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TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1939]

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Full Text

 TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
of the
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
OF THE   PROVINCE  OF
BEITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1938, TO MARCH 31 ST, 1939
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  the  Twenty-fifth  Annual  Report  of  the
Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1939.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1939.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Industrial School for Girls from April 1st, 1938, to
March 31st, 1939.
In two months' time I will have completed ten years as Superintendent of this Institution
and my thoughts travel back along the line of admissions, releases, and the interval of training
between.
There were twenty-nine girls in the School, and my first admission number for the
records was 316, and this month number 540 was admitted. Numbers, of course, are used
only for record purposes.
When a girl is admitted she has a period of usually two weeks' quarantine to prevent
entry of communicable diseases. She occupies a single room, comfortably equipped, is made
to feel she is welcome, and that we want to do our very best for her, and anxious for her
co-operation. She is given a complete physical examination by our Doctor Mary Campbell,
and further by specialists if so ordered by our doctor. The girl is measured and fitted for
a complete new outfit of clothing which, when completed, she marks with her name. They
are usually quite thrilled with the many things provided, especially with footwear, which
includes everyday shoes and dress shoes, bedroom slippers, running shoes, rubbers, and gum
boots (the latter being used in laundry and sometimes in garden work). The new arrival
is given magazines to read rather than books, because, if a positive report comes back from
the laboratory, magazines can be destroyed without loss. Within a few days she is asked
for the information necessary for her record and, if approachable, her complete social history
is taken, this also includes " her own story." If she is not ready, the questions are left over
to a later time, and it may take several interviews before the necessary information is
volunteered. These stories usually reveal tragedy, neglect, bitterness, resentment, and loneliness. There are the fathers who have deserted, leaving mother with little children not
provided for; parents separated because of a number of causes; divorces or no divorce, as
the case may be; mother and father living with another choice; and instances of her family,
his family, and our family with ensuing conflict. Usually they are living in cramped quarters
and on extremely limited income.
Our adopted children are often pitiful in their hunger for information concerning their
own people. One girl had been deserted in a rooming-house when only a few weeks old. The
mother had been there but a short time and little was known of her. The baby was given a
name which was written on the fly-leaf of a book found in the room, but no one was even sure
of the ownership of the book. Her adopted home was comfortable, but she did not fit in, and
I would say that the adopted parents would be opposite in every way to her own parents,
judging by many of her characteristics. We were unable to trace her own mother, perhaps
it was better so. Sometimes the adopted parents are not suitable, but in many cases they
have given much love and care with sometimes small success. Many of the adoption cases
coming to us give no history of behaviour problems until they suddenly learned, in adolescence,
that they were adopted. Had they been told earlier and grown up with the knowledge, it
might not have been such a shock.
The old manner of careless adoptions in British Columbia is passed, and during the past
few years a much better method has evolved. All information available is secured and
records carefully preserved for future information. A case (not in British Columbia) of a
girl whose mother refused to accept her baby, threatening to destroy her if an opportunity
presented.    As this mania persisted over the third month, it was decided to place baby in an U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
institution and for adoption. This child was adopted and very much loved by the adopted
parents, but overindulged and seldom corrected. The adopted mother died, a new mother
came into the home, a baby son arrived, and our girl took second place except in the affection
of her adopted father. Some one then told her she was adopted and did not belong anyway,
and problems developed fast. She had fair mentality, but not well balanced; was selfish,
partly from lack of training, and was a great sorrow to her adopted father, and the cause of
friction in that home. When she came to us her one big wish was to find her own family,
which we discovered consisted of father, mother, and three older children. We learned her
name and racial origin, but nothing further. Had we been able to contact them, it might
have had a stabilizing influence and some happiness for our girl. So far she had been a
disappointment, and is not making a good adjustment on the outside.
