BC Sessional Papers

PART G. INSPECTION OF MINES. BY JAMES DICKSON. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308250.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308250.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308250-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308250-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308250-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308250-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308250-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308250-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308250-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308250.ris

Full Text

 INSPECTION OF MINES. G 1
PART G.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into five Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in District.
Coast Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Yale, and
Nanaimo Mining Divisions.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel, Cariboo,
and Peace River Mining Divisions, and
those portions of the Liard and Omineca
Mining Divisions east of the 124th degree
of longitude.
Interior Similkameen, Osoyoos,  Nicola, Vernon, and
Kamloops Mining Divisions.
East Kootenay and Boundary- Greenwood, Grand Forks, Trail Creek, Nelson, Slocan City, Slocan, Arrow Lake,
Ainsworth, Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort
Steele, Windermere, and Golden Mining
Divisions.
Northern Queen Charlotte Islands, Bella Coola, Stikine,
Nass River, Portland Canal, Skeena, and
Atlin Mining Divisions, and those portions of Liard and Omineca Mining
Divisions west of the 124th degree of
longitude.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective
districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for a
period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
.   J. D. Stewart Nanaimo Station.
Jas. L. Brown 1 Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould Princeton Station.
John T. Puckey Fernie Station.
J. D. Stewart, Instructor, resigned at the end of 1935 and was succeeded by Richard Nichol.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended December,
1935, was 1,187,968 tons, being a decrease of 159,122 tons or 11.07 per cent, under the production
of 1934.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton District, and the
Northern District produced 780,585 tons, an increase of 61,387 tons or 8.5 per cent, over 1934.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B.C. G 2
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
Vancouver Island collieries produced 630,213 tons, an increase of 55,705 tons or 9.6 per cent,
over 1934. The Northern District produced 3,426 tons. The Nicola-Princeton District produced 147,219 tons, an increase of 5,533 tons or 3.9 per cent, over 1934. The East Kootenay
District produced 407,110 tons, a decrease of 220,509 tons or 35.1 per cent, under 1934, this
decrease being entirely due to Corbin Colliery closing down.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the year of
the various mines:—
Colliery and Mine.
°     u
C o <v
££*
* a t*
O   Gj'£
H  O  n
8D«
M
u
o
ts
>>
«
o n
. oi
O Hi
11
Tons of Coal
mined per Employee daily.
■ ^
bB>h
<w Pr*H
tfi   QJ   OJ
C C "
H En
T3
a a
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee daily.
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee for Year.
Western Fuel Colliery, Nanaimo.—	
No. 5 mine, South Wellington	
357,454
51,648
207,117
7,688
3,164
1,903
145
56
1,038
25,617
83,770
8,573
5,704
22,099
786
186
484
3,160
266
86,879
310,258
9,973
250
103
254
258
271
318
27
91
223
176
236
61
260
273
51
91
140
65
147
211
15
868
250
480
23
12
9
4
4
4
109
200
80
24
56
12
2
2
9
4
154
388
277
1.65
2.00
1.69
1.29
0.97
0.66
1.33
0.15
1.16
1.33
1.77
1.75
0.89
1.44
1.27
2.66
2.50
1.01
3.83
3.78
2.40
412
207
431
334
263
211
36
14
259
235
419
107
233
394
65
93
242
351
66
564
799
36
580
200
376
18
10
5
4
2
3
75
132
57
12
34
8
2
2
7
4
120
308
186
2.46
2.50
2.16
1.65
1.16
1.19
1.33
0.30
1.55
1.93
2.68
2.46
1.82
2.37
1.92
2.66
3.22
1.01
4.92
4.77
3.53
616
258
551
427
Fiddick mine . —	
316
380
Biggs' mine  ,	
36
28
Chambers' mine	
346
341
634
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd...  	
150
475
649
Black Diamond Colliery (Bromley Vale)..
98
93
242
451
66
724
1,007
53
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island collieries was 630,213 tons. Of this amount, 53,025 tons
or 8.4 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 73,226 tons or 11.6 per cent, was
consumed by producing companies as fuel, and 516,407 tons was sold in the competitive market;
12,737 tons of this was taken from stock, thus 80 per cent, of the output was sold. Of the
amount sold in the competitive markets, 485,303 tons or about 94 per cent, was sold in Canada
and 31,104 tons or 6 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries of Nicola-Princeton Inspection District.
Of the gross output of 147,219 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-Princeton
District, 21,832 tons or 14.8 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as fuel, 82 tons
was lost in washing, and 123,524 tons or 83.9 per cent, was sold in the competitive markets
in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries of the East Kootenay District was 407,110 tons. Of this
amount, 8,651 tons or 2.1 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 4,527 tons or 1.1
per cent, was consumed as fuel, 37,178 tons or 9.1 per cent, was used in making coke, and
361,291 tons was sold in the competitive markets; 4,799 tons of this was taken from stock,
thus 87.7 per cent, of the output was sold.
Of the amount sold in the competitive markets, 338,200 tons or 93.6 per cent, was sold in
Canada and 23,091 tons or 6.4 per cent, was sold in the United States. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 3
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the past
five years.    Similar figures for the years prior to 1929 are shown in previous Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of
Employees
at Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Employee for
Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
1931   J
East Kootenay District-
661,426
1,046,164
1,707,590
587,875
947,100
1,534,975
477,677
787,069
1,264,746
627,619
719,471
1,347,090
407,110
780,858
1,187,968
1,211
2,871
4,082
1,001
2,607
3,608
698
2,396
3,094
754
2,139
2,893
819
2,152
2,971
546
364
419
587
363
425
684
328
408
832
336
465
497
363
399
909
2,048
2,957
752
1,876
2,628
522
1,719
2,241
551
1,499
2,050
614
1,531
2,145
727
510
I
1932   J
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District._
577
781
504
I
1933   J
584
East Kootenay District —
915
457
1934   J
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District —
564
1,139
480
657
1935   J
East Kootenay District —
663
510
554
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various collieries
and districts compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— G 4
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
CO
OS
53
o
I—I
H
O
&
§
B5
P
ij
O
o
M
PQ
&<
o
CO
w
I—I
03
s
13
o
O
Output
for the
Year
1935.
Tons.
51,648
207.117
357,454
7,688
3,164
1,903
56
145
1.038
eo
eg
o"
CO
CD
25,617
83,770
8,573
5,704
22,099
786
186
484
CT.
eg
© cD
CD CD
rHCg
co"
©
O-l
CO
CO
OO
©
CO
t-
00
00
©CO CO
oo eg os
CD*© OS
CO rH
CO
©
w
OS
OS
C-
■-#
oc
CC
O"
t>
a
©
©
eg
©
©
eg
u
Z
a
os
®
5
0 -'
OJ   rH
o
o
CO
1 IO
lO
^f CO
of CI
trot
a
©
©
eg
©
©
eg
T3
2 °
T3 -P
<
0"
fi
o
H
CM
OS
tM
eg
OS
eg
eg
CO
eg
CM
1-"
©
CO
eg
CO
eg
OI
IO
eg
©
cg
eg
©
eg
CO
tr-
cg*
tvi
o
o
03
-p ri
fi
o
CD       00
"*       CO
eo     cm
eg     ^*
rH
00
CO
ed
>o
CO
eo   ■ ©
eo   1 w
. OS
©
CO
eg"
IO
OS
eg
co©cg
rH © eg
to CM OS
CO*
eg
©
©
tr-
cn
cg
■*
©
©_
o>
-*
©
eg
■*
©
eg
Is
©-#       IO
to      CO IO      ■<*
os
CM
CO
OS*
eg
CO       t-
■"*       CO
rH       ^
©
CD
©
IO
OS
Os"
eg
©©rH
IO fc-H
eg © co
cg"rH
CO
"*"
CO
IO
©
eg
-**
©
CO
©
IO
CO
©
10
Total
for
Colliery
Use.
iq CO       O CO
"          rH t-          00 CO
fi       to CO       «#fc-
r9        CO©"       rH
"        rHrH        ©
IO
eg
CD*
eg
t-rH CD CO ^ O
rH CD CO t-'* CO
<^i-l tr- CO IO
■fl* Cg rH rH tN
O
CM
to
CD
00
© CO CO
© rH CO
© t- ©
©
to
CO
©*
IO
s
IO
co"
©
•
Used
under
Companies'
Boilers,
etc.
•       00 OO       tr- CO
2        OH        rHCO
fi        OS rH        "c* t-
r,        Cg"-*        IO*
t-i                    to
CC
eg
eg
CO*
C- rH -HH CD -* O
rH CO >0 L- ^f CO
© rH CD CO IO
"■tfeg'rH rHCg*
DJ
CO
00
eg
00
IO
CO
to*
os
o      trio     ©
©       IO
eg"   ; rH
eg
to
n"
IO
CO
IO
OS*
©
1
Used
in
making-
Coke.
CO
fi
o
! CO
: t-    :
11-"
' CO
00
t-
CO
00
t>
t>
CO
Lost
in
Washing.
•       tr- IO       CO
%        OlO        CO
lO
O]
o
co"
U9
eg
CO
eg
00
©
CO
iO
' to CO
! CO rH
jiOH
' t-*rH
IO
©
CO*
CO
to
©
Total
Sales.
CO CM       rH IO "* CO CD IO CO
.^       © IO       00 © © © IO »* CO
fi     ^l"^     CTici'^.0l     rH *-!
O        OS*©"       CD* CD CO* rH               rH
£_,        CO OS        CD
t—
o
to
us
00CS00COlOCDCD-g"
cDooocgcooco©
cocDcgcococ-rH-rj'
HHt-'^V"
C-a C-                  rH
eg
lO_
eo"
eg
CD CD
CO CD
CO*
©
eg
CO
©
cg
-ct<
co"
to
CO
eo"
to
o
eo
CO
to
eg
of
©
tr-io©
ioio tr-
© © ©
CO t-*©
CO ©
eg
OS
eg
©
CO
00
©
o
©
to
t-
co
eg
to
tr-
co
eg
o
o
03
ta
fi
o
H
0
•        OH        CO
«        OOS        rH
g        OS CO        CO
r_(          io     -^
r*                  eg
o
eo
eg
IO
eo"
eg
IO tr- ©
rH CO CO
© tr-l-
©*rH*
eg
OS
©
eo*
cg
©
©
eg
oo"
eo
eo
»o
©
-#*
to
CO
©
IO
to"
CO
©
10
to"
pi
-73
m a
CO rH        CO IO "rft CO CO IO CO
K)        © ©        CD O W O IO Tf :o
fi        QClO        CDOSrH©        rH O
P        CO* CS        CM* CO* CO* rH               rH
t-t       CO OS       ■*
rH        OI
o
CO
us"
CO
000SCO001OCDCD-*
cDOOoegcooooo
CO_CO_CgCOCDt-rH'c}'
iHH^V"
CM t-               rH
© ©
CD ©
th eg
CO*
eg co ©
"eji rH -V
© eg os
CO*©* CO
© ©
eg
CO
IO
©'
IO
©
CM
00
OO*
eg
CO
00"
63
g
3
■—          T3.r-
i e*
.-       to c
e.     *rt +j
S    Sg
=   a f
g    "35
fi°
O
>
u
c
p
a
CJ
M
0
o
1
+->
(3
-3
cS
B
O
tH
O
ft
§
o
&£
+5  c
>
c
*c
C
c
a
QJ
e
i
e
c
a
r-
ri
c
5
t>
i-
c
c
c
!-
B
s
ri
01
c
1
+-
c
i:
bl
t
h
a
p
i
"re
a
6
d
Z
a
_o
c
X
H
5
C
a
CO
0)
rQ
V
'E
03
5
ki
l-H
)H
<1)
{>
O
U
fi
>
o
H
o
0   I
S  "
«   a
1}
£ 1
S V
S   c
.-   (-
2i
n
a
"c
t
s
1
0
.=:
r-
c
+s
c
0
s
o
o
1
■*-
rJ
a
'?
a
'c
C
c
a
a
£
a
1
r-
>
>
>
C
0
ri
a
CJ
cu
E
0
OJ
p
5
a
1
>
>
a
1
c
£
>
rH
a
*c
c
-0
E
c
£
fi
c
a
s
a;
c
i
"a
c
CJ
B
0
CJ
a>
dj
rH
CJ
+J
CC)
w
0
CQ
s
c
o
-t-J
a
o
d
'fi
Ph
ri
'o
o
+5
O
H
11
a
C     r=
0)      C
£   CJ
o    >
Z  jS
>
>
C
CQ
>>
"3
CJ
I
>
p
Q
fi
h
01
0
•A
J3
a
H->
o
H->
o
'fi
H-J
to
s
n
ri
0
CJ
m
H
O
fi
rt
rH
o
1
1  ^
.-  6
a cj
c ,9 h
o   U Q
o   to jr
o    m c
&§
o
>
C
CU
"fi
cu
"o
CJ
_fi
rH
0
CJ
HP
p
'fi
s
IS
cd
fi
0)
•p
c
o
M
■p
cd
H
m
03
■p
o
EH
a
c
(
'>
c
*.
p-
.   t-
«   c
O      D
"n
hB
c
H-
■r
e
ri
r-
C
1
+^
6
o
1 °
tO      K^
(21
to.fi
fe-S
CJ
a
t
"">
c
s-
P-
u
c
«*-
A
c
c
c
C
~ INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 5
3
ea
S
»
j
o
o
w
ai
5
PQ
fa
o
03
fa
o
cj
co co eg ©
-vf
^i
©eg eg eg
IO
©
-H-
CO
^ oc
t~.
