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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1939

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EBPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
YEAE ENDED DECEMBEE 31ST
1938
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY   OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
tr..ri^:.ti<.ir.::.:.
■ - -r :      ■:..-
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Bayfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.  To His Honour Eric W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1938 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1939. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-first Annual Report on the work
of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1938.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1939. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister       7
Statistics of Trades and Industries       8
Pay-roll        8
Comparison of Pay-rolls        8
Industrial Divisions        9
Average Weekly "Wage by Industries     10
Industrial Wage     11
Nationality of Employees      14
Statistical Tables      15
Summary of all Tables      28
Board of Industrial Relations      29
New or Revised Orders      29
Statistics covering Women and Girls      32
Summary of all Occupations      37
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees      39
Collections and Inspections      40
Court Cases     40
Wage Comparisons      47
" Hours of Work Act "      48
Comparison with Previous Figures      49
Average Weekly Hours      49
Summary of all Orders      51
Complete List of Orders      67
Regulations      70
Labour Legislation      75
Amendments to Labour Statutes      75
" Apprenticeship Act "      75
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "      75
" Fire Departments Two-platoon Act"      75
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "     75
" Workmen's Compensation Act "     .75
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "      77
Number of Strikes and Employees affected      77
Summary of Disputes      78
Boards of Arbitration      87
Organizations of Employees   111
Organizations of Employers   120
Inspection of Factories   121
Accident-prevention   121
Prosecutions   122
Factory Conditions   122
Home-work    123
Elevators   123
Employment Service   125
Youth Training Plans   125
New Business   126
Women's Section   127
Placement Tables   128
Unemployment Relief  129
Assistance to Settlers   129
Forestry Training  :  129
Mining Training   129
Statement of Relief  131 P 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Apprenticeship  Branch   137
Designated Trades   138
Trades not yet designated   138
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "  139
Occupations registered as Trade-schools   139
Safety Branch   140 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1938.
This, the twenty-first Annual Report of the Department of Labour, marks the " coming
of age " of the Department.
Throughout the twenty-one years of its life the work of the Department has been
extended in many directions. In keeping with the trend of the times an increasing volume
of labour legislation has been enacted, and reports from the various Branches of the Department contained in this issue give some idea of the expansion that has taken place.
It has been the consistent endeavour of the Department to administer our labour laws
in the spirit in which they were conceived, to stabilize and improve conditions in the
industrial field, with resultant all-round benefit to employees, employers, and the public
generally.
The fluctuations of trade and commerce create periodical variations in industrial payrolls, and for 1938 we have to record a decrease from that of the preceding year.
Average earnings of employees and the volume of employment as described in the
ensuing pages have continued at levels which show no marked variation from the figures of
1937, and on the whole the report may be said to portray conditions generally that give cause
for satisfaction.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The following statistical data show a decrease in the total industrial pay-roll of approximately five and one-half million dollars from the figures of 1937.
The largest decrease occurred in the lumber industry, resulting from the closing of
logging camps for an extended period, due to the exceptionally dry summer season and,
towards the close of the year, to world market conditions.
Wages in the pulp and paper industry fell short of the 1937 total by one and one-half
million dollars, other industries fluctuated within a closer range.
Unsettled conditions in Europe and in the Far East had an adverse effect and in a
large measure were responsible for the decrease in the total pay-roll.
It is gratifying to note that the average industrial weekly wage covering all industries
was not affected by the decrease in the total pay-roll, although fluctuations occurred in the
average weekly wage in the various industries.
The number of firms reporting increased by 184, and in order that the report of the
Department may be in the hands of the public at an earlier date it would be appreciated if
industrial firms make their returns promptly.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 4,895.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,895, as
compared with 4,711 in 1937, an increase of 184.
PAY-ROLL.
For the 4,895 firms reporting, a summary of the pay-rolls reveals a sum total of
$122,498,097. Inasmuch as this figure covers only the industrial pay-rolls, it should not be
considered as the total pay-roll of the Province and must be further augmented by the following, yielding an accumulative total of $158,026,375, or a decrease of $4,627,859 over 1937.
Pay-roll of 4,895 firms making returns to Department of Labour    $122,498,097.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   655,053.00
Employees in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns
(estimated pay-roll) _ ..—  1,400,000.00
Transcontinental railways (ascertained pay-roll)  12,473,225.00
Dominion and Provincial Government workers — .—   5,500,000.00'
Wholesale and retail firms  - - -   2,950,000.00
Delivery, cartage and teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture operators, coal
and wood yards, and auto transportation....  3,550,000.00
Ocean services and express companies —  7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous - _ - -   -  1,500,000.00
Total  - - - - - , -. $158,026,375.00 P 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1927 are as follows:—
1927 ...  	
1928-  	
1929... 	
1930  _	
1931 	
1932 _ 	
$177,522,758.00
1933
183,097,781.00
1934
192,092,249.00
1935
167,133,813.00
1936
131,941,008.00
1937
102,957,074.00
1938
$99,126,653.00
113,567,953.00
125,812,140.00
142,349,591.00
162,654,234.00
158,026,375.00
In line with the decrease in the total pay-roll, the percentage of the total payable to wage-
earners decreased from 78.67 per cent, in 1937 to 77.10 per cent, in 1938.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
Officers, superintendents, and managers.	
Per Cent.
11.05
12.71
76.24
Per Cent.
11.06
12.65
76.29
Per Cent.
10.54
11.70
77.76
Per Cent.
10.00
11.33
78.67
Per Cent.
10.82
12.08
77.10
Wage-earners 	
Totals _.           	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Of the twenty-five tables, ten show an increased pay-roll, the remaining fifteen revealing
decreases. Of the former, miscellaneous trades headed the list with an increase of $1,198,572,
followed by metal-mining with $373,284 and public utilities with $249,888; builders' materials
increased by $210,019; metal trades with an addition of $132,032; followed by printing and
publishing with $35,765; paint-manufacture showed an additional $17,422; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $7,720;   and jewellery-manufacture, $5,348.
The decreases include the following, headed by the lumber industry with a decrease of
$2,979,062; pulp and paper mills with a loss of $1,514,470; Coast shipping, $981,099; coalmining, $376,560; explosives and chemicals, $264,920; garment-making, $235,620; wood
(N.E.S.), $114,451; ship-building, $30,301; breweries, $26,679; smelting, $18,882; food
products, $7,311; house-furnishings, $6,998; oil-refining, $6,331; cigar and tobacco manufacturing, $4,964;  leather and fur goods, $2,402.
Industry.
Breweries 	
Builders' materials 	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..
Coal-mining  	
Coast shipping  	
Contracting...  	
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1937.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-rolL
No. of
Firms
porting.
Explosives and chemicals..
Food products — -
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries.  	
Metal trades  	
Metal-mining   	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining   	
Paint-manufacture -	
Printing and publishing .
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building - —
Smelting 	
Street-railways, etc.. —	
Manufacturing wood (N.B.S.).
Totals — —
36
74
5
27
116
787
16
551
59
56
10
91
50
747
698
311
269
31
14
135
14
43
3
108
106
$944,176.00
951,875.00
6,309.00
3,416,428.00
9,058,328.00
7,097,358.00
1,250,844.00
9,908,726.00
664,718.00
905,941.00
192,595.00
1,270,734.00
467,706.00
23,523,759.00
7,012,441.00
9,532,766.00
3,653,599.00
2,349,394.00
323,419.00
3,271,760.00
4,695,356.00
938,111.00
4,702,712.00
9,144,584.00
2,208,437.00
,492,076.00
35
73
4
27
121
887
18
555
68
57
12
101
54
877
742
310
304
41
13
128
17
40
5
115
107
$1,045
1,063
5
3,716
9,642
9,029
1.727
10,752
1,006
1,075
214
1,462,
624
29,570,
8,319,
11,715,
4,095,
2,368.
328,
3,480,
5,591,
1,236,
5,953,
9,900,
2,759,
,683.00
149.00
918.00
,206.00
,662.00
,033.00
,071.00
,488.00
,868.00
,290.00
,622.00
.195.00
,492.00
.433.00
034.00
113.00'
,326.00
523.00
930.00
421.00
394.00
139.00
407.00
176.00
804.00
4,711  [$126,683,377.00
32
76
3
23
120
955
21
559
70
51
12
100
55
893
766
311
368
49
12
133
14
42
5
117
108
Total
Pay-roH.
$1,019
1,273,
3,339
8,661
9,183
1,462
10,745
770
1,068
219
1,469
622
26,591
8,451
12,088
5,293
2,362
346,
3,516,
4,076,
1,205,
5,934,
10,150
2,645
',004.00
1,168.00
954.00
.646.00
,563.00
1,753.00
,151.00
,177.00
,248.00
,292.00
,970.00
,915.00
.090.00
,371.00
.066.00
,397.00
.898.00
,192.00
,352.00
,186.00
,924.00
,838.00
.525.00
.064.00
,353.00
4,895 |$122,498,097.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 9
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
Dealing with the segregation of the industrial activities of the Province into three divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of Mainland—during the year 1938
the percentage representing the Greater Vancouver area increased from 32.96 per cent, to
35.14 per cent. Vancouver Island continued to gain, increasing from 19.50 per cent, to 20.90
per cent. The mainland percentage, however, decreased from 47.54 per cent, to 43.96 per
cent., this being largely due to the decreases evident in the lumbering section of the pay-roll.
The percentages quoted are based on the returns received, the figures contained in the
following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
Greater Vancouver.. 	
Rest of Mainland  	
$45,972,307.59
47,289,695.86
20.305,950.09
$49,142,221.94
56,728,693.99
19.941,224.22
$48,356,156.06
67,758,405.32
26,235,029.62
$53,610,835.53
77,325,822.84
31,717,575.63
$55,530,468.18
69,468,394.45
33,027,512.87
Totals — —
$113,567,953.54
$125,812,140.15
$142,349,591.00
$162,654,234.00
$158,026,375.00
The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number, together
with the percentages of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Number
Industry. employed.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing -   2
House-furnishing      - 	
Garment-making          	
Paint-manufacture	
Builders' materials 	
Leather and fur goods
Food  products	
Metal trades —
Explosives and chemicals —	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Wood  (N.E.S.)    -	
Smelting      —	
Printing and publishing  	
Coal-mining  — -	
Street-railways, power, etc.
B reweries   —	
Contracting     	
Coast shipping  	
Oil-refining   	
Lumber industries  	
Pulp and paper manufacturing
Ship-building 	
Metal-mining    	
Jewellery-manufacture  —	
664
215
131
1,190
316
10,182
4,583
1,127
530
3,717
2,228
3,670
1,063
2,593
4,769
552
11,650
6,434
1,131
26,257
2,938
1,206
8,783
53
Per
Cent.
100.OO
45.63
39.07
37.40'
33.19
32.59
29.39
26.03
24.58
23.58
23.08
19.66
13.24
13.08
12.77
11.70
11.41
11.26
10.79
7.16
6.47
5.00
2.90
2.20
1.89
A comparative study of the above figures with similar data for the year 1937 discloses
diminishing percentages in the number employed at less than $19 per week. Industries in
which these percentages decreased were: Contracting; Coast shipping; garment-making;
jewellery-manufacture; laundries, cleaning and dyeing; leather and fur goods; lumber industries; metal trades; miscellaneous trades and industries; oil-refining; printing and publishing;   pulp and paper manufacture;   street-railways, power, etc., and wood (N.E.S.).
APPRENTICES.
It will be noted that one apprentice is reported in the $40 per week class, a reference to
the tables showing this employee to be in the contracting industry. Five are reported as in
receipt of from $35 to $40 per week, distributed as follows: Printing and publishing, 1; pulp
and paper, 1; street-railways, power, etc., 3. Nine are shown as receiving between $30 and
$35 per week, these being segregated as follows: Contracting, 1; printing and publishing, 1;
pulp and paper, 1;   street-railways, power, etc., 6. P 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Industries showing an increasing opportunity for apprentices during the year were:
Building materials, increased 2; contracting, up 1; jewellery-manufacture, 2; leather and
fur goods, 8; lumber industries, 8; metal trades, 5; miscellaneous trades, 37; printing and
publishing, 7;   smelting, 6;  wood (N.E.S.), 1.
Decreases are noted in the following: Breweries, decrease 2; coal-mining, down 1
Coast shipping, 2; explosives and chemicals, 2; food products, 14; garment-making, 13
house-furnishing, 6; laundries, 23; metal-mining, 6; pulp and paper, 11; ship-building, 6
street-railways, etc., 7.
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the average weekly wage for
adult male employees increased in sixteen of the twenty-five tables. While considerable
difficulty is experienced with some industries in the matter of broken time, the figures have
been computed as in previous years—an endeavour being made to base calculations on a full
working week. Frequency distributions of employees classified on the basis of weekly
earnings from $6 to $50 are used for this purpose, the mid-point of the class limits generally
being taken as the rate for each group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
$27.58
$25.65
$25.70
$25.62
$25.79
$25.00
$26.18
$27.42
25.81
21.95
20.54
20.19
22.07
22.28
22.31
22.82
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
20.40
14.28
14.67
15.86
16.59
17.75
15.50
13.00
Coal-mining 	
28.40
28.04
26.80
28.11
28.49
28.75
27.46
28.20
29.63
26.50
27.62
28.58
26.23
.  31.61
31.99
32.93
27.41
24.78
23.37
22.56
22.72
24.13
25.61
25.81
Explosives and chemicals 	
26.78
23.34
20.66
22.53
25.34
23.76
24.58
24.20
23.43
21.88
21.12
21.10
22.00
23.16
23.85
23.70
22.51
24.07
25.29
23.52
21.29
22.74
22 97
23 15
House-furnishing. 	
23.18
20.05
18.91
19.49
20.05
21.29
22.25
20.80
31.29
23.40
30.55
28.88
31.54
34.39
34.60
38.95
25.29
23.26
21.78
20.67
21.92
22.25
22.89
23.33
Manufacturing leather and fur goods .
25.81
21.62
20.73
22.34
20.06
20.48
21.23
22.23
Lumber industries	
21.09
18.73
18.00
21.32
22.41
24.83
26.81
26.59
27.74
24.24
22.70
22.81
23.67
24.41
24 77
30.02
25.50
25.62
27.35
28.65
29.10
30.34
30 48
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
23.43
22.78
22.13
21.26
22.29
22.07
23.85
23.46
31.24
29.34
23.78
25.04
25.55
26 21
Paint-manufacturing	
26.11
25.00
22.53
22.53
21.53
21.44
23.08
22.78
Printing and publishing 	
39.78
37.05
32.82
32.51
32.31
32.72
33.69
34.19
Pulp and paper manufacturing-	
25.94
24.63
21.21
23.22
23.53
24.24
26.75
26.36
Ship-building 	
29.58
26.17
25.25
26.03
25.83
26.38
27.88
28.76
Smelting  	
30.44
22.98
23.83
23.88
25.82
24.54
25.08
24.80
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele
phones, etc  	
29.11
28.89
24.51
25.51
27.09
27.50
27.20
27.78
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.)	
23.67
20.61
18.05
18.97
18.69
20.32
21.97
22.68
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows :-
Increase.
Metal trades	
Breweries 	
Builders' materials
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping  	
Contracting    	
Garment-making   	
Jewellery, manufacture of — - 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing  	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods..
$1.24
.51
.74
.94
.20
.18
4.35
.44
1.00
Metal-mining
Oil-refining  ...
Printing and publishing  	
Ship-building _
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
phones, etc.	
tele-
Manufacturing of wood  (N.E.S.).
Decrease.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   $2.50
Explosives and chemicals   38
Food products, manufacture of   15
House-furnishing   —     1.45
Lumber industries — — 22
Miscellaneous trades and industry.
Paint-manufacturing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing 	
Smelting     	
1.32
.14
.76
.50
.58
.71
1.39
.30
.39
.28 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 11
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees was $26.70, an increase of $0.06
over 1937, and the following table shows the average for each year since the formation of the
Department:—
$29.20
28.64
26.17
23.62
22.30
23.57
24.09
26.36
26.64
26.70
The above weekly wage-rates appear in the following chart, showing the trend of average
weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1938.
1918                    	
            ....    $27.97
1929 —.   .
1919    	
     29.11
1930. - 	
1920	
     31.51
     27.62
1931	
1921 -	
1932.	
1922  -	
    - —.    27.29
 —     28.05
       28.39
27.82
1933 -	
1923—	
1934-	
1924 —	
1935-	
1925             	
1936
1926   	
 —     27.99
1937...
1927	
     28.29
1938	
1928  	
     28.96
AVERAGE MONTHLY  NUMBER of WAGE-EARNERS   (Male and Female)
t     1929-31 -32-37-38
JAN. FEB. MAR. APL. MAY JUNE JULY   AUG. SEPT. OCT.   NOV.  DEC.
100,000
9 5,00 0
90,000
85,0 0 0
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,0 00
60,0 00
55,000
50,000
45,0 00
40,0 00
I9B9
1937
1938
1931
1932
y
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fEr
L-""— REFERENCE — """"^
nployment in	
1929 shown  thus
1931
1932
1937
1938
-»—*— •* > P 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
1935
1936
1937
1938
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AVERAGE   WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT   MALE   EMPLOYEES.
1918—1938
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WA6ES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
*
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31.OO
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.OO
25. OO
24.00
23.00
22.OO
A
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' REPORT OF DEPUTY
MINISTER, 1938.                                      P 13
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173   S P 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
NATIONALITIES OP EMPLOYEES.
With reference to nationalities, of the total 119,492 employees recorded, 92,242 or 77.20
per cent, were natives of English-speaking countries, an increase of 0.48 per cent.; 17.702 or
14.81 per cent, were originally from Continental Europe, a decrease of 0.59 per cent.; natives
of Asiatic countries employed showed a total of 8,485 or 7.10 per cent., increasing 0.27 per
cent.    Employees from other countries decreased from 1.05 to 0.89 per cent.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
Natives of English-speaking countries..	
Per Cent.
76.30
14.62
7.80>
1.28
Per Cent.
72.83
15.25
8.28
3.64
Per Cent.
76.69
14.51
7.08
1.72
Per Cent.
75.42
14.83
7.46
2.29
Per Cent.
76.72
15.40
6.83
1.05
Per Cent.
77.20
14.81
7.10
From other countries, or nationality not
stated -	
.89
Totals    	
100,00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
The number of firms showing a total pay-roll of over $100,000 decreased slightly for the
year 1938, showing a total of 219 as against 222 for 1937.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal)
are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels
engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry was again in the lead with 69 firms, a decrease of 4; followed by
food products with 27, an increase of 4; metal-mining, 21, down 3; general contracting, 13,
no change; Coast shipping, 11, no change; coal-mining, 8, up 1; public utilities, 8, no
change; pulp and paper, 7, down 1; garages and oil-refining, 6 each, unchanged; printing
and publishing, 5, down 1; wood (N.E.S.), 5, no change; breweries, 4, up 1; miscellaneous
metal trades, 4, unchanged; miscellaneous trades and industries, and ship-building, 4 each,
up 1 in each case; electrical contracting, laundries, and smelting, 2 each, no change; house-
furnishings, 2, down 1; machine-shops, 2, up 1; builders' materials, 1, down 1; explosives,
fertilizers and chemicals, jewellery-manufacturing, leather and fur goods, iron and brass
foundries, paint-manufacture, 1 each.
Of the 219 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $4,000,000, four between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and six between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 15
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following', the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2, Builders' Material, etc. -Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—lr\c\\\A^s the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a*d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.— Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.— This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas ; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.— Includes these industries only.
No, 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15 Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.— Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.— Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.~Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).— Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 32 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $253,275.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    167,615.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    598,114.00
Total 81,019,004.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
jVlay	
468
478
468
481
494
619
41
64
65
65
66
66
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
523
602
181
463
458
471
68
80
73
73
78
74
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week ol
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under 86.00	
1
2
7.00 to    7.99...
8 00 to     8 99...
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
10.00 to   10 99...
2
12.00 to   12.99...
3
5
5
2
38
20
6
2
13 00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   16.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
21
7
2
11
17
18
33
2
54
10
40
13
14
IS
31
26
181
28
12
2
7
2
5
1
1
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99.
2
21.00 to   21.99...
23 00 to   23.99..
1
24.00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to  26 99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99...
1
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
122
2
1
2
17
26
1
12
6
71
16
1 P 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 76 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $222,755.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       108,354.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       942,059.00
Total $1,273,168.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June ....
Males.
Females.
753
12
754
11
791
12
912
10
983
11
951
10
Month.
July	
August
September .
October	
November..
December...
Males. | Females.
957
959
919
879
855
722
10
12
10
9
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
JJ6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99-
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
3
13
1
9
17
11
15
24
22
154
69
53
100
102
68
60
52
78
56
28
23
25
16
76
45
40
19
7
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland 	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
653
338
32
44
20
13
46
7
3
1
17
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $   360.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  594.00
Total      $   954.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
1
1
1
1
1
1
July	
August	
September .
October	
November..
December ..
1
1
1
1
1
2
February...
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9 99
1
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14 99..
15.00 to   15.99 .
16.00 to   16 99
1
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
36.00 to   39.99  .
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America.. .
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country ■	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.        Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 17
Tablb No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 23 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $113,940.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       139,523.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,086,183.00
Total $3,339,646.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April ...
May	
June....
Males.
Females.
2,907
1
2,853
1
2,598
1
2,559
1
2,553
1
2,540
1
July	
August	
September .
October	
November...
December...
2,547
2,523
2,487
2,620
2,541
2,670
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00
to $e
99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
26
37
24
43
46
125
58
58
122
54
175
215
92
114
613
258
78
62
40
Under
21 Yrs.
2
5
4
6
1
15
10
9
21
25
5
4
14
9
3
10
14
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   .  	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries   	
Males.       Females.
960
32
1
11
8
227
24
362
27
74
6
119
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 120 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $835,317.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       559,705.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,266,541.00
Total $8,661,563.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April ...
May	
June
5,511
5,464
5,621
5,556
5,924
5,808
49
53
58
55
55
76
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October...
November.
December
6,034
5,927
5,765
5,745
5,590
5,622
96
76
55
63
63
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
11
6
10
7
14
8
18
61
56
39
61
170
135
98
123
326
73
182
248
166
469
55
59
81
32
592
596
2,419
168
161
$6.00 to  $6.99..
3
3
1
5
1
3
5
1
81
2
18
3
1
9
7
1
2
3
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
1
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
1
3
12
1
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.89..
18.00 to   18.99..
26
9
4
1
10
2
4
2
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
1
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
1
24.00 to   24.99  .
26.00 to   26.99..
26.00 to   26.99
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
1
1
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
2
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia   	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China ,	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
2,834
2,883
80
18
1
21
20
107
77
404
79
5
179
Females.
SO
33
2 P 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 955 Firms.
Tablh No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 21 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pai
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-worker
Total	
/ments, 1938.
j2,159.00
17,434.00
14,160.00
53,763.00
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,104,177.00
Total $1.462,151.00
    1,0
)    7,0
 $9,1
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Male
3.   Females.
Month.
Males!
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February —
May	
4,97
5,30
5,94
6,32
6,65
7,16
1          87
97
i          89
3         125
)         160
I         170
Jul;
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
7,297
7,670
7,207
6,594
5,811
5,155
185
156
98
98
101
97
January ....
February...
March	
774
78".
84t
924
93i
1,015
15
14
16
16
19
16
Jut)
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
1,007
967
854
769
750
794
17
tember .
aber ....
ember..
ember...
ust.
cember..
?ber....
ember ..
ember ..
18
16
15
16
14
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
47
21
10
21
23
31
22
64
63
99
136
152
314
319
2,440
467
605
931
224
880
346
345
331
304
139
1,538
850
538
257
143
30
10
-   5
8
3
12
21
7
9
14
16
15
20
3
34
1
2
4
1
8
3
1
1
11
10
6
13
12
9
7
9
7
12
10
4
2
4
4
4
1
2
Under $6 00	
9
$6.00 to   $6.99.  .
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 tn     7
99..
7.00 to     7.99...
99
1
5
4
1
36
33
7
54
12
17
98
10
88
35
82
66
66
62
67
68
74
34
170
29
10
2
7
8.00 to     8.99...
1
1
1
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99  .
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24 99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over ..
1
9 00 to     9.99...
1
5
2
7
1
64
29
10
24
7
7
4
2
2
4
1
2
1
1
10.00 to   10.99...
2
1
4
2
4
2
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
o
3
1
16.00 to   16.99.
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
3
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99..
1
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
o
1
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
2
1
1
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
28.00 to   28 99...
29.00 to .29.99...
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
1
45.00 to   49.99...
1
1
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees:
Country of Origin.
Males.
females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
6,406
4,287
262
19
23
41
208
233
149
701
266
36
1
1
4
253
177
44
2
1
589
315
31
1
2
1
13
6
7
42
4
1
80
Great Britain and I
United States of An
Great Britain and ]
United States of Ai
Ttalv	
Ttalv	
Germany and Austr
1
Germany and Aust
Norway. Sweden. Denmark. Finland, etc..
2
Russia and Poland
Other European cou
Russia and Poland
Other European coi
62
9.
2
1 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 19
TABLE No.   8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 559 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,524,476.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,566,622.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,654,079.00
Total $10,745,177.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February ....
April	
June	
3,855
3,766
3,902
4,484
6,124
6,138
938
918
1,040
1,119
1,178
1,931
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
7,970
8,286
7,879
6,868
5,478
4,198
4,056
4,923
5,120
3,706
2,602
1,153
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
48
19
32
36
78
130
157
485
304
385
354
392
231
341
671
587
650
679
325
689
586
424
287
366
104
812
438
180
59
433
Under
21 Yrs.
28
124
27
35
19
32
19
57
16
39
42
35
28
27
23
15
8
4
4
13
10
10
3
4
2
1
1
1
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
272
67
325
139
300
443
571
517
463
697
444
382
373
352
168
161
115
70
81
63
62
61
41
36
35
69
15
1
6
Under
18 Yrs.
48
53
30
47
47
35
12
71
14
71
29
15
5
18
11
7
27
4
7
5
4
1
3
2
3
4
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia '■ ■
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
5,268
2,501
121
19
11
22
87
145
159
640
95
50
1,811
6
522
72
Appren.
tices.
5
10
3
7
3
8
7
4
Females.
5,010
751
78
6
5
31
60
167
78
91
61
9
24
604
45
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering TO Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $129,497.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         90,182.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       550,569.00
Total     $770,248.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
201
208
209
213
211
213
539
594
638
637
606
645
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
214
220
223
227
237
209
523
563
597
619
596
504
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
cfe over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
5
1
1
3
2
1
3
2
1
4
11
8
12
16
20
5
55
61
119
83
65
29
35
14
21
9
5
5
9
8
1
1
1
9
3
1
5
3
6
12
1
9
$6.00 to  $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
2
3
1
7
1
6
4
6
28
5
15
6
3
19
7
9
4
7
15
6
5
7
2
21
15
8
1
3
6
8
5
3
3
2
16 00 to   16 99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
1
20.00 to   20.99..
21 00 to   21.99.
22.00 to   22.99
23.00 to   23.99
24 00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.B9..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
1
1
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.      Females.
127
70
2
3
6
7
8
16
1
17
1
1
3
4
5
13
17
21
24
83' P 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
.  Returns covering 51 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $195,951.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    147,025.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   725,316.00
Total $1,068,292.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
732
749
723
688
674
677
131
136
122
126
120
124
July	
August...
September.
October   ..
November.
December..
683
702
749
757
768
738
129
145
148
150
158
134
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
to 28.99.
to   29 99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
to
to
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
14
21
16
22
28
25
90
80
73
29
32
40
28
26
29
20
6
16
12
35
7
3
Under
21 Yrs.
6
1
7
15
19
6
26
28
31
16
11
18 Yrs.
&over.
1
2
1
4
1
12
11
66
22
3
8
5
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren.
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
589
182
11
1
2
11
14
8
28
24
11
136
32
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $27,872.00
■Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   95,299.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  96,799.00
Total $219,970.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.    Females,
January.
February
March...
April.   ..
May	
June
69
69
68
70
69
70
J uly 	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
70
70
69
70
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18 00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40 00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to S6.
to 7.
to 8.
to 9.
to 10.
to 11
to 12.
to 13.
to 15
to 16.!
to 17.!
to 18 !
to 19.!
to 20.
to 21
99..
99..
to 22
to 23
to 24
to 25
to 29.
to 34.
to 39.
to 44.
to 49.
and ov
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99 ;
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
17
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
52
23
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 21
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 100 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $136,150.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       270,874.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   1,062,891.00
Total $1,469,915.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March. .
April..   .
May	
June
521
624
534
550
545
553
924
911
926
960
936
1,005
July	
August
September..
October
November..
December ..
568
558
552
546
687
529
1,046
1,048
1,009
968
950
959
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
1
3
2
5
4
6
10
10
21
15
22
22
33
66
20
29
16
25
54
32
26
18
7
55
14
3
5
2
12
6
2
12
2
2
18 Yrs.     Under
<fe over.    18 Yrs.
12
4
2
11
40
40
71
91
332
175
114
31
20
15
4
18
1
2
8
12
16
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland    	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Males.
296
222
12
5
1
1
5
5
2
12
10
1
20
Apprentices.
4
4
11
6
2
6
2
Females.
659
318
26
1
1
9
17
14
8
19
22
4
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 55 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $126,142.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   112,570.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  383,378.00
Total $622,090.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June. ...
341
343
344
350
345
334
90
95
99
101
105
112
July	
August...
September
October..
November
December
344
347
368
371
388
385
118
128
141
157
160
145
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00	
2
5
9
6
7
8
7
10
1
3
2
5
1
4
2
2
i"
2
$6 00 to   $6.99..
3
2
2
8
2
10
24
23
9
20
23
22
16
17
14
40
14
12
10
9
2
23
3
6
2
1
3
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
1
2
2
1
1
5
19
19
19
18
15
8
6
12
2
5
1
1
"i"
i
2
13
3
1
7
17.00 to   17 99..
18.00 to   18 99
4
5
1
30 00 to   34 99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
230
94
9
12
31
3
6
14
14
103
32
5
i
1
12
2 P 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Tablb No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 893 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,798,096.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       885,803.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 23,907,472.00
Total $26,591,371.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females.
January.
February
March...
April.  . .
May	
June
16,650
15,156
18,549
20,448
21,321
20,641
43
49
56
67
July	
August....
September.
October...
November.
December..
18,603
19,340
20,725
19,798
19,616
17,187
58
66
53
53
54
41
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.80
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
18.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
60.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99,
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
to   23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
13
3
14
15
25
57
36
156
93
334
348
603
4,632
1,137
2,390
781
746
3,325
985
883
1,122
769
723
3,034
1,812
1,346
568
404
Under
21 Yrs.
3
3
2
8
6
3
70
30
138
31
96
23
28
181
22
25
7
12
76
4
16
23
3
18 Yrs.
cfe over.
1
20
14
5
5
7
6
5
6
4
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland .  	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
13,224
2,790
618
21
41
133
237
642
1,224
3,816
1,039
245
1,613
619
1,446
143
62
9
1
TABLE No.  15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 766 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,748,020.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   2,025,425.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,677,621.00
Total     $8,451,066.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March...
April....
May..
June
4,117
4,177
4,313
4,357
4,455
4,483
160
154
151
144
148
164
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August. ...
September
October ...
November .
December.,
4,489
4,468
4,432
4,339
4,305
4,254
157
150
153
148
148
145
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.
to   $6.!
to     7.!
to    8.1
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99
to
to
to
to
to
to
1.0
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
4
4
13
16
26
20
47
32
161
214
224
221
315
125
290
132
212
240
158
127
186
96
745
326
97
65
55
28
27
25
34
37
33
38
41
33
27
40
24
7
9
3
4
2
2
18 Yrs.  Under
over. 18 Yrs.
6
1
2
9
2
7
5
14
3
1
21
30
15
15
7
6
2
3
3
1
2
Apprentices.
26
26
36
51
24
32
27
22
21
5
17
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
073
499
144
16
12
12
38
44
24
11
1
21
26
Females.
165
25
3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 23
TABLE  NO.   16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 311 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $895,449.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        729,953.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  10,462,995.00
Total $12,088,397.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.,.
February..
March.
April	
May	
June	
6,095
6,003
6,105
6,236
6,672
7,001
43
42
41
45
47
61
Month.       Males.   Females.
July 	
August
September.
October   ..
November..
December..
7,019
7,063
7,039
6,916
6,561
6,169
65
53
63
57
61
52
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to   27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
13
6
1
2
9
13
14
4
20
25
73
44
85
90
120
88
692
761
200
498
1,385
402
2,517
1,071
382
145
120
Under
21 Yrs.
10
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
3
11
1
2
5
11
1
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States:	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries .
iMales.       Females.
4,346
1,618
312
25
8
31
185
239
458
1,356
115
56
90
25
135
70
12
5
TABLE No.  17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 368 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,023,273.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      925,075.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,345,550.00
Total $5,293,898.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.        Males.    Females,
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
2,388
2,327
2,440
2,576
2,769
2,949
378
387
401
398
407
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
2,995
2,908
3,207
415
418
451
430
412
420
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
i.99
7.99
10.99
11.99
12.99
13.99
14.99
16.99
16.99
17.99
18.99
19.99
20.99
to 21.99
to 22.99
to 23.99
24.99
25.99
26.99
27.99
28.99
29 99
34.99
39.99
44.99
49.99
and over
21 Yrs.
& over.
16
7
9
12
11
47
15
41
37
113
157
152
123
119
564
127
249
305
113
312
178
125
81
116
27
394
135
73
27
43
Under
21 Yrs.
22
10
13
22
17
10
15
35
13
24
23
6
4
4
13
2
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
6
3
38
29
182
87
33
19
21
39
10
8
4
5
3
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
2,521
1,305
91
35
45
39
112
32
50
26
11
19
Apprentices.
Females.
433
139
4
2 P 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering U9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $253,013.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,082,248.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,026,931.00
Total    $2,362,192.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
619
606
612
623
670
762
13
12
9
10
14
17
July	
September..
November ..
December...
778
835
832
826
706
.   656
19
22
20
21
22
June	
16
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
3
3
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8 00 to     8 99...
1
10.00 to   10.99.   .
11.00 to   11.99...
3
4
12.00 to   12.99...
1
2
13 00 to   13.99.
14.00 to   14.99.
3
23
21
10
12
92
36
58
69
17
75
46
51
13
96
7
193
208
63
11
15
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
1
3
4
1
2
1
1
6
1
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
1
3
3
2
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99.   .
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
835
397
34
4
2
1
1
7
108
12
3
46
11
2
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938,
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    884,655.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    114,202.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   147,495.00
Total $346,352.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January,
February
March.. ,
April
May	
June ....
Males.
Females.
122
18
123
IS
132
17
138
17
137
17
138
18
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
134
131
133
124
124
124
17
16
16
17
17
17
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females,
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
cfcover.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
cfcover.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 tc   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99
1
8.00 to     8.99
1
8
9 00 to     9.99..
11 00 to   11.99  .
1
1
3
2
1
1
12.00 to   12.99..
13 00 to   13.99
3
3
12
8
8
5
9
6
4
7
6
3
6
8
4
8
14
I
7
4
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
14.00 to   14 99  .
15 00 to   16.99
16.00 to   16.99.
17.00 to   17.99
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99
21.00 to   21.99..
23.00 to   23.99
25 00 to   25.99
28 00 to   28.99
29.00 to   29.99
30.00 to   34.99
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France    	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
113
49
2
Females.
14
4
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 25
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 133 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $559,626.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,103,446.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,853,114.00
Total $3,516,186.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males, i Females. Month.        Males.   Females,
January.
February-
March . .
April
May	
June
1,108
1,124
1,145
1,138
1,1.16
1,170
168
168
168
184
174
192
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
1,136
1,123
1,129
1,157
1,164
1,183
184
173
172
170
174
182
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
3
6
11
7
14
■i
8
34
17
11
23
13
38
12
29
17
14
44
11
25
16
9
85
166
248
110
87
Under
21 Yrs.
10
15
3
20
4
11
3
5
9
1
1
2
IS Yrs.
& over.
5
2
3
6
3
3
6
21
7
23
25
15
16
11
3
11
3
18
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
5
8
8
6
17 '
10
10
8
6
7
4
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries 	
Males.      Females.
1,050
370
32
4
27
2
244
37
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering li Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $408,519.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      490,682.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,177,723.00
Total  $4,076,924.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January..
February
March...
April....
May	
June
3,069
3,016
2,942
2,896
2,525
2,189
77
71
72
74
74
71
July	
August	
September..
October
November ..
December...
2,211
2,248
2,498
2,466
2,480
2,434
71
85
91
86
81
77
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
26.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
cfc over.
1
1
1
1
3
5
5
3
16
108
223
38
565
176
338
98
246
117
116
94
48
366
204
78
Under
21 Yrs.
2
3
11
1
17
1
17
5
2
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
23
11
9
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
1,402
832
30
5
27
21
7
62
21
10
84
Females.
80
14 P 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TABLB No.  22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering U2 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $138,133.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         96,091.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       971,614.00
Total $1,205,838.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.   Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
642
720
812
810
901
924
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
728
620
669
816
717
676
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over
1
2
369
13
46
23
10
29
91
87
228
228
26
11
4
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States.....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
647
463
65
1
2
1
4
37
48
2
Females.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $272,288.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       783,635.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,878,602.00
Total $5,934,526.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females,
January .
February-
March ..
April
May	
June
3,594
3,515
3,589
3,628
3,704
3,703
23
24
25
25
26
25
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
3,754
3,818
3,765
3,698
3,639
3,603
25
25
26
25
23
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oaly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&. over.
76
14
27
20
11
19
19
20
23
20
2S
82
53
74
78
139
218
317
341
278
272
227
208
269
168
519
142
16
2
Under
21 Yrs.
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
Under
i8 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7 00 to     7.99  .
1
1
1
6
8
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99 .
1
15
3
2
5
8
3
5
1
4
1
3
14
10
14
3
6
2
4
3
10
14.00 to   14.99..
4
15.00 to   16.99..
10
16.00 to   16.99..
2
17 00 to   17 99..
2
18.00 to   18.99..
19 00 to   19.99
5
5
2
21.00 to   21.99..
3
3
2
23.00 to   23.99..
4
24.00 to   24.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99  .
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99 .
30.00 to   34.99..
1
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99.,
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.      Females.
1,765
1,144
107
6
6
6
411
55
80
158
37
11
40
2
17
3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 27
TABLE No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 117 Firms.-
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $834,892.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,842,838.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,472,334.00
Total $10,150,064.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
May	
June	
3,701
3,627
3,724
4,010
4,038
4,051
1,566
1,565
1,554
1,549
1,599
1,720
July	
August	
September..
October 	
November ..
December...
4,064
4,088
4,144
4,194
4,131
4,014
1,691
1,673
1,633
1,558
1,598
1,625
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
IS Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.0Oto     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99.   .
4
1
1
23
18
17
24
19
35
152
59
113
53
39
491
120
112
108
124
321
168
160
412
255
201
837
407
344
86
65
3
6
1
1
3
2
3
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
5
11.00 to   11.99.   .
2
1
4
11
5
22
22
19
1
554
182
21
104
51
533
133
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99.   .
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17 00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
1
1
19.00 to   19.99...
20 00 to   20.99.
1
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
40
7
4
2
26.00 to   26 99.
28.00 to  28.99.
2
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39 99...
1
6
3
45.00 to   49 99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country 	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
2,630
2,364
201
14
85
61
60
149
50
15
14
3
1,560
476
50
1
TABLE No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 108 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $412,386.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      187,752.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,045,215.00
Total   $2,645,353.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females,
January,
February
March. .
April...,
May	
June
1,571
1,641
1,766
1,926
2,012
2,107
55
68
72
95
129
137
July	
August	
September
October ...
November..
December .
2,183
2,302
2,139
2,041
2,021
1,845
132
102
106
92
89
74
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
2
4
2
2
6
12
30
93
24
56
145
69
398
149
227
84
54
348
71
105
72
66
30
79
67
18
17
5
Under
21 Yrs.
6
4
1
1
4
13
49
116
85
99
49
14
12
3
49
7
18
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
4
2
15
5
17
29
22
7
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France ....  	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
,843
464
36
3
5
5
24
33
47
113
71
26
Females
95
12
1
1 P 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,895 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1938.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers...
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc..
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers) _
$13,253,401.00
14,793,170.00
94,451,526.00
$122,498,097.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary  	
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's inquiry, and
from whom returns were not received	
Transcontinental Railways :	
Dominion and Provincial Government workers	
Wholesale and Retail Firms —.	
Delivery,  Cartage and Teaming,  Warehousing,  Butchers,  Moving-picture  Operators,
Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation	
Ocean Services and Express Companies	
Miscellaneous   	
$655,053.00
1,400,000.00
12,473,225.00
5,500,000.00
2,950,000.00
3,550,000.00
7,500,000.00
1,500,000.00
$35,528,278.00
Total.
$158,026,375.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January. . .
February.
March..  . .
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium ,	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan ,	
All other countries	
52,751
25,282
2,267
173
132
324
1,718
1,640
2,743
7,846
1,985
537
4,194
646
2,859
1,003
Females.
63,786
5,358
63,381
6,429
68,178
5,609
71,896
5,813
74,854
6,945
76,085
6,913
76,309
9,086
77,665
9,955
78,257
10,073
75,162
8,515
71,790
7,300
66,408
5,824
Males.       Females.
9,445
2,121
189
14
8
46
97
205
106
178
120
17
62
734
60
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oilly).
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
<fc over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
234
123
329
54
80
S6.00to   S6.99..
95
191
91
67
67
7.00 to    7.99..
133
115
353
59
95
8.00 to    8.99..
154
174
191
78
126
9.00 to     9.99..
220
136
375
80
78
10.00 to   10.99..
381
165
536
50
96
11.00 to   11.99..
373
199
713
20
73
12.00 to   12.99..
950
426
820
93
75
13.00 to   13.99..