Then we have our low mentality group, girls of fifteen and upwards with a mentality
rate of eight and nine years. We teach them simple arithmetic, to express themselves in
letters, with attention to penmanship, and to find pleasure in reading. They become quite
proficient in household tasks, sewing and knitting, also gardening with all its interesting
developments. They have to be encouraged, there must be much repetition and infinite
patience, as they are easily discouraged. When they meet up with a problem they want to
stop right there, and commence something new and easy. If assisted and helped over this
obstacle, they often continue to progress.
I am thinking of one of our girls, 16 years of age, born in Poland of German parents,
coming to Canada when 10 years of age. German was spoken in the home, progress was
very slow in school, a younger sister advancing into higher grades—a fact often commented
on by the family—resentment, disobedience, and finally charged with incorrigibility and commitment to Industrial School. Here she was taken to Child Guidance Clinic as a matter of
routine, and rated as eight and one-half years, bringing her into the moron group of general
intelligence. One girl undertook to teach her to tell time and it was finally accomplished,
others to help her express in English what she was thinking in German, and her progress in
school was satisfactory as she was willing to apply herself. Our girls are kindly disposed
toward another who is handicapped in any way, and will mother and teach with great
patience.    This is of mutual benefit.
This girl referred to, when she finished her training was placed with an understanding
family at only $5 per month, but an undertaking to continue training and smooth the corners.
She was advanced to $10 in six months, and is now earning $15. She is happy in her work
where she is made to feel she is an important member of the household; her leisure time is
spent in Y.W.C.A. activities;   she is self-supporting and proud of it.
Then there is the reverse picture. A girl of the same mentality group, who has had as
much training, even more supervision and assistance, yet fails in one position after another
must, at least sometimes, be at fault. Her parents are separated, the father earns just
enough to keep himself in food and beer. He is careful not to exceed this amount and so be
expected to contribute toward the maintenance of his wife and family. The mother and
younger sister are on relief, and our girl thinks this is preferable to working as a domestic
for $10 per month, including room, board, and laundry, so deliberately is unsatisfactory, loses
her job, and goes home to live on relief. Having observed her for almost two years in the
School, I know she could not be overworked in the different positions where she has been
placed. This attitude has become more apparent among our group during the past three
years. They are inclined to demand, threaten if their demands are not met, and there is
less desire than formerly to be self-supporting and independent. When some grumbling has
been done about performing the routine tasks necessary to the comfort and cleanliness of our
Home and I advance the suggestion that in order to maintain their self-respect they should
be willing to compensate, in part anyway, for food, lodging, clothes, education, medical and
dental care, and the many pleasures provided, they are amazed at the suggestion, but some
of them grasp the idea and see the force of it. Eighteen months is a short time in which
to eradicate, plant, and even commence development. Some days and weeks are mostly
encouragement, then comes a devastating, almost wholesale temporary failure, and your
heart sinks and you wonder if it is worth all that is being put into it. Generally around
that time letters come in from some of the ex-girls, or calls from our graduates, telling of REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1938-39. U 7
their homes and families, paying tribute to the lessons learned while in the School, and their
desire to give their children wiser training, care, and education because they realize that it
is the better part. Then we are ashamed of our doubts, our faith is renewed and we go on
from there with new heart.
Of the 253 girls who have been in our care during the past ten years, we know that 113
are married, 5 are separated from husbands, 5 deported, 4 transferred to Essondale Mental
Hospital, 2 returned to Indian Reserve, 3 transferred to Children's Aid Society, 7 on relief,
29 employed (mostly domestic service or waitresses, also hairdressing, stenography, and
practical nursing), 7 have died, 7 are known as prostitutes, and 35 are still in the School.
We hope during the coming year to have a Social Service graduate who will spend part
time in the School getting acquainted with the girls and also keep in closer touch with our
graduates. Our work has only commenced before release, and there is a great need for
assistance in solving problems, providing pleasure, also encouragement to continue on the
upgrade.