OS
r •        IO CO        © CM rH
H     cg-Q'     oo
IO
© © co eg io rH
on
to CO tr-
CO
rH eg
-*
rH co eg
J "8
OJ
©-*      ooioeg-*    ! eg rH
CO
-^ oo co eg eg "^
CO
cg
CM
rH
IO    ©
1        © ©        CO
<                  rH          CM
-*
1-1
f
cgjoo
=>£
locgt-cg^foocgcg
OI
tr--*
r-l
r-l
"^    US
M <B
,_;        © C-        00 rHrH
i-J     eg co     io
t- CO IO rH CO
eg
eg©oo
CO
rH
-
eg
co     t- rH     eg   !   i   i
rH
s
0)
rH
f-H             1 rH        IO
t-
t-
t"
CO        Ir-rH     ,CM      1      !      !
iiH   1   j   (   j   1   1
rH
to
z
fi
o
<(j             i rH        IO
t-
b-
tr-
ri
__rJ	
&   M   l II111 i
1 'Il   I   I   i   1   1
o
a
Z
CQ
rH
0)
EH      |  j      j   !  |  |  1   !  ■
-
-
-1-
<   i i   1 ■ 1'l*| i i •
H
H
M
m
z
H
A.
<
i-s
H
tJ       |   !       i   !   ;   i   i   :
-
—
-
-j-
B
3
Eh
j   |  1   t'i   1  j
<        ||        [   1   |- 1   1   |   '
^       |
DQ
z
CO
EH      !j      |" [  !_ 1  1  |
H
P
o
rQ
ri
r-3
<    | |    i | | i ; i i
z
p'      1   i      !   i   !   !   i   i   !
co    ■<*
c_|    egcg    tr-   |       iii'
Ol
CO
CO
o
n
n
rj
To
©
rH t-        rH        CM      ■      I      ■
©
©
rH            -*
<;       CM             CO     |           !     |     !
©
1-1
1-1
—
tr
eg
CO
. ©        ©.ill,
t-   ,    ;   i    ;    i   ,
eg
□        leg     co   |        !   |   |   i
iO
ee
h<
© CO rH
tn"0
b    ~S    3      i   1  1  1  i
rH tr-CM                 !     !
eg
©■en tr-
r-
©
CO
IO
C8r«   5
H fi1"1
'h ri
© io      © co    i    !    !    ;    !
CM -^ -HH -^1 ©       ;       ;
©
,-)
r-t
r-
tr-© ©
os
©
<3           ■*      eo                       j    i
CM
rHCOrH
tr
©
1(7
CO
US
.COCO
co tr- io
P                  S          *
CO
ICOrH
io
COCO CO
IO
tr-
CM
on
eo
ns
CM
rH©      cgcocgcg      egrH
rH rH
© rH ©
L_,        © IO        CO                          !
"^                         CO                       !
cmco         eg        ;   :
at
IO
rH
t*
to
—
©
r-
"* © rH
<<        rHCM        ©             j             ]
>o
rHCg               rH             !      i
©
rH->*
z
pa
o
42
ri
rJ
—
 lea
rr-
CO
to
*-*-                  eg            i   !    '
©
CO
CO
CO
CO
CM eg
IO
©
CO             ! '";•*    ",     |        rH
-!-.
CO        CO -H CO TP        rH
(T)
CO      .
CO
eo
;■<*    !
•H-
©
a
to
u
ft
*H3
n
EH        ;=°        i    1            L j
"*
rH        CM
IO
OS
To
^T
<      1   1      1   I  !  !   I  !
c"5
eo
5-
oo        ;:•■*;;     rH
CO
CO        CO rHCO ^P        rH
CO
. -tf
P               j M               i       !
-#
rH   ;cg                !
IO
©
co©     © ■*!"* to "^ cm eg
■HH
©Otr-tr-COCOrHrH
r-
CO CM
ID
©
to oo eg
l.O
rH
•        CO ©        00 rH
m
t-tr-rH
©
to
OJ
fi
s
^
1-1
©
rHrH
©
<   |.|        MM
tf>
ee
eg
IO
J_
-*f
©©tr-tr-coeoiHrH
r-
CO CM
IO OC
,-J        CO©        CO rH
P        rHrH        rH
"*
1-1
©
rHrH
©
-a
eg ©     co eg        ;    ,
£h    »-h eg    io       !   !   !   i
r->
CDOW*-*HH
eg
-^
rHrH
eg
^*
tr- eg rH
eg cm
©
US
©
.' cd
oj     a
ft S'E
3.2 §
rH
^ ,_| rH rH rH
IO
m
eg oo©
o
CO
<J                  rH          CM       i
-^
1-1                       !    !
--1
to
1-1
CO
oi
nn
©
CO
rH rH
IO n
>
CO
©
OJ
00
rHrH
p
^^
*j
is
>
"m
rH
>>
CD
1
O
rH
Q
CJ
1
p
«        • fi
■£         -r3   fi
cd
cd
fi
O
to
13
O
fi
0
•p
aj
t
p   u
O    P>
o
rJ
s s
«'!
B   h
°   t.
H
Z
Q        -10
■o     ^6
5          Qr5
—          W   fi"
aj o
5 a;
CQ   r-
o.S
b£ >
ri
rC
s
*H    -
° +
at
M CL
fi
fi tr
3^
a
p
i
v
P    rH
*    U
H |
T3     fi
5 S
"~   B
QJ  S.
.S
14
2 o
S
I
o
a
c
o
co
o
c
£
O
Z
+
>
r»
a
r-
!
>-
|
1
CJ
6
0
w
s
o
(3
'C
Ph
ri
o
u
c    .2
1    1
a  o
a
>•
a
c
CO
o
O
X
a
UJ
o
a
Oh
O a
Is
tQr-
u
o
S     '333'aJ    "o «■
■73^   fi   CD    .   5   t
"c
c
c
C
a
a
rc
t
£
"c
c
4-
I
«
fi
2 hB„ S
3 5 o -o B
b*L s s a
ri cd 0 o"fi
EHESSrJ
3^
*3   -
CJ   w
CD    O
In
o
&
K
"^"o   cd   fi
>,ofl EH O
4^.S
fi^'aj
P3<
r-O      0      (H
!sBO
IS "h
O G 6 REPORT OP THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1935.
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1935, 2,971 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the Province,
an increase of 2.7 per cent, compared with 1934.
Taking the average of all the mines in Vancouver Island District, about 35 per cent, of the
working-days was lost through lack of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton District the different
collieries worked on an average about 60 per cent, of the working-days. In the East Kootenay
District the average for the year was about 59 per cent, of the working-days. This did not
include the Corbin Collieries, which closed down early in the year due to the strike.
The table on page 5 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and about the
mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground and above
ground, compiled from returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1935 the imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled 176,361,544
gallons, and from this 41,398,324 gallons of gasoline and 98,972,387 gallons of fuel-oil was
produced and sold in British Columbia.
In addition to above, 18,389,862 gallons of fuel-oil was imported, free of duty, for ships'
stores, and 15,250,493 gallons of fuel-oil was imported for general use; the import value of
above oils was $6,352,140.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1935 the importation of coal from the United States into British Columbia consisted
of 32 tons of anthracite, 2,556 tons of bituminous coal, and 4,649 tons of lignite.
Imports of coal from Great Britain consisted of 836 tons of anthracite and 1,848 tons of
bituminous coal.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia during
past years:—
Year. Short Tons. Year. Short Tons.
1925   117,037 1931   193,060
1926   127,858 1932   136,188
1927   187,023 1933   119,026
1928   262,198 1934   123,968
1929   247,060 1935   221,758
1930   227,385
The total tonnage of coal brought into British Columbia during 1935 was 231,679 tons.
HYDRO-ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT.
At the end of 1935 the hydro-electric horse-power in use amounted to 728,000 horse-power.
The steadily increasing development of hydro-installations in British Columbia is shown in
the following table:—
Horse-power Horse-power
developed by developed by
Hydro-electric Hydro-electric
Year.                                                          Plants. Year.                                                        Plants.
1900   9,366 1926   460,562
1905   29,334 1927   473,142
1910   64,474 1928   523,902
1915   254,065 1929   559,792
1920   309,185 1930   630,792
1921   309,762 1931   655,992
1922   329,057 1932   713,792
1923   355,718 1933   717,602
1924   355,718 1934   726,000
1925   414,702 1935   728,000
For the purpose of comparison it may be stated that one developed horse-power per year
is equivalent to the power value of 6 tons of coal. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 7
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1935, 2,971 persons were employed in and round coal mines. Five fatal accidents
occurred during the year, as compared with six for 1934.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 1.67, as compared with 2.07
in 1934. In 1933 the ratio was 0.97; in 1932, 2.21; in 1931,1.22; in 1930,11.62; in 1929, 2.38;
in 1928, 2.64; in 1927, 2.10; and in 1926, 1.88; the average for the ten-year period being 3.03.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1935 was 4.21; during
1934 the figure was 4.45; in 1933, 2.37; in 1932, 5.21; in 1931,2.81; in 1930, 28.64; in 1929,
5.33; in 1928, 5.54; in 1927,4.48; and in 1926, 4.3; the average for the ten-year period being
6.92 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during 1935
and comparative figures for 1934:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1935.
1934.
3
-1
1
~~5
1
Canadian Collieries  (D.), Ltd	
Western Fuel Corporation, Ltd -	
South Wellington ___   	
No. 1 mine   ,,	
No. 2 mine  	
1
1
Michel    ,-	
3
6
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents and their percentage of
the whole, with corresponding figures for 1934:—
Cause.
1935.
1934.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
3
1
1
4
2
66 70
60.00
20.00
20.00
33.30
Totals                  	
5
100.00
6
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident in their
respective classes in the years 1935 and 1934:—
1935.
1934.
Cause.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
3
1
1
4
2
336,772
673,545
399,322
1,187,968
1,187,968
Totals    ■	
5
237,593
6
224,545
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1935 was 237,593 tons, compared with
224,545 tons for 1934.    The average for the ten-year period was 144,463 tons. G 8
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during the year
1935, compared with 1934, according to Inspection Districts:—
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Total.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-cars
and
Haulage.
Carbon-
monoxide
Poisoning.
Miscellaneous.
1935.
1934.
2
1
1
1
4
1
2
4
Province (1935)	
3
i
1
1
5
Province (1934)	
6
Accident Death-rate.
District.
Per 1,000 Persons               Per 1,000,000 Tons of
employed.                               Coal mined.
1935.
1934.
1935.
1934.
2.42
2.06
1.73
7.27
6.31
6.79
3.48
6.37
Province H935)	
1.67
2.07
4.21
Province (1934)  	
4.45
The following table shows the ratio of accidents per 1,000 employees and per 1,000,000
tons of coal mined in the Coast and East Kootenay Inspection Districts for the ten-year period
ended December 31st, 1935:—
No. of
Fatalities.
Accident Death-rate.
District.
Per 1,000               Per 1,000,000 Tons
Employees.                 of Coal mined.
99
29
3.25
2.46
8.68
4.08
Totals for Province	
128
3.03
6.92
The details regarding the occurrences of the fatal accidents in coal mines during 1935 are
as follows:—
The fatal accident to Thomas Robertson, rope-rider, No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, on
January 25th was due to being crushed by a stringer 16 feet long and approximately 15 inches
in diameter which deceased and another man were loading on a trip of empty mine-cars;
one end of the stringer was placed on the mine-cars and Robertson was" holding the other end
when his foot slipped on a rail and he fell; the timber rolled on him and crushed his head,
killing him instantly.
The fatal accident to Yukutoro Kawaguchi, Japanese miner, No. 4 mine, Comox Colliery,
on January 25th was due to deceased being crushed between a loaded car and a post; deceased
was taking the loaded car from his working-place to the parting and was caught against a post
that had been recently placed to reinforce the original timber.
The fatal accident to James Walker, mechanic, No. 4 mine, Comox Colliery, on January
28th was due to deceased being struck by a runaway trip of five loaded cars; while the trip
of cars was being hoisted the rope slipped on the drum and gave some slack rope.    The first INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 9
three cars of the trip were over the knuckle on to the level landing and the two last cars were
still on the slope at this moment, and when the rope slackened the rope-rider accidentally
pulled the clevis-pin and the trip ran back down the slope, where it caused injuries to Walker
from which he died February 9th.
The fatal accident to William Strang, overman, No. 2 mine, Tulameen Coal Mines, Limited,
in February was due to deceased being crushed between a loaded trip, on which he was riding,
and the timbers in the Main slope of the mine; he died shortly after being taken from the mine.
The fatal accident to Lewis Houston, miner, No. 1 mine, Western Fuel Corporation of
Canada, Limited, Nanaimo, on December 22nd was due to carbon-monoxide poisoning.
Deceased and three other miners started work at 11 p.m. on the 21st on the Diagonal slope,
where the few remaining pillars in this area were being extracted.
About 3 a.m. on the morning of the 22nd Houston complained to the other men of being
ill and stopped work for a little time, then had lunch with the other men and later resumed
work, but again felt ill; he sat down until the other men finished work about 6 a.m. and started
to go home with them, but experienced difficulty in walking.
The others assisted him to a point about 1,200 feet from the working-place, at which point
he collapsed and lost consciousness. Artificial respiration was immediately applied, but
Houston did not respond to this treatment and he was hurried to the surface, where medical
treatment failed to revive him and he was pronounced dead at 7 a.m.
The area where Houston worked is adjacent to an extensive exhausted and abandoned
area in which many fires have occurred in past years, but there were no known fires in the
immediate vicinity and it was impossible to determine whether the carbon monoxide came from
some of these older fire areas or from a new and more recent heating. The other men who
worked with Houston said they did not connect Houston's illness with the possibility of carbon
monoxide in the air, as they felt no ill effects until the end of the shift, when one of them stated
that he noticed that his legs appeared to feel somewhat weak.
