Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1936]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308263.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308263.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308263-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308263-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308263-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308263-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308263-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308263-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308263-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308263.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE  OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF  ATTORNEY-GENERAL
EEPOET
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR  THE  YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31st,  1935
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Ciiaki.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1935.
GORDON McG. SLOAN,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1936. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1936.
Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
31st, 1935.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
P. R. BUTLER,
A. G. BOLTON,
Game Commission. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1935.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
For the purpose of administration the Province is divided into five game divisions, with
an Inspector or a Sub-Inspector in charge of each division, with the exception of Vancouver
Island and the Lower Mainland sections, which, due to the need for economy, are controlled
or supervised from the Vancouver or Headquarters office.
During the year every step has been taken, so far as finances would allow, to protect
and conserve the game and sport fish of the Province, and in this connection many extended
and arduous patrols were undertaken into outlying sections of the Province, these patrols
in many cases extending over lengthy periods. On one of these patrols, Game Wardens J. S.
Clark and B. Villeneuve, of Fort Nelson, B.C., left their detachment on February 24th, 1935,
and returned on June 6th, 1935, the total number of days for the patrol being 103, and the
total mileage 1,485 miles; this patrol being made to the Fontas, Hay, and Black Rivers and
in the vicinity of the British Columbia-Alberta boundary-line. Another patrol was made by
these officers to the Beaver River and Franceways Settlement extending over the period from
July 14th to July 26th, 1935.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
Inquiries are still being received from Game Departments and other interested game-
conservation bodies throughout the North American Continent in regard to our system of
trap-line registration, and it is pleasing to note that under this system the stand of fur-
bearing animals in the Province has increased, although it is to be regretted that in some
districts overtrapping has taken place on certain classes of fur-bearing animals, but it is our
intention to gradually weed out the trappers who are not taking care of their lines in a
proper manner.
As last year, new maps are being supplied for use in connection with our trap-line registration system, and this entails additional work, as invariably a number of previously recorded
trap-lines have to be revised.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
It has been very difficult to get in touch with all registered guides with a view to their
working in full co-operation with the Department, but it is hoped that in the near future guides
in the Province will realize that in order to protect their business they must protect the game
in the districts in which they are or have been operating as guides.
A careful study has been made of the conditions in other Provinces and States in regard
to the operations of big-game guides, with the object in view of eventually approaching the
guides of this Province so that more satisfactory regulations might be put into effect.
FUR-FARMING.
It isi pleasing to note an increase in the number of fur-farms operating in the Province
this year, and to be in a position to state that those engaged in mink-farming have found a
better market for their pelts than in any previous year.
BIRD-BANDING.
The Department has continued bird-banding operations in respect to migratory game
birds on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve near Chilliwack, but unfortunately this year,
owing to severe weather conditions in January and February, our banding operations were
seriously hampered. Very interesting and valuable returns are being received, however, as
a result of these bird-banding operations, and it is proposed to continue banding birds at this
reserve if at all possible. It might be mentioned that this bird-banding work is being conducted in co-operation with the United States Biological Survey, Washington, D.C, and the
Dominion Parks Branch of the Department of the Interior at Ottawa. N 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
Attention is drawn to the statement contained in this report as to the number and kind
of predatory animals destroyed during the year and on which bounty was paid. Besides
paying this bounty, the Commission has supplied shotgun ammunition to a number of Game
Associations in the Province, on the understanding that the members of these associations
would be entitled to one shell for each noxious bird destroyed, and as a result many crows,
magpies, and other noxious birds have been accounted for during the year.
Game Wardens throughout the Province have been checked up from time to time in regard
to their carrying out instructions previously issued in respect to the control of predatory
animals and noxious birds in the districts which they patrol. A statement showing the number and kind of animals and birds destroyed by Game Wardens during the year is to be found
on another page of this report.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
The Commission has again given very careful consideration to the matter of advertising
the wonderful attractions of this Province in respect to game and fish. It is felt that by
properly advertising our wild-life resources the people of the Province will materially benefit
by the increase in non-resident hunters and fishermen who will annually come to British
Columbia. It is conservatively estimated that a non-resident hunter generally spends in the
neighbourhood of $1,000 in this Province in the course of his hunting-trip.
GAME PROPAGATION.
The policy of the Game Commission in respect to encouraging the breeding of pheasants
for liberation by farmers and others in the Province has been continued, and it is pleasing
to note an increase in the number of game-bird farmers.
During the year we have purchased 6,795 pheasants and 124 European partridge at a
much lower cost than paid for birds when the Government Game Farm was being operated
near Victoria. It might be further mentioned that a great many more pheasants have been
liberated under this policy during- the past year than in any year when birds were being
raised and released from the Government Game Farm.
Details of liberations during the year are to be found in a statement contained in another
section of this report.
The policy of trapping surplus- beaver on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve for liberation
in other portions of the Province has been continued, and some very beneficial results have
accrued from this policy of restocking depleted areas with beaver.
We have made a very careful survey of the game reserves in the Province, and every
endeavour has been made to see that no hunting or trapping has taken place on reserved
areas, and steps have also been taken to keep down the number of predatory animals to be
found in some of these reserves. An inspection was made during the year of a territory
long advocated as a game reserve in the vicinity of Princeton, in that portion of the district
known as the Three Brothers Mountain area, and as a result of this inspection a recommendation no doubt will be submitted shortly for the creation of a substantial and much-
needed game reserve in this district.
As reported last year, mountain-sheep and wapiti liberated in certain sections of the
Province in the past have been giving considerable trouble in connection with damage to
private property. While only a few complaints have been received in regard to damage by
elk in the Naramata District, a serious condition exists in respect to mountain-sheep in the
Spences Bridge area, necessitating steps being taken to trap the animals doing damage and
to transport and liberate them elsewhere.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The Commission has again endeavoured during the year to further the interests of all
in providing better conditions in respect to game and fish throughout the Province. Assistance rendered in this connection by Game Associations, farmers, and others has helped very
greatly and is much appreciated. The co-operation of the British Columbia Provincial Police
Force has been a very important factor in our work, and in turn members of the Game Department have assisted the British Columbia Police at all times, and the spirit of co-operation
between the two Departments has been most cordial. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 7
We wish also to thank Dr. W. A. Clemens, Director of the Biological Station at Nanaimo,
B.C.; Dr. C. McC. Mottley; and Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for
British Columbia, for their kindness in furnishing us with the scientific articles appearing
on pages 27-34 of this report.
REPORT OF OFFICER I/C GAME FISH CULTURE.
The annual report of the operations of the Game Fish Culture Branch for the year
ended December 31st, 1935, is hereby submitted.
In order to speed up the liberation of fry from the various fish-cultural plants of the
Department, it was decided, after careful and lengthy investigation, to construct what is
known as an aerating-tank to replace the more laborious and drawn-out method of planting
fish by the use of fry-cans. A brief description of this new tank, together with the principle
involved, is as follows:—
A wooden tank capable of holding 300 gallons of water is mounted on a truck. A power
take-off is connected to the transmission of the truck-engine and from it the drive-shaft with
universal joint is connected to an aerating-pump. From this pump a 2-inch pipe leads to
almost the top of the tank on the outside where it branches into two sections, which then enter
the tank at the sides and continue throughout the length of the tank, being capped at the ends.
At even distances on both of these pipes are %-inch faucets which force water, and therefore
oxygen, into the tank. At the bottom of the tank and in the front end is a screen cone, inside
of which is a 2-inch outlet-pipe connecting with the aerating-pump, this being the manner
by which water is constantly circulating. This tank can be divided into three sections, which
means that different species of fish can be transported at one time, or three separate plantings
on the same trip.
The fish are liberated from the tank through a rubber hose connected together, each
length being 10 feet and connected in any number according to the distance required to reach
the lake or river in which the fish are to be liberated.
Comparing the old method of transporting fish in fry-cans which had to be aerated by
hand, and the same heavy and clumsy cans carried to the water by man-power, the new
system is far in advance in every detail, especially with regard to the number of fish that
can be transported at one time, as many as 30,000 yearling fish having been planted in one
trip, thereby reducing greatly the cost of liberating trout.
In order that fish could be held through the entire year at the Qualicum Ponds, Qualicum,
V.I., it was necessary to construct a cabin whereby the hatchery attendant could give closer
attention to his duties.
At very little cost, water-wheels, one each for the Stanley Park, Vancouver, and Veitch
Creek, V.I., hatcheries, were constructed, the purpose being that this method provides the
power to grind the fish-foods used, thereby permitting the hatchery attendant more time for
the cleaning of tanks, troughs, and other multitudinous duties.
Investigations are still being continued in an endeavour to locate a suitable site for a
satisfactory collection of coastal cut-throat trout eggs, several bodies of water being under
observation.
The loss of practically all the Kamloops trout fry at Veitch Creek Hatchery, Sooke, V.I.,
is greatly regretted as this means a shortage of liberations of this species in the lakes on
Vancouver Island.
A great deal of experimental work was conducted by Dr. D. C. B. Duff and Mr. H. Horn,
of the University of British Columbia, Department of Bacteriology, in co-operation with this
Department, with reference to the dreaded disease which may occur among fish and known as
furunculosis. It is hoped that a procedure will emanate from these experiments which will
provide a disinfectant capable of destroying the causative organism of furunculosis.
Investigations have been made by members of this Department throughout the Province,
in order to acquaint themselves with the needs of various districts with regard to developing
better fishing conditions, also to determine the possibility of expanding our system of hatching-
troughs and rearing-tanks.
A planting of 50,000 kokanee-eggs was made in Jones Lake, Hope District, this being the
second year that such a procedure has been adopted, the idea being to provide feed for the many
large trout that abound in this body of water. N 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Substantial subsidies have been granted various Rod and Gun Clubs, the money so provided
being spent to good advantage. In the case of the Cranbrook District Rod and Gun Club, it
assisted the members there in further promoting the excellent work they have been doing with
regard to the stripping operations conducted, their complete hatchery procedure, also the
liberations made in their own district.
Kelowna has made excellent progress and outlined a programme of future development-
work that should show very beneficial results and amply repay those that volunteered their
services. The funds supplied to the Revelstoke Rod and Gun Club provided for the employment
of a hatchery attendant, feed, etc., for the hatching, holding, and finally the liberating of
some 90,000 Kamloops fry.
Penticton disbursed the subsidy provided by engaging assistance for the removal of coarse
fish, also to employ a special fishery officer during the spawning period to protect these fish
from depredations which had been the case in previous years.
This branch of the Provincial Game Department wishes to express its thanks to Major
J. A. Motherwell and staff, of the Dominion Fisheries Department. The excellent assistance
rendered by Dr. W. A. Clemens and Dr. C. McC. Mottley, of the Pacific Biological Station at
Nanaimo, is also greatly appreciated; also Dr. D. C. B. Duff and Mr. H. Horn, of the Department of Bacteriology of the University of British Columbia, for their advice and attention
in various details pertaining to our game-fish cultural activities.
A summary of the plantings made during the year 1935 is to be found on another page
of this report.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE MAINLAND
COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1935.
Game Animals.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are reported as fairly plentiful in the Coleman Creek, Museum
Creek, Mount Arrowsmith, Beaufort Mountain, Kennedy Lake, Nootka Sound, Kyuquot Sound,
and Shaw Creek Districts, and appear to be on the increase. This is also the case in the
Tsable River and Oyster River areas.
Bear.—In view of the fact that black bear are not hunted they are slightly increasing,
and grizzly bear are to be found in the Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlet areas, as well as
in the vicinity of Thompson and McKenzie Sounds.
Deer.—Reports indicate that deer have decreased in numbers in the Nanaimo and Comox
Districts and on the west coast of the Island north of Alberni. Throughout the remainder
of Vancouver Island, however, deer are fairly plentiful.
Mountain-goat.—The Game Warden at Lake Cowichan reports that these animals still
remain on the higher slopes to the east of Shaw Creek, but it has been impossible to date to
make any estimate as to the number of animals in this district, although the indications are that
they are not increasing to any great extent.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In many portions of Vancouver Island beaver are increasing, especially in the
farming districts. This is especially the case in the Courtenay area, complaints having been
received from that district of beaver doing damage to private property, and in some cases they
have caused the roads to be flooded.
Otter.—This particular animal has not been very plentiful at any time on Vancouver
Island.
Marten.—Fairly plentiful throughout the Division and appear to be standing up very well
considering the numbers trapped each year.
Mink.—There has been no great increase in mink, but some very good catches have been
made by trappers in the Alberni and Courtenay Districts.
Racoon.—Fairly plentiful throughout the Division.
Muskrats—During the past few years there have been a considerable number of complaints
re muskrats doing damage to private property, especially in the Cowichan District, but since
an open season has been provided for the trapping of these animals very few complaints have REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 9
come to hand. Reports of muskrats trapped on Vancouver Island show that during the present
year they have not been as plentiful as heretofore, but that the price received for the pelts of
these animals has been very good on the fur market.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Reports indicate that throughout Vancouver Island blue grouse have
been fairly plentiful, although in the Victoria District this is not the case.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Reported as being scarce on the west coast of Vancouver Island, but
in most areas they are holding their own and there appears to be no noticeable decrease.
Quail.—In the Nanaimo, Alberni, Courtenay, and Cowichan Lake areas these birds have
been scarce, while in the Victoria and Duncan Districts they are reported as being fairly
plentiful.
Partridge.—These birds are only to be found in the vicinity of Victoria and Sidney, but
are not very plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—A few ptarmigan are to be found in the central portions of Vancouver Island.
Pheasants.—The weather during the breeding season was not favourable for the propagation of pheasants, with the result that in most districts on Vancouver Island these birds were
not plentiful, notwithstanding the fact that during the year more pheasants were liberated in
suitable districts on Vancouver Island than heretofore. In the vicinity of Victoria pheasants
were reported as being fairly plentiful.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—In some portions of Vancouver Island ducks have been more plentiful than in
previous year, whereas in other sections, especially in the Courtenay District, they were
reported as arriving in smaller numbers.
Brant.—From all accounts, brant are on the increase and were observed in large numbers
in the Parksville and Qualicum Districts early in the year.
Geese.—The Game Warden at Duncan reports that more geese were observed in his district
while these birds were flying south than for some years past. On the west coast of Vancouver
Island these birds appear to be increasing.
Swans.—A few swans wintered in the Nanaimo Lakes and several of these birds migrated
through the Nanaimo District in the fall. In the Campbell Lakes region trumpeter swans are
appearing each year in small numbers, while whistling swans still show up on migration and
appear to be slowly increasing.
Shore-birds.—Snipe appear to be increasing, and this applies generally to all varieties
of shore-birds. —
Vermin.
Cougar have been reported as quite numerous, and more of these animals are killed on
Vancouver Island in each year than in any other portion of the Province.
Wolves have been increasing, and Predatory-animal Hunter J. Cecil Smith has accounted
for a number of these animals. Bounties have been paid for the destruction of wolves in
various portions of Vancouver Island.
All Game Wardens report that they have been carrying out instructions issued in connection with the destruction of all types of predatory animals and noxious birds, and have
interested the Game Associations in conducting crow-shoots in their respective districts.
Game-protection.
A great deal of difficulty has been encountered in the Nanaimo and other districts on
Vancouver Island in enforcing the Game and Fishery Regulations, due to the fact that a
large percentage of the population is on relief.
However, patrols have been continually conducted throughout the Division, and every
step taken to see that game and fish of the Division have been given the maximum protection.
Game Propagation.
Fallow deer were again trapped on James Island and released in the Alberni District.
With reference to the liberation of pheasants, a statement will be found on another page
of this report showing the total liberations of game birds in various districts throughout the
Province. N 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Reserves.
Periodical patrols have been made throughout the game reserves on Vancouver Island,
and there appears to be no doubt that these reserves have been responsible for the increase
in game of all kinds in the districts adjacent to same.
Fur Trade.
There are very few fur-traders on Vancouver Island, the majority of fur trapped being-
shipped direct to Vancouver or other outside markets.
Fur-farming.
Several of the small fur-farmers are now out of business owing to low prices of fur and
breeding stock. The well-established farms, however, seem to be operating successfully. A few
new mink-farms have been established during the year.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The Game Warden at Courtenay reports that through registered trappers protecting their
lines the stand of fur-bearing animals is improving. There are approximately 500 registered
trap-lines on Vancouver Island, and a large number of trappers have been trapping on private
property, principally for muskrats.
Registration of Guides.
As Vancouver Island is not a big-game district, there are very few registered guides in
the Division.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made from time to time into remote areas by various
Game Wardens in the Division, with beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
During the year there were a few hunting accidents in the Division, as follows:—
On Sunday, November 10th, 1935, Walter Pryde, of Quarterway, B.C., was shot and
seriously wounded by William Gilmour, of Nanaimo, while hunting deer on the Rock City
Ridges. Mr. Pryde was struck by three buckshot pellets, one grazing his neck, one through
the arm near the elbow, and one entering the lung close to the heart. It would appear that
Gilmour heard a movement in the bush and a second later saw an object at which he fired,
thinking it was a deer.
On November 14th, 1935, Dr. Lundahl collapsed on Copper King Mountain at Cameron
Lake, and on investigation it was found that he had died from heart-trouble. Dr. Lundahl at
the time was hunting deer.
On September 19th, 1935, William Arthur, of Duncan, was slightly wounded as the
result of being struck by shotgun pellets in the back of the neck, caused through his getting
in the line of fire of another hunter who was shooting at a grouse.
In the Highland District near Victoria, G. H. Walker, whose licence was subsequently
cancelled, mistook another hunter for a deer, while Victor Marconi died from injuries received
from a fall while out hunting.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game Wardens throughout the Division express their appreciation of the co-operation
and assistance rendered by members of the British Columbia Provincial Police Force, and these
Game Wardens in turn report that they have endeavoured to co-operate with the British
Columbia Police from time to time.
The general game conditions throughout the district, according to reports, appear to be
improving, although in some areas the deer-hunting has not been as good as in previous
years. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 11
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1935.
Big Game.
Deer.—Mule-deer are well distributed throughout the Division. This also applies to
white-tail deer, with the exception of the Boundary and Similkameen areas, where they are
not numerous.
Moose.—Moose have suffered no appreciable decline and are continuing to extend their
range. Reports are received of moose from Cranbrook, Creston, and Upper Kootenay Lake
areas where previously they did not range.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are plentiful in the Rocky Mountains of the East Kootenay and
also increasing in the Selkirks east of the Columbia River, although this is not a suitable
elk range. A few elk were killed in the vicinity of Naramata during a short open season, and
this appears to have had the desired effect of driving these animals back from the orchards.
Caribou.—Caribou are chiefly in the mountain ranges contiguous to Kootenay and Arrow
Lakes.    A small number were taken during the short open season.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are well distributed in the Division and definitely
