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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1939

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
EEPOET
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR  THE   YEAR  ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1938
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OP  THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letters of Transmittal 5, 6
Reports—
Game Commission     7
Game Wardens, "A" Division    9
Officer Commanding " B " Division  11
Officer Commanding " C " Division  15
Officer Commanding " D " Division  22
Game Wardens, " E " Division  26
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-38, inclusive  29
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer (Game) Tags  30
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms Licences  32
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences  33
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' Licences  35
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on Fur  36
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-38, inclusive  37
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been collected, 1921-38, inclusive  38
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected
during Year 1938  39
.     List of Confiscated Fur, 1938  40
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1938, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur and
Firearms  41
Bounties paid, 1938    42
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-38, inclusive  42
Revenue—Big Game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1938  43
Prosecutions, 1938  49
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1938  51
Statement—Migratory and Non-game Birds banded during 1938 by Representatives
of the Game Commission  52
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping)  Firearms Licences, Season
1937-38  52
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1938  52
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1938  53
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1938  53
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1938, also showing Revenue from Sale of
Bird-bands  53
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1938  55
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1938  66
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1938  69  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1938.
GORDON S. WISMER,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1939. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1939.
Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
31st, 1938.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
Members, Game Commission. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1938.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
For administrative purposes the Province is divided into five divisions with an Inspector
in charge of each division. These officials have supervision over a number of Game Wardens
and Fishery Officers who are continually on patrol of their respective districts.
All members of the British Columbia Police are ex-officio Game Wardens, and we are
very pleased indeed to report that all of the personnel of the British Columbia Police have
furnished us with full co-operation in our work of game conservation.
We are again pleased to advise that during the year we have made it a point to attend
as many meetings of the numerous Game Conservation Associations as possible. We have
also continued our educational work in the showing of game and fish films to many associations, clubs, schools, etc., throughout the Province. During the year our educational films
were shown to eighty-two organizations and approximately 15,000 people.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
Trappers generally throughout the Province seem to be more impressed with our system
of trap-line registration than ever before. The co-operation of all registered trappers is not
only most encouraging but is very greatly appreciated. Fur-bearing animals are increasing
and our annual output of fur varies but little, indicating that the true intent of our trapping
system—namely, the farming of fur—is being carried out.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
The regulations covering the registration of guides will undoubtedly have to be considerably changed, as at present it is apparent that more direct control over, and a proper classification of, guides is very necessary. It is most difficult, however, owing to the large country
and diversified opinions and conditions prevailing in the different game districts, to draw up
suitable and workable regulations that will ensure big-game guides of fair and just treatment
and we propose to carefully survey the whole question before recommending any changes in
the present regulations.
FUR-FARMING.
During the past few years fur-farming, especially those residents engaged in the farming
of mink, has increased. A large number of new fur-farming permits have been issued this
year and some idea of the number of fur-bearing animals pelted during the year and the
number of live animals on hand at the conclusion of the year is to be found in statements
contained in this report.
BIRD-BANDING.
As in past years, we have continued, in co-operation with the National Parks Bureau, to
operate a bird-banding station at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, near Chilliwack.
A fairly large number of ducks were humanely captured at this station and released after
being banded with special numbered bands supplied by the U.S. Biological Survey of the
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. The scientific data obtained from these bird-
banding operations over a period of years are most helpful in our game-conservation work.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
On page 42 will be found particulars of bounties paid during the year and on page 53 a
statement showing vermin destroyed by Game Wardens who continued to carry out instructions issued to them in this regard.
We have again followed the policy of supplying shotgun ammunition to many Game
Associations in the Province for use in the destruction of vermin, and the results obtained
have been most gratifying. PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
The policy of advertising the possibilities of big-game hunting and fishing in the Province has again been carried out, and while the number of big-game hunters from outside has
not increased over last year at the same time there has been a very noticeable increase in
the number of non-resident fishermen.
We would like to again point out that there would seem to be no reason why we should
not continue to encourage outsiders to come to this Province for the purpose of enjoying our
wonderful hunting and fishing, as our stand of game and fish will not be depleted and we
will be bringing in thousands of dollars to the people of the Province.
GAME PROPAGATION.
We have had to advise all licensed game-bird farmers in the Province not to increase
their output of pheasants, as the supply is reaching such proportions we are afraid we will
be unable to purchase all the pheasants that might be raised. The number of birds purchased
and liberated during the year was 15,930, an increase of 3,624 over the preceding year. Out
of the total birds purchased only 300 were obtained outside of the Province.
Details of pheasants liberated are to be found on page 53 of this report.
As in past years, we have continued the trapping of beaver alive on the Bowron Lake
Game Reserve, near Barkerville, and the animals so trapped have been moved without being
injured in any way to other sections of the Province and there liberated when we have had
assurance that they will be protected.
Very favourable reports of the benefits derived from the Game Reserves throughout the
Province have again been received. These game reserves are a very important and necessary
factor in keeping up the stand of game in the surrounding country.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Our stand of migratory game birds has shown a marked improvement in every section of
the Province and it is sincerely hoped that the Dominion authorities will next year grant
our repeated request for a slightly longer open hunting season, especially in view of an
extended open season being allowed in the various zones in the United States, where there
are far more hunters than we have throughout our Dominion and where naturally the annual
catch greatly exceeds our take of birds in Canada.
REVENUE.
We are again pleased to be in a position to report an increase in our revenue this year.
Revenue increased $5,519.13 over the preceding year.
GAME FISH CULTURE.
Upon referring to pages 55-65 of this report, a statement showing liberations of trout
and kokanee from the various hatcheries controlled or subsidized by the Game Department is
to be found.
A committee was formed some time ago to deal with the matter of transferring the
control of our sport or inland fisheries to the Province, and we are very pleased to advise
that the Dominion Government turned over such control to the Province at the beginning of
the year, along with a considerable number of their hatcheries and equipment. Hatcheries
formerly operated by the Federal Department of Fisheries at Cultus Lake, Penask Lake,
Lloyds Creek, Beaver Lake, and Summerland are now operated by your Commission. A new
hatchery was constructed and is now successfully operating at Nelson.
We have continued experiments towards cutting down food costs at our various hatcheries
with good results. Cost of food is probably the principal expenditure in the operation of any
hatchery.
The Fisheries Research Board through Dr. W. A. Clemens, of the Pacific Biological
Station at Departure Bay, near Nanaimo, has assisted us greatly in scientific fish-culture
work during the year, and we have in turn assisted the said Board in their important investigation of trout diseases which they have been carrying out at our Stanley Park Hatchery
at Vancouver. There is no doubt that in a few years time the results of this investigation
will be most helpful in the treatment of trout diseases. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 9
The Forest Branch of the Provincial Department of Lands has again carried out many
work projects such as trail and stream improvements recommended by your Commission, and
the co-operation of the Honourable the Minister of Lands, the Chief Forester, and the Forest
Branch in general is very greatly appreciated.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Game Associations, farmers, and others have rendered every assistance in our conservation work, and undoubtedy our lectures and the showing of our game and fish films has been
responsible for our young people especially becoming aware of the need for sane game conservation in the Province.
As in the past, the British Columbia Police Force has furnished splendid co-operation
and the friendly relationship between the British Columbia Police, the Forest Branch, and
other Government Departments has been most gratifying.
We wish to express our sincere appreciation to the Commissioner of the British Columbia
Police, his officers and men; Mr. E. C. Manning, Chief Forester, and his officers and men;
the Honourable the Minister of Fisheries for the Dominion; the Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries, Major J. A. Motherwell; Dr. W. A. Clemens, of the Pacific Biological Station;
the Fisheries Research Board of Canada; Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird
Officer for British Columbia; Dr. D. C. B. Duff, of the University of British Columbia, and
many others who have helped us so much in our work during the year under review.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1938.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear, taking the Division as a whole, are decidedly on the increase and some
complaints have been received of their doing damage to domestic stock.
Grizzly bear are to be found in fair numbers at the head of Knight, Kingcome, and
Seymour Inlets.
Deer.—There is no doubt that the disastrous forest fires in the Courtenay-Campbell River
areas destroyed a fairly large number of deer. However, after the fires had been put out
many deer were observed in the area surrounding the recently burned over section.
Reports from other portions of Vancouver Island indicate that deer are or have been
observed in good numbers.
Mountain-goat.—These animals can be seen in fair numbers in the Phillips and Frederick
Arms. The mountain-goat liberated on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve some years ago are
increasing slightly and during the coming year more detailed information on the stand of
these animals will be obtained.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Courtenay District, elk have slightly increased. Signs of elk cows
and calves were observed in the Upper Campbell Lake and Elk Valley regions despite logging
operations. Reports from the Cowichan District also indicate there has been no decrease in
the elk stand and this also applies to the Nimpkish country.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are on the increase, especially in the Courtenay-Campbell River District as well
as throughout the northern sections of Vancouver Island. Permits to trap beaver were again
issued this year where damage was being done or where registered trappers had built up
their stand of beaver in such numbers as would warrant the trapping of a limited number.
Otter and wolverine are to be found in some sections of the Division but cannot be considered as being plentiful. Marten have been fairly plentiful and the same remarks apply
also to mink.
Racoon and muskrats have been trapped fairly heavy, but there would seem to be no
noticeable decrease in their numbers. V 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—In the Alberni, Courtenay, and Cowichan areas blue grouse were fairly
plentiful, while reports from other sections of Vancouver Island indicate these birds have
been comparatively scarce. Probably the late opening of the season owing to fire-hazard
conditions prevented hunters obtaining their usual quota of birds. There is no doubt that
the large forest fires during the summer months accounted for many grouse especially in the
Courtenay-Campbell River section.
Grouse (Ruffed).—The report for the Nanaimo District indicates ruffed grouse are holding their own, while from Alberni comes word that these birds were fairly plentiful. Some
fair broods were also noticed in the Highland District near Victoria. The Game Wardens in
the Cowichan and Courtenay areas report ruffed grouse to be on the increase.
Quail.—These birds are to be found in the Nanaimo and Alberni Districts but not in any
large numbers. In the Cowichan and Victoria regions California quail have been fairly
plentiful.
Pheasants.—Game Warden F. H. Greenfield, in charge of the Nanaimo District, reports
pheasants have not been increasing as they should when consideration is given to the number
of birds liberated each year. Pheasants were fairly numerous in the Alberni, Cowichan, and
Victoria Districts, and according to Game Warden B. Harvey at Courtenay the pheasant
stand in his district will improve, provided favourable weather prevails during the next
breeding season.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are not observed to any extent as they are found only in the
mountainous country.
Migratory Game Birds.
An exceptional large number of ducks passed through the Alert Bay District during the
course of their migration, while in the Nanaimo District reports indicate that migratory
game birds of all kinds are not in any way decreasing, and this information applies also to
the Alberni and West Coast regions. Game Warden R. S. Hayes at Duncan advises ducks
were very plentiful during the past season in his district.
There would seem to have been no noticeable decrease or increase on geese and other
migratory birds throughout the Division.
Vermin.
Game Wardens in " A " Division report that cougar and wolves are decidedly on the
decrease. Bounty was paid on 100 cougar and 10 wolves compared to 171 cougar and 13
wolves in the preceding year.
Predatory-animal Hunter J. Dewar has accounted for a number of cougar and wolves.
Game Wardens in " A " Division report the destruction of the following vermin during
the year:—
Bear        1 Hawks      54
Cats   198 Eagles      43
Cougar      15 Owls      17
Dogs      54 Ravens      86
Crows   687
Game Associations and farmers have also been responsible for the destruction of large
numbers of noxious birds, principally crows.
Game-protection.
Many long and arduous patrols have been undertaken during the past few months in
every section of the Division for the purpose of stopping game violations,  especially pit-
lamping of game.    This illegal practice is very difficult to control, but every possible step is
being taken to stamp out pit-lamping, no matter in what area it is reported as occurring
Most districts on Vancouver Island have been constantly patrolled with very beneficial
results.
Game Propagation.
During the year 3,604 pheasants have been liberated on Vancouver Island. A detailed
statement of these liberations will be found in another section of this report.
Complaints in regard to fallow deer doing damage on James Island have considerably
decreased. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1938. V 11
Game Reserves.
Close supervision has been kept over the various Game Reserves on Vancouver Island.
Fur Trade.
The majority of the fur taken on Vancouver Island is sold in Vancouver or exported to
dealers outside of the Province.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farms have again increased, especially mink-farms. As usual, every possible assistance has been given to fur-farmers throughout the Division.
Registration of Trap-lines.
It would seem that the system of trap-line registration cannot be improved and trappers
generally are becoming more appreciative of the benefits derived from this system.
Registration of Guides.
As Vancouver Island is not a big-game district as compared to other sections of the
Province there are very few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
A number of special or surprise patrols have been carried out during the year.
Hunting Accidents.
Very few accidents occurred in the Division compared to previous years. A statement