Air samples were taken in the place about one hour after Houston died, and later in the
day tests were made by means of the carbon-monoxide detector and by canaries; both of thesa
tests gave negative results, but the air samples taken earlier showed small percentages of
carbon monoxide. The barometric pressure was low on the night of the 21st and began rising
on the morning of the 22nd, with the probability that this change of pressure first caused
a flow of gases from the gob and then reversed the process.
This whole area was sealed off immediately the presence of carbon monoxide was reported.
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during 1935,
together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of explosive used,
and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities include all explosives
used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines) :—■
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Totil No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
Western Fuel Colliery, Nanaimo.
No. 5 mine, South Wellington	
Comox Colliery  	
Lantzville Colliery  	
Fiddick mine ..— _, 	
Ida Clara Colliery  (Richardson).
Biggs' mine   	
Jingle Pot mine	
Chambers' mine 	
Totals for district..
122,913
11,400
57,507
5,600
3,500
850
100
80
700
357,454
51,648
207,117
7,688
3,164
1,903
145
56
1,038
202,650     |      630,213
189,039
14,250
88,871
7,250
6,450
1,450
150
200
1,100
2.91
4.53
3.42
1.37
0.90
2.23
1.45
0.70
1.48
308,760    |
3.12
0.65
0.80
0.64
0.77
0.54
0.58
0.66
0.40
0.63
0.65 G 10
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
per Shot
fired.
Middlesboro Collieries   -	
5,220
19,155
2,350
1,560
7,100
100
150
100
25,617
83,770
8,573
5,704
22,099
786
183
484
9,310
32,500
3,360
3,857
12,728
200
300
160
4.90
4.37
3.64
3.65
3.11
7.86
1.24
4.84
0.56
0.59
Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd  	
Pleasant Valley Colliery  	
0.70
0.40
0.56
0.50
0.50
0.62
35,735
147,219
62,415
4.12
0.57
Northern District.
1,800
125
3,160
266
3,000
260
1.76
2.12
0.60
0.48
1,925
3,426
3,260
1.77
0.59
East Kootenay District.
61
37,445
1,827
86,879
310,258
9,973
97
58,112
2,092
1,424.24
8.28
5.45
0.62
Michel Colliery.	
Corbin Colliery ._ _.   	
0.64
0.87
39,336
407,110
60,201
10.34
0.65
279,643
1,187,968
434,636
4.24
0.64
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Monobel of different grades...
Permissible rock-powder 	
Lb.
208,942
70,704
Total „  279,646
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable
the Minister of Mines under the provisions of section 101, General-Rule 11, clause (2), " Coalmines Regulation Act ":—
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
Polar Monobel No. 12.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1935 mining-machines produced approximately 723,529 tons of coal, or
60.9 per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type of
machine used:—■
Number dkiven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Mavor
and
Coulson.
Anderson
Boyes.
Hardy.
Siskol.
Sullivan.
Pickwick.
Pneumatic
Pick.
Inger-
soll-
Rand.
1
74
24
57
6
1
8
4
17
11
3
1
36
27
2
2             27
—
Totals..-	
1
155
7
10
33
28
3
1
63
11 INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 11
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,647 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this number,
217 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,430 were electric lamps of various makes,
as follows:   Edison, 2,363;   Wolf electric, 67.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking, and
illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Method of Locking.
Illuminant used.
Colliery and Mine.
Magnetic
Lock:
Screw or
Automatic
Clip.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
56
12
28
2
6
2
1
1
696
204
355
21
10
18
3
2
6
56
12
28
2
6
2
1
2
1
696
204
355
21
10
18
3
6
108
1,315
110
1,313
Nicola-Princeton District.
Middlesboro Colliery      	
9
89
4
4
2
1
1
1
75
80
124
25
67
7
2
8
9
10
4
4
2
1
1
1
75
159
124
25
67
7
2
s
111
388
32
Northern District.
2
4
18
2
4
18
6
18
6
East Kootenay District.
7
360
22
120
20
172
7
40
22
120
340
172
389
312
69
614
2,033
217
2,430
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the 1930
Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—■
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of Mines.    The only G 12 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is manufactured by the
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of Mines. This
model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp approval given under
Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18F
and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18h of the United States Bureau of Mines.
This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18H and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp
is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp
is known as the Edison Model K lanip.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the Department
of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all persons underground in
the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by the officials of the mines in the
carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-
lamps in addition to the electric safety-lo.mps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at nine mines and underground at
four mines. The purpose for which it was used, together with the amount of horse-power in
each instance, is shown in the following table:—
Above ground— Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Winding or hoisting      797
Ventilation      680
Haulage  .      493
Coal-washing  •  1,502
Miscellaneous   1,917
Total horse-power  5,389
Underground—■
Haulage .  1,765
Pumping  1,075
Coal-cutting        30
Miscellaneous  :      915
Total horse-power  3,785
Total horse-power above and under ground  9,174
Of the above amount, approximately 1,709 horse-power was operated as direct current and
7,465 horse-power as alternating current. INSPECTION OF MINES. G 13
VENTILATION.
The District Inspectors' reports give details regarding the ventilation in the splits and
main returns of the various mines. In some instances requests had to be made during the
year for increased quantities on the splits and in some cases for further splitting to reduce the
total amount of gas in the air in certain splits and also to obviate the necessity for high air
velocities.
In No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, it has been found that two operating machine walls is the
practical maximum for one air split. On the whole, the ventilation of the mines was well
maintained during the year.
Use of the Burrell Gas Indicator.
The Burrell Gas Indicator was used throughout the mines of the Province, immediately
determining the methane content where the percentage was too small to be detected by means
of the flame safety-lamp.
Mine-air Samples.
Mine-air sampling was carried out as usual during the year and 232 samples were collected
in the various coal mines of the Province; of this number, sixteen were spoiled in transit and
accidents in the laboratory. While samples were taken in all the mines at intervals, this
method is carried out most intensively in the mines of the Crowsnest Pass District and No. 5
mine, Comox Colliery, where the gas-inflow is much higher than in other mining districts of
the Province. In Vancouver Island and also the Crowsnest Pass Districts a large number of
samples were taken in old workings and near the seat of fires. Analyses of mine-air samples
taken throughout the coal mines of the Province during 1935 are on file in the office of the Chief
Inspector of Mines and copies will be furnished to any one interested.
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
At practically all the mines throughout the Province inspection committees appointed by
the workmen under General Rule 37, section 101, " Coal-mines Regulation Act," were in operation throughout the year; one exception was No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, where the men
allowed this inspection to lapse for two months. As required by above rule, the Chief Inspector
of Mines appointed an inspection committee to function until such time as the men employed
in the mine appointed a committee of their own choosing; this was done shortly after the
above appointment.
COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust was -well maintained during the year and a total of 950 samples were
analysed at the different mines, and where the analyses showed that the incombustible content
of the dust sampled in any mine was only 50 per cent, immediate steps were taken to see that
the mine or part of the mine was re-rock dusted.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
During the year the following dangerous occurrences, in addition to those causing injuries,
were reported:—
On February 1st spontaneous heating was discovered in No. 11 West section, No. 4 mine,
Coalmont Collieries; this was in an area that had already been sealed off for some time
and the roof over one of the concrete seals had caved sufficiently to permit access of air to the
sealed-off area; the seal was repaired and no further trouble was experienced.
On March 1st spontaneous combustion occurred in the Blue Flame mine; this was in
loose coal alongside a fault-line;  the heated material was loaded out.
On March 3rd a severe " bump " occurred in No. 1 East mine. Coal Creek Colliery, and
wrecked 250 feet of the main haulage-tunnel and the adjacent workings in No. 16 East slope;
there were no men in the mine at this time.
On March 20th, in No. 1 mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, Nanaimo,
a section of the shaft-lining about 70 feet from the surface collapsed and fell to the bottom of
the shaft; no person was injured.
16 G 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
On April 9th spontaneous combustion was discovered in No. 2 West district, Reserve mine;
the affected area was immediately sealed off.
On April 5th, at No. 4 mine, Corbin Colliery, an underground fire burned out through the
300-foot level and destroyed the mine-fan and fan-house; this occurred during a suspension
of work due to a strike;  there were no men in the mine at this time.
On April 9th, at No. 1 shaft, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, one of the
descending cages struck the shaft-bottom at high speed and was damaged; this was due to an
error on the part of the hoistman;  no person was injured.
On May 26th, at 6 p.m., a severe " bump " occurred in No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek Colliery,
and damaged 400 feet in one of the roadways in No. 19 East slope; one fireboss was in the
mine at the time and he was uninjured.
On May 27th, at 10.45 p.m., a severe " bump " occurred in No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek
Colliery, and did considerable damage in the workings off No. 19 East slope; this was apparently a continuation of the " bump " of the previous day reported above.
On August 6th spontaneous heating was discovered in the heading section, Blue Flame
mine; this occurred in the vicinity of a faulted area and was sealed off; no further trouble
resulted.
On August 28th spontaneous combustion was discovered in Jackson's Panel area, No. 1
mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited; this area had already been suspected
as likely to develop heating and the seals were ready for closing when required.
On September 12th, in No. 1 shaft, -Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, an
overwind occurred and the automatic overwind device functioned perfectly; there were no
persons on the cage and there was very little damage.
On November 5th, at No. 1 shaft, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, the main
drive-shaft of the hoist broke while hoisting; no damage resulted other than suspension of
operations for some days.
On December 5th spontaneous combustion was discovered in No. 6 incline, Pleasant Valley
mine;  this area was at once sealed off.
On December 7th spontaneous combustion was discovered in No. 7 heading, Pleasant Valley
mine; this was a blind heading of some 75 feet in length; the heated material was safely
loaded out.
On December 22nd spontaneous combustion developed in the Diagonal slope area, No. 1
mine, Western -Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, and produced sufficient carbon monoxide
to cause death to one miner;   this area was sealed off.
PROSECUTIONS.
During  1935  there were three  prosecutions  made for  infractions  of the
Regulation Act," as follows:—
Coal-mines
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
June   11
Canadian Collieries  (D.), Ltd—
Fireboss...
Failed   to   observe   General   Rule   12,
subsection   1 (a),  re  loading  more
than one shot at a time
Fined $10 and costs.
June   11
Canadian Collieries  (D-), Ltd..___
Fireboss	
Failed   to   observe   General   Rule   12,
subsection    1 (6),    re    firing   shot
while face is in dusty condition
Fined $5 and costs.
Sept.   10
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.,
No. 1 mine, Michel
Miner
Failed to observe General Rule 9 re
having matches in his possession
Fined $5  and costs.
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four mine-rescue stations in different parts of the Province
and centrally located in the mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo, Cumberland, Princeton, INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 15
and Fernie. During the year many requests were received from medical men for oxygen and
the inhalators for use in emergencies, and immediate service was rendered in every case.
In the larger coal-mining districts of Crowsnest, Cumberland, and Nanaimo experienced teams
maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the year and so keep ready for any
emergency calls.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual use of
oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere and
instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-work. The training
itself is strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a special physical examination
before starting training and must be under 34 years of age.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, six new men took the full
training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where   .
trained.
853
854
Earl J. Colthrope -
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
1
856 | Paul M. Riedel.    j. _	
857 1 Harold <T  fibaw     ____ <             _____
Kimberley.
855
James E. Mills	
858
Tilmer M. Waterland	
Prince Rupert.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year twenty coal companies operated twenty-two collieries, with thirty mines,
employing 2,145 men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there were
nine managers, one safety engineer, fifteen overmen, seventy-nine firebosses and shotlighters,
a total of 114, or one official for every nineteen persons employed underground.
" COAL SALES ACT."
During the year a considerable number of inspections were made under the " Coal Sales
Act" to see that the sale of coal was in accordance with the provisions of the Act; the number
of complaints received during the year was less than in previous years. All complaints were
investigated and were found to rise from small sales by coal-peddlers who go into this business
incidentally during the winter and have no established business.
It is difficult in most cases to contact the vendor in such cases and the general public would
ensure getting the particular coal they order if they did business only with reputable coal-
dealers.
There were no prosecutions during the year. G 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief Inspector of
Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Colliery and District.
Producing Company.
Comox.-	
Old Wellington.	
Ladysmith-Wellington
Ladysmith-Ex tension „
Hi-Carbon  ___
Nanaimo-Douglas	
Nanaimo.	
Nanaimo Reserve	
Nanaimo-Wellington-
Mabury-North field..
Wellington South, Ida Clara,-.
Cassidy-WelKngton..— 	
Lantzville-Wellington..
Biggs-Wellington	
Fiddick-Douglas	
Little Ash-Wellington .
Jingle Pot.--_ 	
Old Adit, Wellington	
Chambers-Extension	
Bromley Vale, Princeton._
Middlesboro 	
Nicola Sunshine	
Coalmont   	
Princeton Blue Flame..
Tulameen Coal, Princeton ......
Diamond, Princeton District,
B.C.
Sunrise, Princeton District,
B.C.
Pleasant Valley, Princeton
District, B.C.
North Thompson Gem  _
Red  Triangle,  Princeton
Quality
Princeton-King  	
Hat Creek _ 	
Princeton-Black Diamond-
Bulkley Valley  -	
Aveling _  :...
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek-
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Corbin Washed 	
Nos. 4 and 5 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland)
No. 9 mine (Wellington) _ 	
No. 5 mine (South Wellington)  ,
No. 8 mine (Extension)    : „
Mixture   of   Canadian   Collieries'   coal   and   B.C.
Electric coke
No. 1 mine, Upper seam (Nanaimo). -	
No. 1 mine, Lower seam (Nanaimo)_.	
Reserve mine (Nanaimo) _ —	
Blend of No. 1 mine, Nanaimo, and No. 5 mine.
South Wellington
(Recovered from surface dump)   (Wellington)	
Ida Clara No. 1 (South Wellington)	
Cassidy Colliery (Cassidy)	
Lantzville  (Lantzville)  	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)  	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington)-.   „
Little Ash mine (Wellington) _	
Jingle Pot (East Wellington).	
