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THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1939

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 THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
OP   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF    THE   PROVINCE  OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1938, TO MARCH 31ST, 1939
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present the   Thirty-fifth  Annual   Report  of  the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1939.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Ross, George A., Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer.
Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I submit herewith the Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the period from April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939.
The policy of the present administration is to apply the most modern methods in the
treatment of delinquents committed to our care. It is generally agreed that an institution
such as ours should not only serve as a place of detention but also that emphasis. should be
placed on observation, training, and suitable adjustment in order that the boys may become
worthy members of society. It is our major consideration to become familiar with the
causative factors which lead to a boy's removal from his former surroundings and, in addition,
to provide a programme which will develop and stimulate normal social attitudes and foster
the desire for better living.
Where allied services are available, they are made use of in order to help us in the
accomplishment of our task. It is now our policy to present to the Provincial psychiatrist
all our boys, instead of only those displaying definite abnormalities. Experience has shown
that by thorough physical and mental examination, clinical observation and test, many
unsuspected factors and traits of character are discovered which might otherwise be unobserved. Particular reference must be made to the very fine co-operation we have received
in this regard from the staff of the Child Guidance Clinic.
We are endeavouring to provide a programme of training in manual arts and character
development but are handicapped by inadequate facilities. Lack of accommodation for segregation brings about the consequent result of all types and ages being in constant association.
The departmental reports, which are included herein, will give some idea of the varied
activity and the numbers participating. It might be added that on account of the short time
most boys are with us they do not become proficient in any particular trade. However, they
do learn how to use tools and acquire considerable knowledge which, in the cases of older boys,
assists in locating employment upon their release.
The garden, while far from providing all the necessary vegetables for the table, is an
outlet for many boys and a valuable educational feature. As a 'result, several boys have
located farm placements upon leaving the school. Our present policy is to use the available
land for the cultivation of fruit and vegetables, taking into consideration the numbers available to care adequately for the garden without detracting from other programme features.
We feel that activities which will help in reducing the per capita cost are worthy of
consideration.
It would appear from the number of commitments that the training features of the
school are being recognized more and more. It may be that the school is being called upon
to perform the functions of an observation clinic as many boys come to us, particularly from
outlying districts, who display no criminal tendencies but are in need of discipline. Also, in
many cases, adjustments are necessary at the home before the boy returns. We cannot speak
too highly of the fine work being done in this regard by the Welfare Field Service and of the
co-operation we have received from this source in the assembly of the information so necessary
for a true picture of the boy's heritage.
It is obvious, however, that consideration should be given to a preventive programme,
particularly in districts where the services of probation officers are not available. In order
to cope adequately with the delinquency situation in British Columbia it would seem advisable
that provision be made for a Provincial probation service.
Several boys committed to our care have been placed in foster-homes, the results obtained
being most satisfactory. Our thanks are due to the Superintendent of Neglected Children
in this respect and for her intense interest in the welfare of all boys who are inmates of
our school. The appointment of an Advisory Committee to the Industrial Schools towards the close
of the year and the subsequent survey of our school programme and administration have been
of great help to the new principal, who appreciates the whole-hearted co-operation and interest
of its members. This committee has met several times and has appointed sub-committees to
study administration, remedial programme, and legal aspects of the institution.
The work of the follow-up officer is becoming increasingly heavy, as each year adds its
quota of boys and girls released from both schools. The continued struggle to help them to
find employment, the battle against subversive influences in order to fight off further retrogression, and the countless visits to homes are occupying so much time that extra help is
urgently required if this fine service of after-care is to keep up with the demand.
We appreciate sincerely the kindly co-operation we have received from the Department
of the Provincial Secretary, the Department of Public Works, the Attorney-General's Department, and the Department of Labour, and extend our thanks for the many services rendered
throughout the year. Our thanks are due also to the Courts and police for their increasing
interest in, and understanding of, our problems; to the Children's Aid Societies of Vancouver
and Victoria for their sincere interest in the foster-home placement of many of our boys and
their excellent supervision and follow-up work; to the service clubs and other private organizations for their kindly interest in our welfare, and to all who have so generously given of
their time and talent in an endeavour to bring happiness into the lives of less fortunate boys.
