosecutions    -Q4
Employment Service   -Q5
Youth Training Plans   -Qg
Employment Conditions   216
Importation of Labour   j-^
Placement Tables   -qo
Unemployment Relief   219
Registration   ^in
Assistance to Settlers Plan   j,g
Forestry Training Plan   2jg
Mining Training Plan   ,,«
Farm Placement   -,90 G 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Unemployment Relief—Continued. Page.
Works Projects   120
Numbers assisted under Various Plans „  120
Statement of Relief   122
Apprenticeship Branch   128
Contracts in Force   129
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "   130
Occupations registered as Trade-schools   130
Definitions under Act  t  130
Regulations    131
Fees for Registration   131
Safety Branch (Lumber Industry)   133 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1939.
The twenty-second Annual Report of the Department of Labour, covering the year 1939,
gives further evidence of the gradual climb back to the more prosperous conditions that prevailed in the Province at the peak period of its industrial expansion.
The slight recession recorded in last year's report has been overcome and the industrial
pay-roll of the Province for the year under review is the highest since 1930.
While the pay-rolls in some sections of industry have receded, the pay-rolls in the majority
of our industrial groups have expanded, and, all combined, show a general increase of more
than $7,500,000 over the preceding year.
The numbers employed remain approximately the same as in 1938, while the average
weekly wage of industrial workers has increased to a point closest to that of 1929.
The reports of the various branches of the Department, as published herein, indicate that
their activities have been maintained, their responsibilities fulfilled, and their duties adequately discharged.
The period under review embraces the first months of the war in which Canada is
engaged, and its effect upon industry and labour is being increasingly felt as the conflict
develops.
New responsibilities will have to be met by the Department, as well as by every employer
and every employee throughout the Province.
We are convinced that all will go forward, determined that these responsibilities will be
met in keeping with the need of the hour.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The statistics of trade and industry for the year 1939 shows an increased total pay-roll,
although the number of firms reporting decreased by sixty-six firms.
The pay-roll in the lumber industry increased approximately $2,250,000 and the pulp and
paper industry increased $611,000. Average weekly wages increased in nineteen of the
twenty-five tables, and the average wage for all tables increased 10 cents per week.
Due to war conditions, the tables are likely to show several changes during 1940. Some
will likely show sharp increases, such as ship-building, metal trades, and certain lines in the
manufacturing industry, while the shipping table will likely show a decrease due to the uncertain movements of ships.
We have to thank employers for a more prompt return of the statistical forms, and
would ask that those who neglected to complete the forms on time assist in an early release
of the Annual Report by making their return before the date requested on the form.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 4,829.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,829, as
compared with 4,895 in 1938, a decrease of 66.
PAY-ROLL.
For the 4,829 firms reporting, a summary of the pay-rolls reveals a total of $126,311,023.
As this figure covers only the industrial pay-rolls, it should not, however, be considered as the
total pay-roll of the Province, and must be further augmented by the following, yielding an
accumulative total of $165,683,460, an increase of $7,657,085 over 1938:—
Pay-roll of 4,829 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $126,311,023
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   518,700
Employees in occupations  included  in Department's inquiry,  not sending in returns
(estimated pay-roll)   __ _ _.             1,350,000
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)       12,503,737
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey—viz., Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, delivery, auto transportation, ocean
services,  miscellaneous—estimated pay-roll           25,000,000
Total -     - $165,683,460 G 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
1934  ._. $113,567,953.00
1935     125,812,140.00
1936     142,349,591.00
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1928 are as follows:—
1928  —- $183,097,781.00
1929   192,092,249.00
1930—  167,133,813.00
1931... _..._'.   131,941,008.00       1937..... . 162,654,234.00
1932      102,957,074.00       1938  158,026,375.00
1933     99,126,653.00       1939   165,683,460.00
With the increase in the total pay-roll, the percentage of the total payable to wage-
earners increased from 77.10 per cent, in 1938 to 77.32 per cent, in 1939.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
Officers, superintendents, and managers— 	
Per Cent.
11.06
12.65
76.29
Per Cent.
10.54
11.70
77.76
Per Cent.
10.00
11.33
78.67
Per Cent.
10.82
12.08
77.10
Per Cent.
10.82
11.86
Wage-earners 	
77.32
Totals      	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Increases are revealed in nineteen of the twenty-five tables, the remaining six showing
decreases. Of the former, the lumber industries headed the list with an increase of $2,262,230,
followed by pulp and paper mills with $611,417, and public utilities with $466,183; coalmining increased by $348,178; wood (N.E.S.) with an addition of $282,885; ship-building
up $273,377; printing and publishing showed an additional $251,661; food products up
$227,343; Coast shipping, $210,155; miscellaneous trades, $184,889; metal trades, $65,644;
house-furnishings, $61,487; garment-making, $47,041; explosives and chemicals, $41,076;
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $14,365; paint-manufacture, $11,668; leather and fur goods,
$6,630;  jewellery-manufacture, $3,759;   cigar and tobacco manufacturing, $2,069.
The decreases include the following, headed by contracting with a decrease of $768,172;
metal-mining with a loss of $396,485; smelting, down $309,813; oil-refining, $44,832; breweries, $38,849;  builders' materials,
Industry.
No. of
Fii-ms
rerjort-
ing.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll
Breweries   —
Builders' materials   ___	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing—. ~
Coal-mining —  	
Coast shipping    ___.
Contracting    	
Explosives and chemicals 	
Food products    	
Garment-making   _  	
House-furnishing   	
Manufacturing jewellery 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods .
Lumber industries.  	
Metal trades   _ 	
Metal-mining    	
Misc .'llaneous  	
Oil-iefining -  .
Paint-manufacture 	
Printing and publishing.	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building  	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc.   	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.).
Totals  	
35
73
4
27
121
887
18
555
68
57
12
101
54
877
742
310
304
41
13
128
17
40
5
115
107
$1,045
1,063,
5
3,716
9.642
9,029
1,727.
10,752
1,005
1,075
214
1,462
624
29.570.
8,319:
11,715,
4,095:
2,368
328.
3.480
5,591.
1,236,
5,953,
9,900,
2,759,
6«3.00
149 00
918.00
206.00
,662.00
.033.00
,071.00
488.00
868.00
290.00
.622.00
.195.00
,492.00
433.00
034.00
113.00
.326.00
,523.00
930.00
421.00
394.00
139.00
407.00
176.00
804.00
4,711 [$126,683,377.00
32
76
3 j
23 j
120 j
955 |
21 |
559 j
70 |
51 |
12
100 I
55 |
893 [
766 j
311 |
368 |
49 [
12 |
133 |
14 [
42 !
5 !
117 j
108 I
,019,004.00
30
,273,168.00
75
954.00
3
,339,646.00
26
,661,563.00
124
,183,753.00
978
,462,151.00
19
,745,177.00
586
770,248.00
65
,068,292.00
50
219.970.00
10
.469.915.00
101
622.090.00
64
,591,371.00
832
,451.066.00
764
,088,397.00
276
,293,898.00
345
,362,192.00
47
346.352.00
12
,516.186.00
143
,076,924.00
14
,205,838.00
49
.934,525 00
6
,150,064.00
112
,645,353.00
108
;,895 |$122,498,097.00
$980.
1,272,
3.
3,687,
8,871,
8,415,
1,503,
10,972,
817.
1,129,
223,
1.484.
628,
28,853,
8,516,
11,691,
5,478,
2,317,
358,
3,767,
4,688,
1,479,
5,624,
10,616,
2,928,
.155.00
188.00
.023.00
824.00
.718.00
581.00
,227.00
.520.00
.289.00
779.00
.729.00
280.00
720.00
601.00
710.00
.912.00
.787.00
360.00
020.00
847.00
341.00
215.00
712.00
247.00
238.00
4,829 ]$126,311,023.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 9
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
For the purposes of localizing the industrial activities of the Province, a segregation has
been made comprising three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of
Mainland.
During the year 1939, the percentage representing the Greater Vancouver area decreased
slightly from 35.14 per cent, to 34.76 per cent. Vancouver Island dropped slightly from
20.90 per cent, to 20.72 per cent. The Mainland percentage, however, due largely to increases
in the lumbering section of the pay-roll, increased from 43.96 per cent, in 1938 to 44.52 per
cent, in 1939.
The percentages quoted are based on the returns received, the figures contained in the
following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll:—
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
Greater Vancouver	
$49,142,221.94
56,728,693.99
19,941,224.22
S48,356,156.06
67,758.405.32
26,235,029.62
$53,610,835,53        $55,530,468.18
77,325,822.84   ,       69,468,394.45
31,717,575.63  !       33,027,512.37
$57,591,570.70
73,762,276.39
Vancouver Island .'.. —	
34,329,612.91
Totals -  	
$125,812,140.15
$142,349,591.00
$162,654,234.00       $158,026,375.00
$165,683,460.00
The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number, together
with the percentage of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Number
Industry. employed.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing          4
Leather and fur goods    — —         341
Garment-making     —   —          226
Paint-manufacture   —             121
Builders'   materials     — — —    1,253
Food   products    ,    - — —     10,510
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing
House-furnishing	
Metal   trades   ..J - 	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Wood   (N.E.S.)    - -
Contracting   -	
Printing  and  publishing -
Breweries      - —	
Coast shipping  — -	
Smelting     —
Explosives  and chemicals   —
Street-railways, power, etc _	
Coal-mining     —
Lumber  industries 	
Oil-refining     - —
Pulp and paper manufacturing
Ship-building     —	
Metal-mining    	
Jewellery-manufacture    — —
557
666
4,768
3,697
2,396
9,992
1,126
476
5,740
3,549
864
5,161
2,779
27,388
1,105
2,869
1,843
8,016
58
Per
Cent.
50.00
37.24
33.19
32.23
32.08
30.82
27.29
24.77
23.45
18.53
16.65
13.92
12.61
12.39
12.39
9.33
8.91
8.20
7.45
5.98
5.34
4.08
3.69
2.27
1.72
A comparative study of the above figures with similar data for the year 1938 again
shows diminishing percentages in the number employed at less than $19 per week. Decreases
in these percentages are disclosed in seventeen of the twenty-five industries listed, and include
the following: Builders' materials; cigar and tobacco manufacturing; coal-mining; explosives
and chemicals; garment-making; house-furnishing; jewellery-manufacture; lumber industries; metal trades; miscellaneous trades and industries; oil-refining; paint-manufacture;
printing and publishing; pulp and paper manufacturing; smelting; street-railways, power,
etc.;  and wood (N.E.S.).
APPRENTICES.
A reference to the tables shows nine apprentices reported as in receipt of from $35 to $40
per week, distributed as follows: Contracting, 3; printing and publishing, 1; pulp and paper
manufacturing, 1; street-railways, power, etc.', 4. Eighteen are shown as receiving between
$30 and $35 per week, these being segregated as follows:   Coast shipping, 1;   contracting, 1; G 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
metal trades, 4;   printing and publishing, 2;   pulp and paper manufacturing, 4;   street-rail
ways, power, etc., 6.
Increasing opportunities for apprentices during the
Building materials increased by 1; Coast shipping, 1;
chemicals, 2; food products, 15; garment-making, up
manufacture, 3;   laundries, 7;   miscellaneous trades, 3;
Decreases are noted in the following: Breweries,
down 8; lumber industries, 6; metal trades, 67; metal
13;   pulp and paper, 8;   ship-building, 12;   smelting, 2;
year were noted in many industries,
contracting, up 44;   explosives and
13;   house-furnishing, 2;   jewellery-
wood (N.E.S.), 2.
decreased 2;   leather and fur goods,
mining, 23;   printing and publishing,
street-railways, etc., 1.
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the average weekly wage for
adult male employees increased in nineteen of the twenty-five tables. While with some industries considerable difficulty is experienced in the matter of broken time, the figures have been
computed as in previous years—an endeavour being made to base calculations on a full
working-week. Frequency distributions of employees classified on the basis of weekly earnings from $6 to $50 are used for this purpose, the mid-point of the class-limits generally
being taken as the rate for each group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1932.     |     1933.     |     1934.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
Breweries         	
Builders' materials   .     	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining    	
Coast shipping-   	
Contracting...  	
Explosives and chemicals   	
Food products, manufacture of....	
Garment-making - 	
House-furnishing  	
Jewellery, manufacture of   ..  	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods ...
Lumber industries  	
Metal trades      	
Metal-mining  	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil-refining    -	
Paint-manufacturing ...- 	
Printing and publishing   . 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building —	
Smelting....    	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc   -	
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.)	
$25.65
21.95
14.28
28.04
26.50
24.78
23.34
21.88
24.07
20.05
23.40
23.26
21.62
18.73
24.24
25.50
22.78
29.34
25.00
37.05
24.63
26.17
22.98
28.89
20.61
$25.70
20.54
14.67
26.80
27.62
23.37
20.66
21.12
25.29
18.91
30.55
21.78
20.73
18.00
22.70
25.62
22.13
23.78
22.53
32.82
21.21
25.25
23.83
24.51
18.05
I
$25.62
20.19
15.86
28.11
28.58
22.56
22.53
21.10
23.52
19.49
28.88
20.67
22.34
21.32
22.81
27.35
21.26
25.04
22.53
32.51
23.22
26.03
23.88
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
25.51    I    27.09
18.97    |    18.69
I
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61
24.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
$26.18
22.31
15.60
27.46
31.99
25.61
24.58
23.85
22.97
22.25
34.60
22.89
21.23
26.81
24.77
30.34
23.85
27.92
23.08
33.69
26.75
27.88
25.08
27.20
21.97
$27.42
22.82
13.00
28.20
32.93
25.81
24.20
23.70
23.15
20.80
38.95
23.33
22.23
26.59
25.09
30.48
23.46
28.68
22.78
34.19
26.36
28.76
24.80
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:—
Increase.
$27.98
23.23
19.75
29.39
29.35
26.12
25.75
23.23
24.25
22.53
39.23
23.19
21.19
27.14
25.38
30.86
23.91
28.97
22.69
34.34
26.54
28.55
25.57
27.78    |    28.63
22.68     [     23.22
I
Breweries   	
Builders' materials
$0.56
.41
Metal trades
$0.29
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing      6.75
Coal-mining  —- -      1.19
Contracting    - 31
Explosives and chemicals   _     1.55
Garment-making    _     1.10
House-furnishing -  _     1.73
Jewellery, manufacture of _ 28
Lumber  industries         .55
Metal-mining _ _   38
Miscellaneous trades and industries .
Oil-refining      ____ ,	
Printing and publishing -.—	
Pulp and paper manufacturing 	
Smelting    	
.45
.29
.15
.18
.77
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc        .85
Manufacturing of wood   (N.E.S.) _.      .54 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 11
Decrease.
Coast shipping  _.   $3.58
Food products, manufacture of   47
Laundries,  cleaning and dyeing   -      .14
Manufacturing leather and fur goods .
Paint-manufacturing     	
Ship-building      	
$1.04
.09
.21
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees was $26.80, an increase of $0.10
over 1938, and the following shows the average for each year since the formation of the
Department:—
1918  $27.97
1919    —. 29.11
1920 _....     31.51
1921  — _  27.62
1922..
1923-
1924..
1925-
1926..
1927-
1928-
27.29
28.05
28.39
27.82
27.99
28.29
28.96
1929..
1930-
1931-
1932.
1933-
1934..
  —   $29.20
   28.64
     26.17
  23.62
     22.30
     23.67
1935-    24.09
1936—  26.36
1937— —  26.64
1938 -  26.70
1939   26.80
The above weekly wage-rates appear in the following chart, showing the trend of average
weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1939.
AVERAGE   WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT  MALE   EMPLOYEES
1918— .1939
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
32.00
31 :oo
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26. OO
25.00
2n.OO
23.00
22.OO
jA
A
/
1
\
/
/
\
--"\
\
y^
\
\
\
\
/
\
/
\
\
/""
V G 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 13
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
1936
1937
1938
1939
i-
I
I
T
1
J  -
- T
	
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tiA^AA'A^fi   to   P A   B  S A REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 15
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
Of the total 120,092 employees reported under nationalities, 92,467 or 77 per cent, were
natives of English-speaking countries, a decrease of 0.20 per cent.; 17,655 or 14.70 per cent,
were originally from Continental Europe, a decrease of 0.11 per cent.; natives of Asiatic
countries employed showed a total of 8,820 or 7.34 per cent., increasing 0.24 per cent.
Employees from other countries increased slightly from 0.89 per cent, to 0.96 per cent.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
Per Cent.
72.83
15.25
8.28
3.64
Per Cent.
76.69
14.51
7.08
1.72
Per Cent.
75.42
14.83
7.46
2.29
Per Cent.
76.72
15.40
6.83
1.05
Per Cent.
77.20
14.81
7.10
.89
Per Cent.
77.00
Natives of Continental Europe 	
14.70
7.34
From other countries, or nationality not stated
.96
Totals 	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
During 1939 the number of firms showing a pay-roll of over $100,000 increased to a total
of 236 as against 219 in 1938.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal)
are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels
engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry was again in the lead with 74 firms, an increase of 5; followed by
food products with 27, unchanged; metal-mining, 22, an increase of 1; general contracting,
17, up 2; Coast shipping, 13, up 2; miscellaneous metal trades, 10, a decrease of 3; coalmining, 8, no change; oil-refining, 8, up 2; pulp and paper, 7, unchanged; public utilities, 7,
down 1; miscellaneous trades and industries, 6, up 2; printing and publishing, wood (N.E.S.),
6 each, both up 1; ship-building, 5, up 1; breweries, 3, down 1; builders' materials, 3, up 2;
house-furnishings, laundries, 3 each, both up 1; explosives and chemicals, smelting, 2 each,
both unchanged; garment-making, jewellery-manufacturing, leather and fur goods, paint-
manufacture, 1 each.
Of the 236 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $4,000,000, four between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and seven between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. G 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following-, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufac fairing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coalmining.— This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Skipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. — Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a:*d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.— Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxeB, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 30 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.. $238,953.OC
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    163,613.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    577,589.00
Total $980,155.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
April	
jMay	
June	
408
402
418
436
488
470
56
68
69
68
73
72
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
474
485
463
436
440
461
67
80
71
65
66
65
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to     9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
1
17
12
5
16
8
15
4
34
29
15
11
39
2
177
29
12
3
4
Females.
Appren-
18 Yrs.     Under      tices.
& over.    18 Yrs.
20
1
8
35
14
2
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
344
125
6
1
2
3
20
15
3
16
7
81 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 17
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 75 Firms.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers
ments, 1939.
rs     $2C
8,655.00
9,692.00
3,841.00
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
          11
1       94
 $1,272,188.00
Total
$3,023.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
April	
673
715
811
825
953
932
9
9
9
9
7
7
Julj
Aug
Sep
Oct
999
996
945
899
814
738
7
7
7
7
8
8
January....
February...
May	
1
1
2
1
4
4
1
1
July	
August.
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
4
4
3
4
3
4
ust....
ember .
)ber	
December...
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
tfc over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
tices.
Under *6 00	
1
i
1
1
1
$6.00 to   $6.
7.00 to     7.
)9...
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 to     7
8.00 to     8
9.00 to     9
10.00 to   10
ll.OOto   11
12.00 to   12
13.00 to   13
14.00 to   14
15.00 to   15
16.00 to   16
17.00 to   17
18.00 to   18
19.00 to   19
20.00 to   20
21.00 to   21
22.00 to   22
23.00 to   23
24.00 to   24
25.00 to   25
99
)9...
1
8
2
13
1
16
13
13
33
165
87
49
117
92
88
52
64
"5
53
43
29
25
29
64
53
44
21
12
99..
99..
1
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
1
3
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
99
99..
10.00 to   10.99...
2
1
2
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
99
99..
13.00 to   13.99...
99..
14.00 to   14.99...
99..
15.00 to   15.99...
99..
16.00 to   16.99...
99..
99..
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
1
1
99..
19.00 to   19.99...
99.
99..
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
2
1
22.00 to   22.99...
99
23.00 to   23.99...
99..
24.00 to   24.99...
99..
26.00 to   25.99...
99..
26.00 to   26.99...
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
27.00 to   27.99...
2
28.00 to   28.99...
28.00 to   28
29.00 to   29
30.00 to   34
35.00 to   39
40.00 to   44
45 00 tn   19
99..
29.00 to   29.99...
99..
30.00 to   34.99...
99
35.00 to   39.99...
99  .
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
99  .
50.00 and over ..
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
724
315
29
10
4
1
Great Britain and Ir
Great Britain and
France 	
Italv	
1
2
53
9
8
37
11
10
86
Italv	
Germany and Austr
Germany and Aust
Russia and Poland
Other European co
1
20
All other countries
All other countries G 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $123,979.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       138,510.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,425,335.00
Total $3,687,824 .00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
April	
2,795
2,640
2,565
2,491
2,505
2,628
2
2
1
1
1
1
July .
August	
September .
October ..
November...
December...
2,688
3,000
2,638
2,683
2,754
2,786
1
1
1
1
2
June	
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to
to
7.!
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
26.99.
27 99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
12
2
1
18
39
21
16
22
62
47
17
144
69
166
146
84
127
238
145
100
732
352
73
70
63
Under
21 Yrs.
6
6
12
2
9
24
3
15
10
4
3
9
7
19
18 Yrs.
jk over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
3ermany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland .  	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
1,052
999
48
2
9
7
241
32
365
33
77
17
108
Table No. 5.
COAST  SHIPPING.
Returns covering 12U Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $873,904.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       594,982.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,402,832.00
Total $8,871,718.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month. Males.   Females.
January.
February
March..
April ...
May	
June
4,557
4,716
4,901
4,951
6,231
5,475
50
49
56
53
64
Month.       Males.   Females
July	
August...
September
October...
November.
December
5,583
5,619
5,298
4,866
4,837
4,788
106
103
79
56
51
48
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
8
4
6
8
10
25
14
60
55
20
44
122
172
163
266
129
75
228
300
290
729
76
77
38
14
1,474
303
616
208
206
1
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
4
5
4
10
3
1
9
46
26
5
3
1
10 00 to   10.99..
1
ll.OOto   11.99..
1
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99
14.00 to   14.99..
3
3
7
15.00 to   16.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18 00 to   18.99
2
17
28
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
1
1
22.00 to   22.99..
11
1
4
i
23.00 to   23.99..
2
7
1
1
24.00 to   24.99  .
26.00 to   25.99  .
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99
2
1
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99
45.00 to   49.99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia 	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   ...
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
2,885
2,324
77
17
2
18
16
12
36
293
23
16
65
81
36
2 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 19
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 978 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,141,345.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       953,319.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,290,917.00
Total $8,415,581.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January 	
February....
March.......
April	
May	
June	
4,422
4,644
5,160
5,496
5,812
5,717
81
82
97
107
113
134
Month.       Males.    Females.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November .
December..
6,057
6,605
6,501
6,083
5,735
4,999
188
178
142
96
92
88
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
to   26.99.
27.99.
28 99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44 99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
&, over.
32
18
22
20
38
31
27
52
67
80
78
117
553
256
1,820
438
423
544
383
704
282
293
262
253
165
1,228
963
471
171
201
Under
21 Vrs.
4
4
10
9
6
11
7
12
2
12
10
14
6
7
7
3
2
4
Femalks.
18 Yrs.
& over.
60
27
16
11
9
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren.
tices.
4
5
8
9
7
5
19
16
6
10
10
2
29
3
10
4
3
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France     	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States . ..
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
5,786
3,430
248
25
19
39
175
166
180
613
319
29
2
3
5
126
Females.
172
56
3
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 19 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $84,088.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  283,203.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   1,136,936.00
Total $1,503,227.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
JVIales.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January   ...
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
734
710
729
734
753
770
12
11
13
14
14
14
July	
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
752
782
826
807
789
830
15
13
13
12
12
13
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.99
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99.
14.99.
15.99
16.99.
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99
24 99.
25.99.
to 26.99
to 27.99'.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
3
14
3
5
5
3
28
29
46
31
102
32
72
47
91
42
37
61
166
20
9
2
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium    .
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
513
278
30
1
2
11
1
4
29
6
15
4 G 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 586 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,544,738.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        1,616,784.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,810,998.00
Total $10,972,520.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February	
May	
3,727
3,743
3,932
4,489
5,409
6,603
1,025
1,013
1,032
1,135
1,353
2,154
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
7,935
8,482
7,939
7,269
6,090
4,777
4,036
4,476
4,790
4,189
3,227
1,702
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under $6
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
ll.OOto
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
16.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
2S.00to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
36.00 to
40.00 to
46.00 to
50.00 an
00 .
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
d over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
52
55
143
105
525
140
243
785
367
251
418
728
753
589
614
356
651
516
436
354
330
174
694
474
229
76
297
Under
21 Yrs.
49
15
20
28
24
39
19
53
17
33
44
27
13
29
15
16
15
9
15
7
10
5
1
1
2
4
2
18 Yrs.
& over.
113
149
120
398
695
892
429
749
733
253
395
313
144
100
82
58
52
56
57
57
44
43
35
97
11
3
Under
18 Yrs.
59
15
38
64
49
21
26
26
42
36
13
7
14
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country.	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
5,284
2,321
142
24
6
24
200
93
283
549
87
41
1,967
6
799
130
Apprentices.
15
4
18
3
8
11
3
5,165
736
50
3
5
44
60
118
95
84
168
10
19
646
316
Table No. 9.
Females.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 65 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $143,321.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         98,027.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       575,941.00
Total     $817,289 00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March...
April.   ..
May	
June	
209
525
216
609
226
641
234
649
225
622
212
558
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September .
October
November..
December ..
214
218
216
227
217
212
519
564
593
608
573
554
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
2
5
9
14
13
10
15
7
18
8
14
18
5
7
8
1
20
19
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
12
5
23
16
20
11
3
41
81
133
77
52
47
42
22
31
11
12
9
5
13
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
1
2
15
10
3
5
3
7
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.      Females.
130
61
3
1
23
3
17
131
10
2
1
3
5
9
5
22
19
107 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 21
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTBRING OF.
Returns covering 50 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $179,938.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    126,787.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    823,054.00
Total $1,129,779.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
753
141
785
154
761
143
739
142
731
146
716
144
Month.
July	
August...
September.
October   ..
November .
December..
Males.   Females.
727
768
727
760
830
817
132
163
153
173
195
186
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
MjJX.ES.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
(feover.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
4
2
6
28
19
10
34
43
41
14
18
16
1
4
2
1
1
4
1
3
16
76
34
11
23
9
3
8
2
1
12
1
3
1
"  1  "
16 00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11 00 to   11.99...
1
2
2
2
1
4
4
2
2
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   16.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
5
1
12
10
12
70
45
103
42
5S
68
13
40
28
24
10
36
15
42
14
5
2
1
3
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
1
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99.
22 00 to   22.99...
1
2
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.   .
1
25.00 to   25.99...
1
27.00to   27.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
40.00 to   44 99. ..
45.00 to   49.99.
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia        	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
624
205
18
1
2
6
14
16
26
25
6
1
184
38
5
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 10 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $22,990.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   98,129.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 102,610.00
Total $223,729.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
April	
June	
72
72
72
73
73
73
4
3
3
4
3
4
July	
August	
September..
November..
December...
74
74
74
73
76
76
4
4
4
4
0
6
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
2
$6.00 to   $6.99..
2
7.00 to     7.99..
1
8.00 to     8.99
1
9.00 to     9.99
1
10.00 to   10.99.
4
ll.OOto   11.99.
12.00 to   12.99..
1
13 00 to   13.99  .
1
14.00 to   14.99..
1
2
15.00 to   15.99..
1
16.00 to   16.99
2
17.00 to   17.99..
1
18.00 to   18 99..
1
19.00 to   19.99..
1
20.00 to   20.99
2
21.00 to   21.99
22.00 to   22 99. .
23.00 to   23.99
24.00 to   24.99
25.00 to   25.99
1
27.00 to   27.99..
1
29.00 to   29.99
2
17
7
5
2
20
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc,
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	 G 22
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 101 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $141,420.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      272,739.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,070,121.00
Total $1,484,280.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
May	
June   	
542
539
548
564
583
585
913
898
926
955
993
998
August  ....
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
590
596
676
663
56S
557
1,018
1,041
972
957
947
968
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
to
$6.99
to
7.99
to
8.99
to
9.99
to
10.99
to
11.99
to
12.99
to
13.99
to
14.99
to
15.99
to
16.99
to
17.99
to
18.99
to
19.99
to
20.99
to
21.99
to
22.99
to
23.99
to
24.99
to
26.99
to
26.99
to
27.99
to
28.99
to
29.99
to
34.99
to
39.99
to
44.99
to
49.99
and over
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
4
1
2
2
10
10
13
36
27
21
24
36
51
19
37
19
31
42
27
21
40
7
48
16
3
2
6
Under
21 Yrs.
9
8
2
10
2
2
2
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
18
4
6
16
32
33
34
107
351
165
120
37
22
23
11
12
2
1
1
11
13
10
5
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia   .
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
330
219
18
1
2
3
5
3
11
6
2
21
30
1
Apprentices.
1
2
6
21
704
302
23
1
2
9
15
18
2
20
23
5
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 54 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $117,694.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     116,695.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  394,331.00
Total $628,720.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
April	
May	
June	
320
340
354
344
342
340
Ill
122
126
117
128
130
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
337
343
377
379
397
387
142
148
162
182
183
163
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
"j
1
3
5
6
5
17
3
8
22
22
6
27
25
32
12
17
16
30
22
11
6
6
3
23
9
1
1
3
5
4
1
7
4
12
2
9
5
3
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
1
1
3
14
17
19
20
12
13
17
8
14
3
8
2
1
4
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
3
1
3
4
2
3
14.00 to   14.99..
1
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries   	
Males.
253
81
7
12
34
4
5
11
13
4
Females.
128
41
4 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 23
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 832 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $2,003,169.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       875,923.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 25,974,509.00
Total $28,863,601.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February .
March
April.
May	
June	
Males.     Females.
15,756
15,287
18,381
20,227
21,777
22,711
43
43
50
53
64
Month.
Males.
July	
21,963
August... .
20,549
September.
21,262
October ...
22,848
November.
21,913
December..
19,133
67
72
67
79
67
59
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
3
14
10
17
12
17
40
15
112
74
322
351
646
4,164
952
2,453
765
583
3,636
1,003
1,159
1,144
1,022
751
3,428
2,118
1,437
677
459
Under
21 Yrs.
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.99...
7.60 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
2
2
4
3
17
35
24
117
49
66
14
32
233
25
43
12
30
39
6
18
17
6
11
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
1
2
5
4
7
6
4
7
26
6
10
1
4
1
6
1
4
3
1
1
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99.   .
1
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
1
2
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99  ..
20.00 to   20.99...
2
2
21.00 to   21.99...
22 00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
27.00 to  27.99...
28.00 to   2d.99...
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99 ..
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy 	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries	
13,767
2,901
570
17
42
155
233
430
1,132
4,247
1,087
203
1,702
599
1,413
108
Males.       Females.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 764 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,790,108.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    2,014,547.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,712,055.00
Total     $8,516,710.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March..
April
May..
June .   ..
Males.   Females.
4,245
4,252
4,307
4,370
4,361
4,34S
145
141
140
140
148
151
Month.
Males.
July	
4,345
August	
4,384
September .
4,387
October ...
4,448
November ..
4.416
December...
4,336
154
161
173
179
188
209
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
11
10
8
7
18
22
23
49
37
40
365
113
216
199
228
290
138
350
148
255
256
174
137
146
134
779
404
104
45
62
Under
21 Yrs.
21
37
15
38
32
30
31
53
14
16
39
11
20
9
18 Yrs.
&over.
4
1
15
6
9
37
25
20
18
21
22
6
4
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc,
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
4,263
1,520
143
13
15
9
46
45
24
120
28
15
34
Apprentices.
21
14
17
27
15
18
22
26
13
15
11
6
6
7
1
6
3
199
39
3 G 24
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 276 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $885,626.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        713,156.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  10,093,130.00
Total $11,691,912.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March. .
April ....
May	
June ....
6,073
5,932
5,952
6,154
6,363
6,548
55
54
54
55
58
58
Month.       Males.   Females.
July 	
August...
September
October .
November.
December.
6,709
6,731
6,567
6,334
6,176
5,868
62
63
60
69
58
60
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly)
For Week of
Males.
F'EMALES.
Apprentices.
Employment Of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
5
1
6
7.00 to     7.99...
1
2
2
3
3
5
20
6
13
24
35
63
54
44
50
135
56
265
698
200
644
912
716
2,490
1,159
305
106
100
1
1
1
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
3
2
3
7
5
5
1
2
4
1
2
10
3
4
12.00 to   12.99...
6
2
2
20
3
i
i
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99.
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99.
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
1
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
4,102
1.552
272
9
6
25
163
162
439
1,261
154
63
81
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States 	
1
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
5
21
74
o
1
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 345 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $959,251.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.      924,798.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,594,738.00
Total  $5,478,787.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
Februar}'
March..,
April
May	
June
2,580
2,590
2,737
2,906
3,082
3,063
367
364
387
391
413
416
July	
August...
September
October ..
November
December
3,148
3,062
3,239
2,912
2,889
2,816
441
459
475
495
479
482
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99
11.99
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.90.
17.99
18-99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
to   22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
11
10
55
14
19
15
39
131
153
113
106
405
133
254
484
101
388
168
220
130
134
64
31
24
Under
21 Yrs.
26
7
22
38
14
22
4
23
8
23
20
16
6
6
21
18 Yrs.
& over.
11
2
5
12
3
11
6
65
42
145
92
46
32
38
19
12
Under
18 Yrs.
12
1
1
10
2
4
3
5
1
18
1
2
4
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   .
F>ance    	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
2,713
1,213
94
10
24
25
21
121
31
60
27
7
21
42
Apprentices.
5
2
2
13
2
5
11
5
5
546
135
7
2
10
2 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 25
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering ^7 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $270,855.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,067,863.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       978,642.00
Total    $2,317,360.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June ._...
Males.
F'emales.
602
14
588
14
510
12
544
14
647
14
683
13
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.    Females.
722
769
757
703
13
14
19
17
21
15
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Uuder
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
7.99.
8 99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
Stover.    21 Yrs.
1
4
1
4
2
14
9
23
111
25
69
43
8
81
71
36
12
77
14
218
188
63
19
11
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan       	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
873
325
32
4
1
1
9
4
97
14
2
13
13
43
12
1
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $86,875.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    135,961.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    135,184.00
Total  $368,020.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
F'emales.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
116
119
130
137
132
126
15
16
15
16
16
15
July	
September..
November ..
December...
128
128
120
116
116
114
15
13
13
13
12
12
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Wreek of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00 .
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99
1
8.00 to     8.99
1
8
4
7
9
5
5
5
13
7
4
3
4
8
4
7
16
1
7
4
3
3
1
10.00 to   10 99
12.00 to   12 99
1
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14 99..
5
5
2
2
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99  .
17.00 to   17.99
18.00to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99.
20.00 to   20 99 .
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22 99
23.00 to   23 99.
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25 99
27.00 to   27 99  .
29.00 to   29.99..
5
4
1
40.00 to   44 99  .
45.00 to   49.99..
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan :	
Japan 	
AH other countries	
126
57
2
1
16
5
1 G 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 143 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $567,011.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,234,509.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,966,327.00
Total $3,767,847.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
1,170
1,203
1,218
1,200
1,237
1,223
156
173
174
153
161
156
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,210
1,182
1,176
1,179
1,229
1,205
162
164
164
169
209
192
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
4
3
16
12
11
9
9
10
5
5
5
1
2
1
1
7
4
3
4
13
29
25
3
26
22
12
17
8
4
27
3
16
2
1
2
1
1
3
6
1
1
4
1
4
2
1
10
$6.00 to  $6.99.  .
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
2
2
4
4
10
12
12
13
14
24
15
12
18
14
40
8
28
18
14
46
17
22
25
8
81
151
336
97
79
5
2
7
3
9
4
14
9
3
12
6
2
3
4
5
5
2
2
3
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
2
2
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over. ..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries 	
Males.       Females.
1,083
484
38
5
2
2
13
30
3
272
44
4
1
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 14 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $543,716.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      437,103.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,707,522.00
Total    ...   .$4,088,341.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
.Males.
Females.
February...
June	
2,133
2,450
2,442
2,429
2,439
2,722
71
79
80
77
78
82
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
2,745
2,754
2,779
2,841
2,904
2,905
91
100
100
112
112
114
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
<to over.
1
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
7.00to    7.99..
1
1
1
8.00to    8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
1
10.00 to   10.99..
1
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
2
2
1
30
14
28
2
6
12
2
3
2
14.00 to   14.99..
2
3
1
16.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
8
1
3
102
226
44
438
249
211
228
257
123
121
93
65
341
193
78
41
44
3
1
1
32
1
9
7
17.00to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
4
2
21.00 to   21.99
22.00 to   22.99
1
24 00 to   24.99  .
25.00 to   25.99
15
2
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
1
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
1
4
1
46.00 to   49.99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
,376
812
37
7
67
21
7
391
146
94
19
5 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 27
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 49 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $169,312.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  95,264.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,214,639.00
Total. $1,479,215.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March...
April	
May	
June
800
800
977
868
1,008
July	
August....
September.
October....
November .
December..