697
267
967
32
70
14.00 to   14.99..
1,293
398
1,396
86
47
15.00 to   16.99..
1,570
371
1,517
35
53
16.00 to   16.99..
1,964
239
834
20
35
17.00 to   17.99..
1,964
140
571
7
26
18,00 to   18.99..
2,631
104
654
21
29
19.00 to   19.99..
10,207
359
337
11
19
20.00 to   20.99..
3,987
79
813
9
19
21.00 to   21.99..
5,685
100
301
28
9
22.00 to   22.99..
4,691
52
127
5
13
23.00 to   23.99..
3,046
47
145
7
18
24.00 to   24.99..
7,898
129
104
6
10
25.00 to   25.99..
4,763
52
98
4
5
26.00 to   26.99..
3,229
46
63
1
6
27.00 to   27.99..
3,754
40
44
3
7
28.00 to   28.99..
4,370
13
39
2
4
29.00 to   29.99..
2,287
12
39
3
6
30.00 to   34.99 .
13,132
22
93
4
9
35.00 to   39.99..
7,060
3
25
4
5
40.00 to   44.99..
5,995
4
5
1
1,654
1,667
50.00 and over..
1
Totals	
95,984
4,010
11,587
789
1,081 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 29
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell     1000 Douglas Street. Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton    1902 Blenheim Street, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson __   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell   - —   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron... _   ._ _ .....Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head Office  _ Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office  789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—The Fifth Annual Report of the Board of Industrial Relations for the year ended
December 31st, 1938, is presented herewith.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS.
That it was a busy year is evidenced by the fact that seventy-five sessions were held,
some of which took the form of public hearings in Vancouver and Victoria, the balance being
regular Board meetings.
Much time is devoted by the Members to hearing delegations representative of many
occupations and industries. The Board as a whole met forty-four such groups during 1938,
receiving verbal and written information pertaining to their respective businesses and callings,
which, in many instances, was presented with a view to having new Orders made or existing
Orders altered and revised. Men and women through their Unions, or appearing in individual
groups, presented their requests.
To accommodate employees who cannot appear during the day frequent evening sessions
have been convened.
When a new Order is under consideration the Board has met employers and employees
who would ultimately be affected, sometimes in separate meetings and at other times jointly.
Circumstances have to be carefully weighed before a decision is reached regarding the type
of meeting to be arranged.
In addition, of course, to material presented at these gatherings, its own officials collect
and assemble valuable information for the use of the Board.
NEW OR REVISED ORDERS.
A brief review of Orders and Regulations made during 1938 follows.
The Order relating to the hotel and catering industry for women employees was the
subject of important revisions during the year. After holding public inquiries in Victoria and
in Vancouver the Board by Order No. 52 reduced the charges that could be made to employees
for room and board, made provision for the furnishing and laundering of uniforms without
expense to the employee, prohibited deductions for accidental breakages, wrote into the Order
the section that entitles every employee to a rest period of twenty-four consecutive hours in
each calendar week, and, what has had a very marked effect on learners in the occupation,
equalized the rates for beginners of any age, through the permit system.
The former Order allowed girls under 18 to be employed for a training period at lower
rates than were permitted for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over. Now that
there is no difference in the rates or length of training period employment opportunities for
the unskilled workers have been placed on an even footing. Close check is kept of these
employees by means of their permits.
As in former years, a special Order (No. 52a) was put into effect covering resort hotels
in unorganized territory during the summer season, enabling them to meet conditions that
did not exist in the urban areas. P 30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Order No. 52b prescribed that employees in the hotel and catering industry working on
split shifts should have their hours confined within fourteen hours immediately following
commencement of work, but one and one-half times her regular rate of pay had to be given
to any employee for any portion of her split shift that extended over twelve hours following
commencement of her work.
For resort hotels in unorganized territory Order No. 52c granted certain concessions
from September 16th, 1938, to June 15th, 1939, which had the effect in many instances of
keeping on employees for full-time work after the tourist business ceased. Had the Order
not been passed these girls would have been out of employment at the end of the summer.
Orders Nos. 53 and 54 for female and male elevator operators included provisions for
improved working conditions that had not been incorporated in the former Orders.
The fruit and vegetable industry each year seems to require special attention from the
Board. Orders Nos. 46c and 47c took care of an emergent situation in Kelowna with
reference to the dehydrating of apples, and remained in force from March 10th to May 7th,
1938.
Women and men engaged in canning tomatoes were covered by Orders Nos. 46d and 47d.
Order No. 26 relating to the transportation industry was varied by Order No. 26b to
allow the Board to approve of a different arrangement respecting the cost of uniforms when
applications by employers and employees seemed to justify a variation from the clause in the
original Order, which required that uniforms be furnished and kept up without cost to the
employee.
To clarify the situation pertaining to bicycle-riders or foot messengers employed exclusively by wholesale or retail establishments, Order No. 26c took them out of the scope of
Order No. 26 and placed them definitely under Order No. 59 relating to the mercantile
industry.
Order No. 33b amended the Order relating to the occupation of taxicab-driver with
reference to the cost of uniforms, giving employers and employees the privilege of making
written application to the Board for approval of a different arrangement than provided by
Order No. 33, which made it obligatory on employers requiring employees to wear uniforms
to furnish them and keep them in repair without cost to the worker.
A new Order No. 58 affecting the carpentry trade in Vancouver and vicinity set a
minimum wage of 75 cents per hour, which had a beneficial effect in stabilizing conditions
not only in that branch of the construction industry but in other trades as well.
The former Order covering male employees in the mercantile industry was revised as
No. 59, the principal changes being in the form of the Order, and adding provisions for
semi-monthly payment of wages, the furnishing of uniforms free of cost to employees in cases
where uniforms were required by the employers, and for providing a rest period of twenty-
four hours each week.
Owing to certain local conditions in the taxicab industry in Victoria and its environs
Order No. 60 was made, granting an increase in the daily wage-rate and putting into force
new conditions regarding hours, rest periods, uniforms, and the semi-monthly payment of
wages.
Prior to the Christmas season supplementary Orders and Regulations were promulgated
to meet the exigencies of the trade in mercantile establishments to control working conditions
at this busy period, both for men and women employees.
For the first time in its history the Board framed an Order (No. 61) to fix an hourly
rate of 40 cents for males engaged in operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering,
hauling, and shipping of trees and evergreens to be used for decorative purposes during the
Christmas season. This industry had assumed large proportions in recent years, and in
some cases workers spent many hours in the woods gathering trees and boughs, and before
their wages had been paid the companies had left the locality and, with no protective Orders,
the employees suffered hardships from non-payment or low payment of wages.
REGULATIONS UNDER THE "HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Regulations under the " Hours of Work Act " granted the privilege of a nine-hour day to
logging operations east of the Cascades, to bring them into line with a similar ruling affecting
sawmills in that area. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 31
Employees working on split shifts in the catering industry as a whole were allowed by
Regulation 18a to have their shifts confined within fourteen hours from time of starting work,
provided they received one and one-half times their regular rate of pay for any hours that
were beyond twelve from the time they started work. Their actual working-hours must not
be more than eight.
The taxicab industry, in which hours were previously unlimited, was brought under the
Act, but a leeway of six hours per week in excess of forty-eight was granted, with the
provision that no employee should be required to work more than nine hours in any one day.
This Regulation applied to all parts of the Province except Victoria and vicinity, for which
special regulations were made by Order, as stated previously in this Report.
Summaries of the foregoing Orders and Regulations, and subsequent ones made in 1939
prior to the Report going to press, will be found in the Appendix to this section of the Report.
STAFF CONFERENCE.
The annual staff conference was convened in January at Vancouver, all branches of the
Department being represented. Inspectors of the Board from outlying parts of the Province
were given an opportunity to discuss their numerous problems and talk over their work with
officials from headquarters.
During the three days the conference lasted, matters of vital interest from the standpoint of administration and policy were dealt with, all those participating in the discussions
receiving valuable assistance from the interchange of views. The correlation of the various
branches of the Department was stressed, and the importance of all working in co-operation
was emphatically demonstrated.
Informative addresses were given by different officials of the Department. Mr. Robert
Morrison, Chief Inspector, took as his topic " Administrative Mechanics " and ably pictured
the scope and functions of the Department, with special reference to head office in Victoria.
Ideals as well as difficulties were outlined in graphic manner.
Mr. H. Douglas, Factory Inspector, dealt with " Industrial Home-work." He submitted
data proving that the amendments to the " Factories Act " had enabled his branch to check
home-work in the Province before it had reached a stage that would have made its suppression
far from easy.
The question of "Apprenticeship " was informatively presented by Mr. Hamilton Crisford,
who is in charge of that phase of the work under the "Apprenticeship Act." He mentioned
that in the enforcement of the new legislation and the establishment of new principles or the
re-establishment of old, the spirit of reasonableness must be paramount, especially where the
co-operation of the apprentice and his parents, the employer and his journeymen, is a
requisite to success.    It was along those lines that the branch was achieving its good results.
Mr. J. A. Ward Bell, Chief Administrative Officer under the " Trade-schools Regulation
Act " enlightened the conference on this comparatively new type of legislation in the Province.
It had been the aim of the committee in charge to safeguard the interests of the students, and
at the same time protect established trade and industry. Abuses in connection with so-called
trade-schools had been corrected under the Act, and reliable schools having registered and
complied with the regulations were benefiting in their operations on account of the protection
afforded them.
" Methods and Procedure of Minimum Wage Inspections " was the title of the address
given by Mr. James Thomson, Member of the Board in charge of the Vancouver Office. Inside
the large area under his jurisdiction, with employers of all nationalities, inspection work is
a complicated affair. Officials are called upon to exercise much tact and patience when meeting employers and employees on occasions when differences have arisen regarding wages and
working conditions, or in the ordinary routine of their investigation work.
The staff under his direction come in contact with all types of employers and, like the
balance of the inspection staff, strive to educate those affected by the Orders and Regulations
along lines that tend towards co-operation with the Department. As the requirements become
better known less trouble is experienced, but new-comers to the Province and a certain type of
employer who wilfully misunderstands his obligations necessitate constant vigilance by the
Inspectors.
Mr. Thomson stated, however, that whole-hearted co-operation was being given by a
substantial  proportion  of  firms,  and public-spirited  citizens  helped  in  many instances  in- P 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
imparting information regarding suspected violations. In the latter case the complaints
received did not always prove well founded, but investigations were made to check on the
data supplied.
Mrs. Rex Eaton, a Member of the Board, gave a thoughtful paper on " Vocational Training in Relation to Labour Legislation." She pointed out that most of the plans adopted by
the Departments of Labour and Education in British Columbia had been recommended by
the Federal Committee in its Youth Training Project, thereby demonstrating that this
Province was keeping up its reputation for leadership in labour affairs.
Vocational and recreational classes for young people had been formed to meet a specific
need for the future—training to assist with employment, and recreation to improve health
and morale.
The problem of the unemployed was closely bound up with the plans for youth training.
Graduates of the vocational classes would eventually be competing for positions in occupations
for which minimum wages had been set. Careful direction and thought, therefore, had to be
given to this interrelation of governmental activities, and the speaker appealed to the
conference for sympathetic understanding of the vocational training classes.
Following these addresses round-table discussions took place at which the conferees had
the opportunity to offer suggestions or ask for further explanation of points not extensively
covered by the respective speakers in the limited time at their disposal.
At a luncheon meeting the Minister of Labour gave an address which, presented in his
usual vivid manner, proved of great benefit to all present. He outlined his ideas of a proper
functioning Department, mentioned methods of administration which he approved, warned
against the type to be avoided, and definitely stressed the opportunities for advancement by
the staff if serious study were given by the individuals to the far-reaching aspects of a labour
department whose activities were of such primary importance in an era beset with changing
economic problems.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
From 1919 when the original Minimum Wage Board started to collect statistical data
covering women and girl employees the practice has been continued each year, and interesting comparisons are available.
Employers are asked to submit figures covering the week of greatest employment.
It has been the custom to show tabulations for a five-year period so that the trend in
wages and hours may be studied in a convenient form.
Over a period of years the returns show a gradual increase in the numbers employed, and
it is gratifying to note that the forms are more correctly and completely made out each
succeeding year.
Statistical forms were received from 4,259 employers of women and girls, an increase of
510 over the 1937 figure. The returns received covered some 26,732 women workers for the
year 1938, this figure revealing an increase of 2,648 women and girl employees on the pay-rolls
when compared with previous yearly period.
The following tables cover the occupations for which minimum wages have been set by
the Board:—
Mercantile Industry.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
Number of firms reporting...	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years. 	
Under 18 years  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years..
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.—.
Employees under 18 years..
Percentage of employees under 18 years-
Average hours worked per week 	
$65.
$4,
538
5,315
4,851
464
856.44
695.22
$13.58
$10.12
8.73%
43.48
507
5,010
4,540
470
1,373.35
1,638.65
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
40.47
479
4,723
4,326
397
$56,086.46
$3,523.49
$12.96
$8.88
8.40%
40.58
421
4,382
3,960
422
$51,158.70
$3,353.22
$12.92
$7.95
9.63%
40.38
390
4,239
3,870
.968.56
.750.77
$12.65
$7.45
8.70%
40.92 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 33
Increases are generally evident in the above table. For the year 1938 the number of
firms reporting increased by 31, an additional 305 employees being shown over the previous
year.
The average weekly wage for women 18 years of age or over rose from $13.30 to $13.58,
and for the younger employee the average weekly wage for the year under review stood at
$10.12 as against $9.66.
The increase in the average working-hours for 1938 over those of the previous year
caused us to make an analysis of the figures submitted. As the figures are given for the
busiest week of the year, which in this industry will be one of the weeks prior to Christmas,
it was found that one of the larger departmental stores sent in their returns for 1937 when,
on account of statutory holidays, their working-week was 42% hours, while the same firm,
with many employees, chose a period for 1938 during which their staff worked from 47 to 48
hours; In view of the employment weight of this firm the whole average would be affected.
Close scrutiny of individual forms showed no marked increase in hours generally.
Increased employment in the industry was noticeable in the group containing workers 18
years of age and over.    Those under 18 were fewer by six than in the previous year.
Laundry Industry.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
Number of firms reporting-,- __	
95
1,095
1,029
66
$13,565.23
$567.74
$13.18
$8.60
6.03%
42.74
86
1,084
1,014
70
$13,083.49
$575.71
$12.90
$8.22
6.46%
41.90
81
991
911
80
$11,462.44
$658.04
$12.58
$8.23
8.07%
41.94
81
900
857
43
$10,517.50
$406.74
$12.27
$9.46
4.78%
41.12
72
847
810
Under 18 years ___ ____:. _
Total weekly wages—
37
$9,679.17
$309.74
$11.95
$8.37
4.37%
39.91
Employees under 18 years __	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.—	
The number of firms reporting in the above industry increased by 9 for the year 1938,
the returns covering 1,095 employees as against 1,084 for the previous year.
Average weekly wages for employees over 18 years increased from $12.90 to $13.18, and
in the under 18 group from $8.22 to $8.60.
The percentage of employees under 18 years of age continued to drop, the 1938 figures
revealing 6.03 per cent, of total in this group as against 6.46 per cent, shown in the previous
year.
Average weekly working-hours increased from 41.90 to 42.74.
We are pleased to note a gradual increase in average wages, as this industry is one in
which broken time and attendant lowering of earnings is specially noticeable.
Hotel and Catering Industry
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
765
3,970
3,878
92
$53,223.45
$1,058.77
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%
42.95
532
3,424
3,302
122
$46,840.82
$1,353.11
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
42.43
500
2,961
2,878
83
$40,265.89
$956.54
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
42.79
429
2,343
2,303
40
$30,189.28
$452.10
$13.11
$11.30
1.71%
41.31
433
Total number of employees	
2,256
2,209
47
Total weekly wages—
$29,243.64
Employees under 18 years. - —	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years   	
$499.15
$13.24
$10.62
Percentage of employees under 18 years.....	
2.08%
41.31 P 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
As the number of janitresses and women elevator operators throughout the Province does
not reach a very high figure these workers have been included with others in the hotel and
catering industry. In former years these two classes were actually covered by the Order
relating to the public housekeeping industry. The new name—hotel and catering industry-
seems to designate the occupation more clearly than the former one.
The number of firms increased from 532 in 1937 to 765 in 1938, with a corresponding
gain in employees of 546.
The decrease of 47 cents in the weekly average for the 18-and-over class is due to the
fact that the change in the Order permitted unskilled employees 18 years of age and over to
be trained at the same figure as the younger girls, which was a reduction from the previous
Order. While $14 is the weekly minimum for experienced employees of the older group for
a week of 40 to 48 hours, the average recorded above does not disclose wholesale infractions,
but, as explained above, the inexperienced employees were included in the figures. On account
of the equalization of the rates for learners of all ages it was apparent that employers took
advantage of the fact that the older workers could be employed at learners' rates and seemed
to prefer to employ them in preference to the younger girls. Both classes had to obtain permits from the Board before they could work at the trainees' rate of pay.
The percentage of girls under 18 fell from 3.56 in 1937 to 2.32 in 1938, although their
average wage increased from $11.09 to $11.51.
Office Occupation.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
2,096
7,367
7,273
94
$132,369.27
$1,115.55
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%
40.16
1,891
5,911
5,802
109
$106,395.64
$1,306.60
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
40.79
1,848
5,344
5,280
64
$94,789.14
$645.41
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
40.88
1,727
4,827
4,809
18
$84,596.16
$195.20
$17.59
$10.84
0.37%
40.79
1,716
Total number of employees	
4,818
4,783
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
35
$82,745.51
$347.80
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.	
$17.30
$9.94
Percentage of employees under 18 years   ,. 	
0.73%
This classification continues to employ the greatest number of women employees, returns
being received from 2,096 firms for the year 1938, an increase of 205 over the 1937 figure.
Total number of employees reported gained by 1,456, showing a total of 7,367 as against
5,911 for 1937.
The weekly average wage for the experienced workers decreased slightly, the average
being $18.20 as against $18.34 for the year previous. Fractional decrease is also noted in
the average for the section under 18 years, the average weekly wage standing at $11.87 as
against $11.99.
The percentage of younger workers decreased, however, over the previous year.
A drop of more than half an hour a week is noted in the weekly average of working-
hours, so the decrease in average wages is balanced by a shorter week.
It is interesting to note some of the numbers receiving the more worth-while salaries.
A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years of age or over.
There were 1,620 employed at $65.00 per month.
421
70.00
456
75.00
298
80.00
278
85.00
253
90.00
90
95.00
256
,            100.00
78
110.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 35
There were       50 employed at $115.00 per month.
25
72
46
13
25
46
106
120.00
125.00
130.00
135.00
140.00
150.00
more than $150.00 per month.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates, and do not
include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75, and so on
down the list.
Personal Service Occupation.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
161
509
495
14
$6,723.47
$57.75
$13.58
$4.13
2.75%
37.87
157
481
472
9
$6,283.69
$45.09
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%
37.85
138
427
417
10
$5,486.48
$66.05
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
38.07
108
376
374
2
$4,873.84
$18.00
$13.03
$9.00
0.53%
36.81
110
384
Over 18 years  	
378
6
Total weekly wages—
$4,932.31
$10.25
Average weekly wages—
$13.05
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
$1.71
1.56%
37.95
Included in the above figures are employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers. The
irregular hours of the latter employees have the effect of reducing the average weekly hours
to the low figure of 37.87 per week.
The number of firms filing returns in this classification increased by four over the year
previous.    Total employees increased from 481 to 509 for the year under revision.
The weekly average for the experienced workers continued to rise, reaching $13.58 from
$13.31 in 1937.
Fishing Industry.
.1
T
1936.
1935.
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of employees .
Experienced _ __
Inexperienced.
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees 	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees.. —	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.—
Average hours worked per week — —
6
36
23
13
$267.35
$134.37
$11.62
$10.34
36.11%
34.61
5
37
26
11
$330.84
$90.67
$12.72
$8.24
29.73%
37.02
6
32
24
$234.20
$26.73
$9.76
$3.34
25.00%
26.24
2
11
11
$96.85
As the Order of the Board does not cover women workers in fish-canneries, this group
comprises a rather negligible number. Fractional changes are noted in the number employed
and firms reporting. While the average weekly wage for experienced workers decreased
from $12.72 to $11.62, more were employed in the inexperienced group with an increase in
average wages in this section from $8.24 to $10.34. As much of the labour in this industry
is seasonal and casual, the drop in average weekly hours from 37.02 to 34.61 will no doubt
account for the corresponding decrease in the average wage for experienced workers. P 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
137
1,815
1,759
56
$32,238.68
$434.46
$18.33
$7.76
3.09%
40.71
142
1,934
1,720
214
$31,284.95
$2,497.70
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
40.59
124
1,791
1,571
220
$28,717.26
$2,462.93
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%
40.46
120
1,689
1,630
59
$27,776.16
$673.00
$17.04
$11.41
3.49%
39.53
109
Total number of employees	
1,589
1,583
6
Total weekly wages—
$26,909.12
Inexperienced employees  	
Average weekly wages—
$52.50
$17.00
Inexperienced employees    ,.,.
Percentage of inexperienced employees 	
Average hours worked per week  	
$8.75
0.38%
39.75
Included with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those who operate
switchboards in offices and other establishments, such as hotels, hospitals, etc.
Slight decreases are noted in the above table, both in the number of firms reporting and
total employees shown.
The average weekly wage for experienced operators increased from $18.19 to $18.33. In
the inexperienced group, however, the average wage declined from $11.67 to $7.76, no doubt
due to broken time worked by relief operators and casual help.
A very slight increase in weekly hours is evident, the average figure being 40.71 as
against 40.59.
As the drop in employment in this occupation occurs largely in the inexperienced section,
it is probable that owing to contemplated change to the dial system telephone, training of
large numbers of workers at low rates of wages will be no longer necessary.
Manufacturing Industry.
1936.
1935.
1934.
Number of firms reporting .
Total number of employees .
Experienced __
Inexperienced .
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees... 	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees..	
Inexperienced employees  	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week	
380
3,085
2,701
384
$40,177.04
$3,482.01
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
41.92
358
2,652
2,297
355
$32,469.11
$3,247.59
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
41.65
314
2,500
2,167
$30,694.89
$3,015.36
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
42.92
311
2,310
2,111
199
$29,869.50
$1,734.50
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
43.28
284
2,249
1,955
294
$26,975.51
$2,504.27
$13.80
$8.52
13.07%
42.34
There were 22 more firms sending in returns, with an increase of 433 employees in this
industry over 1937.
In the experienced class of employees the average weekly wage rose to $14.87 from
$14.14 for the year previous, this increase of 73 cents being the greatest in any of the
occupations covered.
The percentage of inexperienced workers dropped slightly from the 1937 figure. Fractional increase is noted in the average working-hours.
Reference to the summary of Orders will show that the Order covering the manufacturing industry embraces workers in a very diversified group of occupations. Some of the work
is seasonal, but in most factories the employees are assured of continuous employment. The
practice has been developing lately that when business slackens the work is spread over the
entire staff with reduced working-hours. In this way the employer has his entire crew on
hand when peak production is required. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 37
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
81
3,540
3,316
224
$54,275.82
$2,247.52
$16.37
$10.03
6.33%
46.90
71
3,551
3,298
253
$54,279.51
$2,650.17
$16.46
$10.48
7.12%
47.78
75
3,155
2,803
352
$41,831.03
$3,082.70
$14.92
$8.76
11.16%
46.02
71
3,096
2,681
415
$41,167.84
$4,032.30
$15.36
$9.72
13.40%
46.68
76
2,986
2,680
306
Total weekly wages—
$40,681.77
$2,824.65
$15.18
$9.23
10.25%
47.17
Average weekly wages—
Percentage of inexperienced employees  , ,
Ten more firms filed returns in this industry than in the previous year.
In line with other years the number of experienced workers continued to increase with a
corresponding drop in the percentage of inexperienced help.
Only very slight decreases occurred in the average weekly wage-rates, the rates of $16.37
for experienced workers and $10.03 for unskilled employees being in each case only a few
cents below the highs reported for 1937.
Slight decreases in wages are understandable in the light of the drop in average
working-hours, which decreased from 47.78 to 46.90 for the year under revision.
Summary of all Occupations.
1938.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
4,259
26,732
25,325
1,407
$398,696.76
$13,793.39
$15.74
$9.80
5.26%
42.42
3,749
24,084
22,471
1,613
$351,341.40
$16,405.29
$15.64
$10.17
6.70%
42.05
3,565
21,924
20,377
1,547
$309,567.79
$14,437.25
$15.19
$9.33
7.06%
41.98
3,272
19,934
18,735
1,199
$280,250.33
$10,869.06
$14.96
$9.07
6.01%
41.79
3,192
Total number of employees    	
19,379
18,279
1,100
$270,232.44
$9,299.13
$14.78
$8.45
5.68%
41.81
Under 18 years, or inexperienced  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced .	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced    ..
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inex-
Average hours worked per week  - 	
Actual figures concerning 26,732 women and girl employees are shown in the above table.
These workers comprise the staffs of 4,259 firms and their aggregate wages and salaries
for one week totalled $412,490.15, or an increase of $44,743.46 over the 1937 total.
The experienced employees continued to gain with an average weekly wage of $15.74,
this figure again creating a new high for the past six years.
The lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered by
Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up to $15.50 in the fishing
group. It will be seen, therefore, that taking all classes of employment together, the general
average is still above the highest minimum set by law.
While the Orders permit of a 48-hour week, the average week for 26,732 gainfully
employed women and girls was only 42.42 hours.
The percentage of employees under 18 years of age or inexperienced further decreased
from 6.70 per cent, to 5.26 per cent.
In looking back over all the tabulations it is noted that the average wages in five of the
occupations register increases over those of 1937 for the adult or experienced worker, these
being the mercantile, laundry, personal service, telephone and telegraph, and manufacturing
industries. Slight decreases are recorded in the hotel and catering, office, fishing, and fruit
and vegetable groups. P 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
With almost 27,000 gainfully employed women it must be admitted that they are playing
an important role in the business life of the Province. The figures cover those for whom
Orders are made, and it must be remembered that this total does not include domestic workers,
fruit-pickers, or farm-labourers, who are excluded from the provisions of the Act.
Returns are not requested for women and girls employed in banks, as their conditions of
employment are regulated by the Dominion " Bank Act." Federal employees are likewise
not covered by the Provincial legislation, although in most cases their wages and hours
compare favourably with those set by the Board's Orders.
Another group to whom the Board's Orders do not apply is comprised of women in fish-
canneries. At the time the Fishing Order was made it was realized that many Indian women
were engaged in this type of work, and as they are wards of the Dominion Government it
was deemed inadvisable for obvious reasons to include them in the Order.
While the total of women workers is an imposing one for 1938, the inclusion of some of
the seasonal workers would mean that not all these 27,000 employees have year-round work
with the employers who sent in their returns. Fortunately in some cases girls are able to fit
into positions where the peak of seasonal work occurs at different times of the year, thus
keeping busy for as long as possible over the twelve-month period.
Industry or Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum Wage
set for Experienced Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Total.
Mercantile.
Laundry	
Hotel and catering _
Office 	
Personal service	
Fishing  	
Telephone and telegraph .
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable 	
Totals, 1938	
Totals, 1937	
$12.75*
13.50t
14.00*
15.001
14.25*
lB.BOt
15.00f
14.00t
14.407
2,019
100
1,518
1,620
136
1
132
382
72
5,980
5,439
37.99
9.13
38.24
21.99
26.72
2.78
7.27
12.38
2.03
22.37
22.58
2,409
403
1,302
4,834
199
5
1,478
1,492
2,156
14,278
12,460
45.32
36.80
32.79
65.62
39.10
13.89
81.43
48.36
60.91
592
1,150
913
174
30
205
1,211
1,312
16.69
B4.07
28.97
12.39
34.18
83.33
11.30
39.26
37.06
6,315
1,095
3,970
7,367
509
36
1,815
3,085
3,540
53.41
51.74
6,474
6,185
24.22
25.68
26,732
24,084
* 40 to 48 hours per week. f 48 hours per week. i 37 ,4 to 48 hours per week.
Increasing from a comparative percentage figure for the previous year, the number of
employees included in the returns who were receiving wages in excess of the legal minimum
rose to 53.41 per cent. The group receiving less than the rates for experienced employees
decreased from 25.68 to 24.22 per cent. This group comprises those younger and less skilled
girls for whom lower rates are fixed, and those who are working part time and are thus
unable to earn a sum equal to the weekly rate set for full-time employees.
The 1938 percentage of women receiving more than the legal rate is much higher than
in 1937, while the figures for those whose wages stand at the actual legal minimum, or are
lower for the above-mentioned reasons, are correspondingly less than in the previous year.
The hotel and catering industry, with 38.24 per cent, receiving $14 per week, holds most
closely to the rates fixed in the Orders.
The telephone and telegraph occupation continues to pay a high percentage of its
employees above the legal minimum, 81.43 per cent, of its total employees receiving more
than $15 per week.
Office workers rank next, with 65.62 per cent, having pay-cheques above the legal
standard. In the fruit and vegetable industry 60.91 per cent, are able to earn more than
the rates fixed in the Orders. Manufacturing employees, amounting to 48.36 per cent,
earned more than the $14 minimum. Next in line, the mercantile industry showed 45.32
per cent, of its employees above the fixed minimum rate. In the personal service occupation
39.10 per cent, earned above the legal minimum. Laundry employees above the minimum,
36.80 per cent., and hotel and catering 32.79 per cent. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 39
Each year attention is drawn to the highest weekly wage in each occupation. For 1938
a weekly salary of $65 drew top place in the mercantile industry. The top rating in the
laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industry was a weekly wage of $44.40. The highest figure in
the hotel and catering industry was $54 per week. Amongst office employees the most
remunerative position reported carried with it a salary of $75 per week. In the personal
service occupation one employee was recorded as receiving $50 each week. The highest wage
earned and reported in the fishing group was $20 weekly. The peak wage in the telephone
and telegraph occupation was $41.50, and in the manufacturing industry $50 weekly. In the
fruit and vegetable industry one employee was reported as having received $52.30 for her
week's work.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and Their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Earnings.
Total
Earnings
for Week
reported.
4,375
759
2,671
6,343
382
23
1,548
2,289
1,856
$56,878.94
9,541.86
36,602.14
114,268.91
4,818.61
236.02
27,621.70
31,862.54
26,725.44
772
297
1,046
835
110
12
236
687
1,610
$11,034.51
4,043.06
14,065.83
15,499.14
1,707.80
150.70
4,435.03
10,020.62
28,502.89
168
39
253
189
17
1
31
109
74
$2,638.21
548.06
3,614.25
3,716.77
254.81
15.00
616.41
1,775.89
1,295.01
$70,661.66
14,132.98
54,282.22
Office    	
133,484.82
6,781.22
401.72
32,673 14
43,659.05
56,523 34
Totals  	
20,246
$308,556.16
5,605
$89,459.58
881
$14,474.41
$412,490.15
1938 per cent. ____	
75.74%
75.43%
	
20.97%
21.10%
3.29%
3.47%
1937 per cent 	
..
The percentage of unmarried employees increased slightly during 1938, so corresponding
decreases are noted in the married and widowed classes.
In the fruit and vegetable industry a fairly high proportion of married workers is
recorded, but when perishable products come in with a rush all available help must be used.
Many of these workers, too, are wives of growers and others vitally interested in the industry.
Since figures have been kept relating to the marital status of women employees very
little variation has been noted in the percentages of the different groups.
The returns showed such a negligible number as having been divorced or separated it was
not considered necessary to compile separate figures for them, and they were, therefore,
included in the totals of the married employees.
Table showing Years of Service of Employees with Employers
reporting for 1938.
Name of Industry.
T3
'3
S
p.
CO
r\
Ci
CJ
!M
,-1
u
OJ
TJ
e
&
m
u
IS
V
!*
CM
O
UJ
E
3
0J
!h
CO
O
c.
cc
Jh
a
CJ
in
o
CO
sS
u
cs
V
in
ta
o
■jh
j.
OJ
in
CD
o
h->
JO
CO
rl
3
CJ
t«
C-
o
-M
co
QJ
Ih
«
OJ
t"
CO
o
-w
C-
m
Jh
(3
CJ
in
Ct
o
HH
00
P
a
Ci
tH
O
m
o
■+5
u
>
o
u
o
01
tn
a
O
O CJ   .
a £* a
a fi A
UBS
ui
a
'•g
OJ   -t
Xi ut
ii
e. a
"A'rr
809
9
223
1,920
318
1,562
647
209
704
491
135
44B
278
101
272
201
42
138
139
27
82
100
20
83
99
25
69
115
33
100
105
39
58
411
137
234
5,315
1,095
3,970
538
95
765
332
67
1,319
168
19
1,078
62
7
819
B6
B34
38
448
30
302
16
4
199
19
3
207
7
316
8
324
7
2
1,489
31
1
7,367
509
36
2,096
161
6
9
283
297
264
130
59
24
15
32
81
" 120
B01
1,816
137
Manufacturing ,.,.. - -	
45
1,033
452
332
221
163
107
88
89
106
93
356
3,085
380
957
1,223
426
274
186
143
86
71
26
33
22
93
3,540
81
Totals                    	
2,451
7,845
3,882
2,816
1,760
1,224
787
598
554
792
770
3,253
26,732
4,259 P 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The table indicating the length of time each woman employee had been on the staff of
the employer who sent in the return, sets out the length of service according to occupation.
It is noted that 7,845 employees were working less than 1 year when the pay-rolls were
sent in.
In compiling the figures, the employee in each occupation with the greatest number of
years to her credit was noted. In the mercantile industry one employee was listed with 31
years' service. In the laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industry one worker is credited with 34
years' employment in the one firm. A record of 30 years is the highest in the hotel and
catering section. One office employee was shown as having served 41 years with the same
firm. In the personal service occupation one long-service employee is credited with 23
years' service. In the fishing group one woman has 35 seasons' experience in the industry.
Record service in the telephone and telegraph industry is credited to one worker with 35
years' experience with her present firm. One employee in the manufacturing industry has
served 34 years with her present employer, and 22 consecutive years is the long-term record
jn the fruit and vegetable group.
COLLECTIONS AND INSPECTIONS.
During 1938 the Inspectors of the Board made 15,223 personal investigations throughout
the Province, an increase of 2,011 over the 1937 figure. In doing this work a thorough check
of the pay-roll and working conditions in some places entails a great deal of work, and may
necessitate the Inspector working several days at one place before a final report can be made
on the activities of a firm whose pay-roll contains hundreds of names. An inspection of this
nature would count as one only.
We would like at this time to express appreciation for co-operation extended to the
staff in the routine course of its work. This always lightens the duties and establishes a
satisfactory relationship between the employer and the Department.
Occasionally, of course, the Inspectors come in contact with employers or their officials
who grudgingly give the required information, and thus make the work much more difficult
than it should be.
Through negotiation between employer, employee, and the Board's representatives,
adjustments were made for arrears of wages in the sum of $53,202.82, of which $38,259.59
represented payments made to male employees and $14,943.23 was turned over to women and
girls whose wages had not equalled the amounts required under the respective Orders of
the Board.
In addition to this amount, $2,371.56 was ordered paid to employees as results of Court
actions, the Minimum Wage Acts having clauses which provide for payment of arrears,
when convictions have been obtained for non-compliance with the regulations in so far as
they affect wages.
The sum of $55,574.38 is, therefore, a tangible manifestation of protection afforded
employees against employers who through ignorance, neglect, or wilful action fail to pay the
correct wage.
Cases for collection of wages taken in the Civil Courts by employees themselves to
recover amounts due them are naturally not recorded by the Board.
COURT CASES.
The Board's policy has been to refrain from Court action until all other avenues of
settlement have been explored, but circumstances do arise which make it necessary to start
prosecutions when infractions of the various labour laws occur and amicable settlements
cannot be made out of Court. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 41
The following is a summary of Court cases segregated by statutes under which prosecutions were initiated.    The nature of the charge and the result of each case are briefly noted:—
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
66
43
76
28
6
1
57
32
70
23
6
1
D., 7 ;   W., 2
D., 8 ;   W., 3
D., 5 ;   W., 1
D., 1;   W., 4
Totals           	
220
189
" Female Minimum Wage Act.'
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to produce records-.	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(two charges)
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to produce all records
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to keep records.	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to produce records .	
Failure to keep records.	
Failure to pay minimum wage .....
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage    . .
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(six charges)
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to give information to an
Inspector   (sec. 16   (d))
No register; records of hours
and wages incomplete
$8.75.
Suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $10.58.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Dismissed.
Fined   $75;    costs,   $5;    ordered  to
pay arrears of $5.80.
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
New   Coleen   Grocery   and   Confectionery,
1116 Robson Street, Vancouver
Orida Kosi, 503 Granville Street, Vancouver
National Grocery, Robert Hesleton, Natal	
C.   H.   Lutcb,   303A   Pender   Street   West,
Vancouver
C.   H.   Lutch,   303a   Pender   Street   West,
Vancouver
C.   H.   Lutch,   303A   Pender   Street   West,
Vancouver
of $195.
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
Fined $25 ; costs, $2.50 ; and ordered
to pay arrears of $32.60.
Costs    $2.50    and    ordered   to   pay
arrears  of $27.30.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Dismissed.
Alexandria Hotel, Tony Svec, Natal
Mrs.   K.   Tatebe,   620   Sixth   Street,
Westminster
Tourist Hotel,  348 Columbia Avenue
Westminster
Tourist Hotel, 348 Columbia Avenue
Westminster
New
New
New
Fined $25 and $2 costs ;   ordered to
pay arrears of $101.67.
Fined $10 and costs or ten days.
Fined   $10.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs;   ordered
to pay arrears of $44.60.
B.C. Cafe, Charlie Yen, Natal  	
of $102.04.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
R f.    Cnfp    r,hnr..P Yfn_ Natal   	
of $56.02.
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2;    ordered  to
Venetia Hotel, Pete Zoretti, N^tal.
Spiro's   Cafe,   824   Granville   Street,
couver
Van-
pay arrears of $39.91.
Fined $25; costs, $2; ordered to
pay arrears of $104.75.
Costs $7.50 and ordered to pay following amounts: $18.60, $10.60,
$8.25, $11.60, $9.60, $2.
Costs   $2.50    and   ordered   to   pay
Mrs. Grace Hall, Kimberley. 	
Commodore Hotel, Phillip Morissette,
Wells
arrears of $20.
Suspended sentence.
Fined   $10   and   $4.50   costs  or  one
month.
Fined  $10   and  $4.50' costs  or one
month. P 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Female Minimum Wace Act "•—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
De Luxe Cafe, Wm. C. Wing, Wells..
Best   Cafe,   Mr.   A.   Floeting,   844   Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Best   Cafe,   Mr.   A.   Floeting,   844   Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Portland Hotel, Victoria 	
H. Taylor, Trail  	
Empire Cafe, Kamloops..
Pete Zaratte, Natal _    	
Killas   &   Christopher,    Commodore   Cafe,
Prince Rupert
S.   H.   Bradley,   c/o   Bradley   &   Jackson,
Clayburn
Golden  Pheasant Cafe,  Chew Sing,  Prince
George
National Cafe, J. George, Prince George	
National Cafe, J. George, Prince George —
Pacific Co-operative Union, Mission __ 	
Pacific Co-operative Union, Mission .	
Prince George Grill, George Kolias, Prince
George
Prince George Grill, George Kolias, Prince
George
Prince George Grill, George Kolias, Prince
George
Retail   Credit   Grantors   Bureau,   Ltd.,   535
Georgia Street West, Vancouver
Shasta Cafe, Wm. Manson, Prince George___
Shasta Cafe, Wm.  Manson, Prince George __
Shasta Cafe, Wm. Manson, Prince George_
Shasta Cafe, Wm.  Manson, Prince George...
Shasta Cafe, Wm. Manson, Prince George..
Shasta Cafe, Wm. Manson, Prince George..
Allan Hotel Grill, Wade Ricketts, Rossland
Brown Derby Cafe, Thos. Sheils, Jr., 2735
Granville Street, Vancouver
May Fayolle, 3890 Hudson Street, Vancouver
May Fayolle, 3890 Hudson Street, Vancouver
May Fayolle, 3890 Hudson Street, Vancouver
May Fayolle, 3890 Hudson Street, Vancouver
Grandview  Hospital,   1090  Victoria  Drive,
Vancouver
National Cafe, Prince George —	
No records .
Failure to keep records-
Failure to launder uniforms 	
Failure to keep records  	
Failure to pay minimum wage _.
Failure to pay minimum wage
(two charges)
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to give employee rest
period of twenty-four consecutive hours in each calendar week
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage —
Failure to keep records _ _	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to keep records __	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Excessive hours _ __,. __ 	
Failure to give employee rest
period of twenty-four consecutive hours in each calendar week
Excessive hours   	
Excessive hours .
Failure to pay minimum wage -
Failure to pay minimum wage -
Right Lunch Cafe, Nelson..
Excessive hours  	
Failure to give employee rest
period of twenty-four consecutive hours in each calendar week
Failure to give employee rest
period of twenty-four consecutive hours in each calendar week
Failure to produce records	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to produce records	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to post notice	
Failing to produce records. Court
decided employee was domestic
servant
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Fined   $10  and   $4.50   costs  or  one
month.
Fined $10.
Costs $2.50.
Suspended sentence.
Fined   $25;    costs,   $4 ;    ordered  to
pay arrears of $33.60.
Fined $25 each charge;   ordered to
pay arrears of $69.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25;   in default, distress.
Fined    $25    and    pay    arrears    of
$97.55.
Fined $25 and pay arrears of $55.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25 and pay arrears of $85.
Fined $10;   costs, $2.75.
Dismissed.
Fined $25 and pay arrears of $77.
Suspended  sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence.
Fined  $25   and pay arrears of  $55
Fined     $25    and     pay    arrears     i
$149.50.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Fined  $25;    costs,   $2.50;   and  pay
arrears of $33.60.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $1-04.60.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $79.45.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $36.53. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 43
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Mrs. R. Di Pasquale, Trail..