May I in closing express my appreciation of the work done by my predecessor in laying
the foundation for the policy of our school as it now exists. Hard work has been done and
it is comparatively easy to carry on from where he left off. Also, the genuine interest of
each and every member of our staff in the task at hand and the whole-hearted co-operation
I have received have been much appreciated.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
GEORGE ROSS,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1938, TO MARCH 31st, 1939.
Number in school, March 31st, 1938   56
Number on parole, March 31st, 1938   38
Number away without leave, March 31st, 1938   1
Number returned from another Province   1
Number of new commitments during year  55
Number committed for second term   12
163
Number of boys released  .  59
Number at present on parole   44
Number placed in foster-homes      7
Number transferred to Mental Hospital      2
Number transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm      1
Number at present on extended leave      2
Number escaped and not returned '     6
— 121
Number in school, March 31st, 1939      42 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1938-39.
S 7
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1938, TO MARCH 31st, 1939.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1637
Years.
Life.
14
12
8
8
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
13
4
13
5 mos.
5
4 mos.
Life.
1
9 mos.
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
7
Life.
6 days.
Life.
14
1
8 days.
8 days.
15 mos.
Life.
10 mos.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
Life.
11
Life.
12
1 mo.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Years.
Life.
1638
1639
Theodore, Sask	
Ukrainian.  	
Life.
Life.
1640
Winnipeg, Man..— 	
Wingard, Sask     ,, -
Vancouver, B.C— -	
Life.
1641
1642
Scotch 	
Life.
Life.
1643
Life.
1644
Vancouver, B.C..	
Life.
1645
Life.
1646
English...   -
Life.
1647
Life.
1648
Powell River, B.C	
Canadian— — 	
Canadian-American  	
Life.
1649
Life.
1650
Burnaby, B.C  	
Edmonton, Alta.— —  —
Mossbank, Sask 	
Edmonton, Alta , -	
Belfast, Ireland-   —
Seattle, Washington   	
Winnipeg, Man	
Life.
1651
Life.
1652
1653
German	
Life.
Life.
1664
1655
English   - 	
11
16
1656
Life.
1657
Life.
1658
Lethbridge, Alta	
Life.
1659
Life.
1660
Life.
1661
Unknown 	
12
1662
Masset, B.C 	
Life.
1663
1664
Nelson, B.C     _  ...-.
Regina, Sask	
Canadian-American : „„
Life.
Life.
1665
Life.
1666
Bathurst, N.B.           	
Life.
1667
Life.
1668
Ukrainian- — -	
Life.
1669
Vawn, Sask  _	
Life.
1670
Life.
1671
Life.
1672
Life.
1673
1674
1675
1676
1677
Life.
Prince Albert, Sask	
Powell River, B.C  	
Life.
Life.
Life.
Scotch      	
Life.
English-Scotch— ..— 	
Life.
Life.
1680
Calgary, Alta.....	
Life.
Life.
1682
French- -	
Life.
Life.
Life.
1685
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
English-Canadian..	
Winnipeg, Man....	
Victoria, B.C.          	
11
Life.
3
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
1691
Life.
Edmonton, Alta ,	
Life.
1693
Life.
1694
Life.
Life.
Life.
1697
Milestone, Sask —	
Scotch  — 	
Life. S 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1698
Gleichen, Alta—	
Fernie, B.C — _	
Years.
15
Years.
Life.
1699
English-Canadian. 	
English-Canadian  „	
Life.          I          Life.
1700
Fernie, B.C  	
Life.
4
Life.
Life.
Life.
1701
Biggar, Sask	
Chilliwack, B.C.
Life.
1702
Life.
1703
Powell River, B.C	
Life.