numerous in the Rocky Mountains.    Not plentiful in the Boundary or Okanagan section.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are chiefly confined to the Rocky Mountain Range,
where they are numerous. Small bands exist near Okanagan Falls and on the Ashnola
watershed in the Similkameen but it is conjectural whether these bands will ever increase
to any extent on account of the very limited range which is available in those sections.
Bear.—Black and brown bear are well distributed throughout the Division, but are more
plentiful in the Kootenay section. This also applies to the grizzly bear, which is comparatively scarce in the Boundary, Okanagan, and Similkameen areas.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Mink, marten, lynx, and weasel are the principal fur-bearers, while beaver and muskrats
are next in order. A few otter, fox, fisher, and wolverine are trapped each year. Many
trappers have been restricting their catch due to low prices, but with the improved market
a heavier take may be expected for the. current season.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue, ruffed, and Franklin's grouse have not fluctuated to any appreciable extent and
appear to be quite plentiful at the close of the open season.
Prairie-chicken exist in the East Kootenay and also in the Boundary District, but in no
great numbers. This bird, for some reason, appears to be definitely on the decline in spite
of the close seasons and has shown little likelihood of retaining its former numbers comparable
to former years.
Ptarmigan are found in all the ranges, but on account of the altitude are little hunted.
Pheasants are plentiful in the Similkameen and Lower Okanagan. They are doing well
in both Creston and Grand Forks, and it is anticipated that longer open seasons will be in
order in the two latter communities.
European partridge are fairly plentiful in the Similkameen and Lower Okanagan, but
not to the extent they were a few years ago.
Quail are doing well in the Lower Okanagan and Lower Similkameen where conditions
are suitable.
Migratory Game Birds.
The past summer was a beneficial one for nesting ducks, as it was marked by an absence
of unnaturally high water due to climatic conditions. The bulk of the shooting during the
open season consisted of locally reared birds, as the early freeze-up during October resulted
in the usual northern flights almost completely ignoring this part of the country.
Geese were plentiful in the Columbia River District north of Windermere and particularly abundant at Kootenay Flats and Creston. Wilson snipe did not seem to be as much in evidence as in previous years.
The weather turned unusually cold during the latter part of October and first days of
November, which resulted in the bulk of the water-fowl leaving for more salubrious parts.
Nevertheless, a great many water-fowl stayed on the larger open lakes and streams and
presumably, as usual, will endeavour to winter in British Columbia as long as there is any
open water for them.
Vermin.
Seventeen coyotes, 26 ownerless dogs, 103 cats, 249 magpies, 48 big-horned and snowy
owls, 60 hawks, 354 crows, 1 eagle, 1 raven, and 2 skunks were destroyed by the Game
Wardens in the course of their patrols.
Game-protection.
One hundred and five Informations during the year under the " Game Act " and Special
Fisheries Regulations resulted in 100 convictions and five dismissals.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released for restocking in the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand Forks,
Creston, and Lower Arrow Lakes, as well as the East Kootenay Valley north and south of
Cranbrook. The Lower Arrow Lakes, Robson, Renata, and Deer Park, as well as the East
Kootenay between Cranbrook and Windermere, are still experimental, but reports indicate
that these birds have survived two winters well and are increasing. It is expected that
shortly, with the addition of some new blood, short open seasons may be declared in these
areas. Birds released some years ago in the Inonoaklin Valley have increased slightly and
it is hoped to try restocking there next spring.
Practically all the suitable areas in the Division have now been stocked with pheasants,
and up to the present the results are decidedly encouraging. Much interested co-operation
has been received from sportsmen generally in the district where the birds have been released
and volunteers are not lacking to assist in feeding the pheasants during severe weather.
For this purpose feed is supplied when necessary by the Game Department.
Game Reserves.
Existing game reserves comprising the Elk River Reserve, the Wigwam Deer Sanctuary
near Elko, the bird sanctuary at Nelson, and the water-fowl sanctuary at Vaseaux Lake have
been further augmented by the creation of a deer sanctuary on the Kettle River. This latter
sanctuary is situated on the east side of the main Kettle River and in the heart of the hunting
district. It has natural boundaries consisting of the river and two main creeks and provides
a resting-place for deer in that area. It has also the approval of the local residents as well
as visiting sportsmen.
Fur Trade.
There are five fur-traders in the Division and the bulk of the fur goes to Vancouver,
comparatively little being exported from the Province direct in this Division.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farmers state that the industry is looking up and prices for fur-farmed stock
are encouragingly on the upgrade. It is interesting to note that recently the price of ranch-
raised mink has increased greatly over the pelts of the wild mink. It is presumed that
systematic and selected breeding of these animals is resulting in a superior pelt.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Little or no dissatisfaction is encountered among the trappers in the Division, who number approximately 500.
Registration of Guides.
There are twenty-four registered guides in this Division. Special Patrols.
There were no outstanding patrols made during the year, as the usual routine patrols
were carried on consistently. These embraced trips of ten days and two weeks by Game
Wardens either in pairs or singly, on horseback, snow-shoes, or by canoes.
Hunting Accidents.
On May 8th, 1935, R. J. McKinnon, of Grand Forks, while shooting gophers, accidentally
shot himself in the little finger, his hand slipping along the barrel of the weapon when he fell.
On September 15th, 1935, while duck-shooting near Lake Windermere, E. G. Cooper, of
Cranbrook, accidentally shot himself in the upper arm when his dog clawed the trigger of his
gun as he was stopping to take the duck from the dog.
On October 4th, 1935, Mrs. Elizabeth Fairburn, of the Republic Mine Camp near Slocan,
was accidentally shot when her husband, J. Fairburn, was unloading a shotgun in the house.
The shot entered Mrs. Fairburn's left leg and as a result the use of it has been seriously
impaired.
On November 14th, 1935, James J. Cullinane and his son Morrisi, of Rossland, B.C., age
20, were accidentally drowned in the Kettle River about 10 miles from Westbridge. They
had evidently attempted to cross the river on the ice, when it gave way and they fell into
deep water.    Their bodies were recovered the following day.
On November 17th, 1935, Bruno Truant, of Natal, 14 years of age, accidentally shot
himself through the left eye with a .22 rifle when attempting to blow snow from the muzzle
of the gun.    The eye was later removed in a Calgary Hospital.
Summary and General Remarks.
In reviewing previous annual reports from this Division in recent years, it is noted that
they seem to be a constant repetition of the same thing. This is a condition that is bound
to occur when there are no particular catastrophies to suddenly alter the present abundant
stand of game throughout the Division. At the present time, and as it has been for many
years, the outlook for game generally is most encouraging. We have a plentitude of wild
life and have been favoured that no calamity sufficiently great to make an appreciable difference has occurred.
Some anxiety was felt last year, particularly in the month of January, when excessive
snowfall made the outlook for deer somewhat gloomy. Fortunately, after an unprecedented
precipitation within the space of a few days, the weather moderated and the remainder of
the winter was comparatively mild. The snow settled and crusted sufficiently hard so that
the deer were not a too easy prey for predators and were able to walk on the crust and to
forage readily for food. The spring was a mild and favourable one, there was no unusual
high water in the lakes or streams during the summer, and forest fires were at a minimum.
During the latter part of October we had some snow and about two weeks of winter weather,
the result of which was an unusually early southern flight of migratory water-fowl. It also
resulted in the deer congregating at the lower levels somewhat earlier than usual and as a
consequence the hunting was better than for some years past.
It is the custom, particularly in the United States, to quote statistics purporting to
enumerate game in specific areas. This method of estimating wild life should be taken with
a generous dash of salt. It may be possible in some districts, where the terrain is level, to
make an estimate in a small area which can be taken as a guide, but no such method in
British Columbia is either applicable or reliable. We know that game is well distributed
and also that some districts are much more favoured in that respect than others. While it
may not be correct to say that game is continually increasing, it is also reasonable to assume
that it is not perceptibly decreasing. The deer, particularly in " B " Division, could be well
reduced in numbers and still plenty would be left for the sportsmen. In the Rockies of the
East Kootenay the present abundance of big-game animals is most striking when compared
to the stand of the same species twenty or more years ago.
Therefore, should the annual reports from this Division appear to be merely repetitions
of previous reports, it must be conceded that there is good reason for their optimistic note
in regard to the plentitude and prevailing encouraging conditions of game generally. Many outside hunting-parties visited the eastern part of the Division during the year
and, without exception, expressed themselves highly in favour of this part of British Columbia
as a district offering variety of game, unsurpassed mountain scenery, and an agreeable
climate during the fall. It is to be expected that an increase of non-resident hunters may be
noted in the immediate future.
No cases of diseased liver or liver-fluke in deer were reported during the past year.
The experiment of introducing pheasants into the Great Columbia, Kootenay Valley,
which extends from the International Boundary to Golden, a distance of roughly 200 miles,
has been very encouraging. Should these birds habituate themselves in that area it will
be one more asset for a section which at the present time is probably the most diverse and
easily accessible district in North America for big game, upland birds, migratory birds, and
fresh-water sport fish.
During the year the usual generous co-operation has been received from the Provincial
Police and cordially reciprocated. The various sportsmen's associations throughout the
Division have also been of much assistance and encouragement in the enforcement of game
programmes.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Sub-Inspector, " C " Game Division.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Game
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1935.
Big Game.
Moose.—Reports reaching this office indicate a steady increase of moose in the Kamloops
area. About twenty moose were taken by hunters within 40 miles of Kamloops. Numerous
others were shot in the Deadman, Criss Creek, Clearwater, and McLure Districts.
Moose seem to be drifting into other parts of the country surrounding Bowron Lake, but
at that they are still reported as being fairly numerous.
In certain parts of the Quesnel Detachment these animals did not winter well. In the
Lower Blackwater Valley deep snow and heavy crust caused quite a few moose to starve.
One trapper found thirteen carcasses on his line and it would appear that they got caught
by the heavy January snow before they got to the lower levels to yard up. The calf-crop
during the spring was quite heavy, a number of cows being seen with twin calves.
Throughout the 'whole Division the number of all game animals taken was very small,
due to the hard crust of snow which made approach a difficult and sometimes impossible
problem.
In the Williams Lake area moose are reported in fair numbers throughout. They are
apparently increasing in numbers around Yalakom, Big, and Leon Creek areas.
Mountain-sheep.—In the Shorts Creek area in the Okanagan there are roughly seventy-
five mountain-sheep. They do not appear to increase to the extent that they should. A few
cougar have been killed there by Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth, who was accompanied by Game Warden Maxson during the early part of January. One big ram was found
by the hunters which was a fresh kill by cougar. Three other carcasses of sheep were found
in the vicinity as a result of cougar depredations, together with two deer recently killed by
the same predators.
A band of sixty mountain-sheep is reported on Mount McLean in the Lillooet Detachment.
The only sheep west of the Fraser River in the Clinton Detachment are reported as being
on Marble Mountain. Indians stated that they had found a number of these sheep dead
under a bluff last spring and from their appearance it was concluded that they had starved
to death.    A trip will be made in there in the spring with a view to making a check-up.
The sheep liberated at Squilax in 1926 and subsequently at Squam Bay, on Adams Lake,
continue to increase in numbers. It is expected that arrangements will be made to capture
mountain-sheep at Spences Bridge, where they are still doing damage to some crops. Those
animals will have to be transported to a distant point, otherwise they will return to their
old habitat. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 15
I would request again that a policy of restocking big-game areas be inaugurated in order
to compensate for the loss of previous years due to severe climatic conditions, starvation,
disease, predators, and in some instances excessive hunting in certain well-known areas.
From a summary of a report prepared by T. K. Moilliet and J. D. Gregson, of the Dominion
Entomological Branch at Kamloops, on their investigations of a reported fatal disease of
moose, the following information might be of interest to the Game Department and public
generally:—
" During the last few years this laboratory has received several reports of a diseased
condition existing among deer in the Interior of British Columbia. This is characterized by
the presence of pus-sacks in the legs and neck, although other parts of the body are sometimes
affected as well.    It is not known yet through what agency this disease is contracted.
" Research in Minnesota indicates that a bacterium borne by the winter tick (Derma-
centor albipictus) is responsible for the disease in moose; workers in Wisconsin, however,
could not locate this bacterium. Studies of moose-ticks sent by the Provincial Game Branch
at Prince George to the Kamloops Entomological Branch showed these ticks capable of killing
rabbits through some infection. Studies of the ticks by the Entomological Branch revealed
them to contain large numbers of bacteria.
" Observations made at Banff by the late Eric Hearle indicated that mountain-sheep are
heavily infested by the wood-tick (D. Andersoni) which is the tick commonly known to all
hunters or people frequenting the woods in the spring of each year and is a larger variety
than the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus), which is reported as affecting moose."
According to Moilliet and Gregson, rabbits form the animal reservoirs of our two worst
tick-borne diseases, tularaemia and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which is the cause of the
periodic dying out of rabbits and grouse. Further research-work on this host and the
bacterium affecting animal and bird life should therefore be encouraged and proper facilities
and equipment supplied in order to carry this out. It is a little unfortunate that the general
public has not yet appreciated the importance of this work. Further assistance should be
rendered by the Game Department through the co-operation of the Game Wardens in the field.
Caribou.—A few were taken from this Division, especially around Clearwater, Vavenby,
and Blue River Districts, also Quesnel and Mica Mountain areas. More caribou were taken
from the Clearwater districts than in former years owing to a greater concentration of
hunters and opening-up of trails.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are in fair numbers in Clearwater and Blue River Districts, also the northern portion of the Salmon Arm and Bowron Lake areas. In the Clinton
Detachment they are reported as keeping a steady low average in numbers. Lillooet reports
a decrease in mountain-goat, due perhaps to increased mining activity.
Deer.—The bag-limit throughout " C " Division was a very disappointing one, due greatly
to a hard crust on the snow which made approach difficult. Bucks remained very high up
and few were seen. If weather conditions are favourable for 1936 and bucks are reported
scarce, a change in the bag-limit regulation will be necessary for the year ensuing. Reports
come to hand of larger number of deer being seen during the latter part of 1935, especially
in the yarding areas. However, there is a prevailing tendency at all times to regard a concentration of deer as being " quite numerous " for the entire district. If those animals were
actually scarce in numbers there should be a considerable increase in 1936, as few were taken
during the present year. Nevertheless, a bag-limit of three bucks is generally regarded as
excessive.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Statistics available show a distinct decrease in catch of practically all furs due to the
poor prices offered. It hardly paid trappers for their effort to go and spend time catching
fur for a depressed market.
Beaver to-day are not nearly as numerous as they should be in a Division such as this
with a vast acreage of water and swamp. Six Game Wardens report an increase in beaver,
three report a scarcity, and one Game Warden reports a certain part of his district as having
beaver " nearly extinct," mostly where Indians reside.
A cursory examination by officers in the field on their estimate of beaver left on various
trap-lines would be far from accurate. The more accurate reports come from the actual
trapper.    He is in a position to watch either an increase or a decrease from frequent visits N 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
along his trap-line. It is hardly fair to state that the system of trap-line registration in
force at present does not conserve beaver. Lines are numerous in this Division where beaver
alone furnish a goodly income for the trapper, but as a whole the beaver population is not
what it should be and in the Chilcotin District there are too many trappers who still find
the beaver " easy money." In other portions of the Division a change is slowly taking place
and the beaver is coming into its own again. A perusal of the catch of registered trappers
is a sure indication of either wise conservation or excessive trapping. It is to the trapper
himself that we must look to conserve the beaver population and it is only through education
that this can be done.
The inauguration of a close season on beaver would be futile without a close season in
other territories adjacent to this Province.
Upland Game Birds.
European partridge are slowly increasing in the Kelowna District, Kamloops1 and Vernon
areas.
Blue grouse are reported to be increasing in Kamloops and Kelowna Districts and in
certain portions of the Salmon Arm Detachment, but show a decrease around Quesnel,
Clinton, Vernon, Bowron Lake, Merritt, Lillooet, and Williams Lake. In many cases the
unusual wet weather and poor hatching season was responsible for decrease in all species
of game birds.    It is to be hoped that the Department will take cognizance of this fact.
Ruffed grouse around Salmon Arm were in sufficient numbers to enable sportsmen to
obtain reasonably good bags. Kelowna reports willow-grouse disappointing, and Williams
Lake forwards the unfortunate report that all varieties of grouse are disappearing, particularly prairie-chicken.
It might be said that, taken as a whole, this Division has suffered in its grouse and other
game-bird population and further open seasons should be made only after careful investigation
and consideration.
Migratory Game Birds.
In the Quesnel area ducks showed no appreciable increase. In the Swan Lake area,
the largest breeding-ground east of the Nazko Valley, the local ducks were about the same
as last year. Very few ducks from the north came through that part of the Detachment,
although reports to hand stated that the flight was1 very heavy in the western portion.
Geese were very briefly in evidence, due to the early freeze-up and sudden cold.
Mallards were reported numerous around Kelowna.
There appears to be a divergence in the main interior flight-line of mallard, baldpate,
pintail, and green-winged teal near Kamloops, part of the migration taking the Fraser route
and part taking the Okanagan-Nicola-Columbia route. The Cariboo-Fraser route is well
substantiated by returns on banded mallards, birds banded at Chilliwack being recovered
in various parts of the Cariboo region. There is some evidence supporting the theory that
the large flights of red-head, canvas-back, and lesser scaup which used to take place here
were composed largely of birds raised in the Prairie Provinces. This has not been substantiated through banding.
The main flight of Canada and lesser Canada geese is over the Cariboo-Nicola-Okanagan
and Columbia route and not by the Fraser. Many of these geese winter on the Columbia
River above Portland, where a 75-mile stretch of river is maintained as a bird sanctuary.
Vermin.
More damage has been done to game through coyote and cougar depredations than
through all the hunters combined. This year has been the worst for wanton killing by those
marauders in my experience. A small bounty is better than no bounty, but the continued
loss of our game will in time have a demoralizing effect on business generally, as when people
find the hunting poor year after year merchants are bound to suffer.
Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth killed twelve cougar during 1935. The latter
part of the year proved exceptionally difficult travelling, taking in some cases four and
five days to get one cougar. In the conserving of big game the cougar-hunter stands ahead
of all others. To show how ineffective the $10 bounty on cougar is, it is at present reported
that bounty on only one cougar had been paid at the Kamloops Government Agent's office REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 17
up to December 31st, 1935, despite reports coming from Indians and others of cougar in their
respective districts. It is largely a problem of trained dogs and trained hunters in order
to cope with a situation which is fast becoming a menace of the worst kind to our big game.
If the increase in predators synchronizes with the increase in game, then the most obvious
time to cope with this problem to its fullest extent would be at its peak or, better still, at all
times. It is noted that the Cumberland District paid bounties on 206 cougar during 1934.
It is evident, therefore, that a very substantial increase in game animals must ensue plus
a corresponding increase in the sale of licences and business generally.
The following predatory animals were killed by Game Wardens in " C " Division:—
Crows __
Cats	
Coyotes
Eagles __
871
42
17
11
Hawks _..
Magpies
Owls  	
68
497
54
In the killing of the bald eagle and golden eagle I am not in agreement. It is true they
do a certain amount of damage to game, but their aesthetic value and the beauty of flight is
a sight worth guarding and watching. I do not consider those so-called destroyers of game
in a class with the cougar, coyote, or horned owl.
Through the activity of Game Wardens and the good work of members of the various
Game Associations in this Division, especially Kamloops, Kelowna, Vernon, and Salmon Arm,
a great deal of valuable work has been executed in the protection of wild life.
Game-protection.
While this heading may not be fully applicable to the question of prosecutions, it has
a certain bearing on this phase of our work. Our main object is to prevent violations of the
" Game Act " rather than wait for their occurrence. This policy has been followed by means
of frequent appearances in numerous localities in the various detachments. However, during
the year just ended, ninety-four prosecutions were executed, with one withdrawal. The Provincial Police prosecuted nine for violations of the " Game Act," making a total of 103 for
this Division.
The public is taking a much greater interest in game-conservation as a result of the
various educational facilities placed before them. People generally are against violation of
Game Regulations. The introduction of the permit system, according to Game Warden
Atwood, in the country north of the 53rd parallel of north latitude for the killing of game
during the close season has worked out very well. Returns show that only 12 per cent, of
those taking out permits killed moose.
Game Propagation.
Beaver were liberated in various parts of this Division to assist in the storage of