846
797
1,003
1,526
1,052
735
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99
7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to   13.'
to   14.:
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
»to over
3
1
1
2
4
8
2
1
4
6
3
29
1
17
2
5
620
16
45
19
28
38
23
133
442
328
40
Under
21 Yrs.
1
1
16
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Appreii'
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan	
All other countries	
1,044
621
3
9
7
5
71
3
2
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 6 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $259,885.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         860,364.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,504,463.00
Total     $5,624,712.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   F'emales. Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March..
April
May	
June
23
23
25
25
24
24
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
3,143
3,141
3,271
3,292
3,252
3,266
24
24
23
23
23
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
to   23.9
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
(to over. ■ 21 Yrs.
60
9
11
12
19
15
12
17
71
29
43
60
102
195
314
320
246
247
222
257
245
288
567
132
19
4
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
13
6
6
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
1,694
1,070
103
6
6
5
398
52
79
146
33
1
3
13
Great Britain and Ireland	
3
Belgium	
Italy	
3
1
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
47
2 G 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 112 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $878,620.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,822,177.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,915,450.00
Total     $10,616,247.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April....
May. ...
June	
3,919
4,025
4,164
4,364
4,155
4,211
1,549
1,571
1,620
1,645
1,745
1,750
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October...
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
4,341
4,414
4,544
4,537
4,441
4,349
1,746
1,737
1,600
1,673
1,611
1,610
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99...
to 7.99...
to 8.99. .
to     9.99...
to 10.99...
to 11.99.   .
to 12.99...
to 13.99...
to 14.99...
to 15.99...
to 16.99...
to 17.99...
to 18.99...
to 19.99...
to 20.99...
to 21.99...
to 22.99...
to 23.99...
to 24.99...
to 25.99...
to 26.99...
to 27.99...
to 28.99...
to 29.99...
to 34.99..
to 39.99...
to 44.99...
to 49.99...
and over ...
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
13
16
37
127
29
85
52
38
467
130
122
309
146
367
169
141
341
241
196
1,059
364
462
143
81
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
19
78
40
11
354
248
15
192
81
515
117
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan ,	
All other countries	
Males.
2,910
2,439
203
13
3
9
70
68
65
173
44
12
13
2
4
21
Apprentices.
Females.
1,536
455
60
3
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 108 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $429,325.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      182,682.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,316,231.00
Total   $2,928,238.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
February...
March	
June .......
1,770
1,773
1,906
2,085
2,302
2,320
77
74
73
90
153
144
July	
August	
.September ..
October ....
November...
December ..
2,385
2,490
2,433
2,383
2,313
2,206
138
104
107
113
100
74
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to   25.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to S9.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
S
6
10
12
33
117
103
444
159
140
132
156
361
51
109
78
86
45
85
96
34
7
14
Under
21 Yrs.
1
2
3
4
2
5
33
143
112
108
16
40
2
14
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
2
9
3
18
9
35
12
26
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
FYance	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
2,035
614
50
4
5
20
23
32
56
106
73
14
33
2
64
22
Females REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 29
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,829 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1939.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers ...
Clerks,  Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)   ....
$13,665,138.00
14,977,031.00
97,668,854.00
$126,311,023.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary  —  	
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's inquiry, and
from whom returns were not received  —     _	
Transcontinental Railways  -   	
Pay-rolls of additional services not included in the industrial survey—viz., Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, delivery, auto transportation, ocean
services, miscellaneous—estimated pay-roll    	
$518,700.00
1,350,000.00
12,603,737.00
25,000,000.00
39,372,437.00
Total..
$165,683,460.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January. . .,
February .
March	
April	
May	
June.  	
July	
August ....
September.
October....
November.
December..
Males.
582
063
990
624
169
340
,086
223
,997
058
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries   	
53,!
23,!
2,:
159
121
351
758
196
739
044
087
482
397
622
,952
817
Females.
5,448
5.576
5,748
5,916
6,394
7,173
9,149
9,687
9,790
9,274
8,244
6,654
Males.      Females.
9,937
2,093
172
14
9
60
98
163
110
176
236
25
46
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
91
Under $6.00	
254
116
260
74
$6.00 to   $6.99..
82
82
109
66
47
7.00 to     7.99..
114
115
162
44
71
8.00 to     8.99..
179
174
206
82
81
9.00 to     9.99..
191
148
190
95
98
10.00 to   10.99..
357
171
483
66
72
ll.OOto   11.99..
274
187
796
29
75
12.00 to   12.99..
872
433
1,323
50
94
13.00 to   13.99..
510
259
1,007
41
70
14.00 to   14.99..
888
360
1,482
90
39
16.00 to   15.99..
1,744
267
1,626
45
60
16.00 to   16.99..
1,722
317
800
18
25
17.00 to   17.99..
2,171
112
625
12
56
18.00 to   18.99..
2,450
135
699
25
19
19.00 to   19.99..
9,381
394
388
8
26
20.00 to   20.99..
3,569
61
810
2
16
21.00 to   21.99..
5,330
100
249
4
16
22.00 to   22.99..
5,212
80
117
2
11
23.00 to   23.99..
3,117
62
119
2
8
24.00 to   24.99..
7,963
70
87
1
13
25.00 to   25.99..
4,834
55
93
1
8
26.00 to   26.99..
3,581
30
64
6
27.00 to   27.99..
3,891
37
57
13
28.00 to   28.99..
3,911
19
64
1
29.00 to   29.99..
2,948
13
36
6
30.00 to   34.99 .
14,573
18
107
18
35.00 to   39.99..
7,530
7
12
9
4,417
1,735
1
4
45.00 to   49.99..
1
1,705
95,505
1
774
Totals	
3,823
11,967
1,032 G 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective the Board has shown the average hours
by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the years 1930 to
1939, inclusive.
Of the thirty industries covered, fifteen showed increases in the average weekly hours
worked, the remaining fifteen registering decreases.
COMPARATIVE FIGURES, 1930 TO 1939.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 64 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930	
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
4,829
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
94.045
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
88.68
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
6.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
5.29
5.42
Per Cent.
9.04
1931  -        	
1932   	
9.44
11.92
1933 	
1934                             ....
11.12
9.06
1935
5.96
1936
6.46
1937
6.12
1938  ,. -
6.04
1939      -	
5.90
The average weekly working-hours
1939        _	
for all employees for same years being :-
17.80
6.84
7.25
7.63
7.17
7.32
7.35
7.69
7.37
8.62
1938    	
        4
1937  	
 _               4
1936	
      4
1935	
 _               4
1534	
i
1933	
4
1932  _	
    4
1931	
    4
1930   	
                           ...                      4
The 4,829 industrial firms submitting forms to the Department of Labour gave information regarding hours covering 94,045 male and female employees. A segregation shows 88.68
per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 5.42 per cent, working from 48 to 54 hours per
week, and 5.90 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.                                     G 31
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
45.15
44.55
44.98
44.44
44.60
45.15
44.53
44.63
45.41
45.07
44.38
43.45
42.73
24.00
40.40
47.99
48.03
47.91
47.93
47.92
49.72
48.58
46.93
48.54
49.42
43.81
44.57
44.11
43 85
43.82
48.36
43.83
46.70
47.20
42.57
48.85
50.54
49.05
47 43
47 59
42.60
44.79
44.39
43 22
43.69
45.50
44.92
45.61
44 33
44 12
43 54
44.43
44 30
44 49
44.74
45 20
45 61
Lumber industries—
48.46
48.66
48.49
48.38
48.47
52.46
50.70
50 91
47.30
45.07
45.77
44.67
45.80
49.16
48.45
48 45
48 71
48.35
48.50
48 23
47 98
47.46
47.28
46 65
45.02
45.36
45 46
44 93
50 05
49.89
50 25
Miscellaneous trades and industries  	
48.93
46.17
46.20
45.78
45.64
42.76
47.29
46 70
48 81
47 69
Paint-manufacturing _      	
43.81
43.87
44.16
44.11
44.10
44 10
44 54
44 37
47.99
47.85
47.95
44 29
47 96
43.97
43.75
43.85
44 05
44 08
44.27
47.90
47 92
44.87
45.29
45.36
45 23
45 11
Wood manufacture (not elsewhere specified)  	
46.09
46.05
46.72
46.29
46.39
It will be noted that two rather pronounced changes have taken place in the above table.
In the explosive, chemical, etc., group, which includes the manufacture of fertilizers, it was
because one firm did not operate during 1939 that the average hours for the group decreased.
In the pulp and paper manufacturing group, the increase is accounted for by the fact that
one firm during 1938 was on short time, while during 1939 the plant was operating full time.
Other than the above only slight variations are recorded. G 32 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, 1939.)
"BARBERS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1939."
Section 11 of the " Barbers Act " formerly provided:—
(1.)   That a person  practising barbering in  British  Columbia must first pass an
examination of proficiency in barbering before a Board of Examiners:
(2.)   That a person failing to pass the examination might appeal to a County Court
Judge:
(3.)   That the Judge, after reviewing the appeal, might order another examination
before another Board:
(4.)   That if, by the second examination, the applicant was found to be proficient in
barbering, the Court could reverse, change, or vary the decision of the first
Board.
The amendment passed at this Session repeals the existing section 11, and substitutes
another section in its place, under which:—
(1.)   A person practising barbering in British Columbia must first pass an examination of proficiency in barbering before a Board of Examiners:
(2.)   A person failing to pass his examination may appeal to the Minister of Labour:
(3.)   The Minister, after reviewing the appeal, may order another examination before
another Board:
(4.)   If, by the  second  examination,  the  applicant was  found to be  proficient in
barbering, the Minister may reverse, change, or vary the decision of the first
Board.
" SEMI-MONTHLY PAYMENT OF WAGES ACT."
The former Act was repealed at the 1939 Session of the Legislature, and the following
Act is now in force:—
CHAPTER 62.
An Act respecting the Semi-monthly Payment of Wages.
[Assented to 30th November, 1939.]
HIS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Short title.
2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:— interpretation.
" Employee " means any person who is in receipt of or entitled to
any compensation for labour or services performed for another:
" Employer " includes every person, firm, corporation, agent, manager, representative, contractor, or sub-contractor having, control or direction of, or responsible, directly or indirectly, for
the employment of any employee:
" Industrial undertaking " means any establishment, work, or undertaking in or about any industry, business, trade, or occupation
set out in the Schedule as contained herein or as amended from
time to time by the regulations.
3. (1.)  Subject to section 4, every municipal corporation with respect to Wages in certain
its outside employees and every employer carrying on any work in or about industrial undertak-
any industrial undertaking within the Province, shall, at least as often as J"^*"^^^.^,
semi-monthly, pay to each employee engaged in or about the work so carried
on, whether by way of manual labour or otherwise, all wages and salary
earned by the employee to a day not more than eight days prior to the date
of payment; except that in the case of mines to which the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act " applies the payment to employees shall be at least as often
as fortnightly, and shall be made on a Saturday. Any employee who is
absent at the time fixed for payment, or who, for any other reason, is not
paid at that time, shall be entitled to such payment at any time thereafter
on demand.
(2.)   Nothing contained in this Act shall be deemed to prohibit the pay- Contract of exemp-
ment of wages or salary at more frequent intervals than those prescribed by tion prohibited,
this Act;  but no employer shall by contract with employees, or by any other
means, secure exemption from the provisions of this Act. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 33
4. The provisions of section 3 shall not apply to employees engaged under Certain employees
a bona-fide  contract where the yearly salary or wages  is two  thousand exempted,
dollars or over.
5. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may, by regulations published in Regulations
the Gazette, amend the Schedule by adding thereto or deleting therefrom the amending Schedule,
whole or any branch of any industry, business, trade, or occupation.
6. (1.)   Every employer violating or committing any breach of section 3, Penalties,
or refusing, omitting, or neglecting to fulfil, observe, carry out, or perform
any duty or obligation thereby created, prescribed, or imposed, shall be
liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than twenty-five
dollars and not more than five hundred dollars.
(2.) In addition to the penalty prescribed by subsection (1), the employer
shall, upon conviction, be ordered to pay to each employee all arrears of
wages due to the employee.
7. Where any offence under this Act committed by a body corporate is
committed with the consent or connivance of any director, manager, secretary, or other officer of the body corporate, he, as well as the body corporate,
shall be deemed to be guilty of the offence and shall be liable to be proceeded
against and punished accordingly.
8. The " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act," being chapter 303 of the
" Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1936," is repealed.
SCHEDULE.
1. Mining, quarrying, and other works for the extraction of mineral, stone, or
other material from the earth.
2. Industries in which articles are manufactured, altered, cleaned, repaired, ornamented, finished, adapted for sale, broken up or demolished, or in which materials
are transformed; including ship-building, and the generation, transformation, and
transmission of electricity or motive power of any kind, and logging operations.
3. Construction, reconstruction, maintenance, repair, alteration, or demolition of
any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road,
tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of construction, as well as
the preparation for or laying the foundations of any such work or structure.
4. The fishing industy.
It will be noted by reference to the Schedule the scope of the Act has been widened in its
application. Formerly the Act applied only to mining foundries, and machine-shops, lumbering, ship-building, pulp and paper mills, and fishing. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council
may by regulation extend the application of the Act to other industries.
Under the new Act, the Court in convicting an employer shall also order the employer to
pay all arrears of wages due to the employee.
" WEEKLY HALF-HOLIDAY ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1939."
The Act formerly provided that the weekly half-holiday was cancelled in any week during
which a full statutory holiday occurred.
The Act is now amended so that, even in a week during which a statutory holiday occurs,
the weekly half-holiday shall still remain a holiday.
It is now provided that only in a week where two or more full statutory holidays occur,
the weekly half-holiday is cancelled.
The amendment further provides that a Municipal Council may establish a half-holiday
for any class or classes of shops not at present covered by the Act, if the Municipal Council
receives a petition from at least three-quarters of the shops in question.
The half-holiday so fixed need not necessarily be on the same day upon which the half-
holiday occurs for other shops at present under the Act.
Additional powers are given to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, so that in exempting
any trades or businesses from the " Weekly Half-holiday Act" the exemption may be given
under certain conditions which the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may impose.
3 G 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
"WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1939."
Subsection (6) of section 8 was struck out, and a new subsection (6) was inserted, which
provides:—
"(6.) A workman who becomes disabled from uncomplicated silicosis or from silicosis
complicated with tuberculosis on or after the first day of January, 1936, shall be entitled to
compensation for total or partial disability as provided by this Part; and where death results
from such disability the dependents of such workman shall be entitled to compensation as provided by this Part; but neither a workman nor his dependents shall be entitled to compensation for such disability or death unless the workman:—■
"(a.)  Has been a resident of this Province for a period of at least three years last
preceding his disablement;   and
"(6.)  Was free from silicosis and tuberculosis before being first exposed to dust containing silica in the metalliferous-mining industry in this Province;  and
"(c.)   Has been a workman exposed to dust containing silica in the metalliferous-
mining industry in this Province for a period or periods aggregating three
years preceding his disablement;   and
"(d.)  Has been a workman in the metalliferous-mining industry in this Province for
at least three months in the five years last preceding his disablement;   and
"(e.)   Has filed a claim for compensation while employed in the metalliferous-mining
industry in this Province, or within five years after the date of leaving such
employment in this Province, and in any case within one year after the date
on which he became disabled:
" Provided that if it is proved that the workman has been exposed to the inhalation of
dust containing silica elsewhere than in this Province, the amount of compensation payable
shall be reduced by the proportion that the period he has worked elsewhere than in this Province so exposed bears to the total period he has worked so exposed."
Section 71 is amended by adding thereto the following:—
"(3.) The Board, subject to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, may
establish and maintain a fund, to be known as the ' Superannuation Fund,' for the payment
of superannuation allowances to its employees or of allowances upon the disability or death
of its employees, by contributions from the employees of the Board and from the Accident
Fund; and, subject to the like approval, may determine the amounts of superannuation or
other allowances and the conditions upon which they may be paid and the persons to whom
they may be paid; and the Board, subject to the like approval, may use the Superannuation
Fund to purchase superannuation allowances for its employees from the Crown in right of
the Dominion, or from the Crown in right of the Province, or from an insurance company or
companies. The costs of administering the Superannuation Fund shall be part of the cost
of the administration of the Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 35
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell  1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton.....     _789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson     789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell  _ 739 pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A.  Cameron. _  Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Head  Office   ...Parliament Buildings,  Victoria.
Branch Office   _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
SIR,—We have the honour to present the Sixth Annual Report of the Board of Industrial
Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1939.
SESSIONS AND DELEGATIONS.
To consummate the business for the year, forty-one sessions were held in Victoria and
Vancouver, including a departmental conference in January, at which officials from the various branches of the Department of Labour were in attendance.
To deal with contemplated Orders or to revise existing Regulations and Orders it is the
policy of the Board to receive delegations of interested parties. These hearings necessarily
occupy much of the Board's time. Thirty-five such deputations presented their submissions
during the year. These were composed of groups of employers and employees or individuals
representing specific classes of occupations. When the workers are organized their views are
brought to the Board through their Trade Unions. In many cases written briefs are laid
before the Members, with verbal amplifications at the time they are handed to the Board.
As employees' groups are working during the day, evening sessions are arranged for
their convenience.
Through these delegations much valuable information is obtained by the Board to assist
in the promulgation of Orders and Regulations.
The officials of the Department are available, too, to collect data for the Board's use.
NEW OR AMENDING ORDERS.
A resume of Orders and Regulations made during 1939 includes the following:—
Shingle Industry.—Order No. 62 superseded Order No. 16 by altering some minor details,
but did not change the basic hourly rate.
Personal Service Occupation.—Order No. 27a. This amended Order No. 27 by permitting
beauty-parlour operators to work a nine-hour day, providing their weekly hours did not exceed
forty-four. Provision was also made for a period free from duty each day of at least half an
hour between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m. This guaranteed time for lunch for all employees in the
occupation.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—A special Order waiving the limitations of hours in Order
No. 52 was made to take care of the extra rush of business anticipated during the visit of
Their Majesties the King and Queen to Victoria and Vancouver, from May 27th to May 31st,
1939. Any work in excess of eight hours in any day entitled the employee to one and one-half
times her regular rate of pay.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52d. This made special provisions for work in
resort hotels, in unorganized territory, during the summer season from June 15th to September 15th, 1939. It was practically a repetition of an Order of similar character that was in
effect the previous year.
Hotel and Catering Industry.—Order No. 52e. Conditions of employment in resort hotels
in unorganized territory from November 9th, 1939, to June 12th, 1940, were prescribed by this
Order, to encourage employers to retain their help after the summer business had subsided. G 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Order No. 63. From June 1st, 1939, to December 31st,
1939, slight reductions in wages were effective for female employees in the canning branch of
the industry.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Order No. 64. For the same period corresponding reductions were made for male employees in the canning branch of the industry.
Male Mercantile Industry.—Order No. 59a. Provision was made for the payment by the
employer of all reasonable costs in connection with bicycles provided by employees, in addition to the regular minimum wage, while such bicycles are actually in use on the employer's
behalf.
Carpentry Trade.—Order No. 65. A minimum wage of 75 cents an hour was set for
carpenters in the Provincial Electoral Districts of Rossland-Trail, Grand Forks-Greenwood,
Kaslo-Slocan, and Nelson-Creston.
Construction Industry.—Order No. 12b. An amendment to Order No. 12 required all
employees in the industry to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more
than seven days prior to the date of payment.
Sawmill Industry.—Order No. 50a. This specified a minimum wage of $2.75 a day for
cook- and bunk-house employees in the industry.
Carpentry Trade.—Order No. 66. An increase of 5 cents an hour, making the rate 75
cents, for carpenters on the southerly portion of Vancouver Island was provided by this
Order, which superseded the former Order No. 40. Permanently employed maintenance-men
are not covered by the Order.    Provision was made for semi-monthly payment of wages.
Attendants in Public Places of Amusement.—Order No. 67. A minimum wage of $14.25
a week of forty to forty-eight hours, 35 cents an hour for less than forty hours a week, with
a guarantee of 75 cents for employees working two hours or less a day, set by this Order.
Employers are required to furnish and provide for up-keep of any uniforms they insist on
their employees wearing. This Order took the place of part of a previous Order of the
Minimum Wage Board, and of portions of Order No. 27, relating to the personal service
occupation.
Christmas-tree Industry.—Order No. 68 varied the former Order by providing that after
85 per cent, of male employees of an employer have been paid not less than 40 cents per hour
it would be permissible to pay his other employees not less than 30 cents an hour. Wages are
required to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
Mercantile Industry.—As in previous years, special Orders and Regulations were passed
prior to the Christmas season to meet the exigencies of the trade at this busy time of year.
They dealt with wages and hours of work for temporary and permanent employees, both men
and women.
Glacier Lumber Company, Limited, Nelson, B.C.—After investigation, a special Order
was passed prohibiting this company from deducting more than $1.25 a day from the wages
of its employees for board and lodging.
Cambie Private Hospital, Vancouver, B.C.—After an adequate inquiry the Board passed
a special Order prohibiting the carrying-on of certain agreements entered into by the
employer and two of its women employees. This action was taken under section 10 of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
" HOURS OF WORK ACT "—REGULATIONS.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Regulation No. 21e exempted the industry from the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act " up till March 31st, 1940. Higher rates of pay are set
by Orders of the Board for time worked in excess of the regular working-day.
Mercantile Industry, Drug-stores.—Regulation No. 16f. Permits registered apprentices,
certified clerks, and licentiates of pharmacy to work not more than ninety-six hours in any
two successive weeks, provided their hours do not exceed fifty-two in any one week, or nine
in any one day. This Regulation is a continuation of No. 16e, which had been made for a
limited period.
In the Appendix to this section of the report will be found a summary of the foregoing
Orders and Regulations, as well as others in force at the present time, including certain ones
made during 1940 prior to the report going to press. These summaries constitute a convenient reference for the enactments of the Board. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 37
DEPARTMENTAL CONFERENCE.
A departmental conference (the fourth of its kind) was convened in Vancouver on
January 18th, 19th, and 20th, at which officials from all branches were present. On the
morning of the opening day a special meeting for Inspectors of the Board was arranged.
This gave them a chance for a frank and free discussion of their problems, and they later
made certain recommendations to the Board designed to assist in improving general administration of Acts, Orders, and Regulations that come under the jurisdiction of the Board.
At a luncheon on the opening day, Hon. George S. Pearson, Minister of Labour, addressed
the gathering. He pointed out the need for leadership in a growing department and urged
the members of the staff to study and keep posted on changing conditions in labour matters.
He spoke of the close connection and correlation of the various branches of the Department,
and hoped the conference would make all present realize the co-ordination that should be
achieved. The rapid growth and expansion of the work of his Department was noted, and he
forecast continued expansion of the work.
The afternoon session took the form of a panel discussion on Employment Service
matters. Mrs. Eaton guided the discussion, which was conducted by Mr. J. H. McVety,
Mr. Geo. E. Street, Miss I. Davidson, and Mr. W. G. Stone. These four members conversed
informally and developed the theme. The background of the Employment Service was set out
and its present usefulness stressed. The audience was invited to make suggestions for the
improvement of the service at the close of the discussion. The programme proved to be most
informative and helpful. Several individuals took part in the informal discussion during the
afternoon and many phases of Employment Service were brought to the attention of the
meeting.
The following morning, under the chairmanship of the Deputy Minister of Labour, the
meeting dealt with the recommendations that came from the Inspectors' meeting. The
balance of the day was devoted to these matters, with informal discussion revolving round
groups of Orders.
This proved very helpful, especially to the out-of-town Inspectors, who, for the greater
part of the year, are far away from headquarters and are thus deprived of the privilege of
consulting with the higher officials when problems arise which cause them some concern.
They, therefore, took full advantage of the opportunity to present their difficulties, which were
fully considered. Helpful solutions were often forthcoming from the city Inspectors, whose
experiences under similar circumstances clarified the situation.
Procedure regarding Court cases came in for considerable discussion. The Minister
stated it was contrary to his wishes that prosecutions should be instituted for minor infractions, and he did not wish employers to be brought into Court unnecessarily. Unless there
appeared to be deliberate and repeated violation of the law, Court action should be avoided
whenever possible.
Certain time was devoted to the question of overtime permits. It was felt a reduction
might be made in the number of permits issued, in an effort to absorb more persons into the
labour market. Personal interviews with employers who ask for frequent permits for overtime might result in a solution of their problem along other lines than worjdng their regular
staff long hours. Instances were quoted where successful results had been obtained in
this way.
Specific problems under various Orders occupied the balance of the day.
On the final day of the conference Mr. B. H. E. Goult, Secretary-Registrar under the
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," outlined the work that was being done under
that comparatively new Statute. He illustrated with figures how the number of strikes in
the Province had been reduced since the Act became operative. The importance of the various
forms in use under the Act was also stressed.
It was pointed out that it was the wish of the Minister and Deputy Minister of Labour
that Inspectors in the outlying parts of the Province should assist to the best of their ability
in settling disputes that might arise between employers and employees.
Mr. Hamilton Crisford, Director of Apprenticeship, spoke next about the work of the
Apprenticeship Committee. It tried to help maintain the standard of wages set by the Board
of Industrial Relations. He said it would be of great assistance to the Apprenticeship Administration if there were a wider coverage of Minimum Wage Orders.    At the Chairman's G 38 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
request be mentioned specific instances of trades designated under the " Apprenticeship Act"
for which no Minimum Wage Orders had so far been promulgated, and suggested certain rates
that he felt would be fair in these cases.
Mr. H. Douglas, Chief Factory Inspector, led a discussion on the " Factories Act," one of
the first pieces of Labour legislation placed on the Statute-books of the Province, having been
enacted about 1911.
He spoke briefly about the different matters the administration had to deal with under the
Act. In administering the law for laundries the task was made difficult on account of
Orientals in the business.
So far, fortunately, child-labour had not become a problem in British Columbia, but the
Act contained certain sections dealing with the employment of children and young persons.
Other sections dealt with the employment of women in industry.
Accident-prevention was an important part of the work of the Factory Inspection Branch
and included elevator inspection, which was highly technical.
Home-work was covered by certain sections of the Act, which the Chairman said was
fortunate as it enabled control before home-work had become widespread. Mr. Douglas contended a certain amount of home-work, under supervision, served a good purpose.
Mr. J. A. Ward Bell then presented an outline of the " Trade-schools Regulation Act "
and told of some results of its administration. Correspondence schools were now on a good
basis, although considerable trouble had been experienced at first with some of them.
Some handicraft schools wanted to sell their products to the public, but as this would
have broken down the minimum wage regulations it was not permitted.
The Committee administering the Act was of one mind that schools must be well equipped,
must give proper training, and must not infringe on other legislation.
Since the previous year some schools had dropped out and others had been added to the
list under the Act.
Mr. Charles Pearse, Safety Adviser, spoke briefly of the work of his Branch. A great
deal of thought was being given by the Workmen's Compensation Branch, as well as by his
own Branch, to the question of accident-prevention. Too many accidents seemed to occur in
the logging industry. An attempt was being made to have a safety director appointed in each
camp. These directors would be able to keep in touch with the Safety Branch, with a view
to eliminating as many accidents as possible.
Following Mr. Pearse's remarks and the attendant discussion, the balance of the conference time was devoted to consideration of specific Orders of the Board, with special reference
to points on which Inspectors wished guidance.
When these particular Orders had been dealt with the Chairman brought forward other
Orders for comment, dealing first with those made under the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
Later the Orders under the " Female Minimum Wage Act," relating to employment of women
and girls, came in for attention. Considerable time was devoted to various phases of the
hotel and catering industry, the personal service occupation, and the manufacturing industry.
The Minister closed the Conference by remarking on its value, and suggesting that for
future meetings more ground might be covered by dividing into groups for discussion, with
perhaps the women considering the women's Orders and the men devoting their time to the
Orders relating to men. He urged those who came in contact with employers and employees
to try to present to them the desire of the Department to build up a better system of regulations. He hoped that when the staff next assembled in conference further progress would be
reported in the all-important work.
MIDSUMMER CONFERENCE.
A midsummer conference of Inspectors of the Board and officials of the Factory and
Apprenticeship Branches of the Department was held on July 3rd in Vancouver. All five
Members of the Board were in attendance, with twenty-four staff representatives.
The Chairman explained that the conference might be considered as a continuation of the
one held in January. No formal agenda governed the meeting, but the out-of-town Inspectors
were given the opportunity to bring up for discussion any matters they felt should come
before the session. They took full advantage of the chance to talk over the problems they
encountered in their districts. In this way many phases of inspection-work were dealt with
and points of difficulty cleared up. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 39
Topics included time-books and record keeping, charge for board and lodging in sawmills
and logging camps, " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act," the transportation industry and
Order, salesmen on commission, the canning industry, box-manufacturing, apprenticeship,
vocational classes, first-aid attendants, the work of employees in public places of amusement,
Court work, and administrative mechanics, with special reference to the use of personal cars
on investigation-work.
The proposed Order for the Christmas-tree industry was considered and the Order for the
carpentry trade in Vancouver and vicinity was given some consideration.
The Chairman outlined the Board's procedure with reference to requests for minimum
wage Orders to cover skilled trades, and explained the British Columbia legislation was
different to that in certain other Provinces which handled the matter under Industrial
Standards Acts.
After spending some time debating the subject of permits for inexperienced employees
the meeting adjourned after a very busy day.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Statistical forms were received from 4,702 employers of women and girls, an increase of
443 over the 1938 figure. The returns received covered some 27,489 women workers for the
year 1939, showing an increase of 757 employees reported on the pay-rolls when compared
with previous yearly period.
The following tables cover the occupations for which minimum wages have been set by
the Board.
Mercantile Industry.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years 	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years. 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week 	
664
5,592
5,194
$70
,943.66
1,012.57
$13.66
$10.08
7.12%
42.14
$65,
538
5,315
4,851
464
856.44
1,695.22
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
43.48
507
5,010
4,540
470
1,373.35
1,638.65
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
40.47
479
4,723
4,326
397
$56,086.46
$3,523.49
$12.96
$8.88
8.40.%
40.58
421
4,382
3,960'
422
$51,158.70
$3,353.22
$12.92
$7.95
9.63%
40.38
The number of firms reporting in the above table for 1939 increased to 664, an additional
277 employees being shown over the previous year.
The average weekly wage for women IB years of age or over also increased from $13.58
to $13.66, while for the younger employee the average weekly wage decreased slightly from
$10.12 to $10.08 for the year under review.
Increased employment in the industry was again noted in the group containing workers
18 years of age and over, the percentage of those employed under 18 years of age further
decreasing from 8.73 per cent, to 7.12 per cent, in 1939.
Laundry Industry.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
Number of firms reporting— 	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years 	
Under 18 years.—  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week 	
$14
111
1,182
1,126
56
520.24
$460.97
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
42.09
95
1,095
1,029
66
$13,565.23
$567.74
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
42.74
1,084
1,014
70
$13,083.49
$575.71
$12.90
$8.22
6.46%
41.90
81
991
911
80
$11,462.44
$658.04
$12.58
$8.23
8.07%
41.94
81
90O
857
43
$10,517.50
$406.74
$12.27
$9.46
4.78%
41.12 G 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
In the above industry the number of firms reporting increased by 16 for the year 1939,
the returns covering 1,182 employees as against 1,095 for the year previous.
In line with a decrease in the average hours worked per week, fractional decreases were
noticeable in the average weekly wages. The average weekly wage for employees over 18
years was $12.90 as against $13.18 in 1938, and in the under 18 group $8.23 as against $8.60.
The percentage of employees under 18 years of age continued to drop, decreasing from
6.03 per cent, of total in 1938 to 4.74 per cent, in 1939.
The average weekly working-hours decreased from 42.74 to 42.09.
Hotel and Catering Industry.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1935.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years..
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years..
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week	
819
4,380
4,288
92
$59,156.99
$1,043.15
$13.80
$11.34
2.10%
43.11
765
3,970
3,878
92
$53,223.45
$1,058.77
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
42.95
532
3,424
3,302
122
$46,840.82
$1,353.11
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
42.43
500
2,961
2,878
83
$40,265.89
$956.54
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
42.79
429
2,343
2,303
40
$30,189.28
$452.10
$13.11
$11.30
1.71%
41.31
As the number of janitresses and women elevator operators throughout the Province does
not reach a very high figure, these workers have been included with others in the hotel and
catering industry. In former years these two classes were actually covered by the Order
relating to the public housekeeping industry. The new name—hotel and catering industry—
seems to designate the occupation more clearly than the former one.
The firms reporting increased from 765 in 1938 to 819 in 1939, with a corresponding gain
in employees of 410.
The average weekly wage for the 18 and over class increased slightly from $13.72 to
$13.80. As mentioned in the previous year's report, this group still includes certain unskilled
employees who, by permission of the Board, were allowed to be trained at the same figure as
the younger girls. While $14 is the weekly minimum for experienced employees of the older
group for a week of 40 to 48 hours, the average recorded does not disclose infractions, but, as
stated above, some inexperienced employees were included in the figures.
The percentage of girls under 18 dropped slightly from 2.32 per cent, in 1938 to 2.10 per
cent, in 1939, with a fractional decrease in the average weekly wage of this group from
$11.51 to $11.34.
Office Occupation.
1939.
1938.
1936.
1935.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years - -
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.....
Employees under 18 years .
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years..
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week. 	
2,241
6,779
6,691
$121,691.66
$1,006.38
$18.19
$11.44
1.30%
40.55
2,096
7,367
7,273
94
$132,369.27
$i,115.55
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
40.16
1,891
5,911
5,802
109
$106,395.64
$1,306.60
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
40.79
1,848
5,344
5,280
64
$94,789.14
$645.41
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
40.88
1,727
4,827
4,809
18
.4,596.16
$195.20
$17.59
$10.84
0.37%
40.79 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 41
This classification continues to lead with the greatest number of women employees,
returns being received from 2,241 firms for the year 1939, an increase of 145 over the previous
year.
Total employees covered numbered 6,779 as against 7,367 for 1938.
The average weekly wage for the experienced workers remained practically unchanged,
a fractional decrease of 1 cent only being recorded. A slight decrease is evident in the average
for the section under 18 years, the average weekly wage standing at $11.44 as against $11.87
for the previous year.
The percentage of younger workers increased slightly over the 1938 period.
Average hours increased to 40.55 hours per week as against 40.16 for the year previous.
It is interesting to note some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while salaries. A
$65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
There were 1,416 employed at $65.00 per month.
70.00
75.00
80.00
85.00
90.00
95.00
100.00
110.00
115.00
120.00
125.00
130.00
135.00
140.00
150.00
more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates and do not
include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75, and so on
down the list.
Personal Service Occupation.
342
383
256
218
217
99
228
61
53
33
47
40
12
18
34
90
1937.
1935.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years. —
Under 18 years -	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.—
Employees under 18 years..
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.....
Employees under 18 years..
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week	
198 [
570 j
555 |
15 |
$7,696.07 |
$112.63 I
j
$13.87 I
$7.51 |
2.63%
36.89
161
509
495
14
$6,723.47
$57.75
$13.58
$4.13
2.75%
37.87
157
481
472
9
i,283.69
$45.09
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%
37.85
138
4,27
417
10
i,486.48
$66.05
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
38.07
108
376
374
2
$4,873.84
$18.00
$13.03
$9.00
0.53%
36.81
Included in the above figures are employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers.
The number of firms filing returns in this classification increased by 37 for the year 1939.
Total employees recorded increased to 570 as against 509 for the previous year.
The average weekly wage increased in both experienced and inexperienced groups, the
former increasing to $13.87 from a previous figure of $13.58, while the latter rose to $7.51 as
against $4.13 in 1938.
Irregular hours of theatre ushers within this section were again chiefly responsible for
the low average of 36.89 working-hours per week. G 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fishing Industry.
1939.
1938.
1937.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees .....
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  _
Inexperienced employees 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week-	
10
58
27
31
$455.81
$199.29
$16.88
$6.43
53.45%
31.78
6
36
23
13
$267.35
$134.37
$11.62
$10.34
36.11%
34.61
5
37
26
11
$330.84
$90..67
$12.72
$8.24
29.73%
37.02
6
32
24
$234.20
$26.73
$9.76
$3.34
25.00%
26.24
4
11
10
1
$101.35
$4.00
$10.13
$4.00
9.09%
25.33
As the Order of the Board does not cover women workers in fish-canneries, this group
comprises a rather negligible number. Increases are, however, generally noted in the above
table, both as regards number employed and firms reporting.
While the average weekly wage for the experienced employees increased from $11.62 in
1938 to $16.88 for 1939, owing to increasing numbers in the inexperienced group, mostly
seasonal and casual workers, the average weekly wage in this section decreased from $10.34
to $6.43. Also affected by increasing casual labour, the average weekly hours showed a corresponding decrease to 31.78 as against 34.61 for the previous year.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
145
1,880
1,766
114
$32,074.05
$1,156.11
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
39.84
137
1,815
1,759
56
$32,238.68
$434.46
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
40.71
142
1,934
1,720
214
$31,284.95
$2,497.70
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
40.59
124
1,791
1,571
220
$28,717.26
$2,462.93
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%
40.46
120
1,689
1,630
59
Total weekly wages—
$27,776.16
$673.00
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees — _ -   „ _
Inexperienced employees  	
$17.04
$11.41
3.49%
39 53
Included with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those who operate
switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as hotels, hospitals, etc.
Increases are evident in the above table, both in the number of firms reporting and total
employees shown. The average weekly wage for experienced operators decreased slightly
from $18.33 in 1938 to $18.16 for the year under review.