Canadian  (both)    8
English  (both)   10
Scotch (both)   4
Chinese (both)   1
French  (both)    2
German   (both)     3
Indian   (both)     3
Italian   (both)     2
Russian   (both)   1
Swedish   (both)     1
Ukrainian  (both)    3
English-Canadian     6
English-Scotch    2
English-Irish   2
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
     8 English-French
Scotch-Irish 	
Scotch-American
Scotch-Canadian
Scotch-Russian _
  1
  1
  2
  1
  1
Irish-Canadian   1
Irish-French    1
Irish-Italian   1
French-Canadian   1
French-Canadian-Hawaiian     1
Russian-Canadian   1
Canadian-American    3
Unknown   4
Total    67
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta
10
British Columbia   35
Ireland      1
Manitoba     5
New Brunswick      2
Ontario  	
Saskatchewan
Scotland 	
Washington  _
Total
2
10
1
1
67
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft __..
B.E. & S.
32
11
Retaining stolen property   8
Wilful destruction of property.. 3
Attempted B. & E  1
Attempted theft   1
Violation of probation   1
Supplying liquor to minor  1
Assault 	
Indecent act 	
Indecent exposure
Indecent assault _.
Vagrancy   	
  1
  1
  1
  1
  1
Incorrigibility     4
Total    67 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1938-39.
S 9
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Abbotsford
Barkerville
Burnaby    2
Chilliwack   2
Cobble  Hill   1
Coquitlam     2
Cranbrook    1
Creston    2
Duncan 	
Fernie  	
Grand   Forks
Ladner  	
Maillardville .
Masset 	
Matsqui   	
McBride 	
Nanaimo   4
Nelson   3
New Westminster   3
North Vancouver   4
Lake Cowichan   1
Pouce Coupe   2
Powell River   2
Princeton
Red Pass
Sidney __
Terrace _.
Trail   	
  1
  1
  1
  1
  2
Vancouver   15
Victoria    2
Total    67
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Indefinite   _ 24 1 year ._„*_
J.D.A.   23 2 years —
3 months      1 3 years 	
6 months      4
9 months      2
1
11
1
Total   67
AGES OF BOYS.
10 years
11 years
12 years
13 years
14 years
1
1
3
3
12
15 years
16 years
17 years
18 years
Total
12
17
17
1
67
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Church of England   16
Roman Catholic   16
Presbyterian      5
United      8
Baptist      3
Salvation Army      2
Moravian      2
Christadelphian        1
Pentecostal        1
Church of  Open Door      1
Chinese       1
Non-denominational   11
Total    67
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living   42
Number who have both parents dead   1
Number who have both parents living but separated   8
Number who have father living and mother dead  :  5
Number who have mother living and father dead   4
Number who have stepmothers   2
Number who have stepfathers   1
Number who have foster-parents   1
Number whose parents' whereabouts are unknown   3
Total
67 S 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1939, the teeth of all boys entering the
institution were carefully examined and record charts made. Very few of the boys had
any dental work previously and because of this neglect the mouths were very unhealthy.
During the year 148 amalgam fillings, 5 enamel fillings, and 72 cement fillings were inserted.
Prophylactic treatments were completed for 14 boys. Local anaesthetic was used for extracting 35 hopelessly diseased teeth. All patients were taught proper methods of brushing and
caring for the teeth.
" The services rendered should not only improve the health of these boys but assist in
making them useful citizens. „ _ _ _ _ _ „
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
MEDICAL REPORT.
In the past year the health of the boys has been comparatively good, with the exception
of one case. Unfortunately, one of our better-liked boys developed a brain abscess after a
mastoid operation. Due to weak resistance he was unable to throw off the infection and did
not recover from the illness.
Routine blood tests were given as usual to every boy upon entry and we are pleased to
report that the results were negative in every case.
With regard to other treatment, four boys were sent to the hospital for tonsillectomies
and one for a bone infection. Two lads who were involved in an automobile accident before
commitment also required hospital treatment, one for concussion and the other for the
resetting of a broken arm. One boy was given an eye test, but fortunately the removal of
his tonsils assisted in the correction of his eye condition and glasses were not required.
It is interesting to report that this year for the first time we took advantage of glandular
treatment provided by specialists in Vancouver. Thyroid treatment was administered to one
boy of extreme obesity and considerable reduction in weight was noted. Another lad had
been subject to enuresis all his life and although the endocrinological treatment was not
entirely successful we feel there has been a slight improvement.
