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THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

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 THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APRIL. 1ST, 1935, TO MARCH 31ST, 1936
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.  To His Honour E. W. Hambee,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1936.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Boyes, P. C, Principal. Merilees, W. L., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Waldon, Mrs. M. E., Secretary.
Workman, Miss E., Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborn, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Mayers, W., Physical Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor. Scott, W. J., Engineer and Plumber.
MUNRO, D. W., Poultryman. Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—During the past year more changes were effected in the routine of the school and
some of these promise to be effective.
A decision has to be made as to whether such an institution is an educational centre or a
penal institution. Our Provincial Statute states that it is and shall be held to be a penal
institution. The prevailing idea in some parts of the community is that this is the correct
interpretation. On the other hand, by far the larger part, of the community feels that the
school should be a school in the true sense of the word and it is towards this end that we have
been working.
To increase the educational programme two things are necessary. We must curtail the
outside work programme to the point where it can be used as instructional and not overwhelm
young lads with drudgery, and thus leave time for more courses of a cultural or vocational
nature. When this has been done we must see that the standard of attainment of the staff is
raised. In other words, attendants must become teachers, and there is a vast difference between
the two. When we are considering this angle of the situation we must realize that higher wages
will have to be paid if this result is to be achieved.
Our big step in curtailing the outdoor programme this year was the selling of the poultry
flock. A study of the situation revealed the fact that each month brought a loss. The flock
was badly infected with coccidiosis and production remained below the 50-per-cent. mark in
spite of the best of care and feeding. Experts informed us that once this disease gained a hold
it was almost impossible to control it, since buildings and runs retain the germ. When the
mortality rate among the young chicks became alarming the only solution lay in selling the
flock, and this was done. Incidentally with the dispensing of the chickens we freed our establishment from hordes of rats, and this has been a source of satisfaction to all.
Five of the buildings, together with the farm, were taken over by the Department as a
Home for the Aged. The school was moved to the building formerly designated as the Trades
Building, which was finished for the purpose. The former staff quarters building, first built
as a class-room, was finished as quarters for the female members of the staff, so that the school
unit is completely removed from the new unit. This change has been most desirable as it has
simplified the problem of supervision and upkeep. It has also resulted in a decrease in
operating costs.
During the year a steam line from the heating plant of the Mental Hospital was connected
with the school buildings and the heating problem has been solved. The cost of heating has
been lowered considerablj' and the comfort and convenience of the new method leaves nothing
to be desired.
The former utility house of the poultry plant has been converted into a shop building. At
the present time we are in need of a trained general shop instructor, but we hope in time to
secure one. The reports from the various members of the staff will indicate the nature and
amount of work done by the various shop instructors.
Our vegetable-garden last year was most successful and several exhibits won prizes at local
fairs.    Indications point to even better results this year.
So far I have dealt with the plant itself and it has taken too much of our time—time which
could have been spent to better advantage on the boys for whom the institution exists. From
now on the boy must occupy the centre of the picture and most of our time and energy must be
expended on him.
During the year we had a total of eighty-nine commitments to the school. From a study
of figures issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics the number should have been about 34.5.
A study of school records during the previous six years revealed the fact that the average R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
number was fifty. How to account for the rapid increase is the problem. Either the times
are causing an unprecedented number of boys to commit offences or the Magistrates are making
more use of the school. Statistics tend to show that very prosperous times mean greater
numbers of delinquents, hence the first seems to be the wrong answer. If the latter be the
true answer, then we still must look for the " why."
Many Magistrates seem unaware of the fact that by using the " Juvenile Delinquents Act "
they may commit a boy to a Children's Aid Society for foster-home care. On several occasions
during the year when this has been drawn to their attention they have unhesitatingly changed
their disposition of the case, since they were anxious to remove the child from unfavourable
home conditions rather than to punish him. I realize that such an institution as the Industrial
School is a handy place to use for the shelving of a problem, but a little study will show any
interested person that it can in no way compare with a foster-home in the training of a child
for normal life in a normal community.