Covering the academic and vocational programme has meant a busy year, but pleasant
jaunts, social gatherings, and the best in concerts has made pleasant variation. The talent
brought to us by the Women's Musical Society, Philharmonic Society, as well as private
parties, has made us wish we could share the pleasure with a larger number than our small
population.
The supply of magazines provided by friends has been most generous, also games,
including inlaid cribbage-boards. Some cash donations have been made to our " Bazaar
Fund," from which we purchase new books for our library. Almost every girl now looks
forward to library night when she can exchange her book for another she has selected from
our catalogue.
Sunday services have been provided regularly during the past year, by both Catholic and
Protestant teachers and ministers.
To all who have given so freely of their time and talents we gratefully acknowledge our
thanks, also to those who remember our girls at Christmas, thus making the season happier
for them and a little less lonely.
In closing, I gratefully acknowledge the kindly thoughtfulness and co-operation of the
Government departments with whom I have been working.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 16,480 lb.   $247.20
Peas, 1,025 lb.   50.25
Beans, 475 lb.   23.75
Beets, 1,000 lb.   17.50
Vegetable marrow, 1,250 lb.   25.00
Tomatoes, 885 lb.   44.25
Cucumbers, 109  _.  3.65
Cabbage, 352 heads   35.20
Onions, 548 lb.   17.80
Onions, green, 186 bunches   3.10
Lettuce, 270 heads   15.50
Corn, 2,200 ears   45.85
Turnips, 4,300 lb.   53.75
Cauliflower, 116 heads   11.60
Carrots, 3,750 lb.   45.00
Parsnips, 4,000 lb.   60.00
Spinach, 125 lb.   6.25
Manure, 10 loads   30.00
Lavender, 10 lb.   10.00
$745.65 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Estimated Value of Vegetables and Fruit grown on Premises—Continued.
Fruit.
Apples, 240 lb.   $7.50
Cherries, 160 lb.   16-00
Raspberries, 75 lb.    6.25
Rhubarb, 150 lb.   7.50
Loganberries, 25 lb.   2.50
$39.75
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1939.
On roll, April 1st, 1938   51
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939  23
74
Released as wards of Juvenile Court   30
Released by Stipendiary Magistrate  .—    2
Released by Deputy Provincial Secretary      1
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital      2
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm      1
Transferred to Children's Aid Society      2
Cancelled      1
— 39
Total in School, March 31st, 1939   35
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1939.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939         14,933
Per capita cost, one year         $636.78
Per capita cost, one day  1.74
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries      12,903.47
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies       $331.12
Telephone and telegraph         147.68
 ■ 478.80
Travelling expenses   755.23
Farm operations          986.90
Household equipment (other than furniture)   350.63
Clothing—
Clothing      $564.31
Boots and shoes        300.85
.     .   865.16
Janitors' supplies          374.62
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel     $2,162.60
Water          381.80
Light and power         595.40
      3,139.80
Carried forward  $19,854.61 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1938-39. U 9
Expense and Revenue Statement of School, March 31st, 1939—Continued.
Brought forward   $19,854.61
Operating expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Provisions—
Groceries  .  $3,987.43
Meat     1,047.98
Fish   87.44
 —     5,122.85
Medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical supplies       $186.30
Surgery  (tonsillectomies, appendectomy, etc.)          401.00
Dental cost         375.00
  962.30
Good Conduct Fund  60.15
Incidentals and contingencies   236.58
Total expenditure for year by voucher   $26,236.49
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)          709.45
Inventory, March 31st, 1938   311.94
$27,257.88
Less rent       $326.48
Less inventory, March 31st, 1939         878.92
       1,205.40
$26,052.48 U 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1938, TO MARCH 31st, 1939.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
522
523
524
470
467
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
507
535
536
537
538
539
474
540
Years.
16
15
17
15
14
17
16
9
15
13
14
14
17
17
17
18
16
15
17
17
17
15
16
Years.