During the year we were further impressed by the fact that the addition of a trained
nurse to the staff would be a decided advantage to the health of the boys in the school. We
are pleased to report that in April, 1939, we expect to acquire the services of a registered
nurse, who will also act as matron of the school.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—No change in the educational policy was effected during the fiscal year. Not as
many boys attended classes, due to the general decline in school population. On April 1st,
1938, there were thirteen registered and on March 31st, 1939, there were eleven enrolled.
" Much individual work had to be done, as ability varied greatly. A number of the boys,
although still under 15 years of age, had successfully evaded public school, with the result
that when they entered the school here they found themselves a long way behind their normal
grade group. Two boys took Entrance class work and one was passed into Grade IX. in
June. The results in the lower grades were generally satisfactory, the standard of passing
equalling that of other years.
" Intelligence tests were again given to every boy entering the school, the average being
close to that of the preceding year, namely, eighty-nine.
" Library work was continued and during the long winter evenings much reading was
done.    Our books, consisting of approximately 1,000 volumes, will gradually need replacing,
as many are showing signs of wear and tear.
" Eric W. Blagburn."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
A prominent professor of sociology once stated that the kitchen was the most important
department of an institution such as ours. There may be some room for debate on this
subject, but it has been our experience that a well-fed group of boys certainly contributes to
a contented school.    We are fortunate in having as chef Mr. W. L. Hoffman, who has had REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1938-39.       S 11
much hotel experience in Vancouver. Not only does he supply nutritious meals for both staff
and boys, but also provides excellent instruction for the lads who work with him in the
kitchen.
At the present time there are five boys who work in this department, and each shows
himself to have enough ability to become efficient in the work eventually. However, we are
still faced with the old problem of training boys who are unable to find work in this particular
field on release. Instead, they are often obliged to take employment in which they have no
particular interest. But we are still proceeding with the idea that a trained man will
eventually derive some benefit from the specialized education that he has acquired.
The following menus illustrate the type of meal served to the boys:—
Breakfast.—Rolled oat porridge, buttered toast, marmalade, coffee, milk.
Dinner.—Beef stew with vegetables, potatoes, bread, baked custard, tea, milk.
Supper.—Macaroni and cheese, bread, stewed apricots, cookies, milk.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA  COST.
(1) Office and school supplies   $914.73
(2) Travelling expenses   2,284.32
Gas, oil, and repairs   628.32
Purchase of new truck  1,023.85
(3) Purchase of clothing  908.50
Shoe-shop supplies  392.84
Tailor-shop supplies   78.06
(4) Janitor supplies and maintenance of grounds  532.49
(5) Light   874.00
Fuel ...,  2,400.00
Water   483.48
(6) Provisions   7,656.44
(7) Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and operation expenses. 1,656.93
Dental—Dentist's salary and supplies   600.00
(8) Laundry   820.48
(9) Feed for stock  89.68
(10) Purchase of live stock   Nil
(11) Vocational supplies for various departments   700.87
(12) Incidentals and contingencies   925.49
Salaries   26,540.73
Total expenditure, Vote 146  (a)    $49,511.21
Expenditure, Public Works        3,939.74
Depreciation of stock   211.39
Total expenditure for year  $53,662.34
Total amount of revenue for year—Rent  120.00
$53,542.34
Per capita cost for the year 1938-39, $3.71.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—I submit the annual report for the year 1938-39.
" Forty-two boys have received lessons in sewing, cleaning, pressing, and repairing
clothing, which should be of assistance to them when they are released. Two and three boys
have worked steadily in the shop all the year.
" The year's work consisted of the making of the following: 88 pairs of overalls, 215
pairs of shorts, 30 pairs of tweed pants, 50 tea-towels, 25 face-towels, 78 white aprons, 2 S 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
hoover aprons, 70 sheets, 54 pillow-covers, 31 curtains.    In addition, 31 suits and 109 pairs of
pants were cleaned and pressed, and many miscellaneous repairs were done.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Shoemaking Department.
" Sir,—I submit my annual report for the year 1938-39.
" During the year seven boys have received tuition in the making and repairing of shoes.