Perhaps a more forcible reason for the increasing use of the school lies in the fact that we
have been experimenting with the shorter sentence. Why a boy one day under 18 should have
to spend two years in the school for a crime which would have been paid for by three months
in Oakalla had he been two days older is a difficult problem to solve. The municipality which
would cheerfully pay $1 per day for three months hesitates to pay 80 cents per day for two
years, so many boys were allowed to drift or were sent to Oakalla for the shorter term. The
municipality, hard pressed for funds, blinked at the situation and the boy was quite pleased.
Since it has become known that an indeterminate sentence means indeterminate and that
six months is long enough for the average juvenile, the various municipalities have not hesitated to commit young offenders on that understanding. This seems the logical reason for the
increase of commitments during the past year.
When a boy is sent home at the end of these short terms he is on parole. This gives us the
right to check carefully on his behaviour by means of our Follow-up Officer and in the outlying
areas the police and the various welfare workers assist. This has proven very successful as
a study of the following figures will show:—
Number paroled during the year     65
Number attending school     29
Number working     36
Number of repeaters     10
'   Average length of stay of repeaters (years) 1.23
From a survey of the results of the past two years I think I am safe in making these
recommendations:—
(1.) That a central authority for the Province be created so that all children would be
assured of the same treatment.
(2.) That young offenders should be removed from unsuitable homes to foster-homes as
soon as possible and efforts should be made to build up the home to a fair standard. In such
cases the transfer should be direct and not through an institution.
(3.) That some legislation be passed enabling Magistrates to assess parents for at least
part of the keep of such cases.
(4.) That the probation staff be increased and that the pay of such officials be such that
the right type of men and women will be attracted.
(5.) That a Borstal unit for older boys be developed at once and that no prison record be
attached to boys committed to the unit.
These steps will carry us well along the road toward the re-establishment of the home as
the core of our community. No institution can ever take its place and, at its very best, is but
a poor substitute.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1935-36.
R 7
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1ST, 1935, TO MARCH 31st, 1936.
On roll, March 31st, 1935  65
Number of new commitments during year  69
Number committed for second term  18
Number transferred from Oakalla Prison Farm  2
154
Number of boys released  19
Number successfully paroled..
Number at present on parole .
Transferred to Oakalla	
Dropped from roll	
Number escaped and not yet returned..
30
35
1
6
4
95
Total in school, March 31st, 1936	
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1936.
59
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
966
1280
1351
New Westminster, B.C...  	
Victoria, B.C.._   	
Canadian      	
English _  	
Years.
17
Life.
11
8
11
6
Life.
6
4
Life.
10
11
Life.
9
Life.
6
11
Life.
15
Life.
6
16
11
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
Years.
16
Life.
11
1355
Scotch   	
Life.
1356
Selby Co., U.S.A   .   ■ 	
Talbot, Alta. .___  .
Victoria, B.C '      	
11
Life.
1380
Canadian  	
Canadian-English   	
American. -.-   -
Yugo-Slavian —	
Life.
1385
Life.
1402
13          :
1407
1408
Vancouver, B.C    	
Life.
Life.
1410
11
1415
Life.
1417
American....    —
Life.
1419
Life.
1420
Czecho-Slovakia -	
Vancouver, B.C  	
6
1421
1422
Negro    	
Life.
Life.
1423
United States  	
15
1424
Life.
1426
Saskatchewan   ._	
Saskatchewan  	
Life.
1428
Life.
1432
Life.
1433
Kaslo, B.C   	
Life.
1434
Life.
1435
Life.
1437
Life.
1439
Polish  _ 	
11
1440
Prince Rupert, B.C.    _.
Terrace, B.C.
Life.                    Life.
1441
C an adian      '
Life.
Life.
Life.
6
Life.
7
8
Life.
Life.
1442
Life.
1443
Life.
1444
Life.
1445
Life.
1446
7
1447
Life.
1448
Life.
1449
Life.                     Life. R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st,  1936—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1450
Years.
5
10
9
4
Life.
11
Life.
Life.
6
Life.
12
7 mos.
Life.
Life.
Life,
in
Years.
