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TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

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 TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
HOME FOR GIRLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APKLL 1ST, 1935, TO MARCH 31ST, 1936
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chahles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-second Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial Home for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1936.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1936.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME
FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1936.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls from April 1st,
1935, to March 31st, 1936.
Another year has passed with its bright spots and disappointments, but the former
predominating. Our family in the Home has been more earnest in securing education along
the many lines offered, the more intelligent girls more willing to assist in the training of the
low-mentality group, and the seniors sharing responsibility with the staff in the receiving of
the new arrivals and in explaining to them our programme and aims. The change in outlook
has been gratifying of several of our most difficult girls who had possibilities, but with little
desire to alter their mode of living. They are no longer stumbling-blocks, but stepping-stones.
Some have taken advantage of the freedom given and have been absent without leave. This
is usually the newcomer who has not yet realized that she is among friends, or the mentally
deficient who has a passing grievance. Most of them return voluntarily and are honest enough
to admit that life on the outside was not as alluring as they had pictured. We endeavour to
locate the missing ones as soon as possible because of the dangers to which they are exposed.
A runaway is no longer a heroine, and has to make her peace with the better element before
she is received again into the fold, being ostracized while making up her mind. The disapproval of her classmates means much more than a reprimand from a staff.
We have the usual variety in material, and when classification and segregation is under
discussion you realize how many difficult problems are presented. Ages range from 12 to
19 years, the latter a recidivist, and intelligence rating from feeble-minded to average
intelligence, with only four in the latter group.
There is variety in parents as well. Some have done their best and it is' difficult to
understand just why the wrong element was so much stronger than home influence. Broken
homes play an important part, and poverty due to unemployment or mismanagement. Usually
the parents realize early that we are doing all in our power to point out to their girls the
mistakes of the past, and our efforts to re-establish them in a more normal way of living, so
are ready to co-operate with us in every way.
Members of the staff are reporting on their departments and activities, so there is no
necessity for repetition.
Under the excellent training of Miss White, Director of St. John Ambulance Association,
every girl has -earned her junior home-nursing certificate and is now taking junior first aid.
Miss White holds a high place in the esteem of our girls and many will bless her in the years
to come for her sacrifice of time and effort.
Though we have been busily engaged in the many classes and in keeping our Home up
to standard, there have been diversions and happy surprises. The day at the Exhibition,
entrance tickets being supplied by the thoughtfulness of the Board, was an enjoyable experience to all, and a new and thrilling one to the girls from isolated districts. The truck, with
genial driver Mr. Hart, offered by Mr. Boyes, took us on several pleasure-trips seeing
Vancouver, followed by swimming and basket picnic in Stanley Park. The dinner party with
decorated tables, turkey menu, and warm welcome given at " Killarney " by the Other Girls'
Club to twenty of our girls was a night to be remembered, including returning home through
a fog which made some walking necessary, but all arrived safely. Some of our honour girls
were rewarded by being taken to the Rotary Ice Carnival through the kindness of a Rotarian,
and after hearing of the wonderful programme provided, many resolved to be eligible next S 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
year. One girl from the Far North decided she had seen two of the wonders of the world—
namely, Stanley Park and the Rotary Ice Carnival. The Kiwanians again provided tickets
for their operetta, " The Wizard of the Nile," which was most enjoyable. The Women's
Musical Society, Philharmonic, Red Cross, Sylvian Ladies' Choir, also private parties, brought
many delightful programmes during the winter months. Many magazines and some books
have been donated by friends and are much appreciated. Christmas gifts marked personally
for each girl came in for the tree from the W.C.T.U., Salvation Army Officers, Oxford Group,
Religious Education leaders, and others who have become interested. We are made very
welcome at the churches up on the Heights, both Catholic and Protestant, where we attend
Sunday morning service. The afternoon class at the Home is taken by the different denominations. A series of beautifully coloured slides of Bible pictures with stories of same were
given by Mr. Ware on Sunday evenings. One hour of religious education is given every
Thursday evening, conducted by graduates of the Bible School. These services are not compulsory, but are always well attended.
A few changes have been made during the past year that are proving helpful and
satisfactory. On lower main, formerly used for medical and receiving cases, we have now
a suite for six of the more reliable girls. There are three bedrooms, each accommodating-
two with single beds, dressers, etc., a bath-room, living-room, kitchen, and dinette. They
have a two-burner gas-stove on which they prepare their meals over the week-end. There is
free access to their suite at all times. This floor is called " Happy-land." Another bedroom
will soon be available which will accommodate two more girls. The staff room on this floor
is occupied by the dietitian.    This graduate in dietetics is a recent acquisition.