In the inexperienced section employment increased, the percentage of total in this group
showing 6.06 per cent, over 3.09 per cent, for previous year. Average weekly wages in this
section also increased from $7.76 to $10.14 in 1939.
Average weekly hours decreased to 39.84 from 40.71 in 1938. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 43
Manufacturing Industry.
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of employees .
Experienced 	
Inexperienced	
435
3,208
2,784
424
380
3,085
2,701
384
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees _
Inexperienced employees 	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week	
$41,240.31    |  $40,177.04
$3,676.80    |    $3,482.01
$14.81
$8.67
13.22%
42.01
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
41.92
358
2,652
2,297
355
$32,469.11
$3,247.59
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
41.65
314
2,500
2,167
$30,694.89
$3,015.36
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
42.92
$29,
$1,
311
2,310
2,111
199
869.50
734.50
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
43.28
The number of firms filing returns in this classification increased by 55, with an additional 123 employees recorded over the previous year.
Slight decreases are noted in the average wages, the weekly average for experienced employees standing at $14.81 as against $14.87, and in the inexperienced class $8.67 as against
$9.07 for the year previous.
Employment in the inexperienced group showed stimulation, the percentage increasing
from 12.45 per cent, in 1938 to 13.22 per cent, for 1939. Fractional increase was again noted
in the average working-hours.
Reference to the summary of Orders will show that the Order covering the manufacturing
industry embraces workers in a very diversified group of occupations. Some of the work is
seasonal, but in many factories the employees are assured of continuous employment.
Fruit *.nd Vegetable Industry.
1939.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
79
3,840
3,562
278
$57,232.59
$2,713.79
$16.07
$9.76
7.24%
46.75
81
3,540>
3,316
224
$54,275.82
$2,247.52
$16.37
$10.03
6.33%
46.90
71
3,551
3,298
253
$54,279.51
$2,650.17
$16.46
$10.48
7.12%
47.78
75
3,155
2,803
352
$41,831.03
$3,082.70
$14.92
$8.76
11.16%
46.02
71
Total number of employees	
Experienced    	
Inexperienced  	
Total weekly wages—
3.096
2,681
415
$41,l6V.84
$4,032.30
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  	
$15.36
$9.72
Percentage of inexperienced employees	
13.40%
46.68
Employment in this industry increased, some 300 additional employees being recorded
over the previous year's figure.
Slight decreases occurred in average weekly wages, the weekly average for experienced
workers declined fractionally from $16.37 to $16.07, with a corresponding further decrease in
the average working-hours.
In the inexperienced group an increase in the percentage of unskilled workers employed
was, no doubt, responsible for the drop in the average weekly wage figure to $9.76 from
$10.03 for the year previous. G 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary of all Occupations.
193
1937.
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of employees..
Over 18 years, or experienced..
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-	
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-   	
Average hours worked per week—  	
4,702
27,489
25,993
1,496
$405,011.38
$14,381.69
$15.58
$9.61
5.44%
42.24
4,259
26,732
25,325
1,407
;398,696.76
$13,793.39
$15.74
$9.80
5.26%
42.42
3,749
24,084
22,471
1,613
j$351,341.40
| $16,405.29
$15.64
$10.17
6.70%
42.05
3,565
21,924
20,377
1,547
$309,567.79
$14,437.25
$15.19
7.06%
41.98
3,272
19,934
18,735
1,199
5280,250.33
$10,869.00
$14.96
$9.07
6.01%
41.79
Actual figures concerning 27,489 women and girl employees are shown in the above table.
These workers comprise the staffs of 4,702 firms, and their aggregate wages and salaries
for one week totalled $419,393.07, or an increase of $6,902.92 over the 1938 total.
The average weekly wage decreased slightly from $15.74 to $15.58 for the year under
revision.
The lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered by
Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up to $15.50 in the fishing
group. It will be seen, therefore, that taking all classes of employment together, the general
average is still above the highest minimum set by law.
While the Orders permit of a 48-hour week, the average week for 27,489 gainfully employed women and girls was only 42.24 hours, a decrease of 0.18 hour over the average
working-week for the previous year.
The percentages of employees under 18 years of age or inexperienced increased slightly
for the year from 5.26 per cent, of total in 1938 to 5.44 per cent, in 1939.
In reviewing the tables it is noted that the average wages in four of the occupations
register increases over those of 1938 for the adult or experienced worker, these being the mercantile, hotel and catering, personal service, and fishing industries. Slight decreases are
recorded in the laundry, office, telephone and telegraph, manufacturing, and fruit and vegetable industries.
. In studying the summary table it is noted that almost 27,500 women and girls are taking
their part in the field of business in the Province. The records concerning these workers deal
only with classes of employment that are covered by Orders of the Board. The total number
of women gainfully employed would include domestic workers, farm-labourers, and fruit-
pickers, but these are definitely excluded from coverage by the provisions of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act." Returns are not requested for women and girls employed in banks, as
their conditions of employment are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act." Federal employees are likewise not covered by Provincial legislation, although in most cases their wages
and hours compare favourably with those set by the Board's Orders. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 45
Percentages Above and Below Legal Minimum for Experienced Workers.
Industry or Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual,
Minimum Wage
set for Experienced Workers.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Mercantile- „	
Laundry	
$12.75*
13.50f
14.00*
15.00}
14.25*
15.50t
15.00t
14.00f
14.40t
2,047
119
1,676
1,416
107
2
98
]          330
87
36.61
10.07
38.27
20.89
18.77
8.45
5.21
10.29
2.26
2,581
393
1,424
4,558
260
17
1,457
1,488
2,186
46.15
33.25
32.51
67.24
45.61
29.31
77.50
46.38
56.93
964
670
1,280
805
203
39
325
1,390
1,567
17.24
56.68
29.22
11.87
35.62
67.24
17.29
43.33
40.81
5,592
1,182
4,380
6,779
570
58
1,880
3,208
3,840
Office	
Personal service 	
Fishing.	
Manufacturing	
Totals, 1939- -	
Totals, 1938 _	
5,882       |    21.40
5,980      j    22.37
1                       1
14,364
14,278
52.25
53.41
7,243
6,474
26.35
24.22
27,489
26,732
* 40 to 48 hours per week. t 48 hours per week. % 37^ to 48 hours per week.
Decreasing slightly from the 1938 high, the percentage of employees included in the
returns who were receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum stood at 52.25 per cent, for
1939, as against 53.41 per cent, for the previous year. The group receiving the actual legal
minimum likewise declined fractionally with a corresponding increase in the remaining percentage of those receiving less than the rates fixed for experienced employees. This group
comprises those younger and less skilled girls for whom lower rates are fixed, and those who
are working part time and are thus unable to earn a sum equal to the weekly rate set for
full-time employees.
The hotel and catering industry, with 38.27 per cent, receiving $14 per week, again holds
most closely to the rates fixed in the Orders.
The telephone and telegraph occupation continues to pay a high percentage of its employees above the legal minimum, 77.50 per cent, of its total employees receiving more than
$15 per week.
Office workers again hold second place, with 67.24 per cent, having pay-cheques above the
legal standard. In the fruit and vegetable industry 56.93 per cent, are able to earn more than
the rates fixed in the Orders. Manufacturing employees, amounting to 46.38 per cent., earned
more than the $14 minimum, followed by the mercantile industry, next in line, with 46.15 per
cent, of its employees above the fixed minimum rate. In the personal service occupation 45.61
per cent, earned above the legal minimum. Laundry employees above the minimum amounted
to 33.25 per cent., and hotel and catering 32.51 per cent.
Each year attention is drawn to the highest weekly wage in each occupation. For 1939,
a weekly salary of $65 drew top place in the mercantile industry. Top figure in the laundry,
cleaning and dyeing industry was a weekly wage of $28.20. The highest wage in the hotel
and catering industry was $55.20 per week. In the office group the most remunerative position carried a salary of $75 per week. Of employees in the personal service occupation, one
was recorded as receiving $52 per week. The highest wage earned and reported in the fishing
group was $31.30 weekly. Peak wages reported in the telephone and telegraph classification
were $42.60, and in the manufacturing industry $50 weekly. In the fruit and vegetable industry, one employee was reported as having received $51 for her week's work. G 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
table showing number of single, married, and widowed employees
and their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total
Earnings
for Week
reported.
4,558
783
2,981
5,733
428
28
1,577
2,346
2,042
$59,847.60
9,629.36
40,924.96
103,471.53
5,603.81
241.39
28,107.50
32,120.46
28,835.28
830
344
1,087
883
125
30
261
749
1,737
$11,871.29
4,615.80
14,920.36
15,974.18
1,910.09
413.71
4,329.23
10,990.36
30,133.38
204
55
312
163
17
42
113
61
$3,237.34
736.05
4,354.82
3,242.33
294.80
$74,956.23
Laundry. 	
14,981.21
60,200.14
122,688.04
Personal service	
Fishing	
7,808.70
655.10'
793.43
1,806.29
977.72
33,230.16
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable    „	
44,917.11
59,946.38
Totals	
20,476
$308,781.89
6,046
$95,158.40
967
$15,442.78
$419,383.07
74.49%
75.74%
21.99%
20.97%
3.52%
3.29%
The percentage of unmarried employees decreased slightly in 1939 to 74.49 per cent, of
total as against 75.74 per cent, in 1938. A corresponding increase appeared in the percentage
of married workers, and a fractional gain in the widowed class.
The fruit and vegetable industry again showed the highest proportion of married workers.
The returns showed such a negligible number as having been divorced or separated it was
not considered necessary to compile separate figures for them, and they were, therefore, included in the totals of the married employees.
Table showing Years of Service of Employees with Employers
reporting for 1939.
Name of Industry.
T3
p.
Cfl
+J
o
53
u
a
3
X
,H
JJ,
V
a
5
as
E
rt
«J
t»
cq
o
>|3
,-J
E
X
cc
O
tn
u
V
tH
o
+.•
CO
E
rt
OJ
X
xo
o
OJ
E
rt
3
O
JO
m
u
a
OJ
j*
t-
o
OJ
E
rt
0J
!*
OO
O
E
rt
9
>>
o
o
00
E
rt
0)
O
O
Oi
u
>
o
u
o
tn
u
9
tu
!h
O
rH
tj OJ
O OJ   .
h S-o
QJ  £• OJ
sis:
oi
c
t
v. O
o a
OJ M
li
S5i
Mercantile   	
925
1,996
620
466
385
238
159
138
68
62
75
460
5,592
664
59
300
180
162
106
80'
62
21
18
28
28
148
1,182
111
286
1,779
610
613
332
180
106
79
66
64
86
279
4,380
819
Office           -  	
273
1,338
798
757
634
398
338
225
161
168
223
1,466
6,779
2,241
Personal service 	
71
183
93
55
45
27
18
10
9
10
2
47
570
198
Fishing „   	
3
29
9
4
1
3
3
4
2
	
58
10
6
381
117
270
227
101
41
24
11
25
86
591
1,880
145
Manufacturing .__	
345
944
391
•327
267
171
138
70
58
64
78
355
3,208
435
1.583
1.029
302
262
198
136
90
69
44
20
24
83
3,840
79
Totals —-	
3.551 17 979
3,120
2,816
2,195
1,334
945
640
437
441
G02
3,429
27,489
4,702
The table indicating the length of time each woman employee had been on the staff of the
employer who sent in the return sets out the length of service according to occupation.
It is noted that 7,979 employees were working less than one year when the pay-rolls
were sent in.
• In compiling the figures, the employee in each occupation with the greatest number of
years to her credit was noted. In the mercantile industry one employee was listed with
32 years' service. In the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry one employee is credited with
26 years. A service of 32 years is the highest in the hotel and catering section. One office
employee was shown as having served 42 years with the same firm. In the personal service
occupation one long-service employee is credited with 23 years' service. In the fishing group
two employees were recorded with 9 years' service. Record service in the telephone and telegraph industry is credited to one worker with 33 years' experience with her present firm. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 47
One employee in the manufacturing industry has served 35 years with her present employer,
and 22 consecutive years is the long-term record in the fruit and vegetable group.
INSPECTIONS AND COLLECTIONS.
During the year under review, personal investigations by the inspection staff reached a
total of 14,592. These covered establishments in all parts of the Province and brought the
staff into close touch with all types of employers and employees.
Written reports on all these contacts are made at the time of the inspection and are
checked and kept on file with the Department for reference.
Excellent co-operation is extended to the Inspectors by the majority of employers in
supplying the necessary information, and instances are becoming more rare in which the
officials meet with difficulty in this phase of their work.
When it is found that employees have been paid less than the rates to which they are
entitled under the Orders of the Board, assistance is given them by the Inspectors in making
adjustments and obtaining what is due them.
Through such efforts during 1939 under the " Female Minimum Wage Act" the sum of
810,350.19 was received by 534 women and girl employees from 305 firms.
Under the " Male Minimum Wage Act " 859 men and boys experienced adjustments in
arrears of wages to the extent of $35,148.05.    This amount was paid by 430 firms.
In addition to these amounts paid directly to the employees, arrears of wages totalling
$2,727.56 were ordered by the Courts following convictions of employers for violation of the
Orders.
It will be seen, therefore, that a total sum of $48,225.80 was distributed to employees in
the way of arrears of wages due them from their respective employers. This is tangible evidence of the protection afforded workers employed under the various Orders of the Board.
The above figures relate to adjustments in which the Department assisted the employees.
We have no record of arrears collected by employees who took action in Civil Courts on their
own behalf.
COURT CASES, 1939.
When infractions of labour laws occur the policy of the Department has been to refrain
from Court action if satisfactory settlement can be made by other means. If such efforts fail,
or in instances where repeated or wilful violations are discovered, the Board must of necessity
institute proceedings against the offenders.
The following is a summary of Court cases segregated by Statutes under which prosecutions were initiated.
The nature of the charge and the result of each case is briefly noted: Eighteen cases were
dismissed and nine withdrawn, these are not included in the following statement of cases.
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
43
51
118
14
4
2
34
40
114
12
4
1
D    7 ■   W    2
" Male Minimum Wage Act "  	
D., 5;   W., 6
Totals      	
232
20-5
" Female Minimum Wage Act.:
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
New Grand Hotel  (Lena Kapak), Nelson....
Hastings Cafe   (Bert Sancy),  50 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver
Hastings Confectionery  (Carl Payich), 169
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
Failure to produce records	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined $10 ;   costs, $1.75.
Suspended sentence;   costs,  $5;   in
default, ten days in jail.
Suspended    sentence;     arrears    of
$86.60 ordered paid. G 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "•—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
S. J. Pearce, Deer Park-
Sunnyside    Cafe    (John    Jib),    613    Main
Street, Vancouver
Sing Lee Cafe   (Annie Lin), 406 Columbia
Street, Vancouver
W. Johnston, "West Summerland	
W. Johnston, "West Summerland	
W. Johnston, West Summerland	
Deutschland Cafe (George Gabel), 615 Seymour Street, Vancouver
E. Angeloni, Port Coquitlam	
Braemar  Bakery   (D.  Hendry),   1470
son Street, Vancouver
Grenfells Cafe, Nelson. _	
Rob-
Joffe's Confectionery, Trail-
Right Lunch, Nelson 	
Co-Ed   Sandwich   Shop    (J.   W.   Fry),  404
Victoria Street, Kamloops
Comodore Cafe  (George Bogras), Rossland
Comodore Cafe   (George Bogras), Rossland
Moler   Beauty   Shop    (Belle   Farrell),   311
Hastings Street West, Vancouver
Palm  Confectionery   (Henry B.  Johnson),
Creston
Holland & Barrie, Haney  _~.	
The   Turf,   " Morris   Belkin,"   714   Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Max Heilbroner,  Prince Rupert  —
Max Heilbroner, Prince Rupert_
J. Martinos, Wardner  	
J. Martinos, Wardner   .— —
Vancouver Club Women   (Chas. W. Marr),
319 Pender Street "West,   Vancouver
Pacific Drug Stores, Ltd., 2451 Main Street,
Vancouver
Rio Vista Bungalow Court  (F. R. Brason),
4345 Grandview Highway, Burnaby
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Excessive hours   	
Failure to pay minimum wage
(five charges)
Failure to produce records-—	
Failure to post Wage Order 	
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to pay as often as semimonthly
Failure to keep records.... 	
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay wages semimonthly. Order No. 52 (two
charges)
Failure to pay minimum wage „..
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to keep  records..	
Failure to keep records 	
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
Failure to
keep records.   	
pay minimum wage....
pay minimum  wage
keep records 	
pay minimum wage.'.,.
pay minimum wage	
pay minimum wage
keep records	
keep records	
Suspended   sentence ;    costs,   $3.75 ;
arrears of $7.30 ordered paid.
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
Fined $25;   ordered to pay arrears
of $150 to five employees.
Fined $10;   costs, $3.75.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $3.75.
Fined  $25;   costs,   $3.75;   pay
arrears, $37.50.
Fined $25.
Costs $3.50.
Fined $25 ;   ordered to pay arrears
of $98.50.
Fined $25 ;   costs, $3.10 ;   ordered to
pay arrears of $14.40.
Fined $10;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $35 ; and pay arrears, $13.92.
Ordered to pay arrears, $181.55.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$4.20.
Fined $25.
Fined $10.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $4.50.
Fined $10.
Fined $25 ; and pay arrears, $36.25.
Fined $25 ; and pay arrears,  $91.50;
in default, two months.
Fined $10 ; default, seven days.
Fined $25;   costs,  $4.25;   and pay
arrears, $91.50.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence;   settlement
made.
Fined $10.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Alex. Simpkins, Dundarave..
Eli Chernoff, Taghum.._.	
Express Service  Station   (J.  L.  DesLisle),
Chilliwack
H.   J.   McLatchey Box  Co.,   Gladstone  and
Marine  Drive,   Vancouver
Keystone    Shingle   &    Lumber    Co.,    New
Westminster
Charge.
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Did unlawfully receive from an
employee repayment of part of
his wages
Failure to pay minimum wage.	
Failure  to  furnish   necessary  information
Sentence and Remarks.
Fined $10;   costs, $5.
Fined $50; costs, $12.45 ; pay arrears,
$34.09.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $50 and costs ; ordered to pay
arrears,  $262.20.
Fined $25 and costs. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,
1939.                                     G 49
COURT CASKS—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Mayo Bros. Timber Co.,  Ltd., Paldi	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 ; costs, $3.75.
Mt. Shasta Cafe,  237 Georgia Street East,
Failure to keep records __ 	
Fined $50 ; default, fifteen days.
Vancouver
Nakagama  Fish  Market,   Steveston	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$11.
Fined $50;   pay arrears,  $10.50.
Nakagama  Fish  Market,   Steveston	
Failure to pay minimum wage ...
Pender Harbour Sawmill, Pender Harbour..
Failure to  produce records	
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.
♦Keystone   Shingle   &   Lumber   Co.,   Ltd.,
Failure    to    furnish    certain    in
Fined $25.
New Westminster
formation re working conditions
Ontario   Fuel    (Baboo),   Granville   Island,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10.
Vancouver
records
Ocean Timber Co., Ltd., Lake Cowichan
Failure to keep true and correct
records   (three charges)
Fined $30 ;   costs, $7.25.
Burnaby    Meat    Market     (Wong    Chang,
Failure to pay minimum wage __
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Hing), 3942 Hastings Street East,  Van
couver
Cartwright  Lumber   Co.,   Ltd.,   1685   Main
Failure to pay minimum  wage
Fined $100 ;   costs and pay arrears.
Street,  Vancouver
$63.20.
Cartwright   Lumber   Co.,   Ltd.,   1685   Main
Failure to keep  records	
Fined $15.
Street,  Vancouver
Gassossa Co., Ltd., Trail  	
Failure to keep records ...
Fined $10 ; costs,  $2.50.
Cherry Confectionery   (S,  Mose),  500 Pen
Failure to pay minimum  wage __
Fined $50 ;   default, two weeks' hard
der Street West, Vancouver
labour ;   ordered to pay $50 arrears
in   wages.
Growers   Box   Supply   Co.    (S.    Tanaka),
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined $50 and costs ; ordered to pay
Haney
arrears,  $32.50.
Little, Haughland & Kerr, Terrace 	
Failure   to   pay   minimum    wage
Fined   $50;    costs,   $12.50 ;    ordered
(six charges)
to pay arrears,  $515.13 ;   default,
two   months'   hard   labour.
Peoples  Credit Jewellers,   510-207  Hastings
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Suspended sentence ; ordered to pay
Street  West,   Vancouver
arrears, $24.
Vedder Lumber Yard, Yarrow __ _	
Failure to keep records  ■
Fined $10;   costs, $4.75.
Cowan-Dodson   Bakeries,   Ltd.,   275   Eighth
Failure to keep  true  and  correct
Fined $25.
Avenue East, Vancouver
records
Haskins & Elliot, Ltd., 38 Hastings Street
Failure to pay minimum wage ..
Fined $50 ; and pay arrears, $12.90.
West,  Vancouver
Katar    (Catara)    Singh,   Granville   Island,
Failure to keep  records	
Fined $10.
Vancouver
John   Strinriegler,   Galloway	
Failure to pay minimum  wage __ _
Suspended    sentence ;     pay    arrears,
$24.14.
Windsor  Fuels   (Wm.   Burt),  301  Twenty-
Failure to produce records	
Fined $10.
first Avenue East, Vancouver
J.   D.   Helliar,   2029   Pendrill   Street,   Van
Failure  to  produce  information __
Costs $2.50.
couver
tRobert B. Millar  (Agent,  J. Hofert Co.),
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined $50 ;   and pay arrears, $110.25.
Invermere
tRobert B. Millar  (Agent, J. Hofert Co.),
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Fined  $50;    costs,   $7.50;    and  pay
Invermere
arrears,  $110.25.
A. J. Leslie, Clearwater.  	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Suspended sentence ; ordered to pay
arrears,  $57.30.
A,  J. Leslie, Clearwater...-	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined  $50;    costs;   and  ordered  to
pay arrears, $353.86.
South   Shore   Woodyard,   1   First   Avenue
Failure  to  keep   true  and  correct
Fined $25.
West, Vancouver
records
* Above case was appealed and decision of the Magistrate reversed.
t The above two cases were appealed and Judge Nesbet in County Court allowed the appeals. G 50                                               DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Ralph Leckett, Bay Avenue Market, Trail-
Employing   person   outside   hours
posted
Fined $25.
Central Cafe, Ltd., 608 Pender Street West,
Employing   person   outside  hours
Fined $25.
Vancouver
posted
Eagle   Time   Delivery    System    Co.,    Ltd.,
Failure   to   post   notice   of   hours
Fined $25.
1248 Seymour Street, Vancouver
of work
Reliance   Fuel   &   Heating   Co.,   Ltd.,   1501
Excessive  hours	
Fined $25.
Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver
Safeway Stores, Ltd., Trail  	
Employing  person   outside  hours
posted
Fined $25.
Samuel Wise, Wise's Groceteria, Trail    .
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined $25.
posted
Joseph   Woogman,   Woogman's   Groceteria,
Failure to post notice of hours of
Fined $25.
Trail
work
Capitol   Cafe,   Ltd.,    906   Granville   Street,
Employing  person   outside   hours
Fined $25;   default, distress.
Vancouver
posted
De Luxe Cafe   (John  Soo),  1124 Granville
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
Street, Vancouver
posted
ten days.
Leonards  Cafe, Ltd.,   831  Granville  Street,
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
Vancouver
posted
distress.
Blonde Tong  (Liberty Cafe), 921 Granville
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
Street, Vancouver
posted
fifteen  days.
Mount   Shasta   Cafe    (Jack   Yuen,    Jung
Failure   to   post   notice   showing
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50.
Pow    Jung,    Wing,    Jang    John    Jack
hours   at   which   work   begins
Yung),  237  Hastings  Street  East,  Van
and ends
couver
Newport Cafe  (John Hing, Jang Go, John
Failure   to   post   notice   showing
Fined $25 ;  default, 10 days.
Mow), 1228 Granville Street, Vancouver
hours   at   which   work   begins
and ends
Bright   Moon   Cafe   (Don   Toy   Lim),   650
Failure to post notice of hours ...
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50.
Columbia  Street,  New  Westminster
1
Canada   Cafe    (Jung   Chew,    John    Jing,
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined $25 ;   in default, ten days in
Jung   Ming),   936   Pender   Street,   Van
posted
jail.
couver
Cassidy  Cafe   (Jung Kee  Guey,  Jung Wah
Failure to keep  true and  correct
Fined $10 ;   costs,  $2.50 ; in default.
Hing,    Jung   Moo   Quan),    306   Cordova
records
ten  days in  jail.
Street West, Vancouver
Failure to  keep   true and  correct
records
Fined $15.
Dickson Feed Co. (W. A. Dickson), Clover-
Failure to keep  true and  correct
Fined $10 and costs.
dale
records
Dickson Feed Co. (W. A. Dickson), Clover-
Failure to post notice of hours....
Suspended sentence.
dale
Golden  Dragon  Cafe   (P.  C.  Quon et al.),
Failure to keep  true and  correct
Fined   $10;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
28 Cordova Street West,  Vancouver
records
ten days in jail.
Hamilton   Cafe    (Jung   Mow,   Jung   Yim,
Failure to post notice of hours ....
Fined $25 ; default, ten days in jail.
Jung   Chong   Kee),   69   Cordova   Street
West,  Vancouver
Hastings Cafe   (Bert Sancy),  50 Hastings
Excessive hours    	
Suspended sentence;   costs, $5;   default, 10 days in jail.
Street East, Vancouver
Jones  Tent  &  Awning,   Ltd.,   1595   Kings-
Failure to post notice of hours
Fined $25.
way, Vancouver
Model Cafe (Lee Jack), 30 Hastings Street
Failure to  keep  true and  correct
Fined   $10;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
East, Vancouver
records
five days in jail.
Muir    Cafe    (Peter    Yee),    106    Hastings
Failure to post notice of hours
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days in jail.
Street  East,  Vancouver
1
New Star Cafe   (Timmy Fung),  242  Hast
Failure to post notice of hours
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default.
ings Street East, Vancouver
ten days.
Railway Cafe (John Ming, John Fay Ming,
Failure to  keep  true  and   correct
Fined   $10;    costs,   $2.50 ;    default,
Jean Poy), 732 Main Street, Vancouver
records
five days.                                                                      1
Railway Cafe (John Ming, John Fay Ming,
Excessive hourS"  __	
Fined $50 ; default, twenty days.
Jean  Poy), 732 Main Street, Vancouver
Roxy   Cafe    (Charley   Jung),   616   Robson
Failure to post notice of hours
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50 ;    default,
Street,   Vancouver
ten days.                                                                       1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 51
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Classic   Cleaners   (Sam   Zacks),   278   Tenth
Avenue East, Vancouver
Consumers   Meat   Pool,   Ltd.,   Pender   and
Main Streets, Vancouver
Cowichan  Saltery  Co.,   Ltd.,   208  Hastings
Street   East,   Vancouver
Cumming's   Market,   207   Hastings   Street
West, Vancouver
Dandy Cafe   (Lim   Fee,   Jung  Hong),  329
Carrall Street,  Vancouver
Moresby  Island  Fisheries   (Jedway),   Ltd.,
467 Powell Street, Vancouver
MacPhail    Hardware,    Ltd.,    6167    Fraser
Avenue,  Vancouver
Olympic Cafe  (Alex.  Zongas), 720  Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Pacific Sea Products Exporters, Ltd., 217-9
Dunlevy Street, Vancouver
Pacific Sea Products Exporters, Ltd., 217-9
Dunlevy Street,  Vancouver
River Fish Co., Ltd., Steveston	
Failure to post notice of hours-
Employing   person   outside  hours
posted
Excessive hours 	
Employing   person   outside  hours
posted
Failure to keep  true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep  true  and  correct
records
Employing   person   outside   hours
posted
Excessive hours — _ 	
Excessive hours..
South Shore Wood-Yard   (Thaker),  1  First
Avenue West, Vancouver
Trocadero,  Ltd.,  156 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver
A.  E.  Bend,  Pitt Meadows	
A.   E.   Bend,  Pitt  Meadows
De Luxe Cafe,  1124 Granville Street, Vancouver
Tor Gjomle,  Wells .... — 	
F. Muskett, Haney Meat Market, Haney	
Mount Shasta Cafe, 237 Hastings Street
East,  Vancouver
Muir Cafe, 106 Hastings Street East, Vancouver
New Atlantic Cafe, 130 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver
New York Cafe, 105 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver
Purity Cafe, 70 Cordova Street, Vancouver_.
M. Shinkoda, 226 Powell Street, Vancouver
Zacks, Ltd., Fifth and Main Streets, Vancouver
Medosweet Dairy Products, Ltd., University Area, Vancouver
Regal Bakery, 2709 Commercial Drive,
Vancouver
Chew Wing (Royal Produce), 2415 Main
Street, Vancouver
Sam Lee, 803 Davie Street, Vancouver	
Failure to post notice of employees' hours of work
Failure to post notice of employees' hours of work
Employing person outside hours
posted
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post notice of employees' hours of work
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Excessive  hours- -	
Failure to post notice of hours of
work
Excessive  hours 	
Failure   to   keep   true   and   correct
records
Excessive hours 	
Jimmy Kai, Sunon Market, 2723 Granville
Street, Vancouver
Chin Fong, Harry Chin, Chin Keong, Chin
Pong, 5756 Granville Street, Vancouver
Chong Hee Market (Yee Gon), 646 Columbia Street, New Westminster
Keefer Laundry (W. M. June), 238 Keefer
Street, Vancouver
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
records
Excessive hours  	
Failure to post schedule of hours
Employing   person   outside   hours
shoWn on schedule
Failure   to   notify   an   employee
when work begins and ends
Failure   to   notify   an   employee
when work begins and ends
Employing  person   outside hours
shown on schedule
Employing   person   outside   hours
shown on schedule
Failure to keep records  __
Employing   person   outside  hours
shown on schedule
Excessive hours  - 	
Fined $25 ; default, seven days.
Fined $25 ; default, distress.
Fined $50 ; costs, $2,50.
Fined $25 ; default, distress.
Fined   $10;    costs,   $2.50;    default,
five days.
Fined $10 ;    costs,   $2.50.
Fined $10; costs, $2.50; default,
distress.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $3 ; default,  three days.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50.
Fined $50.
Fined $25.
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    default,
distress.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $20 or five days.
Fined $10 ; costs, $4.50.
Fined $30 and costs.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50.
Fined $25 ;  default, ten days.
Fined   $10;     costs,   $2.50;     default,
ten   days.
Fined $25 ;   default, twenty days.
Fined   $10 ;     costs,   $2.50 ;     default,
ten days.
Suspended sentence ; costs, $5.
Suspended sentence ;  costs, $5.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence ;  costs, $2.50.
Fined $25 ;  default, one month.
Fined $25 ;  default, one month.
Fined $10;   default, five days.
Fined $25 ;   default, one month.
Fined $25. G 52                                                DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Lee,  Lee,  Lee Chew, 2408 Hastings  Street
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 ;   default, five days.
East, Vancouver
Maple Cafe  (Tamarigo Sumido), 221 Main
Failure to post notice of hours
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
Street, Vancouver
Royal   Produce   (Douglas   Chan),   Hastings
Employing   person   outside  hours
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
and Abbott Streets, Vancouver
shown on schedule
S.    Fugimoto,   c/o   Royston   Lumber    Co.,
Being an employee, did work ex
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Ltd., Royston
cessive hours
E.  Hama,  c/o Royston  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.,
Being an employee, did work ex
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Royston
cessive hours
Royston Lumber Co., Ltd., Royston _   	
Excessive hours  (two charges)
Fined $20;   costs, $5.
Superior Produce  (Chin Foo), 2129 Forty-
Failure to post schedule of hours
Fined $25 ;   default, fifteen days.
first Avenue West, Vancouver
of work
Terminal    Market     (Kigashi    Mizabuchi),
Failure to  keep  true  and  correct
Fined $10 ;   default, five days.
5569 Dunbar Street, Vancouver
records
Valley Motors   Ltd , Chilliwack             	
Failure to keep  true and  correct
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.25.
records
Willman's    Bakery,    1337    Pender    Street,
Failure to post schedule of hours
Costs, $5.
Vancouver
of work
Young  Brothers   (Young Kai),   3496  Dun
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
bar Street, Vancouver
of work
A.   &   C.   Company,   Ltd.,   5679   Granville
Excessive hours   ■,   ...
Suspended sentence ;   costs,  $2.50.
Street, Vancouver
Chaing Back Sing, 717 Davie Street, Vancouver
Excessive hours  	
Fined $25 ;   default, five days.
Morris   Belkin,   714   Pender   Street   West,
Excessive hours   	
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $10 ;   de
Vancouver
fault, five days.
Cameron Lake Logging Co., Ltd., Coombs..-
Cameron Lake Logging Co., Ltd., Coombs.-
Iwao Harada   Coombs                             -
Excessive hours
Fined $10 ;   costs, $1.75.
Excessive hours       - 	
Fined $10 ;   costs, $1.75.
Being an employee, did work ex
Fined $10;   costs, $1.75.
Y   Murakami   Coombs
cessive hours
Being an  employee,  did work  ex
Fined $10;   costs, $1.75.
cessive hours
Chow Poy, 865 Denman Street, Vancouver-
Excessive hours .
Suspended sentence;   costs, $5 ;   default, five days.
Cowan-Dodson   Bakeries,   Ltd.,   275   Eighth
Flvepssive Vinnrfi
Fined $25 ;   costs.
Avenue East,  Vancouver
Lee Dow, 1182 Robson Street, Vancouver—
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $10 ;   default, five days.
Yuen Hing, 1193 Denman Street, Vancouver
Failure to  keep  true  and  correct
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $10 ;   de
records
fault, five days.
Holly    Lodge    Confectionery,    1254    Davie
Failure  to  keep  true  and  correct
Fined $10 ;   default, ten days.
Street, Vancouver
records
So Hoy Produce, 5691 Dunbar Street, Van
Failure to keep  true and correct
Fined $10 ;   default, ten days.
couver
records
Masco Cleaners, Nelson— —
Failure  to keep  true and  correct
records
Fined $10.
Mayfair Produce, 5626 Dunbar Street, Van
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10;   default, ten days.
couver
records
Mah Man, 1044 Robson Street, Vancouver....
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $10 ;   default, five days.
Pong   Brothers,    2143    Forty-first   Avenue
Failure to keep  true and correct
Fined $10;   default, ten days.
West, Vancouver
records
Mah Shak, 3135 Oak Street, Vancouver
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence; costs, $10; default, five days.
Star Bakery, Trail        	
Failure to post schedule of hours
Fined $25 and costs.
Sunnyside Market, 1198 Davie Street, Van
Failure to post schedule of hours
Fined $25 ;   default,  fifteen days.
couver
Joe Tara, Westham Island-   	
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence.
Chin Sing Tai, 3224 Oak Street, Vancouver
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended  sentence;  costs,  $10; default, five days.
Bains Confectionery   (C.  J. Munroe), 2524
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined $10;   default, five days.
Main  Street,  Vancouver
shown on schedule
Eastern Produce   (Louie Sing), 2501  Com
Employing   person   outside   hours
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
mercial Drive, Vancouver
shown on schedule
• REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 53
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
records
Long   Market,   2184   Fourth   Avenue   West,
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $10
default, five days.
Vancouver
records
Melrose Cafe   (No. 2),  Ltd.,  716 Hastings
Failure to keep true and correct
Fined $15
default, distress.
Street West, Vancouver
records
Valley Cafe (A. N. Schreifelt), Chilliwack
Employing  person   outside  hours
shown on schedule
Suspended
sentence.
Cowan-Dodson   Bakeries,   Ltd.,   275   Eighth
Employing   person   outside  hours
Fined $25.
Avenue East, Vancouver
shown on schedule
Fined $25
Fined $25
Fined S25:
Nu-Way   Cleaners  &  Dyers   (John   Zacks),
Failure to post schedule of hours
Suspended sentence;   costs, $5.
1656  Fourth  Avenue West,  Vancouver
Thomas M. Fowler, 908 Drake Street, Van
couver
Golden Dragon Cafe  (Sam Wong), 28 Cor
Employing   person   outside  hours
Fined $25;
default, one month.
dova Street West, Vancouver
shown on schedule
Failure to post schedule of hours
Fined $25
Fined $25
Hoy  Brothers,   974   Granville   Street,   Van
Employing  person   outside  hours
Fined $10
default, five days.
couver
shown on schedule
Fined $25.
795 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver
Willman's  Cake  Shop,   1137  Pender  Street
Employing   person   outside  hours
Suspended
sentence;   costs, $5.
East, Vancouver
shown on schedule
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Emil Lunde, Matsqui	
Sam Gritchen, Winlaw..
Devonsbire   Hotel,
Charles   Burgess   Dillon,
Vancouver
Lome E. Butt, 519 Fort Street, Victoria-
Tor Gjomle.  Wells _
Russell Lutz, Katz	
Robert Graf. Bull River  	
Brian Brisco, Hixon-Quesnelle Gold Placers,
Ltd., Hixon Creek
Murray Creek Gold Alluvials, Ltd., Wells.-.
William Rozan, Nelson   	
Katz Logging Co.   (George Moore), Hope..
Jack Munsie, 1 Cook Street, Victoria	
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Fined $100;   costs, $12.50.