1452
1453
Alberta  	
1454
1456
English     	
1457
1458
1459
Sechelt, B.C    	
Chehalis, B.C             	
Indian    	
Life.
1460
Polish
1462
Canadian ..  .    	
1463
1464
1465
1466
Victoria, B.C 	
Life.
1467
1468
1469
Ukrainian  	
Ukrainian  	
1470
Life.
Life.
Life.
5
.J471
1472
1473
Alberta   _ ~
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both) __.
Canadian (both) __
  7
  10
English (both)   5
  3
  5
  1
  3
  4
  1
Indian (both) 	
Irish (both) 	
Italian (both) 	
Russian (both) 	
Scotch (both) 	
German (both) 	
Ukrainian (both)     3
Polish (both)      2
Negro (both)      1
Czecho-Slovak (both)   2
Half breed (both)   1
Rumanian (both)   1
Canadian-English   3
Canadian-American _,  2
American-Scotch
English-Greek .	
Dutch-English	
French-Indian .....
Austrian-Polish _.
Total  59
Alberta 	
British Columbia
Saskatchewan 	
Manitoba	
England	
Ireland 	
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN
  13
  31
United States
Australia	
Czecho-Slovakia
Poland 	
South Africa	
Total.
1
1
1
1
59
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Incorrigible      2
B.E. & S  18
Theft :  32
Receiving stolen property     2
Misrepresentation       2
Carnal knowledge ____.
Concealed weapons ...
Vagrancy	
Total .
1
1
1
59 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1935-36.
R 9
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Agassiz	
Alert Bay ..
Burnaby __
Chilliwack
Courtenay
  1
 .__ 1
  3
  1
  1
Cranbrook  2
Fruitvale	
Kaslo 	
Maillardville
Matsqui 	
Michel	
Montenay	
McBride ..._
Nelson 	
  1
  1
New Westminster  4
South Westminster  1
Penticton  2
Prince George   2
Prince Rupert __•_  5
Sechelt  1
Vancouver  20
Victoria   7
Total..
59
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
" Juvenile Delinquent Act "  38 3 years	
6 months      1 4 years	
2 years  16
Total..
2
2
59
11 years.
13 years.
14 years:
15 years.
16 years.
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
2
7
7
7
12
17 years  15
18 years     8
20 years     1
Total..
59
Apostolic
Baptist
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
     1
     1
Four Square      1
Roman Catholic   20-
Presbyterian      6
Church of England     5
United 	
Methodist	
Salvation Army
Pentecostal 	
Total.
20
3
1
1
59
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living..
Number who have both parents dead ...
Number who have father living and mother dead-
Number who have mother living and father dead .
Number who have stepmothers 	
Total..
35
5
7
10
2
59
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1936, record charts were made and conditions
noted of the mouths of most of the boys entering the school. Of the sixty-five boys examined,
I have completed all fillings and restorations required for forty-two of them. The remaining
boys, together with twenty who have recently been admitted, will be attended to as rapidly
as possible.
" During the year it has been necessary to extract 31 hopelessly diseased teeth. Local
anesthetic has been used to relieve pain for 18 patients.    I have inserted 79 amalgam, 23 R 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
synthetic enamel, and 40 cement fillings; have given prophylactic treatments for 17; made
and inserted 1 gold-base porcelain crown and devitilized and filled the root of a fractured
tooth. One boy had a raidogram made and 2 boys had partial dentures made to restore lost
teeth. All the boys have been taught proper methods of brushing and urged to use a toothbrush.
" I believe the health service rendered will be of great benefit in assisting these boys to
become useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
MEDICAL REPORT.
The policy of having the doctors from the neighbouring institution alternate in caring
for our boys was continued during the past year, and we wish to congratulate them on their
interest in the various problems presented and their promptness when called in an emergency.
During the year we had five boys treated for diseased tonsils, one for a broken wrist, and
one sent to hospital with influenza. In each case recovery was complete and rapid. Seven
boys were fitted with glasses when examination proved that such treatment was necessary,
and it is interesting to note that six of these made such progress in behaviour and school-work
that they have been able to hold their place in normal society since their release. The other
case is that of a feeble-minded lad who will always be an institutional case.