On the third floor partitions have been erected to divide three dormatories into nine
single attractive rooms. The work was done by the engineer assisted by the girls. This is
now our receiving and medical floor. There is a large flat roof-garden leading from this
that is a convenience and pleasure for the patients.
We still have more demands for domestics than we can fill. We do not consider that it
is in the best interests of the girl to release her before she has finished her training even if
a position is available. When released she is under the care and guidance of the Follow-up
Officer, Mrs. Katherine Moody.
In closing, I acknowledge gratefully the courtesy and kindly consideration of the Government departments with whom I have been working.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 16,000 lb.   $224.29
Peas, 831 lb.  47.60
Beans, 590 lb.   29.50
Beets, 2,000 lb.   36.28
Vegetable marrow, 376 lb.   7.52
Tomatoes, 407 lb.   17.99
Cucumbers, 87  4.35
Savoy cabbage, 49 heads  r  4.00
Cabbage, 385 heads  - 38.25
Radish, 56 bunches  .70
Onions, 1,700 lb.  39.04
Onions, pickling, 250 lb.   12.50
Onions, green, 142 bunches   5.30
Lettuce, 286 heads  15.20
Corn, 1,950 ears  16.95
Turnips, 1,500 lb.   31.20
Turnips, 18 bunches   4.50
Leeks, 10 bunches   .35
Cauliflower, 142 heads  14.20
Carried forward   $549.72 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1935-36.
S 7
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWS—Continued.
Vegetables—Continued.
Brought forward
Spinach, 40 lb. 	
Carrots, 2,500 lb. 	
Parsnips, 680 lb. 	
Brussels sprouts, 51 lb.
Celery, 36 bunches	
Manure, 15 loads 	
Fruit.
Raspberries, 108 lb. _
Strawberries, 18 lb. ...
Cherries, 3 lb.	
POPULATION OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1936.
On roll, March 31st, 1934	
Girts admitted during year March 31st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936..
Released as wards of Juvenile Court
Released by Provincial Secretary	
Dropped from roll 	
$549.72
2.00
51.22
12.15
4.83
3.60
60.00
$683.52
$12.60
2.25
.35
$15.20
33
19
52
15
5
1
21
Total in Home, March 31st, 1936
Number absent without leave during year
Number returned 	
Number returned in twenty-nine days     1
Number returned in twenty-seven days
Number returned in fifteen days	
Number returned in ten days	
Number returned in five days 	
Number returned in two days 	
Number returned in one and a half days
Number still at liberty 	
Total inmate-days from March 31st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936..
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year 	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year 	
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day	
Operating expenditure by voucher—■
Salaries 	
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies
Telephone and telegraph 	
31
10
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1936.
11,032
$764,675
2.095
588.745
1.613
$12,353.61
$285.98
122.21
Travelling expenses
Farm operations
Household equipment (other than furniture)
Carried forward 	
408.19
346.62
906.40
277.45
$14,292.27 S 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1936—Continued.
Brought forward  $14,292.27
Operating expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Clothing—
Clothing  $599.17
Boots and shoes     266.48
  865.65
Janitors' supplies         360.27
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel   $1,872.03
Water        331.90
Light and power         428.74
       2,632.67
Provisions—
Groceries   $2,925.44
Meat       968.94
Fish        107.59
       4,001.97
Medical attendance and hospital supplies—
Doctor's salary       $400.00
Medical supplies       175.65
Surgery (tonsillectomies, etc.)         225.00
Dental cost       232.00
       1,032.65
Good Conduct Fund   50.10
Incidentals and contingencies  277.48
Total expenditure for year by voucher   $23,513.06
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)       1,336.83
Inventory, March 31st, 1935         943.96
Less board and rent  $2,161.96
Less other receipts   5.85
Less inventory, March 31st, 1936         503.57
       2,671.38
$23,122.47
Less Revenue Account (maintenance of inmates)        5,322.80
Net cost of inmates' maintenance to Government   $17,799.67 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1935-36.
S 9
LIST OF GIRLS IN HOME, MARCH 31st, 1936.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
TO HOME.
Length of Term.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
419
Seehelt Reserve, B.C.           	
Seehelt Band Indian-
15
111/>
15
14
Until 18 years of age.
421
ct.
424
Vernon, B.C. 	
Roumanian  	
14
14
Three years.
427
Central Bute, Sask 	
German-American	
5
10
Two years.
428
Central Bute, Sask 	
German-American	
5
10
Two years.
429
Glasgow, Scotland —	
Scotch... 	
8
8
Three years.
430
Maryfield, Sask 	
Scotch, Scotch-Canadian
9
15
Two years.
432
English   	
14y2
14%
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
433
16
16
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
434
Irish-Canadian, American
14
14
Industrial Home for Girls A
ct.