Suspended  sentence ;   costs,  $12.50 ;
pay arrears, $65.60.
Fined $100.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $100;   default, thirty days.
Fined    $100    and    costs;     default,
thirty days ; and pay arrears, $66.
Fined $100 ;   costs, $6.25.
Fined  $100-;    costs,   $3.50;    default,
one month.
Fined $100 ;   default, sixty days.
Suspended   sentence;    costs,   $3.75;
pay arrears, $78.03.
Fined  $100   and  costs,  or  fifteen
days.
Suspended  sentence;    costs.     Given
two months  to  arrange payment
of wages. G 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Grandview   Steam   Laundry   (Sam   Hong),
891 Prior Street, Vancouver
New Method Laundries, Ltd., Victoria
Snowflake  Cleaners  &  Dyers,  2046  Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver
Pacific Dress & Uniform Co., 619 Granville
Street, Vancouver
Fined   $100;    costs,  $2.50;    default.
Section 12, clause (b), "Factories
Act"
Working employees outside hours
without permission
Working employees outside hours
without permission
ten days.
Fined $50.
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $5.
" Department of Labour Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Furnishing  information  knowing
it to be false
Fined $50,-   costs, $3.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1937, 1938, 1939.
Figures showing comparative wage trends are furnished in the following tables for the
year 1918, when data were first compiled, and for the three most recent years—namely, 1937,
1938, and 1939.    It will be noted these relate to non-seasonal occupations only.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.
1937.
1938.
1939.
Average weekly wages—
i
1
$12.71
$7.76
15.49%    j
1
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%    '
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
$13.66
Employees under 18 years. —    —	
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
$10.08
7.12%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years  —
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$12.90
$8.23
4.74%
Hotel and Catering Industry.
Average weekly wages—
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
$13.80
$11.34
2.16%
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$18.20
$11.87 |
1-28%    j
I
$18.19
$11.44
1.30% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 55
Personal Service Occupation.
1938.
1939.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years -
Percentage of employees under 18 years
I
j
$13.58 $13.87
$4.13 I $7.51
2.75%     | 2.63%
I
	
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
$18.16
$10.14
6.06%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
1
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%    |
$14.81
Inexperienced employees 	
$8.67
13.22%
SPECIAL LICENCES.
Provision is made in the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for the issuance of special
licences to inexperienced women and girl employees, which licences may set out lower rates
than those established by Order for experienced employees. This enables unskilled workers
to compete on a fair competitive basis with those who have acquired requisite skill.
Application forms completed by the prospective employee and her employer are required
by the Board.    These are carefully checked to see that the application is made in good faith.
The Act limits the number holding special licences to not more than one-seventh of the
total number of female employees in any plant. Where less than seven are employed one
licence may be issued.
In 1939 there were 981 special licences issued to inexperienced female employees. This
was an increase of 278 over the 1938 figure.
Divided by occupations these licences were issued as follows:—
Name of Industry or Occupation.
Telephone and telegraph       2
Personal service      23
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing     68
Manufacturing   154
Mercantile  .-.  183
Hotel and catering  231
Office  320
Number of
Licences issued.
Total  981
Permits may be issued under the Male Mercantile Order for two classes of young men
just beginning work. Different rates and training periods are set for youths between 18 and
21 years and for those starting between 21 and 24 years of age.
In these two groups 106 permits were granted during the year, being 50 less than had
been issued during the previous twelve-month period.
It is gratifying to note that young permit-holders often have their wages increased
sooner than their licences or permits require, and sometimes the employers are willing to
start them at higher figures than the specific Order requires. In the latter case the permits
are made out showing the higher commencement wage. G 56   , DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONCLUSION.
The Board's plan, from the standpoint of policy, in discharging the responsibilities entrusted to it by the labour laws of the Province has been explained in former reports, so that
it is unnecessary to again dwell upon that aspect of our work.
Decisions affecting the welfare of many people must be made after careful consideration
in order to avoid injustices, and to ensure that an ordinance once made will have the effect
intended.
In recording our activities for another year we have continued to deal with the problems
of those who have come before us in a spirit of fairness to all.
We would again express our appreciation of the co-operation received from all we have
tried to serve.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 57
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO "MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
40c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
48
48
48
48
54
BARBERING (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8, Effective August 3rd, 1934.)
Barbering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act,'
chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
46c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum bours, 48 per week.)
BOX-MANUFACTURING (MALE).
Order No. 55, Effective April 4th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. ST of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 7 of August 3rd, 1934.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Adult males, 90% of total -	
A.dult males, 10% of total, not less than..
Males, 18 to 21 years of age	
Males, under 18 years of age —	
40c.
30c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Above rates apply only to those not included in any other Order of the Board.
(6.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70, Effective March 18th, 1940.
(Superseding Order No. 31, Effective October 28th, 1935.)
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven  (7)  passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge is
made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
50c.
55c.
75c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in any one day or
50 hours in any one
week.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 70a, Effective June 27th, 1940.
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-driver
while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from the time G 58                                             DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his employer's
headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty;   and shall include the time occupied by
a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place where he is to
take charge of the bus and vice versa;   but the minimum wage shall not apply to waiting-time of a bus-
driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 66} Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. ^0, Effective February 1st, 1937.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew
75c
48.
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
48.
Note.— (a.)  Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration,  and  repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area : Provincial Electoral Districts of.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
75c.
75c.
75c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 72, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the erection and construction of
any building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any existing
building or structure or part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(6.)   Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance^
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" requires wages be paid as (
york.
ften as semi-montl
ly- REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 59
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 73, Effective May 27th, 1940.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the erection and construction of
any building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling, alteration, or repairing of any existing
building or structure or part thereof.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
All carpentry work within a radius of 5 miles from the centre of the City of
Nanaimo   -      -    	
75c.
48
Note.— (a.)   Does not apply to apprentices under "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)  Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work.
(c.)   " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act " requires wages be paid as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
" Christmas-tree  industry"  includes  all  operations  in  or incidental  to  the  cutting,  gathering,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40c. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
Note.— (a.)  Wages shall be paid semi-monthly,
(b.)  The above is a new order in place of Order No. 61, which expired December 31st, 1938.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 12, Effective October 19th, 1934.  .
• Order No. 12a, Effective February 28th, 1938.
Order No. 12b, Effective July 20th, 1939.
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or  demolition  of any  building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Point Grey, Victoria, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt,
Saanich, Burnaby, Oak Bay— -	
Rest of Province - — -  	
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
* Consolidated for convenience only.
Note.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under "Apprenticeship  Act.'
(b.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly  (Order 12b).
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32, Effective November 28th, 1935.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (o.)  Full week's board (21 meals), $4.00 per week,
(b.)  Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.) each.
(c.)  Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee,
(d.)  Pull week's lodging of seven (7) days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)  Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)  The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)  Employees must be given twenty-four  (24) consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.) Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted. G 60
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30, October 3rd, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 24th, 1934.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
Ziy2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 87% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.   •
37^c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act " 48 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).
Order No. 39, Effective August 1st, 1936.
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
50c.
$4.00
4.00
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(b.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
32%4C. per hour.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
IS years of age or over. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 61
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 15th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22, Effective April 18th, 1935.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
Under 21 years ,,   ., .,..,,'	
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
57c.
76c.
28c.
42c.
56c.
Note.—-(1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21, Effective April 16th, 1935.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Experienced rate
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
Inexperienced rate .
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
30c.
11th and 12th hours
45c.
In excess of 12 hours
60c.
First 10 hours
25c
11th and 12th hours
37»/2c.
In excess of 12 hours
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)  Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. SO of December 3rd, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 25th, 1934.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-
homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments or
office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which a
charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in
connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments. G 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
working at above rates.
Note.— (a.)  Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7)   days, $2.00 per week.
(e.) Emergency overtime up to ten (10) hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two (52) hours in any one
(1) week. •
(/.) Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or forty-eight (48) in
the week.
(g.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (See
Order 52b.)
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(£.) Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
(j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(fc.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(I.)   See Order 52f for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 52f (Resort Hotels), Effective June 17th, 1940, to September 14th, 1940.
(Superseding Orders 52A and 52d.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten  (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four  (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight  (48)  in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
half (1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52, or her regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours in each calendar week.
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over 	
Under 17 years of age 	
17 years and under 18 years of age
18 years and under 19 years of age
19 years and under 20 years of age
20 years and under 21 years of age
48
48
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(6.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 63
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th, 1935, and Order No. 23A, in Effect from
October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-fireman.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)   residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (3IV2C.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:-
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (b).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37V&C.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 29, in Effect from October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.) Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4) residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)   Resident janitress in apartment building's, containing:
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month;
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month;
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month;
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month;
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month;
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month;
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month;
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month;
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month;
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month;
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month;
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month;
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month;
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month; G 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month;
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month;
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month;
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month;
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month;
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month;
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall he
designated as resident janitress', and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or)  gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.
Experienced Employee—Weekly rate, $13.50.    Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced employee -
Under 18 years of age.
Weekly rate.
$8.00 for 1st 4 months.
8.50 for 2nd 4 months.
9.00 for 3rd 4 months.
10.00 for 4th 4 months.
11.00 for 6th 4 months.
12.00 for 6th 4 months.
18 years of age and over.
Weekly rate.
$9.00 for 1st 4 months.
10.50 for 2nd 4 months.
12.00 for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required in this
class.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.— (a.)  Above rates are based on a 48-hour week.
(6.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
LOGGING (MALE).
Order No. 1, Effective April 27th, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, mining-prop, and
pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties,
mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees _	
Trackmen - - - „	
Cook- and bunk-house employees
40c. per hour
37%c. per hour
$2.75 per day
48
48
Unlimited.
Note.—Certain exemptions regarding working-hours.     (See "Hours of Work" Regulations.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 65
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 1923.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
"Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees-
$14.00
48
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 1,
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes
and wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks,
pails, wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions,
gas-mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers, maps, saw-teeth and holders, mats, tiles, ropes, and shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first two months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 2.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations, worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toys and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 3.
Includes bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing, dress-making,
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
ready-to-wear suits, jewellery, furs, leather goods, hand-made cigars,
and hand-made millinery
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—-
$7.00 a week for the first six months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of
age or over. G 66
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
MERCANTILE   (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38, dated June 26th, 1936.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over-
(3.) 21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day-	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
37% to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years of Age.
Mini-mum Rates for Beginners under Eighteen (18)  Years of Age.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (1.)
$6.00 per week-
7.50 per week~
9.00 per week-
11.00 per week...
13.00 per week-
15.00 per week-
Under 17 years
15c
17 and under 18
20c
18 and under 19
25c
19 and under 20
30c
20 and under 21
35c
Thereafter
40c.
60c.
80c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing. Eighteen (18) Years and under Twenty-one (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months—
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 monthS-
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months..
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
36c.
80c.
$1.00
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Beginners and those recommencing, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$9.00 per week, 1st 6 months  	
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
13.00 per week, 3rd 6 months 	
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
1.40
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(6.)  Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)  Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 67
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and  (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
20c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
21c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
23c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
25c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
26c. per hour during 5th 3 months.
27c. per hour during 6th 3 months.
29c. per hour during 7th 3 months.
30c. per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)  Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(b.)  Maximum working-hours, 48 per week.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.                                                                •
(Superseding Order No. i of May 25th, 193Jt.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
37%c. per hour for 4th 3 months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
- G 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
37^ to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than ZIV2 Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
32 %c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
3 7 He. per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING.
Order No. 71, Effective June 1st, 1940.
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour.
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North
Vancouver     	
Note.— (a.)   This Order does not apply to indentured apprentices pursuant to the "Apprenticeship Act."
(b.)   Does  not  apply  to  those  permanently   employed   at  maintenance-work   in   industrial  or  manufacturing
establishments, public and private buildings.
(c.)   All wages must be paid semi-monthly.
PATROLMEN   (MALE).
Order No. 69, Effective February 5th, 1940.
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises  of more  than  one person for the purpose  of guarding or protecting persons  or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman " means any employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by a
private patrol agency.
Hourly  rate
35c.
Note.— (a.)   Wages must be paid semi-monthly.
(b.)   Employees must be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(c.) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order Effective since September 15th, 1919.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring; hairdressing; barbering; massaging;
giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments; removal of superfluous hair; chiropody; or other
work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over„
Minimum  _ 	
$14.25
QlVzC- per hour
$1.50 per day
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 69
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37He per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37Hc. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.) Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out
above.
(b.)   44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27A.)
(c.) Where special article of wearing-apparel of distinctive design, trimming, colour, or fabric is required, it
shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.     (See 27b.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order reduces the weekly hours to forty-four (44) and not more than nine (9) hours
in any one day.
Also provides for one-half (%) hour free from duty between the hours of eleven (11) a.m. and
two-thirty (2.30) p.m.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Order No. 27b, Effective May 1st, 1940.
The above Order requires that where a distinctive uniform of special design, trimming, colour, or
fabric is required, it shall be furnished, laundered, and repaired free of cost to the employee.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT   (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Personal Service Order, dated September 15th, 1919.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
Female attendant (of any age).
$14.25
35c. per hour.
75c.
Note.— (a.)  Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)  Where uniforms  or  special articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall  be  furnished,  repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34. G 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Order No. 50a, Effective July 10th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 2 of April 27th, 1934, Order No. 14 of October 19th, 1934, and
Order No. 36, Effective April 1st, 1936.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."     (See regulations.)
(6.)   For engineers see Engineer Order.
(c.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.)  90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour.
SHINGLE-BOLTS   (MALE).
Order No. 1b, Effective January 4th, 1935.
Includes employees engaged in felling, bucking, and splitting shingle-bolts.
Rate, $1.30 per cord.
Hours, 48 per week.
SHINGLE-MILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 62, Effective April 6th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 16, dated November 1st, 1934.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles, except shingle-bolt
operations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Male employees -
40c.
48
Note.— (a.)  For engineers see Engineer Order.
(b.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20, Effective June 14th, 1935.
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder or wood-caulkei\_
All other employees    _.	
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees
in plant may be employed at not less than   	
48
48
48
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33, Effective January 30th, 1936, and Order No. 33a, September 13th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 6, Effective June 29th, 1934.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.                        Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All ages.
$2.75
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.—If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost to
the employee except by arrangement a'pproved by Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 71
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich	
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.) Permits shall he obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)  Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)  Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
31Uc. per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)  Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(6.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers* premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of  10  p.m.  and  8  a.m.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 26, Effective July 4th, 1935.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of. any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate  	
Less than 40
40 and not more
than 50
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c. G 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE)— Continued.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(2.)   Operator's  of  motor-vehicles  of  less  than
2,000 lb.  net weight, as  specified on the
motor-vehicle   licence,   exclusive   of   those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 48
25 c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
5214 c.
(4.)  Bicycle-riders   and   foot-messengers   employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52y2c.
(6.)  Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
those covered by section 7 hereof
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
(7.)  Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery
of milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(b.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)  Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours is worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
WATCHMEN—LOGGING CAMPS   (MALE).
Order No. Ia, Effective November 29th, 1934.
Wages.
Hours.
Watchmen where operations of camp are suspended-
No minimum wage fixed.
Not fixed.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 35 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 11 of August 24th, 1934..)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and
doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products,
and general mill-work products.
Class.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33}& per
cent, of all male employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 73
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders made by the Board of Industrial Relations,
compiled as at June 27th, 1940:—
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
41
17
8
42
7
37
55
31
70
70a
40
58
65
66
72
73
61
68
12
12A
12b
45
45A
48
19
32
53
54
18
18a
18b
18c
39
8
3A
21
2lA
2lB
21c
22
22a
22b
22c
46
46a
46b
46c
46d
63
Apprentices, Indentured -	
Feb. 3/37
Nov. 1/34
July 12/34
April 5/37
July 12/34
March 23/36—
March 10/38—
Oct. 15/35
March 12/40—
June 21/40
Dec. 1/36
Sept. 18/38
June 23/39
Aug. 16/39
May 14/40
May 14/40
Nov. 18/38      .
Aug. 31/39
Sept. 28/34
Feb. 28/38 -
July 18/39
June 14/37
July 2/37
July 29/37
Feb. 8/35
Nov. 26/35
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 8/35
April 17/35
June 26/36.     .
May 14/37.
June 26/36
Feb. 11/37
Nov. 8/34
July 19/34
April 8/37
July 19/34
March 26/36—
March 17/38-
Oct. 17/35
March 14/40-
June 27/40
Dec. 3/36
Sept. 22/38
June 29/39     ..
Aug. 17/39
May 16/40
May 16/40
Nov. 24/38
Sept. 7/39
Oct. 4/34
March 3/38
July 20/39
June 17/37
July 8/37
July 29/37
Feb.14/35
Nov. 28/35
March 3/38
March 3/38
Feb. 14/35
April 18/35
July 2/36
May 20/37
July 2/36
Jan. 15/20
May 3/34
June 14/34
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
July 8/37      •
Sept. 2/37
Sept. 16/37
March 10/38—
Aug. 18/38	
May 25/39
Feb.11/37
Nov. 23/34 .
Aug. 3/34
June 14/37
Aug. 3/34
April 1/36
April 4/38	
Oct. 28/35
March 18/40-
June 27/40
Feb. 1/37
Nov. 7/38
Aug. 1/39
Aug. 21/39
May 27/40
May 27/40
Nov. 24/38 -
Sept. 11/39 ...
Oct. 19/34
March 3/38    .
July 20/39
July 5/37
July 8/37
July 29/37
March 1/35
Nov. 28/35
March 3/38
March 3/38
March 1/35
April 18/35
July 2/36
June 1/37
Aug. 1/36
Feb. 28/20
May 18/34
June 29/34
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
Male and
June 14/37
April 1/36
April 4/38
March 17/40
Aug. 20/39
Dec. 31/38
July 8/37
July 29/37
Nov. 26/35
March 3/38
April 18/35
April 18/35
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
Dec. 31/39
Barbering .,     .
Male 	
Male 	
Male 	
Male	
Male -	
Male	
Bus-drivers (Victoria and Dis-
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island
andSaltspring Island)	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island
Male —	
Male 	
Male 	
Male  -
Male- 	
Male	
Male	
Male 	
Male- -	
Male 	
Male..—	
Carpentry - 	
Male 	
Male -
Male	
Male	
Male—	
Construction (Cancelling 45)
Elevator Operators	
Male	
Male 	
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam
Engineers, Stationary Steam
Engineers, Stationary Steam
Engineers, Stationary Steam
May 2/34
June 12/34
April 16/35.	
Dec. 2/85
July 21/36
Aug. 26/36
April 16/35..-
Dec. 2/35
July 21/36
Aug. 26/36
July 2/37
Sept. 1/37
Sept. 15/37
March 4/38 ....
Aug. 12/38
May 23/39
Female	
Female-	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency) 	
Fruit and Vegetable... 	
Fruit and Vegetable   ....
Female	
Female-—	
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
July 12/37
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37...
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37—
March 10/38 to
May 7/38
Aug. 12/38 to
Oct. 1/38
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39.. .
Female 	
Male	
Male  	
Male.-— -
Male 	
Female	
Female -
Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency) -   ..
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)	
Fruit and Vegetable.-	
Fruit and Vegetable Canning —
Female 	
Female	 G 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
47
47a
47b
47c
47d
64
51
52
52a
52b
52c
52D
52e
52f
23
23a
43
5a
5b
29
44
13
13a
15
28
25
10
10
10
10a
24
24
24
24
Fruit and Vegetable .
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)	
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable Canning-
Household-furniture.
Hotel and Catering-
Hotel and  Catering   (Resort
Hotels)    _
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel  and  Catering   (Resort
Hotels)	
Hotel  and  Catering   (Resort
Hotels) 1. .'.	
Hotel and Catering (Resort
Hotels)   —
Hotel and Catering (Resort
Hotels) 	
Janitor-
Janitor..
Janitor-
Janitresses
keeping)—
(Public     House-
Janitresses     (Public    Housekeeping ) 	
Janitresses   —
Janitresses  	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing-
Logging  	
Logging (Watchman) 	
Logging  (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers) 	
Logging and Sawmills.—	
Logging    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains) 	
Logging (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers)	
Cancelling No. 9 	
Logging and Sawmills  (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area) —
Logging 	
Manufacturing-
Mercantile	
Mercantile   (Supplementary,
1934)  	
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1935) 	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935) _ 	
Mercantile 	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1935)-—	
Mercantile
1936)	
Mercantile
1937)...	
(Supplementary,
July 2/37...
Sept. 1/37-
(Supplementary,
Sept. 15/37-
March 4/38..
Aug. 12/38...
May 23/39—
Nov. 17/37-
Feb. 8/38	
April 6/38 ..
May 18/38...
Aug. 22/38..
June 14/39-
Nov. 8/39....
June 11/40-
April 17/35-
Sept. 25/35...
May 14/37—
Nov. 9/34 .
April 17/35-
Sept. 26/35...
May 14/37—
April 7/34 .
Nov. 9/34...
Jan. 24/36...
July 12/34 _
Sept. 28/34 .
Jan. 24/36...
Sept. 28/34 .
Sept. 25/35 ...
March 23/38..
March 29/35-
July 24/34	
July 8/37	
Sept. 2/37—-
Sept. 16/37--
March 10/38..
Aug. 18/38—
May 25/39	
Nov. 18/37-
Feb. 10/38-
Nov. 9/34...
Nov. 26/35-
Oct. 15/35...
May 29/35...
Nov. 26/35-
Dec. 1/36	
Nov. 17/37-
April 7/38...
May 19/38—
Aug. 25/38...
June 15/39..
Nov. 9/39	
June 14/40-
April 18/35..
Oct. 3/35	
May 20/37—
Nov. 15/34...
April 18/35.
Oct. 3/35 -
May 20/37-.
Feb. 27/19....
April 12/34..
Nov. 15/34 ..
Jan. 30/36....
July 19/34—
Oct. 4/34 .
Jan. 30/36..
Oct. 4/34....
Sept. 26/35 ...
March 24/38..
June 6/35 .
July 26/34..
Nov. 15/34..
Nov. 28/35..
Oct. 17/35...
June 6/35 ...
Nov. 28/35..
Dec. 3/36	
Nov. 25/37-
July 12/37	
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37...
SefJt. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37 -
March 10/38 to
May 7/38.	
Aug. 12/38 to
Oct. 1/38	
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39...
Nov. 22/37	
Feb. 14/38	
Male.
Male.
Male -
Male.
Male.
Male.	
Male -	
Female.-
June 15/38 to
Sept. 15/38...
May 19/38	
Sept. 16/38
June 15/39 to
Sept. 15/39...
Nov. 9/39 to
June 12/40—
June 17/40 to
Sept. 14/40 -
April 18/35-	
Oct. 3/35	
June 1/37	
Nov. 30/34 .	
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female.
Male	
Male	
Male	
April 18/35
Oct. 3/35—
June 1/37	
March 31/19 ..
April 27/34 ....
Nov. 30/34 —
Jan.30/36.
Aug. 3/34 -
Oct. 19/34 .
Jan.30/36.
Oct. 19/34.
Sept. 26/35	
March 24/38-
July 1/35—
Aug. 10/34..
Dec. 1/34 -
Nov. 28/35-
Oct. 17/35-
July 1/35—
Nov. 28/35..
Dec. 3/36	
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37..
Female _
Female-
Female-
Female _
Female -
Male	
Male	
Male -
Male -
Male.
Male.
Male .
Male -
Male-
Female _
Male	
Male .
Male.
Male	
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female -
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
Dec. 31/39
Sept. 15/38
June 15/39.
Sept. 16/39
June 13/40
May 31/37
May 31/37
April 18/35
Oct. 3/35
May 31/37
March 24/38
Oct. 19/34
March 24/38
March 24/38
Oct. 4/34
July 20/36
.Dec. 31/34
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Jan. 3/37
Dee. 31/37 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 75
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
24a
24b
24
38
38
38b
59
59
4
34
71
27
27a
27a
27b
67
5
30
30a
2
14
2S
36
50
50A
IB
16
62
20
33A
33b
60
2a
26
26A
26B
26C
11
35
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)   	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936) 	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1938) - ;	
Mercantile - 	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1936)   - -  	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1937)  -.
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)   	
Oct. 15/35 ...
Aug. 26/36-
Nov. 18/38-
June 26/36 .
Dec. 1/36.....
Nov. 17/37 .
Mercantile  	
Mercantile  —	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1938)  	
Office Occupation— 	
Office Occupation- 	
Painters, Decorators, and
Paper-hangers  	
Patrolmen  	
Personal Service	
Personal Service	
Personal Service   (Temporary)   .-.	
Personal Service  	
Personal Service 	
Public Places of Amusement-
Public Housekeeping	
Public Housekeeping	
Public Housekeeping „	
Sawmills-  	
Sawmills    (East  of   Cascade
Mountains) 	
Sawmill and Logging   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area)..
Sawmills  —
Sawmills  	
Sawmills        	
Shingle-bolts 	
Shingle-mills  	
Shingle-mills 	
Ship-building. ,—
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Vancouver).
Taxicab-drivers —	
Taxicab-drivers .  —
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and
District)	
Telephone and Telegraph -	
Tie-cutting  	
Transportation	
Transportation	
Transportation— 	
Transportation	
Aug. 31/36 -
Aug. 26/36..
Oct. 12/38 ..
Nov. 18/38-
May 2/34 —
Jan. 24/36...
April 26/40..
Jan. 19/40....
Aug. 29/35 .
Dec. 17/35	
March 23/39..
April 23/40—
Aug. 31/39 —
May 2/34	
Sept. 26/35—
April 2/37	
April 7/34..
Sept. 28/34 .
Sept. 25/35	
March 23/36-
Aug. 3/37	
July 18/39—
Dec. 14/34 —
Nov. 1/34	
March 23/39-
May 28/35 —
June 13/34-
Jan.24/36-
Sept. 1/37...
Aug. 30/38-
Nov. 15/38-
May 2/34	
June 19/35-
June 26/36 -
Aug. 30/38..
Oct. 19/38—
Wood-working-
Wood-working-
Wood-working-
Aug. 1/34	
March 23/36 ..
Aug. 3/37 -
Oct. 17/35—
Sept. 3/36 ..
Nov. 24/38-
July 2/36	
Dec. 3/36......
Nov. 25/37...
Sept. 3/36	
Sept. 3/36	
Oct. 20/38—
Nov. 24/38...
May 10/34—
Jan. 30/36 ..
May 2/40	
Jan. 25/40....
Aug. 14/19-
Sept. 5/35 ....
Dec. 19/35—
April 6/39....
April 25/40-
Sept. 7/39 —
May 10/34—
Oct. 3/35	
April 8/37—
April 12/34..
Oct. 4/34.	
Sept. 26/35...
March 26/36
Aug. 5/37.....
July 20/39—
Dec. 20/34—
Nov. 8/34 —
April 6/39—
May 30/35—
June 14/34-
Jan. 30/36—
Sept. 2/37 ....
Sept. 1/38 ....
Nov. 17/38...
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Female -
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Female
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Dec. 81/35
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Aug. 16/37 G 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
"HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely:—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten  (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)   The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations;   or
(6.)   Transporting  logs  by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;   or
(c.)  Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)  Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform 'preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 77
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
9. Persons employed in laundries may, in
any week in which a public holiday (other
than Sunday) occurs, work on each of the
remaining working-days of the week such hours
in excess of the limit of hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said Act as may be necessary
to avoid serious interference with the business
of the industry, but the total hours worked in
any such week shall not exceed forty-eight (48).
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized,
of the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations No. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade,
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess of
the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 30th
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938. Effective October 1st, 1938, to September 30th, 1939.) G 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations No. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place  where food  is  served  and  a  charge  is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18a.
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be
necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 79
REGULATION No. 20.
REGULATION No. 23.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations No. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, and 2lE
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21f.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
includes all operations in or incidental to the
canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit
or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the said Acts up to and including the
31st day of March, 1940.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
4th day of April, 1940.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 11th, 1940.
Effective April 11th, 1940, to March 31st,
1941.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage or
delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
Transportation Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten (10) hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
" Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10) hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule G 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 26.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving a
motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
REGULATION No. 28b.
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:'—■
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
(&•)
REGULATION No. 29.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 8th
day of November, 1939.
COMPILED JUNE 27th, 1940.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 81
INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION BRANCH.
Head Office   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Branch Office  __ Department of Labour, 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Secretary Registrar    B. H. E. Goult.
Victoria, B.C., May 31st, 1940.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the second annual report of the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch for the year 1939.
There were four industrial disputes in British Columbia during the year—the lowest
number ever recorded. The number of employees affected is slightly lower than in 1938 and
constitutes the least number of workers losing time in the past nine years. Only the time
lost in working-days—13,803—shows an increase, and that is only an increase over the figure
for 1938.    It is less, however, than in any preceding year since 1931.
The greatest loss of time was caused by the illegal strike of gold-miners at Pioneer, B.C.,
which was unterminated at December 31st, 1939. The strike collapsed March 6th, 1940.
Employees directly involved failed to obtain their demands.
There was only one dispute during the year involving more than 500 employees.
There has been a marked diminution in the number of disputes and the amount of time
lost since the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " became effective.
The record of the Department includes lockouts as well as strikes. A lockout, or an
industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout, is rarely encountered, and strikes and lockouts are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables. The term " dispute " is used in
reference to either a strike or a lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of the
Department. Methods taken to obtain this information preclude the possibility of serious
omission. It is not always possible to secure exact information regarding the duration of
a dispute or the number of employees involved, and revisions are sometimes made in the light
of later information.
Estimates of time lost are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute has
lasted by the number of employees directly involved and not replaced. The number of
employees indirectly affected are not included in the computations.
There were four disputes reported during 1939, affecting 822 employees, and causing a
loss of 13,803 working-days.
The following table shows the record for the past nine years:—
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost in
Working-days, 1931-39.
Year.
No. of
Disputes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1939                  .           	
4
11
16
16
23
17
14
11
11
822
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,136
2,322
13,803
8,236
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
37,740
79,310
1938                            	
1937                            	
1936	
1935                                	
1934     .                          - —  	
1933                      -         	
1932	
1931                             	
An average of the number of disputes, employees affected, and working-days lost for the
years 1931-37 as compared with the record for 1938 and 1939, the two years in which the
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " has been effective, shows the marked decrease
in the latter period. G 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Number of Disputes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost in Working-days,
1938-39, as compared with Average for 1931-37.
Year.
No. of
Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1939   .        	
                     4
  -                 11
822
837
3,933
13,803
1938    	
8,236
1931-37 (average)	
                15
66,118
An analysis of disputes by industries reveals the fact that the greatest loss of time was
recorded in the mining industry, where three disputes affecting 813 workers resulted in a loss
of 13,740 working-days.
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia in 1939, by various Industries.
Industry.
No. of                    No. of
Disputes.           Employers.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1 1
2 2
1                            1
582
231
9
2,910
10,830
63
Totals   - -
4                              4
822
13,803
Summary of Disputes, 1939.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in
Working-
days.
Coal-miners, Cumberland  	
Institutional workers, Comox    .
Commenced February 20th, against suspension of transportation facilities usually provided by the Company for
the men.    Ended February 24th on recommendation of
Union officials that men return to work pending negotiation.     Later the Company agreed to provide transportation.     Favourable to the men.
Commenced April 12th on rejection of requests for a shorter
working-week,  annual holidays  with  pay,  annual  sick
leave with pay, and incidental demands.    Ended April
17th when all demands, with the exception of vacation
with pay, were granted.    Favourable to employees.
Commenced October 8th, against refusal of employer to
grant   demands   for   Union   recognition,   institution   of
the " check-off " system,  and an increase in wages of
Sl per day throughout the operation.   Unterminated as
at December 31st.
Commenced October 14th, following the dismissal of an
employee for fighting.  Later eighty-nine other employees
who  had  signed  a  petition  asking that the dismissed
man be reinstated were also dismissed.   Ended October
26th, following intervention by a Provincial Conciliation
Commissioner and reinstatement of the men.    Favourable to employees.
Totals    ____	
582
9
142
89
2,910
63
9,940
Gold-miners, Zeballos      	
890
822
13,803
I. STRIKES, 1939.
COAL-MINERS, CUMBERLAND.
No. 1.—Upon the reopening of the Bevan shaft, which is situated approximately five miles
from Cumberland, a number of Cumberland miners were asked to work there. The men
pressed the employing company to provide transportation to and from Bevan, which the
company refused to do. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 83
Following a meeting of the miners on February 19th, the men refused to go to work
either at Bevan or Cumberland, although advised not to strike by the executive officers of
their Union, whose headquarters are at Calgary.
On February 23rd the men were addressed by a Union official from Calgary, sent especially from Alberta for that purpose, and as a result of this meeting decided to return to
work the next day, pending negotiations between the Union and the Company.
The matter was thereafter given further consideration with the result that transportation was provided as requested.
There was no intervention by the Department of Labour on this occasion, since the
Company and the Union had a written agreement providing for the arbitration of disputes,
which had been approved by the Minister. As a result, both the Union and the Company
were exempt from the conciliation and arbitration provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Act," under the terms of section 47 of the Statute.
INSTITUTIONAL WORKERS, COMOX.
No. 2.—Late in March, members of the staff of a Comox institution communicated with
the management requesting a forty-eight-hour week, with shifts of eight hours; two weeks'
annual holidays with pay, and two weeks' sick leave, a laundry allowance, and another minor
concession.
The management offered the two weeks' holiday with pay and the laundry allowance, but
declared that it was financially unable to meet the other requests.
Nine of the staff of twelve therefore quit work, April 12th.
Following negotiations, the requests were granted,, with the exception of that for sick
leave with pay.    Employees returned to work without discrimination, April 18th.
GOLD-MINERS, PIONEER.
No. 3.—Employees in a gold-mine at this point ceased work October 8th, following rejection by the employing company of their demands for recognition of the Union (International
Union of Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers—a C.I.O. affiliate), institution of the check-off system
(i.e., the deduction of union dues from the pay-cheques of union members), and $1 per day
increase in wages throughout the operation.
Two hundred and forty men were employed, and of these 142 struck. The Union reported
235 on strike.
The cessation of work followed the sending of a telegram to the Minister of Labour,
September 28th, from the vice-president and recording secretary of the Union asking for the
appointment of a Conciliator. These officers said, further, that if no Conciliator arrived by
October 3rd they would be forced to take action.
The Minister informed these officials that the wire was not sufficient evidence that a
dispute existed, and that he was having a departmental representative travel to Pioneer to
investigate the matter. The union members were also informed by wire, letter, and by the
departmental representative on the ground that to strike prior to submission of their differences with their employer to conciliation and arbitration was contrary to the provisions of
the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
The Company announced on October 17th that the mine would be closed indefinitely, and
that the bunk- and cook-houses would be closed. Tenants in certain company houses were
also given notice to vacate.
On October 18th, announcement was made by the Government that Union officials would
be prosecuted for the violation of the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
The Union applied for a Court order, October 26th, restraining the Company from
cutting off heat, light, and water to bunk-houses occupied by the strikers.
Between November 2nd and November 14th, officials of the Union were found guilty of
calling the strike contrary to the Statute and were fined. In the interim, action was taken
by the Union before a Judge of the Supreme Court to have proceedings quashed. This action
failed.    Appeals against the convictions were thereupon made to the County Court.
A number of the non-union workers made application meanwhile to return to work, but
these were withdrawn when the strikers picketed the operation. G 84 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Appeals of the Union officers were heard by Judge J. O. Wilson, in Lillooet, on November
24th and December 20th, when the convictions were affirmed, but the fines were substantially
reduced. A subsequent reference to the Court of Appeal was abandoned January 22nd, 1940,
and dismissed upon application of the Crown.
Despite active efforts at mediation by the Department in the interim, no settlement was
reached. Late in January Union representatives applied to the Federal Department of
Labour with a view to having the dispute referred to a Board of Conciliation under the
provisions of the Dominion " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act." Such a Board can only
be appointed upon concurrence of both parties to the dispute, and such concurrence was not
forthcoming.
On February 27th a number of strikers entered the mine, well supplied with provisions,
and declared they would remain in the workings until the dispute was settled.    After two
days, following a discussion with an Inspector of the Provincial Police, the men left the mine.
The Company reopened the operation with a partial staff on March 6th and the Union called
off the strike March 10th.
GOLD-MINERS, ZEBALLOS.
No. U.—On October 14th, the employees of a gold-mining company at Zeballos, B.C.,
opened negotiations by way of a petition for the reinstatement of a shiftboss who had been
discharged for participating in a fight with the bull-cook at the camp. As a result, all those
who signed the petition were dismissed by the management.
Application was thereupon made by the employees for the services of a Conciliation
Commissioner, and two departmental officials were sent to Zeballos. Shortly after their
arrival on October 25th, the mine manager declared that he desired to negotiate a settlement with the employees through their committee. On the same day the eighty-nine men
were reinstated in their former positions by the management without discrimination.
MEDIATION, CONCILIATION, AND ARBITRATION.
Amongst the most important work of the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Branch
of the Department is that of conciliation. When any dispute exists and the parties thereto
are unable to adjust it, either of the parties may make application for the appointment of a
Conciliation Commissioner, or the Minister may apprehend the dispute and appoint a Conciliation Commissioner on his own initiative.