Old Adit (Wellington)_ _„
Chambers  (Extension) —	
Bromley Vale (Princeton) __  	
Middlesboro   (Merritt) _  I 	
Sunshine   (Merritt)     	
Coalmont (Coalmont).__   __	
Blue Flame (Princeton) _	
Tulameen (Princeton) _
Diamond  (Princeton)...
Sunrise   (Princeton)...
Diamond and Sunrise blended (Princeton).
North Thompson  (North Thompson).
Red Triangle  (Princeton)  	
King (Princeton)..	
Hat Creek  (Lillooet).
Black Diamond (Princeton).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa)	
Aveling  (Telkwa)	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek)	
Michel (Michel) — —	
Corbin  (Corbin)	
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd.
Ditto.
Mabury Engineering Corporation,
Ltd.
Richardson Bros., Ltd.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Lantzville Collieries, Ltd.
Biggs' mine.
Fiddick mine.
Little Ash mine.
Jingle Pot Colliery, Ltd.
Old Adit Colliery   (C.  Stronach).
R. H. Chambers.
Bromley Vale Colliery, Ltd.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Sunshine Coal Co., Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
W. R. Wilson Mining & Investment Co.
Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co.,  Ltd.
Pleasant  Valley   Mining   Co.,   Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining  Co.,  Ltd.
North Thompson Colliery, Ltd.
Red Triangle Coal Co., Ltd.
King Colliery, Ltd.
Canada  Coal  &  Development  Co.,
Ltd.
Black Diamond Collieries, Ltd.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Corbin Collieries, Ltd. BOARD OF EXAMINERS, COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. G 17
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND  THIRD-CLASS  CERTIFICATES  AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of James
Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; Henry E. Miard, member; and James Strang,
member and Secretary to the Board. The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the
Mines Department, Victoria. Examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules
made by the Provincial Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on
September 28th, 1929. Two examinations were held in 1935. The first was held on May 15th,
16th, and 17th, and the second on November 20th, 21st, and 22nd. The total number of
candidates at the examinations were as follows: For First-class Certificates, 1 (1 failed);
for Second-class Certificates, 1 (1 passed) ; for Third-class Certificates, 11 (3 passed and
8 failed) ;   for Mine-surveyor's certificate, none.
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various classes:—
Second-class Certificate.—William H. Adams.
Third-class Certificates.—Thomas 0. Heyes, Andrew Dunn, and Abel E. Hampton.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examination and certificates already specified as coming under the
Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the holder of
a certificate of competency as such. By " miner " is meant any person employed underground
in any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, whether by hand or
machinery.
The work of the Board of Examiners in examining candidates has been carried out in
all the mining districts and at intervals of not less than sixty days as required by the amendment to the Act.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate failed to satisfy the Board
as to his general fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a working knowledge of the English
language. During 1935 examinations have been held in the various coal-mining districts of
the Province. Fifty-eight candidates presented themselves for examination, fifty passed and
eight failed to qualify. The failures may be classified as follows: Insufficient knowledge of
English, 1; special rules, 1; mine gases, 1; general mining practice, 5. In addition to the
certificates granted above, a number of duplicates were issued to coal-miners who had lost
their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for the use
of their premises for holding these examinations.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has the authority, under the amendment (1919)
to the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional
certificate of competency as a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the
occupation of a coal-miner for a period not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next
regular examination before the Board. G 18 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
John D. Stewart.
(Resigned at the end of the year and was succeeded by Richard Nichol.)
The equipment maintained at this station consists of six sets of the McCaa two-hour
oxygen apparatus; six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the
Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator and seventy self-rescuers, together with
adequate supplies to keep the above equipment in service.
During the year three trained teams from the Western Fuel Corporation of Canada,
Limited, carried on regular practice-training at this station. There were no emergency calls
for the rescue apparatus, but the oxygen inhalator was called for several times and there were
fifteen emergency calls for oxygen from the Nanaimo and Ladysmith Hospitals and from
medical practitioners;   these calls were responded to at once.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; twenty self-rescuers and one
H.H. inhalator, together with adequate supplies to maintain the above equipment in service.
There were no emergency calls during the year, but twenty-four trained men maintained
regular practice-training throughout the year and three teams from this district took part
in the annual competition held at Nanaimo in June.
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
The equipment maintained at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour
oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; seventeen self-rescuers
and one H.H. inhalator;   also a sufficient stock of supplies.
With the revival of mining in the winter seven formerly trained men from the Blue Flame
mine started practice-training and three new men started the full training.
There were two emergency calls during the year—one from Coalmont Collieries, Limited,
where six McCaa machines were sent for work in dealing with an underground fire in No. 4
mine, and one call from Pleasant Valley Colliery for the Burrell all-service gas-masks for
use in sealing off a heated area. In both instances the equipment was dispatched promptly
and the work done successfully.
FERNIE.
BY
John T. Puckey.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen
apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; thirty-eight self-rescuers; and
adequate supplies are maintained to keep the above in service. All equipment is kept ready
for any emergency.
During 1935 trained teams from Coal Creek and Fernie took practice-training at the
station and a new team of rescue-men from Kimberley completed their training here; members
of the local Fire Brigade also underwent some practice-training in the smoke-chamber.
There were no emergency calls during the year. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 19
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Geo. O'Brien.
w _ J.  A.  Boyd, President,  Montreal,  Que.;    Lieut.-Col.  C.  W.  Villiers,  Vice-
„ .   President,  Nanaimo,  B.C.;    P.   S.   Fagan,   Secretary-Treasurer,   Nanaimo,
B.C.;   John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.    This company
operated the Nanaimo Colliery and the Reserve mine during the year.
Nanaimo Colliery.—Arthur Newbury, Mine Manager; T. J. Wood, Overman, North Side;
John Sutherland, Overman, South Side.
No. 1 mine was in operation 250 days during the year and the average daily output was
1,257 tons. This average is higher than the average for 1934. The output is from the North and
South sides of the mine in the proportion of about 40 per cent, and 60 per cent, respectively.
The average number of men of all classes employed underground daily is 525 for the
twenty-four-hour period. On the surface there are approximately 265 men employed daily,
including pit-head, power plants, washery plant, wharves, machine-shops, colliery railway,
office staff, and engineering staff. There are twenty-six certificated officials employed daily
in the supervision of mining operations, or one mine official for every twenty workmen and for
every 50 tons of coal produced.
The sizes of coal prepared for the market are lump, nut, pea, and slack, and at times
there is a demand by customers for various combinations of these sizes which is readily
prepared for them.
Descriptions of the power plant, equipment, and workings are given in the Annual Reports
for 1930, 1931, and 1934.
Every effort appears to be made to keep the accident-rate down to the minimum, but one
fatal accident occurred due to carbon-monoxide poisoning as a result of inhaling fumes from
a spontaneous-combustion area. There were also seven non-fatal accidents during the year,
two of which were caused by mine-cars and haulage, one by a fall of coal, two by falls of rock,
and two on the surface from miscellaneous causes. Investigation of these accidents proved
that a number of them could have been avoided if ordinary care had been taken.
The ventilation of the mine was kept up to a fairly high standard during the year and
very little inflammable gas or gas-caps were found in the live workings.
Precautions against the menace of coal-dust were efficiently carried out during the year,
especially at the discharge end of conveyors, where considerable dust is made by the coal being
discharged into the mine-cars from the conveyors. Haulage-roads and face-lines were well
taken care of and 38.500 lb. of rock-dust was used in the reduction of the coal-dust menace.
Regular sampling of the mine-dust was carried out during the year and analyses of the samples
showed the dust to be well within the Regulations for Precautions against Mine-dust.
Regular sampling of the mine-air was also carried out during the year, samples being
taken in every split and return airways. Through the courtesy of the Department of Mines
at Ottawa the samples were analysed and returns of all analyses were sent to this office
regularly. As a result a fairly complete check of the chemical and technical condition of the
mine-air generally is on record. Only in one instance did the analysis of the mine-air in one
small section of the mine prove to be dangerous, resulting in the fatal accident aforementioned.
Regular inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee " as provided for in General
Rule 37. This committee very kindly furnished copies of the several inspections made during
the year.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " are kept at the mine, and
were regularly examined and found to conform to the regulations.
In the South side of the mine 2,500 feet of workings were driven in rock for the purpose of
improving haulage and ventilation. In the North side of the mine a vertical shaft was sunk
from the Newcastle seam to the Douglas seam, a distance of 70 feet, for ventilation purposes.
Reserve Mine, Nanaimo.—W. H. Moore, Mine Manager; A. W. Courtney. Overman. This
mine is situated in the Cranberry district, about 5 miles south of the City of Nanaimo.    The G 20 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
coal-seam is reached by two shafts at a depth of approximately 1,000 feet and the Douglas
seam is the only seam in operation. The mine was idle the first three months of the year,
reopened in April, and worked until the end of July; then closed for three months, reopened
in the month of November, and worked fairly steadily for the rest of the year. Considerable
prospecting was done during the time the mine was closed and several hundred feet of rock-
workings were driven for this purpose.
The mine was in actual operation, producing coal 103 days during the year, and the
average daily output was 420 tons. The average number of men employed underground daily
is 145 for the twenty-four-hour period and approximately thirty-five men are employed daily
on the surface. There are ten certificated mine officials employed daily in the supervision of
mining operations, or one official for every fifteen workmen and for every 42 tons of coal
produced. No coal-mining machines are used in this mine as the output is chiefly extraction
of pillars, though there is some solid work now being opened up in what is known as No. 2
slant in No. 2 West district.    The output is all shipped over the company's railway to Nanaimo.
There were no fatal accidents at this mine during the period of operation and only on?
serious non-fatal accident occurred during the year, which was caused by a fall of rock.
The ventilation of the mine was kept up to a fairly high standard, but there is one section
of the mine known as No. 5 West which gives considerable trouble, due to outflow of methane
gas from an abandoned section of old workings where the pillars have been drawn and the area
more or less caved and inaccessible. This area is on the rise side of the present live workings
and the outflow of methane is very noticeable during barometric variations.
Most of the mine-workings and haulage-roads are naturally damp and are fairly frea
from coal-dust. Regular sampling of the mine-dust was carried out and the analyses showed
the dust to be well within the Regulations for Precautions against Dangerous Mine-dust.
Regular sampling of the mine-air was also carried out, samples being taken in all splits
and return airways.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " are kept at the mine, and
were regularly examined and found to conform to the regulations.
Head Office, Montreal, Que.    J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.;   Lieut.-
Canadian Col-    Col. C. W. Villiers, General Manager, Nanaimo, B.C.;  P. S. Fagan, Assistant
Heries (Duns-    Secretary, Nanaimo, B.C.;   John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo,
muir), Ltd.      B.C.    The mines operated by this company during the year were No. 4 mine
and No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, Cumberland, and No. 5 mine and the Alexandra mine, South Wellington Colliery, South Wellington.
The Comox Colliery is situated in the Comox district, about 12 miles from the shipping-
point at Union Bay, which is reached by the company's railway and most of the output is
shipped from this point.
No. U Mine, Comox Colliery.—J. S. Williams, Mine Manager. This mine was closed down
permanently at the end of January, 1935. Just prior to the closing-down of the mine a large
inflow of water entered the mine due to the great storm of January 21st and successive days.
There was only a few months' work to be done in the mine, however, before the permanent
closing of the mine and the cost of dewatering and repairing did not justify the outlay.
There was one serious accident reported from this mine during the period of operation
which resulted fatally; the injured man died sixteen days after being injured. The accident
was caused by mine-cars and haulage.
No. 5 Mine, Comox Colliery.—Robert Laird, Mine Manager; J. S. Williams, Overman,
West Side; Samuel Jones, Overman, East Side. The coal-seam is reached by a shaft 280 feet
in depth and the seam now being worked is known as the No. 2 seam. All the workings in
this mine are to the dip of the shaft and are reached by four slopes driven from the level of
the Upper or No. 1 seam. The face of the Main slope at the time of writing is about 1 % miles
from the shaft-bottom.
Most of the operations in this mine is the long-wall system, though there are two section-,
of development-work carried on in the solid for development purposes only. The long-wall
faces average about 300 feet in length and are all equipped with conveyors of the Meco type
driven by compressed air. The coal is machine-mined by compressed-air-driven mining-
machines of the Anderson-Boyes type, the depth of undercut averaging about 6 feet. The
machine-cutting is done in the rock-bands in the seam where possible or in the under-clays INSPECTION OF COAL MINES, G 21
just below the seam. The advantage gained by this method is that practically all the coal
in the seam is recovered and the additional advantage of the rock-dusting effect eliminating
to a great extent the danger from coal-dust where explosives are used.
No. 5 mine was in operation 254 days during the year. There was a short suspension
of operations during the month of August due to a labour dispute. The average daily output
is about 800 tons and the average number of men of all classes employed underground daily is
about 350 during the twenty-four-hour period. There are approximately thirty-six men
employed on the surface. There are sixteen certificated mine officials employed daily in the
supervision of mining operations, or one mine official for every twenty-two men and for every
50 tons of coal produced.
The No. 2 seam is known to give off large quantities of methane gas and extreme safety
precautions are necessary in the safe operation of this mine. Explosive gas has been found
a number of times during inspections, especially after severe roof-breaks which are more or
less characteristic in long-wall operations. Explosive gas has also been found at the faces
of advance workings which are carried forward in the solid and in the vicinity of faults.
Under these conditions all workmen are withdrawn at once and the affected areas fenced off
until the gas has been removed and reported safe.