of accidents is to be found in another section of this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The British Columbia Police Force, the Provincial Forestry Department, Game Associations, farmers and conservation-minded citizens have given the Game Wardens in " A"
Division every possible assistance, for which they are extremely appreciative.
Game conditions generally throughout the Division have been very satisfactory.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1938.
Big Game.
Moose.—The migration of these animals from their present prolific stand in the Rockies
continues to be quite noticeable. They have been reported again during the year in the
vicinity of Creston and the head of Kootenay Lake, where they were previously unknown, and
in addition are definitely increasing in the Blaeberry area north of Golden, as well as on the
west side of the Columbia River on the Selkirk Range.
Wapiti (Elk).—The stand of these animals in the Rockies likewise shows a migration to
the west side of the Columbia River and north of Golden. In spite of open seasons they are
still numerous in the mountains behind Naramata and the wapiti released near Princeton a
few years ago have shown an appreciable increase.
Mountain-sheep.—Bighorn sheep are maintaining their numbers in the Rockies, which is
the only part of the Division in which they are found, with the exception of two small bands
on Ashnola Mountains near Keremeos and in the vicinity of Okanagan Falls. As previously
mentioned, these two latter bands show no increase, although they are protected. This is a
condition which must be expected to continue, as their range is very limited and is grazed in
competition with domestic cattle, horses, and sheep.
Caribou.—Their main range is in the Selkirk Mountains, both east and west of Kootenay
Lake, from the Big Bend of the Columbia to the Boundary. An estimate of their numbers is
difficult on account of their migratory tendencies, but the short open season seems to be satisfactory and hunters report that they are not hard to locate. V 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are generally plentiful in the Rockies and the Selkirks,
east of Grand Forks, but are comparatively scarce in the Boundary and Similkameen Districts.
Mule-deer.—Mule-deer are abundant throughout the Division.
White-tail Deer.—White-tail deer are generally abundant, with the exception of the
Similkameen District.
Bear (Black or Brown).—Black and brown bear are well distributed throughout the
Division, but are more plentiful in the East and West Kootenays than elsewhere.
The same remarks apply to grizzly bear.
Fur-bearing Animals.
These continue to hold their numbers in a satisfactory manner, as compiled from the
returns of the 500-odd registered trappers in the Division. One interesting feature is the
presence of red foxes, which seem to be increasing and extending their range. They are now
becoming fairly common in the Kootenays.
The order of the principal fur-bearers is: Lynx, marten, mink, beaver, weasels, and
muskrats.    Fisher, wolverine, foxes, and otter are comparatively scarce.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue Grouse.—Blue grouse have been more plentiful than for several years.
Franklin Grouse.—Franklin grouse are well distributed on the highlands and appear to
show little change from year to year.
Ruffed Grouse.—Ruffed grouse are increasing somewhat since last season, but have not
yet regained their former cyclical abundance and it is not expected that they will for two or
three years yet.
Sharp-tail Grouse.—Sharp-tail grouse (prairie chicken) are still scarce, a few flocks
being observed in the East Kootenay, the Boundary, and the Lower Similkameen Districts.
These birds do not show much promise of increasing their former numbers as they have been
consistently scarce for the past twenty-five years.
Ptarmigan.—Ptarmigan are not sought as game birds on account of the altitude, but they
are to be found on the mountain-tops throughout the Division.
Pheasants.—These birds continue to flourish in the Similkameen and Southern Okanagan,
as well as at Grand Forks and Creston. Conditions in these places seem to be very favourable
for their propagation. They are doing well at various points on the Arrow Lakes from
Robson to Nakusp and it is possible that a short open season next year may be in order. The
experimental plantings in the East Kootenay, between Windermere and the U.S. Boundary,
are still experimental. In some localities good news is received, balanced by adverse reports
from adjacent places where plantings were made.
It would seem advisable to continue liberations until the question of acclimatization of
these birds in the valleys of the Columbia and the Kootenay has been definitely decided.
Partridge.—Partridge are plentiful in the area between Penticton and the U.S. Boundary,
but this is the only place where they may be considered so. A few flocks are found throughout the Division but there appears to be no reason for their presence, except that they are
migratory. In the Creston area they seem to be varying from year to year, but appear to be
established there.
Quail.—Quail are plentiful from Penticton to the U.S. Boundary, but this is the only
place in the Division where their introduction has been successful.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—These birds are apparently on the increase in the Creston area and on the
sloughs of the Columbia River from Windermere to Golden. The above areas are the two
principal duck-nesting districts. The ducks nest also throughout the Division, but in no place
is there a definite concentration. The Creston section has been curtailed somewhat by a
reclamation scheme, but still supports a large nesting population, and it is possible to get a
fairly accurate estimate of the actual increase or decrease in the resident species, as well as
the strength of the southward fall migration. It is felt that there has been a definite and
consistent increase, particularly in locally reared birds, during the past few seasons.
Geese.—Geese are definitely increasing along with the ducks, but in a more noticeable
manner.    In previous years where a few geese were to be seen they were counted last fall REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 13
by the several hundreds.    This was expected as the number of nesting geese has been appreciably larger each season for several years.
Swans.—These are occasional throughout the Division, although there seems to be no
record of their nesting. It is not unusual for bands of from two to twenty birds to be
observed, presumably resting en route northward in the spring.
Vermin.
There were 38 coyotes, 35 ownerless dogs, 69 stray cats, 34 owls, 104 hawks, 236 magpies,
3 eagles, 394 crows, and 1 raven destroyed by the Game Wardens in this Division during 1938.
This is exclusive of the bounties paid on cougar and coyotes, as well as coyotes taken by
trappers in the open season. Some of the Rod and Gun Clubs also conducted crow and
magpie shoots during the summer with much success.
Game-protection.
There were 104 informations laid during the year for infractions of the " Game Act" and
Special Fishery Regulations, which resulted in ninety-eight convictions and six dismissals.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released for restocking purposes in the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand
Forks, and Creston areas. No pheasants were released on the Arrow Lakes or the East
Kootenay, where experimental plantings are under way. This was due to the necessity of
supplying all available birds to overcome the breaking of the dykes at Creston, which resulted
in practically all the early summer crops of young pheasants being destroyed.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of Elk and Bull Rivers, also
White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vasseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are
also beneficial and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and in the Kettle River District.    These are
located on the winter yarding-grounds of the mule-deer, and serve as a haven for these
animals during unusual winter conditions late in the season when they might otherwise be
too easily taken. __      _
Fur Trade.
Resident fur-traders at Oliver, Nelson, and Creston share with the Vancouver market
practically all the furs taken within the Division, very little being exported directly out of
the Province. __
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming appears to be consistently on the up-grade, judging by the number of new
investments in this line of business. The old-established fur-farmers are very optimistic and
apparently have been doing well with both foxes and mink. Marten appear to be in the
experimental stage at present, but it would seem that the rearing of these particularly fine
fur-bearers would soon be on the same basis as the previously mentioned varieties. Considerable success has been obtained by some breeders in recent years by successfully propagating these animals in captivity.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Nothing more clearly demonstrates the value of Provincial administration of trap-lines
than the number of applications that are continually being received at every Game Office for
trap-lines. These are at a premium at the present time and no doubt will continue to be so,
as very few trappers are willing to relinquish their trap-lines—which are in effect large-scale
fur-farms—even though the fluctuations in fur prices are sometimes disappointing to the
Registration of Guides.
There were forty-seven licensed guides operating in the Division during the past season.
This is a considerable increase over previous years. The East Kootenay section particularly
is becoming better known as an accessible big-game country. Last fall was almost perfect
from the standpoint of weather and non-resident hunters were unanimous in expressing their
satisfaction, both with the scenery and the game possibilities of this part of the Province. V 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Special Patrols.
No outstanding patrols were made during the year, although routine patrols were quite
extensive on occasion. The game fish propagation programme during the past summer has
occupied the entire game personnel in this Division, and they did not have as much time to
devote to the remote areas as might be advisable. This condition may be augmented in future
by a rearrangement of duties.
Hunting Accidents.
On November 15th, 1938, Roy L. Skillicorn was accidentally killed when removing a
.32 Stevens rifle from his truck at Fruitvale. Presumably the rifle slipped and discharged,
the bullet striking him in the head.
John Kosiec was wounded in mistake for a bear by Alexander McCormack, at Hosmer,
on September 22nd, 1938, while hunting.    He recovered.
Summary and General Remarks.
In reviewing previous annual reports in this Division a certain similarity as well as much
repetition will be noted. This is the result of a steady and encouraging upward trend of all
wild life throughout the Division. No general serious setbacks have occurred, although some
localities have had their troubles through forest fires and floods, as well as unseasonable conditions in the winter, but none of these have been serious enough to affect the Division as a
whole.
If, therefore, previous reports have sounded an optimistic note there is good reason for
same. Game increases are not readily apparent to the casual observer in a year or so. Consequently, when it is mentioned that moose, for instance, are found in certain parts where
they were previously unknown this condition will be expected to continue for some years
before it can be definitely stated that these animals have permanently extended their range.
Remarks in this connection made in previous reports have been borne out by widespread
observation, and it can be assumed that moose are now resident, though in very small
numbers, in the valley of Kootenay Lake, to the surprise of the Indians who had not seen
these animals before.
The winters of 1935-36 and 1937-38 were comparatively mild and game wintered well.
The present winter has a tendency in the same direction and the snowfall at the beginning of
the new year was far below normal. A continuation of the exceedingly satisfactory game
conditions in this Division may be confidently expected next year.
The duck situation is undoubtedly improving. Certainly all reports indicate a heavier
concentration of nesting ducks in the Creston and Invermere-Golden areas. According to the
press, similar conditions prevail elsewhere and the united sportsmen may be credited with
another achievement, as a result of widespread and enthusiastic co-operation. Restricted
seasons on ducks appear to have accomplished their purpose.
The same remarks also apply to geese.
It was thought that black bear would be very scarce in the Division this year, because
so many were killed in 1937, particularly in the vicinity of settlements or orchards. It is
noted that a similar condition existed in the East Kootenays in 1927, which supports the
cyclical rule of wild life. Black bear are little hunted and tend to increase quickly. Apparently nature still has the matter in hand by curtailing their fall feed supply of berries, which
results in a great number of them not being in shape to survive the following winter, or being
destroyed in the neighbourhood of settlements where they come seeking food which they
cannot obtain naturally.
However, notwithstanding their very heavy loss in 1937, normal numbers of black bear
were noted during 1938.
Due to the unusually light snowfall the annual bag of deer was considerably smaller than
usual. This was also the case the previous season. The actual result was that in certain
places, like the Kettle Valley and Fernie area, where the local sportsmen expect a heavy influx
of deer on the lower levels late in the season, the hunters were disappointed. On the other
hand, in Kootenay Lake section the hunting was never better. There was no lack of bucks
anywhere, but the average hunter does not expect to climb high late in the season.
Big-game parties increased greatly during the year, and in consequence some twenty
new guides' licences were issued.    It is worthy of note that a large number of non-residents, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 15
principally from the States, have been made aware of the game possibilities in British
Columbia through visiting the Boundary and East Kootenay border sections with their
families in the summer holidays. Hence, more local residents have been employed as guides
for extended pack-horse trips into the mountains.
Each summer sees an increasing traffic of touring vacationists in the Boundary and
Kootenay Districts and most of them, particularly those from the States, want to fish. It is
interesting to observe that a warning note is frequently sounded by the non-residents who
insist that British Columbia regulations are too generous with both game and sport fish.
The present extensive sport fish programme is designed to remedy any possible criticism
of this sort, as it is felt that we can still offer the summer visitor a choice of either stream or
lake fishing with reasonable bags and long seasons, and at the same time still keep our
foundation stock unimpaired. The enthusiasm shown by the Game Wardens and Fishery
Officers of the Division in this connection is worthy of mention.
The past year they have carried on under a handicap of trying to do a great deal without
sufficient preparation or equipment. This was due to the change of sport fishing to Provincial
control and it is gratifying to note that the first, season's operation in this Division resulted
in the accomplishment of an ambitious programme through the vigorous co-operation of the
Game Wardens, to whom much of the work was new, aided and directed by the Fishery
Officers.
Appreciation and thanks of the entire personnel is tendered to the Provincial Forestry
Service and the Provincial Police, to whom we are indebted both for personal assistance and
the use of equipment during the year. We should also include the great help we have received
from both individuals and groups of the various Rod and Gun Clubs in the district, who were
always ready to assist in measures designed to augment either fishing or hunting.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Game
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1938.
Big Game.
Moose.—In the northern section of th'is Division, especially in the Quesnel area, the
comparatively light snowfall gave the moose ample feeding-grounds, which brought them
through the winter in good shape. Very few cows without calves were reported in the
Quesnel Detachment during the summer and fall. Guides report seeing more bulls this
season than in any previous year.
Game Warden Atwood reports seeing sixteen bulls in sight of one water-hole on the
Nazko Mountains. In the same area, on November 8th, a settler reported seeing thirty
moose, mostly bulls, on one ridge. A trapper at Swan Lake on Telegraph Trail reported
that on February last he counted forty-two moose feeding or bedded down on the swamp
near his cabin. Those animals confined themselves to the creeks and water-holes because of
the unusually arid conditions of the Cariboo during the summer. Many wells and springs
on various ranch properties went dry.
Trophies were less difficult to obtain. Heads of good, average size were taken in a
couple of days' hunting. Moose are becoming numerous just north of Kamloops and signs
are everywhere in evidence to the north-west. Some splendid moose heads were taken from
the Williams Lake area.
Caribou.—Reports over a period of years do not show any large numbers of these animals
appearing in any one sector. They are invariably reported in small bands throughout the
Cariboo and Clearwater Districts. Unlike the mule-deer, the caribou is not an animal of the
settled portions of the Interior, but rather of a shy and retiring nature to be found mostly
out of reach of the usual hunting-grounds. There are roughly forty caribou in the Clearwater on Battle Mountain. Reports of their presence at the headwaters of Lost Creek came
to hand, where sixteen were counted. A number were also seen up Scotch Creek. Their
scarcity around Clinton, Williams Lake, and Quesnel would convey the impression that
caribou are losing their calves through predators and that they are moving south as are the