There were fifteen such commissions issued in 1939. Eight of the disputes requiring the
services of a Commissioner were settled by such an officer, six were referred to arbitration,
and two were settled by this means. In the other four cases referred to arbitration, disputants made application to withdraw. One application for a Conciliation Commissioner was
cancelled.
In six disputes dealt with by Commissioners, agreements between the employer and the
employees were signed, while the two disputes settled by arbitration resulted in the signing
of Union agreements.
The disputes dealt with by Conciliation Commissioners under the Act constituted approximately one-third of the complaints received by this branch of the Department and investigated and settled by its officers.
The following table shows the disposition of complaints received during the year:—
Disposition of Complaints received by the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch in 1939.
Manner of Disposition. No. of Complaints.
Not within scope of Act     3
*Referred to Conciliation Commissioners   15
Resulting in prosecution     1
fSettled by departmental officials   14
Settled by disputants      1
Withdrawn        7
Total :  4i
* Of the fifteen complaints referred to Conciliation Commissioners, eight were settled, six were referred to
Boards of Arbitration, two of the six were settled by Boards of Arbitration and Union agreements were signed,
while in the other four cases disputants withdrew from arbitration. In one case the Conciliation Commission was
cancelled at the request of the Commissioner, when he found that a dispute as defined by the Act did not exist.
t In three of the fourteen cases settled by departmental officers, agreements were signed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 85
II. CONCILIATION, 1939.
Fifteen Conciliation Commissions were authorized by the Minister in 1939. The record
for the year follows:- ^ G0LD.MINERS> ZEBALL0S.
On March 15th employees of a gold-mine at Zeballos informed the Department that they
had made a request for a wage increase to conform with the scale paid by other mines in the
area.    They declared this request had been refused.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed, and advised that the matter be held in
abeyance until a pending sale of the property had been made and the new owners had an
opportunity of meeting the men.
Following the sale of the mine, the new owners paid the going wage.
2. UPHOLSTERERS, VANCOUVER.
Employees of a Vancouver firm of upholsterers complained on April 19th that the management of their firm refused to consider an agreement covering wages and working conditions, and made application for a Conciliation Commissioner, who was appointed the next day.
After an extended series of negotiations, a satisfactory agreement was signed September 1st.
3. GOLD-MINERS, PIONEER.
Following dismissal of an employee at a gold-mine at Pioneer, application was made by
telegram for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner on May 17th. Applicants were
informed that the dismissal of one man did not constitute a dispute under the provisions of
the Act, and that a Conciliation Commissioner could not be appointed unless the dismissal of
the employee brought about a dispute between the majority of all the employees of the mine
and the employer.
A representative of the Department was sent to Pioneer in an endeavour to compose the
differences between the men and the management. Proper application had meanwhile been
made for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner and the departmental representative at Pioneer was so named.
Arrangements were made to have the dismissed employee reinstated within four weeks
if he would obey orders and avoid friction. This arrangement was later endorsed by the
management, thus removing the cause of the dispute.
4. MAILING-ROOM EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
Representatives of the employees of the mailing-rooms of two Vancouver newspapers,
after unsuccessful endeavours to conclude negotiations with their employers covering conditions, wages, and Union recognition, made application for a Conciliation Commissioner. This
officer was appointed May 22nd and after prolonged negotiation referred the matter to arbitration. The Board commenced its hearings August 31st and submitted a majority award to
the Minister, September 23rd. An agreement closely following the recommendations of the
Board was signed by representatives of the publishers and the mailers, October 10th.
5. FILM-EXCHANGE EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On June 27th representatives of film-exchange employees drew the attention of the
Department to the fact that they had endeavoured to conclude a Union agreement covering
wages and conditions with their several employers, but that the employers would not meet
them until satisfactory evidence was submitted that these representatives were authorized to
speak on behalf of the majority of the employees. Later, application for a Conciliation
Commissioner was made. Disputants, with the assistance of this officer, were able to reach a
satisfactory adjustment of their differences and sign an agreement.
6. IRON-SHIP BUILDERS, VICTORIA.
Representatives of the iron-ship building crafts in Victoria were unable to obtain a satisfactory agreement with their employers to pay them the same scale of wages as that paid
for similar work in Vancouver. Following application, a Conciliation Commissioner was
appointed October 5th, who was successful in bringing disputants together. As a result a
satisfactory agreement was signed, October 16th. G 86 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
7. IRON-SHIP BUILDERS, VANCOUVER.
On September 30th application was made for a Conciliation Commissioner by representatives of this craft in Vancouver on behalf of certain of their members. It was claimed that
welder employees of a certain firm were paid wages lower than the prevailing rate and that
representations made to the employer had not had a satisfactory reception. A Conciliation
Commissioner was appointed and after extended negotiations was successful in bringing
about an upward revision of the wage-scale. It was hoped at the time that further increases
would be given as conditions in the trade improved.
8. PROJECTIONISTS, VANCOUVER.
The manager of a Vancouver motion-picture theatre made application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, on the grounds that his projectionists had demanded a
wage-scale he was not prepared to meet. A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed October 20th who, after negotiation with the disputants, recommended that the matter be referred
to a Board of Arbitration. A unanimous award of the Board was submitted to the Minister,
January 16th, 1940, in which it was set out that a satisfactory agreement between the
employer and his employees had been reached and a Union agreement signed the previous day.
9. GOLD-MINERS, ZEBALLOS.
When a fight took place between two employees of a Zeballos gold-mine, one of them was
discharged. A petition signed by eighty-nine fellow-workers, asking for the reinstatement
of the discharged man, was presented to the management, who thereupon discharged the
petitioners. The matter was brought to the attention of the Department on October 14th.
After endeavours had been made in Victoria to have the mine management re-employ the
men, and had failed, departmental officers were sent to Zeballos. Upon their arrival application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner was made and one of the officers
was appointed. After brief negotiations the discharged men were reinstated, thus obviating
the cause of the dispute.
10, 11, 12, AND, 13. PROJECTIONISTS, VANCOUVER, NORTH VANCOUVER,
NEW WESTMINSTER, AND VICTORIA.
These disputes, which involved the managements of thirteen motion-picture theatres in
Victoria and on the Lower Mainland, were practically identical.
Projectionists in these theatres had been given two weeks' notice. Since it had been the
practice over a long period to employ two projectionists in each theatre, the men applied for
the services of a Conciliation Commissioner when the proprietors endeavoured to reduce the
number of their projectionists to one.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed to deal with the Vancouver, North Vancouver, and New Westminster disputes on October 27th. He later recommended that the disputes
be submitted to a Board of Arbitration.
The management of a certain North Vancouver theatre did not belong to the same group
as other operators, and this case was referred to a separate Board of Arbitration.
A similar application from Victoria projectionists received at a later date was also
referred to a Conciliation officer, who recommended that it be submitted to a Board of
Arbitration.
Meanwhile, changes in the " Fire Marshal Act " affected the number of projectionists
that must be employed in certain classes of moving-picture theatres. The amended Act
required two licensed projectionists to be in the projection-room when a theatre is open to
the public, if such a theatre has a seating capacity of more than 450 or is open to the public
more than forty hours a week.
In theatres having a smaller capacity and open to the public less than forty hours a
week, there must be one licensed projectionist, unless in the opinion of the Fire Marshal
there should be two projectionists for the sake of safety. An appeal may be taken from the
decision of the Fire Marshal to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
Since this legislation obviated the matters of dispute, complainants made application,
and were granted leave, to withdraw from arbitration proceedings. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 87
14. DISTRIBUTIVE WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
On October 24th a complaint was placed before the Department that six men working for
a Vancouver distributing concern had been dismissed, allegedly for Union activities. The
matter was later referred to a Conciliation Commissioner, who ascertained that the bargaining representatives of the men were not properly constituted, in that they did not represent
the majority of the employees. It was ascertained that the majority of the employees had
not voted for a resolution setting up a bargaining committee in October, before application
for a Conciliation Commissioner was made. As a result, the Commissioner recommended that
his commission be cancelled. Investigation into reasons for dismissal of the men revealed
the fact that the majority were discharged for cause, and that in no case could it be proven
that they had lost their employment because of Union activity.
15. ELECTRICAL WORKERS, PRINCE RUPERT.
Prince Rupert telephone employees communicated with the Department early in October,
pointing out that they had unsuccessfully endeavoured to obtain a return of the wage-scale
paid in 1931 to operators and certain maintenance-men. Since a dispute had arisen, a Conciliation Commissioner was appointed and was successful in obtaining an upward revision in
the wage-scale.
III. BOARDS OF ARBITRATION.
Two Boards of Arbitration were appointed pursuant to the provisions of the " Industrial
Conciliation and Arbitration Act " during 1939.
Inquiry was made by these Boards into disputes between the Vancouver Daily Province,
Limited, the Sun Publishing Company, Limited, and their Mailing-room Employees; and
between the Colonial Theatre, Vancouver, and its Projectionist Employees.
A majority award was made in the first case and a unanimous award in the second.
Union agreements were signed in both instances, after the Boards had completed their
hearings.
The complete texts of the awards follow.
No. 1, 1939.
"INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between the Vancouver Daily Province, Limited, the Sun Publishing Company,
Limited, Employers, and the Employees of their Mailing Departments.
Award op the Board of Arbitration.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
We, F. M. Clement (Chairman), W. C. Russell, and R. H. Neelands, designated by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council as a Board of Arbitration in the matter of the above-mentioned dispute, and for the purposes of this Act, have carefully investigated into the said
dispute and all matters affecting the merits and right settlement thereof, and have heard the
evidence adduced by and representation made on behalf of the parties to the dispute, and we
find and determine as follows:—
Following designation by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, under the provisions of
the Act aforesaid, the Board accordingly held an executive session on the 31st day of August
for the purpose of organization procedure, and held public sessions for the taking and receiving of evidence and receiving representations of the parties on the 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th
days of September, and on the 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, and 22nd days of September for consideration of such evidence and representations and the making of the award.
Application was made on the 16th day of May, 1939, by Messrs. A. R. C. Holmes and
H. Fader, president and secretary-treasurer, respectively, of Mailers Union No. 70, on behalf
of the mailing department employees of the Vancouver Daily Province, Limited, and the Sun G 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Publishing Company, Limited, for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner, pursuant to
section 10 of the Act, and accordingly Mr. James Thomson, of the Department of Labour, was
duly appointed and asked to investigate the matters of dispute.
It should here be pointed out that these disputes were between the Vancouver Daily
Province, Limited, and the employees of the mailing department of this concern, and between
the Sun Publishing Company, Limited, and the employees of their mailing department. The
Minister of Labour referred both disputes, which were of a precisely similar nature, to Mr.
James Thomson, the senior official of the Vancouver Branch of the Department of Labour,
for investigation and report by the issuance of a Commission, naming both employers.
Mr. Thomson was appointed Conciliation Commissioner on the 22nd day of May, 1939.
The expiry date of his Commission was thereafter extended by consent of disputants, and
after several meetings which he arranged he was finally notified by the representatives of
both employers and employees that they had failed to agree on a basis of settlement of the
dispute, and he therefore recommended that the disputes be submitted to arbitration, and
the Board was so constituted by Orders in Council Nos. 1177 and 1178, on the 29th day of
August, 1939, and empowered to deal with the matters in dispute between the two publishing
companies and their mailing-room employees therein set out.
The matters in dispute were contained in a contract submitted by the employees to the
employers, which is attached hereto as Schedule A.
Schedule of wages now being paid is attached hereto as Schedule B.
Consideration was given by members of the Board to each and every clause of Schedule
A, and the Board finds and determines as follows:—
Award of the Board.
It is recommended that section 1 of the said agreement shall read: "This agreement,
made and entered into this day of by and between through its
authorized representatives, party of the first part, and Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70,
by its committee authorized to act on its behalf, party of the second part."
It is recommended that section 2 of the said agreement read as follows: "WITNESSETH,
that from and after May 16th, 1939, and for a term of one year ending May 15th, 1940, the
newspaper represented by the party of the first part agrees to employ in its mailing-room,
members of the Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70, provided that the said union furnishes
enough competent men to enable the party of the first part to issue its publications promptly
and regularly. The party of the second part agrees to furnish such men. If at any time,
for any reason, Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70 fails to supply a sufficient number of competent men, the party of the first part may employ any help it can secure."
It is recommended that section 3 of the said agreement shall read as follows: " It is
agreed by both parties that whenever any difference of opinion as to the rights of the
parties under this contract and scale of prices shall arise, or whenever any dispute as to the
construction or interpretation of any section or portion of the contract or scale takes place, a
standing committee of two representatives of the party of the first part, and a like committee
of two representatives of the party of the second part, shall be appointed; the committee
representing- the party of the second part shall be selected by the union; and in case of
a vacancy, absence, or refusal of either of such representatives to act, another shall be
appointed in his place. To this committee shall be referred all questions which may arise as
to the scale of prices hereto attached, the construction to be placed upon any clauses of the
agreement, or alleged violations thereof, which cannot be settled otherwise, and such joint
committee shall meet when any question or difference shall have been referred to it for
decision by the executive officers of either party to this agreement. Should the joint committee be unable to agree, then it shall refer the matter to a Board of Arbitration, the
representatives of each party to this agreement to select one arbiter, and the two to agree
upon a third.    The decision of this Board shall be final and binding upon both parties."
Sections 4, 5, 6, and 7:   The disputants agree to delete these sections.
Section 8: It is recommended that section 8 of the said agreement read as follows: " It
is expressly agreed that the rights and relations of the parties hereto shall be covered by the
terms of this contract and scale of wages. The party of the first part concedes it has no
right to object to any rules and regulations made by the party of the second part for the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 89
governing of its members in so far as they do not conflict with the terms and conditions of
this contract and scale. Both parties recognize that their respective rights under this contract and scale will have been accorded by the performance and fulfilment of the terms and
conditions of said contract and scale, and that the complete obligation of each to the other is
expressed in the said contract and scale now in effect."
Section 9: It is recommended that this section read as follows: " If either party hereto
wishes to propose an amendment to this contract, or a new contract to take the place of this
one, upon its expiration date, it shall notify the other party in writing of its wishes sixty
(60) days prior to May 15th, 1940, and accompany the notice with a statement in detail of
the changes desired.
" The respondent party may within thirty-five (35) days formulate a counter-proposal
setting forth the conditions it will seek to establish. If no counter-proposal be filed, the
existing contract shall be considered to be the respondent party's counter-proposal. If notice
is not given by one of the parties as above described, it shall be construed as a renewal of
this agreement for one year, and the contract shall thereafter run from year to year until
opened for negotiations by the procedure above described.
" If mutual agreement cannot be reached in negotiations for amendment to this contract
or the making of a new contract within thirty (30) days said time to be extended by mutual
consent, after the filing of respondent's counter-proposals, the differences respecting a new
contract which cannot be agreed upon in conciliation shall be determined by arbitration as set
out in section 3 of this contract. During arbitration or conciliation, business in the mailing
room of the party of the first part shall continue as per this agreement. This contract shall
remain in full force and effect until a new agreement is made by conciliation or arbitration."
It is recommended that the preamble on page 3 of the original agreement, under the
heading of " Scale of Prices," should read: " Preamble—All work appertaining to mailing
shall include addressing, tagging, stamping, labelling, bundling or wrapping, cutting lists or
preparing wrappers, sorting, routing, taking bundles of papers from the conveyers or escalators, stacking, folding, handling of bundles or mail sacks, distributing, counting of papers
(leaving or returning), tying, sacking, delivering papers to conveyers, inserting or dispatching of papers, provided that these operations are being performed in the mailing-room at the
present time, and no person except journeymen, and part-time employees who are members
of the union, and juniors, shall be allowed to perform such work, except as provided in
section 2."
Section 10 of the said agreement is agreed upon, and reads: " Payment of wages shall
be made weekly."
It is recommended that section 11 of the said agreement should read: " Full-time regular
employees shall continue to be paid the present scale of wages as set out in Schedule B hereto,
plus an increase of twelve per cent, of the annual pay-roll of the regular mailing-room
employees as set out in Schedule B. This increase shall be divided amongst these regular
employees so that those in the lower-pay brackets shall receive a greater increase of pay
than those in the higher-pay brackets. It is further recommended that this scale shall be as
set out in Schedule C which is attached hereto."
It is recommended that those mailers receiving $32 and $33 weekly respectively shall
receive $34 weekly, and that such an increase computed on an annual basis be deducted from
the increase of 12 per cent, of the annual pay-roll recommended above.
It is recommended that those men on the staff of the Vancouver Daily Province designated as extras shall receive an increase of 12 per cent, on the wages now being paid them.
And it is recommended that all mailers on the staffs of both the Vancouver Daily Province, Limited, and the Sun Publishing Company, Limited, continue to receive the same annual
vacations, sick leaves, and half days off with pay in so far as the present practices in the
respective mailing-rooms apply.
It is recommended that section 12 be deleted.
It is recommended that section 13 of the said agreement be deleted.
Section 14: It is recommended that section 14 of the said agreement shall read: " Overtime of the journeymen, part-time employees, and juniors shall be paid for at the rate of
time and one-half for the first four hours or fraction thereof, based on the hourly wage paid.
Overtime after the first four hours shall be at the rate of double time." G 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Section 15: It is recommended that section 15 of the said agreement shall read: "All
work done on Dominion Day, Labour Day, and Christmas Day shall be paid for at the rate
of double time."
Section 16: It is recommended that section 16 of the said agreement shall read as
follows: " No member of this Union shall be employed in said mailing-room for less than
four hours' pay, or if employed for more than four hours, for less than a full day's pay."
Section 17: It is recommended that section 17 of the said agreement shall read: " Employees who have left the building and are called back thirty (30) minutes or more after the
regular hours of work, shall receive fifty (50) cents for the call. They shall also receive the
overtime rate for any time they may be employed."
It is recommended that sections 18, 19, 20, 21, and 21a of the said agreement be deleted.
It is recommended that sections 22 and 23 of the said agreement be deleted.
Section 24: Members of the Board are in agreement on section 24 of the said agreement,
which reads: " Foremen of daily newspapers have a right to employ help; also to discharge
(1) for incompetency; (2) neglect of duty; (3) for violation of office rules (which must be
conspicuously posted) ;   or the laws of the chapel or Union;   and (4) to decrease the force."
Section 25: Members of the Board are in agreement on section 25 of the said agreement,
which reads: " The foreman shall not be disciplined by the party of the second part for
carrying out the instructions of the party of the first part, authorized by this contract and
scale. Any question as to whether or not a foreman's action is authorized by the contract
shall be submitted to the joint standing committee as provided herein."
Section 26: It is recommended that section 26 of the said agreement read: "Upon
reaching the point where he is employed full time for two consecutive weeks by the office, a
part-time employee shall be classed as a regular and given a situation, provided regular work
is available."
Section 27: It is recommended that section 27 of the said agreement shall read: " Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70 reserves to itself the right to refuse to execute all struck work
received or destined for all unfair employing printers or publications, and to refuse to work
in offices where either the stereotyping or typographical department or the press-room is
unfair. These departments shall not be deemed unfair if craftsmen employed therein or the
Union to which they belong have refused to conciliate or arbitrate differences involved in
accordance with the arbitration agreement between the two parties, or if no agreement exists,
then in accordance with the agreement between the party of the first part and the party of the
second part to this agreement."
Section 28: The Board is in agreement on section 28 of the said agreement, which reads:
" The party of the first part to this agreement shall be protected against walkouts, strikes
or boycotts by the members of the party of the second part and against any other form of
concerted interference by them with the usual and regular operation of any of his departments of labour; and the party of the second part shall be protected against lockouts by the
party of the first part."
Section 29: The Board is in agreement on section 29 of the said agreement, which reads:
" Employment other than regular situations shall be classed as extra work, and shall be given
out in priority to the men competent to perform the work."
Section 30: The Board is in agreement on section 30 of the said agreement, which reads:
" There shall be furnished at all times a healthful, sufficiently ventilated, properly heated and
well-lighted place for the performance of all work done in the mailing-room. Vancouver
Mailers Union No. 70 reserves the right to secure the services of sanitation and ventilation
experts at its own expense, whose report shall be submitted to the publisher, who shall have
the privilege of submitting said report to the Medical Health Officer for verification, and
whose ruling shall be final and carried out forthwith."
In the representations made before the Board, Mr. John Russell appeared for the publishers of the two evening newspapers, and was given the assistance of Mr. P. J. Salter, of
the Vancouver Sun, and Mr. Robert Cromie, of the same newspaper. Mr. H. Fader, Secretary
of Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70, appeared on behalf of the employees in the mailing-rooms
of the two papers.
The Board takes this opportunity of complimenting both Mr. Fader and Mr. Russell on
the fair and amicable way in which they presented the evidence;   there was nothing in the REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 91
nature of personal feeling, and it was evident that both parties worked in the interests of
each other, and are deserving of the appreciation of the Board upon the fair manner in which
they presented their case.
Mr. R. H. Neelands, Member of the Board, fully accepts its findings, with the sole
exception of the recommendations made in connection with section 11 of the proposed agreement, and his minority report on this point of dispute is attached hereto.
In keeping with section 39 (2) of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," it
is recommended that this award shall be retroactive to the date of the application for the
appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, May 16th, 1939.
The foregoing, to the best of our knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the
matters of dispute placed before us as a Board of Arbitration on the 29th day of August, 1939.
F. M. Clement, Chairman.
W. C. Russell, Member.
I concur in the above award with the exception of section 11.
R. H. Neelands, Member.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 22nd day of September, 1939.
Minority Report.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between the Vancouver Daily Province, the Sun Publishing Company, Limited,
Employers, and the Employees of their Mailing Departments.
To the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
I, R. H. Neelands, designated by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council as a member of a
Board of Arbitration in the matter of the above-mentioned dispute and for the purposes of
this Act, have carefully investigated the said dispute and all matters affecting the merits and
right settlement thereof, and have heard the evidence adduced by and the representations
made on behalf of the parties to the dispute. I am not in full accord with other members of
the Board, and beg to submit a minority report as follows:—
I am not in accord with the other members of the Board in their findings with respect to
sections 11 and 12 of Schedule A, for which the following is substituted in the majority
report:—
" Full-time regular employees shall continue to be paid the present scale of wages as set
out in Schedule B hereto, plus an increase of 12 per cent, of the annual pay-roll of the regular
mailing-room employees as set out in Schedule B. This increase shall be divided amongst
these regular employees so that those in the lower-pay brackets shall receive a greater increase
of pay than those in the higher-pay brackets. It is further recommended that this scale
shall be as set out in Schedule C which is attached hereto."
My opposition to that recommendation in the majority report is that it continues the
objectionable feature of equally competent men receiving a different scale of wages for similar
services rendered; and further, it results in a lesser rate of wages being paid by the Publishers, parties to this dispute, than that at the present time being received by mailing-room
employees of another newspaper in the City of Vancouver as shown in Exhibit No. 9.
I may further add that in a genuine endeavour to reach an amicable settlement of this
dispute I, in'many instances, acquiesced in certain recommendations included in the majority
report with which I am not fully in accord.
The foregoing, to the best of my knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the
matters of dispute placed before me as a Member of a Board of Arbitration on the 29th day
of August, 1939.
R. H. Neelands, Member.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 22nd day of September, 1939. SCHEDULE A.
Newspaper Contract and Scale of Prices
Between
Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70
and
Section 1.—This Agreement made and entered into this , by and between , through
authorized representatives, party of the first part, and Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70, a subordinate
union of the Mailers Trade District Union of the International Typographical Union of North America,
by its committee authorized to act in its behalf, party of the second part.
Section 2.—WITNESSETH, that from and after , and for a term of one year ending ,
the newspaper represented by the party of the first part agrees to employ in its mailing room, members
of Mailers Union No. 70, provided that said Union furnishes enough competent men to enable the
party of the first part to issue its publications promptly and regularly. The party of the second part
agrees to furnish such men.
Section 3.—Should the necessity arise, a joint standing committee of two representatives of the
party of the first part shall be selected by the Publishers, and a like committee of two representing the
party of the second part shall be selected by the Union and in case of vacancy, absence or refusal of
either such representatives to act. another shall be appointed to take his place. To this Committee
shall be referred all questions which may arise regarding this contract or scale of prices attached
hereto, the construction to be placed upon any clause or clauses of this agreement or the scale or any
alleged violation thereof, all disputes regarding discharged men, which cannot be settled otherwise.
When differences arise which necessitate action by the joint standing committee, the chairman of the
committee shall be notified in writing by the executive officers of either party to the agreement, and the
committee shall meet within five days of the date on which notice of difference is transmitted to the
chairman. If the joint standing committee does not reach an agreement on any dispute, including
disputes regarding discharged men, within ten (10) days (this time may be extended by mutual agreement) from the date on which the dispute is first considered by it, at the request of either party hereto,
the members of the committee shall form a Board of Arbitration and shall select a fifth member, who
shall be a disinterested party and who shall act as chairman for the Board. Said fifth member may be
selected in any manner unanimously agreed upon between the four members. If the said four members
fail to select a fifth member within twenty (20) days from the date on which either party requested
the formation of the arbitration board, said fifth member shall be selected by the Third Vice-President
of the International Typographical Union and the Chairman of the Special Standing Committee of the
American Newspaper Publishers Association, or their proxies, upon the request of either of the parties
hereto.
The Board of Arbitration thus formed shall proceed with all dispatch possible to settle the dispute.
It shall require the affirmative votes of at least three of the five members of the Board of Arbitration
to decide the issues, and the decision of the Board of Arbitration in all cases shall be final and binding
on the parties hereto. The decision of the Board of Arbitration shall be signed by all the members
thereof, but is legal and binding when signed by a majority.
If a discharged member be reinstated by the joint standing committee, it has jurisdiction to determine if there shall be pay for lost time, and if so, the amount thereof, Provided, in no case shall
reimbursement be in a sum greater than the working time actually lost, multiplied by straight time
rates therefor, as provided in the contract. From this amount, shall be deducted all earnings elsewhere, and the application shall show that diligent effort was made to secure other employment.
Section 4.—It is agreed by the party of the second part that for and in consideration of the
covenants entered into and agreed to by the party of the first part, the said party of the second part
shall at all times during the life of this agreement furnish men capable of performing the work
required in the mechanical department of the party of the first part covered by this agreement.
Section 5.—The question of competency shall be determined by the work done by the employee and
the foreman shall be the judge of competency. If any employee shall have a complaint against the
foreman, and such complaint cannot be settled by conciliation, then the matter shall be referred to the
local joint standing committee of the said Union and the said Publishers, which committee shall, after
hearing both parties, decide said controversy by majority vote and file such decision in writing with
each party.    Such decision shall be final and binding upon both parties.
Section fi.—It is agreed that if any terms affecting wages, hours or working conditions better or
different than those given in this agreement or any concessions whatsoever are allowed by the party of
the second part to any Vancouver newspaper during the life of this agreement those said better or
different terms or concessions shall be allowed immediately by the party of the second part to the party
of the first part.
Section 7.—It is agreed by both parties that whenever any difference of opinion as to the rights
of the parties under this contract and scale of prices shall arise or whenever any dispute as to the construction or interpretation of any section or portion of the contract or scale takes place, at once to
appeal to the duly constituted authority under the contract, viz., the joint standing committee, to the
end that fruitless controversy shall be avoided.
Section S—It is expressly agreed that the rights and relations of the parties- hereto shall be
covered by the terms of this contract and scale of prices.    The party of the first part concedes it has REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 93
no right to object to any rules or regulations made by the party of the second part for the governing
of its members in so far as they do not conflict with the terms and conditions of this contract and
scale. Both parties recognize that their respective rights under this contract and scale will have been
accorded by the performance and fulfilment of the terms and conditions of said contract and scale, and
that the complete obligation of each to the other is expressed in the said contract and scale now in
effect.
Section 9.—If either party hereto wishes to propose an amendment to this contract or a new contract to take the place of this one upon its expiration date, it shall notify the other party in writing
of its wishes sixty  (60)   days prior to , and accompany the notice with statement in detail of
the changes desired.
The respondent party may within thirty-five (35) days formulate a counter-proposal, setting forth
the conditions it will seek to establish. If no counter-proposal be filed the existing contract shall be
considered to be the respondent party's counter-proposal. If notice is not given by one of the parties,
as above described, it shall be construed as a renewal of this agreement for one year and the contract
shall thereafter run from year to year until opened for negotiations by the procedure above described.
If mutual agreement cannot be reached in negotiations for amendments to this contract, or the
making of a new contract within thirty (30) days said time to be extended by mutual consent, after
the filing of the respondent's counter-proposal, the differences respecting a new contract which cannot
be agreed upon in conciliation shall be determined by arbitration in accordance with the code of procedure of the 1917-1922 International Arbitration Agreement. During arbitration business in the
mailing-room of the first party shall continue as per this agreement. This contract shall remain in
full force and effect until a new agreement is made by conciliation or arbitration. Provided further,
local Union Laws not affecting wages, hours and working conditions, and the general laws of the International Typographical Union and Mailers Trade District Union shall not be subject to arbitration.
In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seal this   . .'.  ... day of       , 193 .—
Vancouver Mailers Union No. 70:
Scale of Prices.
Preamble.—All work appertaining to mailing, such as addressing, tagging, stamping, labelling,
bundling or wrapping, cutting list or preparing wrappers, operating stencil machines, galley work,
sorting, routing, dissecting or marking wrappers, taking bundles or papers from conveyers or escalators, stacking, folding, handling of bundles or mail sacks, distributing, counting of papers (leaving or
returning), tying, sacking, delivering papers (to mailers, carriers, agents or newsboys), inserting or
dispatching of papers, envelopes or magazines, whether done by hand or power machine (including
auxiliary machines used in preparatory work for making plates, stencils or other device that may be
used in placing names or addresses on papers or wrappers, etc.), now in use or that in the future may
be introduced is part of the mailing craft, and no person except members and apprentices of the Union
shall be allowed to perform such work.
Section 10.—Payment of wages shall be made weekly.
Section 11.—Evening Newspapers: Men working days shall be paid $1.00 per hour. Seven and
one-half hours continuous work (excepting not less than thirty (30) minutes for lunch) between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. shall constitute a day's work.    Five days shall constitute a week's work.
Section 12.—Morning Newspapers: Men working nights shall be paid $1.00 per hour. Seven and
one-half hours continuous work (excepting not less than thirty (30) minutes for lunch) between the
hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. shall constitute a night's work.    Five nights shall constitute a week's work.
Section 13.—Foreman's pay to be $1.00 per hour, plus an amount to be determined by employer and
foreman in keeping with the responsibility involved.
Section 14.—Overtime of the foreman, assistant foreman, journeyman and apprentice shall be paid
for at the rate of time and one-half for the first four hours or fraction thereof based on the hourly
wage paid. Overtime after the first four hours shall be at the rate of double time. Any fraction of
one-half hour shall be considered as one-half hour, and so on by the half hours. Work done before or
after regular working hours shall be paid for at the overtime rate. Overtime in excess of the regular
shift if excess amounts to more than two hours, thirty minutes shall be allowed for lunch on office time.
Section 15.—All work done on holidays such as Dominion Day, Labour day and Christmas day
shall be paid for at the rate of double time.    Night of the holiday is the off shift for morning paper.
Section 16.—No member of this Union shall be employed in said mailing-room for less than a full
day's pay, except as provided in section 17.
Section 17.—Employees that have left the building and are called back thirty (30) minutes or more
after the regular hours of work, shall receive $1.00 for the call. They shall also receive the overtime
rate for any time they may be employed.
Apprentices.
Section 18.—Each office shall be entitled to one apprentice.
Section 19.—Apprenticeships shall be for a term of six (6) years and according to International
law.
Section 20.—Commencing with the third year and for a period of sixteen months, apprentices shall
receive at least one-third of the journeyman's scale; for the next sixteen months at least one-half of
the journeyman's scale; and for the last sixteen months they shall be paid two-thirds of the scale paid
to journeymen. G 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Section 21.—Registered apprentices shall be given the same protection as journeymen and shall be
governed by the same shop rules, working conditions and hours of labour.
Section 21A.—No apprentice shall be employed on overtime work in an office unless the number of
journeymen employed on the same shift equals the ratio prescribed in the local scale. At no time shall
an apprentice have charge of a Department.
Miscellaneous.
Section 22.—The Union shall not be bound by any provisions of the articles of association, by-laws,
charter, constitution, codes, laws, regulations, resolutions, or rules of any character of the employer
which are in conflict with the provisions of the Agreement. The employer shall not be bound by the
constitution, by-laws, general laws, resolutions, rules or regulations of the Union which are in conflict
with the provisions of the Agreement. Each party, however, recognizes the right of the other to adopt
laws and regulations of any character for the government of its own members.
Section 23.—Employees may be transferred from one position to another at the call of the foreman.
The foreman cannot be required to make any transfer for any purpose which in his opinion decreases
the efficiency of the office. Provided, in no case shall a foreman transfer a person to a department he
is not familiar with and then declare him incompetent.
Section 24.—Foremen of daily newspapers have a right to employ help; also to discharge (1) for
incompetency; (2) for neglect of duty; (3) for violation of office rules (which must be conspicuously
posted);   or the laws of the chapel of Union;   and (4) to decrease the force.
Section 25.—The foreman shall not be disciplined by the party of the second part for carrying out
the instructions of the party of the first part, authorized by this contract and scale. Any question as
to whether or not a foreman's action is authorized by the contract shall be submitted to the joint
standing committee as provided herein.
Section 26.—Upon reaching the point where he is employed full time for two consecutive weeks for
the office a substitute shall be classed as a regular and given a situation.
Section 27.—Mailers Union No. 70 reserves to itself the right to refuse to execute all struck work
received from or destined for all unfair employers or publications.
Section 28.—The party of the first part to this Agreement shall be protected against walkouts,
strikes or boycotts by the members of the party of the second part and against any other form of concerted interference by them with the usual and regular operation of any of his departments of labour;
and the Party of the Second Part shall be protected against lockouts by the party of the First Part.
Section 29.—Employment other than regular situations shall be classed as extra work and shall be
given out in priority to the men competent to perform the work.
Section 30.—There shall be furnished at all times a healthful, sufficiently ventilated, properly heated
and well-lighted place for the performance of all work done in the mailing-room, No. 70 reserves the
right to secure the services of sanitation and ventilation experts, at its own expense, whose report
shall be submitted to the publisher, who shall have the privilege of submitting said report to the
Municipal medical health officer for verification, and whose ruling shall be final and carried out forthwith.
In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seal this ....   day of  __ , 193 ....
Publisher: Mailers Union No. 70:
SCHEDULE B.
Sun Mailers.
McGerr, T.
Fader, H. ...
Holmes, C.
Clark, W.....
Edwards, R
Owen, 0.
Bilson, G.
Beck, A.
Home-owners.
Present
Salary, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 95
Province Mailers.
Home-owners.
Married,
Single.
Years at
Trade.
Present
Salary.
Boler, A.      	
Davie, S    __ 	
Prefontaine, R   	
Brodie, A.                                    . 	
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
M.
M.
m.
M.
S.
M.
S.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
27
27
26
21
20
18
17
21
19
12
10
9
14
$33.00
31.60
30.60
30.60
27.00
25.75
Clark, H.    	
24.70
O'Rielly, J    	
O'Rielly, G   	
Clark, D        ,  	
23.60
22.50
17.10
Stubbs, C.    ....
16.65
Wells, B   	
Taylor, G ,      	
16.05
Extras.
Lister, W  	
McLaren B 	
Yes
No
No
No
M.
S.
S.
S.
4
2'/2
2
l>/2
$17.50
14.00
11.00
Walyer, W                           	
9 10
SCHEDULE  C.
Sun Mailers.
ested Weekly Wage with Increase.
Present Wage.
Increase.
Total.
Fader, H   	
$32.00
29.80
23.15
23.15
21.35
20.00
18.00
$2.00
2.48
2.70
2.70
3.27
3.27
3.83
$34.00
32.28
Clark, W...      	
25.85
25.85
24 62
Bilson, G                                           .    	
23 27
Beck, A.
21 83
Province Mailers.
Suggested Weekly Wage with Increase.
Present Wage.
Increase.
Total.
Boler      	
$33.00
31.60
30.60
30.60
27.00
25.75
24.70
23.60
22.50
17.10
16.65
16.05
$1.00
1.48
1.93
1.93
2.61
3.28
3.28
3.73
3.73
3.96
3.96
3.96
$34.00
33.08
32.53
Brodie      	
32.53
29.61
28.93
Clark          .....             .    	
27.98
O'Reilly, J.
27 33
O'Reilly, G               	
26.23
Clark, D...   ..             .  .               .. 	
21.06
Stubbs      .  ...             ....     •	
20.61
Wells     	
20.01 G 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
No. 2, 1939.
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between Hector Quagliotti, Esquire (The Colonial Theatre, Vancouver, B.C.),
and his Projectionist Employees.
Award of the Board of Arbitration.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Btiildings, Victoria, B.C.
This Board was designated by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council as a
Board of Arbitration under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act " to deal with the above-mentioned dispute, and accordingly held public sessions for the
taking of evidence and receiving representations of the parties on the 20th day of December,
1939, and the 10th and 11th days of January, 1940, and held executive sessions on the 6th day
of December, 1939, for organization and procedure, and on the 13th day of January, 1940,
for consideration of said evidence and representations received and for the preparation and
making of award.