17
15
17
18
19
17
16
11
15
13
14
14
17
17
17
18
16
15
17
17
17
15
16
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Victoria, B.C -	
Canadian-English
Canadian-English	
English-Norwegian
English 	
Roumanian-Canadian-
American-English
Brandon, Man 	
Unsatisfactory ward.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Edmonton, Alta 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Burnaby, B.C	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Prelate, Sask  	
Lillooet, B.C.              	
German-Irish	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Vancouver, B.C - 	
Canadian 	
American 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Canadian-Swedish
Canadian-English
Newfoundland-Scotch
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
1
American  (both)
Canadian   (both)   __
NATIONALITY
1
OF PARENTS.
Oanadian-Swedi
sh                               1
     3
     2
Englis
Englis
Germ*
Irish-!
Newfr
ih-Irish  __
      2
English (both)
h-Norwegian      1
m-Irish      1
Indian (both) 	
     1
Scotch  (both) 	
     1
English     ...   .    1
Ukrainian   ('both'.
       _.    1
undland-S
cotch                      1
American-English
Canadian-Ena-lish
1
Roumanian-Can
Swiss-American
adian      1
1
     3
Canadian-Scotch _
       ..    1
WHERE GIRLS
  17
     1
! WERE
Manit
Engla
COMMIT'
Unsat
Total  23
British Columbia ..
BORN.
_ba       1
Alberta  	
nd                     1
Saskatchewan 	
     3
Total  23
Incorrigible 	
OFFENCES (
  12
_ED.
sfactorv
wards      „              2
Sexual immorality
Theft 	
     2
Absentees retur
ned                          2
     4
Vagrancy 	
     1
Total....                               23 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1938-39. U 11
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Burnaby      1 Princeton 	
Chilliwack       1 Richmond       2
Lethbridge       1 Vancouver   11
Nanaimo        1 Vernon      1
Port  Coquitlam      1 Victoria       2
Prince Rupert      1 —
Total  23
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Juvenile Delinquents Act      1 Two years      2
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929   12 Unsatisfactory wards      2
Industrial School for Girls Act    2 Absentees returned      2
Industrial School for Girls Act    2 	
Total  23
AGES OF GIRLS.
13 years   1    17 years   10
14 years   2    18 years   2
15 years   4    19 years   1
16 years   3 —
Total  23
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist      1 Roman Catholic      5
Church of England      5 Salvation Army      3
Greek Orthodox  .     1 United Church      7
Presbyterian      1 —
Total  23
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living   11
Number who have father living, mother dead  '6
Number who have mother living, father dead  3
Number who have mother living, father unknown  3
Total   23
Of the above, the parents of 3 girls are separated, 2 are divorced;   there are 4 stepfathers, 5 stepmothers;  and 1 mother in Essondale Mental Hospital.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
Teacher and Supervisor Miss Ayra E. Peck.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Linen-keeper Miss -Catherine M. Smith.
Attendant (Sewing Supervisor)  Miss M. E. Murray.
Dietitian Miss Myrtle Moar.
Night Supervisor Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Junior Supervisor Miss Anna C. Martin.
Relief Supervisor Mrs. Alice McCormack.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener George B. Boving.
All of which is respectfully submitted. ANNIE G   WESTMAN
Superintendent. U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1938,
to March 31st, 1939:—
Calls made by physician   44
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   304
Complete physical examination   23
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection   9
Smears taken for Neisser infection   107
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman  32
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously   2
Treatment for syphilis intravenously   18
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection   484
Argyrol and silver nitrate treatments for Neisser infection  87
Prontylin treatments for Neisser infection   87
Urine tests   28
X-rays   4
Chest Clinic   2
Vaccination    34
Basal metabolism   2
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital—
Tonsillectomy   4
Appendectomy   1
Maternity cases (1 boy, 1 girl)  2
Salphingitis    1
Sexual sterilization   1
Ward X observation   1
— 10
Examination by eye specialist   5
Glasses provided  5
Examination by Psychiatrist (special)   • 2
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a
complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1938-39. U 13
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School for Girls
during the year ended March 31st, 1939:—
Visits to dentist   18
Number of girls seen   55
Amalgam fillings   70
Cement fillings   51
Extractions   43
Cleanings       5
Novacaine administrations   49
Partial upper removable plate      1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—In the period between April 1st, 1938, and March 31st, 1939, a total of
nineteen girls have been enrolled in the Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, seven
were in Grade VIII., eleven in Grade VII., and one in Grade VI. Twelve other girls attending
school at some time during the year were not enrolled in this course as the balance of their
term did not provide them enough time.    They were taught in the regular class-room manner.