moose to-day. V 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This office has had reports of caribou having been seen in new localities, mostly to the
north and south-east of their usual haunts. The Cariboo area makes no complaint of
slaughter of this majestic species; in fact, it is said that few, if any, were shot in the
Interior. We have a record of five kills taken from the Clearwater District during the
season and only one from the Williams Lake District. Large herds of caribou were reported
on the Dragon Mountain Range in 1850, but they moved out as the country became settled.
The timber wolves reported in this area at that time also left.
Deer.—From Williams Lake south over this Division deer are by far our most numerous
species. Seldom do we hear of deer scarcity, but rather the conditions affecting their presence
or temporary disappearance has been the principal factor for discussion. Snow with a
heavy crust for a time prevented bag-limits from being obtained, but on the whole the
season was a satisfactory one.
In the Kelowna and Peachland Districts deer were considerably less in numbers than
usual. Following is a proposal made by Game Warden Maxson, which might be considered
as having some merit: " It is recommended that a close season of around two weeks on
bucks be made from November 10th to November 24th in order to allow uninterrupted breeding." The desire of most sportsmen in a case of this kind would be to obtain their bucks
before the close season took place for the brief period proposed, although our records show
that a large percentage of hunters still take their deer during the last two weeks of the
season.    This proposal, in my opinion, is well worth consideration.
Wapiti.—The Paradise Valley and Yalakom Game Reserves contain many large heads.
The Adams Lake area, at the north end and on the west side, still show an appreciable
increase of this species. In the early days wapiti roamed over almost the whole of the
Interior as old, bleached horns have been found from Quesnel to the International Boundary-
line.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are numerous in and around Bowron Lake Game Reserve
and the Momich River in the Adams Lake District east of Kamloops. The same applies to
that territory east of Azure Lake and on the east side of the Williams Lake Detachment and
the Cayoosh Creek District, where they are in fairly large numbers. Few were taken this
year.
Mountain-sheep.—For mountain-sheep one must go to Mount McLean, Shulaps, Nine-mile
Ridge, Churn Creek Basin, Rexmount, Leckie Creek, and Keary Lake, all in the Lillooet
Detachment.
In the Clinton Detachment the only sheep existing are on the Marble Range. They are
not increasing; in fact, Indians report that these sheep cross to the west side of the Fraser
River on the ice and that they never see any coming back.
Bear.—Very few grizzlies were taken in this Division. In the Clinton area berries were
scarce and the black bear invaded the lower ground.
Fur-bearing Animals.
As a whole the fur-bearing animals are much about the same in numbers as in previous
years. The weather conditions for a record catch are positively against any such possibility
up to the end of the year.
I submit herewith comparative statistics on the estimate of beaver left on registered
trap-lines in this Division, exclusive of Indian trap-lines:—
No. of Trappers
Season.
1934-35	
sending Estimates.
 '.   275
Estimate of Beaver.
4,789—17.41 per trapper
6,392—18.6
1935-36	
  343
1936-37	
  367
6,347—17.29
1937-38	
  345
5,945—17.23
Price of fur is a big incentive to the trapper and where prices are high there is an eyer-
pressing desire to trap heavily. The average price of beaver during 1937-38 was around
$12.50. Some study should be made of the squirrel in its relation to forest-growth. It
appears to be a fur-bearer playing a prominent part in thinning out coniferous seed. Any
forestry expert knows the beneficial effect of thinning out tree-growth to encourage more
rapid production and size of timber. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 17
The shortage of squirrels, in the opinion of one officer in the field, is, to some extent,
responsible for the decrease of foxes in the west. This appears to be quite marked during
the period of rabbit scarcity. Before allowing the heavy inroads into the squirrel population
by hunters and trappers, definite and conclusive information should be obtained on its value
in the forest. Its value as a fur-bearer is important. The absolute ease with which this
fur-bearer can be taken will eventually spell its doom wherever a trap-line is to be found or
where they are too close to civilization. The heavy drain on and rapid disappearance of our
squirrel population is to be regretted. A moderate take of squirrels would not be objected to,
but when it runs into hundreds, taken by one hunter or trapper alone, and from territory
which can ill afford it, a reaction of some kind is bound to occur.
In practically all Detachments in this Division it is reported that the snowshoe rabbit
is gradually increasing again, with the exception of the Williams Lake District where a
scarcity is reported.
Some of the best beaver country in this Division is on the Indian Reserves. The experiment of restocking Indian trap-lines with beaver is now being tried in the Williams Lake
Detachment. With the assurance of help from Indian Agent Taylor, it is hoped the experiment will succeed if tempting offers from fur-buyers do not ruin plans already made.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue grouse in the Kamloops District showed a distinct increase over the previous year.
Quesnel reports a large increase in willow-grouse, but blue grouse are not common. The
breeding season was unusually good almost everywhere and a substantial increase in bird-life
was noted, especially the native birds. Even where this increase is noted, an occasional area
reports either a scarcity or no increase, but, in my opinion, this may be due to some local
cause.
Pheasants at Vernon did not show the substantial increase as in former years, but in
comparison with some districts it should be considered as quite satisfactory.
Bob-white quail, liberated in the Lillooet Detachment, have migrated 22 miles from the
point of liberation.    They were liberated in 1936.
European partridges have made their initial appearance in the Lillooet District.
Migratory Game Birds.
Breeding stock showed a considerable increase this spring in the Quesnel area. Geese
showed signs of a definite increase everywhere in locally raised birds. Some northern ducks
were reported moving south quite early in October. The last of the local water-fowl went
south from the Quesnel area about November 9th. The rivers also started running pan ice
at this time with ice forming on the slack water.
At Williams Lake ducks and geese were very numerous. Around October 31st water-fowl
began to leave Williams Lake.
Clinton reports a drying-up of water-holes, but states that large numbers of ducks were
seen during the breeding season.    The freeze-up in this district occurred about November 7th.
During April and May around eight hundred pintails were seen on small lakes adjacent
to Kamloops. Lesser scaups and teal were also very much in evidence. As a whole it must
be said that local-bred ducks increased in numbers, with the possible exception of the mallard.
Canvasbacks also increased.
Geese were here in unusual numbers when the northern season closed about one week
earlier than the southern sector. Consequently the goose-shooting on the only open body of
water—namely, the South Thompson River—was closed. This is a local problem which can
be solved before next season.
There is not the insistent demand for the Game Department to satisfy all local requirements as in former years. Sportsmen everywhere are realizing that a compromise solution
is far better for the Province as a whole in the matter of open seasons rather than one of
purely local expediency. Uniformity of regulations, even if it means slight sacrifices here
and there, makes for simplicity of control and enforcement.
There is a report by Probationer Game Warden Sandiford of a small flock of Emperor
geese (Philacte canagica) having been seen in the Long Lake area on October 27th. Their
presence is regarded as being unusual for this district. A close-up view was obtained and
careful observation made of their coloration.
2 V 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vermin.
Reports of predators destroyed by six Game Wardens are as follows:—
Coyotes    80 Cats      82
Cougar   7 Crows   591
Bears (doing damage)    11 Magpies   388
Timber-wolves   1 Hawks      75
Dogs  (ownerless)    4 Horned owls      31
Game Warden Maxson alone destroyed 44 coyotes and Game Warden Jobin 22 of these
animals.
Ground-squirrels are reported to have appeared at Lac la Hache and Whisky Creek
for the first time.
In the Lillooet District 26 cougar and 2 wolves were reported destroyed by hunters.
The Lillooet Rod and Gun Club has destroyed during the year 107 crows, 50 magpies,
12 hawks, and 22 cats.
Assistance was given to a number of trappers by Game Warden Still, resulting in the
destruction of roughly 100 coyotes. Over 200 coyotes were destroyed in the Vernon District
by trappers and hunters.
The use of a combination of synthetic catnip-oil and cougar-gall for luring cougar
appears to have worked successfully so far. It is too early to state conclusively the final
results of our tests. The idea is to delay the travelling of these animals by means of this
scent so that their tracks can be picked up and followed. Snares are also being experimented
with and in one case is working well. This type of snare is pliable, has a simple locking
device, and blends with the brush in coloration.
Wolves are invading the northern and southern portions of this Division. The agitation
for increased bounty appears to be insistent. Previous records should show whether the
bounty increase was justified. These animals are almost impossible to trap or snare and
the majority of those killed are lucky breaks rather than careful planning or outwitting.
Tracking, as is done in cougar-hunting, might be the quicker and more reliable method
provided the tracks are reasonably fresh. One timber-wolf was shot near Canim Lake and
four others were seen. They are reported doing damage to caribou on Bald Mountain near
Clearwater.
One Indian killed four cougar in the Mahood Lake area in December and is again on
the trail of others. Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth is being sent into the Clearwater
country in March to clean out cougar in what is known as " the basin."
Considerable damage is done every year by bear, coyotes, and deer—the former two
among the wool-growers' flocks and the latter in the orchards and haystacks of the Interior.
Two methods were tried up to the present and results have been very encouraging. The
electric fence was tried as used in the United States at present. Roughly, 2 acres of orchard
land were enclosed by a single strand of barbed wire instead of the usual two strands as
advocated by the manufacturers. The orchard in this case was surrounded by the usual
fence, a distance of 10 feet outside the electrically charged wire, but, owing to its bad state
of repair, was discarded as a proper fence for a test of this kind. As one strand of wire,
even if charged, was not considered sufficient to keep deer out, it occurred to me that wisps
of alfalfa-hay could be tied to the wire every 5 yards apart. With snow on the ground this
feed, tied to the wire, stopped the deer after they cleared the outer fence and, on touching
the wire with their noses, the shock was sufficiently powerful to ward off any further
intrusion.
A portable unit in this case was used by local electricians and the same unit is being
tried in the spring of the year on the sheep ranges when the ewes are lambing. Wool-
growers suffer considerable losses through coyote depredation every year. The loss of game
is also quite extensive. It is doubtful if any electric fence would stop bear unless honey or
blood were smeared on the fence. We expect to be in a position to show how any wool-
grower or any one suffering damage to stock can protect them by this means after one hour's
work on the range.    Up to the present the results are very gratifying.
Test number two consisted of using asafoetida, an imported gum material having a
pungent odour, for keeping deer out of orchards. A small bag of this gum was suspended
from several fruit-trees in the Trepanier District where damage has been reported for years REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 19
through deer coming into the orchards. A variety of material was tried by the United States
Department of Agriculture and it was found that asafoetida was more effective than any
other substance yet tried.
The results so far indicate that deer have left trees where this material was used, and
on trees next to and without this material it was found that damage had been done to the
small tree-shoots. The test in this case has not been completed. It has also been used on a
haystack near Kamloops with satisfactory results up to the present.
Game-protection. •
The division of the Kamloops District with regard to the open season far ducks, which
made the Canadian Pacific Railway the boundary between the northern and southern sections,
was of considerable benefit to the water-fowl population. Reports of hunters taking squirrels
reached the Quesnel Office. They were mostly bar-miners whose work was closed down by
cold weather.    Beaver were also taken, but reports of this arrived too late to be of any value.
A total of 159 prosecutions with four dismissals was recorded under the " Game Act."
Of this number, five were executed by the Provincial Police and twelve by members of the
Game Commission, who were present at Vernon on the opening day of the pheasant-hunting.
The Vernon, Kelowna, and Kamloops Detachments were quite active in this respsct.
Game Propagation.
Nineteen beaver were liberated in various parts of this Division during ths year, both for
irrigation and trap-line stocking. At Kersley the beaver-work is a splendid example cf how
beaver can conserve water. It is close to the highway and is a fine piece of work well
worth examining.    Kersley is roughly 13 miles south of Quesnsl on the main Cariboo Road.
Fifty-six pheasants were trapped at Tranquille and liberated in the Kamloops District
during last winter, 1937-38. There was a lack of enow at the end of 1938 to warrant
trapping operations for birds at Tranquille.
The California quail liberated at Tranquille are doing well. There are roughly 200 birds.
An occasional bird can bo reon on the B.C. Fruitlands property, near Kamlocps.
Nine hundred pheasants were released in this Division during the year. The breeding
season was one of the best. For some reascn the expected number of birds did not show up,
but a winter count hers and there would convey the impression that in most cases the
pheasants took to the highlands until the season was over. Some reports of pheasants at
unusually high elevations have come to hand and in some cases are being fed during the
Game Reserves.
Moose in the Bowron Lake Reserve have increased during the last year. Beaver have
also done well. In the Yalakom Reserve deer have multiplied considerably. In the Tranquille Sanctuary we have only half the number of birds as in previous years, but, even at
that, this ground is considerably over-stocked. It makes, however, a convenient trapping-
ground for an additional supply of bird- throughout the Kamloops District.
Fur Trade.
A limited fur trade is carried on in this Division.    Most of the fur is sent to Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
There is a definite increase in the fur-farming industry. Mink-farming is noticeably
increasing and mere farmers and others are discovering the art of successfully raising these
valuablo fur-bearers.    Forty-one fur-farms are in operation in the Division.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system has ended the disputes existing under the old method of non-registration.
We have had no complaints of any connections between registered trap-lines. There is still
a waiting list of trappers, but it would not be in the interests of fur conservation to reduce
the size of blocks and admit more trappers.
Over 97 per cent, of the trap-line renewals were received from nine out of ten Detachments in this Division up to the end of December. This is the highest record ever made in
this Division. V 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We have in this Division 345 Indian trappers. There are 393 white registered trap-line
holders and 194 trappers on private property, some of whom are working in conjunction with
registered trap-line holders on registered trap-lines.
The principle of providing, as far as possible, a breeding area inside every registered
trap-line block of territory has its virtues. Only time will tell and the returns from the
registered trapper will be the true indicator of fur-conservation or otherwise.
I have purposely endeavoured to avoid the granting of very small areas to prospective
trappers and, wherever possible, the present registered blocks have been enlarged to make
the trapper's investment one of continued interest and profit. Accurate maps are a considerable help, although we worked under a severe handicap in this respect at the beginning of
this system of registration.
Registration of Guides.
There should be some information available to non-resident hunters in their choice of a
registered guide. There are varying degrees of experience in the case of guides; some have
limited experience and equipment while others fill all the requirements as desired by nonresident hunters coming to the Province for the first time. It is desirable that non-resident
hunters come here and leave well satisfied with their hunting experience in British Columbia.
I would recommend that some incentive be provided the guides through means of some protection of their work and investment, and that there should be some method of distinguishing
between the less experienced guide with limited equipment and the guide in whom the nonresident hunter would have full confidence from every angle. As ability in the case of a
young guide grows with experience his qualifications could be judged by the non-resident
hunter better than by any one else, although it is hardly fair to expect the non-resident to