J. J. Hawryluck, Agassiz	
John Nicholas, Vancouver..
Victor Ross, Trail ......
Wm. Konkin, Castlegar....
Wm. Morosoff, Castlegar..
B.C. Bakery, Natal	
Cook's Quality Meat Market, Natal.
Nick Harshenin, Brilliant 	
Central Meat Market, John Oley, Natal-
Natal Meat Market, Frank Svec, Natal.
K. H. Sing, General Store, Wells .-__	
Deep Bay Logging Co., Ltd., Fanny Bay..
W. Hutton, Cumberland __	
Royston Lumber Co., Ltd., Royston.—
Chilliwack  Bakery,   Ltd.,   Chilliwack..
Consolidated    Cleaners    and    Dyers,    3243
Main Street, Vancouver
Olive Palmer, Engle Lodge, 786 Bute Street,
Vancouver
Olive Palmer, Engle Lodge, 786 Bute Street,
Vancouver
Olive Palmer, Engle Lodge, 786 Bute Street,
Vancouver
Mayo Bros. Timber Co., Ltd., Paldi	
Pioneer  Hallock  Box   Co.,   M.   Shibuya,   662
Alexander Street,   Vancouver
Pioneer Hallock Box Co., M. Shibuya,  662
Alexander Street, Vancouver
Ruskin Box Manufacturing Co., M. S. Ta-
kumaga,  Ruskin
New Laundry, Prince Rupert 	
Powell Lake Shingle Co., Ltd., J. F. Jameson, Powell River
Chilliwack Cartage Co., Ltd., Chilliwack	
Y. Takimoto, Mission... .___ ____	
Ahar   Singh, 1763   Second   Avenue   West,
Vancouver
N. H. Davis, Vancouver.. _	
Dominion Bakery, Tony Crncich, 2342
Hastings Street East, Vancouver
Edwards Manufacturing Co., 823 Union
Street, Vancouver
New Pier Cafe, S. Muraki, 220' Main Street,
Vancouver
Patterson Fuel, 2804 Main Street, Vancouver
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(two cases)
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(three cases)
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Failure to produce records ....	
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records in English language
Failure  to keep  true and  correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure  to   keep   proper   register
and records
Failure- to pay minimum wage.....
Failure to pay minimum wage .
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Failure to produce records	
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Excessive hours  _ -	
Failure to allow employee twenty-
four successive hours off duty
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay wages   _
Failure to pay wages .
Failure to pay wages .
Failure to pay minimum wage .
Failure to pay minimum wage.
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure   to   pay   minimum   wage
(three charges)
Refusal   to   give   information   to
person authorized in writing by
the Chairman of the Board of
Industrial Relations
Failure to keep records -	
Failure to pay minimum wage-
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep records  	
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
One dismissed, two withdrawn.
Suspended  sentence;   paid arrears,
$130 ;   costs, $20.90.
Fined $50 and $6.80 costs.
Fined $10 and $4.50 costs or thirty
days.
Fined $10.
Fined $10 and $2 costs.
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $3.75.
Fined $25 and $2 costs.
Fined $20 and $2 costs.
Fined   $10   and   $4.50   costs   or   one
month.
Fined  $50;    costs,   $2.50;   and pay
arrears of $19.20.
Fined $50';   costs, $2.50.
Fined $50 ;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended   sentence ;    costs,   $4.50 ;
arrears, $19.20'.
Dismissed.
Costs, $3.50 ;   ordered to pay $22.80.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $50.
Fined $10 ;   costs,  $2.50.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $10  and costs.
Dismissed.
Fined $50 and ordered to pay arrears
of $40.75.
Fined $10i;   costs, $4.75.
Fined $50 and pay arrears of $29.55.
Fined $50 and costs and pay arrears
of $161.75.
Fined $10'.
Fined $10'.
Ordered to pay arrears of $16.51.
Fined $35.
Dismissed. P 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT GASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Van-
couver
Failure to produce records 	
Failure to pay minimum wage
Failure to pay minimum wage
Fined $10.
Eli Sopon, Crescent Valley.— 	
Fined $50 ;   costs, $24 ;   and ordered
to pay arrears of $27.60.
" Hours of Work Act.'
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
P. Bain Lumber Mills, Ltd., Whonnock..
P. Bain Lumber Mills, Ltd., Whonnock	
Canadian    Pacific   Railway   Co.,    Empress
Hotel, Victoria.
Safeway  Stores,   A.   J.   McLeod,   manager,
Trail
F.  W. Collings,  Trail __ 	
Nils Noren, Trail-
John Penverseff, Trail..
Loy Kee Laundry, 217 Georgia Street East,
Vancouver
T.  Chake,  Chake Fish Market,  262  Powell
Street, Vancouver
Haney Meat Market, Haney... 	
H. Hayashi, 269 Powell Street, Vancouver...
O.K.   Stores,   2481   Hastings   Street   East,
Vancouver
Superior Stores  (B.C.), Ltd., Vancouver	
C.   E.   Disher,   1152   Twenty-third   Avenue
East, Vancouver
Keefer  Laundry,   Wong  June,   238   Keefer
Street, Vancouver
T.   Nakamura,   Star   Market,   353   Powell
Street, Vancouver
Powell Box  Factory,  Masayoshi Fujimoto,
1260 Powell Street, Vancouver
Powell Box  Factory,  Masayoshi Fujimoto,
1260 Powell Street, Vancouver
Union Fish Co., Ltd., Vancouver.— 	
Sam   Wise,   Trail-
New    Laundry,     Samuel    Currie,     Prince
Rupert
Kapoor Lumber Co., Ltd., Sooke Lake	
Lake Logging Co., Ltd., Lake Cowichan	
Richard Rydeen, Lake Cowichan	
Maikawa, Limited, 333 Powell Street, Vancouver
Powell Lake Shingle Co., Ltd., J. F. Jameson, 119 Pender Street West, Vancouver
Failure to post schedule of hours
(two cases)
Excessive hours  (two cases)	
Working hours in excess of those
allowed   in   the   case   of   split
shifts  (four charges)
Working    employee    outside    of
hours shown  on  schedule
Working    male    employee     over
eight hours in the day
Work ing    male    employee    over
forty-eight hours, week of May
1-7, 1938
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post schedule of hours
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employing a person in excess of
the hours fixed on notice
Employees working outside hours
as posted  (three charges)
Employing a person outside hours
fixed on schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post schedule of hours..
Employing  person   outside  hours
fixed on schedule
Employing  person   outside  hours
fixed on schedule (two charges)
Failure to keep proper records	
Failure to keep proper records	
Excessive hours 	
Excessive hours     	
Employing    person    outside    the
hours posted
Excessive hours	
Fined $25 and costs in each case.
Fined $10 and costs in each case.
Fined $10 on each charge.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25 and $2.50- costs.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Suspended    sentence;     paid    $2.50
costs.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25.
Fined $25;   costs,  $4.50.
Fined $25.
Fined $25.
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Dismissed.
Fined $25;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $10;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25;   costs,
1.50.
Fined $25 and costs, $2.50; second
charge dismissed.
Fined $10 ; default, seven days' imprisonment.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $10;   costs, $1.75.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $3.75.
Fined $25;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 45
COURT CASES—Continued.
Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Leong Bun,  1602  Commercial Drive, Vancouver
McGavins,  Limited,  Chilliwack.	
McGavins,  Limited,  Chilliwack	
Leong Bun, 1602 Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Dominion Furniture Co., 1062 Granville
Street, Vancouver
Dominion Furniture Co., 1062 Granville
Street, Vancouver
Fairmont Market, 4201 Main Street, Vancouver
Fairmont Market, 4201 Main Street, Vancouver
Ideal Showcase & Fixture Co., 1965-75
Main Street, Vancouver
Bun, Leong, 1187 Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Mark Joe, Cranbrook— 	
Wallace Bakery, R. W. Hall, Kimberley	
Western Produce Company, 4178 Main
Street,  Vancouver
A. E. Burnett, 251 Eighteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver
A. E. Burnett, 251 Eighteenth Avenue
West,  Vancouver
Jang Wah and Mew Chon Jawg, Commercial Fruit, 1144 Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Mitchell Lumber Co., Ltd., Mitchell Island .
Peter Yee, Muir Cafe, 106 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver
T. Iwata, Newton Cafe, 168 Powell Street,
Vancouver
K. Tanaka, New Fish Market, 394 Powell
Street, Vancouver
Ontario Fuel, Granville Island, Vancouver..
Trocadero, Ltd., 156 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver
Blue Owl Cafe, John Michas, 1743 Burrard
Street, Vancouver
B.C. Bakery Co., N. W. Ham, 1500 Hastings Street East, Vancouver
Robert Beaton, 3159 Twenty-eighth Avenue
East, Vancouver
J. S. Browne, Penticton _ 	
Chong Hee Fruit Market, 739 Columbia
Street, New Westminster
Commercial Taxi Co., 638 Helmcken Street,
Vancouver
Edwards Manufacturing Co., 823 Union
Street, Vancouver
Liberty Cafe, Blonde Tong, 941 Granville
Street, Vancouver
McGavin Bakeries, Ltd., Victoria.	
Scott's, Ltd., 722 Granville Street, Vancouver
Thompson & Clark, Bowser 	
Thompson & Clark, Bowser	
Employing    person    outside    the
hours posted
Employing    person    outside    the
hours posted
Failure to post schedule of hours..
Employee working outside hours
shown on schedule
Failure to post notice..—	
Failure   to   notify   employee   of
hours   at   which   work   begins
and ends
Working employees outside hours
on schedule
Working employees outside hours
on schedule
Excessive hours   	
Employee working  outside hours
shown on  schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to produce records..	
Excessive hours   	
Failure to produce records.	
Failure to post notice—	
Employee working outside hours
shown on schedule
Failing to produce records 	
Failure to keep records	
Failure to post schedule...._ —
Failure  to   post  schedule 	
Failure to post schedule.—	
Employee  working  hours   outside
those shown on schedule
Failure to post schedule— —
Failure to keep records _
Being   an   employee   did   work   in
excess of eight hours in one day
Failure to produce records 	
Failure to post notice  	
Employee working hours outside
those shown on schedule
Excessive hours    	
Failure to post schedule... 	
Excessive hours   (nine charges) ...
Employee working hours  outside
those shown on schedule
Excessive hours 	
Excessive hours	
Fined $25 and $2.50' costs ; in default, distress; and in default of
distress, ten days in jail.
Fined $25 and $4.75 costs.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $35;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $10.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25 ;   costs, $2.50'.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $25 ;   costs, $2.50.
Fined $10.
Fined $10;   costs, $2.75.
Fined $25 ;  costs, $2.50.
Fined $20 and costs.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $10 ;   default, five days.
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
Fined $25 ;   costs,  $2.50.
Fined $25 ;   default, ten days.
Costs, $2.50.
Fined $25.
Costs, $2.50.
Fined $10 ;   costs,  $2.50'.
Fined $20.
Fined $25.
Costs, $5.
Fined $25.
Fined $25.
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $10 ;   costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence. P 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT. CASES—Continued.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Fort Langley Sawmills, Ltd., Fort Langley
Fort Langley Sawmills, Ltd., Fort Langley
W. R. Rough, Vancouver..	
W. Eaton, Whonnock	
K. Kaminura, Hatzic Prairie.— 	
J. H. Norman, Fort Steele .... -	
G. D. Parker Logging Co., Ltd., Standard
Bank Building, Vancouver
G. D. Parker Logging Co., Ltd., Standard
Bank Building, Vancouver
F. W. Scott, Port Coquitlam- 	
F. W. Scott, Port Coquitlam- 	
Frank Willis, Port Coquitlam	
Martin Ross & Sons, Harrison Mills	
Martin Ross & Sons, Harrison Mills	
W.  D.  Jones,   Straiton 	
Duncan McAllister, Courtenay..
Enos W. Brooks, Parksville	
R. Eveleigh, Lake Cowichan	
T.  Odamura,  Growers Box Manufacturing
Co., Haney
L. F. McDorman, Manson Creek.	
S.   H.   Bradley,   c/o   Bradley   &   Jackson,
Clayburn
L. Frederickson, Steelhead- -
L. Frederickson, Steelhead	
Bert McDonald,   Lost Creek  Gold  Placers,
Ltd., North Vancouver
Fred Saunders, Steelhead. -
Fred Saunders, Steelhead	
Gust   Norgren,   Mission. _ 	
Art Bellos, Quesnel  	
R.    J.   Upton   &   Associates,   339   Pender
Street West, Vancouver
Charge.
Failure
Failure
Failure
Failure
Failure
Failure
Failure
to pay
to pay
to pay
to pay
to pay
to pay
to pay
wages
wages
wages
wages
wages
wages
wages
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay
Failure to pay
Failure to pay
Failure to pay
Failure to pay
wages
wages
wages
wages
wages
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages semi-monthly
Sentence and Remarks.
Fined $100.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $100 and costs or sixty days.
Fined $100 and costs or sixty days.
Arrears paid, charge withdrawn.
Fined $250 and costs.
Fined $250 and costs.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $100 and costs;   default sixty
days.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended   sentence;    pay   arrears,
$67.
Suspended sentence;   costs, $1.75.
Suspended sentence ; ordered to pay
arrears, $113.
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $200 and $2.50 costs.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $100 and costs.
Fined $100 and costs.
Withdrawn.
Withdrawn.
Fined $100.
Withdrawn.
Suspended sentence;
Dismissed.
costs, $5.25.
Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Fined   $50;    costs,   $2.50   or  thirty
rison, 1100 Union Street, Vancouver
Nu-Way   Cleaners   &   Dyers,   Jack   Zacks,
1656 Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver
Excessive hours .—	
days.
Fined   $50 ;    costs,   $2.50   or   thirty
days.
Fined $50;   costs, $2.50.
Haney
Famous    Foods,    Limited,    1315    Hastings
Street East, Vancouver
Imperial Laundry, John Cook, Nanaimo	
Employing female employee so
that her health was likely to be
injured   (see. 12)
Employing persons on Remembrance Day
Fined $50 and costs.
Fined $50 and costs. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 47
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Criminal Code."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Corruptly  receiving  money  from
employees
Above case tried at the Nanaimo Assizes.    Jury returned verdict of " Guilty " ;   fined $200.
COMPARATIVE WAGES, 1918, 1936, 1937, 1938.
It was in 1918 that the first figures were compiled relating to women employees in the
Province, and it is interesting to note the trend in wages in the non-seasonal occupations
during the past three years, with the rates of 20 years ago in juxtaposition.
The tables that follow, in addition to wage comparisons, also show a very marked drop
in employment percentages of the younger or inexperienced worker.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.
1936.
1937.
1938.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$12.96
$8.88
8.40%
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
$13.58
$10.12
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
8.73%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
$11.80
$12.58
$12.90
$13.18
$9.78
$8.23
$8.22
$8.60
21.80%
8.07%
6.46%
6.03%
Hotel and Catering Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
I
I
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%,
$13.72
$11.51
2.32%,
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years _.
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
$18.20
$11.87
1.28%,
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years - —	
Employees under 18 years... —
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
$13.83
$6.96
15.38%,
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%,
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%,
$13.58
$4.13
2.75% P 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—-
Experienced employees — - -	
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%,
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
$18.33
$7.76
Percentage of inexperienced employees  	
3.09%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
$14.87
$9.07
12.45%
SPECIAL LICENCES.
In order to allow unskilled employees to start work on a fair competitive basis with
those who have gained experience, and to compensate employers for time spent in training
new help, provision is made in the Minimum Wage Acts for the issuance of licences which
may set out lower rates than those established for the experienced employees.
Application forms are required to be filled in by the would-be licensee and the employer
before the licences are granted, and a check is made to see if the circumstances are such
that benefit would result to the employee and employer by the issuance of a licence.
The Act limits the number that may be issued to a firm to not more than one-seventh of
the total number of female employees in any plant. Where less than seven are on the staff
one licence may be issued.
When the application forms disclose previous experience in the line of work desired,
credit is given the employee and the licence is made out for the appropriate period. The
Orders relating to women's work in the different occupations set out definitely the rates and
length of time leading up in a graduated scale to the minimum for experienced employees.
Details for learners' wages will be found in the section of the Report summarizing
the Orders.
During 1938 a total of 703 special licences were issued to inexperienced women and girls.
They were spread over the occupational groups as follows:—
Name of Industry or
Occupation.
Personal service 	
Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing 	
Mercantile 	
Manufacturing 	
Office  	
Number of Licences
issued.
Hotel and catering
11
55
84
104
223
226
Total
703
The Order covering male employees in the mercantile industry allows permits in two
age-groups for beginners between 18 and 21 and from 21 to 24 years.
There were 156 permits issued under this Order, and it was gratifying to note that in
many instances the employers agreed to start the youthful trainees at a wage slightly in
advance of those required by the Order, and the permits in such cases were made out on the
higher wage-levels.
"HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Since the " Hours of Work Act" became effective the Board has shown the average
hours by industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the years
1930 to 1938, inclusive.
It will be noted that with thirty industries covered, eight reveal fractional increases in
the average weekly hours worked, the remaining twenty-two registering decreases. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 49
Comparative Figures,
1930 to 1938.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
64 Hours.
1930 -	
4,704
4.088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
4,895
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
102,235
96,188
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
89.31
88.67
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.67
5.29
Per Cenfc-
9i.04i
1931
9.441
1932   	
1933    	
11.92
11.12
1934     -	
9.06
1935   	
1936      	
5.96
6.46
1937    	
6.12
1938    .....  ......     ....	
6.04
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being:—
1938
1937
1936
1935
1534
1933
1932
1931
46.84
47.25
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 4,895 industrial firms submitting forms to the Department of Labour gave information regarding hours covering 96,188 male and female employees. A segregation shows 88.67"
per cent, working 48 hours or less per week, 5.29 per cent, working from 48 to 54 hours per
week, and 6.04 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week.
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
46.41
44.97
44.13
48.00
50.04
43.68
47.76
50.60
44.89
43.91
43.47
44.05
46.17
48.33
49.69
45.93
48.00
48.37
46.69
45.39
51.51
45.82
44.82
44.01
44.37
47.93
44.06
41.39
44.67
44.19
45.15
44.55
44.38
47.99
49.72
43.81
48.36
48.85
42.60
45.50
43.54
44.49
46.18
48.46
52.46
47.30
49.16
48.35
47.46
45.02
50.05
48.93
42.76
43.81
44.10
47.99
43.97
44.27
44.87
46.09
44.98
44.44
43.45
48.03
48.58
44.57
43.83
50.54
44.79
44.92
44.43
44.74
45.61
48.66
50.70
45.07
48.45
48.50
47.28
45.36
49.89
46.17
47.29
43.87
44.54
47.85
43.75
47.90
45.29
46.05
44.60
45.15
42.73
47.91
46.93
44.11
46.70
49.05
44.39
45.61
44.30
45.20
45.33
48.49
50.91
45.77
48.45
48.23
46.65
45.46
50.25
46.20
46.70
44.16
44.37
47.95
43.85
47.92
45.36
46.72
44 63
Coal-mining  	
47.93
47.20
47 43
Lumber industries—
Sawmills	
47.99'
47.46;
45.00
50.30'
45.78=
48.81
44.11.
43.55
44.29
44.05.
47.95
45.23
46.29
Metal-mining	
Printing and publishing	
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified) P 50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONCLUSION.
The policy of the Board of administering the labour laws entrusted to its care with a
spirit of fairness to all has been maintained. Firmness must be exercised to ensure that the
right-minded employer is protected against his unfair competitor. The legislation and its
resultant Orders and Regulations are thus a benefit to the employing class as well as to the
employed.
The far-sighted firm realizes, too, that employees who are sufficiently well paid to be
free from financial worry will be in a position to render a higher standard of service than
those harassed with low-wage cares.
Women and girls as a general rule do not work unless necessity requires them to do so.
For a long time emphasis has been placed on the responsibilities of male employees, but too
little credit has been given to the girl who not only supports herself but contributes in no
ungenerous measure to the monetary needs of other members of her family.
Since critics of recent years have sometimes tried to place the unemployment problem
on the door-step of women holding down jobs, the United States Industrial Conference Board,
a research organization dominated by males, citing cold statistics, supported by industries
and large corporations, declared in a New York dispatch carried by the Canadian Press in
November, 1938, " the percentage of male workers in the total population has been approximately the same since 1870," that " the increase in the number of women workers has not
been at the cost of men," and, furthermore, that " particularly in the years up to 1930 it
would have been impossible to maintain the level of industrial production without female
employees."
We have found that in matters of this kind what applies south of the International
Boundary is true of conditions in Canada as well. So to these women employees in our own
Province who give their time and service alongside male employees that business may flourish,
we will continue to render the protection afforded through our Orders. For the men who
work in greater numbers an ever-expanding list of Orders ensure fair working conditions.
Enforcement of the regulations is made effective by a staff of officials who, along with
the Board, desire to express appreciation for the three-fold co-operation from employer,
employee, and the general public, all of whom are becoming more familiar with the ramifications and scope of this protective legislation.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 51
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE  PURSUANT TO "MALE  MINIMUM WAGE
ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
40c.
25 c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
48
48
48
48
54
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8, Effective August 3rd, 1931,.)
Bartering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
BOX-MANUFACTURING (MALE).
Order No. 55, Effective April 4th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. S7 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 7 of August 3rd, 193U.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Adult males, 90% of total-	
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than...
Males, 18 to 21 years of age  	
Males, under 18 years of age -	
40c.
30c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)  Above rates apply only to those not included in any other Order of the Board.
(6.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 31, Effective October 28th, 1935.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich..
45c.
50c.
67y2c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in any one day or
50 hours in any one
week. P 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 66, Effective August 21st, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. UO, Effective February 1st, 1937.)
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and of the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt,
Highland, Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
75c
48.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 58, Effective November 7th, 1938.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
48.
Note.— (a.)  This Order shall not apply to permanent employees employed in maintenance-work in industrial
and manufacturing establishments.
(b.)  Employees shall be paid at least semi-monthly.
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No., 65, Effective August 1st, 1939.
Area : Provincial Electoral Districts of.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours not
to exceed.
75c.
75c.
75c.
75c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.) This order shall not apply to regular employees of industrial or manufacturing establishments
engaged in repair, servicing, or upkeep of plant or equipment used in such manufacturing plant or establishment;
nor to regular employees engaged in work in connection with new installations, alterations, or extensions.
(b.)   Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
CHRISTMAS-TREE  INDUSTRY   (MALE).
Order No. 68, Effective September 11th, 1939.
" Christmas-tree   industry"   includes   all   operations   in   or   incidental   to   the   cutting,   gathering,
hauling, and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Male employees, 85 per cent, not less than 40e. per hour.
Permissible, 15 per cent, not less than 30c. per hour.
NOTE.— (a.)   Wages shall be paid semi-monthly.
(fe.)   The above is a new order in place of Order No. 61, which expired December 31st, 1938.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY   (MALE).*
Order No. 12, Effective October 19th, 1934.
Order No. 12a, Effective February 28th, 1938.
Order No. 12b, Effective July 20th, 1939.
Includes construction,  reconstruction, repair,  alteration,  or  demolition  of  any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways,  or  other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
under 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo,
New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt, Saanich, Burnaby,
Oak Bay  -	
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
* Consolidated for convenience only.
Note.— (a.)   Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under
(&.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly {Order 12b).
Apprenticeship Act.' REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 53
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (MALE).
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32, Effective November 28th, 1935.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
87%c* per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(6.)  Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee,
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven (7)  days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms or special wearing-apparel, required by the employer, must be supplied and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(i.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS   (FEMALE).
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938,
(Superseding Order No. 30, October 3rd, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 24th, 1934.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
87% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.—As for male elevator operators, see Order No. 54.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM  (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under
steam-pressure or in motion.    " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary certificate.
(See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28  (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
50c.
40c.
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act " 48 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents
per hour (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS  (MALE).
Order No. 39, Effective August 1st, 1936.
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
First-aid attendant    -	
Assistant first-aid attendant — 	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work..
50c.
Daily Rate.
$4.00
4.00
Note. -(a.)   "Hours of Work Act" regulates   the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(b.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital. P 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
ackin
the case of canned fish
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
32%4C. per hour.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 15th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22, Effective April 18th, 1935.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
(See   Order  No.  64  for  wage-rates  in  fruit  and  vegetable  canneries   from   June   1st,   1939,   to
December 31st, 1939.)
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
21 years or over._
Under 21 years-
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
57c
76c
28c.
42c.
56c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CANNING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 64, Effective June 1st, 1939, to December 31st, 1939.
(Varying Order No. U7.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning of any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
52y2c.
70c.
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
37y2c.
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall he made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)   Daily guarantee of three  (3)  hours work.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 55
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21, Effective April 16th, 1985.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapt
ing for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
(See  Order No.  63  for wage-rates  in fruit  and vegetable  canneries  from  June  1st,
December 31st, 1939.)
1939,  to
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
30c.
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
Inexperienced rate  _._ __       	
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
45c.
60c.
25c.
87 He.
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall he made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.) Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)  Daily guarantee of three hours' work.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE  CANNING INDUSTRY   (FEMALE).
Order No. 63, Effective June 1st, 1939, to December 31st, 1939.
(Varying Order No. £6.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning of any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First 10 hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
27c.
(Payable to 90
per
cent.
of employees.)
40c.
54c.
25c.
(Payable
to 10
per
cent
of employees.)
37 He.
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
(4.)  Daily guarantee of three  (3)  hours work.
(5.)  Wages to be paid semi-monthly. P 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 of December 3rd, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 25th, 193i.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(o.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a charge
is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-
homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments or
office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which a
charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in
connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
.nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
30c. per hour, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
35c. per hour, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
working at above rates.
Note.— (a.)  Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents  (20c.)  each.
(c.)  Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven  (7)  days, $2.00 per week.
(e.)  Emergency overtime up to ten   (10)   hours per day, but not to exceed fifty-two   (52)   hours in any one
(1) week.
(/.)   Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight   (8)   in the day, or forty-eight   (48)   in
the week.
(fir.)  Split shifts shall he confined within fourteen  (14)  hours from commencement of such split shift.    (See
Order 62b.)
(h.)  Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(i.)  Uniforms or special wearing-apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of cost
to the employee.
• (j.)  Accidental breakages shall not he charged to employees.
(k.)  Employees must be given twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours* rest in each calendar week.
((.)  See Order 52d for "Resort Hotels."
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52.    Every employee whose split shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52d (Resort Hotels), Effective June 15th, 1939, to September 15th, 1939.
(Superseding Order 52k.)
Covers the work of females in any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight  (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-
one-half (1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52, or her regular rate of pay.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four (24) consecutive hours in each calendar week. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 57
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week
40c.
48
20c.
48
25c.
48
271/2C.
48
30c.
48
35c.
48
21 years of age or over  —
Under 17 years of age __	
17 years and under 18 years of age..
18 years and under 19 years of age .
19 years and under 20 years of age .
20 years and under 21 years of age..
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
(6.)   This Order docs not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the "Apprenticeship Act."
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th, 1935, and Order No. 23A, in Effect from
October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-fireman.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (37%c.)  per hour.
3. (a.)   Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—■
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month;
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month;
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month;
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month;
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month;
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month;
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month;
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month;
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month;
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month;
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month;
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month;
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month;
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month;
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month;
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month;
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month;
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month;
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month;
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month;
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or)  gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order. P 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 29, in Effect from October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents  (37%c.)  per hour. _
3. (a.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause  (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and  (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING (FEMALE).
Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.
Experienced Employee—Weekly rate, $13.50.    Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced employee..
Under 18 years of age.
Weekly rate.
$8.00 for 1st 4 months.
8.60 for 2nd 4 months.
9.00 for 3rd 4 months.
10.00 for 4th 4 months.
11.00 for 5th 4 months.
12.00 for 6th 4 months.
18 years of age and over.
Weekly rate.
$9.00 for 1st 4 months.
10.50 for 2nd 4 months.
12.00 for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required in this
class.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.— (a.)  Above rates are based on a 48-hour week,
(b.)   Hours of work governed by " Factories Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 59
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1, Effective April 27th, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, mining-prop, and
pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties,
mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees .rt
T r ackmen	
Cook- and bunk-house employees ._
40c. per hour
87%C. per hour
$2.75 per day
48
Unlimited.
Note.—Certain exemptions regarding- working-hours.     (See "Hours of Work" Regulations.)
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 1923.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity, exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees..
$14.00
48
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 1.
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes
and wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks,
pails, wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions,
gas-mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers, maps, saw-teeth and holders, mats, tiles, ropes, and shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first two months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 2.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies* and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations,' worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toys and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
	
— P 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule
Includes  bookbinding,   embossing,   engraving,   printing,   dress-making,
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
basis.
ready-to-wear suits, jewellery, furs, leather goods, hand-made cigars,
"Not less than—
and hand-made millinery
$7.00  a  week for the first six months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 59, Effective October 20th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 38, dated June 26th, 1936.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and  (or)  retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over _
(3.) 21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day
87% to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37^ hours.
Males under Twenty-one (21)  Years op Age.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Eighteen (18)  Years of Age.
I
37 % to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
(4.)   (1.)
$6.00 per week..
7.50 per week..
9.00 per week-
11.00 per week...
13.00 per week..
15.00 per week-
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
Beginners and those recommencing. Eighteen (18) Years and under Twenty-one (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.)   (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months...
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months..
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months...
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
20c.
25c.
35c.
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
80c.
$1.00
1.40 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 61
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Beginners and those recommencing, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than %iy% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
25 c.
30c.
35c.
$1.00
1.20
1.40
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
Note.— (a.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers, employed in wholesale and (or) retail establishments, shall be
paid at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26.
(b.)   Employees must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(c.)   Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(d.) Whsre uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum, 18 years of age or over- _
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years op Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
20c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c. per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c. per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c. per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c. per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 a week 1st 3 months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.) Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(b.)  Maximum working-hours, 48 per week. P 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. U of May 25th, 193i.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls  (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 3 months.
323&C. per hour for 2nd 3 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 3 months.
37%c, per hour for 4th 3 months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
30c. per hour for 1st 6 months.
12.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
35c. per hour for 3rd 6 months.
14.00 a week for 4th 6 months or until
37%c. per hour for 4th 6 months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order Effective since September 15th, 1919.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring; hairdressing; barbering; massaging;
giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments; removal of superfluous hair; chiropody; or other
work of like nature.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over..
Minimum  _ 	
Hours per Week.
40 to 44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months, or until employee
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months, or until employee
reaches age of 18 years.
reaches age of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 63
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 44 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
371/ac. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.— (a.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as  set out
above.
(b.)   44-hour week and one-half hour for lunch between 11 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.     (See 27a.)
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27a, Effective March 30th, 1939.
(Amending Order No. 27.)
The above Order reduces the weekly hours to forty-four (44) and not more than nine  (9) hours
in any one day.
Also provides for one-half  (%)  hour free from duty between the hours of eleven  (11)   a.m. and
two-thirty (2.30) p.m.
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT  (FEMALE).
Order No. 67, Effective September 11th, 1939.
(Superseding Personal Service Order, dated September 15th, 1919.)
" Public place of amusement " includes theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, shooting-
galleries, bowling-alleys, swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions, and other similar places to which a charge
for admission or service is made to the public.
40 to 48 Hours
per Week.
Less than 40 Hours
per Week.
2 Hours or Less in
any One Day.
$14.25
35c. per hour.
75c.
Note.— (a.)   Employees on call, 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Where uniforms  or  special articles  of  wearing-apparel  are  required  they  shall  be  furnished,   repaired,
laundered, cleaned, etc., free of cost to the attendant.
(c.)   Cashiers are still covered by Office Order No. 34.
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Order No. 50a, Effective July 10th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 2 of April 27th, 193U, Order No. Ii of October 19th, 19Si, and
Order No. 36, Effective April 1st, 1936.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult males  —
Not more than 10 per cent, of all employees at not less than..
Cook- and bunk-house employees— _	
40c.
30c.
$2.75 per day
48
48
Unlimited.
Note.— (a.)  Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."    (See regulations.)
(6.)  For engineers see Engineer Order.
(c.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.) 90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour. P 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE-BOLTS  (MALE).
Order No. 1b, Effective January 4th, 1935.
Includes employees engaged in felling, bucking, and splitting shingle-bolts.
Rate, $1.30 per cord.
Hours, 48 per week.
SHINGLE-MILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 62, Effective April 6th, 1939.
(Superseding Order No. 16, dated November 1st, 1931,.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles, except shingle-bolt
operations.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
48
Note.— (a.)  For engineers see Engineer Order.
(b.)  For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20, Effective June 14th, 1935.
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Bate.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder or wood-caulker 	
67y2c.
50c.
25c.
48
48
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees
in plant may be employed at not less than    	
48
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 33, Effective January 30th, 1936, and Order No. 33a, September 13th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 6, Effective June 29th, 193i.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.                          Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
All ages.
$2.75
9 per day.
54 per week.
Note.—If uniform or special article of wearing-apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost to
the employee except by arrangement approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
TAXICAB DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 60, Effective November 17th, 1938.
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Less than 10
Hours per Day.
Daily
Minimum.
Working-
hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich	
All ages.
$3.00
35c. per hour.
$1.40 per day.
10 per day.
Note.— (a.) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours-
can be paid 35c. per hour.
(b.)   Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 45c. per hour.
(c.)  Drivers must be paid at least semi-monthly.
(d.)  Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(e.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 65
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
31^4c, per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)   Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(b.)   Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,.
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m.  and 8 a.m.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY (MALE).
Order No. 26, Effective July 4th, 1935.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place-
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)   Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
40 and not more
.   than 50
40c.
40 and not more
than 50
S5c.
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40 and not more
than 48
17c.
40 and not more
than 50
35c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
(2.)   Operators  of  motor-vehicles   of  less  than
2,000 lb.   net weight,  as  specified on  the
motor-vehicle   licence,   exclusive   of   those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52y2c.
i
,,
(4.)   Bicycle-riders   and   foot-messengers    employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work
:
not more than 54
52 He. P 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY (MALE)—Continued.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(6.)  Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
Less than 40
40 and not more
In excess of 50 and
those covered by section 7 hereof
than 50
not more than 54
45c.
40c.
60c.
(7.)  Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery
of milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(b.) Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee, except by arrangement
approved by Board of Industrial Relations.
(c.)  Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours is worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)  Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 59.
WATCHMEN—LOGGING CAMPS  (MALE).
Order No. Ia, Effective November 29th, 1934.
Wages.
Hours.
Watchmen where operations of camp are suspended-
No minimum wage fixed.
Not fixed.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. S5 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 11 of August 2ith, 1934.)
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and
doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products,
and general mill-work products.
Class.
Weekly Hours.
Adult Males	
18 to 21 years of age-
Under 18 years	
48
48
48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33% per
cent, of all male employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 67
BOARD OP INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders made by the Board of Industrial Relations,
compiled as at April 17th, 1939:—
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
41
17
Apprentices, Indentured.. —
Feb. 3/37
Nov. 1/34
July 12/34
April 5/37
July 12/34
March 23/36...
March 10/38—
Oct. 15/35
Dec. 1/36
Sept. 18/38
June 23/39
Aug. 16/39
Nov. 18/38
Aug. 31/39
Sept. 28/34
Feb.28/38
July 18/39
June 14/37
July 2/37
July 29/37
Feb. 8/35
Nov. 26/35      .
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 28/38
Feb. 8/35
April 17/35
June 26/36
May 14/37
June 26/36
Feb. 11/37
Nov. 8/34
July 19/34
April 8/37
July 19/34
March 26/36 ...
March 17/38—
Oct. 17/35
Dec. 3/36
Sept. 22/38
June 29/39
Aug. 17/39
Nov. 24/38
Sept. 7/39
Oct. 4/34
March 3/38
July 20/39	
June 17/37
July 8/37
July 29/37
Feb. 14/35
Nov. 28/35
March 3/38
March 3/38
Feb.14/35
April 18/35
July 2/36
May 20/37
July 2/36
Jan. 15/20
May 3/34..
June 14/34
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36      ..
July 8/37
Sept. 2/37
Sept. 16/37
March 10/38—
Aug. 18/38
May 25/39
July 8/37
Sept. 2/37
Sept. 16/37
Feb. 11/37
Nov. 23/34
Aug. 3/34
June 14/37
Aug. 3/34
April 1/36
April 4/38
Oct. 28/35
Feb. 1/37
Nov. 7/38
Aug. 1/39
Aug. 21/39
Nov. 24/38
Sept. 11/39
Oct. 19/34
March 3/38
July 20/39
July 5/37
July 8/37
July 29/37
March 1/35
Nov. 28/35
March 3/38	
March 3/38
March 1/35
April 18/35
July 2/36
June 1/37
Aug. 1/36
Feb. 28/20
May 18/34
June 29/34
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35...	
Male and
Female	
Male	
Male 	
Male 	
Male.	
Male.	
Male 	
Male 	
Male 	
Male 	
8
June 14/37
42
7
April 1/36
37
April 4/38
55
31
40
58
Bus-drivers (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry 	
65
66
61
Male 	
Male 	
Male	
Male-	
Male	
Male 	
Male 	
Male -
Male 	
Dec. 31/38
68
12
12a
12b
45
Construction-  	
Construction  	
Construction —  	
July 8/37
45A
48
Construction (Cancelling 45)
July 29/37
19
Nov. 26/35
32
Male	
Female	
Male	
Male 	
Male  -
Male. -	
Male - —	
March 3/38
53
54
18
18a
18b
18c
39
Engineers, Stationary Steam.
Engineers, Stationary Steam-
Engineers, Stationary Steam-
Engineers, Stationary Steam
3
May 2/34..	
June 12/34
April 16/35
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36	
Aug. 26/36
April 16/35
Dec. 2/35
April 18/35
3a
April 18/35
July 12/37
21a
Fruit and Vegetable
March 31/36
2lB
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36
April 18/35.
Dec. 5/35
Female -	
July 12/37
July 12/37
July 12/37
22a
Fruit and Vegetable
March 31/36
22b
July 21/36
Aug. 26/36
July 2/37
Sept. 1/37
Sept. 15/37
March 4/38
Aug. 12/38
May 23/39
July 2/37
Sept. 1/37
Sept. 15/37
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36	
July 12/37
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37.-.
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37—
March 10/38 to
May 7/38
Aug. 12/38 to
Oct. 1/38
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39
July 12/37
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37—
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37—
Male 	
July 12/37
July 12/37
46
46a
46b
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Female	
Female	
Sept. 15/37
Fruit and Vegetable (Tempo-
Sept. 30/37
46c
Female — —
Female	
Female -	
Male - -
Male	
46d
63
47
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable Canning
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
47a
47b
Fruit and Vegetable..	
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
	 P 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
47c
47D
64
51
52
52a
52b
52c
23
23a
43
5a
5b
29
44
Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)	
Fruit and Vegetable-
Fruit and Vegetable Canning..
Household-furniture-
Hotel and Catering	
Hotel and Catering   (Resort
Hotels)   	
Hotel and Catering 	
Hotel  and  Catering   (Resort
Hotels )  	
Janitor 	
Janitor	
Janitor   „
Janitresses      (Public     Housekeeping ) - 	
Janitresses     (Public    Housekeeping )	
Janitresses — 	
Janitresses  	
1
lA
lc
13
13a
15
28
25
10
10
10
10a
24
24
24
24
24a
24b
24
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing    	
Logging 	
Logging (Watchman) 	
Logging  (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers) .  ..	
Logging and Sawmills	
Logging    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains) 	
Logging (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers )  	
Cancelling No. 9  	
Logging and Sawmills  (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area)—.
Logging	
Manufacturing-
Mercantile	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1934)   	
Mercantile   (Supplementary,
1935) - _ - -.
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935) 	
Mercantile- —	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1935) 	
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1936) - 	
Mercantile   (Supplementary,
1937) 	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935 )  —.
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)   	
Mercantile   (Supplementary,
1938)... 	
March 4/38.
Aug. 12/38-
May 23/39...
Nov. 17/37..
Feb. 8/38.....
April 6/38....
May 18/38—
Aug. 22/38...
April 17/35..
Sept. 25/35-
May 14/37—
Nov. 9/34	
April 17/35-
Sept. 26/35...
May 14/37--
April 7/34 .
Nov. 9/34...
Jan. 24/36-
July 12/34 -
Sept. 28/34..
Jan. 24/36 ...
Sept. 28/34 .
Sept. 25/35	
March 23/38...
March 29/35....
July 24/34	
Nov. 9/34....
Nov. 26/35..
Oct. 15/35...
May 29/35...
Nov. 26/35..
Dec. 1/36	
Nov. 17/37-
March 10/38...
Aug. 18/38	
May 25/39	
Nov. 18/37..
Feb. 10/38..
April 7/38...
May 19/38...
Aug. 25/38..
April 18/35-
Oct. 3/35 .....
May 20/37—
Nov. 15/34..
April 18/35-
Oct. 3/35	
May 20/37—
Feb. 27/19...
April 12/34.
Nov. 15/34 ..
Jan. 30/36 ...
July 19/34 ...
Oct. 4/34..
Jan. 30/36.
Oct. 4/34 ...
Sept. 26/35
March 24/38....
June 6/35 ..
July 26/34..
Nov. 15/34 .
Nov. 28/35..
Oct. 17/35...
June 6/35 ...
Oct. 15/35...
Aug. 26/36..
Nov. 18/38-
Nov. 28/35..
Dec. 3/36.....
Nov. 25/37-
Oct. 17/35...
Sept. 3/36 ..
Nov. 24/38..
March 10/38 to
May 7/38	
Aug. 12/38 to
Oct. 1/38-	
June 1/39 to
Dec. 31/39	
Nov. 22/37	
Feb. 14/38	
June 15/38 to
Sept. 15/38...
May 19/38	
Sept. 16/38 .
April 18/35..