The general outflow of methane is increasing as all the return airways are showing an
increase in the gas content of the return air. The face-lines are generally free from explosive
gas but have to be carefully watched at all times. An experiment is now being tried in the
form of mechanical detection of methane. Two Ringrose gas-detectors have been installed
for this purpose. The mechanical effect of these detectors is to switch on a red light when the
withdrawal point has been reached. Most of the gas-outflow is coming from the gob (or
waste) areas and is conducted direct to the return airways. The last sample of air taken in
the main return in December had a gas content of 1.5 per cent., which is a considerable increase.
More air is required to dilute the gas, and to accomplish this much larger airways are required
as the velocities in the present airways have about reached the limit. Taking the last reading
in December for example, there was 170,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing in the main
return carrying 1.5 per cent, methane. Using these figures as a general indication of the
amount of methane given off in twenty-four hours shows that approximately three and three-
ouarter million cubic feet is carried out of the mine each day. This is an abnormal outflow
and requires extraordinary precautions.
Precautions against the menace of coal-dust are carried out by means of rock-dusting
and water-sprinkling. In connection with the rock-dusting of the mine during the year,
65,000 lineal feet of roadways were treated, and as the average perimeter of the roadways is
40 feet, a total of 2,600,000 square feet of ground was covered. The amount of rock-dust used
was 317,400 lb. On the main haulage-slope a sprinkling system has been installed for the
entire length of 6,000 feet. This line can be used either for sprinkling or for rock-dusting
the slope from time to time. A sprinkling system has also been installed on every siding where
trips are gathered for the main slope haulage, and all trips are sprinkled before being sent
un the slope to prevent the deposit of coal-dust from the moving trips. The delivery ends of
all conveyors are also equipped with sprinklers to prevent the deposit of coal-dust while the
coal is being discharged into mine-cars.
In connection with the improvement and enlarging of airways for ventilation purposes,
some 400 feet of 7- by 12-foot rock-workings have been driven and 1,200 feet of the main
airways have been enlarged to 7 by 12 feet.    This work is being continued.
During the year there were two accidents that resulted fatally and seven serious
non-fatal accidents. The two fatal accidents were caused by mine-cars and haulage; four
of the non-fatal serious accidents were also caused by mine-cars and haulage, one by a fall
of coal, one by a fall of rock, and one on the surface caused by railway-cars. Investigation
of these accidents proved that some of them could easily have been avoided if ordinary precautions had been taken. This is very regrettable as compensation for an injury does not begin
to compensate for the suffering caused in many cases. Greater efforts and co-operation by
all concerned is necessary if the accident-rate is to be kept to the lowest possible minimum.
South Wellington Colliery.—Wm. Wilson, Mine Manager; Joseph Wilson, Overman. This
colliery was permanently abandoned in the month of May after five months' operation during
the year.    An output of 51,646 tons was produced in 103 working-days. G 22 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
A large number of the men thrown out of employment by the closing-down of this colliery
were re-employed at the Reserve mine, Nanaimo.
No. 1 Mine, Lantzville.—John Michek, Overman.    This colliery is situated
Lantzville       on the shore of Nanoose bay, in the strait of Georgia, about 9 miles north
Collieries, Ltd.   of the City of Nanaimo.    The mine is entered by means of a slope 270 feet
long, dipping landwards at an angle of 30 degrees.    The Wellington seam is
operated on a semi-long-wall system and is hand-mined.    In this particular area the seam
is thin, averaging about 2Yz feet in thickness, but of excellent quality.
The mine worked 258 days during the year and produced 7,688 tons. There are twenty
men employed underground and the employees operate the mine on a co-operative basis.
The ventilation, which is produced by mechanical means, was very much improved during
the year by the installation of a larger fan. No explosive gas or gas-caps were found in this
mine at the time of inspections during the year.    No accidents were reported during 1935.
James Biggs, Operator.    This mine is situated about 1 mile from the town
Biggs' Mine,     of  Wellington  and  about  7  miles  north  of  the   City  of   Nanaimo.    The
Wellington seam is operated.    Very little work was done during the year,
the output being 145 tons and only twenty-five days worked.    The mine was closed down in
October and was still closed at the end of the year.
Alex. McLachlan and Associates, Operators; Alex. McLachlan, Overman.
Jingle Pot Mine. This mine is situated on the site of the original Jingle Pot mine at East
Wellington, about 3 miles from the City of Nanaimo. The present operation,
which is not very large, consists of the recovery of pillars left by the former operators. The
mine is reached by a good road and the small output produced is sold locally. The mine did
not operate very steadily during the year, a total of ninety-one days being worked and 61 tons
of coal produced.
The ventilation, which is produced by natural means, was fairly good and no explosive
gas or gas-caps were found during the period of operation. No accidents were reported during
1935.
Richard Fiddick, Sr., Operator; Wm. Roper, Overman. This mine is
Fiddick Mine, situated on the site of the former operations of the Pacific Coast Coal
Company, near the South Wellington Station of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Railway. The Douglas seam is operated and the work consists of the recovery of pillars left
by the former operators. The mine worked fairly steadily during the year, a total of 271
days being worked and 3,549 tons of coal produced, some of which is sold locally and the
remainder shipped to Victoria and Vancouver.
The ventilation, which is produced by natural means, was good and no explosive gas or
gas-caps were found during inspections throughout the year. A new prospect has been driven
on the opposite side of the valley at about the same elevation as the seam in the Tunnel mine.
No accidents were reported during 1935.
Richardson Bros., Operators;    Daniel  Caldwell and John Unsworth,  Fire-
Richardson      bosses.    This mine is situated on the site of the former operations of the
Bros.' Mine.     Pacific Coast Coal Company, close to the Fiddick mine near the station of
the Esquimalt & Nanaimo  Railway at  South  Wellington.    It  is  a  small
operation and consists of the recovery of pillars left by the former operators.    The mine
worked fairly steadily during the year, a total of 318 days being worked and 2,101 tons of
coal produced.    The mine is reached by a good road and most of the output is sold locally,
though some of it is shipped to Victoria.
The ventilation is produced by natural means and is ample for this small operation. No
explosive gas or gas-caps were found during inspections throughout the year. No accidents
were reported during 1935.
Ralph H. Chambers, Operator and Fireboss. This mine is situated on the
Chambers' Mine, site formerly operated by the Dunsmuir interests many years ago at Extension and consists of the recovery of pillars left by the former operators.
The Wellington seam is worked and is reached by a good road known as the Nanaimo Lakes
road. The location of the mine is about 7 miles from the City of Nanaimo and the output is
hauled by truck and sold locally. The mine worked fairly steadily during the year, a total
of 223 days being worked and 1,151 tons of coal produced.    The ventilation is produced by INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 23
natural means and is found to be ample for this small operation.    No explosive gas or gas-caps
were found during inspections.    No accidents were reported in 1935.
Cowie and Associates, Operators. This prospect is situated in the Cran-
Cowie's Prospect, berry district and the area between South Wellington and Extension was
being prospected. During 1935 very little work was done due to lack of
finances.
Ira Westwood, Operator.    This prospect is  situated near the  site of the
Westwood's      Jingle Pot mine and a short slope was driven down on the coal-measures.
Prospect.        A raise was driven to the surface for ventilation purposes.    Prospecting
was discontinued when the rainy season set in as the mine was making
considerable water, with no equipment to handle the inflow. It is expected to carry on the
prospecting in 1936.
Renney and Associates, Operators. This prospect is situated about midway
Renney's between the old Wakesiah mine and the Jingle Pot mine. A short slope
Prospect.        was driven and some machinery installed, but for some reason prospecting
was suddenly discontinued and the slope filled up with water. It was still
closed down at the end of the year.
All workmen in the coal mines of Vancouver island are equipped with electric cap-lamps,
chiefly of the Edison type. All firebosses and shotlighters are equipped with flame safety-
lamps of the Wolf type for gas-testing purposes. All shot-firing is done electrically by shot-
firing battery and cable under the supervision of certificated mine officials and permitted
explosives only are used.
All serious accidents were investigated and those terminating fatally were specially
investigated and the inquests attended. In this connection the writer wishes to thank the
Coroners in the Nanaimo and Cumberland districts for their courtesy in permitting him to
question all the witnesses in connection with the fatal accidents to determine, if possible, the
underlying cause of the accidents. Let the writer at this point impress upon all concerned,
mine officials and workmen, the necessity of further education along the lines of " safety first,"
for until such time that all become safety-minded, accidents that might have been prevented
will continue to occur. Coal-mining is a hazardous occupation under the best conditions, but
if all concerned will make a serious and sincere attempt to reduce the accident-rate good
results will be obtained. In conclusion, the writer wishes to thank all who gave their
co-operation in the combat to reduce preventable accidents and trusts that 1936 will prove that
the accident-rate can be reduced.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John G. Biggs.
The following coal companies operated in this district during 1935: Coalmont Collieries,
Limited; Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; Wilson Mining and Investment Company, Limited
(Blue Flame Colliery); Pleasant Valley Mining Company, Limited; Bromley Vale Mining
Company; Tulameen Coal Mines, Limited; the Red Triangle Coal Company; and Oscar Lind
and Associates. The Oscar Lind coal operation, situated on the " Allison flats " in Princeton,
is a new discovery and started operations in a very small way during the autumn.
There was one fatal accident in the coal mines during the year, and five accidents of
a serious nature—one each at Blue Flame and Tulameen mines and three at Coalmont Collieries, Limited.
All underground employees are equipped with electric safety cap-lamps and the firebosses
use the Wolf flame safety-lamp for gas-testing purposes.
Ventilation was generally satisfactory at the different mines in this district during the
year and they were fairly free from methane, with the result that on only one occasion was
gas detected by the flame safety-lamp.
Air samples were taken at the different coal operations and mailed to the Denartment of
Mines at Ottawa for analysis; most of those samples being taken for the nurpose of determining the nature of the atmosphere in sealed-off areas and in recovery-work. Blake M. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  General J. W. Stewart, Vice-
Coalmont President, Vancouver, B.C.; A. H. Douglas, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
Collieries, Ltd. D. McLeod, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.; Geo. Murray, Superintendent,
Blakeburn, B.C. (This plant has been described in previous reports.) This
is the largest colliery in the district and is situated 12 miles west of Princeton. The power
plant, screens, and mine-yard are situated at Coalmont and are served by a spur off the Kettle
Valley Railway; mining operations are conducted at Blakeburn, 3 miles distant and 1,700
feet higher in elevation. An aerial tramway 2% miles in length is used for transporting the
coal from the mines to the tipple at Coalmont. The No. 3 mine, or the Wilson tunnel, which
was commenced in 1920, and was the most important operation at this colliery, was exhausted
and abandoned during the year;   operations at present are confined to Nos. 4 and 5 mines.
No. k Mine.—James Littler, Overman; Robert Murray, Frank Bond, Thomas Smith, and
Thomas Bryden, Firebosses. This mine," the most important operation of the Coalmont Collieries, is situated 5,400 feet north of the entrance to the old No. 3 mine and is reached by
a light electric railway.
The measures have a general pitch north of 25 degrees and are developed on a modification
of the " panel system," with faulted and broken areas used as the barriers. During the year
1932 spontaneous heating was found to have developed in the pillar section between the Nos.
12 and 15 West levels, and as a result it was found necessary to withdraw the material and
flood this area. Since that time most of the coal produced has been recovered from the pillar
areas on each side of the Main slope above the water-level. The mine has now been dewatered
below No. 15 level and preparations are being made to recover the coal in this section.
Ventilation is produced by an electric-driven 84-inch double-inlet belt-driven Sirocco
reversible mine-fan operated by a 75-horse-power constant-speed motor situated near the
return above No. 1 tunnel. During the last inspection ventilation measured showed 20.000
cubic feet of air per minute passing into this mine for the use of thirty-eight men. The
brattice and stoppings were in good order, the working-places and roads were well timbered,
in fairly good condition, and treated with inert dust. Analysis of the dust showed it to be in
accordance with the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations.
No. 5 Mine.—William G. Brown, Wilfred Valentine, and Robert Barrass, Firebosses.
The entrance to this mine is situated 2,800 feet north and at an elevation of 252 feet above
the portal of the No. 4 mine. The coal is transported over a surface incline to a siding situated
near the No. 4 mine; here the mine-cars are again collected in trips and hauled by means of
an electric motor to the top terminal of the aerial tramway. There has been a little lateral
work done in this mine and development was largely confined to the driving of a pair of
20-degree slopes from the surface to a total distance of 2,600 feet, at which point the seam
deteriorated;   pillars were developed on either side of the slope at the lower levels.
Ventilation is produced by a small force-fan situated near the portal of the counter-slooe.
The general ventilation of the mine is very good and free from any trace of methane. The
working-places were we]l t;mbered. The roads were well timbered, in fairly good condition,
and. being naturally wet, free from coal-dust.
A well-appointed surgery and first-aid room is maintained at Blakeburn, and at all times
under the supervision of a first-aid man, who is in attendance to render any service that may
be required. A doctor also resides at the camp and is in daily attendance at the office.
A mine-rescue station, with smoke-room, is also provided at the camp and is equipped with
Gibbs self-breathing apparatus, Burrell all-service gas-masks, inhalator, charging-pump, and
other equipment necessary for mine-rescue work.
E. W. Hamber, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   Thos. Sanderson, Secretary,
Middlesboro     Vancouver, B.C.;   Robert Fairfoull,  Superintendent,  Merritt, B.C.     (This
Collieries, Ltd.   plant has been fully described in previous reports.)     This colliery is situated
1 mile west of Merritt and is connected with a branch line from the Kettle
Valley Railway.    The whole of the surface plant is located in the valley and the mining
operations are located 300 feet above and 3,000 feet south of the mine-tipple.    The seams are
generally at a high angle of inclination and have been subjected to a great deal of crushing
and faulting.