experiment with guides. This is where some modified system of classification should be
created which would be stamped on each guide's licence. Under the system suggested, guides
would naturally aspire to higher classification and a well-organized body of capable guides
would be available to the visiting non-resident or resident hunter. After all, one's impression of a hunt is made on one's first visit to a Province and his association with the guide
whom he employs during his hunting expedition.
The suggestion has been made in the past that Game Wardens be supplied with first-aid
equipment. The Quesnel Detachment suggests that all guides carry first-aid equipment in
the event of accident. A hunting accident occurred in the Quesnel Detachment some time
ago; the entire party found themselves without first-aid equipment of any kind. Capable
and well-organized guides have all such equipment on hand.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Warden Atwood to the Chilcotin in connection with
establishing trap-line boundaries along the height of land north of the Chilcotin River. This
matter was satisfactorily settled.
On June 19th to 22nd another patrol was made to Kluskus to investigate reported incendiary fires in that area for the British Columbia Police and Forestry Department. On the
20th a fire started in the Nazko Mountains which blocked the road and made a detour of 100
miles necessary. On the same day it was discovered that the Indians involved were on their
way to Quesnel. On returning to Quesnel on the 22nd, an Indian, Frances of Kluskus, was
questioned and finally admitted setting fires and pleaded guilty when summoned by the
Forestry Department.    He was fined $25 and costs.
A patrol was made by Constable Broughton and Game Warden Jobin to the headwaters
of Gaspard Creek, on March 7th, in connection with an alleged violation of the " Game Act."
Mileage covered was as follows:   Car, 150 miles;   sleigh, 126 miles.
Game Wardens Stewart and Mottishaw made a joint patrol into China Lake and Big
Meadow, Chilcotin, for a game survey and general check-up. Game Warden Mottishaw
patrolled the Spruce Lake area, also the Shulaps Range.
Game Warden Cameron received a special request from Mrs. William Needham, of
Salmon Arm, that the Game Department contact her son, who was out on a trap-line, as his
father was dangerously ill. The location of this man was traced through the records at
Kamloops and additional inquiries revealed that he was in the Seymour Arm District. Game
Warden Cameron was instructed to make this trip and he left by boat on November 11th. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 21
After a further journey by saddle-horse, Mr. Needham was located near the headwaters of
Ratchford Creek and returned with Game Warden Cameron to Salmon Arm before his father
passed away.    Weather conditions on Shuswap Lake during this patrol were unusually rough.
Hunting Accidents.
Charlie Baptiste, Indian boy of 11 years, who lives on the Indian Reserve at Castle Rock,
was admitted to the War Memorial Hospital at Williams Lake on September 17th, 1938,
suffering from the effect of a .22-calibre bullet accidentally discharged from a rifle in the
hands of Peter Baptiste, his cousin. The bullet struck Charlie in the back of the left
shoulder. The wound was not serious and there was no longer any danger of infection.
Charlie was finally discharged from the hospital.
A slight accident occurred on the Coldstream Ranch on October 23rd. John Carl Genier,
of Lumby, B.C., reported that while he and his friend, William W. Ward, were hunting-
pheasants on the Coldstream Ranch, a pheasant got up and he fired at it. As Mr. Ward
was in line with the shot on the other side of a bush he was struck by some of the pellets in
the face, neck, chest, and hand. Mr. Ward was taken to the Vernon Hospital where he
received treatment and had the pellets removed. No ill effects were experienced after
removal of shot.
On the 18th of December, an Indian boy, Andrew Tom, age 11, of the Shalalth Band,
borrowed a .22 rifle from Louis Link, another Indian, to shoot squirrels. Putting the rifle-
butt into a hole after he saw the squirrel go in, the movement of the rifle discharged the shot.
The shot struck the boy's hand a glancing blow.    He was treated at the Lytton Hospital.
Irene Alexander, Indian, age 18 years, accidentally shot herself in the leg while out
hunting squirrels. A twig caught the trigger while she was stepping over a log and the
shot entered her right leg below the knee.    She received treatment at Lillooet.
I regret to report a fatal accident which took place at Trinity Valley on November 4th.
On Friday night, November 4th, Phillip Chouquette was accidentally shot through the head
with a .22-calibre rifle in the hands of Robert Patrick, age 15, who mistook the youth for a
hoot owl.
While Phillip Chouquette and John Patrick were playing on the roof of the barn at the
Patrick Ranch during a moonlight evening, Louis Patrick, age 8, who was also playing outside, rushed into the house saying that an owl was sitting on the roof. Robert Patrick, age
15, immediately grabbed the .22 rifle, stepped out of the back door and fired at what he took
to be the owl. On hearing a shout or call, Mr. Patrick (Sr.) and Roderique ran to the shed,
climbed the roof and found Phillip Chouquette lying there unconscious with a bullet wound
on the left side of his forehead. He was immediately taken to the Vernon Hospital where he
died on November 6th.
At the inquest held shortly after the jury returned a verdict of accidental death caused
by the discharge of a firearm in the hands of Robert Patrick, who mistook the deceased for
a hoot owl. As the bodies of the two boys playing on the roof were not visible against the
barn, their heads appeared to project above the top of the building, conveying the impression
that owls were sitting there.
Summary and General Remarks.
Most of the accidents this year were the result of children taking firearms of the .22
calibre, left presumably by their pa_tents within easy reach. There is one place to keep firearms—and that is high on the wall and out of the reach of children. Ammunition should be
kept in a separate place, preferably under lock and key. The precautions against hunting
accidents advocated by the press of the Interior are largely responsible for the decrease in
the number of hunting accidents.
The year just past would be considered satisfactory from the hunter's viewpoint. The
water-fowl problem is a contentious subject at all times. Local desires should be sacrificed
for the good of the water-fowl situation. It is quite impossible to arrive at a satisfactory
decision which would satisfy water-fowl hunters everywhere.
Adjustment of boundaries in this Province is one for Provincial control in co-operation
with the various Game Associations and there is very little more to be desired along this line.
The snowshoe rabbit is definitely on the increase. Increased fur-catch should synchronize with this report of the rabbit population. V 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In conclusion I wish to extend again the thanks of the Department officers to members of
the Provincial Police, particularly at Kamloops, Williams Lake, Chase, and Quesnel, for their
assistance during the year. To the Forestry Department and District Forester A. E. Parlow
for their close co-operation at all times. I also thank the members of various Game Associations and J. A. Munro, Federal Migratory Bird Officer, whose helpful assistance is greatly
appreciated.
The officers in this Division maintained their interest as usual and were assisted in many
cases by hunters in the field in the execution of their duties.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE
RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith, I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1938.
Big Game.
Moose, Caribou, and Deer.—Weather conditions were very unfavourable during last winter, abnormal depth of snow created a shortage of food and a great number of animals
starved to death. The late freezing of lakes and rivers was also the cause of numerous
deaths. The animals crossing the rivers and lakes on very thin ice broke through and were
unable to reach shore and drowned. Five moose were reported drowned at one crossing in
the vicinity of Hansard, B.C.
The wolves also depleted a number of animals who, owing to very deep snow, were unable
to get away from these predators.
The deer and Caribou suffered most from these adverse conditions, and a smaller bag on
these animals will be recommended for the coming season.
Moose, although having suffered a great deal, are not in danger as yet, some bands of
from thirty to forty animals having been reported in various areas in the Division.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are quite scarce in the Division. They are found in the
Tuchodi Lake District, north of Hudson Hope.
The elk on the Queen Charlotte Islands are slowly increasing in numbers. A close season
should be maintained over a period of years.
Bear (Black).—These animals are increasing everywhere. A number of suggestions
have been received recommending that there be no close season on these animals.
Bear (Grizzly).—These animals are quite an asset to the District, as the trophy is highly
praised by big-game hunters. Bag-limit and close season in force last year is again recommended for the current season.
Mountain-sheep.—Four species (Rocky Mountain, Stonei, Fanini, and Dahl's) are to be
found in the Northern Division.
Owing to great losses occurring during the past winter, a smaller bag-limit will be
recommended for the coming season.
Mountain-goat.—Owing to the very low value placed on these animals as trophies, they
are not hunted a great deal and are therefore in no danger of extermination. The season and
bag-limit prevailing last season will again be recommended for the coming year.
Fur-bearing Animal^.
Land Animals.—Owing to abnormal fall of snow during the months of December to
March, covering traps, preventing travel, etc., the fur-catch as a whole will be under normal.
Reports have been received that fur signs are very plentiful and that, given favourable
weather conditions, the fur-catch should be very large next season.
Water Animals.—Conditions reported last year are again in prevalence this year. With
few exceptions, the Indians are not conserving the water animals, especially the beaver, on
their trapping areas.
White trappers in general are not, owing to low prices, trapping extensively, and beaver
are therefore in fair numbers on most white trappers' lines.
The matter of educating the Indians in the conservation of all wild life, especially beaver,
should receive very serious consideration. However, the initiative must be left with the
Indians themselves, if at all possible, as any suggestion of coercion is always resented by them. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.. V 23
The Game Wardens are doing their utmost to educate the Indians in the necessity of
conserving game, especially beaver, on their trap-lines, but this work, which is perforce very
superficial, should be supplemented by lectures, slides, moving pictures, etc., and whereas the
education of the Indians, their welfare, etc., is involved, it is only natural that the Department most concerned should take the greatest interest in this problem; therefore I respectfully suggest that the Indian Department be approached with a view of starting a campaign
of education among the Northern Indians with a view of making the Indians game and trap-
line conscious.
Such lectures, etc., could be started in all the Indian schools of the Province, to be followed up with visits to the Indian Reserves.
The Northern Interior of the Province should receive immediate attention.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Owing to very favourable weather conditions prevailing during last year's nesting period, an increase in all upland game birds has been noticed throughout the Division.
However, in order to fully re-establish these birds to their previous great number, the small
bag-limit and short season set last season will be recommended for the coming year.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are quite numerous, not many killed, and are not in danger of
extermination.
Hungarian Partridge.—Birds liberated in the McBride District are on the increase and
doing well.    More of these birds should be liberated in the Northern Interior.
Pheasants.—After numerous experiments, the consensus of opinion is that these birds
will not winter north of 53°; therefore further experiments should be discouraged, with the
exception of the Tlell District on Graham Island, where these birds are doing very well, and
new stock should be introduced.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—The increase in the number of migratory game birds was very noticeable in the Northern Interior. Nesting season was very favourable, resulting in an increase
in number and size of flights originating in the north of the Province.
It is felt that a longer season on these birds would be justified. Recommendation will be
submitted extending the season to November 30th in each year in the Eastern District, and
to January 31st in the Western District.
Vermin.
Timber-wolves have been uncommonly active. The increase in bounty from $10 to $15
was well received and resulted in a few trappers going after these predators.
Numerous cases of mange have been reported, and it is expected that their numbers will
be greatly reduced should the disease spread throughout the north.
Cougar and Coyotes.—These predators are decidedly on the decrease. Very few tracks
are to be found, and a much smaller number of these predators have been caught during the
past season compared with previous seasons.
Game-protection.
Game Clubs have been very active and are proving of great assistance to the Department
in the education of the younger people along the lines of game conservation.
The lectures by means of moving pictures, delivered in the schools of the district by
Commissioner J. G. Cunningham, were well attended and greatly appreciated by all. In view
of the great educational value of such lectures, visits of all the schools is advocated and
should be carried out by the Commission as quickly as possible, with the ultimate aim to make
every school-child game-conscious and promote conservation of all game in the Province.
The usual routine patrols were diligently carried out by both Police Constables and Game
Wardens. Every available mode of transportation was used, and the following mileage
covered:—
Miles. Miles.
Train   7,500 Horse (including sleigh).      2,900
Autos   69,200               Plane        6,410
Foot (including dog-team) 8,795                                                                 ■
Boat    11,647                                 Total  106,452 V 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Propagation.
Very satisfactory reports concerning the elk (wapiti) liberated on the Queen Charlotte
Islands have been received. These animals are slowly increasing in numbers and are mostly
to be found on Moresby Island, where conditions are more suitable than on the adjacent
islands.
Hungarian partridge have been introduced in the McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof,
and Smithers Districts. A constant lookout will be kept, especially during and after nesting
season, with a view to ascertaining any increase or decrease in their numbers. It will take
from two to three years before any definite results will be noticeable.
If possible, another liberation of Hungarian partridge should be made next year.
Game Reserves.
Only one Game Reserve, the Kunghit Island Game Reserve, is located in the Division.
Sanctuaries covering the City of Prince George, Prince Rupert, and Lake Kathlyn, in
the vicinity of Smithers, have been patrolled regularly. The purpose of these sanctuaries—
to prevent shooting accidents in the areas covered—is being fulfilled. Similar sanctuaries in
the vicinity of Terrace and Ocean Falls are under consideration.
Fur Trade.
Owing to most of the furs obtained in this Division being shipped to Vancouver, no data
as to the quantity or quality of fur procured in the Division are available.
Fur-traders are not quite so numerous as in the past, and owing to a medium fur-catch
it is expected that their number will again be reduced next season.
Fur-farming.
Recommendations submitted last year are again submitted for your consideration.
In view of the growing importance of the fur-farming industry, the necessity of assisting
the fur-farmers, especially the beginners, by expert advice on methods of raising, feeding,
housing, breeding, etc., fur-bearing animals is becoming more evident. It is respectfully
suggested that the appointment of a young man having a degree in pathology be considered
by the Department and put in charge of fur-farms in the Province.
After studying the various methods of fur-farming, etc., such appointee would in course
of time be in a position to advise all farmers on the diseases, their causes, cures, etc., to the
greatest benefit of the fur-farming industry.
This matter should receive very kind consideration.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This phase of our work is progressing very slowly, but nevertheless favourably. Owing
to inaccurate maps, especially of the north-eastern corner of the Division, the work is not
progressing as rapidly as might be expected, but more aerial surveys taking place from year
to year the registration work will show better progress as said maps become available.
Owing to numerous transfers of trap-lines, which creates an enormous amount of work
in our various offices and which to date has been carried out without charge, I beg to suggest
that a transfer fee of $2.50 be imposed. Said fee will compensate the Department for time
and stationery used in putting through such transfers.
Registration of Guides.
Guides were again very busy during the past season, but quite a few of the non-resident
big-game hunters went away dissatisfied, owing mainly to the inexperience of the guides
employed.
The necessity of amending the " Registration of Guides' Regulations " is becoming more
imperative; therefore I respectfully suggest that before any individual is registered as a
guide he should be compelled to serve a certain time with an efficient guide as an apprentice.