irrigation-water. The trapping of these animals entails a great deal of work and travelling.
It has been found that a variety of traps works to better advantage. The tube trap with
drop-doors is the most successful type if suitably baited.
Pheasants were liberated in other portions of the Kamloops District from the Tranquille
area, where there is a greater concentration, due to the protection rendered on the game
reserve.
Arrangements are still continuing for the capture of California quail at Kelowna for
their introduction to the Kamloops District. One pair liberated early in 1935 near Kamloops raised seven young.    I expect to have from twenty to thirty quail for liberation shortly.
Plans are being made for the capture of mountain-sheep at Spences Bridge, where they
are still reported to be doing damage to crops. Those animals will be liberated around
Savona and possibly Jesmond after lambing.
Several hundred pheasants were liberated in this Division during the early spring.    The
wet, cold weather and poor hatching season generally were responsible for a considerable
decrease in bird-life.    I would advise that Lillooet receive a greater number of pheasants
than formerly.
2 N 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Reserves.
The Yalakom Game Reserve and the Bowron Lake Game Reserve are the only sanctuaries
in this Division. The latter still supplies beaver for the retention of irrigation-water in
various localities, provided one is prepared to leave enough water for their subsistence.
Otherwise the complete draining of a body of water leaves these animals without protection
and as a result they fall easy prey to vermin.
Fur Trade.
The greater portion of fur goes to Vancouver. I would ask again that a transient fur-
buyer invading the territory of a resident fur-buyer should be asked to pay a greater licence
fee. A number of complaints have reached Game Warden Atwood from traders and trappers
on the ratio of the fur royalties to the selling-price of furs generally.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farms in this Division have not increased greatly. The poor price of fur to-day is
no incentive to the fur-farmer to go into this business to any great extent.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system is a good one and an attempt has been made to considerably increase a number
of trap-lines into the block formation. In these blocks a breeding area has been provided
to ensure a fairly steady fur-supply. I do not think, however, that trap-line registration
aids beaver-conservation to the extent it should. It is principally through education and not
close seasons over the entire Province which will conserve the beaver population in British
Columbia.
The heaviest trapping of beaver took place, according to the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, during the season 1926-27, when the records show 21,851 beaver trapped at an average value per pelt of $25 in British Columbia. The high price offered was no doubt the main
incentive. During the season 1933-34 a total catch of 12,532 beaver for British Columbia
was recorded at an average price of $10 per pelt. With but an occasional upward fluctuation,
the catch of this fur-bearing animal has decreased, due greatly to poor prices offered and
to a certain extent overtrapping in some cases.    Other causes were predators, fire, etc.
After the trapping season of 1933-34, 406 white trappers gave an estimate of 5,906
beaver left on their registered trap-lines. This is an average of 14.55 beaver to each trapper.
The return of catch for the season 1934-35 showed a total of 864 beaver taken by 350 trappers
sending in returns. After the season 1934-35, 275 white trappers showed a beaver estimate
of 4,789 left on their registered trap-lines, making an average of 17.41 beaver per trapper.
The beaver is an animal of the lowlands and highlands and is comparatively easy to
trap. Instead of a close season on beaver, I feel tempted to recommend the closing of beaver
on lines that show a poor beaver census on a potential beaver trap-line or area. If a number of trappers are conserving their beaver and make a fair living from the beaver-catch
alone, it would be grossly unfair to close the season on lines that are paying their way in
yearly dividends from their beaver-catch. The threat to close the season on beaver on lines
showing wanton neglect and overtrapping plus a poor census return would be a deterrent to
any trapper to overtrap. It might be argued that certain trappers, in order to cover up their
acts of overtrapping, might possibly blame the poacher. It is to the interest of every trapper
to guard his trap-line. I think the Department could assist a great deal in supplying the
names of non-trappers shipping fur from all over British Columbia, so as to enable the
officers in the field to cope with the practice of poaching on registered trap-lines. Ninety
per cent, of the trappers renewed their licences to trap up to December 31st, 1935, with a
corresponding number of returns of catch to hand.
The company lines registered in the names of Indian bands are still unsatisfactory
according to reports from Quesnel. The suggestion is made that there is little or no supervision from the Indian Department over Indian trap-lines, but now that the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police have taken over the policing of the Indian Agencies, it is suggested that
some educational work be inaugurated by these police on the work of fur and game conservation among the wards of the Dominion Government. A recommendation comes from Quesnel for suggested improvements in trap-line registration, as follows:—
(a.) That the professional trapper, who never traps, be eliminated and the trap-line
given to men who are actual trappers.
(b.) There are instances, no doubt, where a large line is a detriment and, on the other
hand, a blessing, especially to aged trappers or where sickness makes its appearance, and
the privilege of leasing a line under proper supervision is to be recommended, provided the
original holder of a trap-line conserves his fur rather than wastes it. There are abuses in
all things and trap-line registration is no exception.
Registration of Guides.
It is to be hoped that some plan will be evolved this year on a scheme something similar
to what has already been suggested. There are forty-four guides registered in this Division
this year. A great deal of employment could be furnished guides by means of a carefully
thought-out plan to bring in big-game hunters—the whole scheme to be aided by a policy
of restocking from the Dominion sanctuaries.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Wardens Mottishaw and Stewart into the Yalakom
Game Reserve during the latter part of the year 1935.
Game Warden Jobin assisted the British Columbia Provincial Police in the apprehension
of the Pioneer Bank bandits near Lytton, B.C.
Hunting Accidents.
Williams Lake Detachment.—James Flynn, Lac la Hache, B.C., accidentally shot Mrs.
Dixon, Indian, in the back.    The accident was not fatal.
Morgan Phillip, Vancouver, B.C., fell from a tree while hunting deer in the vicinity of
Mud Lake.    He died as a result of the fall.
Lillooet Detachment.—While shooting at some cans at Cayoosh Creek, Henry Whitney,
age 12 years, accidentally shot Herbert Fawkes, age 11 years. The bullet entered just below
the right armpit.    The accident did not prove fatal.
Summary and General Remarks on Game Conditions.
The year 1935 was a disappointing one from the view-point of the hunter. Bag limits
were much more scarce than usual and a great deal of territory covered in a vain attempt
to find the elusive grouse, duck, goose, and pheasant. The hatching season generally was
far from the average and the season had not been long open before hunters discovered the
scarcity.
As for game animals, the open season and hunting for any species of game animal was
on a par with that of the game bird. The scarcity of snow and the hard crust made approach
almost out of the question. In the yarding areas for deer and other animals the concentration appeared to be about the same as last year in many localities, but others reported a
reduction. Something should be done and done quickly to save our game from destruction
by cougar, wolves, coyotes, and predatory birds. A system of trained hunters with trained
dogs throughout the Province, paid by means of a high bounty, might effect a financial saving
rather than a small bounty spread over the Province where most people refuse to bother
with it, as it does not pay them to purchase a grub-stake, get equipment ready, and run all
over the country for four or five days at a stretch to get one cougar.
The death of moose and sheep in the Cariboo reported as having starved to death might
well bear further investigation.    An effort will be made, if possible, to ascertain the cause.
Statistical records of fur-catch over a period of years should be an indication of the
efficacy of trap-line registration. The fur price so far for the season 1935-36 shows an upturn in prices. If, on the other hand, the price of fur is high, the statistical records actually
show a tendency to trap more heavily and as a result the fur-supply suffers. Education
among the trappers would prevent serious depletion of our fur resources. There is a demand
for fall-trapping of muskrats and some trappers favour it for both beaver and muskrats.
Very few big-game hunters appeared from other countries. There is a vast potential
field for exploitation if a plan is formulated along the right lines. I wish, in conclusion, to express my thanks to the officers in " C " Division in the execution of their duties, which were at times of an unusually arduous nature, requiring patience
and diligence; also the Game Associations of Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Vernon, Kelowna, and
other points for the ready assistance in the protection and propagation of our game fish, birds,
and animals. The co-operative assistance so readily rendered by the members of the Provincial Police in this Division has been a source of gratification to members of the Game
Department.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1935.
Game Animals.
Moose, Deer, and Caribou.—Conditions prevailing during the year 1934, deep snow,
extremely cold weather, and an extraordinarily large number of predatory animals, occurred
again this year; consequently animals of the deer family suffered severe losses, especially in
the younger animals, calves and fawns, who owing to the deep snow became an easy prey
to wolves and coyotes.
Should similar losses be repeated next year, there is no doubt that the number of these
animals will fall away below the safety point and the balance of nature will be sadly upset.
In order to guard against this danger, it is important that measures will have to be taken
to curtail, in every possible way, the number of predatory animals. This applies especially
to the timber-wolf.    An increase in the bounty is suggested.
The above conditions do not prevail on the Queen Charlotte Islands, there being no wolves,
coyotes, or cougar on these islands. The deer liberated there a few years ago are doing
exceptionally well.    Deer may now be found on every island of the group.
Wapiti (Elk).—Very good reports have been received in regard to the elk liberated on
the Queen Charlotte Islands. They are now well established and the increase in their numbers is noticeable.
The discovery of a big band of elk north of the Peace River, on the Musqua River, has
been confirmed by Game Warden W. L. Forrester, who accompanied a scientific expedition
to this area; approximately 200 head were observed, all in good condition. A strict close
season in this area should be maintained over a period of years.
Bear (Black).—These animals are very numerous throughout the Division and are more
or less a nuisance in the settled areas. Reports have been received from the Queen Charlotte
Islands to the effect that the black bear are doing untold damages to the spawning salmon,
in some cases not a single salmon reaching the spawning-grounds. A survey of these islands
with a view to obtaining data on the activities of these animals in relation to the salmon has
been suggested and will be undertaken next season.
Bear (Grizzly).—These bear are to be found in every district. Some very good specimens
were obtained as trophies by non-resident big-game hunters, and as such are quite an asset
to the Province and therefore should be protected.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain).—The Sheep Creek Pass area north of Mount Robson is the
only area in this Division where these sheep occur. They are in fair numbers. The bag-limit
on this species should be brought down to one head north of the Canadian National Railways.
Sheep (Stonei and Fanini).—These species are quite numerous north of the Peace River,
in the Cassiar and Atlin Districts. The bag-limit on these animals should be set at one of
each species.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are numerous and in no danger of extermination.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Although weather conditions were not very favourable for trapping fur-bearing animals,
a fair catch of fur is reported for the Division. I again wish to bring to your attention the
necessity of giving the trapper and his trap-line closer supervision and greater protection.
This can only be brought about by appointing a greater number of Wardens in the northern
portion of the Province, where the bulk of the fur is produced. Upland Game Birds.
A scarcity of grouse and prairie-chicken is reported in every district. This scarcity is
partly blamed to adverse breeding weather, but the greatest loss occurred through the prevalence of hawks, owls, coyotes, etc. The rabbits having died, these predatory birds and animals
found a ready prey in the grouse and prairie-chicken. This also accounts for the disappearance of the pheasants and partridge liberated in numerous areas. With the return of the
rabbits, and as sufficient birds to propagate the species were left, their numbers will in a short
space of time be back to normal. A small bag and shorter season is suggested for the coming
year.
Migratory Game Birds.
Local ducks and geese were quite numerous during the past season and the fall migration
of northern ducks and geese was very poor; but as this part of the Province west of the Rocky
Mountains and east of the Coast Range is not, generally speaking, within the general migratory flights of these birds, little attention should be paid to their numbers in judging the
increase or decrease in these birds. In the Coast District or Western District, west of the
Coast Range, all migratory birds were reported as being plentiful. The fall migration of
northern birds through this district was reported as normal.
Vermin.
Cougar, coyotes, and wolves are reported to be just as numerous as last year.
The present bounty should be raised if possible; cougar and wolves to $15 and coyotes
to $3.50. In the latter case the bounty to be paid during the months of May to October, inclusive, and the pelt to be surrendered to the Government. The increase in bounties would
induce a greater number of licence-holders to kill these predatory animals.
The necessity of coping with the abnormal increase of all predatory animals is again
brought to your attention. If we wish to retain our game animals in sufficient numbers to
attract the big-game hunters, and at the same time prevent their destruction at a greater rate
than their reproduction, the above suggested bounties become a primary necessity.
Game-protection.
Numerous patrols were made of the Division, each Game Warden' assiduously patrolling
his detachment area.
A new detachment was established at McDame Creek, Cassiar District, and is expected
to be very beneficial to the district mentioned in creating a greater respect for our laws,
resulting eventually in an increase in both fur-bearing and big-game animals.
The mileage covered by members of the Department in enforcing the " Game Act," etc.,
for the year under review is made up as follows:—
Miles. Miles.  -
Train   15,900 Foot      6,414
Car   37,472 Plane         350
Horse      3,171 	
Boat   12,004 Total     75,311
Game Propagation.
Very good reports have been received concerning the deer, elk, pheasants, and muskrats
liberated over a period of years on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
The deer have increased to such an extent that a reasonable open season and bag-limit
may now be considered.
Elk are increasing, but are not in sufficient numbers to allow for an open season.
Pheasants are doing well in the settled districts, but are being picked off by owls, hawks,
and eagles and the increase is not up to expectations.
Muskrats are increasing and doing damage to ditches, dykes, etc. Numerous permits
have been issued to farmers, allowing them to trap muskrats, in order to protect their property
from being flooded or damaged by the actions of these rodents.
Pheasants were liberated at McBride, Vanderhoof, and Telkwa. Owing to the plague of
owls and hawks, most of these birds have disappeared. N 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The McBride Rod and Gun Club did very creditable work in feeding ducks and geese in
the vicinity of McBride, resulting in a noticeable increase in the number of local birds. This
work will be carried on during the coming year.
Game Reserves.
All game reserves are fulfilling their purpose and with the exception of Kunghit Game
Reserve are patrolled regularly. The Kunghit Reserve has not been patrolled owing to the
lack of transportation facilities in the Prince Rupert District. This, however, will be remedied
during the coming year, when an occasional patrol of this district will be possible.
Fur Trade.
A noticeable increase in the number of fur-traders is reported. An increase is also
reported in the number of pelts sold and prices obtained. Owing to the bulk of the fur being
shipped to Vancouver, no accurate data of the trade are obtainable.
Fur-farming.
I am sorry to have to report great losses of mink and fox by the fur-farmers. In most
cases the cause may safely be attributed to the lack of experience on the part of the fur-
farmers.
As suggested last year, the services of a departmental pathologist are greatly needed
and would greatly benefit this new industry. This matter should receive special consideration,
as it is anticipated that in time the fur-farming industry will be the principal source of supply
for all furs, and in order that we may benefit to the fullest extent in the future growth of the
industry the appointment of a departmental pathologist becomes a necessity.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This phase of our work is progressing favourably, but better maps of certain parts of
the Division are required in order to settle complicated disputes as to priority rights, etc.
The regulations governing the registration of trap-lines should be revised in order to stop
the commercialization of trap-lines. Absentee trap-line holders who lease out their lines on
a 50-50 basis should be liable to cancellation. Trappers should be allowed to have one assistant licensed trapper, but no more, etc.
Better supervision and protection of trap-lines is essential to give the bona-fide trapper
a feeling of security on his trapping area and induce him to conserve all fur-bearing animals.
A greater number of Game Wardens is suggested.
Registration of Guides.
The registration of guides as suggested in my last report has been discussed with a few
guides and is finding favour with them. Stricter regulations, placing more responsibility on
the guide or outfitter, stricter examination as to the capabilities of an applicant for a guide's
licence, the use of planes in guiding big-game parties to be regulated, etc., the licensing of
resident outfitters, guides, camp-helpers, etc. All the above suggestions have been received
from various guides and are recommended for your consideration.
Special Patrols.
The Game Wardens at Fort Nelson, McDame, and Finlay Forks Detachments have made
some very lengthy patrols in the ordinary course of their duties.
Game Warden Forrester's special patrol to the Musqua River with the Snyder expedition
is worthy of notice. The information obtained during this patrol was very valuable and
increased our knowledge of this unsurveyed portion of the Province. The patrol lasted eighty-
three days, covering 100 miles on foot, 250 by boat, 488 by saddle-horse, 640 by car, and 1,260
by train, a total of 3,0'68 miles.
All Game Wardens in the Division made numerous patrols in the ordinary course of
their duties, but the above-mentioned patrols are outstanding and worthy of mention. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 23
Hunting Accidents.
I am sorry to have to report that there were seven hunting accidents during this year.
On January 10th Richard Tallman, of Giscome, B.C., accidentally shot and killed himself
with a 6.5 m/m rifle whilst examining one of his traps. '
On February 8th Michael Kic, of Dorreen, B.C., accidentally shot and killed himself with
a 32 special Winchester rifle whilst using the gun as a club to kill a fisher.
On May 13th Rudolph Lindquist, of Fort Grahame, B.C., was reported drowned by falling
in the Driftpile River while trapping in that vicinity.    Body not recovered.
On September 8th Mrs. Paul Curtis, of New York City, N.Y., injured her eye while out
hunting with her husband, Captain Paul Curtis, and guide William Blackman, of Valemount,
B.C. Injury sustained was cut over eye caused by Lyman sight on .300 Savage rifle when
rifle recoiled when shooting.    Mrs. Curtis was taken to Jasper Hospital for attention.
On September 29th John Thomas Sparkes was accidentally shot in the arm by Paul Davis
Raymond, both of Quick, B.C. Accident happened while reloading a .22 rifle. Sparkes recovered. Game Warden Muirhead has been instructed to prosecute Raymond for carrying
firearms without a licence.    Case still pending.
On December 11th Reginald M. Waldron, of Fort Fraser, B.C., accidentally shot and
killed himself with 30/30 rifle while using gun as a club to kill a coyote.
Summary and General Remarks.
Game conditions, apart from the extraordinary number of predatory animals, are fair
throughout the Division.
The work of the McBride Rod and Gun Club in planting duck-feed in lakes, destroying
vermin, the establishment of a hatchery at McBride, operated by members of the club, which
enabled them to stock Horseshoe Lake, Lasalle Lake, and Moose Lake with about 50,000
Kamloops trout fry, is worthy of note.
I would be pleased if the appreciation of the Department could be extended to this club
for their valuable work in propagating and conserving both game animals and fish in their
district.
I beg to bring to your attention the assistance rendered to our Department by the
Provincial Police, Forestry and Public Works Departments, who were always ready to help
in every way possible, and it is needless to say that the Game Wardens in return fully cooperated with the officers and men of all Departments whenever the opportunity occurred.
In conclusion, I beg to extend my sincere thanks to the members of the Game and Police
Departments for the efficient manner in which they carried out their onerous duties.
"E" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1935.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Deer are generally reported as increasing throughout the Division, but in some
isolated areas disease has been observed during the past few years. However, the Game
Warden at Powell River reports that disease which has been prevalent in certain portions
of his district seems to have disappeared, as only a few carcasses of deer were found during
the year, which has not been the case in the past. Quite a number of deer were taken during
the open season in the Squamish area.
Mountain-goat.—The Game Warden at Port Coquitlam reports that during the year in
the Upper Stave area goat appeared to be quite plentiful, due probably to the fact that they
are very little hunted. Goat are also to be found in the Upper Pitt River, Alouette and
Coquitlam Lake areas.
In the Powell River District mountain-goat are holding their own. At Toba Inlet these
animals have been very scarce during the past few years, but are now appearing in greater
numbers. N 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bear.—Black bear are quite plentiful and in a number of instances have caused complaints
to be lodged in regard to damage to domestic animals. At the head of the various inlets in
this Division reports indicate that grizzly bear, while not plentiful, can be found. A few
grizzly bear were also observed along the Skagit River and near Port Douglas on Harrison
Lake.
Moose.—These animals are to be found in the Pemberton Valley in small numbers and
every step has been taken to give them protection.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are to be found in fair numbers throughout the Division, and this is especially
the case in the Skagit River, Harrison and Chilliwack Lake Districts. In the Upper Stave
Lake area reports indicate that in some instances these animals have been overtrapped. The
Game Warden at Powell River, however, reports that beaver in his district are holding their
own in spite of the fair numbers which are trapped each year.
Mink, racoon, marten, and muskrats have been taken in quite good numbers, and there
would appear to be no appreciable decrease in the stand of these animals.
Throughout the Fraser Valley red fox and coyotes have been trapped, and every step
has been taken to keep the numbers of these animals down to the lowest possible minimum
so that game birds may be protected. The pelts of red fox and coyotes taken throughout
the Fraser Valley have no real value on the fur market.