No. 3 North Mine.—Alex. McDiarmid Allen, Overman; Garnet S. Corbett, Fireboss. This
mine is very small and the work consists of extracting all available pillars, with an average employment of seven men. The ventilation is natural and fairly good and the mine free from
any trace of methane. The working-places are well timbered. The roads are well timbered,
in fairly good condition, and analysis of material taken from the same showed them to be in
accordance with the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations.
No. 2 South Mine.—James Fairfoull, Overman; Leslie Dickie, Thomas Rowbottom, and
William Ewart, Firebosses. This is the most important operation of the Middlesboro Collieries.
It is situated about 1,500 feet south of the top terminal of the surface incline and is developed
by an adit-level that follows the strike of the seam from the surface outcrop for a distance
of 4,000 feet; the seam has an average thickness of 8 feet and lies at a high angle of inclination.
The workings down the dip from the Main level are operated by slopes, while the operations
above the Main level are developed by headings driven through to the surface. The working-
places are well timbered. The roads are well timbered, in good condition, and, being naturally
wet, are free from dangerous coal-dust. An average of forty-five men are employed in this
mine.
The coal is mined by machines of the post-puncher type and, being of a friable nature,
very little explosive is used; compressed air is the only power used for haulage and pumps.
General and special rules are well posted at this mine and no serious accidents have been
reported during the year.
L. M. Diether,  President, Vancouver, B.C.;   L. P.  Smith, Vice-President,
Tulameen       Vancouver, B.C.;  E. R. Gordon, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;  A. C. R. Yuill,
Collieries, Ltd.   Consulting Engineer, Vancouver, B.C.;   Thomas M. Wilson, Superintendent,
Princeton, B.C.    This mine is situated on the west side of the Tulameen
river some 2 miles from Princeton and is connected to the Kettle Valley Railway by a half-mile
spur;   there was no change in the surface plant during 1935.
No. 2 Mine.—David Francis, Frank Lester, and W. T. Jones, Firebosses. The surface
plant is situated on the river-flats and the mining operations were developed by a 20-degree
Main slope, with the necessary counter-airway driven in the measures above, which intersects
the coal-seam 600 feet from the portal and 160 feet below the elevation of the river; from this
point the Main level follows the contour of the seam, and as the area below the Main level has
been depleted this has been allowed to fill with water.
Operations were suspended during the month of February, the mine allowed to fill with
water, and no further work was done until the autumn, when arrangements were again made
to place this mine into operation. This recovery-work commenced during the early part of
September, but due to the inflow of water and extremely heavy caving of the underground
roadways the ventilation had not been restored at the end of the year. Sixty-five men were
employed at the end of the year.
W. R. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   R. R. Wilson, Vice-President,
Pleasant Valley  Vancouver, B.C.;   Miss M. Duncan, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;
Mining Co., Ltd. Thos. Cunliffe, Superintendent, Princeton, B.C.    This colliery is situated on
the south side of the Tulameen river 2 miles west of Princeton;   the power
and cleaning plant being located on the river-flats.
No. 2 Mine.—Thomas Cunliffe, Overman. The portal of this mine is located 1,700 feet
west of the mine-tipple and at the same elevation; the main development-levels have been
driven 4,000 feet from the portal and at the end of the year were in good coal approximately
9 feet thick and on an angle of 25 degrees.
Ventilation is produced naturally by a heading from the Main level to the surface and was
found to be fairly good, well conducted around the working-faces, and free from methane; the
working-places were well timbered. The roads were well timbered, in fairly good condition,
and, being naturally wet, were free from dangerous coal-dust. There were five men employed
during the year.
M-  •       W- R' Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   H. P. Wilson, Vice-President,
,.° Fernie, B.C.;  J. S. Irvine, Secretary, Fernie, B.C.;  Miss M. Duncan, Assis-
tant Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;   John Gillham, Superintendent,
Princeton, B.C.
Blue Flame Mine.—Arthur Hilton, Ernest Ward, and John Yards, Firebosses.    This mine
is situated about 10 miles west of Princeton and was the most important producer in the area during 1935.    The coal is hauled by motor-truck from the mine to the loading-chutes near
Princeton.
A very fine grade of domestic coal is produced and during the year an active programme
of development was carried out in a new area to the east of the former workings. Ventilation
is produced by a 4-foot-diameter direct-driven enclosed-type ventilating-fan situated near the
entrance to the counter-slope, and during the last visit of inspection ventilation measured
1,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing into the mine for the use of twenty-seven men.
The working-places were well timbered. The roads were also well timbered, in good condition,
and analysis of material taken from same showed them to be in accordance with the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations. This mine is very free from methane and no gas has
been reported during the year.
A number of the married employees reside at the mine, where a school is provided for the
children; a dining-room and bunk-houses are provided for the single men, while a number of
the employees reside in Princeton and travel to and from the mine by automobiles. There were
ninety men on the pay-roll at this mine at the end of the year.
William Forsyth, Shiftboss.    This mine is situated 2 miles east of Princeton
Red Triangle    and is known as the Old United Empire property.    During 1932 a crosscut
Coal Co. was driven in the measures and intersected two seams of coal in which some
development was carried out, but the coal was found to be of inferior quality
and work was suspended.    During 1935 further prospecting was carried out in another part
of the seam, but work was again abandoned before the end of the year.
This is a newly discovered area of the No. 1 seam of the Princeton district
Oscar Lind Mine, found to outcrop near the Tulameen river on what is generally known as
the " Allison flats " near Princeton. The river-flats are fairly wide at this
point and the seam, exposed several hundred feet back from the river, has a general pitch of
20 degrees towards it. The operations are confined to the upper section of the seam, which
is found to be 7 feet in thickness of a fine clean domestic coal with a good shale roof. The
future success of the development will greatly depend upon the successful handling of the
water situation. A small screening plant has been installed near the portal to the slope and
horse-haulage is being used at the present time. There are two men employed underground
and the small amount of coal produced is sold to the local market and hauled by trucks. Edison
electric head-lamps are used by the employees underground and a flame safety-lamp for the
purpose of inspection. The mine is in good condition and at the present time there is no power-
installation.
V. C. White, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.; Thomas Lloyd, Manager,
Bromley Vale    Princeton, B.C.    This mine is situated on Bromley creek, 5 miles west of
Mine. Princeton, and is reached by a branch road from the Hope—Princeton high
way. The coal is hauled by motor-trucks from the mine bunkers to
loading-chutes located on a spur of the Kettle Valley Railway near the east end of the
railway-tunnel at Princeton.
The seam is 6 feet thick and is developed by a pair of parallel adit-levels which are driven
several hundred feet to faulted ground, at which point extraction of the pillars between the
levels commenced; the mine was operated intermittently during the year and work was again
suspended in December.
The mine is well ventilated, free from methane, and the working-places and roads are well
timbered, in good condition, and, being naturally wet, were free from coal-dust. There has
been no change made in the power plant during the year, which has been described in previous
Annual Reports.
_       ,   _   ,     L. D. Leonard, Manager and Director, Ashcroft, B.C.;   Roy Blakemore,
Fireboss.    This company's Hat Creek mine was worked intermittently during
■   , the year and only a few men were employed;   conditions were generally
Co., l,ln. ,.   n     .
satisfactory.
* Report by Thos. R. Jackson. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 27
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
F.  M.  Dockrill,  Operator;    Edward  E.  Hughes,  Overman.    This mine  is
Bulkley Valley   located on Goat creek, 7 miles from Telkwa, to which point the coal is hauled
Colliery. by motor-trucks and shipped on the Canadian National Railway;  the market
is very limited and chiefly domestic.    The Main slopes have been extended,
a second level turned off, and pillar-extraction has been started in No. 1 level.    The ventilation
is natural and frequent openings to the surface provide adequate ventilation;   no inflammable
gas has been detected on any inspection and the mine is free from coal-dust.    Electric cap-
lamps have been introduced at the mine, replacing the Wolf flame safety-lamps formerly in use.
Asa Robinson, Fireboss.    This is an organization of local men who have
Skeena Develop- taken a lease on the Aveling property on the Telkwa river.    The mine was
ment Syndicate, ready for winter production when a heavy storm in October, resulting in the
rapid rise of the Telkwa river, washed out the bridge leading to the mine.
As a result operations have been suspended and cannot be resumed until the bridge is rebuilt.
v Thos. Campbell, Superintendent.    Work has been carried on intermittently
.    ,       . on a crosscut adit with the object of intersecting the various seams out-
A tit hi*a©ltfe
,. cropping on the mountain, but this objective has not yet been reached;   no
^VTHilPiltO
work has been done since October and the date of resumption is uncertain.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald.
Three collieries, comprising seven mines, were operated during 1935—namely, Coal Creek
and Michel, owned and operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, with head
office in Fernie; and Corbin Colliery, owned and operated by Corbin Collieries, Limited, with
head office in Vancouver.
Michel is the only colliery to show an improvement over last year with a 6-per-cent.
increase in production. Coal Creek output decreased 5 per cent., while that of Corbin was
practically negligible when compared with- previous years, as this colliery only operated for
a period of fifteen days in January, when active production was suspended on account of labour
troubles, which ultimately resulted in the mines being closed indefinitely.
The decrease in output for the district as a whole was 36.8 per cent., the loss of the normal
Corbin output being responsible for this heavy falling-off in production.
It is gratifying to be able to report that all mines in the district operated during the year
without a fatal accident.
VENTILATION.
General conditions in this respect have been fairly good throughout the year and are given
in greater detail at a later stage in this report. Sixty-two samples of mine-air were sent to
the Department of Mines at Ottawa for analysis, thirty-nine being sent from Coal Creek
Colliery, seventeen from Michel, and six from Corbin. In accordance with the practice of
the last two years, the majority of these were taken in and around old abandoned workings
for the purpose of keeping a close check on any changes taking place therein.
REGULATIONS FOR PRECAUTIONS AGAINST COAL-DUST.
With very few exceptions, all roadways requiring treatment for dust have been kept in
good shape generally, and in all cases where the attention of the management was directed to
any additional treatment necessary, this was usually attended to without loss of time. Crushed
limestone-dust is the medium generally used to offset the danger of coal-dust and is also
used extensively around the edges of old gobs and extracted areas. Six hundred and eighty-
three samples of dust were taken in accordance with the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were in keeping with the standard set by Regulation No. 4.    In cases where samples are found
to be under the standard, further treatment is given and other samples taken.
INSPECTION ON BEHALF OF WORKMEN.
This inspection has been made regularly at all mines in the district, and it is very
gratifying to report that the various committees have shown splendid co-operation in the
work of encouraging safety-first methods in and around the mines. No complaints in regard
to working conditions were received from any of the inspection committees. Searches for
matches or other articles prohibited by General Rule 9 were made regularly, one contravention
being discovered where a workman was found with matches in his possession. This man
pleaded guilty and was convicted for this offence.
EXPLOSIVES.
Explosives are used generally at Michel to loosen the undermined coal; none being used
for this purpose at Coal Creek. General Rules 11 and 12 regarding the handling and use
of explosives have been well complied with in general. Full details of the amount of explosives
used and number of shots fired are given in the regular returns under this heading.
COAL-CUTTING MACHINERY.
Coal-cutting machines are being operated satisfactorily on the long-wall faces in the " B "
seam district of No. 1 mine, Michel Colliery; in addition to the above, a large number of
machines of the percussive type are used extensively in many districts in this colliery, the
greater portion of the output being produced by means of the agencies mentioned above. Full
particulars of the tonnage produced by machinery is given in the annual returns under this
heading.
BRIEF DETAILS RE OPERATING COLLIERIES.
At all the collieries operating in the East Kootenay Inspection District the Edison electric
cap safety-lamp is used exclusively by the workmen, while Wolf safety-lamps are used by the
officials and bratticemen for testing purposes, all lamps being cleaned and repaired in well-
equipped lamp-rooms located in a central position at each colliery; Burrell gas-detectors are
provided at all the mines and readings taken regularly in the return air-currents. Copies of
the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " and special rules are posted up at each mine and all report-
books required to be kept at the mines have been examined regularly.
Following is a brief summary of conditions prevailing in the mines during 1935:—
W. R. Wilson, President, Fernie, B.C.; A. H. MacNeill, K.C., Vice-President,
Crow's Nest Pass Vancouver, B.C.; J. S. Irvine, Secretary, Fernie, B.C.; A. A. Klauer,
Coal Co., Ltd. Treasurer, Fernie, B.C.; B. Caufield, Superintendent, Michel, B.C.; E.
Morrison, Superintendent, Coal Creek, B.C.; H. P. Wilson, General Manager,
Fernie, B.C. The above company operated, during 1935, Coal Creek and Michel Collieries on
the western slope of the Rocky mountains in East Kootenay Inspection District. Coal Creek
Colliery is situated at Coal Creek, about 5 miles from Fernie. Railway connections from the
colliery are made with the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway at
Fernie, over the Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway. Michel Colliery is situated on both sides
of Michel creek, about 24 miles in a north-easterly direction from Fernie.
Coal Creek Colliery.—E. Morrison, Manager. As in 1934, No. 1 East was the only mine
operated during the year, although in the latter part of the summer some prospecting was done
on the mountain in the vicinity of No. 1 South with a view to opening another mine should
business conditions warrant such action.
A general description of the surface plant and system of haulage in and around the mines
has been given in previous Annual Reports. A change in the method of working was made
in the latter part of the year by the introduction of several " Meco " and " Mavor & Coulson "
shaking conveyors underground. Where rooms were formerly driven in series of three with
a large barrier-pillar left between each set of rooms, the new system projected for the conveyors
provides for levels being driven off the main inclines every 210 or 280 feet and then rooms
driven to the rise off these levels on 70-foot centres, conveyors being used in these rooms instead
of the horse-haulage formerly in use. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 29
A new storage building for rock-dust has been built in a more convenient position in the
colliery yard, which will greatly facilitate the unloading of the dust from the railway-cars
and also for reloading into the mine-cars for use underground.