Application was made on the 18th day of October, 1939, by the employer for the services
of a Conciliation Commissioner pursuant to section 10 of the Act, and accordingly Mr. James
Thomson, of the Department of Labour, was duly appointed to investigate the matters in
dispute, and on the 20th day of November, 1939, and following investigation, he reported to
the Honourable the Minister of Labour that the parties failed to agree to a settlement of the
matters in dispute, and thereupon recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration,
and the parties were so advised.
Accordingly, the said employer, Hector Quagliotti, did on the 10th day of November,
1939, appoint Arthur Graeburn, Esquire, 1152 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C., to act as arbitrator on his behalf as employer, and that the employees did on the 13th day 6f November,
1939, appoint Percy R. Bengough, Esquire, 529 Beatty Street, to act as arbitrator on behalf
of the projectionist employees, and the said above-mentioned arbitrators having failed to
agree upon and appoint a third arbitrator, as required by sections 18 and 20 of the Act, His
Honour Judge J. Charles Mcintosh, 1370 Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C., was, pursuant to subsection (3) of section 20 of the Act, appointed as third arbitrator in the matter of this
dispute and Chairman of the Board of Arbitration, so constituted by Order in Council No.
1609 on the 24th day of November, 1939, and empowered to deal with the matters in dispute
and therein set out:—
" Hector Quagliotti, Esq., manager of The Colonial Theatre, 603 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C., has proposed a reduction in the wages of his projectionist employees who, during the life of an agreement which expired August 31st, 1939, were paid at the rate of $50.50
per week of 36 hours.
" The employer now offers a weekly wage of $45 per week of 36 hours for the first year
of the life of a proposed contract.
" The projectionist employees of Mr. Quagliotti have rejected this offer."
Report.
Shortly before the date set for public hearing of the matters in dispute the employer, Mr.
Hector Quagliotti, suffered severe injuries and was so prevented from appearing in person
during the sessions of the Board.
The evidence before the Board shows the relation between the employer and his employees
had previous to this dispute been satisfactorily adjusted and stabilized by an agreement
entered into on the 1st day of September, 1937, between the said employer, as manager of
The Colonial Theatre, and British Columbia Projectionists Local No. 348, of the International
Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United
States and Canada, on behalf of the employees, and which had expired on the 31st day of
August, 1939.    The refusal of the employer to renew this agreement on the terms there set REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 97
out, and attached hereto as Schedule A, at the request of the employees, became an issue
between the parties and gave rise to the present dispute. The rate provided by this agreement to each projectionist was $50.50 per week, or a total for the four projectionists employed
of $202 per week of 36 hours. The employer offered to enter into an agreement reducing
such wages to $45 per week for the first year and $47.50 per week for the second year, which
was unacceptable to the employees.
The employer's main contention in refusing to pay the scale of wages he formerly paid
was the excessive rate of taxes charged upon the property he operated as a moving-picture
theatre and known as the " Colonial " theatre, and consequent high operating costs for the
relatively small seating capacity he had at his disposal. The " Colonial " theatre owned and
operated by the employer is situate at the south-west corner of Granville and Dunsmuir
Streets, one of the most desirable and valuable business-sites in the city of Vancouver, and
possesses a great real and potential value in addition to its present possibilities. As a moving-
picture theatre it is somewhat poorly situated, being on the outward fringe of the more popular and recognized theatre district, and clearly would return more profit to the employer if
converted and made suitable for modern business purposes. As a theatre it consumes too
much valuable business frontage, the modern moving-picture theatre trend being to provide
only a comparatively small entrance frontage on prominent and valuable property, and
extending the theatre proper to less valuable property, and so are not burdened by heavy
taxation. The rentals now secured by the employer on his present location and possible
theatre profits are not commensurate with its possible value as a business-site. It is to be
recognized, however, that excessive taxation and small returns from real-estate holdings of
an employer is not germane to the issue involved, the scale of wages paid to employees.
Organized employees represented by the above-mentioned Union Local No. 348 has existing agreements with Famous Players Canadian Corporation, Limited, operating the " Capitol," " Orpheum," " Strand," " Dominion," and " Broadway " theatres in Vancouver, and with
R. J. Dawson, operating the " Paradise " and " Plaza " theatres.
The " Colonial " theatre has a seating capacity of 862 persons and other theatres with
similar seating capacities and operating under similar conditions, although more advantageously situated, are the " Dominion " with 997 seats, " Plaza " with 924 seats, " Paradise " with
920 seats.
The wages paid under the above agreement are, at the " Dominion " theatre, $212.10 per
week of 72 hours, with overtime at the rate of $1.47 per man per hour; at the " Paradise "
theatre, $54.03 per man per week of 36 hours, rising on September 1st, 1940, to $55.55 per
week per man, with overtime straight time, and one week holiday with pay per year; and at
the " Plaza " theatre the same rate prevails.
The condition of the moving-picture industry, its many ramifications and the hold which
it has on the public imagination, its ever-increasing popularity as the major amusement of
the country, is to be recognized and considered, as it greatly affects the public welfare and
economy. The annual survey of moving-picture theatres in Canada for 1938 made by the
Department of Trade and Commerce shows an increase in receipts and admissions for the
fifth consecutive year, and patrons paid a total of $33,635,052 for 1938 for this form of amusement—a truly great sum, and an increase of 3.5 per cent, over 1937, showing an attendance
of 134,374,061 persons. Employment increased slightly with a number of new theatres and
wages remained steady without decline. The total pay-roll amounted to $6,058,400, being 18
per cent, of receipts, but including proprietors' and employers' salaries where reported, and
is exclusive of compensation of 768 persons, including proprietors and members of their
families to whom no stated salary was paid. Provincial figures for admission show large
increases and the per capita expenditure in British Columbia of $4.81 is the highest in
Canada. The seating capacity of theatres is one seat for every 18 persons comprising the
population of Canada, and 28 per cent, of these seats were occupied for each performance.
The upward trend in moving-picture theatre receipts has been in evidence since 1933,
although the number of theatres increased in every Province. While the price of admission
remained fairly constant, total receipts in Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, Windsor, Winnipeg,
Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw, Calgary, and Vancouver were slightly below the 1937 level,
but the Provincial totals are above 1937, due largely to increase in number of theatres and
theatre-goers in rural areas.
7 G 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The price of admission averaged highest in Prince Edward Island at 27.5 cents; Alberta,
25.6 cents; Ontario, 25.5 cents; Saskatchewan, 24.7 cents; Quebec and Nova Scotia, 23.3
cents; Manitoba, 22.7 cents; New Brunswick, 22.4 cents; and British Columbia, 23.1 cents
per person.
Proprietors and firm members actively engaged, in addition to the regular paid employees,
show that 251 male and 36 female proprietors drew regular salaries amounting to over
$392,000, while 556 male and 213 female proprietors and members of proprietors' families are
employed without stated pay, their compensation consisting of the profits of the enterprise
only. Active proprietors and working members of their families were reported almost exclusively from independent and two- or three-unit firms.
The trend during the past few years has been definitely away from the independent to
the multiple operation of theatres. While 71.8 per cent, of the theatres operated in 1930 were
owned singly, this group had decreased to 54.3 per cent, in 1937 and to 50 per cent, in 1938.
Two- and three-unit groups operated 92 theatres in 1930, 119 in 1937, and 156 in 1938, indicating a tendency of independent owners to take over other neighbouring theatres. The
" chain group " operating four or more theatres increased in number from 18 per cent, of the
total number in 1930 to 34 per cent, in 1937 and 36 per cent, in 1938, and secured 58.9 per
cent, of the total admissions and 64 per cent, of the total receipts for 1938. The average
number of seats occupied per performance depends largely on the size of locality, size of
theatre, number of days per week in operation, and number of evening and matinee performances. British Columbia stands highest in the average ratio based on total admission and
potential admission with a ratio of 32 per cent, in 1938, with Prince Edward Island as low
as 21 per cent., and Vancouver theatres filled 31 per cent, of their seats for each show, being
the highest of the principal cities of Canada, while in London only 22 per cent, of the seats
were occupied. The price of admission in 41 per cent, of the theatres averaged between 20
and 25 cents and 61 per cent, between 20 and 30 cents, and there were 202 theatres in Canada
which charged less than 20 cents admission, while 238 theatres averaged 30 cents and over
for each ticket sold. In British Columbia only 69 per cent, of the moving-picture theatres
operated on a full-time basis.
The rental agencies or film exchanges remained constant as to number of offices, but the
total revenue for 1938 rose to the tremendous sum of $10,218,700, an increase of 7.8 per cent,
over 1937, compared with an increase of 3.5 per cent, in receipts for the moving-picture
theatres.
It will be seen from the above that the payment of a fair standardized wage to employees
is very desirable and of much consequence to the public, as it provides in some measure a
return to them for their tremendous outlay for amusement of almost 20 per cent, of what is
spent, and is of particular interest to the people of British Columbia where this entertainment expenditure is of the highest.
As the hearings progressed a laudable desire arose that the existing differences between
the parties should be amicably composed. At the hearing on the 10th day of January, 1940,
a letter was placed before the Board on behalf of the employer, addressed to the " B.C. Projectionist Society " as representing the employees, expressing a desire to settle the dispute
if favourable consideration of an offer would be given by the employees. The representatives
of the employees thereupon requested time for consideration, which was freely granted by
the Board, and advising both parties that an amicable settlement would be welcomed. At the
hearing on the 11th day of January, 1940, the representative of the employees advised the
Board that the offer of the employer had been accepted, which acceptance was concurred in
by the representative of the employer, and that a written agreement making it effective would
be executed by the employer and Local No. 348 on behalf of the employees, which executed
agreement was placed before the Board at a session on the 13th day of January, 1940.
Award.
The Board therefore unanimously make as their award the terms of settlement incorporated in the agreement mutually arrived at by the parties and executed by them, and which
agreement is attached hereto as Schedule B.
Mr. James Thomson, member of the Board of Industrial Relations, gave the Board the
benefit of his wide industrial knowledge, clearing away many of the troublesome questions REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 99
which inevitably arise in such a controversy. Mr. Pollock, representing the employees, with
Mr. Smith, Secretary of Local No. 348, presented their claims and conducted their case with
fairness and ability, while Miss Quagliotti greatly pleased the Board with the frank and
intelligent advocacy of her absent father's problems. Both parties showed that sincere desire
to meet on some common ground and effect a compromise satisfactory to all concerned, which
is so greatly desired and, unfortunately, is so often missing in such disputes.
Mr. B. H. E. Goult, Secretary-Registrar, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act,"
was indefatigable in assisting the Board and his work as such is greatly appreciated.
Percy R. Bengough.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., January 13th, 1940.
A. K. Graeburn.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
SCHEDULE A.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a Dispute
between Hector Quagliotti, Esq. (the Colonial Theatre), Vancouver, B.C., and his Projectionist
Employees.
This is Schedule A referred to in the Award of the Board of Arbitration.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
Contract
Between
H. Quagliotti, Manager, Colonial Theatre,
and
British Columbia Projectionists, Local No. 348, of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage
Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada.
Effective from September 1st, 1937, to August 31st, 1939.
Endorsed by
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators
of the United States and Canada.
Certified to be a true copy.—F. W. S., Sec.
Contract.
This Agreement, made this day of , 19 , by and between  .., Manager of
the Theatre, hereinafter referred to as the party of the first part of  City, Province of
      , and British Columbia Projectionists Local No. 348 of the International Alliance of Theatrical
Stage Employees and Motion Picture Operators of the United States and Canada, hereinafter referred
to as the party of the second part:
WITNESSETH: (1.) The party of the first part agrees to employ only Projectionists supplied by the
party of the second part.
(2.) The party of the first part agrees to pay to the men furnished by the party of the second part
not less than the following schedule of prices for the work performed:—
Per Week.        Per Performance.         Per Hour.
Projectionists  _    $     $       $  	
(3.) The party of the first part agrees that when desiring to dispose of the services of a member
of the party of the second part who is employed on weekly salary he will give such member two weeks'
notice or pay two weeks' salary in lieu thereof (except in case of drunkenness or dishonesty, in which
case no notice shall be required).
(4.) The party of the first part shall have the right to make such rules and regulations as may be
deemed necessary for the conduct and management of the performances and working conditions, and
the party of the second part agrees that its members shall obey all rules and directions of any authorized representative of the party of the first part in so far as they do not conflict with the terms of this
contract, with the by-laws and working rules now in force of the party of the second part, or with the
rules and regulations of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and Canada.
(5.) The party of the second part agrees to furnish competent men to perform work as required by
the party of the first part under the provisions of this contract.
(6.) The party of the second part agrees that such of its members as are employed by the week
shall give the party of the first part two weeks' notice in case they desire to leave the employment of
the party of the first part (except in the case of non-payment of salaries when due, which shall be the
cause of immediate cancellation of relations). G 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(7.) As the party of the second part is a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage
Employees and Motion Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada, nothing in this
contract shall ever be construed to interfere with any obligations in the party of the second part owes
to such International Alliance by reason of a prior obligation.
It is further mutually agreed:—
1. The wages in the Colonial Theatre, Vancouver, shall be:—
September 1st, 1937, to August 31st, 1938, $190.00 for 36 hours per week for 4 men.
September 1st, 1938, to August 31st, 1939, $202.00 for 36 hours per week for 4 men.
Overtime to be paid for at the rate of:—
$1.35 per man per hour for the first year.
$1.40 per man per hour for the second year.
2. Midnight shows shall be paid for at the rate of time and one half with a minimum of ten
dollars ($10.00).
3. All Sunday work will be paid for at the rate of double time.
4. All overtime shall be calculated in fifteen-minute periods, after five   (5)  minutes past the
regular closing-time.    This five  (5)  minutes' grace is not to be used except to finish the
show.
5. All the time before the regular opening-time or after the regular closing-time  (except the
half hour for maintenance) shall be calculated as overtime.
6. All replacements of men, whether of a permanent nature or a temporary nature, shall be
made only with the consent of the Manager, except in case of an emergency.
7. All previous contracts are hereby cancelled and this contract is not subject to any other
understanding or agreement either written or verbal.
This contract to be in force and binding from the 1st day of September, 1937, to the 31st day of
August, 1939.
H. Quagliotti,
Party of the first part.
R. G. Pollock- (Pres.),
E. J. Williams (Sec),
Party of the second part.
SCHEDULE B.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a Dispute
between Hector Quagliotti, Esq. (the Colonial Theatre, Vancouver, B.C.), and his Projectionist
Employees.
This is Schedule B referred to in the Award of the Board of Arbitration.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
Contract
Between
Mr. H. Quagliotti, Manager, Colonial Theatre,
and
British Columbia Projectionists, Local No. 348, of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage
Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada.
Effective from January 15th, 1940, to August 31st, 1941.
Endorsed by
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators
of the United States and Canada.
Contract.
This Agreement, made this 15th day of January, 1940, by and between Mr. H. Quagliotti, Manager
of the Colonial Theatre, hereinafter referred to as the party of the first part, of Vancouver City,
Province of British Columbia, and British Columbia Projectionists Local No. 348 of the International
Alliance of the Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United
States and Canada, hereinafter referred to as the party of the second part:
WITNESSETH: (1.) The party of the first part agrees to employ only Projectionists supplied by the
party of the second part.
(2.) The party of the first part agrees to pay to the men furnished by the party of the second part
not less than the following schedule of prices for the work performed:—
Per Week.        Per Performance. Per Hour.
4 Projectionists  $47.50 per week of 36 hours. $1.32
(3.) The party of the first part agrees that when desiring to dispose of the services of a member
of the party of the second part who is employed on weekly salary he will give such member two weeks'
notice or pay two weeks' salary in lieu thereof (except in case of drunkenness or dishonesty, in which
case no notice shall be required). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 101
(4.) The party of the first part shall have the right to make such rules and regulations as may be
deemed necessary for the conduct and management of the performances and working conditions, and
the party of the second part agrees that its members shall obey all rules and directions of any authorized representative of the party of the first part in so far as they do not conflict with the terms of this
contract, with the by-laws and working rules now in force of the party of the second part, or with the
rules and regulations of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and Canada.
(5.) The party of the second part agrees to furnish competent men to perform work as required by
the party of the first part under the provisions of this contract.
(6.) The party of the second part agrees that such of its members as are employed by the week
shall give the party of the first part two weeks' notice in case they desire to leave the employment of
the party of the first part (except in the case of non-payment of salaries when due, which shall be
sufficient cause for immediate cancellation of relations).
(7.) As the party of the second part is a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage
Employees and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada, nothing in this
contract shall ever be construed to interfere with any obligations in the party of the second part owes
to such International Alliance by reason of a prior obligation.
It is further mutually agreed: —
1. That the wages in the Colonial Theatre, Vancouver, B.C., shall be:—
January 15, 1940, to August 31, 1941, one hundred and ninety dollars  ($190.00) per week
of 72 hours.
Overtime to be paid at the rate of:—
One dollar and thirty-two cents   ($1.32)  per man per hour, to be calculated in one-
minute periods.
2. Midnight shows will be paid for at the rate of time and one half with a minimum of ten
dollars  ($10.00).
3. All Sunday work will be paid for at the rate of double time.
4. All time before the regular opening-time or after the regular closing-time  (except the half
hour for maintenance)  shall be calculated as overtime.
5. All replacements of men, whether of a permanent nature or a temporary nature shall be
made only with the consent of the manager, except in the case of an emergency.
6. All previous contracts are hereby cancelled and this contract is not subject to any other
understanding or agreement either written or verbal.
This contract shall be binding from the 15th day of January, 1940, to the 31st day of August, 1941.
Ella Quagliotti,
Party of the first part.
Seal.     1 R. G. Pollock,
Local 308,  j- F. W. Smith  (Sec),
I.A.T.S.E. J Party of the second part.
DEATH OF HIS HONOUR JUDGE J. C. McINTOSH.
It is with deep regret that the Department must record the death of His Honour Judge
J. C. McIntosh, one who was closely associated with the work of the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration branch of the Department of Labour.
Judge McIntosh was stricken with a heart ailment at Port Alberni on February 23rd,
and passed away late that night.
He had travelled widely through the Dominion in his youth, and had thus become familiar
at first hand with the problems affecting labour and industry. He was keenly interested in
economic and sociological questions, and was active in keeping abreast of modern labour
legislation through consistent study and wide reading.
A staunch Canadian with a high concept of citizenship, he combined his splendid work
as a jurist with a deep knowledge of human nature, fine impartiality, attractive geniality,
and great charm. He was a popular choice as chairman of many Boards of Arbitration, and
was successful in the majority of cases on which he sat in bringing about unanimous awards.
His loss is keenly felt by the Department, and the deepest sympathy is extended to his
widow, his daughters, and his son in their bereavement.
IV. EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES' ORGANIZATIONS.
Since 1937, when the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" became law, the
growth of employees' organizations has been steady and consistent.
Under section 9 of the Act, every organization of employers and employees is required to
file certain returns, namely:—
(1.)  A certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws containing a full statement of its objects and purposes: G 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(2.)   Certified copies of any amendments to its constitution, rules, and by-laws when
made:
(3.)   An annual list of the names and addresses of its president, secretary, and other
officers as at the 31st day of December in each year.    The list must be filed
before the 31st day of January in each year.
To obtain this information application is made to the secretaries of all organizations of
record,  and  to  the  officers   of  all  central   organizing  bodies   having  branches   within  the
Province.
These returns indicate the growth of employees' organizations has increased since employers and employees have been given the right to organize under section 4 of the Act.
The following table marks that growth:—
Number of Employees' Organizations making Returns and Membership
thereof, 1937-39.
Year.
No. of
Organizations.
Total
Membership.
1937       	
336
352
380
1938  	
42,063
44,867
1939	
The printed list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In cases where
information could be obtained the addresses of the presidents and secretaries were revised to
the date of publication.
The post-office addresses of the officers are the same as the heading under which they
appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees.
Twenty-five made the requisite returns in 1939, compared with twenty-three in 1938.
B. H. E. Goult,
Secretary-Registrar.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers' Union, No. 136.—President,   S.  Young;    Secretary,  T.   E.   Holtsbaum,
Abbotsford.
Alberni.
Waterfront   Workers'   Association,   Alberni   District, No. 1.—President, W. H. Ohs;   Secretary,
J. W. Pakenham, Box 71.
Albreda.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.   15.—President,   K.   H.   Graffunder;    Secretary, R. H. Marshall, Albreda.
Alert Bay.
Fishermen's   Association,   Pacific   Coast  Native.—
President, Dan Assu;  Secretary, Geo. M. Luther,
Alert Bay.
Atlin.
Miners'   Union,   Atlin,   No.   252. — President,   R.
Crowe;   Secretary, Geo. A. Nelson, Atlin.
Bella Bella.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.   14.—President,
R.   Carpenter;    Secretary,   Mrs.   E.   Carpenter,
Bella Bella.
Bella Coola.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 4.—
President,  C. Allertson;    Secretary,  Gorgos Jo-
hansen, Bella Coola.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.   15.—President,
A. King;   Secretary, G. N. Wilson, Bella Coola.
Bibken.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 215.—President, W. Elesko;   Secretary, T. W.
Broadhead, McGillivray Falls.
Blubber Bay.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Sub-local
of Local No. 1-71. — President, J. MacCuish;
Secretary, A. McNeil, 504 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Pacific Lime Co., Ltd., Employees' Association.—
President, A. Noble;    Secretary, A. Day-Smith.
Bralorne.
Miners' Union, Bralorne, No. 271.—President, J. C.
Wilkins;   Secretary, J. W. Hillis, Bralorne.
Workmen's   Co-operative   Committee,   Bralorne.—
President, J. Evans;    Secretary, R. Sinke, Bralorne.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, J. Webster; Secretary, J. F. Grover, 3812
Myrtle Avenue, Edmonds.
Fire-fighters' Association, Burnaby, No. 323.—
President, W. Menzies; Secretary, L. C.
Auvaehe, 1995 Inverness Street.
Fishermen's Association, Pacific Coast, No. 12.—■
President, E. Poyry; Secretary, T. Johnson,
Fraser Arm P.O.
Janitors' Association, Burnaby School, No. 1.—
President, W. Gilbert; Secretary, G. Thornhill,
2058 Mission Avenue, New Westminster. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 103
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Dyers Employees'
Association.—President, R. H. Cross; Secretary, A. McAdam, 3006 Wilson Avenue.
Textile Workers Federal Union, No. 12.—President, M. Stacey; Secretary, C. LeGrove, 2224
Antrim Avenue.
Cape Mudge.
Fishermen's Association, Pacific Coast, No. 10.—
President, A. Ramsay; Secretary, W. Coventry,
Quathiaski Cove.
Chapman Camp.
Workmen's Co-operative Committee, Sullivan Concentrator.—President, C. P. Reddick; Secretary,
D. Hall, Marysville.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, Chemainus and District.—President, F. Lewis; Secretary, F. Somerville, Chemainus.
Cortes Island.
Fishermen's  Association,  Pacific  Coast,  No. 24.—
President,   F.   Tooker;     Secretary,   H.   Finnie,
Whaletown.
Courtenay.
Lumber  and   Sawmill  Workers'  Union,   Sub-local
of Local No. 1-80.—President, F. Wilson;    Secretary, A. Greenwell, Box 51, Lake Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—
President, A. K. Gray; Secretary, Geo. A. Hen-
nessy.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive Brotherhood
of, No. 559.—President, R. Bartholomew; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.
—President, W. Henderson; Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 229.—President, O. A. Eliason; Secretary, G. C. Brown, Box 739.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 173.—President, R. Woolley; Secretary, Jas. F. Lunn, Hotel Byng.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, K. H. Branch; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
P.O. Box 262.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 1292.—President, M. R. Belanger;
Secretary, E. G. Dingley, P.O. Box 728.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, D. R. Maxwell; Secretary, P. C.
Hartnell, P.O. Box 865.
Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7293.
—President, R. Coe;   Secretary, Jas. Robertson,
Box 614.
Dease Island.
Fishermen's Association, Pacific Coast, Local No.
20.—President,    H.    Demostin;      Secretary,    C.
Tsoukalas, R.R. 1, New Westminster.
Deep Bay.
Fishermen's  Association,  Pacific  Coast,  No.  11.—
President,   A.   French;     Secretary,   D.   Harold,
Bowser.
Endako.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 1870.—President,  C. Adcock;    Secretary, J.
Wall, Endako.
Fernie.
Brewery Workers, United, No. 308.—President, M.
Peterson; Secretary, F. E. Alexander, Box
1071.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, N. Cockburn; Secretary, Wm. Martin, P.O. Box 212.
Field.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Kicking Horse
Lodge No. 1454.—President, H. Bentham; Secretary, W. Murdock, P.O. Box 117.
Fort Rupert.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 18.—Acting Secretary, B. Blinkinsop, Fort Rupert.
Gibsons Landing.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 3.—President, A. Anderson;   Secretary, J. Corlett.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 165.—President, H. Carlson;   Secretary, H.
Prestwich, P.O. Box 321, Field.
Haney.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 16.—Secretary, P. Verigin, Maple Ridge.
Hartley Bay.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., Local No. 3.—President, L.  Clifton;    Secretary, J. Eaton, Hartley
Bay.
Hazelton.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.   10.—President,
C. Clifford;   Secretary, C. F. Clifford, Hazelton.
Heriot Bay.
Fishermen's  Union,  Pacific  Coast,  No.  9.—President,   D.   Rogers;     Secretary,   T.   B.   Hendley,
Heriot Bay.
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 202.—President, F. P. Donovan;   Secretary,
C. H. Weaver, Hutton Mills.
Jessica.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.  1023.—President, A. J. Cappos;    Secretary,
C. F. Brown, Jessica.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—
President,  W.   R.   Snowden;    Secretary,  W.  A.
Harris, 727 Seymour Street.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—
President, F. C. Bloom;    Secretary, Geo. Reive,
239 Victoria Street.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 930.—President, O. Hoover;  Secretary,
Geo. Fraser, P.O. Box 7.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, J. Parkin;   Secretary, S. H. Hosken,
788 Nicola Street.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President,   R.   W.   Sidney;    Secretary,   R.
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street.
Railway   Conductors,   Order   of,   No.   611.—President,  L.  P.  Chase;    Secretary,  H.  Battison,  36
Nicola Street, West.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
150.—President, R. G. Arduini;   Secretary, T. C.
Pumphrey, 368 St. Paul Street. G 104
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 30.—
President, W. Whiteman; Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 45.—
President, W. Whiteman; Secretary, J. Gallagher, 503 Victoria Street.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—
President, G. D. Robertson; Secretary, V. H.
Mott, 521 Seymour Street.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173.—President, J. Chmelar; Secretary, T.
H. Horner, Crescent Road.
Kelowna.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 186.—
President, H. Chernoff; Secretary, V. Hungle,
Box 161.
Kimberley.
Mine Workmen's Co-operative Committee.—President, H. Nicholson; Secretary, Geo. Ure, General Delivery.
Kispiox.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 11.
—President, S. Johnson; Secretary, W. G. Jeffrey, Kispiox.
Kitimat.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 12.
—Secretary, Chris Walker, Kitimat.
Kitkatla.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 5.—
Secretary, M. Nelson.
Kitwanga.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 8.—Secretary, W.
Morgan, Kitwanga.
Klemtu.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 13.
—President,   P.   Neasloss;     Secretary,   Mrs.   S.
Starr, Klemtu.
Lake Cowichan.
Lumber  and   Sawmill   Workers'  Union,   No.  80.—
President, Fred Wilson;   Secretary, A. B. Green-
well, Box 51.
Lasqueti Island.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 22.—President,   C.   Douglas;     Secretary,   F.   C.   Mitchell,
Lasqueti Island.
Lund.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 6.—President, M. McDonald;   Secretary, J. Murray, Lund.
Maple Ridge.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 16.—President,    A.    Anderson;    Secretary,    P.    Veregin,
Haney.
Massett.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 4.—
Secretary, Maud Weeha, Old Massett.
McBride.
Railway   Employees,   Canadian   Brotherhood   of,
No.   247.—President,   V.   G.   Leake;    Secretary,
G. T. Holdway, P.O. Box 26.
Metlakatla.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 2.—
Acting Secretary, E. Leighton, Metlakatla.
Midway.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 181.—President, G. Johnson; Secretary, C.
Holm, Eholt.
Nanaimo.
Bakery Salesmen, Sub-local of Local No. 189,
Vancouver.—President, H. Jones; Secretary, B.
Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 527.—President, P. Jones; Secretary, B.
Wheatcroft, 260 Kennedy Street.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, W. W. Hewlett; Secretary, H. W. Spencer,
433 Fourth Street.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone.—President, H. Wilson; Secretary, J.
Morrison, Port Alberni.
Fire-fighters' Association, Nanaimo, No. 7.—President, J. Anthony; Secretary, W. Wardill, 325
Hecate Street.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 13.—President, B. Sutton; Secretary, H. Summers, Cavan
Street.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, T. Ostle; Secretary, E. Boyd, Extension.
Typographical Union, No. 337.—President, J. B.
Paul;  Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, 491 Fifth Street.
Utilities Employees' Association, Nanaimo-Dun-
can, No. 1.—President, H. Montador; Secretary,
J. R. Adams, 515 Prideaux Street.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, T. Podrasky; Secretary, H. Sanders,
Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers, International Union of America, Journeymen, No. 196.—President, A. J. Hanson;
Secretary, F. Defoe, Ward Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1843.—President, A. Breeze; Secretary, C.
E. Jorgensen, 806 Mill Street.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone.—President, R. B. Smith; Secretary, R.
Paterson, 545 Stanley Street.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. 579.
—President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary, E.
. Jeffcott, K. of P. Hall.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. Todd; Secretary, A. D. Bruce, 619
Silicia Street.
Firemen and Engineers, Locomotive Brotherhood
of, Lodge 631.—President, Wm. Graham; Secretary, S. Smith, 611 Second Street.
Letter Carriers, Federal Association of, No. 75.—
President, F. N. Thompson; Secretary, Geo. C.
Massey, 306 Third Street.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 663.
—President, S. J. Newell; Secretary, F. Chapman, 415 Behnsen Street.
Railroad Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
98.—President, D. Rees; Secretary, G. B. Abbott, K. of C. Hall.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis; Secretary, Jas. Bird, 406
Victoria Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary,
E. F. Phillips, 514 Victoria Street. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 105
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, J. S. Edwards; Secretary, C. H.
Sewell, 41 High Street.
New Westminster.
Bakery Salesmen, Sub-local of Local No. 189,
Vancouver.—President, H. Jones; Secretary, B.
Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers' and Iron Ship Builders' Union of
Canada, No. 1.—President, L. C. Campbell; Secretary, R. Woodbridge, 2603 Silver Avenue.
Building Workers, Amalgamated, of Canada.—
President, W. Lannon; Secretary, W. Taylor,
3030 Miller Avenue.     '
Butcher Workers' and Meat Cutters' Federal
Union, No. 94.—President, A. McWhinnie; Secretary, S. S. Hughes, 127 Grey Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1251.—President, R. Graves; Secretary, E.
J. Barrett, 3342 Neville Street.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. C. Cheale; Secretary, F. McGrath, 316
Strand Avenue.
Fire-fighters' Union, City, No. 256.—President, B.
Nixon;   Secretary, V. Insley, No. 1 Fire Hall.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 2.—President, R. Wulff;    Secretary, W. Hanson, R.R. 3.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 20.—Secretary, C. Tsoukalos, R.R. No. 1.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 151.
—President, F. J. Simnett; Secretary, D. MacDonald, 413 Twelfth Street.
Milling Company Employees' Benefit Association,
B. and K.—President, F. Gates; Secretary, L.
Owen. 332 Seventeenth Avenue.
Paper Workers' Association, Westminster.—President, L. Cutting; Secretary, B. Day, 1602 Hamilton Street.
Plumbers and Steam Fitters, United Association
of, No. 571.—President, J. Mitchell; Secretary,
T. H. Poulton, 725 Second Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
226.—President, J. A. Spick; Secretary, F. L.
Wright, 313 Keary Street.
Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees, No. 134.—President, W. Cook; Secretary, R. Cormack, 57 Alexander Street.
Typographical Union, No. 632.—President, A. R.
MacDonald; Secretary, R. A. Stoney, P.O. Box
754. .
Waterfront Workers' Association, Royal City.—
President, A. Davis; Secretary, Wm. Fyfe Herd,
71 Tenth Street.
Ocean Falls.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
360.—President, A. Thomson; Secretary, P. Bryant, Box 324.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper-mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 312.—President, H.
Bamford;    Secretary, D. A. Robertson, Box 92.
Parksville.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell; Secretary, H.
W. McKenzie, R.R. 1.
Pender Harbour.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 4.—President, B. W. Sinclair; Secretary, R. Donley,
Irvine's Landing.
Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. 866.
—President, R. C. Hansen; Secretary, C. E.
Hulett, Penticton.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 884.—President, C. P. Bird; Secretary, A.
R. Fulkerson, Box 97.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426.—President, W. McQuistin; Secretary, T.
Bradley, P.O., Penticton.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 179.—President, G. M. Phipps, Jr.; Secretary, C. A. Yule,
Box 67.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, H. Denmark; Secretary, H. Nicholson, Box 595.
Pioneer.
Co-operative Committee, Pioneer.—President, A.
Broomfield;    Secretary,  D.  Bravender,  Pioneer.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, No. 308.—President, W. J. Cameron; Secretary, W. A. Patterson, Pioneer.
Porlier Pass.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 25.—President, J. Brown; Secretary, Roy Peterson, North
Galiano.
Port Alberni.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 26.—President, I. Kerr; Secretary, B. Buttedahl, Port
Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, District
No. 1-85.—President, A. Dewhurst; Secretary,
E. Dalskog, Box 746.
Port Essington.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 6.—
President, Mark Bolton;   Secretary, Louis Starr.
Port Kells.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 21.—President, O. Ekroth;   Secretary, J. N. Dobson, R.R.
No. 3.
Port Simpson.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 23.
—President,  J.   C.  MacKay;    Secretary,  A.  J.
Wesley, Port Simpson.
Powell River.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
8.—President, C. Murray; Secretary, A. McLaren, Fire Hall.
Paper-makers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, E. A. Murray; Secretary, H.
B. Moore, Box 55, Westview.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper-mill Workers, No. 76.—
President, J. Cook; Secretary, H. L. Hansen,
P.O. Box 507.
Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive Brotherhood
of, No. 827.—President, R. R. Anderson; Secretary, F. Armstrong, Prince George.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620.—President, J. G. Sweeney; Secretary, J. E. Paschal,
Prince George.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
28.—President, H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H.
Allen, General Delivery.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters   and  Joiners,  United  Brotherhood  of,
No.   1735.—President,   J.   J.   Gillis;     Secretary,
J. S. Black, Box 694. G 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President,    A.    A.    McEwen;     Secretary,
James Black, 719 Alfred Street.
Fire-fighters,   International   Association   of,   No.
559.—President, E. W. Becker;  Secretary, A. H.
Iveson, Box 462.
Fishermen's  Federal  Union,  Northern  B.C.  Resident, No. 2502.—President, I. Nakatani;   Secretary, I. Miwa, P.O. Box 881.
Fish-packers'   Association,   No.   1.—President,   A.
Stiles;   Secretary, T. Smith, P.O. Box 612.
Fish-packers'   Union,   No.   49.—President,   C.   E.
Cummant;   Secretary, 0. Pick, Seal Cove.
Fishermen's  Federal  Union,  Deep  Sea,  No.  80.—
President, W. H. Brett;   Secretary, Geo. Andersen, P.O. Box 249.
Longshoremen's   Association,   Canadian,   No.   2.—
President,   B.   Carlson;    Secretary,  W.  A.   Pil-
fold, Box 531.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 207.
—President,  H.  K.  Douglas;    Secretary,  P.  A.
Bond, Box 611.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426.—President, F. Barber;  Secretary, F. Derry,
P.O. Box 496.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
154.—President,   H.  Forrest;    Secretary,  J.   H.
McDonald, P.O. Box 676.
Typographical  Union,  Prince  Rupert,  No.  413.—
President,   J.   M.   Campbell;     Secretary,   A.   O.
Franks, Prince Rupert.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, No. 407.
—President, A. Corrents; Secretary, J. M.
Goble, Box 283.
Engineers, Locomotive Brotherhood of, No. 657.—
President, H. W. Keegan; Secretary, G. L. Ingram, Box 485.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive Brotherhood
of, No. 341.—President, A. O. Almen; Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 381.—President, D. Blackwell; Secretary,
Samuel Anderson, P.O. Box 7.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, J. M. Donaldson; Secretary, R.
Robertson, Box 209.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of
Locomotive, No. 208.—President, J. W. Miller;
Secretary, R. H. Wyman, Box 521.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 481.—President, A. N. Watt; Secretary, A. S. Parker, Box
322.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, R. S. Sanders; Secretary, T. B. Philip, 407
Fourth Street.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 72.-—
President, Geo. Watson; Secretary, L. W. File,
Box 577.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, J. P. Campbell; Secretary, D. E.
Johnson, Box 728.
Rivers Inlet.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 23.—President, J. Everett; Secretary, P. Tipton, Provincial P.O.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 16.—Secretary,
David Burnard, Rivers Inlet.
Rounds.
Woodworkers   of   America,    Sub-local   No.   80.—
President, F. Wilson;    Secretary, A. B. Green-
well, Rounds.
Skeena Crossing.
Native Brotherhood of B.C., No. 9.—President, H.
Russell;    Secretary, P. Mark, Skeena  Crossing.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. 111.—
President, F. V. Foster;   Secretary, H. D. Johnson, Box 80.