Oct. 3/35	
June 1/37	
Nov. 30/34..
April 18/35..
Oct. 3/35	
June 1/37	
March 31/19....
April 27/34 ....
Nov. 30/34	
Jan. 30/36-
Aug. 3/34..
Oct. 19/34...
Jan. 30/36.
Oct. 19/34 .
Sept. 26/35....
March 24/38..
July 1/35	
Aug. 10/34 .
Dec. 1/34   -
Nov. 28/35..
Oct. 17/35...
July 1/35—
Nov. 28/35..
Dec. 3/36	
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37-
Oct. 17/35—
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36...
Nov. 28/38 to
Dec. 31/38....
Male.
Male.
Male.	
Male	
Female..
Female-
Female..
Female..
Male.
Male
Male .
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female..
Female..
Male	
Male	
Male .
Male .
Male.
Male .
Male .
Male..
Male..
Female..
Male	
Male.
Male.
Male	
Female..
Female-
Female-
Female
Female .
Female -
Female -
May 7/38
Oct. 1/38
Sept. 15/38
June 15/39.
May 31/37
May 31/37
April 18/35
Oct. 3/35
May 31/37
March 24/38
Oct. 19/34
March 24/38
March 24/38
Oct. 4/34
July 20/36
Dec. 31/34
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Jan. 3/37
Dec. 31/37
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/36
Dec. 31/38 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 69
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
38
June 26/36-     .
Dec. 1/36	
July 2/36
Dec. 3/36
Nov. 25/37
Sept. 3/36
Sept. 3/36
Oct. 20/38
Nov. 24/38
May 10/34
Jan. 30/36
Aug. 14/19
Sept. 5/35
Dec. 19/35
April 6/39
Sept. 7/39
May 10/34
Oct. 3/35
April 8/37
April 12/34
Oct. 4/34
Sept. 26/35
March 26/36—
Aug. 5/37
July 20/39
Dec. 20/34
Nov. 8/34
April 6/39
May 30/35
June 14/34
Jan. 30/36
Sept. 2/37
Sept. 1/38
Nov. 17/38
March 4/20
May 3/34
June 20/35
July 2/36
Sept. 1/38
Oct. 20/38
Aug. 9/34
March 26/36—
Aug. 5/37	
July 20/36
Dec. 3/36
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37	
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36	
Sept. 3/36
Oct. 20/38
Nov. 28/38 to
Dec. 31/38 ....
May 25/34
Jan.30/36
Sept. 15/19
Sept. 5/35
Dec. 19/35
April 6/39 .
Sept. 11/39 ..
May 25/34
Oct. 3/35
June 15/37 to
Sept. 15/37...
April 27/34
Oct. 19/34
Sept. 26/35
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37
July 20/39
Jan. 4/35
Nov. 23/34
April 6/39
June 14/35—
June 29/34
Jan. 30/36
Sept. 13/37
Sept. 1/38
Nov. 17/38
April 5/20
May 18/34
July 4/35
July 20/36
Sept. 1/38
Oct. 20/38
Aug. 24/34
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37—
Oct. 20/38
38
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1936) 	
Jan. 3/37
38
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1937) 	
Nov. 17/37
Aug. 31/36
Aug. 26/36
Oct. 12/38
Nov. 18/38
May 2/34
Jan. 24/36
Male 	
Male	
38a
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)	
Dec. 31/37
38b
Dec. 31/36
59
Male	
Male	
Female	
Female	
Female -	
Female	
Female	
Female- -
Female 	
Female	
Female -	
Female	
Male-	
59
4
Mercantile    (Supplementary,
1938) 	
Dec. 31/38
Jan. 30/36
34
Office Occupation 	
Sept. 11/39
27
Aug. 29/35
Dec. 17/35.
March 23/39....
Aug. 31/39
May 2/34	
27a
27a
Personal Service   (Temporary) - - —    	
Dec. 31/35
67
5
Public Places of Amusement
Oct. 3/35
30
Sept. 26/35.
April 2/37
April 7/34
Sept. 28/34.
Sept. 25/35
March 23/36—
Aug. 3/37
July 18/39
Dec. 14/34
Nov. 1/34
March 23/39—
May 28/35
June 13/34
Jan. 24/36
Sept. 1/37
Aug. 30/38
Nov. 15/38
May 2/34
June 19/35.     .
June 26/36.
Aug. 30/38.
Oct. 19/38
Aug. 1/34
March 23/36 —
Aug. 3/37	
Feb. 14/38
30a
2
Public Housekeeping-—	
Sept. 15/37
April 1/36
14
Sawmills   (East  of   Cascade
Mountains) 	
Sawmill and Logging   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area)
April 1/36
28
36
Male  	
Male 	
Male 	
Male—	
Male	
Male	
Male -
Aug. 16/37
50
50a
IB
16
62
Sawmills  -	
Sawmills   -   - ~
Shingle-bolts - —	
Shingle-mills—	
April 6/39
20
6
Jan.30/36
33
33a
Taxicab-drivers (Vancouver)
Male 	
60
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and
District) — —
Telephone and Telegraph 	
Male	
Female 	
Sept. 30/34
26
Male  -
Male  	
26a
Oct. 20/38
Transportation 	
Transportation  	
26C
11
Male -	
Male -
Male.	
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37
49
Wood-working - —
Male 	 P 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO " HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Province of British Columbia.
1 HOURS OF WORK ACT."
BE IT KNOWN that, pursuant to and by
virtue of the powers and authority vested
in the Board of Industrial Relations by the
" Hours of Work Act," the said Board has
made the following regulations, namely: —
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
[1   (a)  Consolidated for convenience only.    See Regulation
No. 26.]
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, plan-
ing-mills, shingle-mills, and logging industry,
including all operations in or incidental to the
carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt,
mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and
booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles, situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains
may work one hour per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but
the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four  (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred
to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of
hours of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by
one hour per day on five days of each week for
the purpose of making a shorter work-day on
one day of the week, but the total hours worked
in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-
mills situate in that part of the Province lying
east of the Cascade Mountains, and which are
operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and
oilers may work overtime to the extent of one
and one-half hours per day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to
the said fifty-four (54) hours per week set
forth in clauses (a) and (6) of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-
mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may
work a total of forty-eight (48) hours each
week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48)
hours each week in six nights, but the number
of hours worked in any night must not exceed
ten  (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in:—
(1.)   The logging industry in:—-
(a.)   Booming operations;   or
(6.)  Transporting logs by logging-
railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or
river-driving;   or
(c.)   Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)  Or in the operation and upkeep
of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.) Canning fish or manufacturing byproducts from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.) Cook and bunk houses in connection
with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use
steam as a motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen,
and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers
may work overtime to the extent of one and
one-half hours per day to perform preparatory
or complementary work, in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section
3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the
shipping staff in industrial undertakings where
shipping operations are of an intermittent
nature may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said
Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions
which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-hours
limited by section 3 of the Act are being unduly
exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial
undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time as the Board
considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed
in ship-yards, engineering-works, machine-
shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal
works, belt-works, saw-works, and plants of a
like nature may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but not more than) may be
necessary to prevent serious loss to, or interruption in the operation of, the industrial
undertaking for which the repairs are being
made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of
wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables
may work during the months of June, July,
August, and September in each year such hours
in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3
of the said Act as may from time to time be
necessary to fill urgent orders. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 71
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a February 13th, 1936.
Laundries.
9. Persons employed in laundries may, in
any we%k in which a public holiday (other
than Sunday) occurs, work on each of the
remaining working-days of the week such hours
in excess of the limit of hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said Act as may be necessary
to avoid serious interference with the business
of the industry, but the total hours worked in
any such week shall not exceed forty-eight (48).
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July,
August, September, and October in each year
persons employed in the lithographing industry
may work such hours in excess of the hours
prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may
from time to time be necessary to fill urgent
orders. This exemption shall only apply when
sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by
the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the
extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied
by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized,
of the urgency and necessity for the exception,
that it is of a temporary nature, and that no
other means of adequately overcoming such
temporary urgent condition is, or has been,
reasonably available, and that the additional
working-hours applied for will not be more
than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in
the manner required by subsection (1) of
section 9 of the said Act of all additional hours
worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said
Act or in pursuance of any regulation.
13. Every employer shall notify, by means
of the posting of notices in conspicuous places
in the works or other suitable place, where the
same may readily be seen by all persons
employed by him, the hours at which work
begins and ends, and, where work is carried on
by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins
and ends; also such rest intervals accorded
during the period of work as are not reckoned
as part of the working-hours; these hours shall
be so fixed that the duration of the work shall
not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours
of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not
be changed except upon twenty-four hours'
notice of such change posted as hereinbefore
specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the
Act or Regulation 11 above, a like notice of the
change in working-hours shall be posted, which
notice shall also state the grounds on which
the exemption was granted.'
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia,
this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.
Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14.
Occupation of Barbering.
The occupation of barbering is hereby added
to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 24th
day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th
day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.
Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15.
Mercantile Industry.
The mercantile industry is hereby added to
the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 7th
day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th
day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.
Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations No. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15D
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15b.
Mercantile Industry.
Persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for
the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade,
in the Province of British Columbia, with the
exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of
North Vancouver, Municipality of the District
of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt,
the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay,
and the Municipality of the District of Saanich,
may work three (3) hours per day in excess of
the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said
Act, on Saturday of each week and on the day
preceding a statutory holiday, when such statutory holiday occurs on a Saturday, but the
total hours worked in any one week shall not
exceed forty-eight (48).
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 30th
day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st,
1938. Effective October 1st, 1938, to September 30th, 1939.) P 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Regulations No. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and
16e cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f.
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores.
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates
of pharmacy may work not more than ninety-
six (96) hours in any two (2) successive
weeks, but in no case shall the hours of work
of any such registered apprentice, certified
clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed fifty-
two (52) hours in any one week, or nine (9)
hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made
and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of
August, 1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd
day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.
Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17.
Baking Industry.
The baking industry, by which expression is
meant all operations in or incidental to the
manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or
cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the
said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council to such addition to the
said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17a.
Baking Industry.
Employees employed in the baking industry
as deliverymen may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd,
1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18.
Catering Industry.
The catering industry, which includes all
operations in or incidental to the preparation
or to the serving, or to both preparation and
serving, of meals or refreshments where the
meals or refreshments are served or intended
to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-
house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, icecream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food  is  served  and  a  charge  is
made for the same either directly or indirectly,
whether such charge is made against the
persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some other person, is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the
1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 18a.
Catering Industry.
Employees in the catering industry, working
on a split shift, are hereby exempt from the
provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work
Act Amendment Act, 1937," being chapter 30
of the Statutes of British Columbia, 1937, to
the extent that their working-hours on a split
shift shall be confined within fourteen (14)
hours immediately following commencement of
work; but this exception shall not be applicable unless every employee whose split shift
extends over twelve (12) hours is paid at the
rate of not less than one and one-half times
his regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split shift as is not confined within twelve (12)
hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th
day of May, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 6th, 1938.
Effective May 6th, 1938.)
REGULATION No. 19.
Retail Florists.
Persons employed in the establishments of
retail florists may work such hours in addition
to the working-hours limited by section 3 of
the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be
necessary to surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise
overcome: Provided that the working-hours
of such persons shall not exceed ninety-six (96)
hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the
decision of the Board shall be final, and where
the Board is of the opinion that, under the
provisions of this regulation, the working-
hours limited by section 3 of the Act are being
unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written
notification to the management, exclude the
employer's establishment from the provisions
of this regulation for such period of time as
the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th
day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th,
1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 73
REGULATION No. 20.
REGULATION No. 23.
The Occupation of Elevator Operator.
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby
added to the Schedule to the said Act, the
approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the
15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th
day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th,
1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations No. 21, 2lB, 21c, and 21d
cancelled by
REGULATION No. 2lE.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The fruit and vegetable industry, which
includes all operations in or incidental to the
canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit
or vegetable, is hereby exempt from the operation of the said Acts up to and including the
31st day of March, 1940.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this
23rd day of May, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, May 25th, 1939.
Effective March 31st, 1938, to March 31st,
1940.)
REGULATION No. 22.
Transportation Industry.
The transportation industry, which includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport, for the purpose of being further
transported to some destination other than the
place at which such aforementioned carriage or
delivery terminates, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
Transportation Industry.
1. That.where used in this regulation the
expression " transportation industry " includes
all operations in or incidental to the carrying
or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air,
any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles,
or material the property of persons other than
the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of
goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or
material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on
behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or
public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and
the carrying or delivering to or collecting from
any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air,
or road transport, for the purpose of being
further transported to some destination other
than the place at which such aforementioned
carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators of motor-cycles, (6) bicycle-riders and
foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of
vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk,
are hereby permitted to work six (6) hours
per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," in accordance with the provisions of
Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial
Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935,
fixing minimum wages in the transportation
industry: Provided that no such employee in
the transportation industry shall work more
than ten (10) hours in any one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the
retail delivery of milk are hereby permitted to
work fifteen (15) hours per week in excess of
the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said
"Hours of Work Act, 1934": Provided that
over a period of seven (7) weeks no such employee shall work more than three hundred and
seventy-eight (378) hours, nor more than ten
(10)  hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th
day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.
Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24.
Occupation of Hotel Clerk.
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes
the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks,
cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in
clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act,
1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule P'74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
having been obtained by Order in Council dated
the 20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th,
1935.    Effective September 26th, 1935.)
operated for hire, may work six (6) hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed
by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall
the daily hours worked by any such employee
in the taxicab industry exceed nine (9) in any
one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 26.
1. That Regulation No. 1 (a) of the Board,
dated the 14th day of June, 1934, is hereby
amended by striking out the word " and"
before the word " shingle-mills," and inserting
after the word " shingle-mills " the words " and
logging industry, including all operations in
or incidental to the carrying-on of logging;
pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile
cutting; and all operations in or incidental to
driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles,
ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles."
2. That this regulation shall become effective on publication in The British Columbia
Gazette on the 24th day of March, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 23rd
day of March, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28.
Taxicab Industry.
The taxicab industry, which includes the
work of all employees in charge of or driving a
motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven
(7) passengers or less than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public,
and which is driven or operated for hire, is
hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such
addition to the said Schedule having been
obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd
day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd
day of August, 1938.
REGULATION No. 28a.
Taxicab Industry.
Persons employed in the taxicab industry,
which includes the work of all employees in
charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for seven (7) passengers or less
than seven (7) passengers, used for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or
Note.—The taxicab industry having been
brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is
now subject to the following provision of that
Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working
on a split shift shall be confined within twelve
hours immediately following commencement of
work."
REGULATION No. 28b.
Taxicab Industry.
1. That where used in this regulation, the
expression " taxicab industry " shall have the
meaning as assigned to it in Regulation No.
28 of the Board, dated the 22nd day of August,
1938.
2. That persons employed in the taxicab industry in the City of Victoria, the Municipality
of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich, may work:—
(a.) Two (2) hours per day in excess of the
limit prescribed by section 3 of the
" Hours of Work Act," provided that
such ten (10) hours are confined within
eleven (11) hours immediately following commencement of their work:
(6.) In excess of the ten (10) hours permitted by clause (a) hereof, provided
they are paid not less than the minimum rate for overtime—namely, forty-
five cents (45c.) per hour—prescribed
by section 5 of Order No. 60 of the
Board, dated the 15th day of November, 1938.
3. Regulation No. 28a of the Board, made
the 22nd day of August, 1938, is hereby varied
accordingly.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th
day of November, 1938.
COMPILED AUGUST 1st, 1939.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 75
SUMMARY OF LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR.
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, 1938.)
"APPRENTICESHIP ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1938."
Formerly, the Act allowed of a minor under 21 years of age being employed in a " designated trade " for a period of three months without being signed up under an apprenticeship
contract.
This was intended to afford an employer the opportunity to try out a boy for a probationary period of three months before deciding to take him on as an apprentice.
It was found that certain employers were making a practice of taking on a succession of
boys and firing each one as the three-month period expired, without keeping any of them on
as an apprentice under the Act.
The amendment requires that when an employer desires to take on a boy for the three-
month probationary period, he (the employer) must obtain the approval of the Apprenticeship
Committee before he can employ the boy. In this way it is hoped to control a practice that
was threatening to undermine the successful administration of the Act.
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1938."
The Act as originally passed empowers the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to make regulations for the proper conduct of a trade-school.
Formerly, the only penalty that could be applied to a trade-school for failing to observe
the regulations was to cancel the licence of the school, which, in the case of a minor offence,
was considered to be too severe, and, in addition, might be a detriment to students who had
paid money for a course of training.
The amendment provides a penalty more in keeping with minor offences, and which, in
such cases, can be supplied without closing the trade-school entirely.
"FIRE DEPARTMENTS TWO-PLATOON ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1938."
The Act originally provided that, in the Cities of Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster, firemen were required to work on a two-platoon system which regulated their hours
of work.
The amendment extends the application of the Act to every municipality and every place
in which there is a paid fire department or a paid fire brigade, as defined in the Statute.
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1938."
The Act originally provided that it was lawful for employees to bargain collectively with
their employer and to conduct such bargaining through representatives of employees duly
elected by a majority vote of the employees affected.
The amendment continues this provision; but, in addition, requires an employer to conduct such bargaining with officers of a trade-union where the majority of the employees were
organized into a trade-union prior to the 8th day of December, 1938.
"WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1938."
The amendment extends the scope of the Act to include workmen employed on an aeroplane, flying-machine, truck, bus, or other vehicle used in transportation of passengers or
freight, who were not previously covered by compensation, and thus bring the Act into line
with the more modern methods of transportation.
A general all-round increase in the benefits of compensation to workmen is given:—
1. In the case of death resulting from injury, the amount granted for burial expenses is
increased from $100 to $125.
2. In the case of a dependent widow or an invalid widower, the monthly payment to the
surviving spouse is increased from $35 to $40.
3. In the case of a dependent widow or invalid widower with one or more children, the
monthly payment of $35 per month plus $7.50 for each dependent child is increased to $40 per P 76 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
month plus $7.50 for each dependent child, and the total amount payable is increased from
$65 per month to $70 per month.
4. In the case of dependent parents and children of deceased workmen where death
results from injury, the total amount payable is increased from $65 per month to $70 per
month.
5. When the surviving dependents of a deceased alien workman are living in a foreign
country, the Board, under the Act, has always had the right to compute the amount of compensation on a basis commensurate with the standard of living in the country where the
dependents resided.
In that way, a reserve may be created.
The amendment now provides that any reserve so created shall be distributed by way of
additional payments to dependents living within the Dominion of Canada.
6. The amount of compensation to a workman suffering permanent total disability is
increased from 62% per cent, to 66% per cent, of his average earnings.
7. In the case of permanent partial disability, compensation shall now, according to the
amendment, be computed as 66% per cent, of the difference between what the workman was
earning before the accident and what he can earn after the accident, instead of 62% per cent.,
as formerly. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 77
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
Victoria, B.C., May 31st, 1939.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the first annual report of the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch for the year 1938.
Very few disputes marred the industrial scene in 1938. Indeed, there were fewer employees affected and working-days lost during this year than at any other time since 1931.
The " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act " received assent December 10th, 1937,
and 1938 was therefore a year of testing for this important statute. Naturally, some of the
disputes which arose did not come within the scope of its provisions. In the tables and
explanations which follow a segregation has been made of disputes treated under the Act,
and others. However, for the purpose of comparison with other years, it is interesting to
note that there was a total of eleven strikes reported, affecting 837 workers and causing a loss
of 8,236 working-days.
The following table shows the record for the past eight years:—
Number of Strikes, Number of Employees affected, and Time lost in
Working-days, 1931-38.
Year.
No. of Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1938     	
11
16
16
23
17
14
11
11
837
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,136
2,322
8,236
1937           	
30,022
1936   	
1935            -          -            -	
75,311
140,706
1934           - 	
73,977
1933           -           	
25,760
1932                                        -           -	
37,740
1931                                                    	
79,310
An analysis of disputes by industries reveals the fact that while there were four disputes
in the manufacturing industry, resulting in a loss of 1,938 working-days, the greatest loss
was in the fishing industry where three disputes affecting 573 workers resulted in a loss of
6,039 working-days.
Analysis of Labour Disputes in British Columbia in 1938 by various Industries. P 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF DISPUTES.
Of the eleven strikes which took place during the year, six came within the scope of the
Act. In four of these six disputes, due to unfamiliarity with the provisions of the statute,
workers struck without recourse to Provincial conciliation. In the two remaining cases the
strike followed the rejection of the findings of Boards of Arbitration—in one case by an employer, in the other by employees.
Disputes in which the services of this branch of the Department were utilized affected
244 workers and resulted in a loss of 2,107 working-days.    A summary follows:—■
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in Man
Working-
days.
Lime-workers, Blubber Bay~
Lime-workers, Blubber Bay,.
Carpenters, Vancouver..
Bakery-workers, Vancouver..
Metal   stamp,    plate,    and
workers, Vancouver
Welders, Vancouver..
die
Commenced March 7th, following demand for Union
recognition and rotation of work while sawmill
closed. Terminated March 12th upon representations of conciliation commissioner.
Commenced June 2nd, following rejection by the
employees of the unanimous award of the Board of
Arbitration and failure by the company to give a
definite undertaking that certain men on the payroll July 23rd, 1937, would be re-employed. Employment conditions reported no longer affected
October 31st,  1938.    Undetermined.
Commenced July 20th, in protest of alleged failure
of employers to pay the existing fair-wage rate of
90 cents an hour. Following the intervention of a
conciliation commissioner the men returned to
work at 85 cents and 90 cents an hour, July 22nd.
In favour of employees.
Commenced November 11th, in protest of refusal of
employer to accept award of Board of Arbitration.
Eleven of thirteen employees were immediately replaced. Employment conditions reported no longer
affected December 31st, 1938.
Commenced November 17th, against failure of employer to accept proposed agreement submitted by
Union. Terminated upon the representation of
conciliation commissioner, November 19th. A
closed-shop agreement was eventually signed.
Favourable to employees.
Commenced November 30th, in protest against rate
of $1 per hour paid welders on Point Grey water-
main extension. The Union claimed $1.12% was
the fair rate and struck to protect this scale. The
men returned to work December 1st upon representations of the conciliation commissioner. The
established field work-rate was found to be $1 per
hour.
Totals --     _	
83
70
13
16
198
1,650
146
80
10
23
244
2,107 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 79
Other Disputes.
Fishermen    (herring-seiners),
Commenced  January  10th,  to secure  an  increase in
28
364
Prince Rupert
the price per ton of fish.    Men returned to work
January 22nd after compromise was effected.
Retail store clerks, Vancouver
Ten employees of a company operating several retail
stores were dismissed without notice June 13th, but
the majority  of  them  were  reinstated   June   20th
and   an   agreement   signed   with   the   Union.    In
favour of employees.
10
i
60
Mercury-miners, Bridge River	
On August 18th the rate of wages at this mine was
reduced  40  cents  per day.    As  a result the crew
quit.    A new  crew was hired  and  work  resumed
August 20th.    In favour of employer.
10
30
Fishermen (salmon purse-seiners),
Commenced September 16th, when men demanded in
500
5,000
Johnstone Strait district
crease   of   price   paid  for   chums.    Work   resumed
October 3rd when operators agreed to pay a higher
price and signed agreements with Unions.    Favourable to men.
Fishermen    (herring   gill-netters),
Commenced November 4th, when fishermen demanded
45
675
Vancouver district
recognition  of  Union  and an  agreement covering
sales   and   prices   for   their   products.    A   Union
agreement was later signed.    Favourable to men.
837
8,236
I. STRIKES, 1938.
Lime-workers, Blubber Bay.
Nos. 1 and 2.—A full description of the circumstances leading to strikes at Blubber Bay,
which took place March 7th and June 2nd, will be found in the record of conciliation which
appears immediately after the report on strikes.
Carpenters, Vancouver.
No. 3.—Carpenters on three construction jobs in Vancouver struck at 8 a.m., July 20th,
thus ending the work of a number of labourers on two of these operations.
The dispute was caused by the employers offering the carpenter employees the rate of
80 cents per hour. The carpenters protested this rate of wages and demanded the rate of
90 cents per hour, which they claimed to be the prevailing rate in the district.
They were informed the Government would intervene when they had returned to work,
and as a result work on all three jobs recommenced July 22nd at 9 a.m.
Negotiations which were thereafter opened between disputants by an officer of the
Department of Labour terminated September 6th when the employees accepted an offer made
by the employers, which was to become effective on the same date as a Minimum Wage Order
by the Board of Industrial Relations, setting a minimum rate of 75 cents per hour for carpenters employed in Vancouver and adjacent municipalities, became effective. (This order
was made effective November 7th, 1938.)
The offer made by the employers was in the form of a contract guaranteeing a rate of
90 cents an hour, with time and one-half for overtime and holidays.
In the interval, it was agreed by both parties that on work where 90 cents an hour was
being paid the rate would not be altered until the completion of the work.
On other work where 80 cents per hour was being paid, the rate of 85 cents should apply
as from September 1st, 1938. Pending the signing of the agreement correspondence was
exchanged between representatives of employers and employees accepting the proposed provisions.
The settlement was therefore favourable to the employees.
Bakery-workers, Vancouver.
2Vo. J,.-—On July 29th the Minister apprehended a dispute between the employees of a
Vancouver bakery and the management and appointed a Conciliation Commissioner to investigate the matter.    Complainants alleged that there was discrimination shown Union employees and that a feeling of unrest existed due to the employment of young workers in relation to the
number of journeymen bakers.
On September 12th the Commissioner referred the matter to arbitration and the Board of
Arbitration was constituted October 4th.
The employees demanded a closed-shop agreement; certain wage rates, in many cases an
increase over that being paid;   and a certain ratio of unskilled labour to journeymen.
The Board, after a series of sittings in Vancouver, returned a majority award October
17th. The employer's representative, however, found he could not agree with his colleagues
and submitted a minority report on the same date. The texts of the award and minority
report may be found in full elsewhere in this report.
On October 25th, a secret ballot of the employees affected was taken, with an official of
the Department of Labour present, on the question: " Are you in favour of accepting the
award of the Board of Arbitration designated by Order in Council to inquire into the dispute
between the Woman's Bakery, Limited, and the employees of the Woman's Bakery? "
Thirteen employees voted. Twelve marked their ballots " Yes "; one marked a ballot
" No."    There were no ballots spoiled.
On October 31st, the management of the bakery rejected the award of the Board.
As a result, the employees of the bakery struck November 11th. Eleven of the thirteen
employees striking were immediately replaced by other workers.
While there has been no notification of the cessation of the strike, employment conditions
are believed to be no longer affected.
(See " Boards of Arbitration, No. 4.")
Metal Stamp and Die Workers, Vancouver.
No. 5.—During October and early November representations were made by the officials
of the Union of whom the employees of the firm concerned were members. A Union agreement covering wages and hours was requested. Some difficulty was experienced by the management in obtaining approval by its principals for the arrangement of a meeting with representatives of the employees.    In the interim (November 17th) the men ceased work.
Upon application by the employer a Conciliation Commission was issued and the employees were advised that their action was contrary to the provisions of the " Industrial
Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and that they should return to work pending a settlement
of the dispute.
The employees therefore recommenced work November 19th and negotiations thereafter
proceeded.
On February 7th, 1939, a Union agreement covering wages, hours, and Union recognition
was signed and made effective as from January 3rd, 1939.    Settlement favoured the employees.
Welders, Vancouver.
No. 6.—Welders employed by a Vancouver firm struck November 30th to protect the rate
of $1.12% per hour, which they claimed was the fair-wage rate for members of their craft
engaged on field-work.    These men were being paid $1 per hour.
The matter was investigated by an official of the Department and the men were informed
that such a strike was a contravention of the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act." They were advised to return to work pending negotiation, and did so
December 1st.
Following continued investigation it was ascertained that the established wage-rate for
welders employed on field-work in Vancouver and adjacent municipalities for the year 1938
was $1 per hour. This information was conveyed to the secretary of the Union involved, who
acknowledged the information secured was specific and satisfactory to the Union of which he
was an officer.
OTHER DISPUTES.
Retail Store Clerks, Vancouver.
Ten employees of one company operating several retail stores in Vancouver were dismissed without notice June 13th. The management claimed that it wished to employ female
help and thus reduce overhead. These men had joined the Retail Clerks International Protective Association, and as a result of negotiations between the management and the Union the majority of these employees were reinstated June 20th and a Union agreement signed.
Sixty man-days were lost.    The outcome of the dispute was favourable to the employees.
Mercury-miners, Bridge River.
On August 18th, on instructions from his head office, the superintendent at the mine
advised the miners that wages would be reduced from $5.40 to $5 per day. It was explained
the reduction was made to conform with base-metal rates. The miners refused to accept the
reduction and were paid off. A new crew was hired and work was resumed August 20th. Ten
men were affected and thirty man-days lost. The outcome of the dispute was favourable to
the employer.
Fishermen (Salmon Purse-seiners), Johnstone Strait District.
This dispute involved fishermen at Alert Bay in the Johnstone Strait district. The men
demanded an increase in the price of chums from 8 cents to 12 cents per pound. Operations
ceased September 16th but commenced again October 3rd, when operators agreed to pay 10
cents per pound in this area and established prices in other areas along the coast. Agreements were signed between the Pacific Coast Fishermen's Union and the Salmon Purse-seiners
Union and the operators. About 500 fishermen were involved in this stoppage, and 5,000
man-days lost.    The outcome of the dispute was favourable to the fishermen.
Fishermen (Herring Gill-netters), Vancouver District.
Forty-five herring gill-net fishermen ceased operations November 4th, demanding recognition of their Union by fish-buyers and an agreement covering sales and prices for gill-net fish.
An agreement with the Union was later signed to the satisfaction of the men, who resumed
fishing November 23rd. Approximately 675 man-days were lost. The outcome was favourable to the fishermen.
II. CONCILIATION.
Amongst the most important work done in connection with the administration of the Act
is that of mediation and conciliation. Twenty Conciliation Commissions were authorized by
the Minister during the year. The work undertaken by the Commissioners in these disputes
has been summarized hereunder.
In addition, numerous complaints by organizations and individuals were referred to
officials of the Departments for mediation and adjustment. These were not deemed to be of
sufficient gravity to warrant the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.
Several of these complaints did not come within the scope of the Act or were caused by
actions done prior to the enactment of the statute. In the majority of cases the officials to
whom complaints, with which the Department could deal were referred, were successful in
making satisfactory adjustments.
RECORD OF CONCILIATION.
Restaurant Employees, Vancouver.
No. 1.—Two employees of a Vancouver restaurant communicated with the Minister
January 12th, declaring that they had been dismissed from their employment because they
had joined the Union. Two female employees of the same restaurant were also dismissed
about the same time.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed January 25th, who was informed by the
employer that one of the employees had been dismissed on account of insubordination and the
other three because of slackness of business.
Following representations by the Conciliation Commissioner, three of these employees
were reinstated in another cafe controlled by the Company.
Truck-drivers, Vancouver.
No. 2.—Truck-drivers in Vancouver complained that they were endeavouring to make an
agreement with various fuel companies in that city, and that they could not do so since the
management of these companies refused to meet them.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed January 25th.    On April 4th the employers
notified the employees' representatives that the time was unsuitable to enter into any agreement as they were doubtful as to what regulations might be passed by the Fuel Commission.
0 P 82 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Disputants requested that negotiations be suspended meanwhile and reopened October
3rd, 1938. On that date the matter was again postponed and negotiations deferred. Eventually, the employees asked that the application for a commissioner be terminated. This was
done March 11th, 1939.
Lime-workers, Blubber Bay.
Nos. 3, U, 5, and 7.—Differences between the management of the Pacific Lime Company,
at Blubber Bay, and the employees of the Company at this point were first brought to the
attention of the Department in January, 1938. On that occasion, and again in February, a
Conciliation Commissioner journeyed to the plant and was successful in maintaining the continuance of harmonious relations. On March 7th a strike occurred, though the men returned
to work when the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" were
explained to them. On March 21st more trouble arose, when the Company found itself unable
to accept the provisions of an agreement presented by the men. The Conciliation Commissioner again endeavoured to bring disputants to an amicable agreement but was eventually,
with reluctance, forced to recommend that the dispute be submitted to arbitration.
A Board of Arbitration was therefore designated by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
and hearings were held at Blubber Bay and in Vancouver, concluding on May 11th. Though
the Board submitted a unanimous award, which is to be found in full elsewhere in this Report,
the men rejected its acceptance by secret ballot and a strike was called June 2nd.
From this brief resume, the reader may more fully understand the detailed outline which
follows.
On January 29th representations were made to the Minister of Labour by the president
of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union at Blubber Bay, that the Company was endeavouring to force upon the employees a committee, chosen by the Company, against the wishes
of the majority of the employees.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed, who proceeded to Blubber Bay where a
meeting of the employees was held. A ballot was taken and the workers designated their
choice of a committee to represent them.
On February 24th application was again made for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner by the employees at Blubber Bay. Union officials alleged six cases of discrimination by the Company due to union activity.
A Conciliation Commissioner again journeyed to the plant. It was found that three of
the men about whom complaints had been laid did not come within scope of the Act, since they
had been laid off prior to December 10th, 1937, the date on which the statute became law.
The Company agreed to rotate the other three men, thus eliminating cause for complaint.
On March 7th workers at Blubber Bay called a strike without recourse to the Act. Disputants were immediately informed strike action contravened the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
Three days later (March 10th) the Minister of Labour appointed a Conciliation Commissioner, pursuant to section 12 of the Act, who proceeded to Blubber Bay forthwith.
The men had submitted an agreement to the Company, containing thirty-two demands, in
which they asked:—■
(1.) That the Company recognize the Union as the sole bargaining agency as between
themselves and the Company.
(2.)  That the Company employ Union men only.
(3.) That the Company agree to re-employ all men on the pay-roll July 23rd, 1937.
(This was the date of a prior strike.)
(4.) That the minimum wage be 45 cents per hour with a 10-per-cent. raise in the
higher brackets.
(5.) That 75 cents an hour be paid for boat-loading, with time and one-half paid for
Sundays and legal holidays.
The Conciliation Commissioner held a meeting of all employees at Blubber Bay on March
11th, and reported that after he had fully explained the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" to them that they expressed a desire to return to work, and
resume negotiations with the Company in accordance with the provisions of the statute.
On March 21st, the president of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union at Blubber
Bay wired the Minister of Labour that the Company was deliberately provoking the men to REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 83
take action by hiring men from other points while local men were without work. He asked
for the immediate appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner to prevent strike action. He
was informed that any attempt to strike would be met by prosecution and that the application
for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner should be made on the requisite forms.
Application was subsequently properly made, and a Conciliation Commissioner was
appointed March 25th and proceeded to Blubber Bay.    On this occasion the men declared:—
(1.) That the Company had refused to accept the proposed agreement or any of the main
clauses submitted by the employees.
(2.) That the Company had rejected twenty-eight of the thirty-two demands made by
the majority of the employees.
(3.) That the Company had abrogated the custom of years' standing in refusing to
re-employ men laid off during the slack period.
(4.) That the Company had used Chinese labour exclusively while white labour was
available for quarry-work.
(5.) That the Company had abrogated a verbal agreement to rotate men in all departments.
The Conciliation Commissioner reported that the Company would not accept the demands
made by the employees in the agreement which had been submitted, namely:—
(1.)  That the Lumber and Sawmill Workers be the sole collective bargaining agency.
(2.)   That all men on the pay-roll July 23rd, 1937, be re-employed.
(3.) That the minimum wage be 45 cents an hour, with a 10-per-cent. raise in the higher
brackets.
(4.) That those engaged in boat-loading be paid 75 cents per hour and time and one-half
for overtime and holidays.
(5.)   That the principle of rotation throughout the plant be enforced.
(6.) That no summary discharges be effective until investigated by the employees'
committee.
He therefore recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration and, as described,
the Board held hearings at Blubber Bay and Vancouver, returning a unanimous award at the
conclusion of its sittings on May 11th. The Board was composed of His Honour Judge J.
Charles Mcintosh, chairman; Mr. R. E. Williams, representing the Company; and Mr. Frank
Leigh, representing the employees.
Under the terms of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" each party must
agree to the terms of an award before it is enforceable. This provision was inserted in the
Act in deference to the views of organized labour, which was antagonistic to the view-point
that strikes should be entirely prohibited.
Pursuant, therefore, to section 44 of the Act, the question of the acceptance or rejection
of the award was submitted to the employees of the Company at Blubber Bay on May 18th.
The vote was supervised by two officials of the Department of Labour appointed for that
purpose by the Minister of Labour. Because the majority of the employees affected by the
dispute were Chinese, a Chinese interpreter accompanied these officials. The award of the
Board was translated into the Chinese language and copies hung upon the walls of the bunk-
houses occupied by Chinese workmen. The award was also read in the English and Chinese
languages at a meeting called for that purpose in the Blubber Bay school-house.
Following the meeting, a vote of all employees on the pay-roll as at March 25th, 1938
(the date on which the original dispute arose), was held on the following question, which was
printed on the official ballots: " Are you in favour of accepting the award of the Board of
Arbitration designated by Order in Council to inquire into the dispute between the Pacific
Lime Company, Limited, and the employees of the Pacific Lime Company, Limited? "
The number of employees entitled to vote totalled 120; those balloting totalled 109; those
marking their ballots " Yes " totalled 23; those marking their ballots " No " totalled 79.
There were 7 spoiled ballots.    Seventy Chinese voted.
On the same day the manager and treasurer of the Company, Mr. P. J. Maw, advised the
Minister that the Company was willing to accept the findings of the Board of Arbitration in
respect to the dispute at Blubber Bay. P 84 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
On May 24th the members of the Union (Lumber and Sawmill Workers, Local 1-163,
I.W.A.) decided "that unless they could arrive at some amicable understanding with the
Company by 8 a.m., Thursday, June 2nd, they would refuse to go to work."
Mr. J. Hole, secretary of the Union, thereafter requested any assistance the Department
of Labour could give the men in reaching an understanding with the Company.
Under the provisions of the Act, fourteen days must elapse from the date of taking the
vote before a strike or lockout can legally take place. During this interval Judge Mcintosh,
accompanied by an official of the Department of Labour and a Chinese interpreter, journeyed
to Blubber Bay at the Minister's request. Mr. H. I. Bird, solicitor, represented the Company, and Mr. Hole the employees in the discussions that followed. Unfortunately, no basis
of settlement was discovered.
The employees, members of the Lumber and Sawmill Workers, Local 1-163, struck June
2nd, as they were legally entitled to do. These workers numbered eighty-three, of which
fifty-one were Chinese. A sufficient number of men remained at their jobs to allow the Company to carry on operations.
It was reported that employment conditions were no longer affected October 31st, 1938.
In the intervening period of time, active but unsuccessful endeavours have been made to
bring the disputants to an amicable understanding, and in these efforts, notably in October,
1938, and January-February, 1939, Judge Mcintosh played a prominent part.
A disturbance on the Blubber Bay dock, involving strikers, pickets, Company employees,
and police, in September resulted in a series of prosecutions which were before the Courts
until January.
The Provincial Department of Labour has done everything possible to deal with this
dispute in a manner helpful to the disputants.
The Minister has, on two occasions, received a request from the employees of the Company who did not strike, asking permission under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" to elect a new committee, contending that the old does not represent
the employees. The Minister has taken the position that he cannot agree to such procedure
until he is satisfied that the dispute has been satisfactorily settled.
The action of the employees in rejecting the unanimous award of the Board of Arbitration and the subsequent failure of the disputants to reach a settlement, when brought together
by the Department, exhausted governmental powers under the Act.
While the Department is willing, under any circumstances, to give its assistance and to
bring about an understanding between employer and employee, in this case it has been shown
that it could not have done more in endeavouring to reach a settlement.
Factory-workers, Vancouver.
No. 6.—On March 5th the secretary of the employees' committee of a Vancouver factory
addressed a communication to the Minister of Labour, informing him that certain men had
been discharged, allegedly because they had been members of this committee.
Following proper application by the factory and yard employees a Conciliation Commissioner was appointed March 14th. The Commissioner called a meeting of all employees from
all branches of the establishment.
At this meeting a committee was named to represent the employees; and this committee,
acting on instructions from the meeting, formulated an agreement as between the employees'
association and the Company, which was satisfactory to the majority of the workers.
Laundry-workers, Victoria.
No. 8.—On March 29th the employees of two laundries in Victoria made application for
the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner. They pointed out that they had submitted
an agreement to the management of these establishments requesting, amongst other things,
higher wages, a 5%-day week, Union recognition, and holidays with pay. The employers, in
both cases, refused to consider such an agreement.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed April 2nd. The employees of one laundry
decided to let matters drop, after hearing their employer; those of the other establishment
agreed to allow matters to stand in abeyance until certain verbal guarantees made by the
directors, satisfactory to them, had been implemented. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 85
Glass-workers, Vancouver.
No. 9.—On April 6th applications were received from the employees of eight Vancouver
glass-working concerns, requesting the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.
The applications declared the men were asking 85 cents an hour for journeymen shopmen,
but that employers were only willing to pay 70 cents per hour.
A Conciliation Commissioner was appointed April 9th. He was able to bring all disputants to an amicable understanding. Agreements were signed, guaranteeing a 40-hour
week, an 8-hour day, a minimum wage scale based upon classifications of from 60 cents to
85 cents an hour, double time for overtime, and a satisfactory scale for apprentices.
Pole Camp Employees, Fernie.
No. 10.—Formal application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner was
made by employees at a pole camp in the vicinity of Fernie, April 7th. A Commissioner was
appointed the next day.
The men demanded a wage increase on piece-work on cedar poles and shingles, and asked
that cutters be not held responsible for any road-building or slash-burning.
Following investigations by the Commissioner, an agreement was signed which brought
about a substantial wage increase and improved working conditions.
Bakery-workers, Vancouver.