No. 1 East Mine.—J. Caufield, Overman. This mine operates the eastern portion of
No. 1 seam and is ventilated by an electrically driven 11- by 7%-foot Sorocco fan, which,
running at a speed of 174 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of 137,860 cubic feet of air
a minute, under a water-gauge of 3.5 inches. Ventilation is divided into three splits; the
quantity passing in each at the last inspection measured as follows:—
No. 1 split: 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty men and seven horses.
Burrell gas-detector, out for repairs.    Safety-lamp indicated 1 per cent, methane.
No. 2 split: 24,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of twenty-five men and three
horses;   Burrell gas-detector, 0.9 per cent, methane.
No. 3 split: 7,800 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirteen men and two horses.
Burrell gas-detector, 0.8 per cent, methane.
Main return: 138,600 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of seventy-eight men and
twelve horses.    Safety-lamp indicated 0.5 per cent, methane.
Explosive gas has been found occasionally in the course of inspection, mostly in cavities
in the roof and at the face of the conveyor-places, as these roadways travel faster than under
the old system and require closer attention in the matter of keeping the brattice up to the face.
Burrell readings taken in the return air-currents have varied from 0.6 per cent, methane in
the No. 1 split to 1.5 per cent, in No. 2 split. Roadways and timbering have been kept in a
fairly satisfactory condition and generally well treated with rock-dust, all roadways and
working-places being treated regularly with crushed limestone-dust where required. Three
hundred and twenty-nine samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4
of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were above the standard set by the above regulation.
As a result of two heavy " bumps " that occurred in the Nos. 19 and 20 East slope districts
on May 26th and 27th, a decision was reached to abandon this part of the mine and concentrate
all operations on the West side, where more favourable conditions are anticipated in this
respect.
Michel Colliery.—B. Caufield, Manager; C. Stubbs, Acting-Manager. This colliery is
situated on Michel creek, 24 miles north-east of Fernie, on the Canadian Pacific Railway.
A general description of the method of working, system of haulage in and around the mines,
and surface plant has been given in previous Annual Reports.
No. 3 Mine.—Robt. McFegan, Overman. This mine operates the upper No. 3 seam and is
ventilated by an electrically driven 12- by 6-foot Sullivan fan, which, running at a speed of
240 r.p.m., produced, an average quantity of 137,750 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-
gauge of 3.1 inches. Ventilation is divided into three splits; the quantity passing in each at
the last inspection measuring as follows:—
No. 1 split: 15,400 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty men and seven horses.
Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
No. 2 split: 10,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-three men and four
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
No. 3 split: 5,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of three men and one horse.
Safety-lamp, nil.
Main return: 31,200 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighty-five men and twelve
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
This mine has been found clear of explosive gas during the course of inspection, while
Burrell gas-detector and safety-lamp readings taken regularly in the return air-currents have
varied from nil in the No. 3 split to 0.5 per cent, methane in the main return airway. Roadways
and timbering have been kept in good shape and generally well treated for coal-dust. Where
necessary, all roadways and working-places are treated regularly with crushed limestone-dust.
One hundred and seventy-four samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4
of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were above the standard set by the above regulation.
No. 1 Mine.—C. Stubbs and W. McKay, Overmen; R. B. Bonar, Acting-Overman. This
mine is reached by a crosscut from the upper No. 3 seam of No. 3 mine, which intersects
Nos. 2,1, " A," and " B " seams; Nos. 1 and " B " only being operated at present.    This mine
17 G 30 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
is ventilated by No. 3 mine fan.    Ventilation is divided into two splits;  the quantity passing
in each at the last inspection measuring as follows:—
No. 1 seam, return: 28,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-five men and
four horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a slight trace of methane.
" B " seam, return: 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty-five men and five
horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 0.7 per cent, methane.
Main return: 63,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of ninety men and nine horses.
Safety-lamp, 0.4 per cent, methane.
Main return (all mines) : 130,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of 175 men and
twenty horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.4 per cent, methane.
Explosive gas was found once in each district of this mine during the course of inspection,
while Burrell gas-detector and safety-lamp readings taken regularly in the return air-currents
have varied from a slight trace of methane in the No. 1 seam district to 1 per cent, in the " B "
seam district. Roadways and timbering have been kept in good shape generally and well
treated for coal-dust. One hundred and eighty samples of dust were taken in accordance with
Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were in keeping with the standard
set by the above regulation.
No. 3 East Mine.—J. Henney, Shiftboss. Operations in this mine have been confined to
repairing main roadways and stoppings in the fire area adjacent to the main return airway.
It has not been necessary to operate the fan during the year as the natural ventilation was
ample for all requirements.
r "        _ .       Austin Corbin, President, Spokane, Wash.;   E. J. Roberts and J. M. Fitz-
...      T patrick, Vice-Presidents, Spokane, Wash.;  A. M. Allen, Secretary-Treasurer,
'       '      Spokane, Wash.;   E. L. Warburton, Manager, Corbin, B.C.
Corbin Colliery.—E. L. Warburton, Manager; F. W. Reger, Assistant Manager. This
operation is situated 14 miles from McGillivray Junction on the Crowsnest branch of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, to which it is connected by a branch line, called the Eastern
British Columbia Railway. This colliery consists of four mines—Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6 West.
Nos. 4 and 6 West mines were the principal producers, but were in operation for a period of
fifteen days only in the beginning of January, when all work was suspended as the result
of a strike order going into effect on January 20th. No. 3 mine or " big showing " was operated
for twenty days in September, when some 200 tons of loose coal was gathered off the benches
to supply fuel for the hotel, school, hospital, and officials.
During the interval between January 20th and May 21st, the underground officials were
engaged in repairing main roads and airways and patrolling the fire areas in No. 4 mine.
As the company was unable to renew existing contracts, a decision was reached to close the
mines indefinitely and a start was made at the end of April to erect permanent seals at No. 4
and West No. 6 mines, these being completed on May 21st. Since the latter date three men
only have been retained on the pay-roll, two acting as watchmen and one in charge of the
colliery office. At the moment of writing there is apparently little hope of work being resumed
at this colliery for some time to come. INSPECTION OF QUARRIES. G 31
INSPECTION OF QUARRIES.
BY
James Strang.
VANCOUVER MINING DIVISION.
Coast Quarries, Ltd.—At Granite Falls, Burrard inlet, a granite-quarry is operated by
this company, the stone being used for general construction-work. Work here during 1935 has
been very irregular, the number of men employed varying from ten to two. The regulations,
generally, have been fairly well observed and no accidents of a serious nature have occurred.
Thomas Burrows is in charge of operations.
Kilgard Red-shale Quarry.—This quarry is the property of the Clayburn Company and
is worked in conjunction with their clay mines. No material has been taken from the quarry
this year.
Deeks Sand and Gravel Pit.—T. 0. Burgess, superintendent. Four to five men are
employed at this plant. It is a hydraulic operation, electrical power being used for the
mechanical operations of the plant. Condition of machinery, fencing, and other equipment
was generally in fair condition.
Cascade Sand and Gravel Quarry.—A. Ellis, superintendent. Five men are employed
here. This plant operated on part time during the year. The sand and gravel is recovered
from the bed of Seymour creek by a large power-shovel. The condition of the plant is only
fair.    General repairs to equipment are necessary.
B.C. Sand and Gravel Quarry.—North Vancouver; William Monks, foreman. This
quarry operated very little during 1935.    Condition of the plant was good.
Hillside Sand and Gravel Quarry.—West Howe sound. This plant did not operate
during 1935.
NEW WESTMINSTER MINING DIVISION.
Gilley Bros.' Quarry.—Situated at Silver valley, on the Pitt river. The plant for crushing
and screening the stone from the quarry is built on the banks of the Pitt river; the rock being
loaded in scows for shipment and used in general construction-work. About twenty-one men
are employed, although work has been very irregular during the year. The plant is kept in
good condition and the regulations well observed.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Pit.—Operated by Gilley Bros., Limited; is situated on the
banks of the Fraser and employs on an average about fifteen men. The screening and loading-
plant is operated electrically, a power-shovel and conveyor-belt being used in the gravel-pit.
The entire plant is kept in good condition and the regulations carefully observed.
VICTORIA MINING DIVISION.
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.—The main plant of this company is situated at Bamberton, where
there are two limestone-quarries and a cement plant. Work has not been steady throughout
the year due to lack of orders for cement. The number of men in the quarries varies from
twenty-three to six and in the mill from twenty-three to seventy-five. Both officials and men
here are keenly alive to safety measures. Accident-prevention is discussed at safety meetings
and first-aid classes are well attended.    The regulations for quarries are strictly observed.
Pioneer Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.—Situated at Albert head. Very little work has been
done here during 1935.
Producers Sand and Gravel Co.—Situated at Royal bay. This plant has been idle the
greater part of the year.
NANAIMO MINING DIVISION.
Pacific Lime Co.—Situated at Blubber bay, Texada island. This plant, a description of
which has appeared in previous reports, has operated throughout the year. The number of
men employed in the quarry operations averages around twenty; the total number in the plant
varying from sixty to forty-eight. General conditions are good, the regulations being fairly
well observed. B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.—This company's quarry is situated on the opposite shore of Blubber
bay from the Pacific Lime Company; the limestone being shipped by scows to the cement-
works at Bamberton. The average number of men employed is about seven. This plant is
kept in good condition and the regulations are well observed.
Vananda Quarry.—A limestone-quarry operated by F. J. Beale, and supplying limestone
to the various pulp and paper mills and crushed limestone to the coal mines on Vancouver
island. The average number of men employed is around twenty. General conditions are
fairly good.
Vancouver Granite Co.—Operates a granite-quarry at Nelson island and produces a fine
dimension stone. Work has been intermittent throughout the year. When operating about
twelve men are employed. A fatal accident occurred here on April 8th to Mangus Lombnes,
a report of which appears elsewhere.
NANAIMO MINING DIVISION.
BY
Geo. O'Brien.
McDonald Cut-stone Operators.—This quarry is situated on Gabriola island. It was
inspected during the year and found to be in a satisfactory working condition. Stones for
pulp-grinding are cut in situ by a large boring and cutting tool and then detached by a small
charge of gunpowder; the stones are 5 feet in diameter, have a 3-foot grinding-face, and are
fully dressed before leaving the quarry. Only a few men were employed and the quarry
operated intermittently during the year.
KAMLOOPS MINING DIVISION.
BY
John G. Biggs.
Falkland Quarries.—Operated by the Canadian Gypsum and Alabastine Company. This
quarry was inspected during the year and found to be in a satisfactory working condition.
Twelve men were employed and the material produced shipped by rail to the company's plant
at New Westminster.
BELLA COOLA MINING DIVISION.
BY
Charles Graham.
Koeye River Quarry.—P. Christensen, operator. This quarry, situated 7 miles south of
Namu, was inspected during the year and found to be in a satisfactory condition. Five men
were employed and the limestone produced was shipped to the Pacific Paper Mills at Ocean
Falls. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 33
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
James Dickson,     i
In March, 1935, the then existing " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" and the " Quarries
Regulation Act " were rescinded, and the present " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" was
passed by the Legislature and came into force on March 23rd, 1935.
The new " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" covers the operations of metalliferous
mines, concentrators, smelters, and quarries, and brought the regulations governing same
into more detailed recognition of the inherent risks of present-day mining methods and the
practical means of securing the safety of those employed.
Among the outstanding features of this new Act the following may be noted:—
Any unusual occurrence of overwinding, breakage of hoisting-ropes, inrush of water, fire,
premature or unexpected explosions must be reported by mine operators whether or not any
person is injured thereby.
The regulations re surveys and plans of underground workings are more stringent.
At all mines where over fifty persons are employed it is required that special rules be
established for the conduct of persons acting in the management of the mine and the persons
employed in and about the same as, under the particular state and circumstances of the mine,
may appear best calculated to prevent dangerous accidents and to provide for the safety and
proper discipline of the persons employed in and about the mine.
The special rules, when agreed to by the management and the men employed and approved
by the Minister of Mines, become part of the Act.
The general rules are embodied in section 38 of the Act and provide for the following
outstanding points:—
Only experienced men who are over 22 years of age and certified by a medical practitioner to be in good health shall be permitted to hoist or lower persons in a shaft:
Satisfactory ventilation and fans:
Prohibits the use of internal-combustion engines underground:
Provides for more stringent precautions against fire underground and on the surface:
Provides for second exits from mines when the developments stated have been reached:
Provides for the installation of properly equipped refuge-chambers on the order of the
Chief Inspector:
Provides for the connection of adjacent mines in the interests of safety on the approval
of the Minister of Mines:
Provides for mine-rescue apparatus at mines on the order of the Chief Inspector and
the establishment of mine-rescue stations:
Provides that first-aid supplies shall be maintained at mines:
Provides for dust-control in mines and crushers:
Provides for sanitary conveniences underground:
Provides for bathing and dressing facilities where over ten men are employed:
Provides for proper manways and ladder-ways underground:
Provides for proper hoisting and shaft equipment:
Provides that hoisting-ropes where men are handled must not be used for more than
two years and be tested every six months, and that such hoisting-ropes must
have a static factor of safety of ten or over:
Provides for the proper installation of electrical cables and equipment underground.
Copies of the new " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " were mailed to all mine operators
in the Province.
PRODUCTION.
The output from the metalliferous mines for 1935 was 4,916,147 tons, a decrease of 171,187
tons from the tonnage of 1934. This tonnage was produced from 177 mines, of which seventy-
two produced 100 tons or more. G 34
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES   (INCLUDING
UNDERGROUND PLACER MINES).
There were fifteen fatal accidents in and about the metalliferous mines in 1935, being
a decrease of seven from the figures for 1934. This does not include the seven men lost in
the snowslide at the Taseko-Motherlode bunk-house.