They did very well and showed great interest in the work, but one case in particular deserves
particular mention. Although his magistrate was willing to consent to this boy's return home
in November, the lad himself requested that he be allowed to remain and further his knowledge of the trade.    We have been very pleased with the progress he has made.
" Shoe-shop classes were held twice a week and a number of boys received elementary
training.
" Our work for the year consisted of the manufacture of 72 pairs of shoes and 120 pairs
of slippers and the repairing of 431 pairs of shoes and 155 pairs of slippers.
" J. OSBORN,
Shoemaker."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—During the past fiscal year several changes were made in our department which
greatly benefited all the boys taking the course. Each boy undertook some particular project
for himself, and when he had completed this work he was asked to give oral reasons for the
results he might expect to obtain from the work done in the repair of the mechanical part.
By following the above system interest was stimulated and this meant that excellent results
followed.
" The number of boys enrolling for the motor-mechanics class has been very gratifying
and I am well pleased with the attitude and industry displayed by the members of the classes.
" D. W. Munro,
Instructor."
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" Sir,—It has already been mentioned in a previous report that more emphasis has been
placed upon the garden this year. We are endeavouring to produce as many vegetables as
possible in the hope that we may eventually reach a state of self-maintenance. With regard
to the work this spring particular reference must be made to the help of the boys. Fortunately, we have had a very interested group of lads in the garden and they have taken an
exceptional pride in their contribution to the school.
"Produce from Garden.—Potatoes, 1 ton;   carrots, 1% tons;   onions, 800 lb.;   beets, 500
lb.;   green beans, 650 lb.;   broad beans, 400 lb.;   turnips, 125 lb.;   cabbage, 400 lb.;   spinach,
100 lb.;   rhubarb, 300 lb.;   lettuce, 1,600 heads;   celery, 850 sticks;   parsley, 30 lb.;   cucumber,
10 lb.;   marrow, 100 lb.
" W. J. Scott,
Gardener."
Department of Manual Arts.
" Sir,—The end of this year finds this department gaining in importance as a very necessary part of the school. The classes in woodwork, electricity, and sheet metal have attained
a noteworthy degree of popularity.
" Early in 1939, classes in electricity were started and the interest displayed by the boys
in this subject was admirable. The scope of the work in this subject was as follows: Knob
and tube wiring, bell wiring, magnetism, electromagnetism, measurement of current, and
related theory.
" Woodwork seems to appeal to the greatest number of boys. The continued interest
shown by repeated attendance month after month by the same boy was a pleasurable reward
for my efforts in instructing them. Aside from individual projects a number of group
articles were made, including a filing-table, a work-bench, wiring-boards, a cupboard, index-
boxes, forty-eight trinket-boxes for the Girls' Industrial School, and many carpenter jobs
about the school itself. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1938-39.       S 13
" Draughting has repeatedly been offered as a class subject, but due to poor enrolment it
has been dropped and the periods devoted to woodwork.
" Sheet-metal classes were held for four months of this year. The same interest was
shown here as in the other classes. With the addition of more metal-working equipment at
the end of this year we plan to give instruction in a wider variety of metalwork, including
band iron, lead, wire, copper, sheet metal, and forging, etc.
" Throughout the year I have tried to fit my instruction to each and every need and certainly there is a wide range of adaption required. However, this has been repaid by the
enthusiasm of the boys in their class-work. „ -nr   c&t-hv&\tt
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—It gives me great pleasure to report the diversified and numerous activities of the
past year. Keeping in mind that variety is the spice of a programme, every endeavour was
made to hold the interest of the boy.
" As the summer season of 1938 came in, outdoor activity held sway and advantage was
taken to the full of the fine weather. Softball and lacrosse of senior and junior calibre were
attended to with exceptionally keen competition. From the total number of boys in the school
three teams were organized—the " Reds," " Whites," and " Blues." A series of football,
lacrosse, softball, and basket-ball games were played among these teams, the " Blues " winning by a very narrow margin. To foster closer association between the boy and the official,
games were arranged between the boys and the staff and were heartily enjoyed by both sides.
" Two evenings a week were set aside to attend league lacrosse games in New Westminster and baseball games in Vancouver. Our thanks are due to the organizations whose
kindly interest made these outings possible.