On completion of such services and on production of a certificate of service, signed by the
guide or guides in whose employ he served his apprenticeship, and on passing an oral and
written examination set by the Department, and on the Department being satisfied that such
person is qualified, a certificate of competency would be issued. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 25
The above would tend to create efficiency among the guides, benefiting the Province as a
whole, but particularly the guiding and tourist industry.
Special Patrols.
During the course of their duties, the Game Wardens have made a number of patrols
which could be classed as special patrols, but whereas they are too numerous to mention them
all, I beg to submit the undermentioned ones as most noteworthy:—
Game Warden W. __. Forrester, i/c Fort George District.—An outstanding patrol made
by this Game Warden during the month of February, 1938, took him to Fort St. James,
Manson Creek, Bear Lake, Caribou Hide, and Two Brothers Lakes. This patrol covered
1,528 miles (plane 1,470, car 34, foot 24) and had a great moral effect on Indians and white
trappers. The use of a plane is highly recommended; the above-mentioned patrol could not
with ordinary methods of transportation have been carried out under three months' time,
whereas with a plane the patrol was completed in six days.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland, i/c Finlay Forks Detachment.—The above-mentioned Game
Warden undertook a very strenuous patrol, visiting McKinnon's, McPhee's, and Swiggum's
trap-lines, covering 278 miles on snow-shoes in twenty days' time. A number of complaints
were investigated and will be settled during the present season.
Game Warden P. Brown, i/c Vanderhoof Detachment.—Among a number of patrols made
by this Game Warden, the patrol from Vanderhoof to Takla Landing, via Fort St. James and
Tache, is the most outstanding, covering 84 miles by car and 252 miles by boat. The purpose
of this patrol was to settle a number of trap-line disputes between Indians, and same was
carried out to the satisfaction of all concerned.
In the Fort Nelson area, Corporal J. S. Clark and Special Game Warden Villeneuve made
numerous patrols by dog-team, boat, and planes, the most outstanding of which is a patrol
undertaken during the month of April, visiting the Black River area, situated in the northeastern corner of the Province.
Six Alberta Breeds were caught cutting beaver-dams and breaking open beaver-houses.
They were prosecuted and convicted. Four hundred and fifty-two miles were covered—by
plane 150 miles, on foot (escorting six prisoners) 300 miles—a very noteworthy feat.
Constable J. Blakiston-Gray, i/c Telegraph Creek Detachment, B.C. Police, undertook a
very strenuous patrol to the Dease Lake and Little Muddy (Turnagain) River, and is brought
to your attention. All mining operations in the District were visited, about 330 miles were
covered by saddle-horse, occupying eighteen days' time. The patrol had a good moral effect
on miners and Indians visited.
Again I wish to point out that the use of a plane by the Department would increase the
efficiency of our work and would make possible a greater number of special patrols.
The purchase of a plane should receive all consideration.
Hunting Accidents.
I am very sorry that again a number of hunting accidents occurred during the year
under review.
William A. Timms, of Chilko, B.C. (Special Firearms Licence No. 58575) : On May 9th,
1938, whilst trapping rats, he stumbled, the .22-calibre rifle he was carrying discharged, the
bullet entering the lower left leg. Bullet removed at the Prince George Hospital, and subsequently fully recovered.
Ole Moland and Walter Lee, both of Rolla, B.C.: On October 7th, 1938, after a deer hunt,
a party of four—Jack Kerr, Carl Wendt, Ole Moland, and Walter Lee—proceeded down Pine
River by boat. Moland's rifle, a 30-30, loaded, was lying on top of the dunnage, muzzle
facing towards the stern. Ole Moland made a pass at some blow-flies and the rifle was
accidentally discharged, the bullet passing through Moland's abdomen and hitting Lee near
the shoulder.    Moland subsequently died of his wounds, Walter Lee recovered.
Martin Mostue, of Decker Lake, B.C.: On October 9th, 1938, at 5 p.m., near Decker Lake,
Mrs. Tilda Moe, holder of Special Firearms Licence No. 61052, thought she saw a moose in the
small brush bordering the lake, took a shot with a .303 Savage rifle in the direction of the
moving brush and killed Martin Mostue. Mrs. Tilda Moe was charged with " manslaughter "
and will appear in Assize Court at Prince Rupert on May 10th next. Ernest Guss, of Gold Bar, B.C.: On October 27th, 1938, the above-mentioned trapper left
the home trapping-cabin on the Ottertail River, Peace River District, and proceeded up
towards the West Fork of said Ottertail River. Weather turned colder, and as he was not
prepared for cold weather, he died of exposure.
David Franklin Allen, of Chief Lake, B.C.: On Friday, November 4th, 1938, the above
named, whilst walking on the shore (among the rushes) of Nukko Lake, was shot by John A.
McMaster, of Chief Lake, in mistake for a deer. McMaster was charged with " causing
grievous bodily injury" and sentence was suspended for one year. David Franklin Allen
lost the use of his right arm.
Michel Tommy, of Quick, B.C.: On December 1st, 1938, the above mentioned fell whilst
carrying a 25-35 Winchester carbine, the rifle discharging when hitting the ground and the
bullet entering the left thigh.    The wound proved to be serious, as he died on December 3rd.
Summary and General Remarks.
Weather conditions and predatory animals contributed to great losses in all big game
animals. Deer suffered the most, with caribou coming a close second. A smaller bag on
these animals has been recommended.
Owing to the great number of moose, these animals, although having suffered enormous
losses, are still quite numerous and in no danger of extermination.
Pelts of wolves and coyotes brought in for the bounty show signs of mange and a decrease
in their number is expected.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to all Game Wardens and officers of the
British Columbia Police Force for the manner in which they carried out their various duties,
and for the fine spirit of co-operation which at all times prevailed among them.
To the members of the various Rod and Gun Clubs I wish to extend my sincere thanks
for the wholesome co-operation and good-will at all times extended to all members of the
Game Department.
" E " DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1938.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Grizzly bear are to be found at the head of the various inlets forming the northern
sections of the Division as well as in the mountainous country in the eastern portion. Black
bear generally are on the increase and in some portions have been responsible for complaints
of damage to domestic stock.
Deer.—Reports from nearly every Game Warden in the Division indicate the deer are on
the increase, and even though a fairly long open season is provided each year these animals
seem to be able to satisfactorily withstand any large amount of concentrated hunting. There
would seem to be no question but that the provision in the regulations authorizing the shooting
of buck deer only is an excellent safeguard against any great depletion in the stand of deer.
Generally speaking the past open season on deer has been an excellent one.
Moose.—These animals, according to reports, are showing a decided increase in the Pem-
berton District as well as in the Bella Coola Valley. While an open season is provided on
moose in the Bella Coola area this is not the case in the Pemberton District where, notwithstanding an increase in numbers, the time is not opportune to declare even a short open season
in this area.
Mountain-goat.—Goat are to be found in fair numbers in the Upper Stave River region
and in lesser numbers at the headwaters of the Allouette, Pitt, and Coquitlam Lakes. In the
Powell River District reports indicate that goat are on the increase. Many years ago
mountain-goat were very plentiful in this region, but owing to non-protection their numbers
were considerably cut down and it is very pleasing to find that these animals are now
increasing.    In the Chilliwack area, also, goat are apparently on the increase.
Wapiti (Elk).—The elk liberated in the Howe Sound area a few years ago appear to
be doing very well. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 27
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In the areas covered by registered trap-lines beaver are fairly plentiful, but
close to the settled regions this is not the case; but they are not being depleted and beaver
can be found within a few miles of the City of Vancouver.
Fox (Red).—While these animals are not protected on the Lower Mainland, reports
indicate that they have not decreased in numbers to any great extent. Individual trappers
have, during the present year, accounted for a number of these animals. Reports have been
received from time to time of foxes doing damage to domestic poultry as well as game birds.
Muskrats.—Owing to extreme, long dry weather in most sections of the Lower Mainland
muskrats were not as plentiful as in past years, although in some portions fair catches have
been reported.
Marten.—Reported on the increase.
Mink.—These animals have been taken in larger numbers than in any previous year,
which would indicate there are more mink to be found in the Division.
Otter.—Scarce in most sections.
Racoon.—Increasing generally throughout the Division.
Weasel.—Fairly common in the outlying portions of the district.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—In some portions an increased stand has been noted, but taking the
division as a whole there does not appear to have been any noticeable increase.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Increasing, but cannot be considered as being overabundant in any
section of the Division.
Pheasants.—In the Powell River area these birds are not very abundant, but throughout
most sections of the Lower Mainland pheasants have been fairly plentiful. One Game
Warden reports pheasants have been more plentiful than for a number of years, due no doubt
to a fairly good breeding season which is seldom encountered on the Coast. From Saltspring
Island reports indicate an increase in pheasants.
The law prohibiting hunting of pheasants before 12 o'clock noon on the first two days
provided better and more equalized shooting.
During the year 10,924 pheasants were liberated throughout the Lower Mainland, particulars of which are to be found in another section of this report.
California Quail.—Found in fair numbers in the Delta District, and could be provided
with a short open season next year if there is no noticeable decrease in their numbers in the
meantime.
Hungarian Partridge.—These birds are found in some portions of the Division but are
not plentiful. __ „ __
Migratory Game Birds.
During the first three or four weeks of the open season, migratory game birds in the
inland sections of the Lower Mainland were very plentiful, but around the middle of November
hunting in these sections was poor, due no doubt to the birds migrating owing to continued
dry weather. After the season had closed and with more water in the fields owing to fairly
heavy rains, ducks could be seen in large numbers throughout the Fraser Valley. During the
season great rafts of ducks could be found off the mouth of the Fraser River.
Snow geese were observed in about the same numbers as in previous years, while Canada
geese were scarce in the Pitt Lake country compared to other years.
Shore-birds were fairly plentiful. Flocks of swans were observed in different portions
of the Division.
Black brant shooting was fair.
Band-tailed pigeons were very plentiful during the early fall.
Vermin.
Cougar in some portions of the Division are on the increase; while wolves are definitely
increasing, especially in the Pitt Lake area. Coyotes have been observed also in different
parts of the Lower Mainland, but are not plentiful.
One of the greatest menaces to game birds throughout the Division is the domestic (wild)
cat. Every attempt has been made to rid the forest and fields of this particular type of
vermin. V 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Associations and farmers have again co-operated during the year in the destruction
of vermin, and Game Wardens report accounting for the following vermin during the year:—
Cats      667 Hawks   95
Coyotes        5 Eagles   23
Red foxes        9 Owls ....  42
Dogs        61 Ravens   6
Crows  1,790
Game-protection.
Regular patrols have been carried on throughout the year. The officers and men of the
British Columbia Police have kindly assisted in seeing that the provisions of the " Game Act"
and regulations were carried out. Game Associations, farmers, and others have also assisted
the Game Wardens during the year and their co-operation is very greatly appreciated.
( Game Propagation.
Particulars in regard to pheasant liberations are to be found in another section of this
report. _ _,
Game Reserves.
All game reserves in the Division have been carefully and frequently patrolled.
Fur Trade.
In comparison to previous years, there has been no noticeable increase in the fur trade.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming, especially in regard to mink, is becoming more popular as is evidenced by
an increase in fur-farming permits issued.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system is working very smoothly and has been responsible for less poaching being
carried on, which has resulted in an improved fur output.
Registration of Guides.
There are only a few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made into many outlying sections of the Division,
with very beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
Particulars in regard to hunting accidents are to be found in a separate statement in
this report. _ _ _ _
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The officers and men of " E " Division of the British Columbia Provincial Police, members
of the Game Associations, farmers, and others interested in the conservation of game and fish
have rendered every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout the
Division, and the Game Wardens have in turn endeavoured to assist the police and others
wherever and whenever possible. Game conditions throughout the Division have been fair,
and with proper weather for breeding birds during the coming spring there undoubtedly will
be a decided increase in the stand of upland game birds of all kinds. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 29
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics.
Calendar
Year.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
859
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,674.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
1914	
1915	
1916   	
1917      	
1-18
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
1921 	
1922	
1923	
1924   _..
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
1925.	
1926 	
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927	
1928	
71,324.96
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930 	
45,161.11
1931 	
1932	
46,091.08
40,363.79
1933	
44,167.48
1934	
1935 	
47,102.81
49,831.95
1936	
52,196.50
53,697.48
1937...	
1938 	
44,963.87
Totals
10,375
9.634
713
696
$148,939.07
$3,289,155.94
$917,808.84 V 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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V 31
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Government Agents.
Resident Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
764
157
136
1,450
869
653
687
79
163
186
109
1,145
240
1,151
368
291
1,017
1,913
118
3,189
109
1,010
686
1
3
568
7
318
1,220
333
5,464
1.020
1,546
58
297
$764.00
157.00
2
42
7
6
12
10
2
14
5
1
3
30
10
4
13
1
2
2
3
14
34
23
31
20
31
47
87
190
34
58
36
45
46
3
263
26
147
19
29
99
115
616
39
44
161
15
120
13
24
96
65
1
195
67
220
349
264
73
31
18
50
32
38
8
2
2
33
19
31
44
49
28
12
62
9
6
82
5
49
5
27
15
8
104
35
98
164
44
9
7
41
17
320
63
44
54
1
$9.00
4.00
$773.00
Ashcroft 	
Atlin          	
$10.00
171.00
Clinton 	
136.00
1,450.00
869.00
653.00
687.00
210.00
35.00
6.00
7.00
351.00
1,492.00
869.00
1.00
654.00
30.00
60.00
50.00
717.00
2.00
62.00
Golden   . .... —	
79.00
163.00
186.00
109.00
1,145.00
240.00
1,151.00
368.00
291.00
1,017.00
1,913.00
118.00
3,189.00
109.00
1,010.00
129.00
163.00
10.00
196.00
7.00
7.00
5.00
5.00
2.00
116.00
70.00
1,222.00
240.00
25.00
1,156.00
Lillooet	
398.00
293.00
1,017.00
5.00
9.00
1,927 00
118.00
23.00
3,212.00
109.00
15.00
150.00
2.00
3.00
1,027.00
153.00
686.00
1.00
3.00
568.00
7.00
318.00
1,220.00
333.00
686.00
50.00
20.00
53.00
2.00
6.00
41.00
1.00
104.00
Prince Rupert 	
25.00
574.00
65.00
5.00
113.00
Revelstoke -...	
324.00
1,220.00
347.00
10.00
Salmon Arm 	
10.00
10.00
15.00
70.00
4.00
15 00
Vancouver..	
5,464.00
1,020.00
1,546.00
58.00
297.00
80.00
8.00
9.00
11.00
5,614.00
1,028 00
1,555.00
239.00
170.00
115.00
412.00
Totals - .....
27,325
$27,325.00
240
$1,200.00
3,688
1,666
$306.00
$28,831.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 33
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V 35
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms Licences and Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences.
Anglers' Licences
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Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
1
2
1
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5
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1
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10
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6.00
5.00
6.00
1.00
1.00
14.00
3.00
27.00
1.00
1.00
3.00
17.00
3.00
27.00
2.00
5.00
8.00
2.00
5.00
8.00
81.00
3.00
1.00
81.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
6.00
8.00
14.00
5.00
5.00
Windermere 	
15.00
10.00
25.00
Totals	
11
$33.00
207
$207.00
$240.00 V 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Government
Agents.
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-trader.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
1
5
3
1
18
2
1
2
1
1
27
15
13
10
7
$25.00
1
18
1
15
2
28
5
22
8
114
8
1
14
7
2
15
10
24
38
4
204
92
45
5
19
1
1
6
20
9
757
4
80
10
s
$64.25
4.15
148.89
4.25
323.52
21.25
138.00
76.45
1,123.86
52.98
1
1
1
1
....
4
1
3
1
$89.25
$5.00
-
4.15
Atlin	
125.00
75.00
25.00
273.89
	