No. 11.—In May, a month prior to the termination of an agreement with a certain Vancouver bakery, the employees affected requested a new Union agreement, containing a closed-
shop clause. They also asked an increase in wages. The management of the concern
declared it could not comply with these demands and the matter was referred to a Conciliation
Commissioner on May 28th.
The Commissioner found the number of employees requesting the services of a conciliator
did not constitute the majority of the employees affected. He therefore recommended that
dispute be not proceeded with. His commission was terminated June 23rd, following withdrawal of the application by the representative of the employees.
Bakery Salesmen, Vancouver.
No. 12.—Application was made by bakery salesmen for the services of a Conciliation
Commissioner May 4th. Spokesmen for these employees declared that the management of a
certain Vancouver bakery had refused to sign an agreement for the ensuing year.
The Conciliation Commissioner was successful in bringing disputants together. They
agreed to certain amendments in the original agreement allowing two weeks' holiday without
pay, on request, and without change in the status of employees.
Dairy Employees, Fraser Valley.
No. 13.—On May 4th meetings of the employees of a Fraser Valley dairy were held at
Abbotsford and Chilliwack, and thereafter applications were made for the appointment of a
Conciliation Commissioner. These applications set forth that the employees had submitted
a proposed agreement covering wages and conditions, but they had not been successful in
continuing negotiations with the management.
A Conciliation Commissioner was thereafter appointed, who reported that he had been
officially informed by representatives of the dairy management, and also of the employees,
that no settlement could be reached owing to the refusal of the Company to sign an agreement with the Union, which was representative of the majority of the employees. He therefore recommended that the matter be referred to arbitration.
(See " Boards of Arbitration, No. 2.")
Theatre Employee, North Vancouver.
No. 14.—On May 26th an employee of a North Vancouver theatre informed the Minister
that he had named two officers of the trade-union to which he belonged to bargain on his
behalf with his employer, and that he had instructed them to apply for a Conciliation Commissioner on his behalf. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Two days later one of the officials chosen as representative by the employee informed the
Minister that the wages paid the employee were below the minimum; that the man had been
employed for a period during which no wages were paid; that he had later been dismissed;
and that the employer refused to negotiate with the committee from the Union.
A Conciliation Commissioner was therefore appointed, and after thoroughly investigating
the matter reported no dispute existed. The employee, he found, had been dismissed because
of a recession of business, and the Union committee failed to submit evidence which would
prove the existence of a dispute in accordance with the provisions of the Act. It was found,
however, that the employer was in arrears to complainant, and these arrears were ordered
paid.
Hospital Employees, Vancouver.
No. 15.—On April 15th the male lay employees of a Vancouver hospital placed a suggested scale of wages before the directorate of the institution, affecting practically all male
lay employees with the exception of the office staff.
Since the hospital could not see its way clear to grant these increases, the men applied
for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner. In his report this officer pointed out that
disputants had failed to agree upon a settlement of a proposed scale of wages, the restoration
of two weeks' holiday, and a restoration of the wage scale of 1931-32 applied to engineers and
firemen, plumbers and pipe-fitters, electricians and splint-men. He therefore recommended
the matter be referred to arbitration.
(See " Boards of Arbitration, No. 3.")
Operating Engineers, Vancouver.
No. 16.—On June 21st a dispute between two operating engineers and the management
of the bakery by whom they were employed was apprehended by the Minister pursuant to
sections 12 and 13 of the Act.    This dispute involved wages and a Union agreement.
On July 28th the Conciliation Commissioner was able to report that as a result of negotiations between disputants a Union agreement had been signed covering hours, conditions,
wages, overtime, and holidays with pay.
The matter was thus satisfactorily settled.
Bakery-workers, Vancouver.
No. 17.—A dispute between certain bakery-workers in Vancouver and their employer was
apprehended by the Minister, July 29th, pursuant to sections 12 and 13 of the Act. It was
alleged that there was discrimination shown to Union employees and that a feeling of unrest
existed due to the employment of young workmen in relation to the number of journeymen
bakers.
Following continuous negotiation, the Conciliation Commissioner reported on September
12th that the parties to the dispute had failed to agree upon a settlement.
The employees demanded:—
(1.)  A closed-shop agreement.
(2.) Specified hourly and weekly wage-rates, in many cases an increase over that being
paid.
(3.)   A certain ratio of unskilled labour to journeymen.
(4.)  A specified wage-rate for jobbers.
Since there was no common ground between disputants, the matter was referred to
arbitration on the recommendation of the Commissioner.
(jSee " Boards of Arbitration, No. 4.")
Carpenters, Vancouver.
No. 18.—On August 10th application was made by officers of the Vancouver, New Westminster, and District Council of Carpenters for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner.
It was claimed that certain contractors in Vancouver were paying carpenters on two jobs in
Vancouver at the rate of 80 cents an hour, which was said to be 10 cents an hour less than the
fair wage. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 87
The Conciliation Commissioner, following investigation, informed the Minister that the
employees affected had accepted an offer made by the employers through the General Contractors' Association, which was to be signed and to become effective on the same date as a
minimum wage order was gazetted by the Board of Industrial Relations setting a minimum
rate of 75 cents per hour for carpenters employed in Vancouver and adjacent municipalities.
In the interim, it was agreed by both parties that where 90 cents an hour was being paid
the rate would remain unchanged, and where carpenters were paid 80 cents per hour the rate
of 85 cents per hour would apply as from September 1st.
(The minimum wage for carpenters set by the Board of Industrial Relations became
effective November 7th, 1938.)
Joinery Employees, Victoria.
No. 19.—Following unsuccessful attempts to have their wages increased from 60 cents to
80 cents per hour, joiners in two Victoria plants made application for a Conciliation Commissioner on September 23rd.
In order to bring the matter to a satisfactory conclusion it was deemed advisable to
extend the powers of the Conciliation Commissioner to include joiners in all woodworking
plants in Victoria.
The Commissioner held a meeting of interested employers and employees in the office of
the Deputy Minister, September 28th. He was asked to bring to the attention of the Minister
these facts:—
(1.) That owing to the competition of the lower mainland it was impossible to pay a
higher wage to the joiners as this would mean a further handicap to Victoria employers.
(2.) That if a minimum wage was set that included the mainland the Victoria employers
were not opposed to paying a higher scale, providing the scale applied to other employers in
the same competitive area.
(3.) That the Conciliation Commissioner attempt to obtain reliable information regarding the wages paid joiners in Vancouver.
It is understood further action in this dispute is pending.
Firemen, Prince Rupert.
No. 20.—During August, members of the Prince Rupert fire department drew to the
attention of the Department of Labour a number of grievances they declared they had with
the city. These included demands for the continuation of two weeks' annual vacation, restoration of higher salaries, the supply of uniforms annually, and Union recognition.
It was not until December 6th, however, that formal application was made for a Conciliation officer. The Commissioner proceeded to Prince Rupert forthwith. After investigation he was instrumental in having a satisfactory agreement signed between the City
Commissioner and the firemen, covering an increase in wages and two weeks' annual vacation with pay.
III. BOARDS OF ARBITRATION.
Four Boards of Arbitration were appointed, pursuant to the provisions of the " Industrial
Conciliation and Arbitration Act," during 1938.    .
Inquiry was made by these Boards into disputes between the Pacific Lime Company,
Limited, and Its Employees; The Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association and Its Employees at the Sardis and Delair plants; The Woman's Bakery, Limited, and Its Bakery and
Confectionery Employees; and The Vancouver General Hospital and Its Male Lay Employees.
In the cases of the Pacific Lime Company, Limited, and the Vancouver General Hospital
unanimous awards of the Boards concerned were returned. In the case of The Fraser Valley
Milk Producers' Association and the Woman's Bakery, Limited, majority awards were
returned, with the employer's representatives making minority reports in each case.
The complete texts of the various awards, reports, and schedules thereto follow. Following the text, where necessary, attention is directed to the negotiations which preceded the
appointment of the Board.    Details of the sequel to each award are also noted. P 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
No. 1, 1938.
"INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between Pacific Lime Company, Limited, Employer, and Pacific Lime Company,
Limited, Employees.
Award of the Board of Arbitration.
To the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
We, J. C. Mcintosh (Chairman), Frank Leigh, and R. D. Williams, designated by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council as a Board of Arbitration in the matter of the above-mentioned dispute and for the purposes of this Act, have carefully investigated into the said
dispute and all matters affecting the merits and right settlement thereof, and have heard the
evidence adduced by and the representations made on behalf of the parties to the dispute, and
we find and determine as follows:—
The Board held sessions and public hearings at Vancouver, April 29th; at Blubber Bay,
May 4th and 5th; and again at Vancouver, May 7th, 10th, and 11th, 1938; and evidence
heard and taken from the parties to the dispute; and the Board also made an intimate inspection of the plant, operation and premises of the Company at Blubber Bay.
The questions in dispute consist of nine clauses of an agreement of thirty-two clauses
sought to be concluded between the parties by the Conciliation Commissioner, a copy of which
is attached hereto.
The questions in dispute as submitted to the Board, clauses 1 and 2 of the said agreement, the Board finds that the right of the employees to organize as they see fit, for lawful
purposes, is provided by section 4 of the Act.
It is suggested, however, that two committees be set up: (1) A General Grievance Committee, to be composed of one member elected by the present unionized employees and one
elected by the group of non-union employees; in the former case the member elected shall not
be a member of the executive of the union organization. These, together with a representative of the employers, shall form the Grievance Committee, which shall meet on a set day each
week without fail, to dispose of any small dispute or incidents which have arisen.
(2) A Negotiating Committee, which shall consist of two members of the unionized
employees—namely, the president or secretary and one other—and an elected member of the
unorganized employees, none of whom shall be members of the Grievance Committee. These,
together with the general manager and plant superintendent of the employers, shall form the
committee.
This committee of five shall meet at least once a month, or oftener if necessary, to dispose of any matters which the Grievance Committee fails to solve and all matters affecting
the general working conditions and the welfare of the organization, including the employees
and employer.
Clause 3 of the said agreement:—Section 7 (1) of the Act reads: " Any person who by
intimidati-n, threat of loss of position or employment, or by actual loss of position or employment, or by any other threat, seeks to compel any person to join or refrain from joining any
organization or to refrain from becoming an officer of any association shall be guilty of an
offence, and liable to a fine of not more than five hundred dollars."
The Board recommends that the Company re-employ employees who were on the pay-roll
at July 23rd, 1937, and who were at Blubber Bay or available, and thus remove any suspicion
that any discrimination was exercised as set out in above section.
Clause 4 of the said agreement: The Board recommends that the employees be paid a
minimum wage of 40 cents an hour through the entire operation, and the wages of employees
shall be equalized in accordance with the services rendered.
Clause 5 of the said agreements—Boat loading: The Board recommends that employees
be paid at the rate of 75 cents an hour for the first eight hours' time, with time and one-half
for work done on Sundays and holidays. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 89
Clause 6 of the said agreements—Boat loading: The Board recommends that the superintendent of the Company employ such men as are available.
Clauses 7 and 8 of the said agreement: The Board recommends that employees be given
work in their respective departments in accordance with their seniority of employment.
Clause 16 of the said agreement: The Board recommends that when an employee is
transferred from one department for the convenience of the employer for a period of four
hours or less, he shall not suffer any loss of pay.
Clause 18 of the said agreement: The Board recommends that, without restricting the
rights of the employers as provided in section 8 of the Act, the machinery set up in this report
under Clause 1 shall be invoked so that possible injustice may be avoided.
The Board is pleased to know that the Company is installing showers, and it is suggested
that the Company give consideration to further sanitary improvements around the Chinese
quarter.
It was observed that there is considerable debris around the lip of the deep quarry. It
is recommended that a cleaning-up gang be set to work to remove possible hazards arising
from this situation, and care be taken to prevent the overflow of rock from the bunkers.
The Board has been impressed with the Company's statement that relations prevailing
between the men were of a happy and satisfactory nature. The Board hopes that this atmosphere may be maintained and cultivated, and that the Company shall do its utmost not to
confine wages to the minimum but to improve the workmen's position as much as possible.
The proposed agreement which gave rise to this arbitration consisted of thirty-two
clauses. Those in dispute have already been dealt with and the remainder—namely, clauses
9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31—have been disposed
of by agreement.
Clause 15 of the said agreement: While the Board is disinclined to make a ruling, it is
recommended that the Company give favourable consideration to the request for the use of
the hall at any reasonable time for any lawful purpose.
The foregoing, to the best of our knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the
matters of dispute placed before us as a Board of Arbitration.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
Frank Leigh, Member.
R. D. Williams, Member.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of May, 1938.
Agreement.
The following is the proposed agreement to which reference is made in the third paragraph of the award of the Board of Arbitration, ante:—
In this proposed agreement, unless the context otherwise requires, " Company " hereafter means
Pacific Lime Company. " Employees " hereafter means the employees of the Pacific Lime Company or
the majority of them.
Clause 1.—That the Pacific Lime Company recognize the Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union as
the sole collective bargaining agency of their employees.
Clause 2.—That the Pacific Lime Company employ Union men only.
Clause 3.—That the Pacific Lime Company agrees to re-employ all employees who were on the
pay-roll on July' 23rd, 1937, if available and when required.
Clause 4.—That the minimum wage for both whites and Orientals be forty-five cents per hour, with
a ten-per-cent. raise in the higher brackets.
Clause 5.—Boat loading: Seventy-five cents per hour from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Time and one-half
from 5 p.m. to 8 a.m. Time and one-half for work on Sundays and legal holidays. Crews to consist of
fifty per cent, white and fifty per cent. Oriental labour when available.
Clause 6.—Boat loading must be rotated and unemployed men used when available.
Clause 7.—Rotation of employees in their respective departments at such times as will benefit the
employees.    This clause to be effective at all times.
Clause 8.—Rotation of whites and Orientals to be on an equal basis.
Clause 9.—That wages be paid twice a month and in cash.
Clause 10.—No deductions for store bills from wages.
Clause 11.—Company store prices to be held down to ten per cent, profit and invoices to be available to any employee who is purchasing, on the said employee's demand.
Clause 12.—Lists of unfair products to be posted in the store of the Company. Such lists to be
obtained from the Trades and Labour Council, Vancouver. Any product on the unfair list not to be
offered for sale in the Company's store. P 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Clause IS.—Time and one-half for all employees with the exception of engineers and firemen, after
five p.m. on week-days.    Sundays and legal holidays to be paid at time and one-half at any hour.
Clause 14-—That a functioning safety committee be appointed with at least fifty per cent. Union
representation.
Clause 15.—Use of the recreation hall for Union meetings at nominal rental of one dollar per
meeting.
Clause 16.—When an employee is transferred temporarily from one job to another, the employee
shall draw the higher wage-scale.
Clause 17.—No employee shall be permitted to work on two or more part-time jobs when a
qualified laid-off employee is available for one of these jobs. This clause shall be effective in all departments at all times.    Maintenance men excepted.
Clause 18.—No summary discharges to take full effect until the employees' committee has had an
inquiry relating to the facts of such discharges.
Clause 19.—That the Company use a reliable timepiece with which to regulate the blowing of the
works whistle. The aforesaid timepiece not to be regulated between the hours of seven a.m. and
five p.m.
Clause 20.—That notification of Sunday work be posted twenty-four hours ahead of such Sunday.
Clause 21.—Hours of work must be posted in a conspicuous place in each department. Time to be
allowed for men on dirty or dusty work to clean themselves.
Clause 22.—Any proposed change of hours or wages must be posted in a conspicuous place twenty-
four hours ahead of the proposed change.
Clause 23.—Overnight notice must be given in any department which does not intend to operate
the following day. Failure to give such notice shall entitle such employees in that particular department to a full day's pay if they report for work on that particular day.
Clause 24.—No office staff or foremen to be present at employees' meetings on grounds of moral
intimidation.
Clause 25.—All employees' meetings to be called only by the duly elected committee, and such meetings to be presided over by the elected chairman and secretary.
Clause 26.—That bath-houses with lockers and heating facilities be erected for Chinese as well as
white employees, and a janitor be employed to look after the same.
Clause 27.—That the Company provide a place for workmen to eat their lunches, equipped with
tables and benches.
Clause 28.—That the Company, for the protection of the engineers, place a notice at each power
plant prohibiting all persons from the boiler-houses except on business.
Clause 29.—That the school-grounds be kept for recreation purposes only, and not used as a
wood-yard, as these grounds were cleared by voluntary labour.
Clause 30.—Any breach of this agreement will result in immediate cessation of work.
Clause 31.—Discrimination of any nature will be regarded as a breach of this agreement.
Clause 32.—This agreement can be terminated by either party giving thirty days' notice in writing.
Or this agreement may be terminated immediately by the consent of both parties.
Signed:
President:   J. Hole.
Secretary:  F. Leigh.
Local No. 1-163 Lumber and Sawmill
Workers Union, I.W.A.
(Note.—Further details of this dispute may be found under the heading " Lime-workers,
Blubber Bay," in that section of this report devoted* to the description of conciliation-work.
Elsewhere in this report, the number of points of the agreement in dispute is given as
six; in the award of the Board they are given as nine. The discrepancy is explained by the
fact that three additional points of dispute were brought to the attention of the Board during
the time it sat for the taking of evidence.)
No. 2, 1938.
"INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association, Employer, and their
Employees at the Sardis and Delair Plants.
Award of the Board of Arbitration.
To the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
We, F. M. Clement (Chairman) and Edward A. Jamieson, designated by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council as a Board of Arbitration in the matter of the above-mentioned dispute REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 91
and for the purposes of this Act, have carefully investigated into the said dispute and all
matters affecting the merits and right settlement thereof, and have heard the evidence
adduced by and the representations made on behalf of the parties to the dispute, and we find
and determine as follows:—
Meetings of the Board were held in Vancouver, July 20th and 21st, in the Hall Building;
July 22nd, in the Court-house, Vancouver; July 25th, in the Council Chambers, Chilliwack;
and July 26th, 27th, and 28th, in the Court-house, Vancouver.
The findings of the Board are set forth in the statement attached hereto, which is in the
nature of a proposed agreement submitted for the signatures of the parties to the dispute.
The foregoing, to the best of our knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the
matters of dispute placed before us as a Board of Arbitration on the twentieth day of July,
1938.
F. M. Clement, Chairman.
Edward A. Jamieson, Member.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 28th day of July, 1938.
Agreement.
This agreement entered into between the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association of British
Columbia, in so far as the Sardis and Delair plants are concerned, and the Milk Drivers' and Dairy
Employees' Union, Local No. 464, of British Columbia.
It is mutually agreed:—
1. In consideration of the Company agreeing to the clause known as the " monthly check off " the
Union hereby agrees that should any of its members defraud, abscond, or cheat the Company out of its
just moneys that the same will be paid out of the Union's funds within five (5) days of the Union
being notified in writing of such defalcation. The Company agrees to supply such information as is
necessary to prosecute such member.
2. All employees must become and remain members of Local 464 within fourteen (14) days of commencement of their employment with the Company. All employees shall receive and sign for a copy
of this agreement and thereby authorize the Company to deduct and pay over to the secretary of Local
464 any monthly dues, or death assessments levied in accordance with the Union's by-laws, owing by
them to the said local. Owing to the nature of the Association's operations it is recognized that at
certain periods of the year the Company must engage a number of extra employees. It is agreed that
these extra employees shall be exempt from the provisions of this agreement for a period of ninety
days; if after this period they shall be placed in any of the classifications covered by this agreement
they shall receive its protection.
3. The employer reserves the right to discharge any employee for any of the following disqualifications: Drunkenness, dishonesty, incompetency, absence without leave, smoking or drinking intoxicating
liquors while on duty. The employees shall provide their own working apparel and shall present a
clean and tidy appearance as immediate circumstances permit or require. The employer agrees to
supply aprons, gloves, and boots to those employees whose particular work requires same.
4. No workman shall be discharged or discriminated against for upholding Union by-laws; no man
who acts on behalf of the Union or who serves on a committee shall lose his position or be discriminated against for that reason.
5. In case of accidents or breakdowns resulting in loss or damage to the Company the men shall be
given a fair hearing before any finding is made.
6. The Union agrees at all times as far as in its power to further the interests of the employer.
7. All employees shall receive seven (7) days' notice before being discharged unless for reasons
provided for in section 3 of this agreement.    Employees shall give employers the same notice.
8. If there is any breakdown of the machinery beyond the control of the employer he shall not be
compelled to pay overtime, provided as follows: The men shall be notified to lay off during the anticipated time it will take to repair any breakdown; any men kept standing by shall be paid overtime,
providing such standing by causes them to work longer than the stipulated eight (8) hours. No lay off
is to be less than a period of two (2) hours.
9. Any employee working 60 per cent, of his or her time at any of the classified occupations shall
receive the highest scale specified for such work.
10. It is further agreed by the employer that employees will not be asked to make any written or
verbal agreement which may conflict with this agreement.
11. Pay days will be on the 5th and 20th days of each month. When a pay day comes on a Sunday or
statutory holiday employees shall be paid the day previous. When a pay day comes on an employee's
day off he shall have the privilege of getting his cheque the day before.
12. (a.) At Delair: The wages at the Delair plant shall be the wages now paid by the Company;
that is, the wages being paid as at July 26th, 1938, and subject only to such minor adjustments as shall
be acceptable to the management of the Company.
(b.) At Sardis: The wages at the Sardis plant shall be the wages now paid by the Company; that
is, the wages being paid as at July 26th, 1938, and subject only to such minor adjustments as shall be
acceptable to the management of the Company. (c.) It is further agreed that should the price of butter-fat as determined by the annual settling
rate of the Company figured on the same basis as it is now figured advance to 45 cents a pound butter-
fat f.o.b. Vancouver, the scale of wages shall be advanced in the next succeeding year to that prevailing
in October, 1932;   that is, the scale in effect following the first general reduction in wages.
(d.) It is further agreed that if during the period of this agreement the price of butter-fat as
determined by the annual settling rate of the Company figured on the same basis as the settling rate
is now figured advance to 50 cents a pound f.o.b. Vancouver, the schedule of wages shall be advanced
in the next succeeding year to the level prevailing before July, 1931; that is, before any general
reductions were made.
(e.) A Grievance Committee of three shall be elected for each plant and the Company officials shall
be instructed to meet this committee and endeavour to adjust any grievance that may exist.
(/.) Hours of work shall be forty-eight (48) hours per week for all employees covered by this
agreement.
(g.)  All employees of three years' service shall receive an annual holiday of one week with pay.
(h.) It is mutually agreed that in the event of any of the present employees being discharged for
anything outside of dishonesty they shall have the right of appealing their case to the management
through the officials of the Union.
(i.) All employees of three years' service or more than three years' service shall be entitled to six
days' sick leave in any one year without loss of pay, provided always that any such employee shall,
when called upon to do so, provide both the Company and the Union with proof of such sickness.
13. All employees will be given a slip with all pay cheques showing the amount, and what for, if
any deductions.
14. When an employee meets with an accident, providing he has worked fifty-one (51) per cent, of
his day, he shall be paid the full wages for the day of the accident.
15. It is mutually agreed that there shall be no cessation of work or lockouts and that there shall
be no sympathetic strikes during the term that this agreement shall be in force.
16. Whenever any controversy arises between the employer and the Union over this agreement the
men shall continue to work and the controversy shall, if possible, be adjusted between the representatives of the employer and the representatives of the Union. If said controversy cannot be adjusted it
shall then be submitted to arbitration. Said arbitration board shall consist of one representative of
the employer and one representative of the Union and these two representatives shall select a third
party who must be a disinterested person, and a decision of any two members of this board shall be
final and binding and both parties shall abide thereby. Said board shall meet in not less than five (5)
days after the request has been made.
17. In the event of a single agency being established under the " Lower Mainland Dairy Products
Board " or some other action being taken by that Board by which the financial, business, or administrative set up of the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association is in their own interests required to be
materially changed, this agreement shall be subject to review at once at the request of either party
and such changes made therein as will more effectively meet the situation.
18. This agreement shall be in effect from May 4th, 1938, until May 4th, 1941, and from year to
year unless notice of abrogation or amendment shall be given in writing thirty (30) days prior to
expiration. In the event of either party being unable to agree to any amendment, it is mutually
agreed that application shall be made under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," British
Columbia, for a Board of Arbitration, whose majority decision of the points in dispute shall be accepted
as both signatories hereto as final and binding.
The proposed agreement, submitted for the signatures of the parties to the dispute,
carried the endorsement of F. M. Clement (Chairman) and Edward A. Jamieson (member),
who concurred in the award set out in the proposed agreement. The document was dated at
Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia, the 28th day of July, 1938.
Minority Report.
Mr. W. J. Park, representative of the employer on the Board, was not in full accord with
his colleagues, and on August 1st, 1938, submitted a minority report, which follows:—
To the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
I, William James Park, designated by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council as a member
of a Board of Arbitration in the matter of the above-mentioned dispute and for the purposes
of this Act, have carefully investigated the said dispute and all matters affecting the merits
and right settlement thereof, and have heard the evidence adduced by and the representations
made on behalf of the parties to the dispute. I am not in full accord with the other members
of the Board, and beg to submit a minority report as follows:—
Evidence presented by the different parties indicated clearly that returns received by
dairy farmers for the past eight years were substantially lower than the average annual
wages received by the employees in the plants affected. One of the witnesses stated that he
owned 71 acres, in which he had invested $17,000 and, after paying all his operating costs, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 93
that for the year 1937 his returns were approximately $40 per month, from which he was
called upon to provide food, clothing, and board for himself and family. Other evidence submitted from farmers showed practically the same basis of financial return.
In 1931 the producers' price for butter-fat dropped over 50 per cent. The wages of the
men were cut on an average of 12% per cent. For the year 1937 some slight increases had been
made in some of the wages received by the employees and the farmers' price was still 30 per
cent, below 1930, and from the evidence submitted there was no immediate prospect of this
return being increased.
The evidence produced indicated to me that the farmers, who are the employers, were far
behind in their obligations, and this has had a serious effect on the morale of these people,
causing them to look upon their industry in a very dispirited manner. Many of them would
willingly change places with the employees now working in the plants.
The argument was advanced by the Union that with a contract with the employee better
harmony would prevail between the employer and the employees. The evidence submitted
showed that the employer had consulted with committees of the employees in regard to
matters of mutual interest, and wherever possible the requests of the employees were granted.
The witness when questioned on the matter of harmony did not present any evidence that
would suggest a lack of harmony between the employer and the employees.
Milk marketing legislation which has been held intra vires by the Privy Council is very
largely an unknown factor in the results that will be obtained for the farmer, and in my
opinion until such times as it has been definitely demonstrated that the farmer is receiving
more than the costs of production for his produce, and is assured of this price staying
indefinitely, then I cannot see from the evidence produced that an agreement between the two
parties would assist in greater harmony existing between them.
A study of the situation brings out the fact that this association is a non-profit service
organization. It does not buy the raw product for resale at a profit. The dairy farmers
owning the organization, out of their own substance, have provided facilities for manufacturing and marketing their milk. Milk is consigned to the organization, is disposed of to the
best possible advantage, the costs deducted from the gross returns, and the balance handed
back to the farmers. The imposition upon this organization of the closed-shop principle or
of higher wages would add to the disability under which it will have to function, inasmuch
as it is in constant competition in the marketing of the milk of its members with private-
owned dairy manufacturing and distributing concerns, who are able to buy their raw product
at prices below what it can be produced for in the Fraser Valley, and who are not obliged by
Union agreements or minimum wage laws to pay the labour costs at present being paid by the
organization, and that would undoubtedly have to be paid under the terms of the proposed
agreement. In fact, with the present unsettled condition of world markets where most of
the product from these two plants is governed as to sale price, it has definitely been proved to
me that contractual relations between the employer and the employee would not benefit either
party at the present time.
The foregoing, to the best of my knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the
matters of dispute placed before me as a member of a Board of Arbitration on the 20th day
of July, 1938.
W. J. Park, Member.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 1st day of August, 1938.
The award of the Board and the minority report were thereafter transmitted to representatives of the disputants. At a meeting of the employees of the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association, held at Chilliwack, Friday, August 5th, 1938, a secret ballot was taken
on the following question: " Are you in favour of accepting the award of the Board of
Arbitration in the dispute with your employers? "
The number voting totalled 55. Those voting " Yes " totalled 51; those voting " No "
totalled 4.    There were no spoiled ballots.
On August 12th, A. H. Mercer, Esq., general manager of the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association, in a letter addressed to the Department of Labour declared that he had
been directed to inform the Department " that the Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Board have
considered the award and decided unanimously that they cannot see their way clear to act in
accordance with it." P 94 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Subsequently at a meeting held at Chilliwack, October 26th, 1938,. the employees of the
Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association decided that conversations with the management
of the Association be suspended until April 1st, 1939.
No. 3, 1938.
" INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a^
Dispute between the Vancouver General Hospital and its Male Lay Employees.
Report and Award of Board of Arbitration.
To the Honourable George S. Pearson, Minister of Labour,
Victoria, B.C.
This Board was designated by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor as a Board of
Arbitration, under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," to
deal with the above-mentioned dispute, and accordingly held public sessions for the taking of
evidence and receiving the representations of the parties on the 15th, 22nd, 23rd, 25th, 26th,
29th, and 31st days of August, 1938, and held executive sessions on the 4th day of August
for organization and procedure, and on the 30th day of August and 1st day of September,
1938, for consideration of such evidence and representations and the making of award.
Application was made on the 23rd day of June, 1938, by the Male Lay Employees of the
Vancouver General Hospital for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner, pursuant to
section 10 of the Act, and accordingly Mr. James Thomson, of the Department of Labour,
was duly appointed to investigate the matters in dispute, and on the 16th day of July following reported that the parties had failed to agree to a settlement of the matters in dispute
which he set forth as being:—■
(a.)  A proposed increase in wages;
(6.)  Restoration of two weeks' holidays;
(c.) Restoration of a reduction in wages as applied in 1931-32 for the following
classes of employees: Engineers and firemen; plumbers and pipe-fitters; electricians and splint-men.
Mr. Thomson recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration and this Board
was so constituted by Order in Council 1061 on the 2nd day of August, 1938, and empowered
to deal with the matters in dispute and therein set out, and the scale of wages and working
conditions proposed by the employees concerned and which are hereto attached as Schedule A.
The scale of wages now being paid is attached hereto as Schedule B.
The Vancouver General Hospital was incorporated by the Legislature of the Province of
British Columbia under the provisions of the " Vancouver General Hospital Act, 1902," and
is managed by a Board of Directors of fifteen, eight of whom are elective, three appointed
annually by the Municipal Corporation of the City of Vancouver, and three appointed by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and one nominated by the medical staff of the hospital.
This Act empowered the Municipal Council of the City of Vancouver to make certain
money grants to the Hospital for the carrying-out of the work and purposes for which it was
incorporated and which has heretofore been mainly assisted and supported by such money
grants, and money grants from the Province of British Columbia, other surrounding municipal
corporations, tuberculosis money grants, and the ordinary revenue received from patients
accommodated by the hospital.
The Vancouver General Hospital is the largest hospital in the Dominion of Canada,
having beds for 1,204 patients and serving 5,000 meals per day, well equipped and efficiently
managed, and has greater general facilities for the care of the sick than any other hospital
in the Province of British Columbia, and is the only hospital operating an " out-patient"
department. It is truly an institution of which the citizens of the City of Vancouver may
well be proud.
The City of Vancouver pays to the Hospital 70 cents per diem for indigent patients
except tubercular patients and the Province of British Columbia a like amount for all patients. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 95
The several surrounding municipalities concerned pay 70 cents per diem for all their indigent
patients pursuant to the provisions of the " Residence and Responsibility Act."
These several money grants are sadly inadequate in meeting the enormous losses sustained by the Hospital in the care of indigent patients, known as staff patients, of whom there
are 421 on the 30th day of June last receiving free medical aid and hospital accommodation,
and the Hospital has had now to budget for the largest loss in its history.
In 1930-31, owing to the prevailing universal financial stringency, the Hospital, in conjunction with the municipal authorities of the City of Vancouver, inaugurated a cut in the
wages of all employees, which the City of Vancouver and the Hospital partially later restored
to their employees. The male lay hospital employees have, from time to time, requested
annual holidays with pay, change of working conditions of the several categories of employment, that the hours of work and hourly pay should be adjusted and fixed in accordance with
their requests. Some adjustments were made and increases given on orders of the Board of
Industrial Relations, but the main issues, annual holidays with pay and scale of wages, were
not met by the Hospital to the satisfaction of its employees, largely owing to the unhappy
and unsatisfactory financial condition of the Hospital and the uncertain source of its necessary and required monetary support with which to carry on its ordinary work. The requests
of the employees were, generally speaking, not satisfactorily met or dealt with or definitely
refused; and they were, from time to time, led to believe, from declarations of members of
the Board, that although they felt the wages fair they could not financially meet an increase.
As Hospital deficits or losses, so called, owing to the free care of indigent patients, had from
time to time been met by the City of Vancouver, this additional burden of increases to employees would also fall to that authority, and who were naturally unwilling to add to their
already great financial responsibility. In May, 1938, a committee of the Hospital directors
reported to the Municipal Council of the City of Vancouver in connection with the pending
negotiations with their employees regarding wage increases, as follows: " If it were decided
to make any increases, these could only be through one source, namely, the City of Vancouver."
The civic authorities consider that the financial loss incurred by the care of indigent
patients is not wholly their responsibility or under their control, and is a condition mainly
due to the widespread and prevailing transient as well as residential unemployment problem,
and that the assistance received from the Province of British Columbia is insufficient to meet
the situation with which they are faced and which they say is not wholly theirs, and that the
whole financial structure of the Hospital should be rebuilt on other lines. In the legal sense
this position of responsibility is ill-founded, however true it may be in a moral sense.
It is clear from all the evidence that the Hospital Board in dealing with Employees'
increases was in a conciliatory mood and undoubtedly the representatives of the employees
were led to believe that if the necessary funds were made available by some other authority
or, if this could not be secured by negotiations, if the Board of Industrial Relations could be
induced to make a compelling order and the responsibility thus shifted, that their requests
would be automatically and amicably adjusted. Any scale thus set would thus be made
applicable to all hospitals (of which there are seventy-five in the Province) and not made
particular to the Vancouver General Hospital.
The Board of Industrial Relations quite properly refused to accept the vicarious responsibility of the fixing of a blanket order wage-scale, and partly owing to the obvious ulterior
purpose and future effect, but principally owing to the complexity of categories of occupation
peculiar to a public hospital and not in some cases commonly found in industrial and commercial concerns for which this Board was created and over which they exercise certain
limited provision. These negotiations and what was said or what took place are not deciding
factors in any conclusions arrived at by your Board of Arbitration, but recital is made
necessary in fairness to all concerned.
The Industrial Relations Board did, however, act in cases of occupations in the hospital
found to be similar in industrial and commercial concerns, and by Orders 52 and 53 regulated
the minimum wage to be paid to female lay employees as public housekeeping industry, and
by Order 34 governing those employed in office occupations, and by Order 23 as to janitor-
cleaners, making the latter term synonymous with janitors, for which a minimum wage had
already been set, and as being occuptions usual to industrial or commercial concerns. P 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The complete list of orders of the Industrial Relations Board affecting the matter in
dispute is attached hereto as Schedule D.
In 1936 an adjustment was made and certain basic salaries established.
In a report of a committee of the Hospital Board appointed for this purpose, dated June
30th, 1936, in answer to a requested adjustment of pay and working conditions an hourly
rate of pay was recommended to be set for cleaners and orderlies in the different grades, with
one meal per day at a charge of $5 per month deductable from their wages, and that an eight-
hour six-day week be placed in operation, but which did not meet the employees' request for
a minimum wage of $80 per month, but stated that whenever a minimum wage is set by the
Industrial Relations Board that that wage would be made effective by the Hospital, but that
all allowances for holidays and sick leave would be cancelled, but subsequently agreed that
they should have the advantages of sick leave, which seemingly is made necessary by working
in a depressive atmosphere of sickness.
In May, 1937, negotiations were again resumed between the parties and carried on more
or less continuously until the present time, without any satisfactory understanding being
concluded.
The Employees receive certain privileges, such as hospitalization for selves and dependents at a reduced rate, laundry at reduced rates for laundry employees, and sick leave
with pay, reduction in the price of drugs, and certain holidays for certain categories; and
their working conditions, generally speaking, are good.
Lengthy oral testimony was submitted to the Board, together with a mass of documentary
evidence, by both parties to. the issue, but apart from that which was verified was not of great
assistance. Dr. Alfred K. Haywood, Medical Superintendent of the Vancouver General
Hospital, rendered great assistance to the Board in portraying the functions of that great
institution and its many varied activities.
Many statistical compilations and comparisons were prepared by Mr. Oliver Phillips,
Secretary to the Board of Directors, which were of considerable assistance and which were
supplemented by evidence descriptive of the manifold activities of the staff of the Hospital,
which were valuable.
The Board had the advantage of the pay-rolls of the Provincial Hospital for the Insane
at Essondale and the Provincial Infirmary (Marpole) ; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver;
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster; Provincial Mental Hospital, Colquitz;
Shaughnessy Military Hospital, and of other institutions akin to that in question; and
unquestioned oral testimony and other documentary evidence of merit. The Hospital provides holidays with pay to their professional classes of employees and to certain categories of
the male lay employees, but this is not applicable to all.
It is admitted by the Hospital authorities that the group covered by Order 52 of the
Industrial Relations Board in regard to female employees—such as women cleaners, waitresses, maids, home matrons, kitchen help, and ward assistants—should also apply to male
lay employees in performing similar functions, like occupations, or akin to these occupations,
but that it should be applicable throughout the whole Province by order of that Board.
It was evident throughout the whole proceedings that both parties were actuated from
commendable motives to fairly and honestly lay all phases of the problem of adjusting wages
and working conditions before the Board, so that a fair and reasonable solution could be found
satisfactory'to all concerned.
Certain employees in different categories asked in writing (Exhibit 20) that their request
for adjustment be disregarded, and on such no ruling has been made by the Board.
R. L. Reid, Esquire, K.C., gave the Board the benefit of his great legal talent in clearing
away many of the troublesome questions which inevitably arise in such a controversy and
which proved invaluable to his clients.
The Employees are to be congratulated on their representatives, Messrs. Scribbins,
Paterson and Stirrat, who, under the leadership of Mr. Scribbins, presented their claims and
conducted their case with outstanding ability.
Award.
The Board unanimously agree and make the following award:—
1. That the requests of the Male Lay Employees of the Vancouver General Hospital are,
in the main, fair and just, and that the scale of wages now in effect is subject to revision
upward, and that they are entitled to adjustment of working conditions as hereinafter set out. 2. That there shall be paid by the Vancouver General Hospital to all their Male Lay
Employees in the lowest brackets a salary based on a minimum rate of not less than 40 cents
per hour.
3. That all shifts of Male Lay Employees be of eight hours per day, and where the shifts
are broken as to time the spread is not to exceed twelve hours in point of time.
4. No Male Lay Employee to work more than six days per week on a straight-time basis.
5. All overtime to be paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
6. That all Male Lay Employees be given two weeks' holidays each year, with pay.
7. That all Male Lay Employees be paid wages at the rate set out in Schedule C attached
hereto and made a part of this award.
8. That this award be put into effect on or before the 1st day of October, 1938.
W. M. Carson.
Percy R. Bengough.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., September 1st, 1938.
(Note.—A short description of conciliation proceedings which resulted in the appointment of a Board of Arbitration in this dispute may be found under the heading " Conciliation—Hospital Employees, Vancouver.")
SCHEDULES.
The following Schedules A, B, C, and D are those to which reference is made in  the
report and award of the Board of Arbitration:—
SCHEDULE A.
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL.
Wage-scale asked for by Male Lay Employees.
This wage-scale is submitted as a basis of negotiation.
Per Hour. Main Kitchen— Per Hour.
Janitors   40 cents. Wagon-men    40 cents.
Orderlies, third-class   45 cents. Scullery-men     40 cents.
Orderlies, second-class   50 cents. Cleaners    40 cents.
Orderlies, first-class   55 cents. Boiler-man     40 cents.
Window cleaners and polish- Potato-man   40 cents.
ers   43 cents. Milkman   40 cents.
Kitchen Staff— Per Month. Bread-cutter   40 cents.
Head chef  (board inc.)   $150.00 Dish-washer _   40 cents.
Second chef  .     126.00 Laundry—
Soup-desserts     —       98.00 Starch-washer    55 cents.
Assistant cook   _      97.00 Flat-washer     50 cents.
Cook-helper          83.00 Infectious-linen washer   50 cents.
Pastry-cook        126.00 Wringer-men     45 cents.
Vegetable-cook        101.00 Infectious-disease loader .... 45 cents.
Assistant vegetable-cook        96.80 Linen-trucker   43 cents.
Assistant vegetable-man        87.00 Laundry-helper    40 cents.
Milk and ice man        95.00 Printing department   50 cents.
Butcher, buyer      127.00 Stores department   50 cents.
Assistant butcher          90.00 Carpenters _    80 cents.
Scullery-man         91.00 Painters     80 cents.
Scullery-man  ......      86.00 Per Month.
Private Ward Cook— Paint-washers       $100.00
Chief   _    125.00 Work department      103.00
Assistant cook        92.00 Incinerators  .__      90.00
All shifts to be eight hours per day.    Where shifts are broken, spread not to exceed twelve hours-
No employee to work more than six days per week.
Orderlies in T.B. and I.D.H. ward, and Heather  Street Annex, also senior man at X-ray, to be-
classed as second-class orderlies.
Senior man on O.R. and Heather Street Annex to receive same additional amount over first-class
orderlies as existed January, 1936.
All overtime to be paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
Laundry to have relief-man provided in case of sickness of male employee and for anuual holidays-
Return of cuts taken off during 1931-32 to firemen, engineers, plumbers, pipe-fitters, electricians,,
splint-man.
Restoration of two weeks' holiday.
1 P 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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S3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 99
SCHEDULE  C.
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL.
Male Lay Employees.
Scale of Wages adopted by the Board and made a Part of the Award.