435
16
16
Recidivist.
ian-American
437
Vancouver, B.C	
Austrian—  	
16%
16%
Three years.
439
Trail, B.C.
16
2
16
15%
13
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
441
13
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
442
Chilliwack, B.C  	
Chinese— —	
15
15
Undefined,   not   less   than
years.
two
443
Choate, B.C  	
Indian   	
17
17
Undefined,   not   less   than
years.
two
444
16
16
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
445
Trail, B.C 	
Scotch-Indian strain...
15
15
15
15
Two years.
447
Lytton, B.C	
dian
450
16
16
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
451
Fernie, B.C   _
13
13
452
Edmonton, Alta	
Unknown 	
5
15
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Polish
13
13
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
454
Gardington, Man 	
Roumanian—    .
8
15
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929
455
Edmonton, Alta 	
American-Swedish	
15
15
Three years.
456
16%
16%
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
457
7
7
17
459
Edmonton, Alta 	
English.. 	
11
17%
Indeterminate.
460
Victoria, B.C.
16
16
Juvenile Delinquents Act.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English (both) _
Scotch (both) _____
Irish (both) 	
American (both)
Indian (both) 	
Roumanian (both)
Austrian (both) 	
Italian (both) 	
Chinese (both) 	
Polish (both) 	
German (both) 	
Unknown (both) __.
Scotch-English	
Scotch-Indian     1
Scotch-Indian strain     1
Scotch-Canadian	
English-Canadian _
English-Scotch	
Welsh-Canadian ....
American-Swedish
Irish-American	
German-English ____
German-American     2
Total  31 S 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
British Columbia .
Alberta	
Saskatchewan
Manitoba	
Scotland	
19
3
5
1
1
United States .
Poland	
Total.
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible
Theft	
  19
     3
     3
Found in disorderly house     1
Prostitution     1
Violating probation .
Recidivists	
Sexual immorality.
Total..
1
1
31
2
2
31
Agassiz     1
Burnaby     1
Chilliwack  1
Erickson  1
Fort St. John  1
Gundy  1
Kelowna  1
Lytton   1
North Pine  2
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
     1 Rosemont	
Saanich	
Trail 	
     1
     1
    3
Vancouver   13
Vernon      1
Victoria     2
Total.
31
Sec. 20, J.D.A..
Two years	
Three years
1929.
LENGTH OF
  10
    6
SENTENCE.
Undefined,  not  less  than   two
years	
Until 18 years of age .
Recidivists	
Indeterminate	
5
1
2
2
Industrial Home for Girls Act..
Juvenile Delinquents Act	
Total  31
AGES OF GIRLS IN HOME.
12 years
13 years
14 years
15 years
16 years
1
2
5
11
7
17 years
19 years
RELIGIOUS
     1
Bible Student	
Church of England     5
Catholic  10
Christian Science     1
Lutheran     1
Pentacostal    1
Total  31
STATISTICS.
Presbyterian  .  2
Salvation Army  2
Seventh Day Adventist  1
United Church  7
Total.
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living..
Number who have both parents dead..
Number who have father living and mother dead-
Number who have mother living and father dead..
Number who are adopted	
31
22
2
4
1
2
31
Of the above, the parents of 4 girls are separated; 5 are divorced, of which 7 are remarried. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1935-36. S 11
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
Teacher and Supervisor Miss Ayra E. Peck.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Linen-keeper Miss Katherine M. Smith.
Attendant (Sewing Supervisor) Miss M. E. Murray.
Dietitian Miss Betty M. Wallace.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener Henry Philip.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1935, to
March 31st, 1936:—
Calls made by physician     46
Patients seen by physician, including treatments  225
Complete physical examination     33
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection     11
Smears taken for Neisser infection  167
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman     48
Treatment for syphilis intravenously     38
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously      4
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection  852
Urine tests    45
X-rays       3
Vaccination      19
Goitre cases treated daily       2
Basal metabolism       4
Tonsillectomies at General Hospital by specialist       5
Sexual sterilization     	
Maternity case attended in General Hospital (boy)       1
Examination by eye specialist       3
Glasses provided       2
Artificial eye       1
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a
complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
Each girl has been examined by dentist on admission and before release.    All necessary
fillings or extractions were attended to.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. S 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
Taking the girls to the city office has proven satisfactory, so, therefore, continued during
this year.
The following report applies to the period from April 1st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936:—
Visits to dentist  13
Number of girls seen  49
Amalgam fillings  52
Cement fillings  30
Extractions  1  29
Cleanings      7
Novacaine administrations  3 5
Upper removable partial plate     1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following report applies to the period between April 1st, 1935, to
Harch 31st, 1936:—
Morning Class (9.30 a.m. to 12 noon).—The average monthly attendance for this class
was 7 and the total time 3,453 hours.