79.25
—
353.52
21.25
138.00
$200.00
276.45
450.00
1,573.86
Golden     	
	
52.98
1.46
1.46
50.00
20.48
5.00
75.48
41.00
21.06
105.85
17.95
114.43
41.00
25.00
50.00
46.06
155.85
17.95
25.00
139.43
136.16
	
136.16
25.00
675.00
7.60
6,659.58
5.00
32.60
7,339.58
375.00
325.00
1,669.59
1,075.03
18.50
330.67
5.25
.65
21.66
781.07
188.30
25,950.66
27.05
195.40
41.17
35.70
5.00
2,049.59
1,400.03
18.50
250.00
580.67
5.25
.65
21.66
175.00
956.07
10   1        250.00
438.30
Vancouver	
66
2
3
14
1
1,650.00   |       1
50.00  1  	
75.00   |
350.00   |
25.00 j	
	
200.00
20.00
5.00
15.00
5.00
27,825.66
82.05
285.40
391.17
	
60.70
Totals
203
$5,075.00
2
$400.00'
1,595
$39,423.87
12
$60.00
1
$5.00
$44,963.87 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 37
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1938, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921  ,      _
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,675.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
$30,790.80
1922	
57,458.89
1923 	
67,524.18
1924	
62,446.68
1925 _	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927   	
71,324.96
1928   _
58,823.07
199.9
47,329.89
1930 _	
45,161.11
1931    _	
45,981.08
1932  	
40,363.79
1933   	
44,167.48
1934    _ _     _  ..
47,102.81
1935        _	
49,831.96
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
1936
1937 _	
1938                                               	
$829,272.45
$108,715.00
$937,987.45 V 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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© REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 39
Particulars of Various Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid,
January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Government
Agents.
3
CJ
u
CJ
>
Cfl
CJ
CQ
C
CD
A
vx
E
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m
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c
u
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to
3
u
o
d
o
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u
«
a
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m
V
id
QJ
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cv
>
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is
Alberni	
26
8
62
209
3
18
Ashcroft	
4
	
5
Atlin- -	
1
7
4
16
73
6
189
92
5
63
27
8
Clinton '.	
1
70
Cranbrook	
23
168
1
2
27
173
41
564
1
191
1
Cumberland	
1
2
47
5
10
__i
1
Duncan __	
53
5
1
493
Fernie 	
30
1
1
6
2
48
2
45
Fort Fraser. 	
3
462
14
157
21
20
16
184
737
3,029
6
1
1,067
2
1
Golden  -
21
3
25
4
50
	
41
	
	
Grand Forks	
	
Greenwood __ _
5
7
	
Hope 	
	
	
Kamloops ._„_	
5
9
11
2
1
26
11
1
56
	
	
Kaslo 	
	
Kelowna 	
162
2
	
	
Lillooet 	
	
21
	
	
2
394
63
3
5
22
1
Nanaimo 	
Nelson 	
4
4
124
1
5
25
407
16
2
126
....
	
New Denver _
	
New Westminster
1
68
1
2
1,158
	
	
2
	
	
20
12
—
Penticton __	
	
2
Fouce Coupe	
17
3,995
61
14
125
191
318
1,534
183
4,146
18
14
4,316
119
23
Powell River..	
	
	
	
	
Prince George _
11
901
28
11
30
28
27
92
212
576
2,086
20
5
3,965
30
8
Prince Rupert —
3
515
6
3
9
29
57
202
330
273
63
8
1
426
12
9
Princeton	
1
63
1
	
	
5
Quesnel ..	
1
154
4
1
6
5
5
21
20
2,324
3
	
119
7
	
Revelstoke __	
5
1
	
	
	
Rossland 	
2
.	
	
	
	
	
Salmon Arm.-	
1
1
1
1
1
11
4
50
92
	
Smithers 	
16
197
22
8
33
20
7
255
196
1,419
13
	
5
2,891
	
8
Telegraph Creek
2
122
2
1
4
8
14
33
8
	
	
	
—
Vancouver	
317
8,800
363
1,354
425
508
36
950
5,690
15,148
62,096
457
2,226
437
30,622
1
153
V ernon 	
77
2
6
.. -
10
	
Victoria _
20
	
1
263
5
5
2
6
853
17
1
16
	
50
	
1
"Williams Lake —
3
21
20
1
9
'8
4
......
34
	
2
Windermere	
2
1
1
21
97
......
	
30
Totals _.
405
15,291
502
3,016
672
840
560
1,582
8,461
20,146
76,516
596
2,278
475
44,159
198
215 V 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation-
u
>
H->
1
n
d
<D
i
rt
B
a
u
eq
9
g
'3
a
Ul
n
s
Jan.      6	
Kohtala, W. X       	
2
21
1
12
i
i
i
i
1
1
2
37
6
22
3
282
12
78
31
32
88
11
3
7	
7	
8	
Teather, Herbert  	
Teather, George  	
Biliski, Anton  	
Kelowna	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops	
Vanderhoof .	
Lillooet _	
Vernon	
Nelson 	
Vernon	
11   	
„      13	
18   ..
La Rochelle, A	
Paul, Wm.  	
1
»>      24
6
Feb.       3
3 -
Anderson, Murray  	
3
.,      12
Erskine, T. J. -
Richmond 	
-
May    23	
Hannawald, Carl	
Prince George	
Horsefly. __	
>.        9
Zinchuh, Nazar -	
Johnson, John	
Brown, Rein	
Gardiner, R	
Aug.   15-	
Nov.   28	
Prince George	
17
3
Dec.     14	
14	
Kamloops	
3
17	
Totals..-	
36
i
i
2
72
534
36 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 41
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.      Shotguns.
3	
6	
6	
11.. 	
11	
25	
»
28	
28	
	
28	
28	
28	
28
28	
Feb.
21... 	
21	
1	
17  ...
17	
4. 	
12	
16	
16	
Sept.
2 ...
16	
19	
21	
28 ...
Oct.
6 ...
20	
20	
1	
3 ...
21	
28
28 —
6
21
21	
22.... _ .
Johnson, John	
Moberk, Oscar	
Kohtala, W. J	
Kuro, Joseph	
Touchie, Matthew..
Anderson, Murray.
Vanburgher, Tony.
Pearson, Stanley.—
Cannon, Stanley___
Buchanan, Ken	
Ruttan, Davis.	
Sweet, Steve...	
Reyburg, Harry	
Hodgson, Stewart-
White, Cyril 	
Iverson, Otto. __.
Hogstrom, John	
Reynolds, Harold—
Waske, Harry	
Lamoureux, R.	
Andrew, Alex	
Williams, David—.
Olson, Albert	
Ohlund, Chas	
Garner, T. L.._	
Hougen, Halbert—
Hanson, Martin	
Bedell, J. P. 	
Hakatani, I.	
Burk, Gerald-.	
Canoe, Elliott P.„„
Gorke, Theodore	
Kilburger, F	
Heppner, P. L	
Newton, Wm	
Frende, Nestor	
Robinson, C. E	
Connor, Thomas.	
Connor, Robert	
Barker, Jack	
Totals	
Campbell River..
Vernon 	
Vernon 	
Quesnel	
Alberni.	
Vernon	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Vane ou ver	
Vancouver	
Vancouver 	
Van cou ver	
Vancouver	
Saanich.	
C lo verdale	
Quesnel _	
Quesnel 	
Vancouver	
Pitt Meadows	
V an couver	
Vane ou ver	
Alberni	
Alberni	
Vancouver	
D uncan	
Alberni.  	
Duncan 	
Dawson Creek— 	
Queen Charlotte City..
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Vernon  	
Victoria 	
Chilliwack 	
Victoria _.
Squamish  	
Alert Bay____  	
Abbotsf ord _	
Abbotsford	
Vancouver 	
Note.—Revenue  derived  from   sale  of  confiscated  and  surrendered  fur  and  confiscated  firearms   during  the
calendar year 1938 amounted to $491.32. V 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1938.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves,
Cougars.
Total.
1
1
144
213
37
166
8
14
16
149
3
33
36
141
40
91
9
76
1
42
140
6
30
22
25
4
108
380
158
1
81
1
3
8.
1
36
2
4
142
138
124
17
13
261
67
16
18
14
2
34
20
6
3
5
9
22
3
1
33
8
28
12
1
5
1
14
2       |
16
40
1
1
33
13
20
19
$370.00
Atlin _ 	
812.00
12.00
Clinton  	
598.00
466.00
760.00
410.00
194.00
752.00
116.00
28.00
212.00
738.00
66.00
86.00
752.00
442.00
560.00
320.00
60.00
282.00
1,438.00
20.00
1,812.00
1,282.00
404.00
1,250.00
12.00
80.00
194.00
2,660.00
1,338.00
476.00
1,320.00
Windermere.— j -	
696.00
2,094
915
384
$21,018.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1938.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922      _	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
828
915
872
195
173
137
183
372
444
E30
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
172
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
20,398.40
1923  _	
1924	
1925	
	
24,397.00
41,077.00
1926 	
5,770
10,046
1927	
2,487
65,377.95
1928	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929	
	
	
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,033 15
1930       	
	
1931	
	
3,427
1932	
80 00
1933 	
	
6,285.00
6,825 00
1934	
1935  	
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
	