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants throughout the Sumas District suffered considerably through ice-storms and
floods at the beginning of the year, and no doubt heavy restocking measures will have to be
undertaken in this district.
In the Delta region the Game Warden reports that pheasants were very plentiful, and
as a matter of fact were in greater numbers than during the previous year; this condition
also applying to the Pitt Meadows and Surrey Districts.
Throughout the Gulf Islands pheasants appear to be decreasing.
The birds liberated in the Powell River District, however, in spite of the fact that very
little of the district is farmed, have been increasing and some fair bags were taken during
the open season.
Blue grouse showed a slight increase in some portions of the Division, but in the majority
of areas they were only to be found in fair numbers.
Ruffed grouse appear to be holding their own.
A few European partridge and California quail are to be found throughout the Lower
Mainland of the Division, but they do not seem to increase in sufficient numbers to warrant
an open season.
Migratory Game Birds.
Reports of the various Game Wardens in the Division indicate that migratory game birds
of all kinds were fairly plentiful, but owing to a close season being in effect on these birds
in the State of Washington during the time that they were allowed to be hunted in British
Columbia, many ducks migrated to the State of Washington, where they were able to secure
feed and rest.
Weather conditions generally throughout the open season were not very satisfactory for
the hunting of ducks.
In the Boundary Bay region black brant were found in larger numbers than in any
previous year.
Canada geese in the Pitt Lake region arrived earlier and in larger numbers.
Wilson or jacksnipe appeared in increased numbers and some excellent shooting was
obtained in certain portions of the Division.
Shore-birds in general, such as sandpiper, for which a close season has been in effect
for a period of years, seem to be increasing.
The open season on band-tailed pigeons was very disappointing.
A few swans were observed during the latter part of the year in various sections of the
Lower Mainland. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 25
Vermin.
A number of cougar and coyotes were presented for bounty during the year.
House-cats gone wild were a great menace to game birds, and many of these animals
were destroyed by Game Wardens in heavily wooded areas miles away from human habitation.
Game Wardens throughout the Division have been most active in the destruction of
vermin of all kinds, and in some cases have interested Game Associations in conducting
organized shoots for the taking of various kinds of noxious birds.
Game-protection .
Regular patrols have been conducted throughout the year in every portion of the Division,
but Game Wardens have encountered difficulty in enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act"
and Fishery Regulations, due to the unemployment situation.
A number of special patrols have been undertaken throughout the year, and during the
close and open seasons every available member of the Game Department has undertaken both
short and lengthy patrols.
The officers of the British Columbia Provincial Police have rendered valuable assistance
throughout the year in connection with enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Acts.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released in greater numbers than in any previous year throughout the
Lower Mainland, and a special endeavour was made to restock the Sumas areas, which suffered so severely during the latter part of January. A statement showing the pheasant
liberations in the various districts will be found on another page of this report.
The wapiti released at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, are increasing.
Game Reserves.
No new game reserves have been established in the Division, but every step has been
taken to see that the reserves at present in effect were properly patrolled and protected.
Complaints have been received, however, especially in the North Vancouver District,
against black bear and deer, due no doubt to the protection afforded these animals by the
establishment of the North Vancouver Game Reserve.
Fur Trade.
Generally speaking, it would appear that the fur trade is improving, though some complaints have been received as to the royalties charged on the pelts of certain fur-bearing
animals. _
Fur-farming.
Owing to the demand for mink-pelts principally, various mink-farmers have increased
their breeding stock, and returns to hand indicate that they are breeding far more mink than
heretofore. __, _
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division is working very smoothly, and the trappers
in general now appear to realize that these regulations were put into effect for their benefit,
and they are endeavouring to conserve the fur-bearing animals on their respective trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
The Division has been regularly patrolled, and a number of extended patrols have been
made into out-of-the-way sections, with beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
Rodney Nay, a minor, of Newton, B.C., while out hunting with another youth, Ernest
Westerman, was carrying a .22 rifle and in thrusting the rifle through a fence it discharged,
a pellet striking his right forearm, causing a serious wound. Nay was in hospital for three
weeks and the accident caused a permanent injury to his arm. N 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Malcolm Silvey, of Egmont, was injured in the leg by the discharge of a firearm which
happened to be an old shotgun in an unsafe condition, and it was subsequently voluntarily
destroyed.
Elmo Larsen, another minor, was out hunting in the North Vancouver District with a.
companion when Larsen accidentally struck the hammer of his shotgun against a log, the
charge of shot severely injuring him in the wrist and hip.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game conditions throughout the Division have been fair, and with proper weather for
breeding birds during the coming spring there is no reason to doubt that there will be an
increase in the stand of upland game birds of all kinds.
The officers and men of " E " Division, British Columbia Provincial Police, members of
Game Associations, and others interested in the conservation of game and fish have rendered
every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout the Division.
The Game Wardens have also assisted the British Columbia Police throughout the year. A BIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF JONES LAKE.
By C. McC. Mottley, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C.
The present report deals with an investigation of Jones Lake, in the vicinity of Hope,
B.C., made during the second week of August, 1933. The investigation was carried out at the
suggestion of A. Bryan Williams, Provincial Game Commissioner, who, together with Inspector
Jas. Cunningham, kindly assisted in the work. The purpose of the inquiry was to determine
what were the biological factors underlying the apparent depletion in the stock of trout which
became evident during the two previous years.
History of the Lake.
Jones Lake was originally a barren lake. It was stocked by the Dominion Department
of Fisheries in 1924 with 5,000 eyed eggs from Lloyd's Creek eyeing-station, and in 1925 with
15,000 eyed eggs from the same source. In 1930 a further planting of 15,000 eyed eggs from
the Penask Lake station was made. The lake was opened for fishing in 1927. First-class
boats (Turner's, of Vancouver) were taken in over the trail by the proprietor of Restmore
Lodge at St. Elmo, and cabins were built near the outlet of the lake. The lake was well
patronized by tourists, a number of which came from the United States. At first good catches
of fairly large fish were reported, but later the fishing deteriorated. In 1933 the season was
opened at a later date than usual (July 16th) and the catch-limit was reduced to six fish per
person per day. The people interested in the promotion of this fishery felt that these restrictions have curtailed their trade and inquired if such severe limitations were justified.
Physiography.
The Fraser Valley Highway crosses Jones Creek about 2 miles west of Laidlaw, B.C., 80
miles from New Westminster. This creek finds its source about 5 miles south of the highway
in Jones Lake, which is directly behind Mount Cheam. For the purpose of description the
drainage-basin may be divided into three sections: (1) Jones Creek and its tributaries; (2)
Jones Lake;   (3) tributaries to Jones Lake.
(1.) Jones Creek is about 5 or 6 miles long. It receives numerous tributaries in the course
of its descent from Jones Lake, the majority of which are precipitous, spring-fed streams
coming from the steep sides of the valley, which is well forested. One of the tributaries,
Boulder Creek, which enters near the outlet of Jones Lake, is less precipitous and the trout
are reported to drop down into Jones Creek and run up Boulder Creek to spawn. This creek is
apparently spring-fed, being 10° C. (50° F.) on August 11th. Jones Creek is quite turbulent,
falling 1,800 feet in its course from the lake to the Fraser River. About a mile from the
highway there is a fall of considerable height which has evidently proved an effective barrier
to the upward migration of fish.
(2.) Jones Lake is situated at an altitude of 2,000 feet above sea-level. It is about 3 miles
long, % a mile wide, and covers approximately 1,200 acres. The area of the drainage-basin
above the outlet of the lake amounts to 25 square miles. The basin is in reality a glacial cirque.
South of the lake the Cascade Mountains rise sheer from the valley to about 7,000 feet above
sea-level. Their slopes are covered with snow and many small glaciers. The mountains to the
east and west slope rather steeply to the lake and are covered with a virgin forest.
The lake is comparatively shallow in spite of the steep slope of the surrounding mountains.
The deepest sounding was 62 feet, but the majority of the bottom lies above 52 feet. Over half
of the bottom area lies above a depth of 15 feet. The bottom consists chiefly of fine sand and
glacial silt; organic ooze, detritus, and muck were noticeably scarce; large glacial boulders
and occasional gravel-beds were observed.
There appeared to be very little variation in water-level, the outlet probably effecting a
satisfactory control.
(3.) There are a number of tributaries to Jones Lake. The two most important ones,
however, enter near the southern end. These streams find their source in the melting snow
and the glaciers on the slopes of the Cascades. Tributary A, the larger, was laden with the
characteristic glacial silt and the bluish, colloidal rock-flour of a glacier-fed stream. Its temperature was 60° C. (42.8° F.) at 12 noon on August 10th. Tributary B, slightly smaller, was
quite clear, but its temperature was only 7.5° C.   (45.5° F.)   about 10  a.m.    The surface temperature of the lake was 16° C. (60.8° F.) at this time. A third tributary, C, enters the
lake on the west side. It is much smaller and its temperature was 11° C. (51.8° F.) ; it is
apparently spring-fed.
Run-off Data.—According to White (" Water Powers of British Columbia "), the run-off
from this area represents a transition stage from the stream-flow characteristics of the Interior
to those of the coastal type of stream. The mean monthly discharges are highest in the early
summer months, due to the augmentation of the flow by the melting snows at the higher
elevations, but the mean annual discharge per square mile is much greater than in the Interior;
the influence of the heavy autumn and winter precipitation characteristic of the Coast region
is also evident.
A rough calculation of the capacity of the lake places it at about 5,000 million gallons of
water. The yearly average rate of discharge is about 80 million gallons per day, but it may
rise as high as 250 million gallons per day during the spring floods. On the basis of these
calculations the water in the lake is completely changed, on the average for the year, every two
months.    In the spring, however, it could be completely changed in three weeks.
Biology of the Lake.
Owing to the inaccessibility of the lake, the investigation was limited to the more salient
features because of the difficulty of packing in the equipment and supplies. However, an
examination was made of the distribution of the plants, the nature and distribution of the
bottom fauna, the quality of the plankton, and a sample of twenty-six trout was obtained by
fly-fishing.
Plants.—In the more sheltered sections of the shore zone there was an abundance of rooted
aquatic vegetation consisting mainly of reeds, water-lilies, and pond-weeds; a small amount
of Chara was also observed. The most important feature in the lake was the complete absence
of attached plants in the area beyond 3 feet in depth. No doubt this condition can be related
to the continual shower of glacial silt that is being poured into the lake by at least one of the
tributaries. The slow deposition of the colloidal material probably takes place over an
extended area, thus lowering the productivity of the shallow water zone. At certain seasons
when the tributaries are in extreme flood the silt may also increase the turbidity of the lake,
and, by screening off sunlight, it may effectively retard plant-growth.
Bottom Fauna.—The deeper water (15-60 feet) seemed to be fairly rich in midge larvse
(Chironomid-e). Although the majority of them had emerged, their empty tubes were quite
abundant in the dredged material. Over a hundred tubes were counted in a dredging from an
area of 81 square inches at a depth of 20 feet.
The shallow water (0-15 feet) contained a greater variety of forms. The following were
obtained by dredging:—
(1.)   Caddis larvae and pupas in cases  (Sedges).
(2.)   Hyalella in moderate abundance (small fresh-water shrimps).
(3.)   Small Planorbida. (snails).
(4.)   Small Pelecypoda (clams).
(5.)  A small leech.
(6.)   A few dragon-flies (blue damsel-flies).
The bottom fauna seemed to be scanty to moderate in amount. There were no organisms
of any appreciable size on which to support a population of large trout. The caddis-flies were
fairly abundant, but the adults were all quite small in size.
Plankton.—Vertical and horizontal plankton hauls were made. The plankton consisted
chiefly of Cladocera (water-fleas) and the large red Copepod (Diaptomus shoshone). The most
important feature of the plankton was the scarcity of plant forms. This scarcity is characteristic of glacier-fed lakes and is probably associated with the heavy run-off and the turbidity
caused by the silt.
Fish.—A sample of twenty-six trout was caught by fly-fishing. These were examined for
degree of maturity, scale samples for age determinations were investigated, and the stomach
contents were studied.
The sample consisted of 42 per cent, immature fish—i.e., would not have spawned the next
spring; 8 per cent, maturing fish—i.e., would probably have spawned the next spring; and
50 per cent, kelts—i.e., fish which spawned the last spring and would probably have spawned REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 29
again. The kelts were all mending and some were in very good condition. There were no
eggs in the body-cavities of the females, but in one instance about a dozen collapsed egg-shells
were observed.
The age determinations showed that there were 19 per cent, yearlings, 38 per cent, two-
year-olds, 8 per cent, three-year-olds, and 35 per cent, four-year-olds. A large number of
yearlings were observed feeding around the shore and fry were observed in Jones Creek.
The rate of growth of the four-year-olds was obtained by back calculation from the scales.
The stomach contents were examined in order to correlate the different items with the
potential food-supply in the lake. The following list shows the percentage of occurrence of
the different items:—
Per Cent.
Caddis (larva., pupae, and adults)  33
Shrimp (Hyalella)   23
Terrestrial insects   20
Snails   10
Leeches       7
Midges (pupae)      3
Dragon-flies  (blue damsel-flies)     3
Copepods      1
Caddis-flies were emerging at the time of the investigation, but the stomachs contained
a large amount of sticks and debris, together with the larvse, indicating that the fish were
feeding on the larva; as well as the adults.
Discussion of the Salient Features.
Nutritive Capacity of Jones Lake.—Unlike the barren lakes of the Interior Plateau region,
Jones Lake may be termed relatively poor in its food-supply. This condition is probably the
result of a number of factors which are inherent in the physiographical setting of the lake.
The heavy precipitation and the large run-off characteristic of this district are not conducive
for the maintenance of a rich supply of the raw materials necessary for organic growth.
The chief tributaries are cold, snow- and glacier-fed streams. In the summer their cold
waters pour into the lake underneath the warmer surface layer and owing to their large
volume the upper plankton supporting layers are being displaced at a rate too rapid for an
abundant growth. A further limiting factor is the absence of attached plants in the zone
beyond 3 feet in depth. Such a condition renders impossible the shelter and food-supply
adequate for a large number of aquatic organisms. While the lake has probably built up a
fairly large population of a few species in the sheltered shore area, such as caddis-flies,
shrimps (Hyalella), and snails (Planorbida;), it does not seem adapted to the maintenance
of these in large numbers in the face of the inroads of a large population of trout.
The Production of Trout.— (1.) Spawning Conditions. Spawning conditions appear to be
good for the production of an effective seeding of trout. The second and third generations
from the original planting are now present in the lake. The main spawning is said to occur
in Jones Creek below the lake and they are apparently spreading down-stream as well as
returning to the lake. Conditions in the main tributaries, A and B, are unsuitable for spawning purposes owing to the extremely low temperature which prevails in them. If the
temperatures which have been found this year are not unusual, it would take three or four
months for the eggs to hatch. Fisheries Guardian W. J. Barker, of Chilliwack, has reported
that the trout spawn at the outlet during the latter part of May. If spawning does take place
in the upper tributaries at the same time as at the outlet, it would be autumn at least before
the fry emerged. The question of spawning in the upper tributaries should be investigated
further.
(2.) Survival and Growth. At present the conditions for the survival of the young fish
seem to be good. Large numbers of yearlings were observed feeding along the shore. There
was no evidence of cannibalism in the sample of trout examined, but the current year's brood
of fry had probably not entered the lake, although they were observed near the outlet.
The scales indicate a tendency for the young to spend one or even two years in the creek.
The growth of the different age-groups compares favourably with the growth of the stream
type in Paul Lake.    The growth of the trout in Jones Lake is quite slow when compared with N 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
other barren lakes in the Interior. The prognosis for growth in the lake appears to indicate
a slowing-up. The conditions for survival are good enough to produce a large number of trout
which will eventually reduce the food-supply to a low level. Even if heavily fished, the
maximum weight in a few years will probably not exceed 1 or 2 lb.
(3.) The Reported Depletion. The reported depletion finds its explanation in the lack
of plantings after the two original ones made in 1924 and 1925. The female Kamloops trout
spawn for the first time at three, four, or five years of age. Fish which have spent the first
year or two in the stream usually spawn one year later than the lake type. Consequently at
Jones Lake the four-year-olds form the most important age-group. If eggs had been planted
in 1926 and 1927, in addition to the 1924 and 1925 seedings, this irregularity in the building-up
of the run would have been obviated. Opening the lake for fishing just prior to the spawning
years of the two missing age-groups only served to heighten the apparent depletion.
When stocking barren lakes of this type with Kamloops trout, four plantings in successive
years should be made. The planting programme for Jones Lake should have been roughly
as follows:—
First year, 25 fry per acre.
Second year, 50 fry per acre.
Third year, 100 fry per acre.
Fourth year, natural seeding plus planting to make 200 fry per acre.
The lake could then have been opened for fishing as soon as the trout were big enough to
catch without the fear of the occurrence of the irregularities in production.
Conclusions.
The outlook for Jones Lake on the basis of its present food-supply indicates an ultimate
diminution in the growth-rate. The introduction of a larger type of food organism does not
seem feasible, nor would it likely be attended with much success owing to the absence of aquatic
plants in the zone from 3 to 15 feet in depth. However, the lake seems to have a moderate
abundance of floating food organisms (Copepods and Cladocera) which would support an
intermediate forage fish such as the kokanee. The introduction of these fish, if attempted,
should be made over a period of four years.
The conditions at Jones Lake point to the necessity of developing a game-fish stocking
policy in British Columbia based on adequate information which must be obtained prior to
and concurrent with the plantings. With such a programme resort-owners will not be forced
to take losses on their investments owing to unscientific management and many of the unnecessary fluctuations in the angling fisheries might be smoothed out. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 31
THE INTRODUCTION OF COAST DEER AND RING-NECKED PHEASANT
ON GRAHAM ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA.
By J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Birds Officer, British Columbia.
The results of the introduction of Coast deer (Odocoileus columbianus subsp.) and ring-
necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) on Graham Island, Queen Charlotte Island Group,
present ecological problems of considerable interest which are outlined in the following paper.
The exact date of the deer introduction has not been ascertained. Apparently it was a
private enterprise; Osgoode (North American Fauna No. 21, Natural History of the Queen
Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, 1901) states: " Deer have been introduced on the islands,
but have not yet thoroughly established themselves there. I was told by Rev. Mr. Collinson,
who was formerly in charge of the missionary work at Masset, that he was instrumental in
the introduction of a few deer on Graham Island some years ago. Nine individuals from the
vicinity of Port Simpson were liberated at Masset and within a year signs of them were seen
at Skidegate."
A manuscript list of the mammals of the Queen Charlotte Islands by Rev. J. H. Keen,
dated September 15th, 1897 (in the possession of Mr. W. A. Newcombe, Victoria, British
Columbia), does not include deer, so presumably no introduction had been made at the time
the paper was written. It is evident, then, that the original stock was liberated some time
between 1897 and 1900. There may have been subsequent introductions, but, if so, the
particulars are not at present available.
Osgoode, loc. cit., does not mention seeing deer in 1900, so it may be assumed that he did
not. Twenty years later, during six weeks spent at Masset (May, June, 1920), the present
writer saw no Coast deer and local residents interviewed on the subject expressed the opinion
that the introduction had failed. But this opinion proved to be wrong, for by the year 1931
deer had increased sufficiently to permit the Provincial Game Department to declare an open
season of two months, with seasonal bag-limit of two bucks to each hunter, and an open season
has been permitted during each year since.
In the spring of 1935 an abundance of Coast deer was noted in various parts of the
so-called " dry belt," which comprises areas of open forest and muskeg on the east and north
coasts. They were abundant also at the head of Masset Inlet, where the annual precipitation
exceeds 125 inches and the forests are so dense as to be all but impassable. Along a plank
road between Port Clements on Masset Inlet and Tlell on the east coast, which for most of its
14 miles passes through burnt-over muskeg, it was usual to see deer at any time of the day.
Near Tlell fifteen were recorded one evening during the course of half an hour and at McClin-
ton Creek nineteen animals were counted at one time on a tidal flat.
It is reported that a migration from the forest to the open grass lands on the high
mountain-slopes takes place in the summer; the return journey to sea-level being made in the
early fall, at which time the animals are said to be very fat. Numerous deeply worn deer-trails
are a feature of the forest edge; and these, together with the many tracks on open beach,
muskeg, and tide-flat, the large deposits of droppings and the signs of extensive browsing
indicate a large deer population. Indeed, in 1935 deer were so abundant as to suggest that
this area supported a larger population than did any other deer-range of similar size in
British Columbia.
All the animals encountered were exceedingly tame and if met on trail or road it was
usual for them to make a few jumps and then resume feeding. Thus at McClinton Creek on
several occasions a doe was watched for some minutes from a distance of 20 yards or so while