The only other item of importance was an epidemic of rubella which caused us much
inconvenience in the early part of the year. For one week the whole population was placed
under quarantine. For several weeks more the boys were kept under quarantine, while the
staff was permitted to come and go daily. Outside visitors were forbidden to enter during the
entire period.
On the whole, the year was marked by general physical well-being among the boys, most
of whom showed a gain in weight and an all-round improvement in physical fitness.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—The year April 1st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936, saw such a decrease in the number
of boys attending school that one teacher was capable of handling them. The daily average
attendance for that period was about twenty, consisting of Grades III. to VIII. In an ordinary
public school the teaching of such a group would have presented no outstanding problem, as
the majority would likely have remained all year at the same school. In an institution of
this sort, however, where the boys come and go all the time, and the mental ability of many
is limited, it was found very difficult to handle all grades together with any degree of success.
No two pupils, even though in the same grade, were found to be doing the same work. For
this reason they were separated into two groups, each attending school half a day. Most of
the time was devoted to the fundamental subjects, so that when a boy left he would fit into
his former school with the minimum of loss.
" A number of the boys came here with a grudge against society in general and it was
necessary to try and break down this anti-social attitude before they would do much work.
It was remarkable the number that responded to treatment. In all cases character-building
was considered the essential thing, being placed above the ability to work an arithmetic
question or to give a correct historical date.
" There were fifty-nine pupils enrolled during the year, of which fifteen remained at the
end of March, 1936.
"Eric W. Blagburn."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
During the past year we accomplished a great deal in this department. Each boy,
interested in the kitchen-work, had three months in the following line of work: Dining-room
waiter, pot-washing, cooking, and baking;   thereby spending a year in this department.
One boy has held a position as steward with the Union Steamship Company since last
July and so far is doing exceptionally well. Another boy is working as a cook at a mining-
camp and he also is doing very well. We hope to be able to place several more boys in the
near future. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1935-36.       R 11
The following tables show clearly the manner in which the boys and staff of the institution
were fed during the year and the cost per meal:—■
Boys Menu—One Day.
Breakfast.—Boiled eggs, jam, bread and butter, tea, milk.
Dinner.—Boiled cod, egg sauce, potatoes, vegetables, apple pie.
Supper.—Tomato soup, stewed prunes, bread and butter, tea, milk.
Staff Menu—One Day.
Breakfast.—Porridge, hot cakes and syrup, toast, marmalade, bread and butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, potatoes, vegetables, lemon pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white bread and butter, creamed salmon on toast, vegetable salad, fruit,
cake, tea.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA  COST.
(1.)   Office and school supplies  $945.46
(2.)  Travelling expenses   1,869.83
Gas, oil, and repairs  252.44
(3.)   Purchase of clothing  1,350.90
Shoe-shop supplies   264.10
Tailor-shop supplies   6.33
(4.)  Janitor supplies  349.38
(5.)   Light  1,177.20
Water  709.58
Fuel   2,173.29      .
(6.)   Provisions   6,461.37
(7.)   Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and operation expenses  1,150.45
Dentist—Salary and supplies  600.00
(8.)   Laundry   1,156.05
(9.)   Feed for stock   1,194.59
(10.)  Purchase of live stock   Nil
(11.)  Vocational supplies for various departments   347.22
(12.)  Incidentals and contingencies  1,212.71
Salaries   25,414.07
Total expenditure, Vote 149   $46,634.97
Expenditure, Public Works        3,738.28
Total expenditure for year   $50,373.25
Total amount of revenue for year—
Board and room   $3,004.54
Sale of eggs     1,505.70
Municipality receipts      8,192.80
Other receipts         140.84
     12,843.88
$37,529.37
Per capita cost for the year 1935-36, $1.66.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
Sir,—I submit the annual report for the year 1935-36 of the work that has been done
by the boys in the Tailor-shop, which is under my supervision.