Janitors   _ 	
Orderlies, third-class _
Orderlies, second-class
Orderlies, first-class 	
Per Month.
.. ?83.20
. 83.20
.. 93.60
.. 104.00
.      83.20
Window cleaners and polishers
Kitchen Staff-
Head chef      130.00
Second chef 	
Soup-desserts _
Assistant cook
Cook-helper
Pastry-cook
  105.00
  90.00
  87.50
   83.20
  105.00
Vegetable-cook   90.00
Assistant vegetable-cook   83.20
Assistant vegetable-cook   83.20
Milk and ice man    87.50
Butcher, buyer    105.00
Assistant butcher   - 83.20
Scullery-man    83.20
Scullery-man     83.20
Private Ward Cook—
Chief   105.00
Assistant cook   83.20
Main Kitchen—
Wagon-men ..
Scullery-men
Cleaners 	
Boiler-man ...
Potato-man ..
Milkman 	
Bread-cutter ....
Dish-washer 	
Laundry—
Starch-washer .
Flat-washer  	
Per Month.
... $83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
... 83.20
Infectious-linen washer..
Wringer-men
Infectious-disease loader
Linen-trucker 	
104.00
100.00
90.00
90.00
83.20
83.20
Laundry-helper        83.20
Printing department        83.20
Stores department        83.20
Carpenters       148.50
Painters        118.00
Paint-washers         95.00
Work department        83.20
Incinerators     — —      83.20
SCHEDULE D.
LIST  OF  ORDERS  OF  INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS BOARD AFFECTING  THE
MATTER IN DISPUTE.
Orders Nos. 12 and 12A, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the Construction Industry.
Orders Nos. 26 and 26A, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the Transportation Industry.
Orders Nos. 18, 18a, and 18b, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the
Occupation of Stationary Steam Engineers.
Order No. 34, " Female Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the Office Occupation.
Order No. 39, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage for First-aid Attendants.
Order No. 43, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the Occupation of
Janitor.
Order No. 44, " Female Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the Occupation of
Janitress.
Orders Nos. 52 and 52B, " Female Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage in the
Hotel and Catering Industry.
Order No. 53, " Female Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage for Female Elevator
Operators and Starters.
Order No. 54, " Male Minimum Wage Act," establishing a Minimum Wage for Male Elevator
Operators and Starters.
Order No. 27, " Female " Personal Service.
Summary of Order relating to Telephone and Telegraph Occupation made pursuant to the " Female
Minimum Wage Act," and summary of Order relating to the Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing Industry
made pursuant to the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
Following transmission of the award of the Board to disputants, acceptance was made
by the Board of Directors of the Vancouver General Hospital, September 13th, 1938, and by
the Male Lay Employees, September 22nd, 1938. No. 4, 1938.
"INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 41.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a
Dispute between the Woman's Bakery, Limited, and its Bakery and Confectionery
Employees.
Majority Report, Award, and Recommendations of Board of Arbitration.
To the Hon. George S. Pearson, Minister of Labour,
Victoria, B.C.
This Board was designated by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor as a Board of
Arbitration under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" to
deal with the above-mentioned dispute, and accordingly held public sessions for the taking
of evidence and receiving representations of the parties on the 12th, 13th, and 14th days of
October, 1938; and held executive sessions for organization and deciding procedure on the
8th day of October; and for the consideration of such evidence, representations, and for
making a report and award on the 14th, 15th, and 17th days of October, 1938.
Application was made on the 14th day of May, 1938, by the organized employees of the
Woman's Bakery, Limited, for the services of a Conciliation Commissioner pursuant to section
10 of the Act, but not having a sufficient number of employees signing the application as
required under the Act it was on the 20th day of June withdrawn; and later, friction having
in the meantime developed between the members of the Union and the management of the
Company as to the number of workmen between the ages of 18 and 21 years employed in
relation to the number of journeymen, the Minister apprehending the dispute appointed, on
the 29th day of July, Mr. James Thomson, of the Department of Labour, a Conciliation Commissioner under sections 12 and 13 of the Act to investigate the matters in dispute, and on the
12th day of September, 1938, he reported, as to the result of his investigation, that the parties
had failed to agree to a settlement of the matters in dispute, and which report is attached
hereto as Schedule A.
Mr. Thomson recommended that the dispute be referred to arbitration, and this Board
was constituted by Order in Council No. 1338, on the 4th day of October, 1938, and empowered
to deal with the matters in dispute therein set out, and the scale of wages and working conditions of employees concerned, and which matters as therein set out are attached hereto as
Schedule B.
The scale of wages now being paid is attached hereto as Schedule C.
On the 6th and 7th days of October, 1938, a voluntary arbitration board dealt with
matters of mutual concern between the Master Bakers' Association and the Bakery and
Confectionery Workers International Union of America, Local 468, and as to the executing
of a proposed agreement as to suggested change in working conditions and scale of wages
between the Canadian Bakeries, Limited; Cowan-Dodson's Bakeries, Limited; McGavin's,
Limited; and Robertson's Bakeries, Limited, and their employees, and as a result an agreement was arrived at and executed between the parties, which was later extended to Campbell's
Bakery, Limited; Brown Bros., Limited; the Mother Hubbard Bakery, Limited; and
Hastings Bakery, and which agreement has been submitted to the Woman's Bakery, Limited,
by its organized employees for approval and execution, and which approval and execution
were refused by the Company, the terms of which is the subject-matter of this dispute, and
which is attached hereto as Schedule D.
An agreement regarding working conditions has been in effect between the parties, but
expired on the 30th day of June, 1938, and which is attached hereto as Schedule E, and
renewal in the form suggested, being Schedule D, is desired by the organized employees.
The Woman's Bakery, Limited, was incorporated under the laws of the Province of
British Columbia on the 4th day of November, 1927, as a family trading corporation, of which
James C. Brault and his wife, Grace R. Brault, are the sole shareholders and participants in
its operations as wholesale and retail bakers and confectioners.' The business of the Woman's
Bakery, Limited, as previously carried on as the Woman's Bakery in a small way in the City REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 101
of Vancouver, was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Brault in 1925 for $8,500, and which has since
expanded to an organization of ten retail shops and two leased shops as well as having 150
distributing agencies for the sale and distribution of their goods, in addition to the central
manufacturing plant. It has now a gross turnover of $176,592.22, with a total pay-roll in all
its activities of $52,860.05. The company has thirty-five male and female employees in the
manufacturing plant, twenty-four of whom being male employees engaged in the baking
department are those principally affected by this dispute, twelve of whom are workmen
between the ages of 16 and 21 years. This plant, owing to its diversified operations in the
major manufacture of cakes, pies, confectioneries, and other delicacies of like nature, and
minor production of bread, is not so highly mechanized as plants engaged chiefly in the production of bread, and has consequently more employees engaged in production as opposed to
the number engaged in the more mechanized plants devoted more or less to the highly
intensified production of bread. In an endeavour seemingly to equalize labour costs, the
management has used the services of twelve workmen between the ages of 16 and 21 years
in conjunction with twelve working journeymen employees, which was viewed with grave
concern by the working journeymen bakers. Although much of the work in this plant is
performed by hand, owing to the diversified nature of its product and lack of mechanical
devices, it does not seem reasonable for the employment of so many unskilled immature workmen as opposed to skilled workers and in such great disproportion of one to one. The proportion in the other baking plants under the existing working agreements is one apprentice
to twelve journeymen. The immature workers in this plant are not indentured apprentices,
except one, and they cannot under these conditions receive the training necessary to become
skilled journeymen. It was shown in evidence that the method suggested by the employees
under the proposed new arrangement would not affect the present occupational category,
while in effect, of those immature workmen now employed where not engaged in the work of
journeymen, or displace them, and it was never so intended, and the parties to the dispute
have been at arm's length largely due to this being misunderstood. What is intended should
be clearly shown if a satisfactory arrangement is to be effected between the parties.
The Company admits it has no objection to the proposed wage-scale but that it cannot
meet it owing to lack of sufficient profits in its business operations, and submitted a balance-
sheet in proof. Having made this submission and relied upon it the Company must so satisfy
the Board. Although the Board does not subscribe to this as being a good ground for
refusing the Employees' requests, it was nevertheless carefully examined and considered, and
the conclusion is reached that the Company has failed to substantiate its claims of inability
to meet the suggested wage-scale. Unfortunately for the claim of the Company, the financial
statement is not a complete exposition of its financial resources and does not show its real
and present financial standing and the means taken are not those used in good accountancy.
Having regard to this statement, as the Company's sole ground for refusing to meet the
Employees' requests, no excuse is apparent for the submission of this imperfect financial
statement, as the opportunity was provided the Company to substantiate its claims by the
production of a correct and proper balance-sheet approved by some firm of reputable auditors,
to which no good exception could be taken.
It was submitted that an employee (Rowlett) had been unfairly discharged for Union
activities, but this is not substantiated.
Mr. Thomas H. Ainsworth, a member of the Board, disagrees with the award of the
majority of the members of the Board and his minority award is appended hereto.
Majority Award and Recommendations.
The majority members of the Board agree and make the following award:—
1. That the requests of the employees of the Woman's Bakery, Limited, are, in the main
fair and reasonable, and that the scale of wages now in effect is subject to revision upward,
and that they are entitled to adjustment of working conditions as hereinafter set out.
2. That there shall be paid by the Woman's Bakery, Limited, to their employees affected
a salary based on the following minimums:— Weekly. Hourly.
Foremen   Optional.
Dough-man      $31.50 66 cents.
Oven-men        30.50 64 cents. P 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Weekly. Hourly.
Bench-hands and machine   $27.75 58 cents.
Helpers   24.00 50 cents.
Shipper   30.00                 	
Assistant shipper or checker   23.30                 	
Finishers and cake wrappers   17.00 36 cents.
Apprentices.
The apprentices shall be indentured and the weekly wage-scale shall be:—
For the First Half of. For the Last Half of.
First year      $12.00 $14.00
Second year        16.00 17.00
Third year  ..      18.00 19.00
Fourth year       20.00 21.00
(Owing to the peculiar diversified operations of the Company.) One appprentice shall
be allowed up to twelve journeymen, and one for every twelve journeymen thereafter. No
present apprentice shall be discharged on account of this award. The Company undertakes
to extend to all apprentices full opportunity of training in every branch of baking operations,
and the period of such training shall be four years.
3. Jobbers shall receive $5 per day up to three days. If employed four days or more in
any one week, their wages shall revert to the scale of bench-hands; and eight hours or any
part thereof shall constitute one day's work and he shall be paid when his shift is completed.
4. Eight hours shall constitute a day's work and all time worked over that time shall be
paid for at the rate of time and one-half; and one hour, or not less than half an hour, shall
be allowed for lunch between the fourth and fifth hours of work every day.
In the interests of the public and those concerned it is recommended that the parties
reach an agreement and reduce it to writing. If an agreement is arrived at between the
parties, it is recommended that the present working personnel be not disturbed or displaced,
and that their working status be clearly indicated and set forth so that no further misunderstanding shall exist. It is recommended that as many helpers will be allowed in the manufacturing of bakery products as are necessary for such work, but that helpers shall not be
allowed to work at the bench, on machines, at the oven, weighing ingredients, mixing dough,
or handling the product in any way until it is finished, but they may clean pans, clean
machines, grease pans, push trucks, or do any other labourers' or unskilled work incidental
to the baking business, but shall not do any journeymen's or apprentices' work. Any employee now classified as helper and paid as such, doing or continuing to do bakers' work, shall
receive bakers' wages in accordance with the class of work he is doing.
It is further recommended that under such suggested agreement these bakery employees
mutually agreed upon as such, and themselves so agreeing, may become and remain members
of a Union in good standing while so employed, and no member of such union shall be discriminated against for upholding Union rules or principles.
The prosperity and contentment of all require that the parties come to a mutual understanding and a common recognition of the relations of intimate co-operation which must exist
and continue to exist between organized labour and working capital to safeguard the public
welfare and preserve- the interests of both the parties.
It is further recommended that this award be put into effect on or before the 1st day of
December, 1938.
J. C. McIntosh, Chairman.
Dorothy G. Steeves.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 17th day of October, 1938.
Minority Report.
Mr. T. H. Ainsworth, representative of the employer on the Board, was not in full
accord with his colleagues and on October 17th, 1938, submitted a minority report, which
follows:—
To the Hon. George S. Pearson, Minister of Labour,
Victoria, B.C.
The first steps towards the solution of any problem should lie in analysis.    Too often a
condition or effect is overemphasized, leaving the cause obscured or forgotten;   and so it is REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 103
felt that the report of this Board would be incomplete without a review of conditions with
which the baking industry has been faced during the past decade.
For a long time prior to that period, merchandising methods have made radical changes,
occasioned in many instances through the diversion of capital into the realms of food distribution. Here, through specialization, low unit operating cost, and focus on substandard
price-levels, chain grocery store organizations and department stores have reaped the dual
benefits which accrue from the application of efficiency and the appeal through advertising to
a well-propagated bargain consciousness.
With the coming of the chain store organizations to Vancouver there was introduced the
policy of featuring the sale of milk and bread, which experience in the United States had
been shown to be an excellent media with which to induce the daily visits of the housewife.
Since these commodities were extensively advertised at extraordinarily low prices they promoted the sale of other lines of merchandise.
The promise of large sales volume too often proved bait to the bakers, but these in due
course were compelled to capitulate to the demands of the chain stores for ever-cheaper prices
to meet the competition which their method had generated; and thus originated a practice
which has since proved a dominating factor in the sale of bread.
It is not intended to convey the impression that a cheaply priced loaf was not in existence
before the coming of the chain stores. There had been instances of its sale in certain parts
of the city, notably through the poorer quarters; but this was not a disrupting factor, due
to its isolation;  whereas the chain stores operate in all parts of Vancouver and suburbs.
The growth of the chain store threatened extinction to the individual grocery store, whose
lack of buying power did not allow him to meet the ultra-competitive prices in many lines.
Consolidation of many such units followed in an effort to survive, until there are now a
number of such groups established, such as The Consolidated Grocers, The Red and White
Chain, the Purity Stores, and other chain organizations which vary in size.
In the operation of such groups imitation grew as a natural sequence, and here again the
value of bread and milk was recognized and used for sales promotion.
To-day with two down-town department stores and the Safeway Stores, each operating
its own bakery, the situation is impossible of control without the co-operation of a number
of small wholesale grocers whose customers, mainly small grocery and confectionery stores,
demand a price which will enable them to undersell the larger organization.
The question has been asked repeatedly as to why are not the bakers able to reach an
agreement as to sales policy? The answer is that they are continually trying to do so, and
that no industry has attempted more desperately to set its affairs in order, or with such little
success. To paraphrase Tolstoi: The small grocery stores are willing to do anything for the
baker except get off his neck!
It must be said in fairness to the Safeway Stores and the department stores, at this point,
that these organizations co-operated during the past year in response to an appeal by the
Master Bakers' Association to stabilize the price. They agreed to sell at a price of 8 cents
a loaf, or two loaves for 15 cents—which was 1 cent lower per loaf than the price of the bread
of the larger bakeries and many others.
Nearly two months ago the chain grocery and the department stores gave notice that they
could no longer sell at the price agreed upon, unless the aggravating price-cutting of the
smaller stores was stopped. At this time the general price in such stores throughout the city
was 6 cents a loaf or 1V2 cents lower per loaf than that charged by the chain grocery and
department stores.
A great amount of effort was expended in trying to induce the small wholesale bakers to
raise their price to 8 cents or two loaves for 15 cents; but here again it is not possible to
reach an agreement, chiefly because of distrust among the element, the majority of whom are
non-English-speaking origin. The result was that there followed a reduction of 1 cent, per
loaf in all price-levels, which meant a drastic loss to the industry.
In the ultimatum by the department stores and chain stores to reduce the price of bread
unless their conditions were complied with, it is easily understood that so marked a disparity
in their bread price with that of the smaller stores might well suggest that their other lines
of merchandise were correspondingly out of line. P 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
During the years of insensate price-cutting, all sense of bread value has been shattered,
and the levels reached were so low that each successive attempt to impose an increase of
1 cent towards a fair price has been met with great resistance and severe criticism. The
public is naturally confused and looks askance at such endeavours, due to a multiple of
causes, among which, there is the demagogue who broadcasts his disapproval; the city's plea
of consideration for the relief recipient, and the views of those arm-chair economists who
glibly prate of advantages to the consumer by the obliteration of the smaller companies,
relegating with cold logic the employer and his employees to swell the ranks of the unemployed. This is as predatory as it is fallacious to attempt the isolation of the consumer from
the whole social fabric. This is not intended as a treatise but simply to point out some of the
many obstacles in the path of rehabilitation.
The descent to the low price-levels has been illustrated as the inevitable end of the use
of bread as a " special." Of necessity, in the process, wages were reduced; in consequence
lowering the standard of living of the workers and creating conditions which were to prove
a fertile field for the labour-union organizer.
As a result of attempting to satisfy the price demands of a large chain store organization, Robertson's Bakery, Limited, was selected as the place to call a strike. Without commenting on the merits of either side, however, it is long overdue to point out that in the strife
which followed the Bakery Company was villified, but the chain store practice, which was the
primary cause, was overlooked or ignored.
During the past year Dr. Lyle Telford has done much to spread the belief that the cost
of bread is too high in Vancouver; yet how he is able to reconcile a cheap loaf with a decent
wage is just one more mystery. The Master Bakers' Association, as the result of the Doctor's
allegations, was summoned to a session of an investigating body of the City Council in
October, 1937, and the outcome only added to the troubles of the industry. In this connection
it should be observed with regret that apathy to the issue was shown by labour union officials
in that they did not appear.
The onus seems to be squarely placed on the shoulders of the Master Bakers to find the
solution to the problem which mutually affects both capital and labour, and which by its
seriousness should command the help of both parties. To-day the industry is in a deplorable
state, as was evidenced three months ago in an arbitration between the Union and the four
large Bakeries. In disclosing their position and experiences over the years mentioned, it was
found that reserves had been seriously depleted and capital structure greatly reduced, due to
a series of drastic operating losses over the past four to seven years. These companies were
fortunate, in some instances, to have had an accumulation of reserves and are still able to
Carry on. In one instance, however, it was shown the company had fallen into the hands of
the bondholders, who had found it necessary to liquidate the company by a sale at a very
substantial loss to themselves.
Throughout the industry there is a trail of staggering losses. Proprietors have thrown
in their entire resources, have borrowed money and have sunk deep into debt in an effort to
protect their investment. In many of the smaller shops, where the owner and members of
his family lead a slave-like existence, it is to be found that they are actually in receipt of
returns substantially less than the Government minimum wage.
It is held in certain quarters that the unionization of bakery-workers would provide the
panacea for much of the trouble in the industry; but it might be pointed out that wages and
selling-prices are inseparably linked and, as previously stated, should constitute the joint
concern of employer and employee alike.
It is also to be regretted that due to the myopic and warped concept of a brand of
unionism that class hatred should be fostered. In the final analysis co-operation will go a
long way to solve any problem, but this would appear to be beyond the understanding of any
one who seriously believes in the Declaration of Principles laid down in the book of Constitution and Laws of the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union of America, the
opening paragraph of which reads as follows:—
" Society at present is composed of classes whose interests are antagonistic to each other.
On the one hand we have the employing class, possessing almost all the soil, all houses, factories, means of transportation, machines, raw materials, and all necessaries of life. In comparison to the entire people this class represents a small minority." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 105
It may be profitable to certain individuals who disseminate that doctrine, but it cannot be
proved in the long run to be conducive to the essential promotion of good feeling; neither
can it solve the problem of how to bring the price of bread and other bakery products to the
point which will permit the payment of Union demands from profits instead of from losses.
The Master Bakers' Association of Vancouver has recently gone on record as being in favour
of a plan to rationalize the industry, which it is submitting to the Provincial Government,
whose help it will seek as being the only course it believes to be remaining.
There can be but few who would seriously question the need for assistance, nor need any
one look very far for a precedent, since there are so many to quote from, such as: The Transport System in Great Britain; Shipping on the High Seas; the Canadian Grain Growing
Industry; and our Provincial Act, which has removed milk from the machinations of the
loss-leader specialist.
Such rationalism as the baking industry is anxious to achieve is free from arbitrary
governmental " price-fixing," and embodies the sincerest form of co-operation between Government and Industry. Briefly, the suggestion is that bakeries shall individually file its prices
with a Board, which shall be composed of representatives of all branches of the industry.
The individual or firm will undertake to bind itself to the price it shall submit and shall have
no others. Intended price changes on the part of any unit shall be given to the Board in
the form of a declaration, ten days before such change is to become effective, and such intention shall become the general knowledge of the entire industry. To which end it intends to
ask the passage of a Provincial Act, enabling certain regulation, and the appointment of an
Administrator by the Board with the approval of the Government.
Such, in synopsis, is a measure now in successful operation in the State of Washington,
in which territory the baking industry suffered all the despoliation and resultant losses as
have been described.
It has brought about a better standard of living for the bakery-workers, and better
relationships, while its rehabilitation to the industry has been such as to increase revenues
through the source of income tax. Besides the foregoing, much good has come to the farmer
through the more liberal use of his products, since quality has supplanted the low price
consideration.
As this is the'first arbitration of the baking industry under the Industrial Conciliation
and Arbitration Board, this resume is respectfully tendered in the hope that it will prove of
value in any further disputes should they arise.
In conclusion I am desirous of expressing my approval of the above-mentioned Act as
being a step in the right direction.
Thomas H. Ainsworth.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 17th day of October, 1938.
SCHEDULES.
Herewith are Schedules A, B, C, D, and E, to which reference is made in the majority
award of the Board:—
SCHEDULE A.
'INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
(Section 16.)
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a Dispute
between the Woman's Bakery, Limited, Employer, and its Bakery and Confectionery Employees.
Conciliation Commissioner's Report op Findings.
To the Hon. Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
I, James Thomson, appointed by the Minister of Labour as a Conciliation Commissioner in the
matter of the above-mentioned dispute, declare that I have expeditiously and carefully inquired into the
said dispute and all matters affecting the merits and right settlement thereof, and beg to report as
follows:—
Negotiations in this dispute have failed to effect a settlement of the differences between the
employer and his employees.    The basis of a Union Agreement as submitted by the employees' repre- P 106 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
sentatives to the employer is herewith attached. Clause 1 requires that all employees of the Woman's
Bakery, Limited, as set out in clause 2 of the said proposed Agreement, shall become and remain
members of the Union in good standing while employed by the Company, etc. Clause 2 of the proposed
Agreement classifies employees and sets out the rates of wages which shall be paid per week and per
hour, ratio of apprentices to journeymen, and the rates of wages to be paid to apprentices; also provides for a daily rate of wages for jobbers.
In the main, the rest of the Agreement appeared to be acceptable to the employer, but he refused
to consider signing a Union Agreement which contained the restrictions enumerated in the first two
sections of the proposed Agreement.
The employees' representative, Mr. J. A. Humphreys, definitely stated that the employees of the
Woman's Bakery, Limited, and who are members of his organization, shall not agree to the employer's
proposal of operating an open shop and the modifications of wages and working conditions proposed by
the employer. Official notice to this effect as submitted by Mr. Humphreys, Secretary of the Bakery
and Confectionery Workers' International Union of America, Local No. 468, dated August 24th, 1938,
is herewith attached.
The negotiations in this dispute were so extensive that it was found necessary to extend the time
beyond that in which I was required to transmit my report as provided by statute and both parties
agreed to this extension and, after having gone into the matter in dispute very fully, and both parties
having made what they considered the maximum amount of concession, I feel that there is still such a
wide difference between the employees' demands and what the employer is willing to concede in this
dispute that no good purpose would be served by proceeding any further with conciliation. Therefore,
I would recommend that the whole matter in dispute be referred to a Board of Arbitration as provided
by the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."
The foregoing, to the best of my knowledge and belief, is an accurate report upon the matter (s)
of dispute referred to me as a Conciliation Commissioner on the 29th day of July, A.D. 1938.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 12th day of September, A.D. 1938.
James Thomson.
SCHEDULE B.
STATEMENT OF DISPUTE.
In the Matter of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in the Matter of a Dispute
between the Woman's Bakery, Limited, of Vancouver, B.C., and the Bakery and Confectionery
Workers employed by the said Woman's Bakery, Limited.
The majority of the bakery and confectionery workers employed by the Woman's Bakery, Limited,
have requested the manager of the said Woman's Bakery, J. C. Brault, Esq., 1420 Fifteenth Avenue
East, Vancouver, B.C., to sign, in the form of an agreement, a contract, containing amongst others, the
clauses hereinafter enumerated.
The request of the employees has not been granted.
Clauses in the agreement submitted by the employees to which exception has been taken and which
are the basis of dispute between the employer and his employees follow:—
"It is mutually agreed:—
" 1. That all those bakery employees, as set out hereafter under section 2 of the Agreement, shall
become and remain members of the Union in good standing while employed by the Company. Any
vacancy occurring, the Union office will be given the first opportunity of filling same. No member of
the Union shall be discriminated against for upholding Union rules and principles.
" All said employees shall receive and sign for a copy of this Agreement, and thereby authorize the
Company to deduct from their wages and to pay over to the Secretary of the Union any dues, fines, or
assessments, levied in accordance with the Union's by-laws, owing by them to the said Union.    The
Secretary to receive same on or before the third Saturday of each month.
"2. Wages.—The following shall be the minimum:—
Foreman     	
Dough-man      	
Oven-man       	
Bench-hands and machine   	
Helpers    	
Shipper    . 	
Assistant shipper or checker  	
Finishers and cake wrappers   	
Weekly.
Hourly.
Optional.
$31.50
66 cents.
30.50
64 cents.
27.75
58 cents.
24.00
50 cents.
30.00
23.30
17.00
38 cents.
" Apprentices.—The weekly wage-scale for apprentices shall be as follows:—
For the First Half of. For the Last Half of.
First year .- - „        $12.00 $14.00
Second year          16.00 17.00
Third year           18.00 19.00
Fourth year _         20.00 21.00
" One apprentice to be allowed up to twelve journeymen, and one for every twelve journeymen
thereafter.    No present apprentice to be discharged on account of this ruling. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 107
" The Company undertakes to extend to all apprentices full opportunity to become thoroughly
versed in every branch of operation in the bakery.    The period of apprenticeship shall be four years.
" Jobbers.—Five dollars per day up to three days. When employed four days or more in any one
week, the wages shall revert to those of bench-hands.
" Eight hours, or any part thereof, shall constitute a day's work. He shall be paid when his shift
is finished.
" 3. Eight hours shall constitute a day's work, and all time worked over that shall be paid at the
rate of time and one-half. One hour, or not less than half an hour, shall be allowed for lunch between
the fourth and fifth hour of work."
SCHEDULE C.
COMPARISON OF WAGES, WOMAN'S BAKERY, LIMITED.
Cakes.
Baker—                                                                              Present Scale.
Thornton..... _          $35.00
Mitchell..
Patty....
Offord.
Bon	
Bell.......
Arnold..
Murry..
25.00
25.00
24.00
24.00
35.00
25.00
25.00
$218.00
Helper—
Massey (21 years).      $20.00
McClure  (Ind.)  _   13.50
Westrand (18 years)   16.00
Postunea  (18 years)  _   12.00
$61.50
Boys—
Britten  (17 years)    $12.00
Blaker (19 years)..   14.40
Boletea (16 years)  8.00
McArthur  (16 years).....   8.00
$42.40
Three Finishers.        $14.00
(42.00
Bread.
       $25.00
         24.00
     ....        24.00
Jensen            ...   ...          24.00
        35.00
$132.00
Penlc                                   __     __•_    ....
     $12.00
Dnmm     ..              20.00
$32.00
Proposed Union Scale.
$35.00      '
27.75
27.75
27.75
27.75
35.00
27.75
27.50
Weekly
►   Difference
$18.50
$236.50
$27.75
13.50
18.00
18.00
15.75
$77.25
$16.00      ]
16.00
12.00
12.00
13.60
$56.00
$17.00
(51.00
9.00
$56.85
$31.50      "
27.75
27.75
27.75
35.00
■        $17.75
$149.75
$17.00      '
23.30
8.30
$40.30 P 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Packers (same as cake wrappers) —
9 at $14  	
Present Scale.          Proposed Union Scale.
  .$126.00            9 at $17        $153.00
$27.00
Forward  	
$53.05
56.85
$109.90
X 52
$5,714.80
763.80
Total.....  	
.... $6,478.60
SCHEDULE D.
This Agreement entered into between , of the Province of British Columbia, hereinafter
called the " Company," of the First Part, and the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International
Union of America, Local 468, of the City of Vancouver, in the Province of British Columbia, hereinafter called the " Union," of the Second Part.
It is mutually agreed:—
1. That all those bakery employees, as set out hereinafter under section 2 of this Agreement, shall
become and remain members of the Union in good standing, while employed by the Company. Any
vacancy occurring, the Union office shall be given the first opportunity of filling same. No member
of the Union shall be discriminated against for upholding Union rules and principles.
All said employees shall receive and sign for a copy of this Agreement, and thereby authorize the
Company to deduct from their wages and to pay over to the Secretary of the Union any dues, fines,
or assessments, levied in accordance with the Union's by-laws, owing by them to the said Union. The
Secretary to receive same on or before the third Saturday of each month.
2. Wages.—The following shall be the minimum:—■
Foremen 	
Dough-man     	
Oven-man       	
Bench-hands and machine-men
Helpers   ~ 	
Shipper
Assistant shipper or checker —
Finishers and cake wrappers ...
Apprentices.—The weekly wage-scale for apprentices shall be as follows:—
Fo
First year     	
Second year     	
Third year       	
Fourth year    	
Weekly.
Hourly
Optional.
$31.50
66 cents.
30.50
64 cents.
27.75
58 cents.
24.00
50 cents.
30.00
	
23.30
17.00
36 cents.
follows:—
First Half of.
For the Last Half of
$12.00
$14.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
One apprentice to be allowed up to twelve journeymen, and one for every twelve journeymen
thereafter.    No present apprentice to be discharged on account of this ruling.
The Company undertakes to extend to all apprentices full opportunity to become thoroughly versed
in every branch of operation in the bakery.    The period of apprenticeship shall be four years.
Jobbers.—Five dollars per day up to three days. When employed four days or more in any one
week, the wages shall revert to those of bench-hands.
Eight hours, or any part thereof, shall constitute a day's work. He shall be paid when his shift
is finished.
3. Eight hours shall constitute a day's work, and all time worked over that shall be paid at the
rate of time and one-half. One hour, or not less than half an hour, shall be allowed for lunch between
the fourth and fifth hour of work.
4. Baking premises shall be kept clean and sanitary throughout. All employees shall keep their
persons in a clean and sanitary manner, and all those engaged in the handling of bakery products in
the bakery, until they have been wrapped, shall wear white. The Company shall provide and maintain
for the convenience of employees, toilets, wash-rooms, and lockers. All employees shall at all times
leave benches and machinery cleaned and (excepting in the case of necessity for mechanical or joiner's
repairs) in condition for the immediate resumption of work.
It shall be the duty of the employees to co-operate and assist in maintaining the utilities and conveniences of the plant in good order and to refrain from misusing or defacing them and to refrain
from any conduct which would tend to depreciate or render unsanitary any such utensil or convenience.
5. Double time shall be paid on all statutory holidays. Where an employee has had a holiday the
night before, time and one-half will be paid. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 109
After one full year's service, each employee shall have one week's holiday with pay.
6. The Company will give to regular employees one week's notice before discharging them, or one
week's wages in lieu thereof. Employees will also give the Company one week's notice when they
desire to leave said employment.
7. Any employee now classed and paid as a helper and doing bakers' work shall be paid according
to the class of work he is doing. Miscellaneous help shall not be allowed to do any work covered by
this Agreement in the baking departments.
8. The Union label will be furnished to the Company at cost as long as this Agreement is upheld,
provided no other Union has a grievance with the Company. The Union agrees at all times to advance
the sale of Union products by label campaign or otherwise.
The Company shall have the full right to employ and discharge any and all employees, but no
employees shall be discharged by the Company because of his Union activities; provided, however, that
no Union employees shall be required to go through any picket line lawfully established and maintained
by the Union.
The Company and the Union undertake mutually to foster the spirit of co-operation in the interpretation of this Agreement. The management of the Company will at all times, whenever reasonably
possible, extend to the accredited representative of the Union upon his request evidence and facilities
for confirming that the terms and conditions of this Agreement are being maintained. The Business
Agent shall be permitted to enter any and all departments of the shop during working hours to attend
to the business of the Union. He shall also be granted permission to inspect the pay cheque of any
employee should he so desire.
9. The Superintendent of a plant shall have complete supervision of all operations connected with
the baking, but when he performs the duties of journeyman baker he must become a member of the
Bakers' Union.    Shops not employing one or more foremen shall not be entitled to a Superintendent.
10. Should a controversy arise between the Company and the Union, the men shall continue to
work as per this Agreement until such controversy is settled, which controversy shall, if possible, be
adjusted between the representatives of the Company and representatives of the Union. Failing to
reach a satisfactory adjustment, either party may refer the matter to a Board of Arbitration, which
is hereby created, and is to be composed of two representatives of the Bakers' Union (Local 468) and
two representatives of the Employers who have signed this Agreement. These four representatives
shall then select a fifth member who shall be Chairman, and the decision of the majority of the Board
of five shall be final and binding on all parties. The said Board shall organize at once and shall elect
a secretary, and shall adopt the rules and procedure which shall bind both parties.
The said Board shall have the power to adjust any differences which may be referred to them
within forty-eight hours subsequent to the receipt of its secretary's notice to come. The Board's
decision shall be submitted to both parties in writing and shall be signed by the majority of the Board.
The decision of the Board shall be retroactive to the date of submission of the question or differences
to the Board; providing, however, that a decision must be reached within seven days after the submission.
11. This Agreement shall be in full force and effect from June 1st, 1938, until June 1st, 1939, and
thereafter from year to year until a new Agreement (the terms of which shall be retroactive from
June 1st of each year) has been consummated. Should either party desire to make any changes in
this Agreement, and failing amicable settlement, they shall, within thirty days of the expiry date in
any one year, give notice in writing to the Board of Arbitration, which Board shall then proceed to
hear and arbitrate the proposed changes.    Their majority decision shall be final and binding.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this day of-    a.d. 1938.
The Bakery and Confectionery Workers'
International Union of America, Local
468.
President.
Secretary.
SCHEDULE E.
AGREEMENT.
This Agreement entered into between Woman's  Bakery, Limited, of British  Columbia, party of the
First Part, and the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union of America, Local 468,
of Vancouver, B.C., party of the Second Part.
It is mutually agreed:—
Section 1.—All employees must become and remain members in good standing while employed with
the Company, and when a vacancy exists the Union office must be given the first opportunity to fill
same. All Employees shall receive and sign for a copy of this Agreement and hereby authorize the
Company to deduct from their wages and pay over to the Secretary of Local 468 any dues, fines, or
assessments, levied in accordance with the Union's by-laws, owing by them to the said Local. P 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Section 2.—Wages:— Weekly.
Foreman       _   Optional.
Dough-man    	
Oven-man  _   	
Hourly.
Bench-hands and machine-men
Helpers   	
Shipper   	
Assistant shipper or checker 	
Finishers and cake wrappers
31.50
66 cents.
30.50
64 cents.
27.75
58 cents.
24.00
50 cents.
30.00
23.30
17.00
Apprentices first six months, $15 per week and to be raised $1 per week every six months for
a period of four years.
One apprentice to be allowed for every six journeymen.    Jobbers, $5 per day, up to three days.
When employed four days or more in any one week the wages to revert back to the same
as bench-hands.    Eight hours or any part thereof will constitute a day's work and must
be paid when his shift is finished.
Any one doing the work of a dough-man cr oven-man must receive the stipulated wage while
he is so employed.
No member shall have his wages reduced on account of this Agreement going into effect or be
discriminated against on account of his Union activities.
Section 3.—Forty-eight hours shall constitute a week's work and all time worked over forty-eight
hours in any one week shall be paid at the rate of time and one-half.    One hour, or not less than half
an hour, to be allowed for lunch after the fourth or fifth hour of work.
Section 4-—All bakeries shall be clean and sanitary. All employees shall keep their person in a
clean and sanitary manner. The Employer shall provide and maintain for the convenience of the employees, toilets, wash-rooms, and lockers.
Section 5.—In case of emergency, regular employees may be employed on their day off, at the rate
of time and one-half. On all statutory holidays time and one-half shall be paid, excepting where the
employees have had a holiday the night before.
Section 6.—The Union label will be furnished to employers as long as they uphold this Agreement,
providing no other Union has a grievance with the Employer. The Employer agrees to purchase
bakery products from Union shops. In case of a shortage, if Union shops cannot supply they may
purchase outside. The Union agrees at all times to push the sale of Union-made goods by Label campaign or otherwise.
Section 7.—Whenever any controversy arises between the Employer and the Union, the men shall
continue to work and the controversy shall, if possible, be adjusted between representatives of the
Employer and representatives of the Union.
This Agreement shall be in effect from the date of signing until June 1st, 1938, and from year to
year thereafter unless notice of any desired changes shall be given thirty (30) days prior to the
expiry date in any one year. In the event of either party being unable to agree to such changes, it is
mutually agreed they shall be submitted to a Board of Arbitration, whose majority decision shall be
final and binding.
Dated at Vancouver, B.C., this 22nd day of June, 1937.
Party of the First Part.
J. C. Brault.
Party of the Second Part.
James McMackin, President.
James Brydson.
(Bakers & Confectionery Workers Int. Union of
America.   Local Union No. 468, Vancouver,
B.C.)
(For further details of this dispute, see descriptions of strikes in this report.)
IV. ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES AND EMPLOYERS.
Pursuant to section 9 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," every organization of employers and employees is required to file certain annual returns, namely:—
1. A certified copy of its constitution, rules, and by-laws containing a full and complete
statement of its objects and purposes.
2. Certified copies of any amendments to its constitution, rules, and by-laws, when made.
3. An annual list of the names and addresses of its president, secretary, and other
officers, as at the 31st day of December in each year. This list must be filed before the 31st
day of January of each year.
To obtain this information application was made to the secretaries of all central
organizing bodies having branches within the Province, as well as to the officers of local
units of which this Department had record. In a number of cases it was necessary to make
several requests and, as a result, of 372 organizations of employees contacted, 352 complied REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 111
with the statutory obligation. In cases where information was not furnished by local
secretaries, that obtained from general secretaries has been used.
The returns compare favourably with those obtained in 1937, when 336 organizations of
employees made returns. In that year a report of membership was not required. Returns
for 1938, made under the provisions of the " Department of Labour Act," show 352 organizations to have a paid up membership of 42,063. Members whose dues were over three
months in arrears were not computed.
The printed list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. In cases where
information could be obtained, the names and addresses of the president and secretaries were
revised up to the date of publication. The post-office addresses of the officers are the same
as the heading under which they appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows immediately after that of the employees.
Twenty-three organizations made the requisite returns, compared with twenty-two for 1937.
B. H. E. Goult,
Secretary-Registrar, " Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act."
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYEES.
Abbotsford.
Brick and Clay Workers Federal Union, No. 136.
—President,   L.   Hartley,   Mission;     Secretary,
T. E. Holtsbaum.
Alberni.
Waterfront  Workers  Association,  No.  1, Alberni
District.—President, W. H. Ohs, Port Alberni;
Secretary, James W. Pakenham.
Albreda.
Railwaymen, Lodge No. 54, Canadian Brotherhood
of.—President, W. M. Tilley, Blue River;   Secretary, J. Jones.
Alert Bay.
Fishermen's  Association,  Pacific  Coast  Native.—
President, Dan  Assu,  Quathiaski Cove;    Secretary, George Luther.
Atlin.
Mine, Mill, and  Smelter Workers, Local No. 252,
International    Union    of. — President,    R.    H.
Crowe;    Secretary, D.  S.  Mattson.
Bella Bella.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 14.—
President, A. Humchit; Secretary, R. Carpenter.
Bella Coola.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C., Branch
No. 4.—President, H. Christensen; Secretary,
R. Levelton.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 15.—
President, Joe Saunders;   Secretary, G.Wilson.
Birken.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 215, Brotherhood of.—Secretary, J. Franson.
Blubber Bay.
Lumber and  Sawmill Workers  Union, No.  1-163,
I.W.A.—President,    F.    Leigh,    Blubber    Bay;
Secretary, H. Shaak, Blubber Bay.
Blue River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 15, Brotherhood of.—President, K. H. Graffunder, Vavenby
P.O.;   Secretary, F. Trestain.
Bralorne.
Co-operative Committee, Bralorne. — President,
J. W. Hillis;   Secretary, Geo. W. Lyons.
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, No. 271, International Union of.—President, J. C. Wilkins;
Secretary, Geo. W. Lyons.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees Union, No. 23.—President, R. D.
Etches; Secretary, R. Smith, 2573 Sussex Avenue.
Fire Fighters Association (Burnaby), Local No.
323.—President, W. Menzies; Secretary, L. C.
Auvache, 1995 Inverness Street.
Janitors Union, Burnaby Branch of.—President,
Wm. Gilbert; Secretary, Geo. Thornhill, 2058
Mission Avenue.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners, and Dyers Association.—■
President, R. H. Cross; Secretary, A. McAdam,
3006 Wilson Avenue.
Textile Workers Federal Union, No. 12—President,
M. Stacey; Secretary, C. Legrove, 2224 Antrim
Avenue.
Chapman Camp.
Co-operative Committee, Workmen's, Sullivan Concentrator.—President, F. Conrad; Secretary,
Wm. Bailey, Kimberley.
Chemainus.
Longshoremen's Association, Chemainus and District.—President,    H.    E.    Thornett,    Crofton;
Secretary, F. E. Somerville, Chemainus.
Courtenay.
Lumber  and  Sawmill  Workers  Union,  Local  No.
2797.—President,   0.   M.   Gibbs;     Secretary,   J.
Sundin, Box 105.