she browsed on the new spathes of skunk cabbage. Later it was observed that most of these
plants in the vicinity had been bitten off below the surface of the mud. According to reports,
this extreme tameness is modified once the hunting season begins; nevertheless, settlers have
little difficulty in obtaining what animals are required for food. It might be mentioned here
that the creation of this valuable food-supply has modified to an appreciable extent the
economic problems of the settlers on this island.
What has been responsible for the somewhat spectacular success of the introduction?
The answer to this question cannot be made on the basis of the scant data now available. At this time it can only be said that probably the absence of predators is one of the contributing causes. There are no wolves or cougar on Graham Island, and unless the bear is
excepted, the deer has no natural enemies other than man. Undoubtedly the success of this
introduction will be entirely attributed to the absence of predators, with the obvious corollary
that complete eradication of the natural enemies of game in any place will produce similar
results—an assumption that is still open to question. In the meanwhile the future history
of the Coast deer on Graham Island will be a matter of no little interest.
The pheasant introduction has had somewhat different results. In 1918 the Provincial
Game Department liberated a number of birds near Tlell and further introductions were made
in the two years following. From that time to the present no open season for the shooting
of pheasants has been provided in the Game Regulations, so that it is unlikely that many birds
have been shot. In the interval an area roughly 10 miles long and a mile or so in width,
between the Tlell River and the seas, has been colonized by the increase from these birds.
This area, which is the only part of the island at all suitable for pheasants, is entirely sandy,
with open forest of jack-pine and low spruce and in places an underbrush of salal, huckleberry, and salmonberry. No grain is grown there and apparently the birds subsist entirely
upon insects and berries. Land of this character would not be considered as suitable pheasant
country in other parts of British Columbia where these birds have long been established.
But if the area in question is " marginal land " in respect to pheasant propagation its surroundings are at zero, for on one side is the sea and on the other heavy forest and muskeg.
No data respecting the yearly history of the pheasant population are available, other than
the casual statement of several local residents that the number of birds seem to have been much
the same for the past ten years. In the spring of 1935 male pheasants were abundant throughout the small area described and females were relatively scarce. It was estimated that the
number of birds per acre exceeded the breeding populations observed in other parts of British
Columbia where the males are reduced each year by shooting. It is understood that pheasant-
breeders estimate the sex ratio most conducive to a good pheasant-crop in the wild to be from
four or five females to one male. In the Graham Island area males outnumbered females at a
ratio of approximately three to one.
In explanation of this abnormal situation, it is suggested that the pheasant population,
isolated within a circumscribed area by rigid environmental boundaries, reached the saturation
point some years ago. Subsequently in the competition for food and shelter, and with a
population of necessity stabilized, the males survived at the expense of the less vigorous
females until gradually the population became predominantly male. As stated before, males
were not subject to annual reduction through shooting as is the case elsewhere in British
Columbia.
It has been stated in connection with the Coast-deer introduction that an optimum population was attained with the absence of predators as one of the causes. In the case of the
pheasant a similar result occurred in spite of the presence of predators. The following species,
named in the order of probable importance, are potential enemies of the pheasant: Goshawk,
sharp-shinned hawk, bald eagle, duck-hawk, western red-tailed hawk, marten, weasel, Norway
rat, black rat. It should be mentioned that no evidence of destruction of pheasants by predators was observed. Nevertheless, it seems safe to assume a loss from this source; indeed,
this is a necessary assumption to the argument submitted in explanation of the present sex
ratio. Possibly the greatest destruction is that of nesting females, eggs, and young birds,
particularly the latter, which would be subject to attack from even so small a raptor as the
sharp-shinned hawk.
Summary.
On Graham Island the introduced Coast deer attained a dense population within a period
of approximately thirty-five years; it is probable that the absence of natural enemies permitted
a rate of increase approaching the theoretical maximum. Shooting under a buck law was a
factor during the past five years of this period. The introduced ring-necked pheasant reached
a probable saturation point within the only area suitable for colonization, although numerous
predators were present.    No shooting has been permitted in the case of the pheasant. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935. N 33
FOOD  OF  THE  COMMON  MALLARD  IN  THE  LOWER  FRASER  VALLEY,
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
By J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Birds Officer, British Columbia.
The question of the food-supply of water-fowl in British Columbia is one which increasingly is engaging the attention of sportsmen, particularly those who are interested in
hunting-grounds in the Lower Fraser Valley. That the natural food resources are insufficient
to meet the requirements of wintering ducks is an assumption generally accepted. So also is
the corollary that the propagation of p'ant-foods, such as wild rice, is desirable.
It is not the intention to discuss the merits of introducing plant-foods in British Columbia
or, at this time, to question the widely held view that the supply of native plant-foods is inadequate. Before doing so it would seem necessary to inquire into the local feeding-habits of the
more valuable duck species in order to understand their food preferences, and later to undertake
food-resource surveys on the wintering grounds.
In connection with the first requirement some data pertaining to the mallard (Anas
platyrhynchos), the most abundant of the surface-feeding ducks wintering in the Lower Fraser
Valley, are now available. Through the co-operation of the British Columbia Game Commission and the Vancouver Angling and Game Association the stomachs of ninety mallards, taken
in this district in the last two weeks of November, 1935, were acquired. The following summarizes the results of an examination of the stomach contents of these specimens:—
Stomach Contents of Ninety Mallards, Lower Fraser Valley, November, 1934.
Twenty-one contained 90 to 100 per cent, fragments of grass leaves representing several
species.
Twenty-seven contained 90 to 100 per cent, wild oats.
Twelve contained 90 to 100 per cent, seeds other than wild oats.
One contained pieces of equisetum.
One contained shred of fish, probably salmon.
No. of Times
Species of Seeds taken. found.
Cat-tail (Typha latifolia)      1
Bur-reed (Sparganium sp.)   38
Pondweeds (Potam,ogeton heterophyllus)      1
Pondweeds  (Potamogeton (pusillus?) )       1
Pondweeds (Potamogeton foliosus)  :  25
Sago pondweed (Potamogeton pectinatus)     6
Horned pondweed   (Ceratophyllum demersum)     2
Barnyard grass  (Echinochloa crusgalli)     2
Wild oat (Avena fatua)  41
Sedge (Carex sp.)        5
Sedge (Carex (exsiccata?) )  _     4
Bulrush  (Scirpus  (americanus?) )       1
Bulrush (Scirpus (occidentalis?) )   19
Spike-rush (Eleocharis palustris)  12
Bindweed (Polygonum convolvulus)   19
Knotweed (Polygonum aviculare)      1
Knotweed (Polygonum muhlenberghii (or amphibium) )     9
Knotweed (Polygonum lapathifolium)   30
Smartweed (Polygonum (hydropiper?) )      2
Water smartweed (Polygonum (acre) )      2
Lady's-thumb  (Polygonum  (persicaria) )      5
Wild water-pepper  (Polygonum (hydropiperoides?) )  10
Goosefoot (Chenopodium sp.)     4
Orach (Atriplex sp.)      1
Penny-cress (Thlaspi arvense)      4
Ball-mustard  (Nestia paniculata)       3
Rose (Rosa sp.)      1
3 N 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
No. of Times
Species of Seeds taken. found.
Dogwood (Cornus (occidentalis?) )  1     1
Mint (Labiatse)      3
Bedstraw (Callium sp.)      1
Wheat (Triticum vulgare)   12
It is of interest to record that eleven of these mallard stomachs (or 12.2 per cent, of the
total number) contained lead shot; unfortunately the bodies of these birds were not available
for examination, so that no information regarding their physical condition was obtained.
In this connection it should be mentioned that three mallards, each with shot in the gizzard,
taken at Pitt Meadows, December 16th, 1923, were fat and apparently in normal condition.
In two the shot pellets were considerably abraded, indicating that the birds had been subjected
to the poisonous effect of the lead for some time. It would seem then that mallards may
develop a resistance to lead-poisoning when only a small quantity of shot is ingested.
Grateful acknowledgment is made to the Bureau of Biological Survey, Washington, D.C,
for valuable assistance in the identification of seeds.
APPENDIX.
Page,
Revenue derived from the sale of resident firearms licences and deer-tags   35
Revenue derived from the sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors' and farmers'
licences  36
Revenue derived from the sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences    37
Revenue derived from the sale of fur-traders' licences and from royalty on fur   38
Comparative statement showing pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has been
collected during the period 1921 to 1935, inclusive ...    39
Particulars of various pelts on which royalty has been paid during 1935  40
Bounties paid during the year 1935  41
Comparative statement of bounties paid during the period 1922 to 1935, inclusive  41
Comparative statement showing total collections for fur trade, 1921 to 1935, inclusive  42
List of fur confiscated under the " Game Act "  42
List of firearms confiscated under the " Game Act "  43
Summary of sport-fish liberations, 1935  44
Big-game trophy fees paid by non-resident hunters  45
Prosecutions  47
Statement showing revenue derived from the export of game animals, etc.        49
Statement showing revenue derived from the sale of game-bird bands to game-bird farmers _ 50
Statement of game-bird liberations  51
Statement of vermin destroyed by Game Wardens  51
Statement of migratory game and non-game birds banded  51
Returns of trappers, season 1934-35  51
Fur-farm returns, 1935 (Statements Nos. 1 and 2)  52!
Statement re game-bird farm returns  52'
Hunting accidents  53
Comparative statistics, 1913 to 1935, inclusive .  54
List of guides and non-resident outfitters ■_  54
Personnel of Game Department  56 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N
o
o
IO
©
to
o
IO
IO
to
©
to
o
©
©
o
rt
©
ra
©
o
to
©
o
O
o
e-^
o
tO
to
C1
©
to
IO
o
©
to
©
to
o
c->
to
IO
O   CM   O   fc-
© t-
<N    (M
©   C-
©
©
© ©
©
ooot-owiooo
©
fc-   CM   ©
©   C-   <M
to
©
CM   ©   CM
LO    ©
tr-
K
o
lO    CO
C3
fc-©©©tr-©cocMCO
t-      LO     --JI
LO    •<*    rH
te
cp
O
CC
co   -^   IO   CC
LO    CD
on
«!
CMOOrHCOCM-^COrHCO
CT5
CO    ©    ©
fN
■*    t-    CC
© ©
LO
00
ia   r-t   OI   cz
©  c_
©    CO
CO   (M
to
CO    CO
LO
0000©t--O-^©©i-H
00
©   -*    CO
CJ    ©    ©
©
©
CO   CO   ©
"*    CO
CO
-_|
M   IM
M   rH
^
CO   CO   CO             CO   CO   i-H
LO   r-t   rH
HN   H
-_<*
T-l
w-
"
o
"^
e»
o
O
o   ©
©   ©
©    ©
r>
© ©
©©©©©©©©©
o
©   ©    ©
©   ©
n
© © ©
© ©
©
o
©
©
© ©
©   ©
©   ©
©
©
©
© ©
©
©©©©©©©©©
©
©   ©    ©
©   ©   ©
©
© © ©
© ©
©
B
o
CM
00     Tf
•"*   ©
CO    CO
CO
CM   CM
on
(M©CMC000©00©CO
CD
00   •*    CM
00   CM   CM
00   N   ^
CO   "*
©
CM
CC
r-
t- •<*
•^  to
Oi    LO
^1
on
Oi
Ht-mClt-Ht-OH
h-
i-H    C.    ©
LO           LC
<i
t»
I—1
H
rH
rH
CO
©
i-H   CO   CO   CM   -^   CM
i-l
r-t
rH             IO
Tf    M   ■.
rH
OS
CM
00
CO
C-
tH
©
."■
©    00
-*
__,
CD    rH
CO-OCD©©O0©CO©
irs
©    CM    i-H
©    rH    ©
CC
-"#    ©    CM
©    t-
eo
fc.
o
CO
CO
CO   tr
t-    (M
©   IN
to
T.
©
o
CO
CO    t-   ©    CO    ©    CO    ©
rH    i-H   rH   Cq   rH
CO
rH    LO
t-       c-
CM
^
CM   CO   CO
CM   -*   CM
—
in
in
lO    LO
©     LO
O
<->
©    ©
©    ©    IO    ©    LO    ©    ©    ©    ©
©
IO    LO    ©
IO     LO    LO
i-i
©    ©    LO
LO    ©
IO
t-
O   (M
_r-
io   tr-
<N   IM
©   t-
iO
o
LO    LO
CM
©lOCM©CMLO©LO©
©
t-    t>    ©
t- t- c.
to
©   ©   CM
D-    ©
g
cc
O
<M   "?f
00    rH
to
rH
LOCO©©©t-©-^,-rJt
IO
©   't?    ©
Tf       t"       t-
I-H    ©    r-
CD   tr
©
CO
e>
CD   Oi
CO   rH
rH   ■-*
V.
00    r-t
CC
IO   N    00   _•    t1   ^   f             LO
CQ
LO    rH    CO
co  'i1  cc
io   fc-
N
CO
<
<
efl
r-t   W
rH   r-l
1-1
*■*
CM   rH   CO             CM
r-l    rH
H
LO   CM   CO
OS
pa
S
<
0
69-
w
t-
to ©
©    fc
c.   b-
C-l
•rft
©    *3<
O^HOHO^MtD
<->
CO    ©    ©
©    rH    Oi
■(*
"*   *#    LO
C-   00
CO
v.
NHNMOOfflCCHH
^f
CO    ©    CC
"*   CM   ■**
w
o
o
7,
IO
CD    l-H
fc-   -^
CM
'"
CO
N    H    H    O   ^   H    O)             CM
rH    LO    CM
© oo ■*
CM"            rH
CM   CO
CO
©
lO
© ©
©    ©
©
©    ©
©     LO     LO    LO
©   ©   ©
©
©    ©
IO    ©    ©
LO    ©    ©
LO
10
t-   LO    ©
Q
. -
g
o
«_■
-rf    i-H
CO    (N
to
CM   "^   CO
LO               T-l
ri
rH    rH    rH
CO    LO    ©
eg        i-h
*       i
to
©
o
H 3
£ o
3 H
<
CO    fc-
•^   CM   CO
co   ■ ;
©
©
IO
CO
O-
GQ
£
CM
©       !
©
o
■♦J
a
LO
_o
©    :
_c
f-^
©    :
eg
HO!
©
T-l
<
«J-
w
LO
C-        i
©       !
CO
i*
a
o
© ©  © ©
©    ©
© ©
© ©
©
©
©    ©
o
©    ©    ©    ©    ©
©
©    ©    ©
©
© ©
©
•P
© © ©  ©
© ©
© ©
O
©
©
©    ©
o
©    ©    ©    ©    ©
© © ©
o
© © o
©
©
©
© © ©
© ©
.©
jj
o
©   ©   ©   tr-
©    ©
rH     ©
© ©
o
©
©
CD    ©
©
©    ©    t-    ©    ©
■c*
© © ©
©
r-
C
©  © -tf
©    CM
to
s
H   IO    <fi       .
■■■*
IO    ©
©    CO    «
CO    CM    ©
©    ©
<
.-<  a
CO    ©
<N   *«.
«*    "^
00
1-1
ft!
0_
<!
«-
r"
H
1-1
rt
CO
CJ
CM
rH
^
to
CM
&0-
t/_
ec
r-t  \n  o  •*$
CO    "*
©    rH
(N   CO
00
,_l
©    Oi
o?
©LOrH©©             C-    OI   M
en
CO    CM    ©
CO        ,    rH
IO
co io eg
©    I-H
©
o
o
r-t    0C
CO    ©
C.    T.
■*   ir:
CM    «
CM
rH   (N   CM   ©   ©
CM    O    (N
CC
CM    rH    iC
"^
LC
co   t-  cc
^   xjt
«j
g
1-1
rH
H
r-H
CO
CM
rH
rH
H
CM
03
__
W
o
© ©
©    ©
©   ©
©    ©
o
© © ©
©    ©    ©
©
©    ©
©
o
© ©
©    ©
©   ©
©
©    ©
©
© © ©
©
C
©
©    ©    ©
©
©   ©   ©
©    ©
©
g
cm
CO    ©
00   ""#    CO
--.
CM    ■**    00
00
-*
WO
c-
-<* c.
©    r-
CC
■*   -^   UJ
o
CO    GO    i-
CM   tr-
CO
P
o
<!
w-
rtr.
CM             rH
trey:-
CC
■^   ©
CO    "<J
CM   ©
LO
o
-TJH
<<
A
©
O      !   ©   ©
© ©
© ©
© ©
©    ©
o
©©©©o©©©©
o
©    ©    ©
©    ©   ©
o
c
©    ©    ©
©   ©
o
o
© ©
© ©
©  ©
©
o  ©
©
©©o©o©©©©
©
©    ©    ©
©    ©    ©
©
c
©    ©    ©
©   ©
a
«i
CO
CM   <N
CO   c.
r*    ©
"tf   "*
©
Oi
CM   CO   ©
CO    ©    ©
^
^
LO    ©    ©
-q.   ©
©
-nj.   tr-
©    r-
(N   CC
©    CT
C£
a
CM   r-t   C
01
-rj>   iD   cr.
LO    ©
t-
ee-
©
M   (N
CO
rH                      T-t    ©^            rH
©
LO             CO
CM
CM
©
CO   CO
©_
oo"
-*   ©
oo
©    ©
■■*
lO     LO
C<
©Cg©CO©rH0O"*CM
t-I                      CM    c-             -_--,-_,
t-
t-    CO    ©
CO    CM    ©
t-
T
©    rH    LO
Oi   ©
l-l
£
1-1
rH
T-1
CO
K
rH
<
o
© © © c
©    ©
©   ©
©   ©
©©©©©©©©©
© © ©
©  © ©
<r
© ©
©
o
© o o ©
IO   ©
©     LO
LO   ©
©
©
©
LO    ©
©
©©_o©irs©_o©©
to
LO    ©    ©
LO    ©    Lf
m
C
LO   LO   ©
LO    ©
+j
-* CO
©    -H
CC
CM    ©    -ri
"*   i-H   a
CO
g
©
fc-   Oi   •*&   co
CO   cc
lo a
0.
c
CO    -tf    ^
or
©    LO    CT
CM   LO
i-i
CQ                      O
tr-   N
<M    C<
CO    00
«
i-H     CC
w
lO_OrHCO©rH©CMt-
©   ©  c.
CC
CM   ©   CO
IO  -rp
a
CO    rH   tj
eg
£
fe
6
46
rH
»9-
C<
-&   ©   CO   CO
00    "-f
-fl
Cft
t-      00      LO
"*    N    H
or
©    rH     0 _
-*     I-H
tO
2;
M
<M   M   H   f
t- c-
CN
©    1-
CC
00fc-©CO(M©--l'©C£
l~
t—   -#  I-
O   LO   G
c«
CO    LO    ©
£
lO    ©
t>    rH
^
t-t    r-t    ©    ©    CO             ©             CN
Cv
©    CO    rH
CM   LO   C^
©
H
n
N
to
w
fc.
o
E-
0
A
f
§
1
0
H
oi
1
!
!
I
_
•>
3
fH
r-
a
a
r-
V
,0
q
+
<t-
I
!
I
1
c
E
-
4
J.
a
a
a
a
2
c
1
c
(
CC
f
c
fc
a
:
a
£
C
C
,1
c
+
<
c
c
+
+
I
c
1
fc
p
c
f.
I
+->
CO
c
t
H-
a
C
C
a
I
a
&
j.
c
c
P
t
I
P
f-
c
p
a
c
]
a
c
>
c
B
p
ft.
<
i
1/
if
f
u
1
a
r.
H
- >
p
c
1  u
B
c
c
c
ft.
.2
T
c
V
ft
QJ
1
-a
c
o
E-
[0     H    4J   -
3   a
F-
i.
c
U     (h     P
w  o  ■
<
<
i <
5 C_
) (-
C
e
t
fc-
U
c
c
a
L-
!__
fcc
>
z
^
2
C
d
EL
a.
P-
a
ft.
c
(K
Cr
a-
tt
E-
1>
>
>
IS-
t> N 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Resident Anglers' and Guides', Farmers', and Prospectors' Licences,
January 1st, 1935, to December 31st, 1935.
Government Agents.
Anglers.
Guides.
Farmers'
Free
Firearms
Licences.
Prospectors'
Firearms
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
545
67
2
$545.00
67.00
2.00
2
19
1
5
5
7
1
5
1
14
11
9
9
6
16
10
37
8
54
41
568
210
34
90
34
45
34
4
317
19
159
9
46
105
146
569
11
65
234
38
186
8
6
110
72
5
142
82
38
319
215
86
10
18
21
2
45
28
31
5
3
1
31
6
29
14
23
74
14
19
93
9
7
58
72
3
33
35
1
142
39
40
172
38
3
19
31
14
314
35
47
90
16
$18.00
21.00
2.00
45.00
24.00
29.00
5.00
3.00
27.00
6.00
24.00
14.00
23.00
70.00
14.00
17.00
51.00
9.00
5.00
54.00
48.00
3.00
27.00
35.00
$563.00
$10.00
98.00
4.00
45.00
97
1,137
418
519
526
1
74
179
140
32
925
223
771
175
239
748
1,241
1,811
7
622
97.00
1,137.00
418.00
519.00
526.00
1.00
74.00
179.00
140.00
32.00
925.00
223.00
771.00
175.00
239.00
748.00
1,241.00
1,811.00
7.00
622.00
95.00
5.00
216.00
1,171.00
423.00
522.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
5.00
551.00
53.00
115.00
208.00
154.00
Hope  	
55.00
25.00
1,020.00
237.00
788.00
5.00
231.00
248.00
753.00
1,295.00
1,859.00
10.00
649.00
70.00
105.00
" 409
5
159
290
6
241
812
205
2
469.00
5.00
159.00
290.00
6.00
241.00
812.00
205.00
2.00
469.00
Prince George   ._
55.00
132.00
35.00
40.00
155.00
38.00
3.00
12.00
27.00
12.00
249.00
30.00
40.00
56.00
16.00
192.00
194.00
330.00
45.00
206 00
279 00
29 00
Telegraph Creek	
Vancouver  	
45.00
30.00
3,794   •
805
1,053
31
164
3.794.00
805.00
1,053.00
31.00
164.00
4,073.00
1,093.00
80.00
50.00
Windermere —	
230.00
Totals... —
18,535
$18,535.00
121
$605.00
4,156
1,675     |    $1,419.00
$20,559.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 37
CQ
S
m
o
O
o
CO
H
iH
&
Z
-.
1-5
CO
w
o
Z
fcl
o
o
z
".
Q
z
<!
0-
3
_-
z
fcl
n
5
w
<s
2.
o
a
a
'3
+->
o
EH
o
oo
O
©
d
o
o
a
c
c
IC
c
c
LC
©
©
o
CC
CM
©
c
LC
iO
©
©
c
e
LC
a
G
©
©
O
Ifi
©
©
C
©
©
C
C:
c
©
e
lC
CC
c
c
LT
©
c
LC
C
©
-<*
©
©
c
Lf
©
©
LC
-«:
tc
©
©
©
c
©
CM
©
c
LC
© c
© c
©   If
t- t-
©
©
LP
©
©
LC
©
©
c
©
c
IT
©
c
LC
©
©
e
GC
c
a
©
©
c
LC
LC
©
©
V
IC
c
c
c:
CC
C-
©
©
LO
CO
eo
©
©
©
©
i-rT
>. a »
2 H fc
H 5 a
£3-1
a
S3
O
g
©
©
©
©
id
as
d
z
co
CO
"to
K
W
r_   «
._■ «
o *i
MM
-S
B
W
PS
0
o
g
<
ooooooooooooooo
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
©io©ioiO-c_-oiraw©©©©©©
_.HN-,Ht-l_JHHH-liN-*P_t-
t-H                               l-H    CO             CO                               rH    <N             CM
© © © ©
©  © © ©
IO   IO   KJ   -J
©   <N   -*
CO    rH    CM
©©©©©©©©©
©©©©©©O©©
-.loooiniooioo
OHt-NIOHHHN
© © © © ©
© © © © ©
©    IO    IO    ©    ©
t    Ifl    IO     H    t»
CO           CM
©
©
©
lO
©
cd
d
z
OC.ffflMu.HC.MNOO'.COtD^
CO                        N   _■  H   «                        N  ^          m
H    H   IO   IC
(ON*
o.c.-f-fimecNM'*
CO             rH             rH
t-   H   H   N   T
©    r-t    IO             rH
©
Cd
t-
©
©_
©
CO
*._
M
W    •
j to
Ss
<%
drj
<.
Q
H->
(3
3
0
g
<
o o
o ©
CO    CO
o
©
CO
©
c.
©
©
©
©
O-
©
©
id
©
©
id
©
©
©
©
d
z
CM   00
rH
<N
rH
Oi
cm    i     :
i    :
-*
^
■*
CO
©
General
Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences
(Special).
c
3
0
g
<
! o     :
|  id     1
i ©    :
j   ©       !
i id
!  ©      |
! 4
o
©
©
CO
o ©
© ©
©' ©
CO tr-
©
©
LO
©
©
id
©
(M
eft
CO
©
©
©
iO
«ft
6
Z
H i
-   t-      !
c.
CO   IO
rt
General
Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences
(Alternative) .
B
fi
0
g
<
©
©
©
LQ
©
©
©
©
6
A
H
CM
CO
General
Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences.
E
fi
o
g
<
©    ©   ©   ©       !   O
© © o ©        ©
io d  io in     ! ©
N    O   N   t*        !    IO
o  ©
o   ©
© \d
©©©©©©      !   ©
©©©©©©      j   ©
©'  id  id ©  id ©"     :  id
O   CM    W    t-   N    O        '    C-J
rH    CO    CO                      Wl       j    -*
©
©
©
(M
fc-
lO
o  ©
o   ©'
iO   IO
o   ©   ©
id © ©'
tr-   id   io
CM    CM    IM
CM    t-
_d ©
L-    IC
d
z
rH    CO
CO   <N
UO     Tf     rH     CO
<N
IN    rH
V    M   M    CO    H    N
rH    10                      rH
t-
rH    O    ©
Oi
CM
to
«
i
H
o
H-i
1=1
3
o
4
©
©
©
LQ
&3-
©
©
©
iO
©
©
©
©
rH
6
z
rH        j
i M
(M
—
_
<
B
.
p
9
>
o
O
<
I
.£
F
C
F
c
t
-
1
1
r
3
a
a
0
f.
E-
t
g
2
X
c
c
a
S
X
c
1
c
i
_c
0
C
S
z
<
c
c
i
1
C
j
c
c
*-
4
4-
D
P
'|
C
[5
f-
a
>
c
c
+■
a
s
a
t
i.
1
a
I
c
C
a
t
p
t
P
pi
a
t
e
:
!
a
t
p
!
1
_
<
|
|
a
f-
C
^:
P
bi
a
>
C
c
t
p
1
a
«
.J
t
p
1
4-
c
-S
<
o a o p !-h h a
OOWMWJ^r-;^^Or-Hft-.aHf-,r-<pHtfCd-0H>>>!>rS: ^^^^^™
N 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' Licences and from Royalty on  Fur,
January 1st, 1935, to December 31st, 1935.
Government Agents.
Resident
fur-tk-ders.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
4
1
1
1
22
3
3
1
24
13
15
11
6
8
51
6
2
19
$100.00
3
2
20
2
31
7
19
5
78
20
2
26
5
25
6
27
19
4
229
66
72
5
15
5
-----
4
27
11
560
12
72
5
12
$16.28
6.10
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
$116.28
6.10
Atlin	
25.00
25.00
25.00
255.47
5.03
136.98
19.15
86.25
46.50
644.22
227.11
2.40
280.47
30.03
Cranbrook   	
$5.00
166.98
19.15
86.25
550.00
75.00
46.50
1,194.22
302.11
2.40
75.00
156.86
5.00
63.12
63.12
199.82
6.45
106.01
68.24
3.82
10,736.11
199 82
6.45
25.00
131 01
68.24
600.00
3.82
11,336 11
Prince George - —	
325.00
375.00
642.86
2,298.81
16.75
209.54
5.20
5.00
972.86
2,673.81
16.75
275.00
5.00
489 54
5.20
12.15
1,154.73
775.70
26,685.33
136.26
141.95
19.20
102.55
150.00
200.00
1,275.00
150.00
50.00
475.00
40.00
5.00
5.00
28,000.33
Victoria   - ,	
196.95
494.20
Totals	
191
$4,775.00
1,396
$44,986.95
$49,831.95
Note.—No non-resident Fur Traders' licences issued during year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 39
Q
O
a
0.
H
B
CJ
z
5
Q
P
fc)
H
O
a
o
Z
a
fc)
ca
on
■<?
B
>H
H
o
«
B
a
z
o
s
H
M
i
OS
D
b
O
-3
5
fc)
Ph
o
Z
ss
o
a
Eh
z
fc)
s
fc)
i
B
W
fc)
<
0.
s
o
o
,
o.
on
no
CO
CO
to
t^
Cft
,_,
nn
nn
__,
-
©
1—
■"#   CO   ©
©
•pD^OO[IOO
1(3   CO  -J1   (D   t-   io   ©   eo
Oi     r-t
CC
CO   C-   ©
-*
i-l^AOH
inoiocot-oioio
tr-   Tjt
c
CM
io © a.
"#
jo ^unouiy
-.HOICOOtOHH
©  ©
CO
©   CM   -*
©"
-tf -*
CC
co -*i<  -*
Oi
s_-
c-^ft-tr-C-©-*tr-
Tjl    r-t
CO
on
-*
'JI°A__
r-t    CO                                         i-H
r-t    -0"    ©
©
co"
■*BaPl_M
COt-COCMrHCMCO©
CO
iO
IO
Ci00©rHCClOCMt-
<■-.
CM©rHlO©CO©CO
COCOCOCOCOCOLO-tf
co eo
CM
CO
CO   CO   CM
KjCOMaiONt-N
© ©
.
■ps'eaAV
COOOt-HlOMOO
NtDTfWNIDKiC-
©
00
_o
CO
CI    CO    rH
CO    ©    Oi
LO
00
©  ©
©■>tf_-OilO©00©
C-   CO
IN
CMC0COCMCOCOCO-*
©    LO
•*(<
•-#
■*   -*    CO
Oi
IO
©
r-t   CO   00   CO   **f
CO    ©    ©    CO    rH
IO   c-
CM   CO
CO
©
CO   CM   CO
Oi
•stun^g
t-   00
LO
©
lO   lO   CO
LO
©
Hfli^wfliOcoH
rH    ©
__,
IfllDOC-IONoOt
t-    Oi
_
■UOOO'B'JJ
lOONWOlH-fH
co   tr
rH
LO
CO   T.    OS
CO
entcio^'.-.t-c-
io   CO
CC
CO    CO    r-t
©
©
o
o
t. mNOiMcoocH
©   CO
I—
©
'3&\\0
(DC-COt-C-t-OO.
CO   CO
00
©
t-    C-    LO
Oi
55
<
ifJINICOiHtB-fo
© ©
©
OOeO-tfOlCOCOOOcO
rv:
rHCMCOlOCO-^OOrH
©   IO
©
IO
CO    rH    CO
Oi
•S^BJ-lStim
lOO-t-rHC-COCOlO
CO   -<*
CC
o
>-
H
J
tr-coco©©^*©©
IO   CO
C
o
Oi   CO    ©
CO
rH
O
COCM©rH-OOOO0Q0
©    IO
or
P.
©O-COCOtr-rHlOCi
CO   ©
ic
0!
©■*.-*
CO
M
'TO W
OCOCT-©CO-^f^rH
CO    CO
c
IM
t-    rH    rH
CO
COHMOWOCOO
IO    CO
eo
O
CO   c-   ©
(MOO-fOOCCNOH
55
rHrH©C-10C-0©
CO    rH
<"
O
•U31J--IAI
rH    CO    ©    r-
rH    ©
nr
CC
rH    Oi    CO
LO
«
EM
oiflcoocooiat*
CO    -*
oi
-*LO©_OCOlOCOO.
CO    OC
O!
r—
eo   -*   ©
o
"XU__>7
COCO©0O^l,COCOCO
IO    LO
OJ
©    IO    ©
**
HHN^-'QOtD-)'
CO    r-
i-
rH
CO    CO   CO
55
s
•(pauiJB^)
CO
CO    CM    t-
CO
55
<
an[g 'xoj[
CO    CO    CO
CQ
l-MOrlMrlOH
00    Oi
o,
0-*ft_00(JlO-O.C-
t-
•pay 'xo£
C0*#©C01OCClO©
©    LO
IO
©
Oi   LO   ^
■*.
5
\A
CS©C0©_O©C0C
©    r-
ex
'SSOJQ
«
CMCO-^O-rHCOCOO:
O    ©
If.
tr-   CO   ©
©
'xo^
rH    CM    CO
rH
rH    rH
IO
cooo-<#©qo©-<#co
©    ©
r-
I--
t-
©OOrHrH-^rHlr-tr-
tr-   ©   Oi
00
'XOJ
Ci
CO    CO    CO*
s
HOlCC-^WQt-
Oi    r-t
M
on
CO    Oi    r-t
o
HO0t-NNf.-*a
*# a
©   O   CM
CO
•-taqsi.^
t-lOlOCDlOOHM
tr-  ©
to
© t- tr-
5
OftNSlHOOMN
tr-    C-
c
ro
co   «
O
i>
t*   CO   Oi
00
•J9AT33JJ
-aieoNON^^o
t-    r-t
©
tr-   00   io
CM
CD   CM   -tf   CO   CC   --P   ©
-cj"    t-
OC
CS
rH    ©    CO
■«
CM   CO   CO   rH   rH   CO   CM
rt
-.ft. ,h
CM
LO    IO
CM
©
GOCOCieOOi©COM
© c
^*
a
tr-
•a^ag
^HMMHIfllOL-
r-t    rH
U.
LC
CO    CO    rH
^1
tr-
H
g
u
BOX JBpua^HQ
o
Oi   C
IN
COCOCOCOCOCOCOCv
co o-
0
Of
CO    CO    CO
OiCiOiOiCiO-OiO"
rH    %
a
o
S   S    rH N 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Particulars of Various Pelts on which Royalty has been paid, January 1st, 1935,
to December 31st, 1935.
Number and Kind
of Pelts on which Royalty
HAS   BEEN
PAID.
Government
Agents.
a
PQ
>
QJ
B.
01
s
u
o
>
33
K
o
fc)
—
c_
O
u
o
X
o
fc.
Fox, Red.
£ v
M S
. t.
Oft.
fci —
X
a
w)
c
0
M
s
e
S
_
O
0
0
0
o
oi
«
B
3
W
"o
n
<»H
6
£
01
j>
0
is
5
9
5
1   .
1
Ashcroft— -
6
2
Atlin
1
88
6
17
15
466
78
4
194
20
3
Clinton 	
1
67
6
Cranbrook 	
23
88
1
6
21
30
1,395
3
41
Cumberland	
11
2
3
108
32
74
9
128
13
2
4
	