The morning class is for girls capable of doing Grades I. to VII. work, the time being
divided between academic and hand-work.
Hand-work includes the making of baskets, trays, and small pieces of furniture.    Gardening in the spring and summer replaces hand-work.
Afternoon Class (1 p.m. to 4-30 p.m.).—The average monthly attendance was 11 and the
total time 5,950% hours.
The regular Grade VIII. curriculum is followed.    Successful pupils are recommended for
high school.
Five girls of the afternoon class will be recommended for high school.
The spirit of the girls has been very good throughout the year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Dear Madam,—On April 1st, 1935, the girls who were qualified to do high-school work
were enrolled in the British Columbia High School Correspondence Courses.
In the beginning three girls were enrolled for Grade IX. and one in Grade X. These
students re.ceived papers in English literature, social studies, grammar and composition, and
hygiene. During the year three more girls became interested members of this group, all in
Grade IX., but two taking general science, and one, home economics. All the girls have
responded with keenest interest, and, on the whole, results have been most satisfactory.
Ayra E. Peck,
School-teacher and Supervisor. Dear Madam,—During the year April 1st, 1935, to March 31st, 1936, seven girls have
undertaken Commercial Correspondence work in typing and shorthand, in addition to other
high-school subjects. All have made good progress, and two are now finishing their training
in Pitman Business College.
Margaret W. Sibbald,
Clerk and Commercial Teacher.
Dear Madam,—On main floor there are three sitting-rooms, one for juniors only, another
for seniors only, and a common room where all may assemble that wish to do so. These are
comfortably and tastefully furnished and the girls feel they are their own. Having three
rooms, small groups can form, which is desirable. The radio and Victrola contribute to their
enjoyment. A large bath-room on this floor makes it unnecessary to go to the dormitory
quarters during the day.
The library from which books are given in exchange each week is fairly well supplied, and
our list has been approved by a librarian of the Public Library, but we hope to add to our
collection.
The dining-room, with small tables, white cloths, flower centrepiece, and hand-embroidered
monk's-cloth curtains, is most attractive. The food is cooked on lower main in general kitchen,
coming up on dumb-waiter to serving-room, where it is served in cafeteria style, and this is
where the dishes are washed. A training in thorough housekeeping is given, assisting in
serving of food and waitress duties.
Agnes C. Oxley,
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—Every girl is taught to knit, making first a coat sweater and when more
proficient a three-piece suit, hat, and purse. They choose their colour and style, are very
proud of their handiwork, and look well dressed in them.
During the past year, 38 suits, 39 pullover sweaters, and 34 coat sweaters have been
completed;   also 2 afghans and 3 cushions.
Agnes C. Oxley,
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—The entire laundry of the Home was accomplished by the girls, under
supervision, including blankets and white starched uniforms of staff.
The number of girls trained during the year was twenty-eight. Hours worked, 5,627;
and number of articles laundered, 40,560.
This training enables a girl to take charge of laundry in a private house, or obtain
employment in a commercial laundry, and will prove very useful later on in her own home.
Katherine M. Smith,
Linen-keeper.
Dear Madam,—Community singing is encouraged and almost all the girls enjoy this hour.
About half of those in the Home belong to the choir and attend two evening practices a week.
Here solos, duets, and two-part choruses are taught, which they sing from memory. Annually
a special programme is given for the pleasure of their parents and the general public. Twice
a year the girls provide the anthem for Sunday morning service at the church where we attend.
Katherine M. Smith,
Director of Singing. S 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dear Madam,—Every girl is taught to mend her own clothes and to make simple garments.
If interested, are carried on into more advanced work.
During the past year twenty-one girls received their full training in the sewing of 575
garments, 70 pieces of bed-linen, 30 pairs of curtains, 75 of table-linen, and 165 other articles,
as well as hem-stitching, embroidery, and cut-work. They are taught to take careful measurements, cut from patterns, and draft others if necessary.
M. E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—During the past year the girls have been very interested in their kitchen
training.
Four classes in dietetics were held weekly during the school-year; 6,785 hours of training
were given in the main kitchen and 210 hours in the bakery, where 4,680 loaves of bread, also
buns, were made. Canning and pickling included 490 quarts of fruit and 312 quarts of pickles.
The poultry department provided 2,141 dozen of eggs, 85 hens weighing 504 lb., 124 cockerels
weighing 696% lb., and 4 turkeys weighing 76% lb.
Betty M. Wallace,
Dietitian.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.
425-1036-2876  

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