" Saturday rides and picnics to various points of interest were much anticipated and
really enjoyed. One outing of special enjoyment to the boys was the visit to the Canada
Pacific Exhibition at Hastings Park in Vancouver.
" We must not forget to mention in our report the numerous evenings spent on the banks
of the Coquitlam River. Fishing, swimming, and the occasional corn roast with community
singing around a fire were always anticipated with pleasure. Track and swimming meets
were given their share of attention and small prizes were ofttimes distributed to the winners.
" As the fall season descended upon us, the gymnasium, auditorium, and swimming-tank
regained their popularity. Boxing, wrestling, basket-ball, volley-ball, and swimming crowded
every evening period. The concert party was organized once again and was asked to perform
in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Moody, and North Vancouver.
The party was asked to return to all these places and its members fully deserved the high
praise they received for their performances.
" The Christmas season was a busy one. A number of our boys were allowed to visit their
homes and spend Christmas with their families. For the remainder, whose homes were too
distant to permit a visit, a programme was planned to give them every possible pleasure. The
enthusiastic assistance of the boys in the decorating of the building and the Christmas tree,
the pleasure they showed in the gifts they received and their evident appreciation of the holiday menus made us feel that their Christmas was indeed a merry one.
" I should like, in closing, to express my appreciation to those groups who have so kindly
given of their time for our entertainment; and also to the visiting teams, whose sportsmanship and competition were much enjoyed by the boys. I also feel that the boys themselves
deserve a great deal of credit for the way they have co-operated and for the enthusiasm they
have displayed in carrying out their own programmes. It has been a pleasure to have been
of assistance to them throughout the year. " W   R  Jones
Instructor."
BAND NOTES.
" Sir,—It is generally recognized that music appreciation is one of the most important
subjects on any school curriculum. Most of our boys have had very little contact with culture
of any sort, so we endeavour to stimulate their interest by the resources we have at hand. It
is surprising to note the number of boys who really anticipate the band practices that are held
each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon.    Of course, due to the policy of short terms, we have S 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
not the organized band of previous years, but the important thing is that the boys who are
really interested are acquiring the fundamentals of a musical education. Emphasis is now
placed on individual instruction and a variety of instruments is maintained for the school.
" J. W. Rushton,
Bandmaster."
SOCIAL WORK REPORT.
This issue of the annual report marks the first time that a statement of the social work
has been included. Up to the present time our work has been largely concerned with presenting as many boys as possible to the Provincial psychiatrist at the Child Guidance Clinic
in Vancouver. In addition, we have also been performing this service for any neighbouring
court which wishes the expert advice of the clinic before making a decision.
It has already been pointed out in the Principal's report that an attempt is being made to
present to the clinic every boy who enters the school. Before this is done a complete social
history on the lad is written and sent to the psychiatrist. Such a history contains statements
from the committing magistrate, the police, school-teacher, family doctor, recreation supervisors, social workers, and parents. In addition, an interview is held with the boy and the
combination of all reports gives a fairly comprehensive picture of his life, family, and personality. One of our staff members, Mr. William Dixon, has been in charge of the compiling
of these histories and deserves much credit for the excellent work he has done.
During the past year thirty-seven examinations at the clinic were made and the following
statistics have been compiled from the psychiatric reports:—
Intelligence Ratings:— Cases.
Average      2
Dull normal   10
Border-line   10
High-grade moron      3
Moron    11
Low-grade moron      1
37
Mental Abnormalities recognized by Clinic:—
Psychopathic personality       1
Incipient schizophrenia      1
Schizophrenia      2
Physical Defects recognized by Clinic:—
Ears requiring attention  1
Eyes requiring attention   , 3
Teeth requiring attention   8
Tonsils requiring attention  2
Gonad atrophic changes   1
Enlarged heart  .  1
Anasmia   1
Thyroid enlargement   1
Malnutrition   2
The value of such a clinical examination is sometimes questioned by those who have no
appreciation of its significance. However, we at the school have found that many benefits
accrue from such a procedure. In the first place, unsuspected mental and physical disabilities
are often found which would go undetected by the casual observer. Secondly, the I.Q. of the
patient is determined. This indicates just how much ability the boy possesses and gives an
idea of just how much one can expect from him. A perusal of our records will show some
cases in which intelligent parents have expected backward children to excel in school work,
and often criticized them for their failure. In such a situation we endeavour to give a clear
picture of the boy's ability and point out that it would probably be advantageous to the lad
to be trained in some form of work instead of trying to force him into academic study which
is beyond him.    With regard to work, a complete psychiatric examination also entails aptitude REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1938-39. S 15
tests which give a clue as to what type of employment would be most suitable for the boy.