10
Fernie 	
4
100
21
126
52
35
—  1      29
83
992
1,250
10
2
587
Golden 	
4
18
1
9
125
48
1,118
1
76
1
Greenwood  ,
1
2
Kamloops	
1
46
4
4
2
2
2
49
71
522
1
275
1
Kelowna	
108
1
8
13
21
Merritt 	
31
657
1
20
522
44
7
57
86
8
13
157
4
33
Nelson  	
1,046
„„1 ....
New Westminster..
2
24
9
249
330
Penticton	
31
10
4,671
76
106
804
1,317
1,805
1,076
1,674
7
38
2,232
1,303
823
15
Prince George	
6
156
16
33
43
39
22
117
228
2,011
4
6
61
2
Prince Rupert	
3
580
10
4
21
24
30
646
3,018
671
141
6
881
1
17
-
53
11
58
1
12
8
17
16
30
2
298
51
Quesnel ,,.	
1,313
Revelstoke	
3
1
3
342
29
22
17
14
36
1
37
2
10
11
3
354
471
	
10
2,347
Smithers 	
1,432
13   	
14
Telegraph Creek ...
9
296
8
1
8
10
197
224!      169
180
10   	
100
13
8
Vancouver	
56
7,022
540
813
675
921
137
1,491   6,127|13,582
87,958
374:1,945
277
26,346
166
Vernon	
1
106
4
52
7
5
15         42        39
694
7. 	
3
67
2
Victoria  _
13
2
245
5
5
10
5|      156
364
 i     31
'38
Williams Lake	
3
*
2
1
_ 1          6|	
Windermere	
1
—
119
1          251    	
102
10
Totals	
118
13,593
721
2,696
1,698
2,413
107,339
353
34,910
_.u REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 41
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1935.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
1
101
155
27
256
21
1
13
82
66
11
76
25
77
34
93
7
31
76
7
28
80
13
9
95
444
48
35
1
15
1
7
1
102
36
101
3
11
162
79
7
57
4
2
113
42
4
3
7
6
1
2
3
11
32
1
2
1
16
2
4
7
2
4
45
6
34
17
2
$570.00
Atlin„                                            	
330 00
1,270.00
Golden                                                   - —                           '                   	
Grand Forks ___ _____ __._  	
2.00
Kamloops  , ,    	
224.00
10.00
152.00
52 00
272 00
320.00
60.00
174 00
873 00
Powell River ...    _	
160.00
521.00
854.00
62.00
252.00
Revelstoke _ -  ,_ , —	
34.00
56.00
290.00
Telegraph Creek.— , _	
Vancouver  _	
1,246.00
993.00
250.00
340.00
Williams   Lake _ _	
1,128.00
116.00
Totals            	
1,877
_J
561
430
$12,374.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1935.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
1923
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924 —  .
1925
172
20,398.40
24,397.00
1926
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927 -
2,487
1,025
1,389
403
1
65.377.95
50,709.25
1929
42,122.00
1930
36,090.25
1931
3,427
42,036.15
1932
80.00
6,285.00
1934
6,825.00
1935
1,877
12,374.00
Totals                   	
3,899
5,236
61,330
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$423,106.80 N 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1935.
Calendar Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-trade and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921                 	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
$30,790.80
1922                                         	
57,458.89
1923 —                    	
67,524.18
1924     — 	
62,446.68
1925          '  	
56,287.78
1923 -                 	
62,535.13
1927-                 	
71,324.96
1928                	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
1930...      	
1931                            	
45,161.11
45,981.08
1932	
40,363.79
1933 : :..._	
44,167.48
1934	
47,102.81
49,831.95
1935                                    	
Totals                                                        	
$696,404.60
$90,725.00
$787,129.60
List of Fur confiscated under the " Game Act
" January 1st, 1935, to December 31st,
1935.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Fur
CONFISCATED.
Date  of
Confiscation.
u
>
a
n
—
S
£
a
£
>_
o
M
tn
<-
a
03
+J
s     s
1      §
3         3
-
<U
01
S
U
U
rf
0
E-H
Feb.      8...
Hoffman, George	
Hunter,  Fred. 	
Revelstoke __	
i
i
5
1
1
4
7
3
2
1
i
i
i
i
i
1
1
4
2
i
4
8
2
35
2
3
3
1
7
4
Courtenay	
22
Pacey, J. TV  ; 	
22
,,       25
Qualicum Beach _..
May     13—
Ennis, A. J  -_.
Clark,  J 	
17—
Merritt	
Lynch Creek	
4-
Twells, W. J	
4.
Foster, C. H	
Shuswap _ 	
10—
White, Jas. R	
10—
Toma, Phillip	
Yerbury, F., et al.
McKay, Mark, et al.
May    25. .
July    13 —
Sept.     5—
Oct.    31....
Walters, Lloyd	
Mac Aschiel   (Indian)-
Petit, Geo.	
McNeil, B. H.	
Minato, K._.	
Peters, H. J	
Nov.   21—
21....
21—
Dec.    17—
2...
Courtenay	
30 —
17—
Willett, John __	
Totals _.	
26
i
4
2
64
1
7
2
Note.—One pelt from beaver intended for liberation ;   one mink trapped under permit. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 43
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st, 1935,
to December 31st, 1935.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.       Shotguns.
Mar. 25
25
»> 25
June 12
June
July
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
L...
17.-.
18...
18._
12....
12._
12..
21-.
21....
25...
25...
28..
9 .
Blaseckie, N	
Stone, Douglas-
Sweeney, Jos—
Foster, Ernest .
Foster, C. H	
Danielson, E. —
Good, Geo	
Smith, Frank	
Wright, Thos	
Petras, Victor	
Johnston, Stan ley ~
Knight, Herman ....
Target, Geo	
Feltram, Ralph	
Horsting Ted	
Gould, John	
Klick, Jack _	
Klick, Benny	
Russell, Jack	
Totals	
Campbell River _
Port Alberni _	
Port Alberni	
Vancouver	
Shuswap	
Fernie	
Nanaimo	
Port Alberni _
Michel	
Vernon	
Blackpool	
Strawberry Hill _
Crescent Beach ...
Clayburn.....	
Clayburn	
Vancouver „
Sardis	
Sardis __	
Sardis..—	
16
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and firearms  under  the  "Game  Act'
during the calendar year 1935 amounted to $449.39. N 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Fish Culture Branch—Summary of Plantings for the Year 1935.
District and Area.
Plantings,
River or Lake.
Brown
Trout.
Kamloops Trout.
Steelhead.
Yearlings.
Finger-
lings,
No. 3.
Fry.
Finger-
lings,
No. 2.
Yearlings.
Vancouver Island—
77,321
6,500
77,321
6,500
Wolf Lake
5,000
5,000
3,643
1,000
3,643
1,000
23,260
23,260
Lower Mainland—
Sechelt .     _.                  	
5,000
1,400
5,000
1,400
6,000
1,500
7,500
5,000
15,000
15,000
2,100
5,000
15,000
15,000
2,100
10,000
4,000
2,500
4,500
4,000
20,000
30,000
Mill Lake_. .
4,000
2,500
4,500
4,000
10,000
15,000
12,000
25,000
26,000
35,000
3,000
3,000
Capilano River _	
Coquitlam River _	
10,000
15,000
12,000
Interior—
Griffin Lake.	
25,000
26,000
35,000
3,000
3,000
Summit Lake	
Begbie Lake 	
83,821
6,000
140,500
31,143
80,260
341,724
 - ~ ;	
The following fish are being held for liberation in the spring of 1936 :-
Qualicum Retaining-ponds, Qualicum Beach, V.I.—
Brown trout	
 .  49,000
Kamloops trout  26,500
Stanley Park Hatchery, Vancouver—
Steelhead trout  42,500
Kamloops trout  36,500
Veitch Creek Hatchery, Sooke, V.I.—
Steelhead trout _' 35,500
Kamloops trout     5,000 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 45
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st, 1935, to
December 31st, 1935.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
no
- c
a *
3
s
o
'3
rO
O
*_
0)
(_
n
_   •
0-8
s .
3 "S
° o
ta
O
0
a
2
1
l
2
i
i
2
2
—
1
--
--
3
1
	