Cranbrook.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. 563.-—
President, A. K. Gray; Secretary, Geo. A. Hen-
nessy, P.O. Drawer 878.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, No. 559.
—President, R. Bartholomew; Secretary, M. H.
John, P.O. Box 214.
Machinists, International Association of, Lodge
No. 588.—President, Wm. Henderson; Secretary, R. J. Laurie, Box 544. P 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 229.—President, A. A. Eliason; Secretary, G. C Brown, Box 739.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
173.—President, F. Woolley; Secretary, J. F.
Lunn, Byng Hotel.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 407.—President, E. Gummer; Secretary, H. J. Huxtable,
P.O. Box 262.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 1292.—President, M. R. Belanger;
Secretary, E. G. Dingley, 318 Garden Avenue.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 585.—
President, D. W. Dow; Secretary, P. C. Hart-
nell.
Cumberland.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, No. 178.—
President, R. Leason; Secretary, F. J. Frew,
P.O. Box 618.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7293.
—President, R. Coe; Secretary, J. Robertson,
Box 614.
Deas Island.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 21.—Secretary, C. Tsoukalas, R.R. No. 1, New Westminster.
Deep Bay.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 11.—President, J. Larson; Secretary, E. B. French,
Bowser.
Endako.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 1870.—President, C. Adcock, Isle Pierre;
Secretary, J. Wall.
Enderby.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, J. E. Jamieson, Armstrong; Secretary,
W. B. Hilliard, Enderby.
Fernie.
Brewery Workers of America, United, No. 308.—
President, M. Peterson; Secretary, F. E. Alexander, Box 1071.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—
President, N. Cockburn; Secretary, J. Manning,
Box 658.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1454.—President, P. Decicco; Secretary, H.
Bentham, Box 154.
Fraser Arm.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 12.—Secretary, E. Johnson, Fraser Arm P.O.
Gibsons Landing.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 3.—President, C. Parnwell;   Secretary, J. Corlett.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
Lodge No. 165.—President, H.  Carlson, Donald
Station;    Secretary, M. A. Koski, Box 123.
Haney.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 16.—President, A. Anderson;   Secretary, P. Verigiss.
Hartley Bay.
Native   Brotherhood   of  B.C.,   No.   3.—President,
L. Cliften;   Secretary, John Eaton.
Hazelton.
Native  Brotherhood  of  B.C.,  No.  10.—Secretary,
Charles Clifford.
Herriot Bay.
Fishermen's  Union,  Pacific  Coast,  No.  9.—President, W. Law;   Secretary, T. B. Hundley.
Hutton Mills.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 202.—President, F. P. Donovan;   Secretary,
C. H. Weaver.
Jessica.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No.  1023.—President,  R.  W.  Hall,  Brookmere;
Secretary, C. F. Brown.
Kamloops.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 821.—
President,  W.  R.  Snowden;    Secretary,  W.  A.
Harris, 727 Seymour Street.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 855.—
President, W. M. Cortrite;   Secretary, W. Reive,
433 Landsdown Street.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.
—President, J. Parkin;   Secretary, S. H. Hos-
ken, 788 Nicola Street.
Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Locomotive,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   930.—President,   0.   B.   Hoover;
Secretary, G. Fraser, 1328 River Street.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
148.—President, O. Johnson;   Secretary, Robert
Lapsley, 907 St. Paul Street.
Railway   Conductors,   Order  of,   No.   611.—President, P. McLellan;   Secretary, H. Battison, P.O.
Box 377.
Railway   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   150.—
President, R. E. Arduini; Secretary, A. C. Smith,
721 Victoria Street.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Nos. 30 and
45.—President,  Wm.  Whiteman;    Secretary, J.
Gallagher, 164 Seymour Street.
Railroad   Trainmen,   Brotherhood   of,   No.   519.—■
President, A. J. Boss;    Secretary, V.  H. Mott,
521 Seymour Street.
Kaslo.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,
No. 173.—President, A. H. Dryden;    Secretary,
T. H. Horner, Crescent Road.
Kelowna.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, No. 1-186.—
President,  A.  Swanson,  Oliver;    Secretary,  H.
Chernoff, Box 161, Kelowna.
Kimberley.
Mine Workmen's  Co-operative  Committee,  Sullivan.—President, H. Nicholson;   Secretary, H. C.
Shaw.
Kispiox.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 11.
—President, R. Wilson;   Secretary, Wm. Jeffrey.
Native Brotherhood of British  Columbia, No. 23.
—President, Silas Johnston;   Secretary, W. G.
Jeffrey.
Kitamaat.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 12.
—President, C. Walker;   Secretary, J. Gray.
Kitkatla
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 5.—
President, J. Nelson;   Secretary, P. Mason. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 113
Kitwanga.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 8.—
President, R. Harris;   Secretary, W. Morgan.
Klemtu.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 13.
—President, A. Neasless;   Secretary, Wm. Freeman.
Lake Cowichan.
Lumber  and  Sawmill Workers  Union, No. 80.—
President, F. Wilson;   Secretary, E. A. McLel-
lan, Box 51, Lake Cowichan.
Lund.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 6.—President, J. Murray;   Secretary, C. Miettinen.
McBride.
Railway   Employees,   Canadian   Brotherhood   of,
No.  247.—President,  V.  G.  Leake;    Secretary,
G. T. Holdway, P.O. Box 26.
Maillardville.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, No. 1-183.—
Secretary, E. W. Canuel.
Marguerite.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No.    221.—President,    H.    Robinson,    Wright;
Secretary, A. Sinclair.
Masset.
Native  Brotherhood  of  British  Columbia,  No.  4.
—President,    W.    Matthews;      Secretary,    C.
Matthews.
Metlakatla.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 2.—
Secretary, E. Leighton.
Midway.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood  of,
No. 181.—President, J. Eliason, Nelson;   Secretary, G. Johnson, West Grand Forks.
Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, W. E. Hewlett; Secretary, W. Spencer,
433 Fourth  Street.
Firefighters Association, Nanaimo, No. 7.—President, J. Anthony; Secretary, W. Wardill, 325
Hecate Street.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 13.—Secretary, Harry Summers, 49 Nicol Street.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7355.—
President, E. Webb; Secretary, E. Boyd, Regal
Hall.
Typographical Union, Nanaimo, Local No. 337.—
President, J. B. Paul; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert,
P.O. Box 166.
Utilities Employees Association, Nanaimo-Duncan.
—President, A. Montador; Secretary, J. R.
Adams.
Natal.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7292.—
President, Geo. Mannion, Michel; Secretary, S.
Weaver.
Nelson.
Barbers' (Journeymen) International Union of
America, No. 196.—President, A. J. Hamson;
Secretary, A. N. Fleming, 579 Ward Street.
Carpenters  and Joiners,  United  Brotherhood of,
No.  1843.—President, R.  A.  Dyke;    Secretary,
L. A. McDougall, 707 Cottonwood Street.
8
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, Local No.
579.—President, L. W. Humphrey; Secretary,
E. Jeffcott, K. of P. Hall, Nelson.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 18.—
President, R. Todd; Secretary, L. S. McKinnon,
516 Silica Street.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 631.—President, Wm. Graham;
Secretary,  S.  Smith,  611  Second  Avenue.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Branch
No. 75.—President, F. N. S. Thomson, Rose-
mount; Secretary, G. C. Massey, 306 Third
Street.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 663.—President, S. Newell; Secretary, Fred
Chapman, 415 Behnsen Street.
Railroad Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 98.—President, D. L. Rees; Secretary, G. B. Abbott, K. of
P. Hall, Baker Street.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Kokanee Lodge
No. 460.—President, W. E. Margus; Secretary,
J. Bird, 406 Victoria Street.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
No. 1291.—President, J. S. Brake; Secretary,
E. F. Phillips, 413 Victoria Street.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 558.—
President, R. E. Parker; Secretary, W. R.
Smythe, 623 Carbonate Street.
New Westminster.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders Union of
Canada, No. 1.—President, L. C. Campbell;
Secretary, R. Woodbridge, 2603 Silver Avenue.
Building Workers of Canada, Amalgamated.—
President, W. Lannon; Secretary, W. Taylor,
3030 Miller Avenue, West Burnaby.
Butcher Workers and Meat Cutters Federal
Union, No. 94.—President, F. G. Baxter; Secretary, S. S. Hughes, 57 Elliot Street, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1251.—President, A. O. Forman; Secretary,
S. Spiker, 55 Fourth Street, New Westminster.
Checkers Association, Royal City.—President, J. M.
McMurdo; Secretary, Geo. B. Silk, 808 Thirteenth Street.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R. V. Cheale; Secretary, F. McGrath, 316
Strand Avenue.
Fire Fighters, City, Local Union No. 256.—President, B. Nixon; Secretary, K. K. Highsted,
No. 1 Fire Hall.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 2.—President, R. Wulff; Secretary, W. Hanson, R.R.
No. 3.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 20.—President, T. Demoster; Secretary, C. Tsoukalas,
R.R. No. 1.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 21.—President, D. Ekroth; Secretary, J. H. Dobson, R.R.
No. 3.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
International, Local No. 65, District No. 1.—
President, T. N. Dorman; Secretary, F. Chriss,
1698  Seventeenth Avenue.
Machinists, International Association of, Lodge
No. 151.—President, F. J. Simnett; Secretary,
D. MacDonald, 413 Twelfth Street.
Paper Workers Association, Westminster.—President, L. Pumphrey; Secretary, Blanche Day,
1547 Hamilton Street. P 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 571.—President, James Mitchell; Secretary,
T. H. Poulton, 725 Second Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 226.—President, J. A. Boyd; Secretary, A.
Harrison, 417 Twelfth Street.
Street, Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association
of, Div. 134.—President, R. Cormack; Secretary, W. T. Cook, 1507 Nanaimo Street.
Typographical Union, New Westminster, No. 632.
—President, A. R. MacDonald; Secretary, R. A.
Stoney, Box 754.
Waterfront Workers Association, Royal City.—
President, A. Gore; Secretary, Wm. Fyfe Herd,
71 Tenth Street.
Ocean Falls.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 360.—President, C. A. Thompson;
Secretary, W. E. Collins, Box 366.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 312.—President, H. Bamford;    Secretary, D. A. Robertson.
Parksville.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 533.—President, J. B. Bell, Shawnigan
Lake;   Secretary, H. W. MacKenzie, R.R. No. 1.
Pender Harbour.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 4.—President, J. Cameron; Secretary, W. Davis, Irvine's
Landing.
Penticton.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 866.—
President, R. C. Hansen; Secretary, C. E.
Hulett.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 884.—President, C. P. Bird; Secretary,
A. R. Fulkerson, 724 Winnipeg Street.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426.—President, W. McQuistin; Secretary, T.
Bradley.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Div. 179.—President, Harry Nicholls; Secretary, C. A. Yule,
Box 67.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 914.—
President, H. Denmark; Secretary, H. Nicholson, Box 595.
Pioneer.
Co-operative Association, Pioneer. — President,
Wm. J. Cameron; Secretary, Grant Cameron,
Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, District
1-85.—President, Chas. Michell; Secretary, E. P.
McLeod, P.O. Box 746.
Port Essington.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 6.—
President, T. Campbell;   Secretary, L. Starr.
Port Simpson.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 23.—
President, J. Lawson;   Secretary, A. Wesley.
Powell River.
Fire Fighters, Powell River, Union, Local No. 8.
—President, C. Murray; Secretary, A. McLaren,
Fire Hall.
Papermakers, International Brotherhood of, No.
142.—President, E. A. Murray; Secretary, H. B.
Moore, P.O. Box 55.
Pulp, Sulphite, and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 76.—President, C. Johnston; Secretary, H. L. Hansen,
P.O. Box 507.
Prince George.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive Brotherhood
of.—President, R. R. Anderson; Secretary, F.
Armstrong, P.O. Box 159.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 620.—President, J. G. Sweeney; Secretary, J. E. Paschal,
Box 305.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
28.—President, H. A. McLeod; Secretary, H.
Allen, General Delivery.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1735.—President, J. J. Gillis; Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344.—Secretary, J. W. Pottinger, P.O.
Box 457.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
510.—President, A. A. McEwen; Secretary, J.
Black, Box 860.
Firefighters, International Association of, Local
No. 559.—President, E. W. Becker; Secretary,
A. H. Iveson, General Delivery.
Fishermen's Federal Union of British Columbia,
Deep Sea, No. 80.—President, W. H. Brett;
Secretary, George Andersen, P.O. Box 1675.
Fishermen's Association, The Northern B.C. Resident.—President, I. Nakatani; Secretary, P. Y.
Miki, P.O. Box 880.
Fish Packers Federal Union, No. 49.—President,
James Taylor;   Secretary, O. Pick, Sub. No. 1.
Longshoremen's Association, Canadian. — President, B. Carlson; Secretary, Wm. A. Pilfold,
P.O. Box 531.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 207.
—President, F. A. Rogers; Secretary, P. A.
Bond, General Delivery.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426.—President, F. Barber; Secretary, Frank Derry, P.O. Box 498.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 154.—President, H. Forrest; Secretary, R. B.
Lane, Box 679.
Typographical Union, Prince Rupert, No. 413.—
President, James Campbell; Secretary, A. O.
Franks, P.O. Box 57.
Quathiaski Cove.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 10.—Secretary, C. Hilbert, Quathiaski Cove.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407.—
President, A. Correnti; Secretary, Jas. M.
Goble, Box 283.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 657.
—President, H. W. Keegan; Secretary, G. L.
Ingram, Box 485.
Firemen and Enginemen, Locomotive, Brotherhood
of, No. 341.—President, C. W. Mervyn; Secretary, F. J. Westlake, Box 187. Firemen, Oilers, Helpers, Roundhouse, and Railroad Shop Labourers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 381.—President, D. Black-
well;   Secretary, Samuel Anderson, P.O. Box 7.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 258.
—President, R. Robertson; Secretary, D. Bell,
Box 209.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 481.—President, A. N. Watt; Secretary, A. S. Parker, Box 322.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 487.—President, R. S. Sanders; Secretary, T. B. Philip,
Box 261.
Railwaymen,- Canadian Association of, Local No.
72.—President, Geo. Watson; Secretary, L. W.
File.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 51.—
President, J. L. Bennison; Secretary, D. E.
Johnson, Box 728.
Rivers Inlet.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 16.
—President, S. Walkus;   Secretary, D. Burnard.
Salmo.
Mine,   Mill,   and   Smelter  Workers,  International
Union of.—Secretary, H. Bowen, Box 31.
Sandon.
Miners' Union, Sandon, Local No. 81.—President,
Rod Dewar;   Secretary, Geo. P. Stewart.
Skeena Crossing.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia No. 9.—
President, A. McDames; Secretary, Moses Jones.
Smithers.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Div. 111.—
President, F. Foster;   Secretary, H. D. Johnson,
Box 80.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 1415.
—President,  G.  G.  Calderwood;    Secretary,  D.
McLean.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
93.—President, S. Heavysides;   Secretary, Stan.
Noble.
Railway   Trainmen,   Brotherhood  of,   No.   869.—
President, J. M. Graham;   Secretary, J. H. Rife,
P.O. Box 168.
Smith Inlet.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 17.—
President, G. Walkus, Sr.; Secretary, G. Walkus,
Jr.
Sointula.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 8.—President, B. Kaario;   Secretary, E. Ahola.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 1419.—President, J. E. Holmes; Secretary, W. A. Mahood, P.O. Box 46.
Steveston.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, Local No. 14.—
Secretary, J. Hudson.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, Local No. 15.—
Secretary, Walter Jacobson, 365 Finn Road.
Stuart Island.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 7.—Secretary, A. T. Holm.
Telkwa.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 340.—President, A. K. Hemstreet, Walcott;
Secretary, D. Small, Box 29, Telkwa.
Trail.
Workmen's  Co-operative   Committee. — President,
T. Wilson;   Secretary, J. Ferguson, Box 28.
Vanarsdol.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 335.—President, W. Pobureny, Usk; Secretary, G. Somerville.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia, No. 7.—
President, Mark McKay;   Secretary, A. Bolton.
Vancouver.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers Union, No.
468.—President, R. P. Davis; Secretary, J. A.
Humphreys, 700 Dunsmuir Street.
Bakery Salesmen, Local Union, No. 189, Vancouver, Nanaimo, New Westminster.—President, B.
Janes; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street.
Barbers' Union of America, International, No.
120.—President, R. J. Guthrie; Secretary, R.
English, 529 Beatty Street.
Beverage Dispensers Union, No. 676.—President,
W. G. Couper; Secretary, T. J. Hannafin, 402
Homer Street.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers, and Helpers Union,
No. 151.—President, Wm. J. Bartlett; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048 Second Avenue West.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Welders and
Helpers of America, No. 194.—President, Chas.
McMillan; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross
Street.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, No.
105.—President, Geo. K. Low; Secretary, H. R.
Cummings, 5710 McKinnon Street.
Boot and Shoe Workers Union, No. 505.—President, E. H. Boak; Secretary, Geo. W. Morris,
2532 Scott Street.
Box Employees' Association, B.C.—President, J.
Finlayson; Secretary, J. R. McGillivray, South
End Heather Street.
Bricklayers and Masons, International Union of,
No. 1.—President, Alexander Fordyce; Secretary, W. S. Dagnall, 4005 Perry Street.
Bridge and Ironworkers, International Association
of, No. 97.—President, R. MacDonald; Secretary, J. P. Rankins, Room 311, 531 Beatty Street.
Building Workers, National Union of, No. 1.—
President, G. S. Moore; Secretary, J. P. Carey,
712 Holden Building.
Building Workers of Canada, Factory Unit No. 1.
—President, E. Hill; Secretary, Victor W. Dal-
ziel, 2426 Yale Street.
Building Workers of Canada, Unit No. 1.—President, J. L. Martin; Secretary, J. McKinlay, 163
Hastings Street.
Building Workers of Canada, Shipyard Branch
No. 2.—President, A. E. Arnold; Secretary, W.
Bray, 163 Hastings Street West.
Building Workers of Canada, No. 3.—President,
B. Forbes; Secretary, A. Watson, 6449 Commercial Drive.
Camp and Mill Workers Union, No. 31.—President,
T. Sada; Secretary, T. Umezuki, 544 Powell
Street. P 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Canners Union, Jam, Fruit and Vegetable, No.
105.—President, A. Lee; Secretary, V. Jackson,
126 Powell Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 452.—President, J. G. Smith; Secretary, W.
Page, 529 Beatty Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1025.—President, S. W. Henderson; Secretary, Wm. Ion, 2215 Carolina Stret.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2235.—Shingle Weavers Local.—President,
D. W. Thomas; Secretary, E. E. McNair, 529
Beatty Street.
Checkers and Weighers Association, Marine.—
President, H. G. Dunne; Secretary, A. K. Evans,
505 Dominion Bank Building.
City Hall Employees Association, No. 59.—President, W. M. Black; Secretary, Jas. Tarbuck,
3917 Eleventh Avenue West.
Civic Employees Union, No. 28.—President, William Ash; Secretary, W. J. Scribbens, -3208
Pender Street East.
Civic Federation of Vancouver.—President, F. G.
Lucas; Secretary, R. Skinner, 195 Pender Street
West.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, H. M. Dean; Secretary, H. G. Hunt, 522
Pender Street West.
Divers and Tenders Union, Submarine.—President,
H. E. Ryan; Secretary, Wm. Zess, 1855 Georgia
Street.
Domestic Workers Federal Union, No. 91.—President, Mildred Dougan; Secretary, Mary Johnston, 3147 Georgia Street East.
Electrical Employees, B.C. Telephone Co., Ltd.—
President, H. Dobinson; Secretary, R. H. Mil-
ner, 768 Seymour Street.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
No. 213.—President, H. J. Astbury; Secretary,
W. C. Daley, 2127 Charles Street.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of,
No. 82.—President, Geo. S. Ross; Secretary,
Rod Holmes, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 907.—
President, W. V. Wright; Secretary, John
Meehan, 1915 Haro Street.
Engineers, Locomotive, Brotherhood of, No. 320.—
Chief Engineer, J. H. Lyons; Secretary, H. O. B.
McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating,
Local No. 882.—President, J. Henderson; Secretary, J. Stevenson, 529 Beatty Street.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
963.—President, D. S. Alsbury; Secretary, J. L.
Enefer, 525 Forty-fifth Avenue East.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, No.
115.—President, C. Bouchard; Secretary, A. J.
Livingston, 531 Beatty Street.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 2.—
President, A. W. Cochran; Secretary, G. D.
Lamont, 223 Carrall Street.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, No. 7.
—President, R. W. Pyne; Secretary, E. Read,
319 Pender Street West.
Engineers, National Union of Operating, No. 3.—
President, W. W. Sansom; Secretary, J. E.
Brown, 712, 16 Hastings Street East.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.—
President, E. J. Lambert; Secretary, M. R.
Jordan, 3268 Twentieth Avenue West.
Film Exchange Employees Union, Local B-71.—
President, O. Bird, 2724 Dow Road, Burnaby;
Secretary, D. W. Findlay, 811 Tenth Avenue
West.
Firefighters, B.C. Association of, Local No. 4.—
President, G. Horridge; Secretary, T. W.
Murphy, University Fire Hall.
Firefighters Union, No. 1.—President, E. R. Sly;
Secretary, P. Enright, 1310 Sixty-fourth Avenue West.
Firefighters Union, No. 3.—President, L. S. Whea-
don; Secretary, Wm. H. Galbraith, c/o Fire
Hall, North Vancouver.
Firefighters Union, Local No. S-18.—President,
Jas. Lyon; Secretary, Chas. A. Watson, 1626
Thirteenth Avenue East.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of, No. 656.
—President, T. McEwan; Secretary, C. W. Pul-
ham, 3174 Fifth Avenue West.
Firemen and Oiler Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 289.—President, E. Daem;
Secretary, W. R. Chapman, 1165 Beach Avenue.
First Aid Attendants' Association. ■— President,
W. H. South; Secretary, N. Mclnnis, 303a
Pender Street West.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 1.—President, T. Harris; Secretary, A. Neish, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 5.—President, J. Webber; Secretary, R. Gray, 171
Seventy-fourth Avenue East.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 18.—President, R. Stewart; Secretary, J. Dupray, Vancouver Heights P.O.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, members at
large.—General President, P. Sabin; General
Secretary, A. V. Hill, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, H.Q.—President,
P. Sabin; Secretary, A. V. Hill, 164 Hastings
Street East.
Fishermen's Union, United Brotherhood of, B.C.,
Local No. 44.—President, Matt Nielson; Secretary, M. E. Guest, 164 Hastings Street East.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of British Columbia.—President, Capt. Charles Prince; Secretary, Rolph Bremer, 163 Hastings Street West.
Garment Workers of America, United, No. 190.—
President, Mary Poole; Secretary, Wm. R. Harrison, 3046 Sixth Avenue West.
Garment Workers of America, International
Ladies, No. 276.—President, Harold Appleton;
Secretary, Roland Jackson, 3336 Porter Street.
Granite Cutters' Association of America, Vancouver Branch.—President, A. Simpson; Secretary,
Wm. Morrice, Obrien Hall, Hastings Street.
Hod Carriers Building and Labourers' Union, No.
602.—President, J. F. Johnson; Secretary, H. W.
Watts, 531 Beatty Street.
Hospital Employees' Union, Shaughnessy.—President, Miss McCarthy; Secretary, Mrs. Woodman, 2615 Keith Drive.
Hospital Employees' Union, No. 4.—President,
Mrs. Morey; Secretary, Mrs. Williams, 895
Forty-ninth Avenue East.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, No. 28.—
President, W. Stewart; Secretary, W. Gateman,
1257 Pacific Street.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific.—President, R. Sullivan; Secretary, C. N. Coe, 3268
Millgrove Street, Victoria, B.C. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 117
Iron Moulders Union, No. 281.—President, Geo.
Edwards; Secretary, J. Browne, 638 Broadway
West.
Jewellery Workers, International Union of, No.
42.—President, C. V. Smith; Secretary, Wm.
Richardson, 4825 Lanark Street.
Journalists, B.C. Institute of, No. 1.—President,
C. M. Defieux; Secretary, Will Dawson, c/o the
Daily Sun, Pender Street.
Lathers' Union, International Union of, Local No.
207.—President, W. Fontaine; Secretary, M. G.
Finlayson, 116 Hastings Street West.
Letter Carriers, Federal Association of, No. 12.—
President, A. Thomson; Secretary, John Cass,
850 Thirty-first Avenue East.
Lithographers of America, Local No. 44.—President, C. Addie; Secretary, R. H. Bain, 2831
Thirty-seventh Avenue West.
Longshoremen's Association, Burrard Coastwise.
—President, Thomas Yates; Secretary, A. E.
Nichols, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Longshoremen's Association, Vancouver. — President, D. Paull; Secretary, Gus G. Band, Japan
Dock, North Vancouver.
Longshoremen's Association, Vancouver. — President, J. Boyes; Secretary, H. Burgess, 45 Dun-
levy Avenue.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, No.
11.—President, W. Taylor; Secretary, A. Boutin,
143 Cordova Street East.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Vancouver
Local No. 71.—President, J. MacCuish; Secretary, A. A. MacNeil, 130 Hastings Street West.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Local No.
74. —President, H. Hooff; Secretary, N. 0.
Arseneau, 130 Hastings Street West.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 182.
—President, B. S. Oliver; Secretary, Jas. Wallace, 3271 Fifteenth Avenue West.
Machinists, International Association of, Lodge
No. 692.—President, G. Sangster; Secretary, J.
McMillan, 529 Beatty Street.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 1382.
—President, Wm. Nevard; Secretary, V. Spencer, 529 Beatty Street.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, No. 70.—President,
A. R. C. Holmes; Secretary, H. E. Fader, 2725
Eton Street.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Lodge No. 31.—
President G. D. Knowles; Secretary, R. McLure,
4269 Victoria Drive.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Lodge No. 167.—
President, G. Ades; Secretary, T. H. Gibb, 3301
Kingsway.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Lodge No. 210.-—
President, J. Fraser; Secretary, R. Halliday,
3481 Georgia Street East.
Meat Cutters and Packing House Employees'
Union, No. 95.—President, T. H. Bohart; Secretary, H. Douglas, Labour Headquarters, Beatty
Street.
Milk Drivers and Dairy Employees' Union, No.
464.—President, R. McCulloch; Secretary, Birt
Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Miners' Union, Vancouver District, No. 289.—
President, T. R. Forkin; Secretary, G. F. Price,
16 Hastings Street East.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 145.—
President, J. Bowyer; Secretary, E. A. Jamieson, 732 Seymour Street.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver.—President, E. N.
Brown, Jr.; Secretary, Miss Doris Milligan, 46,
1101 Nicola Street.
Painters, Paperhangers, and Decorators, International Union of, No. 138.—President, J. Gamble;
Secretary, E. Smith, 529 Beatty Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers, International Union of, Local No. 954.—President, Wm.
A. Brown; Secretary, Geo. E. Barnes, 529
Beatty Street.
Paper Box Co., Ltd., Employees' Association,
National.—President, A. Cameron; Secretary,
R. C. Lucas, 160 Third Avenue West.
Photo Engravers' Union, No. 54.—President, W.
Wilson; Secretary, J. A. Hinke, Labour Hall,
Beatty Street.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock and Wharf Builders'
Union, No. 2404.—President, L. J. Corbett; Secretary, J. McGuffie, 144 Hastings Street West.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers' International
Association of U.S.A. and Canada, Local No. 89.
—President, D. Bain; Secretary, Reg. Foster,
529 Beatty Street.
Plasterers and Cement Finishers' International
Association, No. 779.—President, T. Chilton;
Secretary, A. Wilson, 4258 Ontario Street.
Plumbers and Steam Fitters, United Association
of, No. 170.—President, R. Little; Secretary,
C. Pritchard, 529 Beatty Street.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 69.
—President, M. Erenberg; Secretary, T. S.
Ezart, 1807 Thirty-eighth Avenue East.
Projectionists' Society, British Columbia, Local
No. 348.—President, R. G. Pollock; Secretary,
F. W. Smith, P.O. Box 345.
Pursers and Chief Stewards' Association, No. 130.
—President, R. G. Reed; Secretary, J. S, Hale,
531 Beatty Street.
Purse Seiners' Union, Salmon, No. 6.—President,
M. Ruljanovich; Secretary, Geo. Miller, 164
Hastings  Street East.
Railway Carmen of America, Lodge No. 58.—
President, H. Warde; Secretary, S. S. Shearer,
Canadian  Pacific Railway, Drake Street.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Pacific Division
267.—President, J. R. Burton; Secretary, J. B.
Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division 59.—President, A. Shreeve, 4564 First
Avenue West; Secretary, H. Strange, 3616 Victory Street, New Westminster.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division 206.—President, J. Furlang; Secretary,
A. D. McDonald, P.O. Box 415.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association. — President,
H. F. Hatt; Secretary, F. W. Hitchcock, Railway Mail Service.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, No. 74.—
Chairman, A. Poller, 812 Fourth Street North,
New Westminster; Secretary, H. S. Evans, 347
Forty-eighth Avenue East.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 46.—
President, R. Dixon; Secretary, H. E. Barnes,
2986 Tenth Avenue West.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 626.—
President, R. C. Walker; Secretary, M. Me-
Gilvray, 1052 Richards Street. P 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 630.—
President, J. W. Hope; Secretary, W. J. Mason,
3116 Thirteenth Avenue West.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express and Station Employees, No. 2265.—
President, James McLaughlin; Secretary, Elbert
Vance, 2041 Forty-first Avenue East.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144.—
President, W. Pennington; Secretary, R. H.
Blackwell, 557 Fifty-sixth Avenue East.
Rays, Limited, and Associated Companies Employees' Association, No. 1.—President, E. P. James;
Secretary, E. Sanderson, 207 Hastings Street
West.
Retail Clerks International Protective Association,
No. 279.—President, J. 0. Stinson; Secretary,
D. S. Maxwell, 16 Hastings Street East.
Retail Employees' Association, No. 1.—President,
R. M. Stevenson; Secretary, A. J. Huckvale,
1210 Jervis Street.
Rob Roy Employees' Association.—President, Vic.
Ohler; Secretary, Olive Dahlquist, 812 Hornby
Street.
Sailors' Union of the Pacific. — Secretary, T.
Hardy, 262 Columbia Street.
Seafarers' Association, Canadian. — President,
H. H. Taylor; Secretary, H. Dean, 405 Powell
Street.
Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 314.—President,
H. H. Swinden; Secretary, Geo. Watson, 1909
Nineteenth Avenue East.
Sheet Metal Workers' Association, Local No. 280.
—President, R. Macaulay; Secretary, D. Mac-
pherson, 529 Beatty Street.
Shingle Weavers' Local Union, No. 149.—President, V. S. Carlyle; Secretary, Martin Bowles,
529 Beatty Street.
Shipyard Labourers' Federal Union, No. 126.—
President, K. W. Kennedy; Secretary, G. Lawrence, 773 Tenth Avenue East.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Local Union, No. 726.
—President, J. B. Collin; Secretary, Wm. O.
Clarkson, 2112 Adanac Street.
Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers, and Assistants' Local Union, No. 18177.—President, Jessie
M. Sutherland; Secretary, Anne MacDonald,
529 Beatty Street.
Stonecutters' Association of North America.-—
President, F. H. Lowe, 4455 Douglas Road,
Burnaby; Secretary, Frank Hall, 2931 Forty-
second Avenue East.
Street-railway and Motor-coach Employees' Association, No. 101.—President, T. Dunlop; Secretary, S. T. Wybourn, Prior and Main Streets.
Tailors' Union of America, No. 178.—President,
C. A. Laing; Secretary, G. Turnbull, 304
Twenty-eighth Avenue East.
Taxi, Stage and Bus Drivers' Union, No. 151.—
President, J. Caithcart; Secretary, C. Mclvor,
727 Twentieth Avenue West.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — President, J. M.
Thomas; Secretary, P. N. Whitley, 1300 Robson
Street.
Telegraphers, Commercial Union of, Div. 1.—
President, W. D. Brine; Secretary, G. W. Campbell, Box 432.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance of, No. 118.—President, W. Danby; Secretary, W. Black, P.O. Box 711.
Tile, Marble and Terraza Helpers' Union, No. 78.
—President, A. Crossley; Secretary, J. Smith,
5009 Payne Street.
Tilesetters Local No. 3, B.C.—President, R. Neville;
Secretary, W. Richards, 5326 Spencer Street.
Transportation Employees, Canadian Federation
of.—President, J. F. Nelson; Secretary, F. W.
Crawford, Murray Hotel.
Truck Drivers and Helpers' Local Union, No. 31.—
President, H. J. Ashbee; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street.
Typographical Union, Vancouver, No. 226.—President, Thos. A. Holland; Secretary, R. H. Nee-
lands, 529 Beatty Street.
Upholsterers, Furniture and Carpet Workers'
Union, No. 306.—President, R. W. Hall; Secretary, B. C. Hankin, 531 Beatty Street.
Warehouse Employees' Association, Shanahan's.—
President, M. McConachie; Secretary, D. M.
Keir, foot Campbell Avenue.
Waterfront Workers' Association, No. 2104.—
President, C. E. Bailey; Secretary, A. G. Smith,
45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., No. 1. — President,
E. A. Hill; Secretary, V. W. Dalziel, 16 Hastings Street East.
Vernon.
Public Service Plant Employees' Association, Canadian.—President, A. B. Edwards; Secretary,
R. W. Mclndoe.
Typographical Union, Vernon, No. 541.—President, J. E. Jamieson; Secretary, W. B. Hilliard,
R.R. 1, Enderby.
Victoria.
Barbers' (Journeymen) International Union of
America, Local No. 372.—President, Geo. A.
Turner; Secretary, Jas. A. Green, 1319 Douglas
Street.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders' Union of
Canada, No. 2.—President, James P. Veitch;
Secretary, A. G. Jacques, 619 Canteen Road.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local 191.—President, L. Basso; Secretary, W. S. Duncan, 1409
May Street.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 147.—President, W. W. Laing; Secretary,
J. A. Wiley, 141 Clarence Street.
Brewery, Flour and Soft Drink Workers, United
Brotherhood of, No. 280.—President, J. H.Allen;
Secretary, W. Bryan, 2642 Scott Street.
Bricklayers and Masons, International Union of,
No. 2. — President, W. Mertton; Secretary,
James Beckerley, 337 Robertson Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 2415.—President, S. Berrow; Secretary, E.
Hovey, 939 Empress Street.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1598.—President, L. W. Noble; Secretary,
J. T. Townsend, Box 26.
Chauffeurs  Association,  Vancouver  Island,  Class
. " A."—President, D. L. Huckin; Secretary, C. H.
Morrison, 1228 Langley Street.
City Hall Officials' Association.—President, E. E.
Hardisty; Secretary, S. Hodgkinson, 2726 Blackwood Street.
Civic Employees' Federation of Greater Victoria.
—President, C. Morton; Secretary, T. G. Harris,
City Hall. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 119
Civic Employees' Union, No. 50.—President, W. J.
Hooper; Secretary, R. Betts, 2858 Shakespeare
Street.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, J. R. Cleator; Secretary, W. S. Fraser,
Lower Law Chambers, Bastion Street.
Coach Lines Operators' Association, Vancouver
Island.—Committee: Ed. Wilkinson, J. Simpson,
and Jack Sykes, Broughton Street.
Electrical Workers' International Union, No. 230.
—President, R. D. Lemmax; Secretary, I. F.
Smith, 542 Langford Street.
Engineers, National Association of Marine, No. 6.
—President, D. MacRaild; Secretary, G. W.
Brown, Room 409, Union Building.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 20.
—President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, T. E.
Dutot, 1546 Bank Street.
Fire Fighters, Provincial Association of, Local
No. 2.—President, K. Mills; Secretary, J. Lusse,
No. 1 Fire Hall.
Fire Fighters Association, Oak Bay Municipal,
Local No. 5.—President, H. Bates; Secretary,
A. G. Leason, 1703 Monterey Avenue.
Fire Fighters Association, Provincial, of British
Columbia, Local No. 6.—President, A. J. Snel-
ling; Secretary, F. V. Miller, 3680 Douglas
Street.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, Lodge No. 690.—President, E. W. Collins; Secretary, Austin Craven, 36 Howe Street.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 17.—Secretary, D. McKenzie, Suite 6, Leland Apartments.
Garage Employees' Association, Vancouver Island
Coach Lines.—President, A. Brayshaw; Secretary, E. Jones.
Government Employees, American Federation of,
Lodge No. 59.—President, E. L. St. Martin;
Secretary, E. E. David, P.O. Box 59.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees, Alliance of,
Local No. 459.—President, F. Welsh; Secretary,
F. Dovey, P.O. Box 233.
Inland Boatmen's Union of the Pacific.—President,
R. Sullivan; Secretary, C. N. Coe, 3268 Mill-
grove Street.
Iron Moulders Union of North America, Local No.
144.—President, B. Jacklin, Esquimalt P.O.;
Secretary, Archie Clegg, 240 Burnside Road.
Journalists, B.C. Institute of, Branch No. 2.—
President, Muriel Richards; Secretary, Roy
Murdock, c/o The Daily Colonist.
Lathers' International Union, No. 332.—President,
D. W. Townsend; Secretary, J. B. White, Mount
Tolmie P.O., Victoria.
Lathers' Association, Vancouver Island. — President, E. Day; Secretary, V. Midgley, 3258 Irma
Street.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11.
—President, W. J. Knotts; Secretary, F. C.
Hurry, 898 Front Street.
Library, Victoria Public Staff Association.—President, Miss T. Pollock; Secretary, Miss Dora
Payne, 746 Yates Street.
Longshoremen's Association, Victoria.—President,
J. Lackie; Secretary, W. N. Scott, 270 Dallas
Road.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Local No.
122.—President, T. R. Lidgate; Secretary, E.
Logan, 451 Walter Avenue.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No.
456.—President, A. Wallace; Secretary, C. H.
Lester, 1319 Government Street.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 2824.—President, J. H. Davies; Secretary, Arthur Cann, R.M.D. No. 1.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, No. 247.—
President, Wm. F. Tickle; Secretary, F. V.
Homan, 602 Broughton Street.
Painters & Paperhangers Association, Victoria
and District.—President, J. Beckett; Secretary,
E. W. Merriman, 402 John Street.
Pantorium Employees' Association. — President,
M. C. Milley; Secretary, G. R. Beek, 376 Cook
Street.
Papermakers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 367.—
President, J. Frew; Secretary, J. H. McManus,
2664 Lincoln Road.
Police Mutual Benevolent Association.—President,
H. Jarvis; Secretary, S. T. Holmes, 625 Fis-
guard  Street.
Postal Employees' Union, Canadian, Victoria
Local.—President, H. W. Adams; Secretary,
J. H. Hedley, 1166 Chapman Street.
Printing, Pressmen and Assistants' Union, No. 79.
—President, T. Nute; Secretary, F. H. Larssen,
1236 McKenzie Street.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, No. 50.—President, J. Stephenson; Secretary, H. Greaves, 638
Victoria Avenue.
Railway Conductors, Order of, No. 289.—President, E. H. Spall; Secretary, Jas. N. Forde, 707
Wilson Street.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, No.
222.—President, G. King; Secretary, G. L.
Woollett, Point Ellice, C.N.R.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 1137.—President, D. MacKinnon;
Secretary, W. H. White, 3040 Carrol Street.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 613.—
President, B. L. Sterling; Secretary, C. H.
Cross, A.O.F. Hall, Cormorant Street.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, No. 604.—President, James Talbot; Secretary, H. H. Hollins, 41 Arcade Building.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 118.—President, J. A.
King; Secretary, T. E. Harrison, 515 Gore
Street.
Sheet Metal Workers' Association. — President,
Roy Wilson; Secretary, A. J. Stevenson, 937
Fort  Street.
Sightseeing and Transportation Company Bus
Drivers' Association.—President, D. L. Huckin;
Secretary, A. R. Wall, 968 Yates Street.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Local No. 109.—President,
E. F. Fox; Secretary, W. Turner, corner Broad
and Yates Streets.
Theatrical Stage Employees, International Alliance of, No. 168.—President, R. Jones; Secretary, Carl Rau, P.O. Box 524.
Truck Drivers and Helpers' Local Union, No. 101.
—President, H. Swetman; Secretary, E. Belton,
2387 Estevan Avenue.
Typographical Union, No. 201.—President, J. D.
Davidson; Secretary, James Petrie, Room 311,
Jones Building.
Westview.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 2068.—President, Erik McKela; Secretary, A. H. Marchand, Westview P.O. P 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
White Rock.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal and Soft Drink Workers,
International Union of, Local No. 300.—President,  W.  Tyler,  Cemetery  Street,  New Westminster;   A. Bowers, White Rock P.O.
Whonnock.
Fishermen's Protective Association, Local No. 1.—
President, R. E. Ritchie;   Secretary, F. Rolley.
Fishermen's Protective Association, Local No. 2.—
President, B. Larsen;   Secretary, F. Rolley.
Fishermen's Protective Association, Local No. 3.—
President, M. V. Vidulich.
Fishermen's Protective Association, Local No. 14.
—President, F. C. Probert, Glen Valley; Secretary, F. Rolley.
Fishermen's Union, Pacific Coast, No. 19.—President, A. Halveson;   Secretary, A. Gilstead.
Ymir.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, No. 300.
—President, D. McKay;   Secretary, G. M. Bar-
nett.
Zeballos.
Mine,   Mill   and   Smelter   Workers,   International
Union, No. 450.—President, T. Russell;   Secretary, W. J. Mesco.
ORGANIZATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
Fernie.
Coal Operators' Association, Western Canada
Bituminous, Fernie Branch.—President, R. M.
Young, Canmore Mines, Ltd., Canmore, Alberta;
B.C. Secretary, J. R. Smith, Western Canadian
Collieries, Blairmore, Alberta.
Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries' Exchange.
—President, Col. J. F. Keen; Secretary, R.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West.
Building Contractors' Association. — President,
J. L. Northey; Secretary, H. H. Rostill, 342
Pender Street West.