Another point to be noted is that in gathering a complete social history one often finds interested friends or relatives who are willing to give the boy a hand when he is released from
our institution.
In order to cope effectively with the delinquency situation in British Columbia a central
observation and examination clinic is required. Each juvenile who becomes involved in any
serious trouble would then be sent there and held for the purpose of observation. In the
meantime a complete social history would be compiled and presented to the psychiatrist. After
the examination, the latter's recommendations would be presented to the Judge who is handling
the case. In the light of the clinical results the magistrate would then be able to decide on
the best plan—whether the delinquent should be detained for a short while, be placed on probation, given employment, be committed to the Mental Hospital, Industrial School, Oakalla,
recommended for New Haven, foster-home placement, or any other suitable disposition.
But to make the work of such a clinic of value, a well-organized follow-up service is required. It is all very well to know all the faults of a patient, but just what to do about it is
another question. The establishment of a Provincial probation system, in conjunction with
a child guidance centre, would be of inestimable value to the solution of the delinquency situation in British Columbia. Should such a step be taken we would no longer be faced with the
prospect of boys being sent to the Industrial School simply because of the fact that there is no
other place for them to go.
Even though we regard our institution as being one of the most modern in its approach
yet we feel that it is not always the best place to deal with a boy. First offenders are obliged
to mingle with more hardened associates and acquire a knowledge of crime which they carry
with them on release. With adequate provisions as suggested, preventive measures could be
instituted which would mean that many of our so-called " bad boys " would not be faced with
the perplexing problem of trying to become " good boys " while associating with those who are
probably worse than themselves.
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
The following report is submitted for the year ended March 31st, 1939:—
Visits to homes    1,163
Visits to office          897
Business calls and interviews       786
Telephone calls        992
The past year has been a great satisfaction wherein the replacement of our youth into
their proper social conditions has been concerned. Several of the most difficult problem cases
of the past four years have turned out to be fine men, some married with small families and
permanent positions, others in the making of good citizens.
Although these youths have been handicapped by home conditions, having no encouragement and being deprived of any background, many cases show real character by overcoming
these obstacles when given a real chance.
The various recreational projects which have been started in the different vicinities of
Greater Vancouver have done much to alleviate delinquency in the younger element from
fifteen to eighteen years. In this age-group some have left school and others have been
forced to the streets from their homes in the evenings and their minds are anxious to be
diverted into other channels.
These organizations are welcome and beneficial to the end towards which we are working,
but fill only the recreational period of the day. We are still hampered by prevalent economic
conditions whose elasticity has not yet stretched to the point where it can absorb all our
surplus unemployed youth. Although the mining, forestry, and fishing industries have solved
many of our problems, there are still the few that are not eligible. These boys can be
apprenticed locally, it is true, but there are many employers who still hesitate to engage boys
who have been in institutions. This is a grave problem and one to be studied, seemingly
insurmountable, but it can and will be overcome with diligent efforts.
I am deeply grateful for the co-operation of Abbott House and the officials who have been
most helpful in emergency cases. S 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Again I wish to thank the social workers in our own department, the public and private
agencies whose assistance at all times has been readily given, the Department of Labour, and
the civic and Provincial police. Sincere thanks are also given to the members of the Department of the Provincial Secretary and various judges and officials of the Juvenile Courts with
whom it has been my pleasure to work during the past year.
Results of the past year's endeavours have been most pleasing, and I feel that with
renewed efforts and co-operation the coming year will show an even greater improvement.
K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.
425-839-982

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