This is the first complete year the girls have taken the Government Correspondence
Course, and it has proven to be a great advantage. Especially is this so in the case of the
more ambitious girl, as she can travel at her own rate of speed without hindrance. A
late-comer is not handicapped for she may commence her course at any time during the year.
Considering that many of the girls have been out of school for long periods before coming
here, and that their time for study is limited because of the variety of training afforded them
in other departments, they have made good progress.
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher. U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following are movements of high school pupils from April 1st, 1938,
to March 31st, 1939:—
Number enrolled  j  13
Grade IX.     9
Grade X.      2
Grade XL  ■     2
13
Girls leaving during term      8
Girls in class at present
During this fourth year of work in the Government Correspondence Course several of
the girls did very commendable work. One Grade XL • student completed her grade in
hygiene, social studies, English literature, English grammar and composition with very
satisfactory marks.
These four subjects were undertaken by all the girls in each grade and in addition one
pupil, upon completing them, also enrolled in French, Art, and General Science, making
splendid progress in the latter two.
Four of the girls enrolled in Grade IX. had completed their Grade VIII. in this institution and were anxious to take advantage of the opportunity offered to continue their studies.
Of the above-enrolled pupils seven girls received tuition in commercial training as well.
Ayra E. Peck,
School-teacher and Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—A great deal of work was accomplished in the sewing-room during the
year from April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939. During this time twenty-seven girls received
full or partial training in sewing, completing 70 curtains, 65 articles for dining-room, 26 for
kitchen, 492 personal garments, 1,265 miscellaneous articles, 68 uniforms, 51 morning dresses,
as well as 19 dresses for going home.
All the mending is supervised in the sewing-room, each girl attending to her own
garments and learning to darn her own hose.
Girls who display an interest and extra ability in their sewing advance from elementary
work to become expert enough to finish their own going-home frocks.
Beside the sewing instruction the girls learn to hemstitch, embroider, and crochet.
M. E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—The annual report of work done in the laundry is as follows:—
The entire work of the laundry for the School from April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939,
has been done by forty-seven girls, under supervision.
The number in the laundry at one time averages six, the number of articles which pass
through their hands in one month averages 4,732, making a total for the year of 56,795.
Number of hours worked during the year 6,290.
The work is progressive, new girls taking charge of their own clothes, and working up
to care of laundry, including starched uniforms from Superintendent's suite and Staff rooms.
.Catherine M. Smith,
Linen-keeper. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1938-39. U 15
Dear Madam,—The period of training in the kitchen is one to which the girls look forward with enthusiasm. This training includes planning of menus, preparation and serving
of meals, as well as general kitchen routine. Beside cake, cookies, and pastry they also learn
to make bread as all bread used in the School is home-made, amounting this year to 4,420
loaves, an average of 85 loaves per week. Copies of all tested recipes are provided for each
graduate upon completion of her cooking course.
From April 1st, 1938, to March 31st, 1939, twenty-seven girls received training in this
department. In addition, the girls preserved 975 quarts of fruit and 325 quarts of pickles
of many kinds.
Two hundred and forty-three dozen eggs were packed and sent to the Boys' Industrial
School as well as 2,294 dozen used here. Ninety-five cockerels weighing 609 lb. and 47 hens
weighing 257 lb. were also provided by our poultry department.
Myrtle M. Moar,
Dietitian.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.
425-939-1522 

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