1936  	
20,350 00
1937    ....
19,540.00
21,018.00
1938	
Totals 	
6,479
6,642
66,774
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$484,014.80 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 43
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
H*
a
M
u   .
03 fl
«!
iffi
o
'tH
o
13
a
2d
h£
(U   H
■"__.
n
*
o
O
u
¥
Q
.5
a rt
M*
O
O
"3
+j .
c 0,
3 _
o -
2
S
33
"ft
Amount.
Clinton—
Alsin, Carl, Seattle, Wash. __ __	
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
1
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$50.00
25.00
25.00
Bull, L. L,, Seattle, Wash __	
40.00
Bull, Mrs. Leland, Seattle, Wash. 	
25.00
25.00
Gardner, R. L., Seattle, Wash  _ — _	
Hollingsworth, 0. R-, Bellingham, Wash— —
55.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Merkley, E. W., Seattle, Wash _ —
Palmer, M. H., Seattle, Wash..„_	
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Schaffer, M. F., Bellingham, Wash  _	
25.00
25.00
Show, H., Ellensburg, Wash __  	
Speck, R. H., Culver City, Cal __	
25.00
25.00
Tres, E. T., Seattle, Wash. -	
25.00
Cranbrook—
55.00
Cheney, G. W., Portland, Ore	
15.00
15.00
70.00
Knudsen, T., Glendale, Cal.—  I: 	
25.00
55.00
40.00
Pilcher, Allan, Withington, Eng._ _	
Randall, Cecil, Yakima, Wash _	
55.00
15.00
65.00
25.00
40.00
Fernie—
25.00
Minzel H I, Colville, Wash	
15.00
Pitz, Harry, Spirit Lake, Idaho _ — __ —-	
25.00
80.00
Fort Fraser—
25.00
.... 1 ....
25.00
1  | ....
1 1 --
1  1 —
25.00
25.00
25.00
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
50.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
65.00
25.00
25.00 V 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938—
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
- c
s^
a a
3 _
O -
Amount.
Golden—
Beale, R. G., England	
Edison, F., Dawson Springs, Ky..
Gould, F. M., New York, N.Y	
Krippner, W., New York, N.Y	
Heyderanter, W., Berlin, Germany-
Lea, N., New York, N.Y	
Lipscomb, Vera B., Wapato, Wash-
Mayer, W., New York, N.Y 	
Mehlhorn, Dr. H. G., Berlin, Germany..
McNab, J. L., San Francisco, Cal	
Owens, M. H., Louisville, Ky	
Harrison, Geo., Banff, Alta. (trophies over period of years,
1936-38)	
Greenwood—
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash 	
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash  	
Bull, J. A., Seattle, Wash   _	
Elmore, A. A., Grand Coulee, Wash—
Gwinn, M. D., Omak, Wash	
Manley, J. J., Seattle, Wash 	
Paulson, E. M., Seattle, Wash...	
Schou, Omar, Seattle, Wash	
Stender, Bruce, Seattle, Wash	
Stewart, E. T., Omak, Wash 	
Styer, C. M., Seattle, Wash	
Kamloops—
Bennett, F. A., Pomeroy, Wash	
Hag-eman, G. A., Hollister, Cal	
Somovia (Jr.), J. R., Hollister, Cal.	
Somovia, Juanita, Hollister, Cal	
Lillooet—
Degarimore, O. J., Bremerton, Wash-
Dick, G. T., Bremerton, Wash 	
Keis, Martha, Seattle, Wash	
Stadler, L., Seattle, Wash	
Stadler (Jr.), L., Seattle, Wash-
Van Thiel, T., Seattle, Wash	
Watts, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Merritt—
Barnes, O. C, Kent, Wash	
Bauer, H-, Washington, D.C	
Brill, F. W., Seattle, Wash...	
Carnes, U. D., Seattle, Wash	
Castiner, Neal, Seattle, Wash	
Colasurdo, A., Seattle, Wash	
Fisher, W. H., Everett, Wash	
Gehman, L., San Francisco, Cal—
Hannah, J. H., Riviera, Cal	
Hoff, H. B., Seattle, Wash _
Jordan, B., Seattle, Wash.	
Kean, W. C, Seattle, Wash	
Linlak, H. L., Seattle, Wash	
McFee, D. J., Seattle, Wash	
Norcross, P., Los Angeles, CaL.
Oliver, C. T., Kent, Wash....	
Peterson, W. E., Seattle, Wash	
Replogle, E. G., Los Angeles, Cal—
Ruth, A. H., Pullman, Wash	
$65.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
90.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
65.00
30.00
80.00
125.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
60.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 45
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
'tH
o
hi
n
CQ
u   .
rt C
TO £
CQ o
3
O
.B
rt
O
'_
B
rt
I!
. Q>
_\-g
_ s:
xix
s
o
rA
s
d
P
"a
■ri
SI
o
o
8
B
'3 .
B P.
2  QJ
o -
2
g
'3
Amount.
Merritt—Continued.
Steen, W. H., Seattle, Wash   _	
-_.
1
1
1
-
i
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1.
3
....
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
—
1
1
--
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
I
....
....
2
1
-
I
....
$25.00
Nanaimo—
25.00
New Westminster—
Bice, Dr. D. F., Yakima, Wash.— _ -.
40.00
Cullin, C. C, Seattle, Wash  _	
15.00
25.00
Gray H E., Seattle, Wash.                  	
Groninger, R. R., Seattle, Wash    	
Harms, J. D., Seattle, Wash 	
40.00
65.00
25.00
Hilkert, A. W., Seattle, Wash - - _ 	
Hoodermaker, E. D., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
15.00
30.00
50.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
Melby C E   Seattle Wash.                          	
26.00
Pauhlman, Dr. V. C, Chehalis, Wash.	
25.00
15.00
Pride, G. 0., Vaughan, Wash _ _	
Pugsley, E. F., Wenatchee, Wash— _ _  .
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
26.00
Sandona, Tony, Cle-elum, Wash - -	
25.00
40 00
40.00
25.00
Stead C B   Seattle Wash.               - 	
25.00
Studebaker, C. W., Castle Rock, Wash   	
Sund, William, Conway, Wash  _ _	
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
Penticton—
30.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Pouce Coupe—
50.00
115.00
40.00
65.00
80.00
100.00
....  1           80.00
[ V 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
H
'C
rt
9
TO
M
o   ■
3 a
cq a
3
o
u
T3
a
11
. QJ
QJ _2
cafe
rt
o
O
u
OJ
V
a
h
J
a  .
B"S
5 S
QJ
CO
O
o
IS
B
'rt
b a
3 _
O QJ
2
N
a
rt
Amount.
Pouce Coupe—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
i
l
l
l
l
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
l
—
....
l
...
--
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
....
$50.00
145.00
65.00
65.00
40.00
40.00
Hill, Dr. Kyle, Hempstead, N.Y.    -
30.00
Hollenbeck, H. C„ Salt Lake City, Utah	
25.00
75.00
Kiefer, F. M., New York, N.Y -	
55.00
Kolb, L. H., Holland, Mich	
155.00
145.00
90.00
40.00
115.00
65.00
Mewby, Dr. H., Rapid City, S.D	
90.00
Novotny, L. W., Berwyn, 111  ._ _ __ __._
Pier, L. A., Belvidere, S.D	
25.00
115.00
Pistole, Dr. W. H., Memphis, Tenn- _	
55.00
25.00
15.00
Schoellkopf, J. F., Dallas, Texas    _	
65.00
50.00
Smith, C. E., Hulmeville, Pa. _	
50.00
Smith, E. D., Columbus, Ohio   	
50.00
Stephenson, A. W., Salt Lake City, Utah _ _	
50.00
80.00
65.00
Sulkers, C F., Holland, Mich  _ 	
Walker, W. D., Meadville, Pa    _	
130.00
75.00
50.00
West, Dr. H., Norwood Station, Pa _	
25.00
30.00
Prince George—
130.00
Ewing, 0. R., New York, N.Y   _	
110.00
Griffith, W. C., Chicago, III _ -.-
55.00
Jett, S. M., Akron, Ohio, . __ _ _ _ _  .,
55.00
15.00
25.00
Tacona, F., Seattle, Wash..—   _ _	
Prince Rupert—
Bard, F. W _ _	
25.00
25.00
Restvedt, G. P., Ambrose, N.D. 	
15.00
Quesnel—
Diobald, E. A., Kambrick, Idaho   _	
26.00
25.00
Hoder, H. A., Colorado Springs, Colorado	
50.00
40.00
80.00
25.00
25.00
Meek, P. F., Escondido, Cal. -                             	
25 00
25.00
Smith, G. 0., Cleveland, Ohio.... _ _	
Watts, W. A., Kambrick, Idaho ..._ _  	
40.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 47
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
13
.N
'u
O
'H
a
TO
o   .
a d
TO fe
. o
Sm
QJ .
CQ _
3
o
-a
u
el
O
T3
S
rt
2 .J
31
. i
OS
US
03
rt
o
O
M
01
CD
Q
.2
'rt
B   .
0)
—
o
0
h
4J     .
B a
3 jS
S —
s
H
"ft
rt
Amount.
Quesnel—Continued.
Watts, G. E., Seattle, Wash.
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
i
i
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
i
....
--
i
i
i
i
i
$25.00
80.00
Smithers—
55.00
Stoll, G. W., North Hollywood, Cal.
30 00
Telegraph Creek—
185.00
Gilmore, R. R., Berkeley, Cal	
75.00
3  1    1
245.00
Vancouver—
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
50.00
Beale, R. G., Chelmsford, Eng   _	
65.00
25.00
Crabtree, S. B., Tyler, Texas '  _  \
Miller, K. C, Tyler, Texas  _ _  j
Dodd, J. A., Bloomfield, N.J.            	
120.00
40.00
Eubank, J. F., Houston, Texas.   !	
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
25.00
Minton, H. C, Fort Worth, Texas. __. _ ., .„
25.00
25.00
15.00
Patterson, W. W., Saginaw, Mich....- ,', _ __ .',	
25.00
75.00
15.00
55.00
65.00
Wells R S   Detroit, Mich.
15.00
Vernon—
Grant  I  P
40.00
40.00
Victoria—
35.00
15.00
Williams Lake—
40.00
Cranston, L. A., San Francisco, Cal  — _ —__
Dole, J. D-, San Francisco, Cal  —	
Heath, K. A., Seattle, Wash _ _	
Hoder, Henry A., Colorado Springs, Colorado _ ,
Kelso, Charles, Chula Vista, Cal _ __	
50.00
25.00
50.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
Windermere—
25.00
Atwater, W. W., Grand Coulee, Wash  .__._-	
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
55.00
105.00
40.00 V 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1938—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
.s
o
tH
s
S
TO
m g
. o
V.    *H
« _
3
o
o
-3
B
K
Oi_4
_HI
. QJ
QJ _3
to
rt
o
O
c
V
OJ
O
° n
a)
to
O
o
2
_B
'rt
4J>     .
b a
3 QJ
O QJ
3
H
is
'a
rt
Amount.
Windermere—Continued.
Hedrick, C. L., Hot Springs, N.M _ -  _.	
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
....
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$80.00
75.00
Hankins, Lowell, Rock Springs, Texas	
Hankins, Otto, Rock Springs, Texas    .
Holt, 0. B., Medland, Texas _	
50.00
50.00
105.00
80.00
40.00
65.00
25.00
80.00
Nelson, Dr. E., Alhambra, Cal   	
Prins, Martin, Grand Coulee, Wash.. __ _	
Randle, C. N., Yakima, Wash SS
Read, George, Los Angeles, Cal _ __ __	
Richter (Sr.), Karl, Obersdorf, Germany _ _	
40.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
40.00
80.00
55.00
25.00
110.00
Waterman, L. S., Reno, Nevada. _ , _	
30.00
Totals 	
4]
32
!
56
70
5
120
155
49
36
$11,780.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 49
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1938.
See Foot-note
b:s
n
m
xix
s
§
S
w
B
O
33
o
>
B
o
O
o _
4
—< rt
1-
Description of Offence.
VJ
: Q
r\
O
mis
: 0
B
O
:   to
o'.i,
B
O
-    ro
s P
B
O
•     D)
: P
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
1
1
2
2
$40.00
Hunting game between one hour after sunset and one hour before
8
3
3
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals of female
3
3
2
2
i
10
11
220.00
Killing,   hunting,   or  having  in   possession  game   animals   during
R
9
15
2
?:
29
31
555.00
3
1
4
4
40.00
1
2
3
3
30.00
4
1
2
7
7
30.00
Removing all evidence of sex of game animals.— __ _ _	
1
5
1
6
10.00
?,
?,
?
A
65.00
1
1
1
Game Birds.
1
1
1
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds    _ —	
1
5
6
6
60.00
Hunting  or  in  possession   of  migratory game birds  during  close
5
1
11
1
17
18
190.00
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
2
3
4
1
14
2
?4
'6
315.00
Hunting certain game birds with a rifle contrary to the game regu-
1
1
1
10.00
13
13
13
100.00
Hunting migratory game birds from a power-boat..—	
4
4
1
8
9
95.00
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours  _	
1
7
—
1
2
9
11
85.00
Hunting migratory game birds over baited area —   _	
1
1
1
2
10.00
Possession of game birds on premises of restaurant _ _ — _
....
1
1
1
10.00
Trapping.
3
3
3
Interfering with a registered trap-line—_ _ _ —
1
3
6
4
10
100.00
1
?,
3
3
30 00
Setting traps within a mile of a registered trap-line  __	
1
1
2
2
10.00
1
Si
10'
6
2
1
22
Trapping during the close season  _ "	
2
2
1
4
5
85.00
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
....
4
1
5
5
125.00
Carrying firearms without a licence— _ _ __ _	
17
15
25
21
19
3
97
100
805.00
1
1
1
1
1
1
?
50.00
Killing game without a licence _ _ — —
2
1
3
3
75.00
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accom
panied by an adult _     _ —
3
1
1
2
7
7
20.00
1
1
2
2
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence _.
"
1
12
12
110.00
Resident angling or carrying fishing-tackle without a licence.—-	
15
12
12
27
2
66
68
500.00
Using another person's licence or permit or allowing same to be
u   d
-
1
1
2
2
100.00
Firearms.
Carrying  loaded  firearms  in  or  discharging  same  from  an  auto-
3
7
9
1
3
23
'3
160.00
Carrying or in possession of unplugged pump, repeating, or auto-
?
4
1
a
10
10
70.00
Carrying firearms  in  launch,  etc.,  during close season without a
9
1
2
3
20.00
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
1
1
1
10
1
12
13
100.00 V 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1938-
Continued.
See Foot-
NOTE.
rn
"id
—
s
XIX
S
n
B
0
o
'>
B
O
o
b2
i
h
Description of Offence.
C
.2
r "_.
: Q
S
.2
: a
B
0
: a
b'
o
■   a    S
C
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Accompanying a non-resident hunting big-game without a permit _
Carrying firearms or traps within boundaries of Game Reserves	
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
8
3
1
1
1
8
3
1
11
2
1
3
11
9
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
5
1
1
4
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
6
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
—
....
1
6
1
1
3
1
7
2
1
1
5
15
1
3
10
3
9
7
2
1
1
1
15
2
8
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$45.00
10.00
10.00
Failing to keep a record-book of pelts of fur-bearing animals pur-
100.00
10.00
Making false statement in obtaining a licence, etc  __ _	
70.00
40.00
10.00
Possession of unprime pelts of fur-bearing animals      ,
25.00
Trespassing in pursuit of game..-   _	
100.00
10.00
Unlawfully posting lands against trespass without being the owner
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
30.00
43.00
Exceeding bag-limit on trout   . _ _ 	
14.00
27.00
28.60
Setting nets across mouth of stream    _  ___	
Setting nets for fish without a licence or permit-   	
20.00
10.00
15.00
25.00
Taking undersized trout __       —
86.00
4.00
Unlawful possession or use of salmon-roe _ __ _...
40.00
$5,729.50
Gaol Sentences.
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
Killing or possession of game animals of female sex  __	
Leaving traps set after end of open season  _ _ — _..
1
1
Non-resident Indians hunting in British Columbia _	
Possession   of   carcass   of   a   deer  without   tag   securely   fastened
thereto    _ _ _ _ _ _	
Possession of an unplugged pump, repeating, or automatic shotgun
Possession of game animals on premises of logging camp, etc.	
Possession loaded firearms in  or discharging same from an auto-
Trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence _ _	
Trapping or in possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during
....  |    5
Totals - _ _ _ 	
97   1   96
161
79   1
51
613
Note.—" A " Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one week to three months. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 51
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by a Representative of the
Game Department during the Year 1938, at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
near Chilliwack, B.C.
Baldpate     22 Mallard   966
Green-wing Teal    20 Pintail     50
Returns from 2,464 Holders of Special Firearms (Trapping) Licences, showing Big
Game, Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1937-38.
Big Game.
Bear 	
Caribou
Deer 	
Moose ...
466
104
870
582
Mountain-goat   122
Mountain-sheep      11
Wapiti (elk)        7
Beaver  7,651
Fox   814
Fisher  302
Lynx   857
Marten   6,152
Mink   5,398
Muskrats   51,104
Fur-bearing Animals.
Otter       256
Racoon      1,290
Skunk         100
Squirrels   33,619
Weasel  32,077
Wildcat         203
Wolverine        273
Cougar  .	
Coyotes    2,128
Predatory Animals.
29 Wolves
129
Fur-farm Returns, 1938 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31at,
1938.
6,850
30
15,799
348
978
3,236
12
12,472
172
142
18
1,282
42
2,494
89
10,349
Muskrats	
1,714
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 61 ;   nil returns, 9 ;
received, 20.    Eleven fur-farmers reported farming muskrats, but number on hand unknown.
no returns
Fur-farm Returns, 1938 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1938.
7
9
172
7
2
38
3
25
7
84
73
40
Fitch     	
Note.—Figures in respect to beaver only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 4 ;   no returns received, 4.    Eleven
fur-farmers reported farming beaver, but number on hand unknown. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 53
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1938.
Kind of Anfmals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
" A."
" B."
" C."
"D."
" E."
Animals.
1
198
15
54
687
54
43
59
17
86
73
12
46
41
415
91
9
344
41
7
11
122
7
101
39
29
1
836
145
12
627
103
8
3
5
1
255
24
8
	