Railway   Carmen,   Brotherhood   of   America,   No.
1415.—President,    G.    Cathral;     Secretary,    D.
MacLean, Smithers.
Railway   Employees,   Canadian   Brotherhood   of,
No. 93.—President, R. W. Champion;   secretary,.
S. Noble, Box 57.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   869.—
President, J. M. Graham;   Secretary, J. H. Rife,
P.O. Box 168.
Smith Inlet.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.   17.—Secretary,
Geo. Walkus, Smith Inlet.
SOINTULA.
Fishermen's  Union,  Pacific  Coast,  No.  8.—President, H.  Malm;    Secretary, E. Ahola,  Sointula.
Squamish.
Railway   Carmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.    1419.—
President,   J.   E.   Holmes;     Secretary,   W.   A.
Mahood, Box 46.
Steveston.
Fishermen's Union, No. 15, Pacific Coast.—Secretary, W. Jacobson, 365 Finn Road.
Stuart Island.
Fishermen's  Union,  Pacific  Coast,  No.  7.—President, M. Gerrard;   Secretary, Geo. Stickland.
Telkwa.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.   340.—President,   A.   K.   Hemstreet;     Secretary, D. Small, Box 29.
Trail.
Co-operative   Committee,   Workmen's.—President,
G. M. Thomson;  Secretary, R. W. Hills, Meakin
Hotel.
Fire-fighters'   Union,   Trail-Rossland  and  Nelson,
No. 9.—President, Geo. Dingwall;  Secretary, W.
Banton, 1390 Pine Avenue.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 76.
—President, R. H. Hilder;   Secretary, M. Gordi,
1544 Goepel Street.
Vanarsdol.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 335.—President, D. J. Gunn;   Secretary, P.
Mark, Dorreen.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 7.—
President, M. C. MacKay;   Secretary, A. Bolton,
Vanarsdol.
Vancouver.
Aeronautical Mechanics' Lodge, No. 756.—President, H. Foster; Secretary, T. C. Dearlove, 1966
Nelson Street.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, No. 468.—President, R. P.
Davis; Secretary, J. A. Humphreys, 16 Hastings Street East. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 107
Bakery Salesmen, LB. of T.C.S. & H„ No. 189 —
President, H. James; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, No.
120.—President, R. J. Guthrie; Secretary, R.
English, Jr., 529 Beatty Street.
Beverage Dispensers, Local No. 676.—President,
W. G. Couper; Secretary, T. J. Hanafin, 402
Homer Street.
B.C. Box Employees' Association.—President, J.
Finlayson; Secretary, J. R. McGillivray, llll
Broughton Street.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 151.—President,
Wm. J. Bartlett; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048
Second Avenue West.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Welders and
Helpers of America, No. 194.—President, C. McMillan; Secretary, W. J. Johnstone, 5877 Lanark Street.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, F. L. Milne; Secretary, E. R.
Thorpe, 3534 Eleventh Avenue West.
Brewery Workers, Local No. 300.—President, W.
Tyler;   Secretary, E. Sims, 529 Beatty Street.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, No.
1.—President, A. Fordyce; Secretary, Wm. S.
Dagnall, 4005 Perry Street.
Bridge, Structural & Ornamental Iron Workers'
Local Union, International, No. 97.—President,
M. Crabbe; Secretary, Robert McDonald, 531
Beatty Street.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, No.
1.—President, E. H. McArthur; Secretary, J.
McKinlay, 163 Hastings Street West.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated, Shipyard Branch No. 2.—President, A. E. Arnold;
Secretary, W. Bray, 163 Hastings Street West.
Building Workers' Union, National, No. 1.—President, G. S. Moore; Secretary, J. P. Carey, 712
Holden Building.
Camp and Mill Workers' Federal Labour Union,
No. 31.—President, T. Sada; Secretary, T.
Umezuki, 544 Powell  Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, International Brotherhood of, No. 1025.—President, W. Ion; Secretary, D. MacKay, 223 Seventh Avenue West.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 452.—President, J. G. Smith; Secretary, J.
Stevenson, 529 Beatty Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2235.—President, D. W. Thomas; Secretary,
H. Hamper, 8530 Osier Street.
Checkers' and Weighers' Association, Marine.—
President, W. Wright; Secretary, S. H. Grist,
1052 Esquimalt Avenue, West Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59.—President, Wm. Black; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 3917
Eleventh Avenue West.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 28.—President, Wm.
Ash; Secretary, W. J. Scribbins, 195 Pender
Street East.
Civic Federation of Vancouver, No. 1.—President,
R. G. Lucas; Secretary, R. Skinner, 571 Twenty-
second Avenue West.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. M. Dean; Secretary, D. J. McCarthy,
2355 Arbutus Street.
Divers, Submarine, and Tenders' Union of Canada,
Western Division. — President, H. E. Ryan;
Secretary, Wm. Zess, Seventh Floor, Fleck
Building. i
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Co., Ltd.—President, H. Dobinson; Secretary, R. H. Milner, 768 Seymour Street.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, J. M. Bezer; Secretary,
Wm. C. Daley, 529 Beatty Street.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of.
No. 82.—President, H. MacKichan; Secretary,
R. Holmes, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, D. Hodges; Secretary, H. Gris-
wood, 531 Beatty Street.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 2.—
President, G. L. Devenny; Secretary, G. Lamont,
223 Carrall Street.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. No.
907.—President, V. Wright; Secretary, J. Mee-
ham, 1915 Haro Street.
Engineers, Locomotive Brotherhood of, No. 320.—
President, J. H. Lyons; Secretary, H. O. McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, R. A. Woods; Secretary, E.
Gerger, 4305 Ontario  Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
882 & 882b.—President, J. Henderson; Secretary, J.  Stevenson, 529  Beatty  Street.
Engineers, National Association of, No. 7.—President, R. W. Pyne; Secretary, E. Read, 319
Pender Street West.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 3.—
President, C. S. Wright; Secretary, J. E. Brown,
712 Holden Building.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 15.
—President, W. A. Gath; Secretary, J. Battye,
2309 Trafalgar Street.
Film Exchange Employees, No. B-71.—President,
O. Bird; Secretary, G. Hislop, 2549 Charles
Street.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
1.—President, E. R. Sly; Secretary, P. F. En-
right, 1310 Sixty-fourth Avenue West.
Fire-fighters Union, B.C. Provincial Association
of, No. 3.—President, L. S. Wheadon; Secretary Wm. H. Galbraith, 150 Nineteenth Street
East, North Vancouver.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
4.—President, Geo. Horridge; Secretary, T. W.
Murphy, 2 Acadia Circle, University Hill.
Fire-fighters Union, No. S18.—President, J. Lyon;
Secretary, Chas. A. Watson, 1626 Thirteenth
Avenue East.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 656.—President, T. McEwan; Secretary, C. W. Pulham, 3174 Fifth Avenue West.
Firemen and Oiler Helpers, No. 289.—President,
E. Daem; Secretary, W. R. Chapman, 1165
Beach Avenue.
First-aid Attendants, B.C.—President, H. Sharpe;
Secretary, G. E. Blundell, 303a Pender Street
West.
Fishermen's Federal Union of B.C., United, No.
44.—President, H. Stevens; Secretary, W. T.
Burgess, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—
President, Capt. C. E. Prince; Secretary, R.
Bremer, 163 Hastings Street West.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast (Headquarters).
—President, P. Sabin; Secretary, A. V. Hill,
164 Hastings Street East. G 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 1.—President, J. Gorry; Secretary, A. Neish, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 5, North
Arm. — President, G. Prezeau; Secretary, R.
Grey, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 18, Upper
Burrard.—President, R. Stewart; Secretary, J.
Dupray, 164 Hastings Street East.
Garage and Motor Trades, Association of B.C.—
President, Wm. Brown; Secretary, Fred Elliott,
342 Pender Street West.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, Reg. Moore; Secretary, S. Cropper,
1024 Twentieth Avenue East.
Garment Workers Union, No. 276, International
Ladies.—President, H. Appleton; Secretary, R.
Jackson, 119 Pender Street West.
Granite Cutters' Association of North America.—
President, A. Simpson; Secretary, Wm. Mor-
rice, 1987 Charles Street.
Hod Carriers, Building and Common Labourers of
America, No. 602.—President, J. F. Johnson;
Secretary, H. W. Watts, 531 Beatty Street.
Hospital Employees' Union, No. 4. — President,
Miss McGregor; Secretary, Miss I. Inkson, 3625
Third Avenue West.
Hospital Employees, Shaughnessy. — President,
Miss M. Anderson; Secretary, Miss A. Hobbins,
1132 Twelfth Avenue East.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.
—President, Wm. Stewart; Secretary, H. Gate-
man, 732 Seymour Street.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific, B.C. Division.—President, T. Pimm; Secretary, James
Thomson, 164 Hastings Street East.
Iron Moulders' Union of North America, International, No. 281.—President, J. Foster; Secretary, J. Browne, 638 Broadway West.
Jewellery Workers, International, No. 42.—President, R. Hawken; Secretary, Gordon Farring-
ton, 529 Beatty Street.
Lathers' International Union, No. 207.—President,
W. H. Crane; Secretary, M. G. Finlayson, 116
Hastings  Street West.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 12.
—President, A. T. Thomson; Secretary, John
Cass, 850 Thirty-first Avenue East.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, No. 44.
—President, C. Campbell; Secretary, D. V.
Robinson, 3129 Renfrew Street.
Longshoremen's Association, North Vancouver.—
President, D. Paul!; Secretary, Gus. Band, Indian Reserve.
Longshoremen's Association, Vancouver. — President, J. Boyes; Secretary, H. Burgess, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Longshoremen's Association, Burrard Coastwise.—
President, T. Yates; Secretary, J. Darwood, 45
Dunlevy Avenue.
Longshoremen and Warehousemen's Union, No.
1-11.—President, W. Taylor; Secretary, A.
Boutin, 143 Cordova Street East.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 1-71.—
President, J. MacCuish; Secretary, E. Dalskog,
505 Holden Building.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 1-217.—
President, D. A. Cameron; Secretary, B. J.
Melsness, 118 Fourteenth Avenue West.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
President, H. H. Miller; Secretary, Jas. H. Wallace, 3271 Fifteenth Avenue West.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 692.
—President, G. W. Marshall; Secretary, Jas.
McMillan, 529 Beatty Street.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70. — President,
A. C. Holmes; Secretary, H. E. Fader, 2725
Eton Street.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 31, Brotherhood of.—President, J. R. McCulley; Secretary,
R. McLure, 4269 Victoria Drive.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 167.—President, G. Ades; Secretary, T. H.
Gibb, 224 Fourteenth Avenue West.
Meat Cutters and Packing House Employees'
Union, No. 95.—President, D. Bryce; Secretary,
H. Douglas, 2027 Thirty-first Avenue East.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210.—President, J. Fraser; Secretary, R.
Halliday, 3481 Georgia Street East.
Milk Drivers and Dairy Employees' Union, No.
464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary, B.
Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Miners' Union, Vancouver District, No. 289.—
President, T. R. Forkin; Secretary, Geo. F.
Price, 508 Holden Building.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, J. Bowyer; Secretary, E. A. Jamie-
son, 553 Granville Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, International Brotherhood of, No. 138.—
President, D. Hughes; Secretary, Ed Smith,
4130 Slocan Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 566.—President, J. H.
Wheat; Secretary, G. S. Noren, 529 Beatty
Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 954. — President, J.
Brice; Secretary, Geo. F. Barnes, 1449 Robson
Street.
Paper Box, Limited, Employees' Association, National.—President, C. McMurchie; Secretary,
R. C. Lucas, 160 Third Avenue West.
Photo Engravers' Union, No. 54.—President, Wm.
Wilson; Secretary, J. A. Hinke, 3776 Thirty-
fifth Avenue West.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf and Dock Builders,
No. 2404.—President, Wm. Reid; Secretary, J.
McGuffie, P.O. Box 369.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers, No. 779.—President, A. Wilson; Secretary, J. Chilton, 4258
Ontario Street.
Plasterers, Vancouver Association of.—President,
H. West; Secretary, R. Foster, 1153 Melville
Street.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 170.—President, R. Little; Secretary, C.
Pritchard, 529 Beatty Street.
Police Federal Association, No. 12.—President, A.
Murray; Secretary, J. Gillies, 236 Cordova
Street East.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, No. 69.
—President, M. Erenberg; Secretary, T. S.
Ezart, 1807 Thirty-eighth Avenue East.
Projectionists' Society, B.C., No. 348.—President,
R. G. Pollock; Secretary, J. H. Leslie, P.O. Box
345.
Pursers' and Chief Stewards' Association, No. 130.
—President, G. Reed; Secretary, H. N. Cromp-
ton, 529 Beatty Street.
Purse Seiners' Union, Salmon, No. 141.—President, E. Neish; Secretary, D. Hemow, 1039
Union Street. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 109
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
58.—President, H. Warde; Secretary, S. Shearer, 3651 Pender Street East.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Div. 267.—President, E. Pubsley; Secretary, J. B. Physick, 1156
Thurlow Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
59.—President, A. Shreeve; Secretary, F. Macaulay, 760 Fiftieth Avenue East.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver.—
President, H. F. Hatt; Secretary, F. W. Hitchcock, 2551 Thirty-seventh Avenue West.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 46.—President, R. Dixon; Secretary, H. E.
Barnes, 5438 Larch Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Stations Employees, No. 626.—
President, R. G. Walker; Secretary, M. McGil-
vray, 1052 Richards Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 2265.—President, F. H. Killick; Secretary,
R. Egan, 3240 Twenty-fourth Avenue West.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 630.—President, J. W. Hope; Secretary, W.
J. Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, W. Pennington; Secretary, R. H.
Blackwell, 557 Fifty-sixth Avenue East.
Rays, Limited, and Inc. Companies Employees'
Association, 'No. 1.—President, E. P. James;
Secretary, C. E. Sanderson, 207 Hastings Street
West.
Retail Clerks' Union, No. 279.—President, J. O.
Stinson; Secretary, D. Maxwell, 404 Holden
Building.
Retail Employees' Association, No. 1.—President,
R. Stevenson; Secretary, H. J. Huckvale, 112
Hastings Street West.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian, No. 1.—President, H. H. Taylor; Secretary, W. Bligh, 405
Powell Street.
Seamen's Union, B.C. — President, H. Murphy;
Secretary, T. Irving, 340b Cambie Street.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association,
No. 280.—President, R. Macaulay; Secretary,
D. Macpherson, 529 Beatty Street.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association,
No. 314.—President, H. H. Swinden; Secretary,
Geo. Watson, 1909 Nineteenth Avenue East.
Shipyard Labourers' Federal Union, No. 126.—
President, H. Wilding; Secretary, G. Lawrence,
773 Tenth Street East, North Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, Local No. 726.—
President, J. B. Collin; Secretary, Wm. O.
Clarkson, 529 Beatty Street.
Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers and Assistants, No. 18177.—President, L. M. Nicholes;
Secretary, Anne MacDonald, 529 Beatty Street.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, No. 88.—
President, G. F. Tookey; Secretary, W. L.
McComb, 3158 Thirty-second Avenue West.
Stonecutters' Association of North America, Journeymen.—President, F. H. Lowe; Secretary, F.
Hall, 2931 Forty-second Street East.
Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees, No. 101.—President, T. Dunlop; Secretary, R. K. Gervin, 175 Broadway East.
Switchmen's Union of North America, No. 111.—
President, W. J. Inglis; Secretary, A. S. Cros-
san, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue West.
Tailors' Union, Journeymen, No. 178.—President,
C. A. Laing; Secretary, G. Turnbull, 529 Beatty
Street.
Taxi, Stage, and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.—
President, W. J. Caithcart; Secretary, C. Mc-
Ivor, 727 Twentieth Avenue West.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, J. H. Sutherland; Secretary, H. Charlesworth, 1300 Robson Street.
Telegraphers' Union of America, Commercial, No.
1.—President, W. D. Brine; Secretary, G. W.
Campbell, Box 432.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture
Machine Operators of U.S. and Canada, International Alliance of, No. 118.—President, W.
Danby;   Secretary, W. Blake, P.O. Box 711.
Tile, Marble Setters and Terrazzo Helpers, International Association of, No. 78.—President, A.
Crossley; Secretary, S. J. Cooke, 7735 Ontario
Street.
Tilesetters, B.C., No. 3.—President, R. Neville;
Secretary, Wm. Richards, 5326  Spencer  Street.
Transportation Employees, Federation of Canadian.—President, D. H. Thompson; Secretary,
F. W. Crawford, 1154 Comox Street.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, General, No.
31.—President, H. J. Ashbee; Secretary, B.
Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—President, T. A. Holland; Secretary, R. H. Neelands,
529 Beatty Street.
Upholsterers' Union of North America, No. 306.—
President, E. Reaville; Secretary, R. E. Gar-
side, 3260 Turner Street.
Warehouse Employees' and Truck Drivers' Association, The W. H. Malkin.—President, H.
Davey; Secretary, F. H. Calhoun, 57 Water
Street.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Canadian, No.
2104.—President, C. E. Bailey, Secretary, A. G.
Smith, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Woodworkers' Union of B.C., Vancouver, No. 1.—
President, B. Holt; Secretary, F. Brewer, 712
Holden Building.
Vernon.
Public Service Plant Employees' Organization,
Canadian.—President, A. B. Edwards; Secretary, R. W. Mclndoe, 634 Mara Avenue.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, J. E. Jamieson; Secretary, W. B. Hilliard,
R.R. No. 1.
Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers International
Union of N.A., Sub-Local of Local No. 468.—
President, D. Sagar; Secretary, A. Jacobs, 1421
Harrison Street.
Barbers International Union of America, Journeymen.—President, G. A. Turner; Secretary,
J. A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, No. 191.
—President, L. Basso; Secretary, W. S. Duncan, 1409 May Street.
Boilermakers and Iron Ship Builders Union of
Canada, No. 2.—President, J. Pringle Veitch;
Secretary, A. G. Jacques, 619 Canteen Road.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
147.—President, W. W. Laing; Secretary, J. A.
Wiley, Jones Building, Fort Street.
Brewery Workers' Union, No. 280.—President, R.
Hudson; Secretary, W. Bryan, 2642 Scott
Street. G 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Bricklayers and Masons, International Union, No.
2.—President, W. Mertton; Secretary, J. Beck-
erley, 2373 Bowker Avenue.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, No. 1598.—
President, L. Noble; Secretary, R. Berry, Bell
Block, Oak Bay Avenue.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, No. 2415.—President, S. Berrow;
Secretary, E. Hovey, 939 Empress Avenue.
City Hall Officials Association of Victoria.—President, C. Jones; Secretary, W. P. Wright, City
Hall.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, No. 50.—
President, S. Osbourne; Secretary, R. Betts,
2858 Shakespeare Street.
Civic Employees' Federation of Greater Victoria.
—President, A. H. Bishop; Secretary, T. Harris, City Hall.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E. W. Jones; Secretary, W. S. Fraser,
307 St. Lawrence Street.
Class " A " Drivers Association, Vancouver Island,
No. 1.—President, W. Eaton; Secretary, J. Atkinson, 1228 Langley Street.
Coach Lines Operators' Association, Vancouver
Island.—Chairman, J. Devine, 629 Broughton
Street.
Electrical Employees' Organization, B.C. Telephone Company.—President, J. Egan; Secretary,  W.  H.  Sturrock,  3567  Savannah  Avenue.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 230.—President, R. D. Lemmax; Secretary,
L. F. Smith, 542 Langford Street.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, Council No. 6.—Secretary, G. W. Brown; President,
A. S. Moffat, P.O. Box 922.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20.—■
President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, T. Dutot,
2176 Pentland Road.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
2.—President, K. Mills; Secretary, J. Lusse, No.
1 Fire Hall.
Fire-fighters, Oak Bay Municipal Association of,
No. 5.—President, N. Stewardson; Secretary,
R. A. Ireland, 1703 Monterey Avenue.
Fire-fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of, No.
6.—President, A. J. Snelling; Secretary, F. V.
Miller, 3680 Douglas Street.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins; Secretary, G. H. Stewart, 722 Craigflower Road.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 17.—Secretary, D. McKenzie, 6 Leeland Apartments.
Garage Employees' Association, Vancouver Island
Coach Lines Employees.—President, J. Moffitt;
Secretary, W. Main, 1344 Grant Street.
Government Employees, American Federation of.
—President, E. St. Martin; Secretary, E. E.
David, P.O. Box 484.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 459.
—President, F. Welsh; Secretary, Frank Dovey,
P.O. Box 233.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific.—President,
T. Pimm; Secretary, C. N. Coe, 1228 Langley
Street.
Iron Moulders Union of N.A., International, No.
144.—President, B. Jaeklin; Secretary, A. Clegg,
240 Burnside Avenue.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire &
Metal, No. 332.—President, R. J. Hutchinson;
Secretary, J. B. White, 3481 Doncaster Drive.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island.—President, E. C. Day; Secretary, V. H. Midgley,
3258 Irma Street.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, S. J. Knotts; Secretary, F. C. Hur-'
ry, 898 Front Street.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public.—President, Jean Porter; Secretary, Isabel Routledge,
Victoria Public Library.
Longshoremen's Association, Victoria.—President,
J. Lackie; Secretary, W. Scott, 676 Battery
Street.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, No. 1-122.
—President, T. Lidgate; Secretary, E. Logan,
451 Walter Avenue.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 456.
—President, W. R. Watson; Secretary, C. B.
Lester, 415 View Street.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 2824.—President, W. W. Baker; Secretary,
A. Cann, R.M.D. 1.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Association, No. 247.
—President, W. F. Tickle; Secretary, F. V.
Homan, 602 Broughton Street.
Painters and Paperhangers, Victoria and District.
—President, J. McPherson; Secretary, J. Donaldson, 2541 Wark Street.
Pantorium Employees' Association.—President, M.
C. Milley; Secretary, G. R. Beek, 376 Cook
Street.
Papermakers, International Brotherhood of, No.
367.—President, A. Coates; Secretary, J. H.
McManus, 1228 Langley Street.
Police Mutual Benefit Association, Victoria.—
President, H. F. Jarvis; Secretary, S. T. Holmes,
625 Fisgard Street.
Postal Employees, Canadian. — President, H. W.
Adams; Secretary, J. H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman
Street.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, No. 79.
President, T. Nute; Secretary, F. H. Larssen,
1236 McKenzie Street.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 50.—President, J. Stephenson; Secretary, H. Greaves,
628 Victoria Avenue.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, E. H. Spall; Secretary, J. N. Forde, 707
Wilson Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
222.—President, G. King; Secretary, A. Nicol,
1569 Westall Avenue.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 1137.—President, G. F. Bullock; Secretary,
J. W. Yates, 1753 Davie Street.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, B. E. Sterling; Secretary, J. A.
Stone, 1320 Burleith Drive.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, No. 604.—President, J. Bantly; Secretary,
H. P. Gray, 428 Richmond Avenue.
Shingle Weavers, Local No. 1-118, I.W.A.—President, J. A. King; Secretary, S. Dearden, 2632
Blanshard Street.
Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, No. 109.—President, E. F.
Fox;   Secretary, W. Turner, 3060 Carrol Street.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance of, No. 168.—President, R. Jones; Secretary, C. Rau, P.O. Box 524.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, No. 101.—
President, C. Harris; Secretary, E. Belton,
2387 Estevan Avenue. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 111
Typographical Union, Victoria, No. 201.—President, J. D. Davidson; Secretary, J. Petrie, 77
Howe Street. WELLg^
Mines Benevolent Association, Island Mountain.
—President, H. K. Lucas; Secretary, R. G.
Cameron, Box 323.
Westview.
Carpenters and Joiners of Ariierica, United Brotherhood   of,   No.   2068.—President,   E.   McKella;
Secretary, S. M. Scott, Westview.
Whonnock.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 1.—
President, R. E. Ritchie; Secretary, Geo. F.
Crockett, Whonnock.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 2.—
President, A. J. Mortimer; Secretary, I. Tver-
son, R.R. 1, New Westminster.
Fishermen's Protective Association, B.C., No. 3.—
President, A. P. Cosulich;    Secretary, M. Vidu-
lich, Jr., R.R. 1, Ladner.
Fishermen's  Protective  Association,  B.C.,  No.  14.
—President, J. H. McFalls;   Secretary, F. Rol-
ley, Whonnock.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 19.—President, A. Halverson; Secretary, A. Gilstead,
Whonnock.
Woodward Slough.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 15.—President, J. Hill; Secretary, W. Jacobson, 365 Finn
Road, Steveston.
Zeballos.
Miners' Union, Zeballos, No. 450.—President, B. C.
Beale;   Secretary, F. D. Mahoney, Privateer.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Fernie.
Coal    Operators'    Association,    Western    Canada
Bituminous,   Fernie   Branch.—President,   R.   M.
Young;   Secretary, C. Stubbs, 516-520 Lougheed
Building.
Vancouver.
Building  and   Construction   Industries'  Exchange
of B.C.—President, Col. J. F. Keen;' Secretary,
R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender Street West.
Building   Contractors'  Association.—President,  J.
L.  Northey;    Secretary,  R.  Lecky,  342  Pender
Street West.
Canned  Salmon  Section,  B.C.  Division,   C.M.A.—
President, D. M. Bartlett;    Secretary, L. Richmond, 355 Burrard Street.
Contractors'   Association,   General.—President,   J.
E.   Buerk;     Secretary,   R.   Lecky,   342   Pender
Street West.
Electrical   Association,   Vancouver.—President,  J.
S.  Homersham;    Secretary,  S.  F. Rieketts,  525
Homer Street.
Fishing   Vessel   Owners'   Association   of   B.C.—
President,   Capt.   C.   E.   Prince;    Secretary,   R.
Bremer, 163 Hastings Street West.
Hotels' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Davis;
Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender Street West.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—President, W. L. Macken;  Secretary, Margaret Riley,
355 Burrard Street.
Jewellers'  Association,  Canadian,  B.C.   Section.—
President,   E.   R.   Flewwelling;     Secretary,   A.
Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Linen Supply Club.—
President, W. R. Morrow; Secretary, A. R.
Bernard, 910 Richards Street.
Loggers' Association, B.C.—President, C. D. Anderson; Secretary, R. V. Stuart, 510 Hastings
Street West.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, J. G. Robson; Secretary, T. H.
Wilkinson, 837 Hastings Street West.
Meal, Oil, and Salt Fish Section, C.M.A.—President, D. M. Bartlett; Secretary, L. Richmond,
355 Burrard Street.
Metal Trades Section, C.M.A.—President, H. F.
Letson; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608 Marine
Building.
Printers' Section, C.M.A. — President, C. Chapman; Secretary, A. Parkinson, 355 Burrard
Street.
Plastering and Lathing Contractors' Association.
President, Wm. Smith; Secretary, G. A. Skinner, 2957 Euclid Avenue.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—
President, W. S. Charlton; Secretary, Geo. R.
Matthews, 420 Pacific Building.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, P. B. Cooke; Secretary, C. W. Train, 45
Dunlevy Avenue.
Storage and Transfermen's Association, Canadian.—President, Geo. S. Peacock; Secretary,
E. Johnston, 300 Pender Street West. G 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 4th, 1940.
Mr. Adam Bell,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for the
year 1939.
Industry, generally, during the year 1939 did not find it necessary to engage in any
comprehensive expansion programme. This was largely due to the feeling of uncertainty
caused by the International situation, which was climaxed by the declaration of war in
September and our entrance therein. During the latter part of the year, in response to the
National demand, certain factories which had received contracts for equipment urgently
required for war purposes increased their staffs, and, in some instances, worked a double shift.
In other instances, the emergency was met by working a limited amount of overtime.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1939, 2,140 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT PREVENTION.
No part of the work of this Department is of more immediate importance for the well-
being of workers in all branches of industry than that which concerns the protection of life
and limb. Believing that it is the desire of industry to send each and every employee home
at the end of the day's work in the same physical condition as he was when he came to work,
periodical inspection visits are made for the purpose of assisting management to obtain this
objective.
While numerous orders are issued during the course of a year specifying certain measures
to be taken to eliminate or at least lessen a hazard which inspection revealed to be present, it
is very rare indeed that an employee informs us that he had received direct benefit from the
employer's compliance with a specified order. There was, however, one outstanding instance
of this during the year under review, the particulars of which are as follows: Orders had
been issued to guard a very hazardous portion of a fast revolving cylinder. Upon a reinspec-
tion being made, the protection afforded was found to be inadequate. Following the rectifying of this condition we made a further inspection some time later, and while in the plant an
employee informed us that shortly after a wire-mesh guard which we had specified had been
installed he had occasion to use an elevated walk leading to this revolving cylinder. While
using this walk he tripped on a loose piece of material carelessly left by a fellow employee,
and, in falling, saved himself by gripping the frame of the wire-mesh screen, informing us
that the screen was the means of preventing him from receiving, if not fatal, at least permanent disabling injuries.
While great progress has been made in accident prevention, much still remains to be
accomplished. Plant safety committees are performing a very vital part in this respect.
Many valuable recommendations are made by these safety committees. All recommendations
should receive serious consideration by management, and if upon investigation they are found
impractical to implement, explanations should be advanced as to the reason thereof. If this
policy is not followed, there is a strong possibility these committees will lose interest, resulting,
most likely, in a higher accident frequency. The fact that employees are chosen to act on
these committees would indicate that they are encouraged to think and make suggestions, with
the result that management gets the full benefit of their recommendations, and the work is
performed safer and better because of the co-operation of all concerned.
Tribute must be paid to present-day designers of power-driven machinery for the manner
in which they are building safety into their machines, which are now more self-contained, with
movable parts more enclosed, yet accessible. Mechanical safeguards do not eliminate all
accidents, as " familiarity often breeds contempt," but if they are the right kind and the
department head insists that they always be used, they will do much to reduce accidents and
increase the efficiency of the worker through the added sense of security. .     REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 113
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
In previous reports we cited details of a variety of activities affecting the well-being of
workers which have raised the standard of comfort of industrial workers. Industry is to-day
more and more recognizing the value of carrying their health and safety programmes right
into the plant dining- and wash-rooms. Such plants have a sound investment in health, sanitation, and safety, and the employees are quick to express their appreciation of the interest
being taken in their welfare.
While we have not as yet reached the point where all industrial establishments have
provided steel lockers for their employees' wearing-apparel, each succeeding year finds these
facilities more general in evidence.
We note with pleasure that our larger and more progressive firms are, between our
inspection visits, expanding their welfare activities. During the year under review, we
entered a recently constructed brick building built for the sole purpose of providing shower-
baths and washing facilities for their employees.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
Previous to a workman being placed on the pay-roll of our larger industrial plants, it is
now a fairly well-established practice for the employment department of these companies to
require the applicant to pass a medical examination. Whatever the underlying motives are
for this procedure, it is only reasonable to expect that industry will, once it has engaged the
workmen, take all necessary precautions in order to prevent impairment of their health by
contraction of an industrial disease.
Modern industrial developments have created many hazards to which the workmen are
constantly exposed, not the least of these being health hazards. In some industries a great
deal of dust is generated in the manufacturing process; in others, harmful fumes, vapours,
and gases are emitted, which if not removed prove injurious to the health of the workmen.
The ideal solution is to remove all these at their point of origin by means of exhaust-fans and
the necessary piping. This, for a variety of reasons, in some industrial occupations is difficult
to attain, and, in any case, the problem is best solved by procuring the advice of an efficient
ventilating engineer. The location and plan of the workrooms have a great deal to do with
the resultant working conditions, and are not always given the consideration they merit.
In some industrial occupations, hazardous operations may sometimes be separated from
the factory proper by means of dust-proof enclosures. In other intermittent operations of a
dusty nature, respiratory protective devices may be used. This method should only be used
when exposure to hazards is of a temporary duration. The successful removal of dusts is one
of the problems facing industry to-day. Dust that is thought to be harmless to-day, may,
following research, be viewed in another light to-morrow.
With industry's fine record of achievement in the prevention of industrial accidents, we
note with satisfaction during our inspection visits it is now realized that there is no more
reason to ignore the health hazards of industry than there is to overlook the cause of industrial injuries.
In the interest of the employees' health, we found it necessary to suspend the operation of
an extremely dusty manufacturing process located in a basement where the mechanical equipment for the purpose of removing the harmful dusts was inoperative and very little natural
ventilation provided.
While we are frequently requested by employers to examine prospective premises previous
to leases being taken, it would be much more satisfactory to all concerned if employers would
become gene"ally conversant with the requirements of the " Factories Act " before finally
deciding on the location of their factories, thereby avoiding such situations as outlined above.
HOME-WORK.
The regulation of industrial home-work has a twofold purpose in that it seeks to protect
the consumer by prohibiting goods being manufactured in insanitary homes and homes where
there are contagious diseases. It also denies to a type of employer the advantages he previously secured by the practice of giving out work to be performed in the home. In this
respect it has, in addition to eliminating unfair competitive practices, provided more employment for factory-workers. G 114 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Examination of records which are required to be kept by employers who are authorized
to give out work to persons in possession of a Home-worker's Permit reveals that the amount
of work sent out to be performed in the home is becoming less in volume.
Enforcement of Part II. of the " Factories Act," which relates exclusively to Home-work,
has proven beneficial to both employer and employee. We have the instance of the employer
who desired to employ a considerable number of home-workers in direct competition with an
old established industry; denial of this request made it necessary for this employer to acquire
factory premises and install machinery. This industry has to-day grown and prospered to
such an extent that, during the year under review, larger factory premises had to be secured
in order to prevent overcrowding.
ELEVATORS.
We are pleased to report that no fatal or serious injuries were received by any person
while being transported on passenger or freight elevators during the year. This record has
been achieved largely because all power passenger and freight elevators in service have been
equipped with interlocking devices as specified in the regulations. This equipment, if properly
maintained, will continue to function as an effective accident-prevention device, as it prevents
the operator from moving the car unless the hoistway doors or gates are closed and in the
locked position.
While we have had to contend with some opposition before attaining complete compliance
with the regulations governing the operation of passenger and freight elevators, the persons
(few in number) who took this attitude have since informed us that they would not be without
these protective devices, and they now consider this accident-prevention equipment indispensable.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1939, 865 operators' licences were renewed and 253 temporary and 193 permanent
licences issued.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Sixteen plans and specifications relating to modern elevator equipment were approved.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1939, 1,309 passenger and freight elevators were inspected.
HOLIDAY PERMITS.
During the year, 157 permits authorizing the operation of factories on statutory holidays
were issued; these permits were issued in cases of extreme emergency only, and to industries
the nature of which requires continuous operation.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
Sixty-three overtime permits were issued during the year, limiting the employment of
female factory employees to not more than nine hours in any one day or fifty-four hours in
any one week.
PROSECUTIONS.
A proprietor of an Oriental laundry was fined $100 and costs for operating the laundry
after the statutory closing-hours. A superintendent of a laundry was fined $50 for an infraction of section 12, clause (6), of the " Factories Act." A proprietor of a dry-cleaning plant
was fined $50 and costs for operating the cleaning plant after the statutory closing-hours. A
proprietor of a dressmaking shop was fined $5 costs and given suspended sentence for an
infraction of section 3 of the " Factories Act."
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected with
industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 115
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent-     —   Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer and
Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets     ) _ _ „,      ,   „        .   ,     ,
,7 .,., ,   ^.  . . „ , _, .   „,      .        } G. E. Street, Superintendent.
Vancouver (Women s Division), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets— I
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets    - W. G. Stone, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women's Division), Pemberton Bldg., 625 Fort Street Mrs. L. E. Leonard, Superintendent.
New Westminster, 704 Clarkson Street      1 _ , .  „    _       ,,  _ .   ,     ,    .
xt       m   i   ■    .       /ttt          j   *»•• • i     ;   „j «,    ,          CTi > Rout. MacDonald, Superintendent.
New Westminster   (Women s Division), 704 Clarkson Street  (
Nanaimo.. —        J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops    _     _J. E. Andrews, Superintendent.
Penticton     A. Coy, Superintendent.
Nelson           J.  M. Dronsfield,  Superintendent.
Prince George       - E. Victor Whiting, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert —     - — -J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
r G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets     \ R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets   W. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the twenty-first annual report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the
calendar year 1939.
The last quarter of the period under review finds Canada, a part of the British Commonwealth of Nations, at war with Germany. One of the reasons for the organization of
the Employment Service of Canada was to assist in the restoration to industrial life of the
men and women who had been engaged in the World War of 1914-18. After twenty-one
years, war has again changed the entire structure of our industrial life. Peace-time activities are subordinated to the necessities of production for war and every effort is made to
secure the employment of the maximum number of citizens, consistent with economical and
rapid production.
On October 16th, 1939, a meeting of officials of Provincial Governments was called in
Ottawa by the Hon. the Minister of Labour, which was well attended by representatives of
the different Provinces. The primary purpose was the co-ordination of the Employment
Service with other departments and with employers in order that the maximum results be
obtained in Canada's war effort. Consultations were held with officers of branches of Government connected directly with war services and also with representatives of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, from whom a considerable amount of useful information was
obtained. One of the decisions reached was for the Employment Service to carry on a special
registration of employed, unemployed, employable, and partially employable men in some
thirty-eight categories, having regard to their probable use in war industries.