	
1
2
	
3
	
1
1
2
3
1
Amount.
§9 -3
■2.8   feW
Alberni—
Duthie, J. F., Seattle, Wash	
Barkerville—
Marsh, L. B., San Francisco, Cal —
Cranbrook—
Cole, W. E., San Francisco, Cal 	
Gilbert, A. C, New Haven, Conn	
King, Dr. B. H., Couer D'Alene, Idaho..
Richardson,   L.,   Seattle,   Wash	
Fernie—
Bucklen, E. R., Grafton, W.V	
Casey, E. L., Walla Walla, Wash	
Kelting, 0. L., Greensburg, Pa	
Larenz, J. H., Burlingame, Cal	
Paulson, K. C, Spokane, Wash 	
Greenwood—■
Bauer, Mrs. E., Seattle, Wash ._
Bauer, E.,  Seattle, Wash— 	
Brown, Mrs. L., Eagle Butte, Mont—
Kleenor, J. W., Yakima, Wash	
Klunberg, L., Seattle, Wash	
Millar, W., Medicine Hat, Alta	
McKenney, L.  J., Yakima, Wash—
Zaneth,   N	
Grand Forks—
Berry,  F.,  Yakima,  Wash 	
Golden—
Brown, Mrs. L., Lethbridge, Alta—
Converse, E. C, Carmel, Cal	
Hurlimann, H., Zurich,  Switzerland..
Houser, D., Zurich, Switzerland	
Millar, W., Medicine Hat, Alta	
Kamloops—
McKenzie, R. E., La Crosse, Wis—
Nanaimo—
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Kern, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Rouse, K., Seattle, Wash	
New Westminster—
Ayers, A. H., Corvallis, Ore —.
Agen, J. R., Seattle, Wash	
Alderson,  T.,  Seattle,  Wash	
Burke,  V.,  Pullman, Wash	
Brents, P., Bellingham, Wash-
Bates, D. H., Portland, Ore	
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash	
Bull, J. A., Ellensburg, Wash-
Baker, D. R., Seattle, Wash	
Churchill, N. D., Centralia, Wash	
Callison, J. P., Port Orchard, Wash-
Cameron, B., Mount Vernon, Wash—
Day, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Green, I. B., Seattle, Wash 	
Grafton, J. H., Bellingham, Wash	
Hollingsworth, 0. R., Bellingham, Wash-
Hill, W. H., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Jannsey, N. C, Seattle, Wash	
1
I
Johnston, W. C., Maple Valley, Wash...
-I
i
i    i
11
$10.00
55.00
55.00
110.00
25.00
30.00
65.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
75.00
15.00
55.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
25.00
15.00
5.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
70.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
I I N 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st, 1935, to
December 31st, 1935—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
3.S
ma
a a
E*
7 o
£ *
P3 o
6
!   _   _
io-s
gft
c a
p  OJ
o w
Amount.
A.M
Is
New Westminster—Continued.
Ketchum,  E.  J.,  Seattle. Wash-
Kern, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Markham, J. H., Centralla, Wash-
Newman, J., Corvallis, Ore	
Phillips, E. C, Centralla, Wash	
Salvino, F., Seattle, Wash	
Schuster, R.  M.,  Seattle, Wash-
Wright, L., Los Angeles, Cal	
Wright, J. K., Los Angeles, Cal-
Pouce Coupe—
Fritsche, Dr., New Ulm,  Minn-
Dennory, Dr. A. V., Mankato, Minn-
Goodwin, G., New York, N.Y	
Kellar, C, Lead, S.D	
Helmer, A.,  Lead,  S.D	
Leibold, Dr. H. H., Parkers Prairie, Minn-
Ochrer, E. D. and B. J., Durango, Cal	
Pribnow, H. W., Mankato, Minn 	
Snyder, H. M., Montreal, Que	
Snyder, Dorothy J., Montreal, Que	
Sackett, S. J., Chicago, 111	
Slaughter, S. D., Muskogee, Okla-
Sehlesselman, J. F., Mankato, Minn-
Wagner, W. M., La Crosse, Wis	
Prince George—
Berscheider, R. F., Seattle, Wash	
Brian, A., Waterbury, Conn	
Callahan, H. B., La Crosse, Wis	
Chadwick,  L.   S.,  Cleveland,   Ohio	
Kerr, E., Dowington, Pa 	
Knight, W. W., Dowington, Pa-
Middling, H. A., White Pigeon, Mich-
Smith, J. M., Snowshoe, B.C	
Penticton—
Boot, L., Orland, Cal	
Coffin, H. L., Yakima, Wash-
Griffith, D. S., Seattle, Wash-
Loudon, J. A., Yakima, Wash	
Quesnel—
Gilmore, W. W., San Francisco, Cal—
Smithers—
Fuller, D. L., San Francisco, Cal	
Howard, C. Jr., San Francisco, Cal	
Jones, O. R., Oakland, Cal	
Telegraph Creek—-
Allen, O. O., La Mirada, Cal	
Burdon, D. H., Los Angeles, Cal	
Henry, Mrs. J. H., Gladwyne, Pa-
Henry, Miss J., Gladwyne, Pa	
Lewis, F. E., Spadra, Cal	
Murdock, R. A., Westport, Conn	
Murdock, Mrs. R. A., Westport, Conn—
McMartin, A., Montreal, Que	
McMartin, D., Montreal, Que __.
Shoemaker, J. C, State College, Pa-
Struble, F. L., State College, Pa .__
Victoria—
Sommers, H., St. Paul, Minn 	
$25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
105.00
95.00
65.00
40.00
90.00
25.00
210.00
65.00
75.00
50.00
95.00
55.00
95.00
175.00
25.00
25.00
90.00
50.00
55.00
15.00
205.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
130.00
$130.00
180.00
15.00
55.00
15.00
90.00
105.00
155.00
130.00
165.00
130.00
40.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 47
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st, 1935, to
December 31st, 1935—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
_ _
tf 3
«g
Sm
£ h
n a
3
o
X
O
j.
0)
a
„
o
O
£
.5
"3
H
° $
CQ
O
1
+*    ,
S Pi
3 _
o 0*
O „
Amount.
Vancouver—
2
$10.00
Lee, G. H., Egmont, S.D.  	
3
45.00
l
1
~
—
i
i
--
15.00
40.00
Re.T_-g.er, K. F., Wenatchee, Wash	
15.00
i
15.00
Williams Lake—
Bell, Dr. H. W., Bakersville, Cal 	
	
1
1
i
1
80.00
1
15.00
Bolton, W., St. John, Wash  	
1
25.00
Foellinger, 0. G., Fort Wayne, Ind	
l
1
	
40.00
1
1
40.00
1
15.00
Klackn, R. H., Fort Wayne, Ind 	
2
50.00
2
1
25.00
MacFadden, S.  P., Seattle, Wash 	
30.00
Oliver, 0. R., Oakland, Cal	
—
	
	
1
—
25.00
Phillips, V. K.;  Phillips, B. D., Jr.;  Phillips, B. D., Sr„
Butler, Pa  _	
1
4
85.00
Regan, Miss C. S., Old Westbury, N.Y.	
1
25.00
Windermere—
1
—
—
2
2
?.
1
1
l
i
55.00
80.00
Greenwood, H. S., Ashville, N.C	
70.00
Hazard, J., Los Angeles, Cal „
____
....
1
25.00
Kempley, R., Los Angeles, Cal 	
1
2
2
1
l
125.00
Kempley, Lucille, Los Angeles, Cal 	
	
2
	
1
1
	
l
95.00
McKee, W. W., Blackwell, Okla	
1
2
1
i
95.00
Thurlow, A. N., Pequot, Minn 	
____
—
—
1
1
l
65.00
Winterhalter, H. F., Bonnerville, Idaho	
1
	
	
	