" The boys have done exceptionally well all through the year. Eighteen of them having
taken an elementary course in tailoring, which will be of great benefit to them in caring for
their own clothing. " During the year the boys made 45 pairs of tweed pants, 79 pairs of overalls, 6 dozen
towels, 6 dozen aprons, 8 dozen pillow-slips, and 53 pairs of curtains. In addition, 79 suits
and 92 pairs of pants were pressed.
" I have performed a certain amount of relief duty during the year and this has brought
me in contact with all the boys in the institution, and I think they are all just fine.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Shoemaking Department.
" Sir,—In presenting my annual report, I wish to speak well of the boys I have had in
my charge. Their behaviour has been all one could wish for and their earnestness in the work
calls for praise. Although their stay in the Shoe-shop has been short, most of them have
shown remarkable ability and left with a good knowledge of repairing and making of shoes.
" In December, as you are aware, we were obliged to move from the old shop. The boys
were a great help in moving the machines, making benches, and fitting up the new workshop.
" During the year 63 pairs of shoes were made and 610 repairs. There has been an
average of three boys on full time, one on half-time, and four different boys each month for
one hour and a half a day learning the theory of shoemaking and repairing.
" Considering I have only averaged about four days a week in the Shoe-shop, having to
relieve attendants when they are off duty, I am sure the boys have done very well.
" J.   OSBORN,
Shoemaker."
Garage Department.
" Sir,—The expenses incurred by this department have been very low this year owing to
the fact that the institution acquired a new truck at the end of March, 1935. The amount
spent this year was $252.44.    This includes all gasoline, oil, and grease used in the school.
" The truck has been used extensively to take boys on outings. Picnics, baseball games,
lacrosse, basket-ball games, and the odd show were attended. At no time did any boy give
us trouble while on an outing.    Frequently one man has had as many as thirty boys out.
" The class in auto mechanics is very popular. Owing to the short length of time a boy
is able to attend, the instruction is limited to the principles of construction and the operation
of the various parts rather than the teaching of service operations. We have an old Cadillac
chasis for instruction purposes, along with other miscellaneous equipment.
" H. Hart,
Instructor."
Carpentering Department.
" Sir,—The work of this department for the past year has been mostly maintenance-work.
" One hundred and fifty chairs were repaired  and  given two  coats  of  enamel  paint.
Twenty dining-room tables were  also  repaired,  and later  on during the  year  these  were
replaced with new ten-seat tables, doing away with chairs and making benches for the tables.
" The painting was completed in the kitchen block, dining-room floors were sanded and
finished with one coat of filler and two coats of varnish.
" The No. 1 school-room was remodelled into living-quarters for the ladies of the staff,
the interior of the building receiving three coats of paint.
" Two large cupboards were built in the boys' dormatories and 100 lights of glass were
replaced.
" During the year I had three and sometimes four boys with me most of the time, instructing them in the work being done. I had manual-training monthly classes of four or five boys
for one hour each day and found them very interested in the work. Some were very neat
and showed real progress.
" D. R. Stewart,
Carpenter."
Plumbing and Blacksmith Department.
" Sir,—Daily instruction was given to a number of boys in sheet-metal and blacksmith
work.    The majority were very interested and enjoyed these classes, especially when they
were able to make different tools themselves. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1935-36.       R 13
" The usual routine work was carried on, such as attention to furnaces, radiation, hot-
and cold-water supply, refrigeration, and hot-water heaters. Fire-extinguishers were always
closely checked and recharged;   the swimming-pool also receiving regular attention.
" All necessary repairs were attended to as soon as they were reported.
" W. J. Scott,
Plumber."
POULTRY REPORT.
" Sir,—It is rather hard to prepare this report in the same spirit as the previous years.
So many unexpected problems attacked this department, it was finally thought advisable to
completely shut down the plant in order to clean up all infected houses and soil and resume
operations after a building was put up which would meet with our requirements. We needed
buildings with a southern exposure, vermin and burglar proof, which would offer freedom
from some of the common diseases such as roup and bronchitis.