Through the employment offices, relief officers, other Government agencies, and newspaper
publicity approximately 6,800 men were registered in this Province. This information was of
material assistance to the War Purchasing Board when awarding contracts and assisted, to
some extent, in the five ship-building companies in British Columbia obtaining contracts for
the construction of vessels.
At the end of 1939, although relief recipients had been reduced in number, there still
remained a large surplus of labour, of a wide range of occupations, the majority being
unfitted for employment in any war work which has so far been assigned to this part of
Canada.
In the annual report for the previous year reference was made to the influx of single,
transient, unemployed men and women, and of the steps taken to reduce this flow in the
following years by a system of deferred pay and allowing earnings sufficient only to pay the G 116 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
expenses of transferring the transients back to their own Provinces. This policy, coupled
with the fact that no relief camps were opened in the fall of 1939, greatly reduced the westward trek, with a complete absence of the disturbances that have been so prevalent in the
Coast area cities during previous years.
YOUTH TRAINING PLANS.
Under Dominion-Provincial agreement, Forestry and Mining Training Camps were
operated and, in the cities and towns, classes for young men were conducted in auto
mechanics, Diesel engineering, industrial electricity, frame house construction, carpentry and
joinery, painting and decorating, plastering, retail selling, and classes for young women in
dressmaking, power-machine operation, household training, waitresses, and commercial
refresher courses.
Classes were also carried on for aircraftsmen. The applicants accepted for this class
were men with high mental and physical qualifications and were also required to agree that,
on completion of the course, they would apply for enlistment in the Royal Canadian Air Force.
The direction of the programme of Youth Training was, under an agreement between the
Hon. the Minister of Labour and the Hon. the Minister of Education, entrusted to a committee consisting of representatives of the Department of Education and Department of
Labour, the Employment Service securing applicants and members of the staff acting on
committees of selection and the training being under the direction of the Technical Education
section of the Department of Education.
LOCAL WORK TEST, VANCOUVER.
The arrangement in the City of Vancouver whereby physically fit recipients of material
aid were required to work five days each month when called upon was continued throughout
the year. This produced 65,260 man-days' work at a value of $130,520, this figure being
based on the belief that the labour was only 50 per cent, efficient. This scheme is based on
the belief that persons in receipt of material aid are available for employment whenever
called upon and if not available that they have obtained employment. One hundred and
twenty-six persons who had applied for relief for the first time failed to appear when
instructed that they were required to work five days each month, and 361 others were cut
from the relief rolls because of their failure to perform the work required. In the larger
cities where it is difficult to keep track of persons in receipt of material aid, this scheme,
together with the one requiring registration for employment not less frequently than twice
per month, makes it more difficult for persons to receive material aid and at the same time
secure or continue in employment.
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS.
The primary industries—such as lumbering, metalliferous mining, fishing, and agriculture—continued active, with a corresponding activity in the secondary industries. Towards
the end of the year there were some dislocations due to the declaration of war but, on the
whole, the volume of employment was well sustained. Improved crop conditions in the
Prairie Provinces and the decision not to reopen camps for single men materially reduced the
flow of unemployed persons to this Province, with the result that opportunities for employment for our own citizens were improved.
The tables showing the work by offices and by months gives an indication of the operations as far as applicants, reapplicants, employers' orders, and placements are concerned, but
it is impossible to portray by figures the many activities and assignments the staff are called
upon to assume in addition to actual placement-work. There were 345,369 applications and
reapplications for employment during the year. Employers' orders total 46,195 and there
were 46,107 placements, with 153 transfers from one part of the Province to another.
HANDICAP SECTIONS.
Under an agreement between the Dominion and Provincial Governments, special sections
are maintained in the Vancouver and Victoria offices for handicapped ex-Service men and
for men handicapped through injuries received in industry. The members of the staff
assigned to these sections are employees of the Dominion Government and their salaries and
expenses are received from that source. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 117
This Province, for many years, has had a large surplus of physically fit men and the
principal industries are unable to absorb those injured in the industries. In addition, the
number of handicapped ex-Service men in British Columbia has steadily increased, there
being less than 5,000 in 1925 and 16,700 at the end of the period under review. The average
age of ex-Service men is now said to be slightly over 50 years and the disabilities of advancing age, added to war disabilities, makes the employment problem one of first magnitude.
In employment furnished by the State, ex-Service men are required, under the regulations,
to be given preference and certain other employers follow this rule for temporary employees
on seasonal work.
WOMEN'S DIVISION.
Separate offices for women applicants are maintained in Vancouver, Victoria, and New
Westminster. Extensive changes were made in Victoria, in a location separate from the
men's office and with an increased personnel. The establishment of an office for women in
New Westminster has resulted in an improved service to employers and workers in the
Fraser Valley.
As a result of the various activities of the staff of the Women's Divisions, conditions of
employment for women, and particularly those in domestic service, are improving. Opportunities for training under the Youth Training Plan and special courses for women already
engaged in domestic service are attracting a more efficient type of woman to this class of
work, but a great deal of educational work remains to be done among both employers and
workers, the personnel in the latter group, for various reasons, being in a constant state of
flux. Reference to this subject would not be complete without an expression of thanks to
the many women's organizations which have assisted materially in improving the working
conditions of women.
IMPORTATION OF LABOUR.
For many years there has been a close working arrangement between the Employment
Service and the Department of Immigration, under which applications for importation of
labour are referred to our offices for a report as to whether the labour required is available
in Canada. With the large number of unemployed we have had in this country in recent
years, applications for the importation of aliens has been discouraged, except in cases of
men of specialized knowledge and, in those cases, on the understanding that Canadians were
to be trained to fill the requirements. This policy has become widely known among employers,
with the result that there has been a marked decrease in the number of applications during
the past year. The Department of Immigration has, of course, the responsibility for the final
decision, but finds the wider knowledge of the Employment Service officers on employment
questions of material assistance.
CONCLUSION.
Completing twenty-one years of service in post-war, normal, depression, pre-war, and
war conditions, the Employment Service has been required to meet a wider variety of conditions and material changes in its functions. From its inception, both the Dominion and
Provincial Governments have adhered to a policy of equal opportunity, regardless of race,
creed, colour, or political affiliations and, though at times it has been difficult to convince
some citizens that this policy is adhered to, its wisdom is now conceded and its application
approved. Acting as a link between employers and workmen, many situations arise that
require not only a reputation for fair dealing but experience in the solution of industrial
problems. Whatever success has been achieved is due to the loyal co-operation of members
of the staff and the assistance many other branches have given. G 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BUSINESS  TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1939.
Office.
Kamloops	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Penticton	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver (Men)	
Vancouver (Women)
Victoria (Men)	
Victoria (Women)....
Totals	
Applications
and
Reapplications.
4,667
6,811
2,991
13,842
7,679
510
4,971
235,058
41,558
18,269
9,013
345,369
Employers'
Orders.
1,114
5,239
2,084
1,184
968
333
854
23,908
4,996
3,141
2,374
Placements.
46,195
1,097
5,232
2,081
1,183
956
308
854
23,892
4,995
3,136
2,373
46,107
Transfers
in B.C.
26
1
2
97
24
153
Transfers
out of B.C.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1939.
Month.
Applications
and
Reapplications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December.—
30,329
33,313
37,591
27,551
26,248
33,800
24,375
20,358
29,655
22,821
25,384
33,944
Totals .
345,369
3,857
6,040
5,967
3,203
3,515
5,172
2,907
3,352
3,921
2,724
2,655
2,882
T6.195"
3,856
6,035
5,957
3,194
3,512
5,164
2,895
3,331
3,910
2,729
2,626
2,898
46,107
6
3
10
12
16
23
12
11
8
25
14
13 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 119
REPORT OF ADMINISTRATOR OF UNEMPLOYMENT
RELIEF, 1939.
There was a substantial improvement in the relief situation for the calendar year 1939.
The number of those in employment increased substantially in the summer months. The
index number of employment by economic areas (taking the average for the calendar year
1926 at 100) for the lowest month was 96.2 on February 1st, 1939, this figure being the same
for the low month for the previous year on March 1st, 1938. The peak month was October
1st, 1939, when the index reached 118.7, as compared with the peak month of 1938 when the
index was 112. The largest number of employables and dependents receiving material aid
was in February, 1939, 69,560 as compared with the peak month of March, 1938, when assistance was granted to 70,799. The all-time peak was in March, 1933, when 128,858 were
assisted. The lowest number assisted in any one month in 1939 was 36,603 in October, as
compared with the low month of September, 1938, at 51,677. This shows that there were
15,000 more individuals on a self-supporting basis than in the previous year.
The Province continued to pay 80 per cent, of the cost of material aid afforded to
municipal residents and the full cost of material aid to Provincial and transient cases residing
within municipal limits. Assistance received from the Federal Government was in the form
of a monthly grant-in-aid of $115,000 per month to March 31st, 1939. After that date a new
agreement provided that the Dominion would pay 40 per cent, of the actual expenditures made
for material aid to residents of the Province and 50 per cent, for transients.
In March, 1939, this Department resumed responsibility for all unemployable cases transferred to Municipal and Provincial Welfare Departments in 1938 and, in addition, for all
unemployables previously dealt with as a full charge to municipal or Provincial funds. The
basis of reimbursement to the municipalities is 80 per cent, of the cost for municipal cases and
100 per cent, for Provincial cases residing in municipalities.
Registration.—Since August 1st, 1934, when a re-registration took place, a total of
107,353 applications for assistance has been received. This is made up of the following categories: Standard, 78,816; farmer, 6,785; transient,. 15,409; unemployables, 6,343; each
application representing either a head of family or single person.
Assistance to Settlers Plan.—The agreement entered into with the Federal Department of
Agriculture on April 1st, 1937, was revived and extended to March 31st, 1940. During the
year assistance was afforded to 364 farmers. The type of assistance provided to these
families consisted principally in the supplying of farm animals, machinery and implements,
explosives, seeds and fertilizer, fluming material, and harness. Subsistence was also provided without any road-work being required so that those helped could devote their whole
time to farm-work. The number of new cases accepted during the year was 119 and the
total number of active cases at the end of the year was 251. Since the inception of this plan,
173 settlers have become self-supporting.
Forestry Training Plan.—Agreements were entered into with the Federal Government on
a similar basis to 1938, providing for the training in forestry-work of youths in necessitous
circumstances between the ages of 18 and 25, inclusive. Under the Youth Training Agreement, 305 youths were enrolled while 555 were accepted under the National Forestry Agreement, making a total of 860 young men given training. This work was carried out by the
Forest Branch, Department of Lands. One hundred and forty were given training as ranger
assistants and 20 as game warden assistants, the balance being used in small crews on trail
construction and repairs, forest-stand improvements, building construction, nursery-work, etc.
The total man-days' work performed was 61,563. During the training period, 42 enrollees
secured employment, 52 enlisted for active service, 25 left for advance education, 19 left
through injury or sickness, 33 quit for no specific reason, 20 were discharged, and 669 were
laid off on the termination of the project. Uniforms were issued to all enrollees excepting
ranger assistants, half of the cost being borne by the Government. During the past five
years, 3,100 young men have received the advantages of practical forest training in this
Province.
Mining Training Plan.—We continued this form of training during the current year
under the Dominion-Provincial Youth Training Agreement, the nature of the training undertaken being geology, mineralogy, ore-deposits, mapping, placer-mining, woodsmanship, hand- G 120 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
drilling, field-cooking, etc. A total of 228 students were enrolled, and of the 159 who completed the training 111 were successful in passing their examinations and received certificates
of proficiency according to grade. Preliminary training was offered at Emory Creek and of
the more proficient 50 were given an advance course and 80 sent out on prospecting parties.
Subsequently 16 selected students were used to explore for war minerals, making test-pits,
surveying and analysis of known deposits.
Farm Placement.—Under a separate agreement with the Federal Government a total of
246 single homeless persons were placed on farms for the winter months, there being 235
males and 11 females. They were given an allowance of an average of $7.50 per month and
$5 to the farmer to assist him in paying for board and, in addition, a certain amount of
clothing was provided. The males were used for general farm labour and the females for
housework and light farm chores.
Municipal Improvements Projects.—Under an agreement with the Federal Department of
Labour, provision was made whereby the two Governments offered to assist any municipality
desiring to carry out Municipal Projects by paying for the cost of " direct labour," the men
to be selected from the ranks of the unemployed. A total of 47 projects was authorized. The
average number of men employed per month was 1,318 and the work consisted of construction
and improving of parks, cemeteries, streets, waterworks, public buildings, etc. The total
number of man-days afforded-was 143,215. Municipalities were required to pay for all administration, supervision, material, and equipment costs.
Winter Works Projects.—Under two agreements entered into with the Federal Department of Labour, work was provided for single homeless men during the winter months of
1938-39, the total number employed on Forest Development Projects being 2,798 and on Public
Works Projects 1,310, making a total of 4,108. The rate of pay and type of work done was
similar to that of previous years.
Summer Works Projects.—Due to the accumulation of single homeless men in Vancouver,
projects were operated for approximately six weeks in the summer of 1939 when a total of
1,087 were employed on Forest Development Projects under the Single Homeless Men's Agreement and 417 under the Rehabilitation Agreement, making a total of 1,504.
Youth Training Agreements.—In addition to the training provided under the Forestry
and Mining Schedules, many classes in Occupational and Physical Training were operated.
Under the Urban Occupational Training Plan, under the administration of the Department of
Education, 833 young men and 1,181 young women were given training. Under the Rural
Occupational Training Schedule, a total of 1,194 were enrolled. Physical training was
afforded to 9,488 unemployed persons.
The following is a list showing the total numbers assisted under the various plans,
exclusive of Municipal Improvements Projects:—
Forestry Training—
National Forestry Plan       555
Youth Forestry Training Plan       145
Ranger Assistants        140
Game Warden Assistants .         20
      860
Mining Training—
(a.)   Emory Creek only         98
(6.)  Advanced training         50
(c.)  Prospecting           80
       228
(d.)  War Minerals—16 students drawn from (6).
Assistance to Settlers         360
Farm Placement—
January to April—
Men        304
Women          11
       315 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 121
Farm Placement—Continued.
October to December—
Men   -  153
Women   11
164
479
Single Homeless Men—
Winter Projects—
F.D.P.      2,798
P.W.D.     1,310
4,108
Summer Projects—F.D.P.     1,087
Rehabilitation        417
1,504
5,612
Physical Training—
January to March     2,980
April to December    6,508
9,488
Urban Occupational Training—
Men        833
Women     1,181
    2,014
Rural Occupational Training I    1,194
Details of all expenditures made in connection with Unemployment Relief appear in the
Annual Report of the Department of Public Works and the Annual Public Accounts Statement of the Department of Finance.
E. W. Griffith,
Administrator. G 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of British Columbia, 1939.
(As compiled from returns received from the field.)
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
January.
Organized Territory—
10,073
513
118
26,859
1,436
299
36,932
1,949
417
6,389
432
59
•
6,389
432
36
3,709
90
91
12,199
350
186
Unorganized Territory—
15,908
440
1,774
76
105
1,774
76
46
224
113
732
264
956
249
1,530
668
162
1,460
650
249
Unemployables—
907
351
1,793
703
4,230
1,722
162
Camps—
1,460
650
Totals  —	
16,067
44,575
13,554
74,196
February.
Organized Territory—
10,554
556
118
28,227
1,529
315
38,781
2,085
433
6,209
460
55
6,209
460
26
4,099
90
61
13,324
334
142
Unorganized Territory—
17,423
424
1,936
81
137
1 936
49
235
81
122
749
308
984
294
1,487
650
176
2,126
900
294
Unemployables—
875
346
1,738
696
4,100
1,692
Camps—
2,126
900
Totals 	
16.948
47,095
14,511
78 554 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 123
Statement of Relief, 1939
—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
March.
Organized Territory-
10,543
573
121
28,177
1,563
325
38,720
2,136
446
4,863
494
33
4,863
494
33
4,291
94
92
13,944
348
158
Unorganized Territory—
18,235
442
2,042
109
141
2,042
109
55
241
154
752
Farm improvement and employment	
294
1,544
635
161
1,710
950
294
Unemployables—
85 S
353
1,671
711
4,073
1,699
161
Camps—
Hospital   . _.  .,  -  	
Single Men Forestry Development Projects	
1,710
Single Men Public Works Projects 	
950
'
17,162
47,737
12,976
77,875
April.
Organized Territory—
10,240
515
104
26,923
1,441
291
37,163
1,956
395
3,955
493
55
3,955
493
42
44
3,943
90
90
113
123
13,025
279
328
210
167
Unorganized Territory—
369
418
1,950
77
282
1,950
77
Emergency     	
42
186
109
633
433
819
212
2,798
1,467
136
1,232
503
35
212
Unemployables—
Municipal -   	
1,409
723
2,659
1,544
6,866
3,734
Camps—
136
1,232
503
35
Totals                         —
17,428
47,468
13,195
78,091 G 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief, 1939—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
May.
Organized Territory—
9,561
473
102
25,101
1,315
270
34,662
1,788
372
3,434
459
36
3,434
459
16
42
3,577
80
80
60
110
11,862
243
308
112
152
Unorganized Territory—
15,439
323
388
1,720
78
181
1,720
78
Emergency   	
38
198
1,407
748
104
643
2,645
1,630
323
841
Unemployables—
2,814
1,466
120
110
80
108
6,866
3,844
120
Camps—
110
80
108
Totals                       —
16,322
44,291
10,606
71,219
June.
Organized Territory—-
8,922
425
91
23,550
1,187
237
32,472
1,612
328
4,705
436
54
4,705
1             	
436
9
43
3,145
74
63
23
120
10,227
238
245
86
163
Unorganized Territory—
13,372
312
308
1,414
68
245
1,414
68
38
221
1,395
773
86
734
2,605
1,742
369
955
Unemployables—
2,776
1,483
125
1,250
40
135
230
6,776
3,998
125
Camps—
Hospital —   _
Single Men Forestry Development Projects
1,250
40
135
230
15,199
40,994
12,961
69,154 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 193S
t
G 125
Statement of Relief, 1939
—Continued.
Direct Relief.
Numbers.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
July.
Organized Territory—
Resident families   	
8,380
401
78
21,787
1,089
191
30,167
1,490
269
3,231
428
80
115
12,236
291
267
1,274
70
285
1,010
6,632
4,066
127
1,392
275
425
175
3,231
428
41
12
32
2,893
73
5.3
27
83
9,343
218
214
Unorganized Territory—
1,274
70
176
Emergency  -	
29
229
1,368
790
80
781
2,596
1,746
Unemployables—
2,668
1,520
127
1,392
275
425
175
Camps—
Single Men Forestry Development Projects
Young Men's Forestry Training Projects	
Totals	
14,338
38,155
11,802
64,295
August.
Organized Territory—
Resident families    ,.
Provincial families _— —-    _
7,728
357
73
19,694
967
181
27,422
1,324
254
2,501
383
48
116
10,894
271
254
1,472
71
182
937
6,376
4,136
125
510
285
518
170
2,501
383
9
11
31
2,588
66
51
28
85
8,306
205
203
Unorganized Territory—
Transient families 	
1,472
71
94
Single women  - —
62
720
2,441
1,825
26
217
1,306
846
Unemployables—
2,629
1,465
125
510
285
'    518
170
Camps—
Single Men Forestry Development Projects	
13,300
34,717
10,232
58,249 G 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief, 1939—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Belief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
September.
Organized Territory—
6,514
289
63
16,343
772
174
22,857
1,061
3,139
38G
18
237
3,139
380
16
30
2,245
49
45
40
83
7,039
152
178
74
313
Unorganized Territory—
9,284
201
223
1,003
58
78
1,003
58
21
219
1,303
836
72
719
2,437
1,821
171
938
Unemployables—
2,634
1,492
121
11
295
521
16
6,374
4,149
121
Camps—
11
295
National Forestry Projects	
Mining Training	
16
Totals 	
11,630
29,830
9,766
51,226
October.
Organized Territory—
5,736
253
46
14,130
634
121
19,866
4,050
372
19
4 050
14
26
2,094
41
42
35
70
6,433
139
169
Unorganized Territory—
Resident families	
Municipal families   	
180
Transient families  	
1,017
52
105
1,017
52
185
16
2
212
1,324
813
64
6
705
2,439
1,895
Enemy aliens— _	
917
6,485
4,237
120
Nil
2S
16
Unemployables—
2,722
1,529
120
Nil
23
16
Provincial	
Camps—■
National Forestry Projects      	
Mining Training
Totals..	
10,619
26,840
10,025
47,484 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 127
Statement of Relief, 1939—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
November.
Organized Territory—
6,202
283
42
15,322
752
96
21,524
1,035
138
5,167
394
26
5,167
394
Emergency   	
24
23
2,301
50
49
64
66
7,229
171
200
114
89
Unorganized Territory—
9,530
221
249
1,113
54
131
1,113
54
Emergency — . 	
27
202
1,341
844
62
679
2,384
1,952
220
881
Un em p loy ables—
Municipal.	
2,761
1,555
134
16
6,486
4,351
Camps—
134
16
Totals                                      -	
11,388
2R 977                          11.351
51,716
December.
Organized Territory—
6,909
358
42
17,503
1,003
110
24,412
1,361
5,813
401
25
152
5,813
401
Emergency -  	
27
22
2,735
61
54
95
60
8,773
216
210
147
82
Unorganized Territory—
11,508
277
264
Single men  	
1,337
59
108
1,337
59
35
209
89
704
232
913
119
2,758
1,574
138
16
119
Unemployables—
1,299
854
2,304
1,984
6,361
4,412
Camps—
138
16
Totals                                      -	
12,605
33,051
12,348
58,004 G 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ANNUAL REPORT OF APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH, 1939.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee.
3. A. Ward Bell, Chairman.
Adam Bell.
Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton Crisford .
Thomas V. Berto....
J. F. Keen.
James Thomson.
 Director of Apprenticeship.
  Assistant Director.
The year 1939 shows a steady increase in the number of apprenticeship contracts in
force, 368 new contracts being executed during this period; of these, 288 were in Group A,
trades designated under the " Apprenticeship Act," and 80 in Group B, occupations
undesignated.
One hundred and twenty-one apprentices completed their apprenticeship contracts to the
satisfaction of their employers, making a total of 211 completed contracts since the Act came
into force.
In connection with the war, His Majesty's armed forces and war-time industries have
made a distinct demand for young men who have completed their apprenticeship terms;
a demand that, owing to lack of apprenticeship regulations until 1936, we have been unable
to meet.
The enlistment of apprentices under unexpired indentures has not been encouraged by
either the Navy, Army, or Air Force up to the present. In spite of this, we have at the
present time 27 indentured apprentices serving with one or other of the armed services.
These contracts have been marked as " in abeyance " pending continuation or disposal at
some future date.
It is an increasing source of gratification to note the higher educational standing of lads
now entering upon apprenticeships.
For some years it was the general belief that sufficient knowledge of the basic trades
could be obtained entirely from courses established by technical and trade schools. In modern
apprenticeship the value of school training, both before and during the apprenticeship period,
cannot be disputed; but the necessity for apprenticeship still remains, as it is the effective
application of knowledge to the practices of modern industry that is learned and perfected
during the apprenticeship period that contributes so largely to successful craftsmanship and
that gives it its earning capacity, which otherwise is negligible.
The realization of this fact accounts for the low commencing wage with regular progressive increases every six months that appear in practically all apprenticeship contracts,
and it is the desire to establish their earning capacity that attracts the intelligent section of
our young people towards apprenticeship, and makes them not only willing to bind themselves to an occupation for a number of years but to apply themselves both on and off the job
to the collection of knowledge and, particularly on the job, to its effective application and to
the attainment of craftsmanship and speed.
The reports coming in from employers in regard to apprentices who are now completing
or will shortly complete their time are most encouraging.
There appears to be very little doubt that the majority will be well equipped to fend for
themselves in the future and will form the nucleus of young craftsmen trained within our
own borders upon which the industrial development of this Province may well depend.
The appended table gives the standing of controlled apprenticeship in various trades and
occupations as at December 31st, 1939.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939.
G 129
APPRENTICESHIP CONTRACTS IN FORCE.
Group A.
Occupations designated as Trades under the " Apprenticeship Act."
Automobile mechanics 	
Automobile metalwork 	
Automobile-painting	
Automobile-tire repairing
Automobile-trimming   	
No. in
Force,
- 91
. 29
.. 8
.      6
1
Automobile woodworking     1
Aviation  mechanics  —-   -   12
Boiler-making      14
Carpentry        110
Druggists       76
Electrical appliances  15
Electrical  work   .  13
Electrical  work—construction   2
Electrical work—shop   17
Ironworker 	
Jewellery work
Lithography  	
Machinists   	
Moulding	
No. in
Force.
       1
  16
   13
   145
.   36
   16
 _ 10
        1
Plumbing and steam-fitting _    38
Sheet-metal working  _ 43
Ship and boat building  24
Sign and pictorial painting  ___ 11
Total     749
Painting and decorating
Pattern-making  __	
Plastering    	
Group B.
Occupations not yet designated under the " Apprenticeship Act"
Bakers and cooks
Barbers   __	
Blacksmiths	
Bookbinders 	
Bricklayers   —	
Business-machine mechanics .
Butter-making	
Carpet and linoleum layer ....
Chocolate-dippers    	
Clerk, automotive—wholesale
Confectioner    	
Dressmaking    	
Fur-finishers   	
Furniture-manufacturing   „ —
Gardeners     	
Hairdressers   	
Hardware clerk -   ,
Lead-burners     	
Grand total of contracts now in force
Total  apprenticeships  completed  	
No. in
Force.
: is
.    24
2
1
2
2
4
1
3
Q
2
6
AG
1
11
No. in
Force.
Millinery   	
Photo-finisher   	
Pipe-fitters  	
Retail lumberman
Saw-filers   	
Seedsman   	
Shipper, vegetable industry
Shoe-repairing   	
Tailoring    	
Upholsterers      	
Watch-repairing   	
Welders  	
Wholesale hardware
Woodworking   	
Zinc light and glazing department
Total..
159
908
211 G 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT."
J. A. Ward Bell    Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton  _ _ _ Administrative Officer.
Hamilton  Crisford      Secretary.
This Act provides for the compulsory registration of any school or place, or any course of
study carried on by correspondence, teaching or purporting to teach the skill and knowledge
requisite for or intended for use in any industrial or commercial occupation, calling, or
vocation.
The Act came into force on January 1st, 1937, and, therefore, has now completed three
years of operation.
During this period practically all the abuses hitherto existing in the sale of trade education have been eliminated.
At the present time tuition, either practical or correspondence, is available to residents
of British Columbia through registered schools in the following occupations:—
Accountancy. Kindergarten work.
Agriculture. Mechanical engineering.
Aircraft engineering. Mining.
Air-conditioning. Modern merchandising.
Applied art. Navigation.
Architecture. Paper-manufacture.
Automotive engineering. . Pharmacy.
Barbering. Plumbing and heating.
Business training. Radio and television.
Chemistry. Railroad operation.
Civil engineering. Refrigeration.
Domestic science. Salesmanship.
Diesel engineering. Short-story writing.
Draughting and design. Show-card writing.
Dressmaking. Steam engineering.
Electrical engineering. Textile manufacture. -
Hairdressing. Welding.
Highway engineering.
This tuition can now be purchased without fear of exploitation and at reasonable rates.
The past year-has indicated that the few cases of dissatisfaction that have been brought
to our notice have been caused by a total lack of knowledge of the conditions under which
tuition can be sold and a willingness to sign any form of contract without being conversant
with the contents. Regulations promulgated under the Act cannot eliminate dissatisfaction
of this kind.
Prospective purchasers of tuition are therefore urged to give careful thought to the type
of school or course best suited to their own individual needs, to make sure that the school is
registered under the provisions of the Act, and to make themselves conversant with the regulations under which tuition can be sold, before enrolling or signing any form of contract.
If this is done there should be no cause for complaint, as undoubtedly the Act has resulted
in clearing up a situation that was very undesirable, and in this has received the wholehearted support of the general public and of practically all bona-fide schools.
As a result there has been the demand for similar legislation throughout the Dominion,
and similar Acts are upon the Statutes of the following Provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan,
Manitoba, Ontario, and Nova Scotia.
The following is a brief outline of the Act and the General Regulations in connection
therewith:—
DEFINITIONS UNDER ACT.
" Trade " means the skill and knowledge requisite or intended for use in an industrial or
commercial occupation, calling, or vocation.
" Trade-school" means any school or place or any course of study by correspondence,
wherein or whereby any trade is taught or purported to be taught. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 131
REGISTRATION.
" No person shall keep or operate any trade-school in the Province unless he is registered
pursuant to this Act."
Application for registration shall be in writing in such form and with such particulars
as the Minister of Labour may prescribe.
Before registration is granted, the operator of a trade-school must satisfy the Minister
of Labour that the school is provided with an adequate course of instruction, carried on under
proper supervision, with sufficient facilities or equipment, and that tuition fees are reasonable.
REGULATIONS.
The following general regulations apply to every trade-school in respect to which no
special regulations have been issued.
(a.)  Advertising.—The following forms of advertising are prohibited:—
(1.)   The use of advertising which may tend to mislead:
(2.)   The use of the " Help Wanted" or other employment columns of any publication:
(3.)   Advertisements which fail to give the name and address of the school or of its
authorized local agent:
(4.)   Broadcasts by radio, unless conforming strictly to the regulations and an exact
copy kept on file as part of the school's records.
The operator or proprietor of a trade-school may be required to discontinue any specified
advertisement or means of advertising.
(6.) Student Services and Labour.—A trade-school must not be operated jointly with a
shop or other commercial business.
Student services, or articles produced by student labour, must not be sold or offered for
sale by the keeper or operator of a trade-school, or by any person connected therewith, but
shall remain the property of the student.
(c.) Provincial Statutes governing Health, Sanitation, and Safety.—It shall be the duty
of the proprietor or operator of every trade-school to see that all Provincial Statutes are
complied with in every respect, upon and within the school premises.
SPECIAL REGULATIONS.
Special regulations have been issued covering the following types of trade-schools:—-
(a.)  Correspondence and home-study.
(6.)   Barbering.
(c.)   Hairdressing.
FEES FOR REGISTRATION.
The annual fees for registration of a trade-school in respect to which no special regulations have been issued are as follows:—
In case only one trade or occupation is to be taught, $5 per annum.
If more than one trade or occupation is to be taught, $5 in respect of one such trade
and $2 in respect of each additional trade or occupation, with a maximum total
fee of $25 per annum.
Registration covers the current calendar year and must be renewed on the 1st day of
January of each calendar year, or within thirty days thereof.
PENALTIES.
The Act provides for penalties of not more than $500 if a corporation, or $250 if a
natural person, upon summary conviction, for the following infractions:—
(a.)  Keeping or operating a trade-school when not registered pursuant to the Act:
(b.)  Giving instruction in a trade not specified in the certificate of registration:
(c.)   Entering into any contract for the furnishing of instruction in any trade other
than the contract set out in the application for registration, or a contract not
approved by the Minister:
(d.)  Failing to comply with any regulation made by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council under the provisions of the Act. G 132
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION.
In addition to the foregoing penalties, the Act provides that if the Minister is satisfied
that any school is provided with insufficient means of instruction, or that charges made for
instruction given are unreasonable, or that any regulation pursuant to the provisions of this
Act is not observed therein, he may cancel the registration, and thereupon the registration
and the certificate thereof shall be null and void.
ADMINISTRATION OFFICES.
The Administration Offices are situated on the Fifth Floor of the Hall Building, 789
Pender Street West, Vancouver, British Columbia, where registration application forms and
further information may be obtained.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1939. G 133
SAFETY BRANCH.
Department of Labour,
720 Belmont Building,
Victoria, B.C., February 29th, 1940.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I submit the report on the work of the Safety Branch of the Department of Labour
for the year 1939.
The Safety Branch, as first instructed by the Honourable the Minister of Labour, has
continued to assist and encourage the logging operators in their efforts toward accident prevention. It has worked in close co-operation with the safety administration of the Workmen's
Compensation Board and encouraged the workmen on the job to be careful. An endeavour
has been made to foster a spirit of co-operation between the employer, the employee, the
Workmen's Compensation Board, and the Safety Branch. It is believed that peace in the
individual camp, as well as in the industry as a whole, is essential to safety. An honest and
sincere accident-prevention programme is the major factor in preserving peace and harmony
in the industry, as well as being of prime importance in reducing human suffering and sorrow,
including loss of life.
The accepted yardstick for measuring the cost of accidents is four times the visible cost.
The logging operators realize the tremendous cost of accidents and are anxious to do what
they can to reduce that cost. This is reasonable, if considered only from a business standpoint.
However, past experience with many operators shows that the humanitarian side of an accident affects them severely.
The Safety Adviser met the British Columbia Loggers' Association at a special meeting
in Vancouver, and asked the members to consider the advisability of some definite action
being taken toward accident prevention. It was suggested to them that each large operator
appoint one man in his camp to take charge of safety matters. This suggestion was received
with favour by the members of the Association and was immediately accepted in principle.
Since the start of 1939, many of the Association operators have employed safety directors.
Others have given instructions to their superintendent or foreman to pay particular attention to accident prevention. This was an important step forward, because the operators
assumed the responsibility that is rightfully theirs. As each camp presents its own accident-
prevention problems there is no doubt they can be dealt with best by each individual operator.
After several investigations of fatal accidents, caused by falling limbs or other small
objects, the Safety Branch realized that the hard hats, such as worn by miners, would prevent
this type of accident. The safety hat was, therefore, recommended by the Safety Branch to
the operators and to the workmen. In March, 1939, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Limited, provided safety hats for their employees. Some difficulty was experienced in getting the workmen to use the equipment, and during the first month they were used in the camp, six
accidents occurred which might have resulted in serious injuries had not the men been
wearing safety hats. Since that time there have been several other injuries prevented by the
hats. A large number of camps purchased a few of them for trial, but difficulty has been
found in getting the men to wear them. The Safety Branch has continued with the hard-hat
campaign, and it is hoped that the hats will soon become general equipment in all logging
camps. Their introduction and use into the camps is the second definite step forward in the
work of the Safety Branch.
Due to efforts made by the Safety Branch, four men from British Columbia attended the
Western Safety Conference, which was held in Oakland, California, from November 12th to
16th, 1939. The Safety Adviser represented the British Columbia Government at this Conference. Mr. J. Taylor, Chief Inspector, represented the Workmen's Compensation Board.
Mr. W. D. Jenkins, Safety Director, attended for the British Columbia Lumber and Shingle
Manufacturers' Association. Mr. Ted Parkinson, Safety Director of the Franklin River
Operation, represented the Bloedel, Stewart & Welch Company. This representation from
our Province showed the growing interest in accident-prevention work. The Safety Adviser
was appointed Vice-Chairman of the Lumber Section, as well as discussion leader in logging G 134 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
accident-prevention problems. During the five days the Conference was in session he attended
fifteen lumber and logging meetings, seven safety lectures, and was chosen to take part in an
open forum discussion on accidents, which was broadcast over the Mutual network. The
Safety Adviser was elected Chairman of the Lumber Section for the 1940 Conference.
To encourage the interest in first-aid work in logging camps, the Safety Branch offered
a large trophy to the best logging first-aid team on Vancouver Island. In September, a first-
aid competition was held at Duncan, B.C., in which six logging teams competed. The Department of Labour trophy was won by the first-aid team of the Comox Logging & Railway
Company, Headquarters Camp. From the commendation received from many sources regarding the Safety Branch taking an interest in and encouraging first aid to the injured, it
appears that such was the third important .step taken in 1939.
During 1939, 1,000 large, coloured, accident-prevention posters were sent out to the
logging camps. As soon as new camps registered with the Workmen's Compensation Board,
the posters and other safety information were forwarded to them by the Safety Branch. It
was subsequently decided that small bulletins should be issued monthly to the camps, instead
of posters, in order to get safety warnings to the workmen. The Safety Branch sent out
4,500 such bulletins, which contained up-to-date information on the accident experience of the
industry and valuable accident-prevention suggestions. Many encouraging comments were
received from operators, safety workers, and the loggers to whom they were sent.
The Safety Branch made 314 special calls in 1939. Forty-six inspections were made in
logging camps, including those camps in the Queen Charlotte Islands and camps along the
Canadian National Railway, from McBride to Prince Rupert. Thirty-one inquests into
logging fatalities were attended by the Safety Adviser. Six safety meetings were held by
the Safety Branch, at which the B.C. Loggers' Association, the Workmen's Compensation
Board, and the Safety Branch were represented. Thirty-one other safety meetings, including
camp safety committee meetings, were attended.
Considering the record production of logs in 1939, as compared with other years, it can
be said conservatively that the accident situation during the year in British Columbia logging
camps was better than in previous years. The Safety Branch has no definite figures regarding employment in the camps, but can estimate it quite accurately from the production, which
generally runs 1,000 feet log-scale per man per day. Accepted authorities on accident prevention say that results of a safety campaign cannot be definitely arrived at in a lesser period
than five years, but with constant application of safety principles a gradual reduction in the
frequency and severity of accidents is bound to come.
The Labour Department's efforts have already produced a decided change in the attitude
of the logging industry toward accident prevention. Both the operators and men have become
much more sympathetic toward the safety work. Some are still skeptical, but a large majority believe it is possible to improve the accident rate. This alone is worth every dollar spent
and every effort made in the interest of safety in the woods.
Respectfully submitted.
Charles Pearse,
Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.  

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