1
l
65.00
Wolfe, C. D., Wewoka, Okla...	
—
....
--
2
1
l
80.00
25
38
40
34
17  |  70  |  48  1  36
1         1         1
13
1
Note.—Special collecting permits issued to H.  M.  Snyder and  G.  Goodwin,  representatives  of  the
National
Museum of Canada and the American Museum of Natural History.
'• N 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1935, to December 31st, 1935.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
: P
:  Q
Game Animals.
Game on premises of a boarding-house, etc.	
Hunting game between one hour after sunset and one hour before
sunrise __.	
Indians in possession of game when not in need of same for food	
Killing or having in possession game animals of the female sex	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals during the
close  season    	
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age _	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during the close season-
Possession of untagged deer   ~—
Running deer with dogs   _ 	
Removal of evidence of sex of a game animal killed or taken..
Selling or buying game animals or parts thereof	
Using poison for the taking of game animals 	
Game Birds.
Exceeding bag-limit on game birds _	
Hunting or in possession  of migratory game  birds  during close
seas on  	
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
close season  . 	
Hunting game birds with a rifle 	
Killing or hunting game birds in a game reserve or bird sanctuary..
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line 	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence.  	
Trapping during the close season  __	
Trapping on a game reserve  	
Licences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence-
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Guiding without a licence 	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult-
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence 	
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence-
Using another person's licence or permit 	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an automobile, etc  _	
Carrying or in possession of an unplugged pump,  repeating,  or
automatic shotgun	
Carrying firearms within a game reserve-	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
Miscellaneous.
Failing to report killing of fur-bearing animals doing damage	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to a Game Warden or
Constable 	
Trespassing in pursuit of game   ,	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding daily bag-limit on fish _
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited area.	
Fishing or in possession of fish during the close season-
Jigging, using set-lines, or shooting fish	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
1
1
1
8
10
1
2
5
9
o.2
: a
C.2
; a
■ a
si
_<o
5
1
1
2
2
4
2
3
34
3
1
6
3
1
2
5
1
1
2
2
4
5
8
21
1
1
2
2
7
2
1
15
1
5
2
2
25
1
54
46
2
111
1
4
9
3
8
3
4
5
16
2
5
5
6
6
7
1
4
5
2
3
9
10
10
10
1
2
4
2
17
55
113
1
4
9
Fine or
Penalties
imposed.
$80.00
20.00
315.00
10.00
90.00
30.00
40.00
30.00
10.00
35.00
30.00
315.00
20.00
100.00
155.00
30.00
520.00
852.50
20.00
350.00
110.00
150.00
70.00
40.00
40.00
70.00
55.00
30.00
52.00
95.00
32.50
23.00
54.50
$4,399.50 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 49
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1935, to December 31st, 1935-
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
_ Q
M >
: P
_  P
- Q
H >
- Q
ri <u
-W    01
p cd
HO
Fine or
Penalties
imposed.
Gaol Sentences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence-
Carrying firearms without a licence -
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
the close season 	
Interfering with a registered trap-line —	
Killing deer over number allowed under permit.. _	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during the close season-
Possession of unplugged pump, repeating, or automatic shotgun..
Pit-lamping game   _	
Trapping during the close season..
Totals-
I I
138
16
438
1
11
4
4
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
Note.—" A " Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from five to ninety days.
Revenue derived from Export of Game Animals, etc., 1935.
Date.
Address.
Particulars.
Amount.
Jan.
March
April
May
June
Aug.
Oct.
Koch, M	
Pop, G. L..
Pop, G. L..
Hann, W. H _..
Pop, G. L 	
Pop, G. L 	
Wardlen, J	
Stiglbauer, Hans
Oxley, E	
Herman, Albert..
Bidstrup, M	
Total	
Vancouver.
Vancouver
Vancouver
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Van couver	
Vancouver	
Fish Lake	
Sheffield, Eng..
Vancouver..
Vancouver__
1 set elk-horns. 	
1 mountain-goat hide~
1 mountain-goat head~
1 black bear. —
1 deer-head 	
1 goat-head 	
1 goat-head	
1 set moose-horns..
1 goat-hide. 	
1 bear-hide ___	
2 sets deer-horns—
1 sheep-head	
1 goat-head 	
2 bear	
1 caribou-hide-
$1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
$17.00 N 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Game-bird Bands to Game-bird Farmers, 1935.
Date
Name of Game-bird Farmer.
Address.
Band Nos.        Amount.
Jan.
Feb.
March
April
May
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Hooper, M 	
DeLong, C. T	
Crumner, E	
Kinsey, W. D.	
Troth, Wm	
Valley, Leslie	
Pittendrigh, G. B._.
Haine, A. W. 	
Wulff, Robert	
Both, J. P 	
Sandland, F	
Richards, T.	
Esworthy, J	
Stroulger, A. E-~
Ruddy, J. G	
Griffith, Henry.....
Neaves, Chas	
Burton, E. F	
Stephens, J.._	
Tucker, Wilfred—
Esworthy, J .....
Esworthy, J—	
Pitts, W	
Millner, T. A—	
Hodges, H. G	
Smythe, H. E. R.-
Wiegand, E	
Wooley, M. J.	
Frey, L. R	
Crux, A. G. D	
Downing, T. W—
Esworthy, J	
Tucker, W	
McMullin, S. L	
Kirk, H. W	
Crickmay, A. E—
White, C. A.	
Hitch, Dennis	
Wilkins & Leigh—
Switzer, J. C	
Haine, A. W	
Smythe, H. E. R._
Trott, Wm.	
Esworthy, J.	
White, C. A	
Wiegand, E	
Winkel, Wm. C. ___
Penneway, F	
Nicola	
Gabriola Island	
Caulfeild	
Quatsino	
Duncan	
Hilliers 	
New Westminster.
Clayburn  _
New Westminster.
Vernon. _
Nan aimo	
North Vancouver.
Vancouver 	
Duncan	
Lynn Valley 	
Cloverdale 	
Royal Oak, V.I.	
Vancouver _	
Vancouver	
Van cou ver	
Van cou ver	
Vancouver	
Steves ton 	
Burquitlam	
Happy Valley	
Revelstoke	
Vancouver	
Vancouver 	
Lynn P.O	
Vancouver 	
Cloverdale.	
Vancouver 	
Kelowna	
Victoria	
Burnaby 	
North Vancouver-
Vancouver	
Hatzic - —
Van cou ver	
Saanich	
Claybu rn	
Revelstoke	
Duncan	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Vancouver —
Totals..
4429-4478
$5.00
4479-4488
1.00
4489-4498
1.00
4499-4503
.50
4504-4513
1.00
4514-4516
.30
4517-4522
.60
4523-4552
3.00
4553-4560
.80
4561-4562
.20
4563-4566
.40
4567-4569
.30
4570
.10
4571-4575
.50
4576-4578
.30
4579-4582
.40
4583-4592
1.00
4593-4594
.20
4595
.10
4596-4605
1.00
4606-4610
.50
4611-4613
.30
4614-4619
.60
4620-4625
.60
4626-4636
1.10
4637-4656
2.00
4657-4666
1.00
4667-4670
.40
4671-4673
.30
4674-4743
7.00
4744-4803
6.00
4804-4806
.30
4807-4810
.40
4811-4820
1.00
4821-4822
.20
4823-4828
.60
4829-4833
.50
4834-4866
3.30
4867-4869
.30
4870-4874
.50
4875-4894
2.00
4895-4904
1.00
4905-4914
1.00
4915-4916
.20
4917-4921
.50
4922-4925
.40
4926-4935
1.00
4936-4943
.80
$51.50 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 51
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1935.
Vancouver Island Districts.
Lower Mainland Districts.
Interior Districts.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Partridge.
Pheasants.
168
131
188
24
49
558
172
212
24
660
723
659
639
200
285
150
9
640
35
109
14
20
280
20
22
102
101
122
12
11
Cobble Hill
129
19
19
Grand Forks 	
39
Shawnigan Lake 	
19
Salmon Arm 	
109
45
100
101
Totals                     	
1,526
4,443
124
826
Summary.
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland -
Interior   __	
Pheasants.
— 1,526
— 4,443
826
Partridge.
124
Totals..
6,795
Statement of Predatory Animals and Other Vermin killed by Game Wardens, 1935.
Bear
10
Cougar         31
Coyotes
Crows -
Cats 	
Dogs —
Eagles _
Fox —
99
4,638
1,199
137
141
25
Hawks 	
Magpies 	
Mergansers
Owls 	
Ravens 	
Skunk   	
Weasel  	
Wolves  	
369
1,139
121
282
76
14
2
14
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by Members of the
Game Department, 1935.
Mallards
1,162
Baldpates
Green-wing teal       443 Blue herons      5
Pintails         39 Wood-duck      1
Note.—Owing to climatic conditions during the months of January and February, when
usually large numbers of birds are handed, banding operations could not be conducted. After
the thaw the bird-banding trap was found to have been damaged and it took some considerable
time to repair the same.
Returns from 1,957 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1934-35.
Big Game.
Bear   400 Mountain-goat      89
Caribou     92 Moose   495
Deer   946 Mountain-sheep     18 N 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
... 3,730
Beaver 	
Fisher       440
Fox  2,512
Lynx   1,753
Marten   5,296
Mink  5,767
Muskrats  51,184
Otter _
Racoon
Skunk __
Weasel
81
1,315
68
.24,652
Wildcat       265
Wolverine       140
Cougar
Coyotes
Predatory Animals.
26 Wolves
.__ 2,513
92
Fur-farm Returns, 1935 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1935.
3,591
22
4,968
1,560    .
583
2,930
21
4,438
458
59
9
303
100
3,328
59
Mink  	
3,145
5,840
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 42; Nil returns,  11; no returns
received, 13.
FUR-FARM RETURNS, 1935   (STATEMENT No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1935.
74
18
5
3
7
6
12
391
62
16
Note.—Figures  in  respect to  beaver  only  approximate.    Cancelled  permits,   4 ;  NU  returns,   21;   no  returns
received, 3.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1935.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at. January 1st, 1935.
Pheasants   1,395 Ducks  28
Quail    4 Grouse     1
Pheasants
Pheasants
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1935.
  4,656 Ducks 	
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1395.
Pheasants
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1935.
  4,066 Ducks 	
35
166
20
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1935.
Pheasants   1,837 Ducks    26
Quail          4 Grouse     1
Note.—During the year 1935 there were 169 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year twenty-three of these farmers discontinued operations. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 53
tea
_H
A
W
Q
G
o
<
o
A
HH
M
-i
UJ    c
a
E
'C
T
c
a
+-
c
2
t
|
.-
<
if
Not serious.
Not serious.
Not serious.
Not serious.
Died.
Died.
Died.
Serious.
T3
P
C
'fc
a
a
.
2
Serious.
Dead.
Serious.
D
P
<
'fc
a
a
■fc
c
tz
ta
3
.2 -J
fc     QJ
3 .~
CO P
*
*fc
,a
'p
0)
fc
p
fi
t
fl
!=
c
4-
V
c
4-
er
e
a
t.
S_
s
x
a
x
R
1
P
X
fl
x
p
1
P
P
X
fl
c
bo
"co
t_J
0
-> I
.5 '
en it
fs
%   C
ft -
a x
bo  P
i
bo
r2
P
5
1
E
fc
R
__<
5.
a
.£
x
!   si
J *
c 5
c          s. "
'Si.       "g "°
"■a    £ "
■a •-      .^
■fl _P          f   O
60   bfl          P    <U   4-
*C*   «F*                fc      P      C
«   fc         ei        fi
C C       P .S J:
-9
IH
-u
Xi
P
a
co
fc
•?!
-1
a
£
a
e
X
P
bo
ri
4->
0 _i_
X   c
>» ■■
ftp «
c
T3   t
S    «
5^
■4
r
"   e
-1
X    co
1   3
0    o          O          c
.-is    £    £
S-J J
to IS p
,c^4.ftp      ^j.-0^^^^:^^^
COt>COCQ         Q3CQ         !>KE>C0         t>C«
Is
•g
o
CO
3
O
a
T
eg
4
4^
o
o
fi
a.
<U
3
OJ
JO
"fi
(N
N
«H
0
T)
OJ
</j
P
bo
.£
"S
fii
OJ
s
«
O
bo
R
c- _c
rR    ri
eg  +-
OJ    c
li
ri   "■
O
a
£
T
a,
ft-
a
t-
«
-
1=
P
EH
c
EC
Q
a
en
X
CS1
1
+
n
P
p
bi
4-
c
A
3
<c
■fc
c.
0
O
4>
P
O
QJ
13
N
P
B
fi
^>
c
3
fc
fl
ri
fc
c
p
a
#
fl.
ft-
c
3
Eg
0
c.
a
T
ri
p
p
bfl
-P
O
ftP
w
QJ
ri
co
P   a
P «
«M     f"
°     R
9   _.
o  c
•S
"3    c.
co    C
cp   E_
0)
"__   J!
fc   p
p.  •"
o
B   6   0   0   >,
0   c
OO^
0
bo
c
1
QJ
fc
ri
CJ
O   fc
bo  fl
a   -3
^  ,
cj ft-:
fc     DO
ri v-
fc    °
ri   bfl
■si
•S x
x  p
ft-,  oj
ri -p
4J
?,     (»
3  -3
0 fc
V   ri
p i
X ^
p p
ri   ri
.fl fi
co    </■
CO     CT
fc   fc
d   ri
O C
.  „ S s " S -S .S S £ -S
S?*1s--11-1
E*-*P!bC'CC                                           -=-u
°^3.S^2i"3«»^wboS
=3 2 »| 1j § ^ ^ -S ^ si
Sftft^3 £g SSp
P.WC00S-.E-.00U0C-.
y
'£
-p
S
a
I
c
a
■*.
fc
c
fe
a
1
fc
fc
a
Er
1
0
1
e
a
a
c
c
fc
fi
P
R
fc
c
a
>
e
a
f--
C
eS
a
t
C
1
1
c
i
c
J5
P
n
fc
C
a
e
'i
a
!
V-
a
I
i
«
_i
X
B
j
---
t
P-
s
4-
c
c
hft
"5
p
q
e:
ft3
4-
-
C
C
j
R
P
ri
2
fc
a
>
P
c
P
R
>
fi
c
c
1
?
B
ci
2
1
+-
«
"fc
0
>
fc
E
f
ri
tr
(-
a
X
P
a
fe
s
J
fc
j
s
R
>
R
o
SP 3
5 J
Co
O o
s<
°J _
ft..
o D
B'S-
«
1-
A
fi
*f-
J-
a
0
B
C
c
ft.
c
c
£
<
c
'J
>
c
fc
P
c
P
c
a
e
a
OJ   ".
CO w
"3        &.
en      O
O   -0 fe K
"3 s.       cu "a!
CO  !>         CO CO
4
CT
ro   9 _> __*   ¥        ,F"         0
Dh EC t> t> CO        O        CO
X<
UJ
-3
C
3
M
^  CO
u_,   fc
s
„
A
p:
e
a
t
s
ft
• _
«
[
c
B
.
U
5
L
a
«
E
a
_£
el
fc
C
f.
1
C
p.
a
;_.
B
fc
P
<
E-
B
fc
a
P
c
c
c
1
P
c
>
0
ft.
E-
0
a
---
fc
0
P
CC
d
c
c
a
01
C
a
b
fc
c
a
c
fe
ftj
4-
a
fl
a
X
>
fc
fe
P
S
CT
0
H
0
Q
ft 3
p  ft
J Eh
i-s
a
U
c
s
0
0
0
>
a
>
a
0
ft
6
ri
P
P
a
OC
1
ft
00
1
fc-
4-
c
«
a
1
OC
IC
■^t
u
0
G
c
b
4-
P
a
0
ft
t
c
e
CM
03
0
>
c
2
c
•fl
1?
a
O
c-
r=3 4->    ■ N 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Miscellaneous
Fees.
Calendar
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913 _ -
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
64
33
40
37
22
4
19
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
6,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
T5,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142.0J8.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
1914 -	
1915 	
1916 —
	
1917. 	
1918. 	
1919.— 	
1920  -	
1921  	
1922 	
1923.	
1924 - —
1925—	
1926 	
1927 	
1928	
1929 — '	
1930	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
1931  	
1932. 	
1933	
1934   - 	
1935 _	
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1935.
Cochrane, J. D—
Giddings, E. W.
Peterson, M	
Anderson, Dave-
Archie, George-
Archie, Thomas-
Bidstrup, H	
Bradford, W. J...
Burgess, R. F	
Cameron, A. L._
Cleveland, L. C.Cochrane, R. R.Collier, Eric	
Collins, H	
Daniels, G. A	
Daniels, W. M.___.
De Wees, R	
Dexter, Batiste—
-Barkerville.
..Barkerville.
Barkerville District.
Jones, W. D.
Youngs, Grover A._
-Cottonwood.
.Barkerville.
Boundary District.
. Westbridge.
Cariboo and
-Clearwater Station.
.Canim Lake.
-Canim Lake.
.Likely.
Bridge Lake.
„Roe Lake.
..Ashcroft.
._70-Mile House.
 Blue River.
 Riske Creek.
 Cache Creek.
 Canim Lake.
 Pawn.
 Likely.
 Kleena Kleene.
Doughtery, E. G Clinton.
Evans, Charles  Quesnel.
Fletcher, Wm Pavilion.
Gaspard, E Williams Lake.
Gaugh, A. H Lytton.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Lillooet Districts.
Hansen, W. B. _
Higgins, E	
Hooker, S. B.__.
Hutchison, D. B..	
Johnson, J. W	
Bridge Lake.
 Bridge Lake.
 Horsefly.
__.70-Mile House.
.Likely.
Larsen, Ole Roe Lake.
MacKill, James Kleena Kleene.
Nicol, Alex Horsefly.
Nilsson, Peter Likely.
Park, Jack P 70-Mile House.
Parminter, J. W Horsefly.
Parminter, Ross Likely.
Patenaude, Bryson Horsefly.
Prest, Thomas 70-Mile House.
Quanstrom, Harry-
Ray, John B	
Rioux, Ed	
..Quesnel.
-Clearwater Station.
.Roe Lake.
Scheepbower, J. A 70-Mile House.
Service, John Likely.
Skuce, Herbert Lytton.
Tibbies, Fred Quesnel. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 55
Tompkins, Earl-
Turner, George	
Walters, Gerald—
 70-Mile House.
 Kleena Kleene.
.Likely.
Whitman, T. C Alexandria.
Williams, A. A . Horsefly.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B.
..Telegraph Creek.
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek.
Decker, L Telegraph Creek.
Dick, Little Telegraph Creek.
Dunstan, Tom Telegraph Creek.
Gleason, Henry	
Manson, W	
McClusky, Pat	
Williams, Mike	
 Telegraph Creek.
 Telegraph Creek.
 Telegraph Creek.
 Telegraph Creek.
Mansell, Fred_.
Munro, J. H.___.
Coast District.
..North Vancouver. Philipps, Frank A North Vancouver.
Blackman, W.
Callio, Joe	
Callio, Peter...
Calliou, John__
Calliou, Sam—
-Vancouver.
Fort George
-Valemount.
-East Pine.
.Little Prairie.
.Kelly Lake.
..Moberley Lake.
Stanton, James R.	
and Peace River Districts.
Hargreaves, R. F.	
Hooker, J. B	
Le Beck, Ole	
..Glendale Cove.
Cameron, Patrick Hudson Hope.
Chesser, C. A Mount Robson.
Colebank, G. F Strathnaver.
Esswein, P. B Little Prairie.
Garbitt, T Hudson Hope.
Gauthier, A Moberley.
Hale, Stanley-
..Dome Creek.
Hargreaves, Geo. E Valemount.
Hargreaves, R Valemount.
 Mount Robson.
 Dome Creek.
 Tete Jaune.
Lonsdale, F. E Snowshoe.
MacDougall, John Hudson Hope.
Minaker, Glen Fort St. John.
Noske, Narcisse Kelly Lake.
Ross, James A Hudson Hope.
Sheffield, Bert ! Fort St. John.
Sheffield, Calley Fort St. John.
Shork, E. P Snowshoe.
Smith, J. M Redpass, Snowshoe.
Taylor, Wm Moberley Lake.
White, Robert..
-Hudson Hope.
Beaver, R. B	
Hardy, Sam	
Harrison, Bryan
-Ootsa Lake.
-Ootsa Lake.
-Wistaria.
Hazelton District.
Morgan, James E Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, Edward Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Mobley, C. W.
.. Salmon Arm.
Aemmer, Rudolf Golden.
Ashman, Levi .Flathead.
Avis, John Perry Siding.
Baher, M Natal.
Bergenham, Peter Beavermouth.
Boiven, W Natal.
Capilo, Louis Athalmer.
Fenz, Edward Golden.
Harrison, William Edgewater.
Jaeggi, John Edgewater.
Kootenay District.
Kain, I	
McKay, G. J—
Nicol, A. H._-_
Nixon, J. H—
...Wilmer.
__Athalmer.
-Fort Steele.
-Invermere.
Nordstrom, Chas Natal.
Richter, F Radium Hot Springs.
Staples, E. L Cranbrook.
Tegart, R Windermere.
Turnor, Miss M Skookumchuck.
York, R. A .Invermere.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brewster Transport Co., Ltd..Banflf, Alberta.     Brown, F. E.
..Hazelmere, Alberta. N 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1935.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) Gordon McG. Cloan, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
F. R. Butler Vancouver.
A. G. Bolton Vancouver.
Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew Vancouver.
Fishery Officer..
Fishery Officer-
Fishery Officer-
Fishery Officer_.
Fish Cultural Branch.
 C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
 E. W. Baker Vancouver.
 J. D. Inverarity Sooke.
 A. Higgs Qualicum.
A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden.
._R. Marshall	
„A. Monks	
_W. N. Massey	
_S. H. McCall	
_B. Cash	
„F. H. Greenfield..
_B. Harvey	
_F. P. Weir	
_J. W. Jones	
—Duncan.
—Alberni.
—Alert Bay.
—Victoria.
—Victoria.
—Nanaimo.
—Courtenay.
—Lake Cowichan.
-Royal Oak, V.I.
Sub-Inspector—
Stenographer __.
Game Warden.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
 C. F. Kearns	
..Miss G. M. Lowery..
_A. F. Sinclair	
Game Warden N. Cameron	
Game Warden M. J. Wilson	
Game Warden L. F. Washburn..
Game Warden B. Rauch	
Game Warden M. B. Ewart	
Game Warden_
-W. H. McLean-
Game Warden (Special) H. Morgan	
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright..
. Nelson.
—Nelson.
— Canal Flats.
. Golden.
. Penticton.
—Fernie.
. Cranbrook.
. Nelson.
 Greenwood.
...-Revelstoke.
—Creston.
C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Sub-Inspector—
Stenographer —
Game Warden..
 R. M. Robertson —Kamloops.
 Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
-R. W. MacMartin..
Game Warden D. Cameron	
Game Warden W. R. Maxson	
Game Warden C. F. Still	
Game Warden L. Jobin	
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game Warden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Lillooet.
Kamloops.
Salmon Arm.
Kelowna.
Vernon.
Williams Lake.
Game Warden E. H. Martin.—
Game Warden J. W. Stewart..
—Merritt.
....Clinton. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1935.
N 57
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon
Boundary Districts). N
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game Warden D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown .Vanderhoof.
Game Warden S. F. Faherty McDame Creek.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Finlay Forks.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Stenographer Miss H. Walker Prince Rupert.
" E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden T. D. Sutherland Sechelt.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden L. H. Walker South Pender Isl.
Game Warden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
J. C. Smith Comox. C. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.
925-836-9912   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0308263/manifest

Comment

Related Items