12
667
5
9
61
27
1,790
95
23
23
42
6
12
Cats	
1,063
34
Coyotes     	
Fox           	
157
9
39
185
Skunks 	
Wolves  —
Birds.
Crows  	
27
2
3,983
409
95
Magpies     	
994
59
215
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1938.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
290
780
52
260
563
50
40
1,569
386
1,739
1,229
1,527
308
1,129
105
1,451
1,419
1,619
12
252
Chilliwack     . 	
Delta   	
Creston    	
96
Cobble Hill _	
48
Lulu and Sea Islands	
134
292
230
290
Pitt Meadows	
24
36
Yale  	
3,604
10,924
1,402
Summary.
District.
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland  ..
Interior 	
Pheasants.
....    3,604
.... 10,924
....    1,402
Total
15,930
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1938.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1938.
Pheasants   3,795 Ducks         11
Quail        16
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1938.
Pheasants
Pheasants
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1938.
18,173
1,075 V 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1938.
Pheasants   15,796 Ducks 	
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1938.
Pheasants   5,262 Ducks 	
Quail        16
6
Note.—During the year 1938 there were 191 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year thirty-four of these farmers discontinued operations.
Twenty licensed game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1938—955 bands at
10 cents—$95.50.
Summary
of Game-fish Distributions, showing Eggs, Fry,
AND FlNGERLINGS, 1938.
Kind of Game Fish.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fingerlings and
Yearlings.
1,487,530
93,240
1,899,075
1,980,000
2,282,185
564,783
98,500
3,552,714
24,244
Kamloops     -	
627,210
31,366
Totals
7,742,030
4,215,997
682,820
Summary of Game-fish Eggs and Fry on Hand at Hatcheries, December 31st, 1938.
Hatchery.
Cut-throat.
Eastern Brook.
Kamloops.
Kokanee.
Steelhead.
Fry.
Eggs.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
Fry.
6,000
130,496
236,135
256,897
30,063
42,377
61,748
50,623
23,869
154,478
83,347
-    149,440
40,658
5,578
184,617
236,135
256,897
558,419
30,063
5,578
Eggs 	
Fry 	
Fingerlings
Total distributions
Summary.
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1938
Total
7,742,030
4,215,997
682,820
12,640,847
1,271,709
13,912,556
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized in
connection with their Game Fish Culture operations; subsidies being granted by the B.C.
Game Department to the following:—Powell River District Board of Trade; Revelstoke
District Rod and Gun Club; Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club; Princeton Fish, Game, and
Forest Protective Association;   Penticton and District Rod and Gun Club.
Eggs were also supplied to the Rupert Rod and Gun Club, Prince Rupert; Ocean Falls
Rod and Gun Club, Ocean Falls; Prince George Rod and Gun Club, Prince George; McBride
Rod and Gun Club, McBride.
The Washington State Game Department was supplied with 200,000 cut-throat trout
eggs. Later on the Department mentioned will return a similar number of trout-eggs to the
B.C. Game Commission. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 55
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V 57
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V 59
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V 61
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V 63
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Cranbrook Hatchery—Continued.
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H REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 65
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Er V 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cochran, J. D.—
Colebank, G. F...
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1938.
Barkerville and Quesnel Districts.
 Barkerville. Rawling, A. L	
Tibbies, F..
Hixon.
Cornwall, C. C Barkerville.
Evans, Chas Quesnel.
Ludditt, B. C Barkerville.
Quanstrom, Wm Quesnel.
Tibbies, Jack	
Tibbies, James	
Youngs, Grover A.
..Quesnel.
.Quesnel.
..Quesnel.
..Quesnel.
.Barkerville.
Clark, H. J	
Evans, Neil Peachland.
Haskell, Gordon Westbridge.
MacNeill, Hamish Peachland.
Okanagan and Boundary Districts.
.Keremeos.
Peterson, S. G..
Raymer, T. A._.
Richter, Hans...
Willis, G. E	
..Westbridge.
Kelowna.
.Olalla.
-Keremeos.
Cariboo District.
Abbs, Ed. S Fawn.
Abbs (Jr.), R :..Fawn.
Abram, A. E Forest Grove.
Anderson, Axel Fawn.
Anderson, Dave Clearwater.
Archie, Geo Canim Lake.
Armstrong, Ole Bridge Lake.
Bell, Darwin .70-Mile House.
Bidstrup, H Likely.
Birdstone, A Baker.
Bones, Frank.
.Clinton.
Bones, Peter Clinton.
Borthwick, Hector Forest Grove.
Boyle, Hugh Bridge Lake.
Bradford, W. J Bridge Lake.
Brown, Donald Soda Creek.
Burgess, T. R Roe Lake.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Colin, A. A Dog Creek.
Colin, Peter H Dog Creek.
Collier, E Riske Creek.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Daves, Bill 70-Mile House.
Day, Norman E Kelowna.
Dewees, Pete Likely.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford Lac la Hache.
Fairchild, Cecil .Williams Lake.
Haines, Wm. E 70-Mile House.
Hall, Wm. A Soda Creek.
Hamilton, G. G...
..Williams Lake.
Hamilton, H. M Lac la Hache.
Hansen, J. F Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Hansen, W. B Bridge Lake.
Henderson, J R.R. 1, Kelowna.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hooker, S. B. Horsefly.
Hurstfield, Frank Macalister.
Hutcheson, D. B..
Johnson, C	
Johnson, 0. M	
Jowsey, Jack	
Larson, Ole	
Lehna, Earl	
Lind, Geo	
McDonald, J. A....
McKort, C	
Monkman, F. G....
Moore, W. E	
Muench, Harry...
Myers, Alfred	
Nelson, B. I	
Nicol, Alex	
Ogden, Percy	
Park, J. P	
Parminter, J. W.
Parminter, Ross..
Peters, Machel	
Pollard, J	
Rioux, Ed	
Roseneau, Steve	
Scheepbower, J. A.
Sellers, A	
Sneve, Ben	
Stanislaus, P	
Thygesen, Julius....
Turney, Ralph	
Vickers, Robert	
Walters, Gerald	
Walters, Glenn	
Walters, L. E	
Walters, R. I	
Weir, Dan	
Winquist, W	
Young, Geo	
Young, Herber	
Young, Wm	
__70-Mile House.
..70-Mile House.
.Fawn.
..Bridge Lake.
.Roe Lake.
_.70-Mile House.
..Williams Lake.
.. Likely.
..Alexandria.
.Narcosli Creek.
...Wells.
_Lac la Hache.
..Horsefly.
...Vancouver.
..Horsefly.
..Lac la Hache.
..70-Mile House.
.. Horsefly.
..Likely.
.Clinton.
..Clinton.
..Roe Lake.
...70-Mile House.
...70-Mile House.
..Soda Creek.
...70-Mile House.
..Canim Lake.
.Horsefly.
..Lone Butte.
..Fawn.
..Likely.
..Horsefly.
...Horsefly.
...150-Mile House.
..Williams Lake.
.-.Likely.
Lac la Hache.
...Lac la Hache.
.Clinton. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938.
V 67
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1938—Continued.
Chilcotin District.
Church, R. H Big Creek.
Mackill, C Kleena Kleene.
Mackill, J Kleena Kleene.
Penno, E. E.
Ross, C	
.Redstone.
...Kleena Kleene.
Ball, G. E Telegraph Creek
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek
Cassiar District.
Harris, W._
Ratcliff, Walter Bella Coola.
Spicher, P. A Glendale Cove.
Coast District.
Stanton, J. R..
-Telegraph Creek.
.Glendale Cove.
Fort George District.
Coe, J. C Mapes.
Cowart, J. T.  Prince George.
Davidson, C. B Vanderhoof.
Davidson, L. H Vanderhoof.
Dennison, G. M Mt. Robson.
Hargreaves, R. F.  Mt. Robson.
Haynes, E. B Dome Creek.
Clark (Jr.), J. E Ootsa Lake.
Fox, James W Telkwa.
Harrison, R. B Wistaria.
Henson, F. E Marilla.
Holland, Julian Telkwa.
Laveck, Wm. J Nithi River.
Blair, Irvin Kamloops.
Fleet, Earl Kamloops.
Goddard, Harry Kamloops.
Latremouille, J. L Little Fort.
Marsden, G Savona.
Mobley, C. W Tappen.
Nation, Wm Kamloops.
Hooker, G. B Bend.
Hooker, J. B Bend.
Jones, Isaac H Vanderhoof.
Lestin, John A Prince George.
L'Heureux, J. E Mt. Robson.
Robinson, John Summit Lake.
Hazelton District.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Morgan, J. E Wistaria.
Van Tine, E Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, L. E Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, Wm Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Ray, John B Clearwater Station.
Smith, Allen E Kamloops.
Stevenson, C. R Little Fort.
Walters, Budd Savona.
Walters, Floyd Savona.
Walters, Loretta Savona.
Kootenay District.
Anderson, Andrew B.._.Corbin.
Appleby, Gordon Duncan.
Ashman, Levi Waterton Lakes P.O..
Alta.
Bagley, A. J Windermere.
Baher, M. C Natal.
Barbour, Geo Wilmer.
Bergenham, Peter ...Beavermouth.
Brewer, S. H Invermere.
Couilard, Harry Natal.
Cretney, E. F Fort Steele.
Cretney, Leonard Fort Steele.
Dilworth, James Athalmer.
Galbraith, F. E Galena.
Gilbert, F. P Field.
Harrison, Wm Edgewater.
Henry, Arthur -..Fort Steele.
Jones, R. K Golden
Kain, Isadore Wilmer.
Lake, Wm. P Invermere.
Larsen, Ole Radium Hot Springs.
Lawrence, G. C Golden.
Legart, Geo. J Brisco.
Lum, Peter Fort Steele.
McGinnis, E. C Kimberley.
McKay, G. G. J Athalmer.
McLintick, Lee Golden.
Morigeau, Martin Fairmont.
Munro, J. H Vancouver.
Muska, John Vancouver.
Nixon, D. C Invermere.
Nixon, J. H Invermere.
Nixon, W. J Invermere.
Philipps, E. 0 North Vancouver. V 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1938—Continued.
Kootenay District—Continued.
Philipps, F. A North Vancouver. Tegart, R .Windermere.
Pommier, E Skookumchuck. Vernon-Wood, N Invermere.
Richter, F Radium Hot Springs. Washburn, L. F Fernie.
Rutherford, G. M Invermere. White, J Fort Steele.
Stanley, Leo Fairmont. Wiedenman, Edward. Golden.
Stewart, C. W Spillimacheen. Wiedenman, O. W Leanchoil.
Tegart, J. H Windermere. York, R. A Invermere.
Lillooet District.
Cameron, A. L Ashcroft. Manson, W Lillooet.
Campbell, Pete Big Bar. Matier, James H Ashcroft.
Colins, E. M Cache Creek. Michel, T Lillooet.
Grinder, John Big Bar. Williams, Albert Shalalth.
Land, B Shalalth.
Peace River District.
Brown, W. J. W Fort St. John. Garbit, T Hudson Hope.
Calliou, John Moberly Lake. Gauthier, Alexis Moberly Lake.
Calliou, Robert J Kelly Lake, B.C., via Gerlinsky, A Fort St. John.
Goodfare P.O., Alta. Goodwin, Russell Fort St. John.
Calliou, Pat Little Prairie. Golota, F. W Rolla.
Calliou, Peter Little Prairie. Hambler, George Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Calliou, Sam Moberly Lake. Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Callison, Lynch Rose Prairie. Lamont, Al East Pine.
Cameron, Patrick Little Prairie. McCusker, J. F Fort St. John.
Campbell, Al Kelly Lake, B.C., via Millar, Wm Fort St. John.
Goodfare P.O., Alta. Minaker, Glen Taylor.
Campbell, Leo Kelly Lake, B.C., via Noskey, N Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Goodfare P.O., Alta. Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Campbell, Milton Kelly Lake, B.C., via Ross, J. A Hudson Hope.
Goodfare P.O., Alta. Wallace, Stanley Hudson Hope.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla. Wanyandi, St. Paul....„.Kelly Lake, B.C., via
Cotrey, Alfred Moberly Lake. Goodfare P.O., Alta.
Dopp, Edgar Bear Flat.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alberta. Sunderman, Sidney Hythe, Alberta.
Harrison, George Banff, Alberta. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1938. V 69
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1938.
Attorney-General (Minister) Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
Corporal R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Junior Clerk F. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Fish Culture Branch.
Superintendent , A. Robertson .Cultus Lake.
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Fishery Officer J. F. Thompson Nelson.
Fishery Officer C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
Junior Fishery Officer H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity Sooke.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Qualicum.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Kamloops.
" A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Lake Cowichan.
Game Warden W. N. Massey .'. Alert Bay.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Duncan.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak, V.I.
" B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Stenographer . Miss M. Marapodi Nelson.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Invermere.
Game Warden N. Cameron .Golden.
Game Warden R. W. MacMartin Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden _M. B. Ewart Nelson.
Game Warden .W. H. Cartwright Creston.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Penticton.
Game Warden W. H. McLean Greenwood.
Game Warden H. V. Morgan Princeton. V 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1938—Continued.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Inspector , R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart  Clinton.
Game Warden G. Sandiford Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game Warden E. H. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Lillooet.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
Game Warden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Clerk R. A. Johnson Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Corporal ■. H. J. Engelson Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Finlay Forks.
Game Warden G. Davis McDame Creek.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron J_adner.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden F. Urquhart .Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Jones Ganges.
Corporal R. E. Allan Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
C. Shuttleworth Kamloops. J. Dewar Chase River.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Bayfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.
925-939-1625  

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