" Shortly after the previous report was submitted an epidemic of coccidiosis broke out
among what appeared to be a fine healthy flock of chicks. In less than a week the mortality
was unbelievable, although medicated preparations which had given favourable results for
others were of little value in our case. We called in Professor Bieley, who could not give us
much encouragement re a cure other than measures which had been adopted—namely, disposing
of all birds diseased and a general clean-up which was well under way. It was very encouraging to note the keen interest displayed by the boys working among the birds in trying to care
for them during the epidemic.    It proved a wonderful experience for the boys.
" Several experiments were carried out over a short period which would have been an
education in itself if prolonged—namely, different mixtures of scratch, hopper feeding of
scratch versus litter feeding; straw loft versus open loft. Another experiment tried was
having two boys take complete charge with assistance from the instructors wherever difficulties
arose.    This arrangement gave good results both in knowledge and self-confidence to the boys.
" Due to the last experiment it was possible for the instructor to care for a good crop of
potatoes and assist in cottage duty.
" D. W. Munro.
Poultry and Farm Instructor."
PRODUCE  FROM GARDEN.
Vegetables—
Potatoes, 18,586 lb.   $277.50
Carrots, 770 lb  7.70
String beans, 204 lb.   5.20
Onions, 256 lb.   3.84
Lettuce, 239 bunches   11.95
Cauliflower, 198 lb.   3.96
Cabbage, 1,039 lb.   41.58
Beets, 1,018 lb.  .  15.27
Turnips, 402 lb.  .  4.02
Tomatoes, 63 lb.   .95
Celery, 71 sticks  3.55
Parsnips, 1,170 lb.  17.55
Cucumber, 44  .88
Corn, 71 dozen   14.20
Marrow, 15 lb.   .15
Sprouts, 15 lb.   .60     ,
S408.88
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES.
" Sir,—For the period beginning October, 1935, and ending March, 1936, social activities
were carried out with satisfactory results and a great deal of credit to our boys. Following a
series of Community Evenings and " Amateur Hour " in the Auditorium, they launched a R 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
great effort for their first big concert of the season—the Christmas Tree Concert—an endeavour
to raise funds for their Christmas gifts, outings, etc. That night they were ably assisted by the
New Westminster Male Voice Choir, who kindly rendered their services for the occasion. The
interest of the boys was shown not only in the admirable way they displayed their talent, but
also in the work they did in preparing the stage and fixtures, a no easy task considering it had
to be built from the ground up.
" Shortly following that concert came an invitation to display their wares to the Rotary
Club of New Westminster at the Annual Christmas Dinner. The reception the boys received
there resulted in an engagement at the Rotary Club luncheon in Vancouver, followed by an
invitation to compete in the Automobile Show Amateur Hour contest and to later appear as
guests at a second Rotary gathering in New Westminster. All these engagements were eagerly
looked forward to and great preparations were carried out to bring still more honours for their
work. Unfortunately a slight epidemic of measles placed the school in quarantine. The
disappointment was felt by all, but it did not dampen the spirits of the boys. Instead a programme was always kept on hand in readiness for the time when quarantine would be over.
" Community Evenings and Amateur Hours were carried on through the winter and
through these mediums new talent was constantly located. One recent find was a tap-dancer,
another a comedian and female impersonator. The hearty laughs he gets from his audience
are good, especially when he gets them at the expense of his partner.
" The last two concerts were held at the Girls' Industrial School and the Alexander
Orphanage, with an ardent request from both institutions to appear again at an early date.
At the present time arrangements are being made to travel to White Rock to entertain the
children at the Rotary Camp. Also to appear at the Crippled Children's Hospital and the
Preventorium.
" In all, it has been a very successful year and the boys are always eager and ready to
display their talent. In doing so they help to bring a little happiness to some one less fortunate
and at the same time build up a better environment for themselves. In conclusion, I wish to
congratulate them all and to say it has been a real pleasure to give what little assistance I could.
" W. R. Jones,
Instructor."
SPORTING ACTIVITIES.
The following resume of sporting events and activities of the boys of this institution has
been compiled with a great deal of pleasure and pride, for behind the various exercises and
games a team spirit and co-operation has developed to such an extent that I feel sure the
benefits derived from this particular phase of the work will prove themselves well worth while.