Canned Salmon Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—Chairman, S. M. Rosenberg; Secretary, L. Richmond, 355 Burrard Street.
Contractors' Association, General. — President,
N. D. Lambert; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342
Pender Street West.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, C.
Jarvis; Secretary, S. F. Ricketts, 535 Homer
Street.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of British
Columbia.—President, A. A. Christiansen, R.R.
No. 1, New Westminster; Secretary, Rolph
Bremer,  163  Hastings  Street West.
Hotels' Association, B.C.—President, B. M. Davis;
Secretary, J. J. Kahn, 626 Pender Street West.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—
President, W. L. Macken; Secretary, Miss M. M.
Riley, 355 Burrard Street.
Jewellers' Association, Inc., Canadian, B.C. Section.—President, F. W. Sanguine; Secretary,
A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners and Linen Supply Club,
Vancouver.—President, Wm. R. Morrow; Secretary, A. R. Bernard, 910 Richards Street.
Loggers' Association, British Columbia. — President, R. C. Richardson;   Secretary, R. V. Stuart.
Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association,
B.C.—President, J. G. Robson; Secretary, T. H.
Wilkinson, 837 Hastings Street West.
Meal, Oil, and Salt Fish Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association.—Chairman, R. Nelson; Secretary, L. Richmond, 355
Burrard Street.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association.—Chairman, H. F. Letson; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608 Marine Building.
Printers' Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association.—Chairman, C. Chapman; Secretary,
Audrey Parkinson, 355 Burrard Street.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.—■
President, J. M. Watson; Secretary, Geo. R.
Matthews, 744 Hastings  Street West.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President, Capt. B. L. Johnson; Secretary, C. W.
Train, 45 Dunlevy Avenue.
Storage and Transfermen's Association, Canadian.
—President, Geo. S. Peacock; Secretary, Elmer
Johnston, 300 Pender Street West.
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association
of B.C.—President, S. H. Small; Secretary, J. M.
Richardson, 626 Pender Street West.
Victoria.
Bakers' Association, Victoria Master.—President,
W. J. Rennie;   Secretary, T. P. McConnell, 625
Fort Street.
Builders'   Exchange,  Victoria. — President,  L.   G.
Scott;   Secretary, W. J. Hamilton, 1712 Douglas
Street.
Electrical Association, Victoria.—President, R. T.
Murphy;   Secretary, A. R. Colby, 645 Pandora
Avenue. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 121
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 14th, 1939.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for the
year 1938.
Personal observation and interviews with management previous to or following our
inspections of industrial plants indicated, particularly towards the latter portion of the year
under review, that there was inclined to be a slowing-up of industry. In widely separated
portions of the Province we noted similar conditions existing in this respect. Plants inspected
by us in recent years had ceased operations, and yet, within a short radius, new structures
were being built to house new machinery used in connection with the operation of an industry
similar in processing procedure to those that, through a combination of circumstances, had
been forced to suspend operations.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1938, 1,972 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
While there may be difference of opinion as to the methods employed, there should not be
any question regarding the necessity of providing the workman who risks his life, health, or
sight in the service of industry with the highest degree of protection that can be given him.
With this end in view, we note with satisfaction that designers of modern machinery are
meeting with a large measure of success in their efforts to build safety into their machines.
Some of our local machinery manufacturers have not given this subject the attention it
merits, as will be illustrated by the following: While making an inspection of a somewhat
congested plant, we drew the attention of the owner to an exposed unguarded gear and pinion,
together with a set-screw projecting seven-eighths of an inch above the surface of the collar.
When informed of these hazards and methods to be taken for the elimination of same, he
stated that he had purchased the machine from the manufacturer only a week previous.
Upon securing the name of this manufacturer we visited his plant, and when this condition
was brought to his attention we received his assurance that all machines of his manufacture
would be equipped with metal guards and headless set-screws before leaving the shop. Here
was a situation where a hazard was knowingly introduced and allowed to exist. We believe
that if it had not been detected it would have been the cause of some employee receiving
serious injuries, and both the purchaser and the manufacturer of the machine were equally
responsible for permitting such a condition to exist. Until such time as a certain standard
is set which prohibits the installation and operation of all machinery which does not conform
with exceedingly rigid safety requirements, avoidable accidents will continue to occur.
It is not sufficient that the imperfect machine be safeguarded after it is placed in the factory.
Each machine should be completely safeguarded in the process of building.
Investigation of injuries received by workmen reveals that they cannot be attributed
solely to failure on the part of the employer to provide adequate mechanical safeguards.
All too frequently we find during our investigation of an accident that the injured employee
has either removed, or in some other manner rendered ineffective, safeguards which have
been provided. It is only reasonable to expect that, if the employer has provided adequate
safeguards and furnished competent supervision to issue the necessary instructions, the
employee will co-operate and see to it that all guards are kept in place.
Twenty-five years ago accidents and industrial employment were almost analogous. We
thought of the factory as a place where accidents were bound to occur, and they were usually
charged as the price of industry. Comparison of present-day working conditions in factories
with those of twenty-five years ago indicates that management now realizes that when their
employees come to work in the morning they are practically entrusting themselves to their
employers' care for a certain number of hours each day. This applies not only to their safety
but to their well-being in every respect.    Recognition by industry of its responsibility in this P 122 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
respect has resulted in the factories being made a much healthier and safer place in which to
earn a livelihood.
PROSECUTIONS.
One proprietor and one superintendent of a factory were each fined $50 and costs upon
being convicted of working their female factory employees excessive hours. Two proprietors
of dry-cleaning plants were each fined $50 and costs for having operated their plants after
the hour of 7 p.m. A proprietor of a laundry and a superintendent of a box-factory were
each fined $50 and costs upon being convicted of operating their plants on a statutory holiday.
HOLIDAY PERMITS.
During the year 135 permits authorizing the operation of factories on statutory holidays
were issued; these permits were issued in cases of extreme emergency only, and to industries
the nature of which require continuous operation.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
In reporting the issuance of sixty-five overtime permits, extending the working hours of
female factory employees to not more than nine in any one day or fifty-four in any one week,
the impression may be created, particularly in the mind of an unemployed person, that consistency is lacking in the enforcement of the forty-eight-hour working-week. While section
13 of the " Factories Act" authorizes the Inspector under certain specified conditions to
issue these permits, same are granted only, after investigation, in order to determine if it
would be possible to employ additional workers. This procedure has in a number of instances
been the means of providing part-time employment for persons who were unemployed.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
While we believe that working conditions existing in factories in this Province will stand
favourable comparison with those of the other Provinces, difficulties are encountered from
time to time in maintaining a certain standard. Having a wide variety of industrial occupations we also have a wide variety of management directing same, whose views, in so far as
they relate to the health, safety, and comfort of their employees, differ as widely as the
products they produce.
We have in the industrial centres of the Province certain factories in which women
employees predominate, and for various reasons it is necessary for them to bring a lunch and
partake of the noonday meal at their place of employment. While by far the greater majority
of employers provide a room separate from the factory proper for this purpose we find,
periodically, between visits of inspection, that the industry has grown beyond expectations,
and owing to the limited area available no provision has been made for a dining-room. In one
instance during the year under review the management not only questioned the necessity of
this facility but also questioned our authority to order same. Police Court proceedings were
only avoided by the management placing a room in the office for the exclusive use of the
female factory employees during lunch-hour.
It should not be necessary to state that it is not the policy of this Department to place
obstacles in the way of industry. However, when industrial management, because of expansion and also because a very low rental fee could be obtained, requests us to authorize the
removal of power-driven machinery from an overcrowded work-room to a basement below the
street-level, where it would be impossible to properly ventilate it and artificial lighting would
have to be resorted to during the entire work-day, if refusal of this request in the interest of
the welfare of the employees involved is interpreted as such, we can only state that the time
is past when such working conditions will be allowed to be introduced. The solution in the
case as cited was obtained by the removal of partitions on an upper floor, thus providing a
large, bright, airy work-room.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
Our visits of inspection revealed an increasing interest being taken by industrial management in what may be termed their employees' welfare, which covers a wide variety of
activities affecting the well-being of their workers. This does not apply exclusively to large
industrial undertakings.    It is significant to note that the small establishments are showing REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 123
an increasing interest in this respect. Regardless of the size of the industrial undertaking,
the directors of same are more and more appreciating the fact that the welfare of their
workers affects, very materially, the prosperity of their business as a whole.
To illustrate to what extent facilities are provided for those employees who care to use
them, we cite the following: While making an inspection of a plant, we desired information
from an employee in a certain department relative to the hazards of his occupation. When
he was finally located after completing his eight-hour work-day, he was found to be enjoying
a plunge-bath previous to leaving the plant. Under the circumstances, the interview we
desired was held the following day. In another instance we had almost completed our inspection of a plant when the whistle blew at 3 p.m.; all production was stopped and both male
and female employees were noted to be adjourning to an up-stairs room. Upon inquiring as
to the reason of same, the superintendent requested the Inspector to join him and together
we entered a spotlessly clean dining-room where, surrounded by employees, we enjoyed a cup
of tea with refreshments to the accompaniment of music supplied by a radio. This procedure
is now an established custom, namely, a ten-minute period at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. each work-day.
HOME-WORK.
Inspection of factories manufacturing ladies' wearing-apparel which previous to Part II.
of the " Factories Act " being enacted gave employment to a far greater number of persons
in the home than was recorded in the factory, revealed this situation to be entirely the reverse.
To what extent these former home-workers have accepted employment in these factories
is difficult to say, but we are certain that this legislation has been the means of vastly
increasing the number of female factory employees. The entrance of these employees into
supervised industry has not only proven beneficial to them as individuals but it has also
eliminated a most unfair competitive condition which previously existed. And further, the
public interest has also been served in this respect, that garments formerly made in homes
where sanitation was of secondary importance are now being manufactured under proper
sanitary conditions. In order to provide adequate accommodation for these additional workers,
new factories have been built and extensions have been made to present plants during the
year under review.
While " home-work " has long been considered something that should be abolished we
have, in the course of our investigations, learned to realize that a certain type of industrial
home-work, properly regulated, can serve a very useful purpose, as it enables incapacitated
persons to earn a livelihood in their homes. With this in view, a limited number of homework permits have been issued.
ELEVATORS.
It has been said, and nobody has ever been able to refute the statement, that more persons
travel in elevators every day than are transported in railway-trains, street-cars, or automobiles. Unlike other forms of transportation, once the car is installed its path is limited to a
vertical straight line guided in its ascent and descent by guide-rails, the length of which are
determined by the height of the building in which the elevator is installed.
In order to make the elevator the safest mode of conveyance the manufacturers have,
through the years, developed and perfected numerous safety devices in connection with its
operation, not the least important of these being what is termed a hoistway door and car-gate
interlock. Previous to the year 1935 it was optional with the manufacturer and purchaser
whether or not interlocking devices would form a part of a completed elevator installation.
Failure to provide this equipment on a very large majority of passenger and freight elevators
was a prolific cause of both fatal and major accidents. As stated in previous reports, Order
in Council No. 139, issued February 4th, 1935, as amended June 9th, 1936, required these
safety devices to be installed prior to a certain date, which has now expired.
Owing to somewhat of a mechanical problem being involved in adapting interlocking
devices to freight-elevators of a hydraulic type and also those equipped with hatch-covers, we
are unable at this time to report complete compliance. The effectiveness of interlocking
devices as a means of preventing injuries to persons while being transported on passenger or
freight elevators is conclusively proven by the fact that we are able to report that no person
has been injured on any elevator provided with this equipment. P 124 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
We regret, however, to have to report the following in connection with a fatal accident
which occurred to a woman while being transported on a freight-elevator, the hoistway gates
of which had not been equipped with interlocking devices. Deceased, who was employed as
a garment-worker, entered her place of employment at approximately 8.20 a.m., boarded the
freight-elevator at the main floor, and requested the shipping clerk to pull the control cable
and send the elevator to the fifth floor, where the car stops automatically. Shortly after the
elevator reached the top floor a strange sound was heard by the shipping clerk, and investigation by him revealed that deceased had fallen into the shaftway. While nobody actually witnessed the accident, the fact that the hat of deceased and a parcel which she was carrying
when boarding the elevator were found in the space between the gate forming protection in
front of the elevator shaftway and fire-door on the fourth floor would indicate that for some
unknown reason deceased, while the car was in motion, opened the gate, stepped off the
moving elevator, and in some undetermined manner fell from the fourth floor to the elevator
pit, receiving injuries which later proved fatal.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1938, 859 operators' licences were renewed and 212 temporary and 193 permanent
licences issued.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
Forty-one plans and specifications relating to installation of modern elevator equipment
were approved—namely, freight-elevators, passenger-elevators, and dumb-waiters.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1938, 1,268 passenger and freight elevators were inspected.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected with
industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 125
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent       Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer and
Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets. _ —  )  „ ._  _,,      .   -, .   .     ,    ,
-it                   ,_.          ,   ,_        , .            -.-                 , _             .en G. E. Street, Superintendent.
Vancouver (Women s Branch), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets  (
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets   i ,..  -,  ...
,,. .    .     .,,, ,   _        v.   t.     i l     tj  •«■       t.   i c.i     i > W. 6. Stone, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women s Branch), Pemberton Building, Fort Street  (
New Westminster      Eobt. MacDonald, Superintendent.
Nanaimo  _  J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops    .J. E. Andrews, Superintendent.
Penticton    .....A. Coy, Superintendent.
Nelson    _    J. M. Dronsfield, Superintendent.
Prince George..  B. Victor Whiting, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert _   J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
I" G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets...  J R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets   W. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the Twentieth Annual Report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the
calendar year 1938.
The annual influx of transient unemployed men and women remained one of the principal
problems confronting the Service, and these transients, because of their inability to obtain
relief, secured employment which should have gone to residents of the Province, often without
much regard for the Minimum Wage laws. Establishment of work camps for single men
unable to obtain other employment was undertaken on a different basis than has hitherto been
attempted, in that all transients admitted to camps were required to earn an amount sufficient
to cover the cost of meals and transportation for return to their place of domicile. For other
single men admitted to camps under Public Works and Forestry Works Projects, the deferred-
pay plan, introduced in 1937, was continued with a greater measure of success. These earn-
your-way-home and deferred-pay plans appear to have reduced agitation materially, and it is
hoped that they will, to some degree, diminish the annual trek to the Coast.
In October, Mr. James Mitchell, Superintendent of the Vancouver offices, applied for and
was granted superannuation. He had been connected with the Service almost since its
beginning and his departure ended a long period of faithful service. The vacancy was filled
by the promotion of Mr. Geo. E. Street, who has almost an equal length of service in various
capacities.
In January, 1939, the Department held its annual meeting of the officials of the different
branches and the Employment Service was able to bring the majority of the members of the
staff together for the first time in many years. The opportunity of discussing the problems
of special and general interest was much appreciated and resulted in a better understanding
of the work of the different branches of the Department.
YOUTH TRAINING PLANS.
Under the Dominion-Provincial agreements, Young Men's Forestry and Placer-mining
Training Camps were again successfully operated, and the Employment Service has been able
to place a considerable number of the qualified trainees in the larger operating mines. In
placement of forestry trainees there has not been the same measure of success. The trend of
thought of the trainees appears to be that the Government having trained them should also
undertake to find work for them when training is completed. P 126 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WORK SCHEME IN VANCOUVER.
In co-operation Provincial and municipal authorities continued the local work test requiring recipients of material aid to work for part of their allowances, the selection and directing
of men to works being again undertaken by the Employment Service.
Under the scheme during the period under review, the estimated number of man-days
worked was approximately 90,000 and, assuming that the efficiency was only 50 per cent., on
a wage rate of $4 per day, a return of $180,000 in labour has resulted. In addition, some 560
relief recipients who failed to report for work were removed from relief rolls, with an appreciable saving in public funds.
The test consisted of work on roads and boulevards, cutting brush, cleaning drains and
sewers, clearing windfalls, underbrush, etc., for several city departments.
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS.
The volume of employment during the period was slightly less than during the previous
year, with about the same number of unemployed persons in receipt of public funds. Disturbances in Asia and apprehension regarding conditions in Europe exercised a marked influence on our industries, which are principally primary and extractive and subject to international market conditions over which we have no control.
Due to less severe winter conditions, particularly in the Coast area, British Columbia
continues to be the goal of large numbers of unemployed persons from other Provinces who
accept any employment without regard to existing wage rates or working conditions. This
additional competition, together with a reluctance on the part of employers to employ persons
in receipt of relief, has made conditions much more difficult for residents of the Province.
Addresses to organizations and discussions with employers have, however, had some influence
in counteracting the effect of demonstrations by single unemployed men which have very
seriously reduced the prospects of local relief recipients obtaining employment.
While the tables showing work by offices and months give an indication of the Service's
operations, so far as applicants, reapplicants, employers' orders, placements, and transfers are
concerned, it is impossible to portray by figures the many activities and assignments it is
called upon to assume and the many demands made upon the staff by the public.
Although there is a very considerable increase in the number of applications and reapplica-
tions over 1937—308,347 against 198,775—employers' orders dropped to 48,511 and placements
to 48,441.
NEW BUSINESS.
Under the agreement between Federal and Provincial Governments, beginning March,
1938, all persons in receipt of relief and all subsequent applicants must be certified as employable or otherwise by officers of the Employment Service or officials deputed by the Service to
carry out this work.
This certification has an important bearing on the distribution of the cost between the
Provincial Government and the municipalities.
The agreement also requires that all employable recipients of aid must be registered by
the Employment Service and report regularly every two weeks for the purpose of renewing
their registrations. Further, all accounts of cities and municipalities must be checked by the
Employment Service before being approved for payment.
The volume of this new business can better be appreciated when we point out that in our
Vancouver offices alone the daily average of men and women registering is approximately
1,100.    The work in the other offices has correspondingly increased.
HANDICAP SECTIONS.
Special sections are maintained in the Vancouver and Victoria offices for handicapped
ex-service men and for men handicapped through injuries received in the industries of the
Province. With a large surplus of physically fit men available and the principal industries
requiring only this type of labour prospects for physically unfit persons are not bright. The
subject has been extensively dealt with in detail in previous reports and the situation has not
changed appreciably for the better during the past year, except in the Victoria area where
extensive defence works provided employment for approximately 1,000 ex-service men and REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 127
members of active militia units.    In this field many ex-service men with small disabilities
obtained employment and the magnitude of the problem will be better understood by the fact
that all the men required were obtained in the area in which the work was being carried on. •
Except in Government service, where the existing regulations require that ex-service men be
given a preference, this qualification has no special appeal.
WOMEN'S SECTION.
Reference has been made in previous reports that special divisions for women applicants
are maintained in our Vancouver and Victoria offices, and that in other areas the women are
dealt with in the general office.
The influx of transient women from other Provinces has been greater in 1938 than in
previous years, and they have offered their services competitively but with a greater degree
of aggressiveness than local women, due to the fact that they know there is no relief
assistance or camps for them should they fail to obtain employment. Return transportation
to place of domicile is the only alternative offered, and under the circumstances the incentive
to defeat the regulations governing the wages and working conditions of women is considerably strengthened.
At Vancouver the services of the Women's and Girls' Counsellor were continued and some
very delicate domestic problems between employer and employee were satisfactorily adjusted.
This service has been of considerable value in improving the relations between the employers
and employees, particularly in the field of domestic service.
Another branch of the work in this section at Vancouver is that of a Special Investigator
or Interviewer to deal with women and girl applicants for relief aid who must be classified as
to employability. In this division the work fluctuates with the number of applications for
relief and is operated in exactly the same manner as the section of the men's division in
regard to registration for employment and the regular renewal of registrations.
The value of this work cannot be estimated in monetary terms. Many women and young
girls, either as a result of discouragement in finding work or because of the influence of
others, decide to apply for relief, and once admitted to the relief rolls the desire for employment rapidly diminishes. At this stage courtesy, understanding, and advice become important
factors and quite frequently result in directing women towards employment or in removing
handicaps which to them appeared insurmountable.
IMPORTATION OF LABOUR.
Adhering to the principle of discouraging all applications for admittance to Canada
except those of exceptional specialized knowledge, and then with the object that Canadians
shall be trained to take the place of key-men so admitted, we have maintained the good relations long established between this Service and Department of Immigration and kept importations to the lowest possible minimum consistent with the actual requirements of our industries.
CONCLUSION.
During the period of stress through which the country is passing, the Employment
Service officials have endeavoured to make the Department of service to other branches of
Government, being careful at the same time not to lose sight of its real functions or to destroy
its usefulness by becoming known as a relief agency. The success of the Department has
resulted from the adoption and adherence to a policy approved by all Governments since its
inception of equal opportunity to all regardless of race, creed, colour, or political affiliations.
Acting, as it does, as a connecting link between employers and workmen it often becomes a
shock-absorber in disputes between these two contending forces and, although not always able
to please every one, the officials have acquired a reputation for fair dealing which enables
them to handle difficult problems during present conditions with a degree of success which
would otherwise have been impossible. The Employment Service in Canada has endeavoured
to set a high standard, and it is no small tribute that the United States is now adopting a
system of public employment offices patterned after the system worked out in this country. P 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1938.
Applications
and
Reapplications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
Kamloops..
Nanaimo...
Nelson	
New Westminster.-
Penticton.. 	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver (Men)	
Vancouver (Women).
Victoria (Men).	
Victoria (Women)	
Totals	
4,347
5,283
3,011
13,318
6,096
931
4,391
206,674
35,346
21,760
7,190
308,347
758
3,721
2,002
538
774
252
746
30,426
4,431
3,344
1,519
48,511
749
3,708
39
2,002
2
638
6
766
238
746
0,406
63
4,428
10
3,342
1
1,518
48,441
121
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1938.
Month.
Applications
and
Reapplications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
January _      	
February. _.	
17,483
20,399
19,789
31,461
22,348
23,755
31,725
21,505
30,224
26,737
28,520
34,401
2,948
4,805
2,884
1,848
1,408
5,043
5,414
3,763
5,642
3,823
5,627
5,306
2,933
4,799
2,880
1,838
1,400
5,036
5,414
3,774
5,625
3,817
5,622
5,303
6
11
10
34
7
18
5
16
10
2
1
1
May   	
Totals 	
308,347
48,511
48,441
121
^ REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 129
REPORT OF ADMINISTRATOR OF UNEMPLOYMENT
RELIEF, 1938.
The general improvement in the relief situation experienced in 1937 was not maintained
during the calendar year 1938. While the average monthly numbers of those receiving
material aid during 1938 were slightly less than for 1937, the last six months of this year
showed a substantial increase over 1937. The highest number receiving assistance during
1938 was during the month of March, the number being 70,799, compared with 82,772 in
March, 1937, and 128,858 in March, 1933. The lowest number receiving assistance was
51,677 in September, 1938, compared with 43,110 for September, 1937. The index number of
employment by economic areas (taking the average for the calendar year 1926 at 100) was
89.2 as at March 1st, 1937, compared with 96.2 for March 1st, 1938, while the peak month
of September, 1937, was 121.2, compared with 112 for the same date in 1938.
The Province continued to pay 80 per cent, of the cost of material aid afforded to municipal residents and the full cost of material aid to Provincial and transient cases residing
within municipal limits. Assistance received from the Federal Government was in the form
of a monthly grant-in-aid of $115,000 per month.
In March, 1938, it was decided to transfer all unemployable cases to municipal and
Provincial Welfare Departments, with this Department assuming 40 per cent, of the cost
in municipalities. Subsequently the proportion of costs payable by this Department was
increased to 60 per cent., effective from September 1st, 1938.
Registration.—Since August 1st, 1934, when a re-registration took place, a total of
93,772 applications for assistance has been received. This is made up of the following categories: Standard, 72,833; farmer, 6,414; transient, 14,525; each application representing
either a head of family or single person.
Grub-stakes.—We continued the policy of affording grub-stakes to enable men to follow
placer-mining or lode prospecting.
Assistance to Settlers Plan.—An agreement was entered into with the Federal Department of Agriculture on April 1st, 1937, and expired March 31st, 1938. This was revived and
extended to March 31st, 1939. During the year assistance was afforded to 304 farmers and
the form of assistance provided to these families included the supplying of brood sows, cows,
horses, harness, farm implements, explosives, fluming material, seed, fertilizer, etc. The
heads of families placed under this plan were not required to perform any road-work and
subsistence was supplied in addition to the purchase of equipment, farm animals, etc. A
total of fifty-six families had become self-supporting by the end of the year, and I am of the
opinion that the number would have been very much larger than this if it had not been for
the serious drought conditions prevailing in most parts of the Province.
Forestry Training Plan.—An agreement was entered into with the Federal Government
on a 50-50 cost basis, whereby provision was made for the training in forestry work of youths
in necessitous circumstances between the ages of 18 and 25, inclusive. The work was carried
out by the Forest Branch, Department of Lands. The number of projects operated was
thirty-six and the total number of youths enrolled was 689. The number placed on trail
crews and experimental stations was 574 and as forest ranger assistants 115. The total
number of applications received was 1,440. In addition to the 689 placed, there were 150
who refused the offer of training, due, in the majority of cases, to other forms of employment having been obtained. The average time spent on projects by enrollees was 3.4 months.
The disposition of enrolment shows that 91 secured other employment through their own
efforts, 41 were placed in other employment through Government efforts, 55 left before
termination of the training to return to school, and 73 left on account of injury, sickness,
miscellaneous reasons, or were discharged for cause.
Mining Training Plan.—This form of training was continued during the current year
under the Dominion-Provincial agreement, but we departed from the policy of previous years
whereby most of the enrolment period was devoted to placer-mining training. Much more
time was allotted to training in lode prospecting. A preliminary training camp was operated
at Emory Creek; at the end of the training period written and oral examinations were held
and 60 of those receiving the highest marks were sent to a field base camp at Quesnel Forks.
From this point they worked in small field parties under competent instructors and were P 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
required to explore the surrounding country, returning to the base camp for the week-end.
The total number afforded training was 137. In addition to those who were given the
advanced course of training, several of the youths were grub-staked in order that they could
carry out placer-mining on their own. The age-limit was 18 to 25, inclusive, but there is a
possibility that the minimum age will be advanced to 20 years in future, due to the fact that
we have found mine operators disinclined to afford employment to youths under 20, because
of the higher proportion of accidents due to immaturity.
Winter Works Projects.—Under an agreement entered into with the Federal Department
of Labour, work was provided for single homeless men during the winter months of 1937-38,
when a total of approximately 4,700 men were given employment on forestry and public
works projects. The rate of pay was the same as for the previous year and the camps closed
early in April, 1938. A similar agreement was entered into in the fall of 1938 and work was
provided for between 4,000 to 5,000 single homeless men.
Details of all expenditures made in connection with Unemployment Relief appear in the
Annual Report of the Department of Public Works and the Annual Public Accounts Statement of the Department of Finance.
E. W. Griffith,
Administrator. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 131
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
January.
Organized Territory—
9,501
748
613
24,724
2,002
1,594
34,225
2,750
2,207
Single men  —._	
6,285
856
267
6,285
856
3,138
176
267
Unorganized Territory—
9,898
741
13,036
917
1,841
151
119
1,841
151
164
119
506
......
670
R.A. 12 Totals—
841
162
841
           1
162
Supplementary Projects—
1
209
Single Men's Camps—
Forest Development Projects _ )
2,019
           1            	
16
Total number receiving assistance ..	
14,340
39,465
10,522
66,571
February.
Organized Territory-
10,124
752
598
26,604
1,985
1,562
36,728
2,737
6,046
876
284
2,160
6,046
876
284
Unorganized Territory—
3,413
197
10,907
788
14,320
985
2,071
156
155
2,071
156
155
185
573
758
R.A. 12 Totals—
890
142
890
142
Supplementary Projects—
226
Single Men's Camps—■
1,984
34
Total number receiving assistance—	
15,269
42,419
10,620
70,552 P 132
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
March.
Organized Territory—
9,149
568
449
25,190
1,492
1,204
34,339
2,060
4,442
508
292
1,653
4,442
508
292
Unorganized Territory—
3,336
194
10,852
783
14,188
1,816
126
220
977
1,816
126
220
197
625
822
R.A. 12 Totals—
24
2,474
141
24
Welfare.  	
1,476
2,932
6,882
141
Supplementary Projects—■
217
Single Men's Camps—-
1,681
288
123
Total number receiving assistance	
15,369
43,078
10,043
70,799
April.
Organized Territory-
9,265
284
228
24,905
800
659
34,170
1,084
887
2,521
457
240
2,521
457
240
Unorganized Territory—
3,091
179
10,142
724
13,233
903
1,676
99
122
1,676
675
2,996
209
1,501
R.A. 12 Totals-
13
2,503
126
13
7,000
126
134
Welfare  	
Supplementary Projects—
Farm placement and improvement __	
_
Single Men's Camps—
Forest Development Projects 	
	
Public Works Department	
	
	
229
14,757
40,901
7,757
64,334 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 133
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
May.
Organized Territory—
8,693
298
232
23,497
833
574
32,190
1,131
806
2,814
441
260
61
2,814
441
260
200
2,847
159
580
9,338
657
841
Unorganized Territory—
12,185
816
1,438
94
161
1,438
94
161
196
1,536
641
3,063
837
R.A. 12 Totals-
Welfare                -	
2,651
112
7,250
112
Supplementary Projects—
44
	
14,161
39,183
8,032
61,420
June.
Organized Territory—
8,289
290
191
22,232
831
499
30,521
1,121
690
2,620
399
136
44
2,620
399
563
8,589
598
136
199
2,610
143
806
Unorganized Territory—■
11,199
741
1,218
87
173
1,218
191
1,599
87
173
604
3,190
..........
795
R.A. 12 Totals—
2,711
102
7,500
Hospital camp   — 	
Supplementary Projects—
102
374
137
Total number receiving assistance.	
13,512
37,106
7,490
58,619 P 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
July.
Organized Territory—
7,778
273
129
20,762
799
338
28,540
1,072
467
2,519
362
1,714
39
2,519
362
51
202
2,346
79
153
582
7,775
340
1,918
823
Unorganized Territory—
10,121
419
1,151
83
163
1,151
19
188
1,680
60
586
3,332
83
242
774
R.A. 12 Totals—
2,787
102
7,799
102
Supplementary Projects—
571
114
Total number receiving assistance	
12,745
34,727
8,920
57.077
August.
Organized Territory—
7,344
270
116
19,496
770
314
26,840
1,040
430
2,520
348
1,832
33
2,520
348
29
239
2,267
43
100
678
7,493
172
Intermunicipal cases 	
Unorganized Territory—
950
9,760
1,115
72
94
431
2,787
104
Single men...  	
1,115
Single women   	
28
187
67
587
189
774
Assistance to settlers  „
R.A. 12 Totals—
" Camp-type " cases.	
1,686
	
3,349
7,822
104
623
58
210
Hospital camp   „ _	
Supplementary Projects—
Forestry Training Camps   _	
Mining Training Camps	
Total number receiving assistance	
12,209
33,026
9,336
55,462 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 135
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
September.
Organized Territory—
7,064
265
105
17
237
2,086
41
	
18,567
694
276
52
667
6,873
172
25,631
959
4,175
334
20
30
381
4,175
334
89
934
Unorganized Territory—
8,959
213
1,026
65
46
1,026
65
25
190
1,693
.........
65
619
3,357
136
809
R.A. 12 Totals-
Welfare _ 	
2,797
119
7,847
119
Supplementary Projects—
	
617
-            1             	
55
850
11,723
31,342
8,612
53,199
October.
Organized Territory—
7,326
282
104
14
239
2,156
42
19,419
766
254
26,745
1,048
358
5,074
343
42
25
5,074
343
40
663
7,250
165
96
Intermunicipal cases —
Unorganized Territory—
927
9,406
207
1,121
65
84
1,121
65
29
200
1,311
66
625
2,693
179
825
R.A. 12 Totals—
Welfare —	
2,609
127
6,613
127
Supplementary Projects—
Single Men's Camps—
	
527
1,110
Total number receiving assistance..	
11,703
31,941
9,490
54,771 P 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Unemployment Relief Branch Summary Statement—Continued.
Numbers.
Direct Relief.
Family Heads.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total
Number.
November.
Organized Territory—
8,455
365
110
22,652
1,004
279
31,107
1,369
389
7,035
368
45
7,035
368
29
2,821
59
69
9,277
220
143
Unorganized Territory—
12,098
279
1,302
64
95
1,636
659
135
1,302
25
942
345
64
70
1,862
678
190
R.A. 12 Totals—
4,440
1,682
135
Supplementary Projects—
135
Single Men's Camps—
1,246
|
500
I
949
Total number receiving assistance. 	
13,151
36,111
11,339
63.431
December.
Organized Territory—
9,362 .
441
122
24,597
1,226
325
33,959
1,667
447
6,107
391
30
1,568
70
95
1,585
650
143
6.107
391
56
3,237
85
162
10,736
328
248
Unorganized Territory—
13,973
413
1,568
45
235
909
345
70
125
746
1,636
678
265
981
E.A. 12 Totals—
4 130
1,673
143
Supplementary Projects—
210
Single Men's Camps—
1,400
672
519
Total number receiving assistance	
14,837
40,559
1
10,639
68,836
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 137
REPORT OF APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman. J. F. Keen.
Adam Bell. James Thomson.
Officials of the Branch.
Director of Apprenticeship Hamilton Crisford.
Assistant Director of Apprenticeship  Thomas V. Berto.
The year 1938 shows a satisfactory increase in the number of apprentices placed under
contract.
The Apprenticeship Branch dealt with a total of 965 contracts; 180 new contracts being
executed. Of these, 144 were in Group A, trades designated under the " Apprenticeship Act,"
and thirty-six in Group B, occupations undesignated.
Seventy-one apprentices completed their apprenticeships to the satisfaction of their
employers, making a total of 100 to date.
There were fifty-nine contracts cancelled by mutual consent, many of the lads concerned
entering the Air and Naval Forces or bettering their positions in other avenues. It is a
source of some satisfaction that the training obtained under their contracts was largely
instrumental in their advancement.
The number of contracts cancelled at the request of the employer for misbehaviour on the
part of the apprentice was practically nil.
Periodic inspections show that a very happy relationship has been established between
the majority of contracted apprentices and their employers, and a great deal of interest is
taken in their tuition both on and off the job.
The attendance at technical school night classes, where these are available, is well above
average; and other forms of education, such as correspondence courses, are encouraged and
are well patronized.
The trades and occupations of pharmaceutical chemist and moulding in the Metal Trades
Group were added to those designated, and a number of contracts were arranged in other
occupations not previously touched.
The year's work has made it increasingly clear that successful apprenticeship requires
careful selection, both of employers and apprentices, and indicates that it cannot be encouraged in any wholesale manner if the best results are desired.
It goes without saying, that in order to produce a high standard of craftsmanship the
employer must have the proper training facilities and be able to offer reasonable continuity
of employment, and that apprentices must have sufficient mental equipment and educational
background for advancement.
In addition, industrial and trade requirements have varied considerably during the last
decade or so. There is to-day an increasing demand for semi-skilled and specialized labour,
that reduces the demand in many fields for the same percentage of thoroughly trained craftsmen and the number of avenues through which these can be produced.
Great care has, therefore, had to be exercised by the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
in approving only contracts where the proper conditions exist, thereby maintaining the
standard of apprenticeship at its proper level and restraining any tendency for it to develop
into a low-wage proposition with insufficient training equivalent and prospects. This policy
has been carried out without losing sight of the desirability of flexibility and variation to meet
modern requirements. The general high standard and advancement of most present apprentices, and those being selected and placed under contract from time to time, is evidence that
there is a growing realization amongst British Columbia employers of the desirability and
necessity of preparing for the future requirements of industry by selection from the ranks of
our own young people and providing adequate training under an established apprenticeship.
The appended tables give the standing of controlled apprenticeship in various trades and
occupations as at the 31st day of March, 1939.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. P 138
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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O REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938.
P 139
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT."
Administrative Officers.
J. A. Ward Bell. Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford, Secretary.
The " Trade-schools Regulation Act" has now been in operation for two complete years
with very satisfactory results.
The regulations governing the registration and operation of the various types of schools
remained unchanged during the year 1938 and were administered with a minimum of friction.
Generally speaking, there is now a marked interest amongst the proprietors of practical
schools to have such schools fulfil their true purpose by generally improving the standard of
the tuition offered and thereby the recognized standing of their graduates.
As regards correspondence schools: The somewhat stringent regulations instituted have
apparently achieved their objective, as complaints regarding sales misrepresentations and
objectionable collection practices have practically ceased.
The regulations have resulted in an increase of business for legitimate and worth-while
organizations by the elimination of unfair competition by those concerns that depended largely
upon high-pressure salesmanship and irrevocable contracts.
At the last session of the Legislature an amendment was made to the penalty clause of
the Act to include infractions of the regulations. Previously, the only disciplinary action
possible under the Act for infractions of the regulations was for the Minister to suspend
operation of the school. This was considered too drastic for minor infractions and the
realization of this by certain school proprietors was having an undesirable effect. Since the
passing of this amendment, minor infractions have diminished.
Tuition in the following occupations, either by practical tuition or through correspondence
courses, is now available to residents of British Columbia from schools duly registered under
the provisions of the Act:—
Diesel engineering.
Draughting and design.
Dressmaking.
Electrical engineering.
Hairdressing.
Highway engineering.
Kindergarten work.
Mechanical engineering.
Mining.
Modern merchandising.
Navigation.
Paper-manufacture.
The number of practical schools registered during the year was seventy-four. Of these,
fifty-five were practical schools situated within the Province and nineteen were correspondence
schools.
Of the correspondence schools, seven are Canadian schools and twelve are American
schools.
Regulations cannot eliminate the necessity for students giving careful thought and consideration to the selection of the school most suited to their purpose, but before enrolling in
any course of study or signing any contract students are advised to make themselves familiar
with the regulations under the Act, which set out the conditions under which tuition can be
supplied or discontinued.
These regulations, together with any information desired regarding any particular school,
can be obtained on application to the Administrative Office, Trade-schools Regulation Act,
Fifth Floor, Hall Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary.
Accountancy.
Agriculture.
Aircraft engineering.
Air-conditioning.
Applied art.
Architecture.
Automotive engineering.
Barbering.
Business training.
Chemistry.
Civil engineering.
Domestic science.
Pharmacy.
Plumbing and heating.
Radio and television.
Railroad operation.
Refrigeration.
Salesmanship.
Short-story writing.
Show-card writing.
Steam engineering.
Textile manufacture.
Welding. P 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SAFETY BRANCH.
Safety Adviser      Charles Pearse.
The Safety Branch of the Department of Labour has kept records of all accidents in the
logging industry which were reported to the office. These records show the name of the
injured man, his occupation, date of the accident, camp where the accident occurred, and a
short description of how the injury was received. The names of the key-men who reported
the accidents and the men injured while working under their direction were also recorded. A
summary was made each month of all accidents reported to the Safety Branch.
Letters have been sent in reply to all reports, pointing out parallel accidents, making
suggestions for the prevention of future accidents, and passing on information and safety
suggestions received from other workers in the logging industry.
Seventy-five suggestions for new safety regulations have been received, all of which are
very valuable because they come from the loggers actually working in the industry at the time
the suggestions were made.
We have also received many good recommendations from coroners' juries at inquests held
regarding logging fatalities.
All suggestions are passed on to the Workmen's Compensation Board and are discussed
at the safety meetings. Most of the suggestions received have been embodied in the new 1939
Logging Safety Regulations of the Workmen's Compensation Board.
The safety suggestions are also passed on to key-men in the logging industry, when such
suggestions are considered of value in connection with the prevention of the certain type of
accident at hand.
The Lumbering Section of the Western Safety Conference, held in Los Angeles, California, was attended in September. Safety-men were contacted and operations visited in
California, Oregon, and Washington, with which States we are continually in touch and are
exchanging new ideas or suggestions regarding safety.
On November 22nd, 1938, the Safety Branch met the B.C. Loggers' Association members
and put forward a suggestion that each operator appoint a man in his operation definitely to
take charge of accident-prevention. This suggestion was accepted by the members, and since
that time we have received word of the appointment of seven safety supervisors or directors
in the larger camps, and many of the smaller camps have named the foreman or superintendent in charge of safety.
The Safety Branch has advocated the use of safety hats or helmets in the logging camps,
and at each opportunity recommended them to operators. Due to a continual campaign and
the co-operation of other safety bodies, the safety-hat idea was accepted by the Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch Company, Limited, and a trial of the hats is now being conducted at their
Franklin River operation. During the first month the hats were in use six accidents occurred
which might have resulted in very serious injuries. In two of the cases it is believed the men
would have been injured fatally had they not been wearing the safety-hats.
Accident-prevention posters have been produced and mailed to the logging camps. The
first poster was a special appeal to all loggers for co-operation with safety rules and regulations. It was also an appeal for more interest in accident-prevention, and the slogan it
featured was " Avoid Accidents." The second poster was a simple yet effective photograph
of a logger's dilapidated shoe. This was an actual photograph taken of a shoe worn by a
logger who, due to the poor condition of the calks, slipped off a log he was working on into
the water, and lost his life. The third poster featured the slogans " Watch Saplings " and
" Get Further Away." This poster was sent out because of the experience of the logging
industry during 1938, when four men were killed by being struck by saplings and eight were
killed because they stood too close to the moving logs or the rigging. All expense of producing
and mailing these posters has been borne by the Department of Labour.
We are co-operating with the Safety Directors of all logging camps and with the Workmen's Compensation Board in an effort to formulate Safety Regulations for the reduction of
accidents in the logging industry, and we are receiving the support of both operators and
key-men in the camps. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1938. P 141
From January 1st to December 31st, 1938, the Safety Branch sent out 1,324 letters.
Thirty coroners' inquests regarding fatal accidents in the logging industry were attended.
There were 277 special calls, conferences, or safety meetings made or attended, and 128 camp
inspections.
Charles Pearse,
Safety Adviser.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1939.
1,525-639-9841   

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