The boys have played the game in every sense of the word extremely well.
Through the courtesy of the Lacrosse Association the boys have had the privilege of attending twelve senior games in New Westminster during the 1935 season. Soft-bail was played to
the extent of sixteen league games in a house league. Swimming completed the roster of the
1935 summer and many of the participants displayed real promise in this particular line of
sporting endeavour.
The two major sports of the fall and winter season—namely, basket-ball and soccer—
brought forth startling developments amongst the group, particularly the former. A successful
house league of basket-ball functioned all winter, three senior and two junior teams engaging.
Eleven exhibition games were played with teams of New Westminster and Vancouver, the boys
winning seven. Three of our players developed to such an extent that near the close of the
season they were invited to join the Senior B Essondale squad, a team well known throughout
the valley. Soccer football was confined to games in a house league and five exhibition games,
of which the boys won two and lost three.
During the spring of 1936 soft-ball started again along with the favourite lacrosse. We
have already over two-thirds of the boys playing lacrosse. However, owing to their inexperience, the play will be confined to a house league with an occasional exhibition game. The boys
are improving rapidly and before long will be able to give a good account of themselves on any
field. Swimming is fast gaining in popularity and some very interesting races are looked
forward to. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1935-36. R 15
Before closing this report I would like to again point out how much I appreciate the opportunity of being of some little service to the boys. They have co-operated and made splendid
use of the activities which were available to them and I feel sure that they have benefited
greatly.
W. Mayers,
7ms.rwc.or-.
BAND NOTES.
Since the length of stay in the school has been materially reduced it has become impossible
to develop a band, but it has given us the opportunity of instructing more boys in the rudiments
of band music.
Practices are held on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and the period is considered as an
instruction period similar to other subjects handled at that time. This has helped materially
to interest the boys and during the year sixty-four have been trained in one or other of the
various instruments. A few of the boys have developed sufficiently to play solos or duets at
various concerts, but most of them are in need of further training and we do all we can to
encourage them to join a band on their return to their homes. Some have been able to do this,
but for those who have not been so fortunate the knowledge gained while here has helped them
to appreciate the various band concerts which they attend from time to time. We are looking
forward to another successful year.
J.   H.   RUSHTON,
Instructor.
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" SIR,—I beg to submit the following report for the year ended March 31st, 1936:—
Visits to homes  1,012
Visits to office      565
Business calls and interviews      598
Telephone calls  1,028
" Three trips were made to different points of the Province—namely, the Fraser Valley,
Upper Island, and Lower Island.
" The invaluable co-operation of the Social Service Exchange, Social Agencies, Superintendent of Neglected Children's Department, Child Guidance Clinic, Juvenile Courts, Chief
Probation Officer, Provincial and City Police Departments, Provincial and City Relief Departments, Principals of Public and High Schools, and Minister of Labour cannot be too highly
commended.
" A junior placement bureau would render a great service to our youth of to-day. I feel
quite sure that employers would support such a movement.
" The apprenticeship scheme should be widened to include many occupations besides those
at present under the Act, since a period of three or four years of supervised employment and
instruction is of much greater service to the young people than a few extra dollars in wages
with broken time and no supervision. This would enable us to place our boys more easily and
under better conditions, thus saving them for society.
" Wherever we have made a placement under good conditions we have not, as yet, had a
failure.
" The programmes of the Minister of Labour for the employment of these boys are excellent and should be continued and widened as soon as possible.
' Mr. Boyes, Superintendent of the Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools and staff, and Mrs.
Westman, Superintendent of the Girls' Industrial School and staff, I wish to thank for their
untiring efforts, guidance, and sincere co-operation for the welfare of our boys and girls.
" My work as Follow-up Officer for the Industrial Schools, replacing the boys and girls in
their own homes and bettering the relationship with the parents and home conditions, starting
them back in public schools, placing them in positions, and helping them with their problems in
general, has been a great pleasure and satisfaction.
" K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools." VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.
390-1036-2842

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