There were 4,237 persons employed under and above ground in the metalliferous lode
mines in 1935. The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 3.54, compared
with 4.86 in 1934.    The ratio for the last ten-year period was 3.27.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1935 was 327,743 tons, compared with
231,242 tons during 1934. The tonnage mined per fatal accident for the last ten-year period
was 420,291 tons.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1935, and
comparative figures for 1934:—■
Mining Division.
Mine.
No. of Accidents.
1935.
1934.
V anc ou ve r  	
Phillips Arm..   —
Britannia 	
Alexandria  	
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
4
1
2
Bradian _	
Pioneer   	
Pilot Gold    —. 	
Lillooet - 	
2
Homestake  	
Vital
2
Atlin                                              -
Clydesdale Lease    	
4
1
Trail Creek                         -  	
Josie No. 1 	
1
Nelson 	
Reno Gold	
Gold King Claim	
1
1
Fort Steele 	
Sullivan	
3
Totals	
15
22
The following table shows the cause, the percentage to the whole of the fatal accidents,
with comparative figures for 1934:—
Causes.
1935.
1934.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
4
2
2
6
1
26.64
13.33
13.33
40.00
6.67
1
7
4
7
3
4.54
By falling down chutes or shafts 	
31.82
18.18
31 82
By carbon-monoxide poisoning  „	
Miscellaneous  _
13.64
Totals                  	
15
100.00
22
ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES.
The fatal accident which occurred to  Shirley Alliston, brakeman, Britannia mine, on
January 21st was due to deceased being caught and squeezed between the descending door INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 35
and the end wall of a side-dumping car; this type of car is dumped by means of compressed
air and the control-valve was on the opposite side of the car from where deceased was injured.
There were no witnesses to this accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Michael Busen, miner, Bonanza mine, on February
13th was due to a fall of ground from the back in an open stope on which deceased was drilling
a large boulder for block-holing. This place had been blasted at noon on the 12th and Busen
had barred down immediately after, and again barred down on the morning of the 13th before
starting to drill.    A carbide flood-light was in use in this stope.
The fatal accident to Harry Dreger, miner, and Albert Quickfall, mucker, Island Mountain
mine, on February 14th was due to blasting; the deceased had spit a round of shots and had
delayed too long after starting to spit and failed to get clear. The place was wet and this
probably caused a loss of time in completing the spitting of the round. Had the deceased used
a spitter of reasonable length and left the face when the spitter was exhausted this accident
would have been averted.
The fatal accident to Nels Johnson, miner, and Otto Stoesser, mucker, Pilot gold mine, on
March 15th was due to blasting; the place was wet and probably due to this the men were
delayed in completing the spitting of the round. As in the accident at the Island Mountain
mine, the use of a spitter of reasonable length would have averted this accident. From the
investigation into this accident it would appear that two spitters had been used; if used
consecutively, these spitters had a greater total length than the fuse in the cut holes.
The fatal accident to John Sajatovich, chuteman, Bonanza mine, on March 28th was due
to a runaway car on the underground main haulage-incline to the surface; a descending
empty car had been arrested by some means and became detached from the rope; the empty
car apparently released itself and ran down the slope and struck deceased at the station below.
An ordinary open hook was in use for attaching the car to the haulage-rope; only safety-
hooks are now permitted by the new " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act."
The fatal accident to Oscar Edstrom, miner, and Niels Anderson, nipper, Reno gold mine,
on April 23rd was due to a fall of ground which sluffed off from a pillar above; both men died
shortly after being taken from the mine.
The fatal accident to Winthroe W. Young, pumpman, Bradian No. 2 shaft, on May 22nd
was due to the shaft cross-head dropping some 60 feet and striking deceased or the bucket in
which he was ascending the shaft at the time; a few minutes prior to the accident deceased
had descended the shaft to attend to a pump at the bottom, and before descending had told
the hoistman to close the safety-doors immediately the bucket had cleared the doors as there
were some repairmen working above. Apparently the hoistman had closed the safety-doors
sufficiently soon to arrest the cross-head, which remained suspended at this point, until deceased
went to the shaft-bottom and again ascended the shaft; when the bucket reached a point
about 60 feet from the top of the shaft the hoistman opened the safety-doors to permit the
passage of the bucket, and this allowed the cross-head to drop, with fatal results to Young.
The new " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " requires that all cross-heads be provided
with a safety locking-device, so that the cross-head and bucket cannot be accidentally separated
while in the shaft. The management was prosecuted for the contravention of General Rule 87,
but the charge was dismissed.
The fatal accident to Gus Hantual, miner, Pioneer gold mine, on June 10th was due to
deceased being crushed by a slab of rock from the hanging-wall in his working-place. This
slab projected about 2 feet above the loose ore resulting from the previous blasting, and Hantula
and another miner tried to bar the slab out, but were unable to do so and left it; a short time
afterwards he removed some of the loose ore at this point to make sufficient height to set up
his machine. The slab fell out when he removed the ore and crushed his hips against the
foot-wall. Hantual was taken by airplane to the Vancouver General Hospital, where he died
six days later.
The fatal accident to Evan Williams, miner, Buchanan placer mine, Atlin, on June 27th
was due to a fall of ground at the face of a drift. Deceased and partner were engaged in
driving lagging over a false set of timber at the face when a cave occurred which caused the
collapse of the false set and the two adjacent permanent sets; Williams was buried in the
debris and was dead when recovered. G 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
The fatal accident to Henry J. Brauer, Gold King mine, Nelson, on July 12th was due to
carbon-monoxide poisoning from the exhaust of a small gasoline-engine in the shaft. Deceased
and another man were engaged, on separate shifts, in dewatering this shaft by means of a
small pump driven by a lYz-horse-power gasoline-engine. The shaft had been dewatered to
a point 50 feet from the surface, at which point a short drift had been driven and the engine
and pump were installed at this point. Deceased had gone on shift about 10 p.m. and apparently experienced trouble with the engine, as this was partly dismantled when Brauer was
found dead in the drift the following morning. It was later learned that deceased had been
previously affected by gases in this shaft and had required help to reach the surface. Deceased
and partner were part owners. The management was prosecuted and convicted for contravention of General Rule 6, which states that " No internal-combustion engine shall be installed
or operated underground in any mine."
The fatal accident to Alfred Joseph Hebert, miner, Kamloops Homestake mine, on October
30th was due to a fall of ground; deceased was barring down at the time and probably, due
to an error of judgment, stood on the lower side of the material he was barring down.
Apparently more material was brought down than deceased anticipated and he was unable
to get clear.
The fatal accident to Joseph Nicholson, foreman, Nugget mine, Reno Gold Mines, Limited,
on December 3rd was due to deceased falling down a raise a distance of 200 feet; this mine
was being reopened after standing idle since 1921.- Supplies were lowered through this raise
by means of a small bucket and a hemp rope and at the time of the accident a miner was
climbing down the raise; deceased had leaned over a fence, 41 inches high, at the top of the
raise to see whether the miner had arrived at the bottom before allowing the bucket to be put
in motion.    Nicholson apparently overbalanced and fell down the raise.
In addition to above accidents in mines, seven men—H. Gustensen, Eric G. Carlson,
Hans Pederson, R. J. Bacon, W. G. Nelson, Chris Christensen, and R. Stewart—were killed
by a snowslide near the Taseko-Motherlode mine. Apparently this snowslide occurred about
January 7th and probably at night, as all the men were in the bunk-house at the time of the
slide; the bunk-house was at an elevation of 1,000 feet below the mine and was reached by a
zigzag trail about 1% miles long.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On April 22nd, while the brakes of the main hoist, No. 3 shaft, Pioneer mine, were being
tested, the safety-dogs on the cage were unexpectedly brought into action and the cage was
arrested. When the hoist was started a considerable amount of the hoisting-rope was paid
out before the above occurrence was discovered. The hoisting-rope became badly " kinked "
and was immediately replaced by a new rope.
On May 22nd, in No. 2 shaft, Bradian mine, a loose cross-head had been arrested by the
safety-doors on a descending trip of the bucket; when the bucket was being raised and the
safety-doors were opened the cross-head dropped 60 feet to the bucket and killed a man.
On June 1st, in the Pioneer mine, a miner was slightly burned by a small inflammation of
methane gas.    This occurrence is reported elsewhere in this report.
In No. 1 shaft, Sheep Creek Consolidated Gold mine, the king-pin of the coupling between
the hoisting-rope and skip sheared through and allowed the skip to fall to the bottom of the
shaft. This pin had been in use only eighty-three days and was evidently of defective material;
no person was injured.
On July 5th an overwind occurred at No. 2 shaft, Pioneer mine, during sinking operations;
no one was injured, although the sinking crew was in the shaft-bottom at the time. This
occurrence was due to an error on the part of the hoistman.
On August 5th, at the Reward mine shaft, Cottonwood, two miners were badly burned by
gasoline when taking a supply from a 40-gallon drum at night when presumably a naked light
was in the vicinity.
On December 9th, at the Pacific Eastern Gold mine, methane gas was ignited at the face of
the main drift;  no person was injured.    This occurrence is reported elsewhere in this report.
On December 22nd an air-blast occurred at the Premier mine due to workings above No. 2
level caving to the surface; one man was knocked down by the blast and was immediately
afterwards slightly injured by a mine-car which had been set in motion by the air-blast. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
G 37
OCCURRENCE OF METHANE AT PIONEER GOLD MINES, LTD., AND PACIFIC
EASTERN GOLD MINES, LTD., BRIDGE RIVER.
The occurrence of methane in the Pioneer mine has been demonstrated on several occasions
in the past few years by ignitions of this gas at the face of some of the upper levels and in
raises, and in one or two instances slight burns were sustained by the men who inadvertently
lit the gas. The total inflow of gas has so far been very small, but there is a danger of the
gas accumulating in any abandoned dead-end workings.
In one case two pipemen went up a raise that had not been operated for some days and
ignited gas about 60 feet from the top; both men were slightly burned. In another instance a
miner was slightly burned in a raise shortly after the shiftboss had inspected same with an
open light.
Following the above ignitions, the Inspector of Mines supplied flame safety-lamps for the
purpose of testing any places where the presence of methane may be suspected.
In the Pacific Eastern Gold Mines, Limited, methane was encountered on December 9th
at the face of the main drift being driven from the bottom of the shaft. The face was being
drilled when a heavy feeder of water was met, and as the mine-pumps were already taxed to
deal with the mine-water, drilling was suspended to permit a survey of conditions, and on the
following day, when the face was being examined, it was found that the flow of water from the
drill-holes had appreciably lessened, but gas was ignited at the collar of the holes; the burning
gas was extinguished and the ventilation of the drift augmented and the air tested by means
of a flame safety-lamp, but by this time no indications of gas were found on the lamp. All
naked lights were removed and the round completed by electric light; when the round was
completed there was no trace of gas and the carbide lights were again used, but before the holes
were loaded gas was again ignited at the collar of several holes.
The naked lights were again withdrawn and the round blasted electrically; it was found
that the gas had apparently come from a small mud-filled fracture which the drift intersected;
samples taken here later showed 0.43 per cent, methane at this point and 0.03 per cent, methane
at the face after the drift had been advanced a short distance. Instructions were given to use
the flame safety-lamp for inspection after any temporary shut-down of operations.
Slight traces of methane have been noted in air samples of the Bralorne mine; so that this
gas has been found at different points along some 4 miles in this area.
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1935 there were seven prosecutions made for infractions of the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act " and special rules, as follows:—■
Date.
Mine.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Jan.    28
Jan.    28
April    9
April    9
April    9
Aug.     5
Oet.     30
Pacific Eastern Gold Mines, Ltd.
Bradian Mines, Ltd	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Anyox
Ditto                                             	
Manager..
Manager...
Miner.
Hoistman
Miner
Manager-
Owner
Failed to observe General Rule 87 re
safety cross-head
Failed to observe General Rule 87 re
safety cross-head
Riding on loaded ore-skip in violation
of General Rule 95 (b)
Hoisting a man on loaded ore-skip in
violation of General Rule 95 (b)
Running a rock-drill without using
the water provided to allay dust in
violation of General Rule 79 (6)
Contravention of General Rule 5 by
having an internal-combustion engine underground
Contravention of General Rule 5 by
having an internal-combustion engine underground
Case dismissed. Court
ruled there had not
been sufficient time
to comply.
Case dismissed. Court
ruled there had not
been sufficient time
to comply.
Fined $10 and costs.
Reward Mining Co., Ltd	
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $20 and costs.
Suspended sentence.
18 G 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1935 slightly over 9,000,000 lb. of explosives were used in mining in British
Columbia and approximately 4,023,000 shots were fired, of which 693,000 were fired by electrical
means and 100,300 by delay methods; 18,700,000 feet of safety-fuse was used with above
explosives.
It is noted that there is a gradual increase in the number of shots fired by electricity from
year to year.
AIR-SAMPLING.
Many air samples were taken in the metalliferous mines to determine the condition of the
air, and much of the sampling was for the purpose of establishing the effect of blasting in
producing noxious gases at the faces of the longer workings.
In those samples where small percentages of carbon monoxide were found steps were taken
to have the ventilation augmented or a change made in the blasting-time.
Much assistance was received from the Dominion Department of Mines during the year
in the analyses of air samples and in advice on problems arising in connection with the air in
mines, and this help is gratefully acknowledged.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
During 1935 many tests were made to determine the dust content of the air in mines and
mills in different parts of British Columbia; by dust, reference is made to particles of material
10 microns or less in diameter (1 micron is ^.-.ooo of 1 inch).
The tests showed that, with a few exceptions, there is much dust in the air underground,
these exceptions being in those mines and parts of mines where the ventilating efficiency is
much above the average.
Tests made in the vicinity of drilling operations and immediately after blasting showed
a dust content of from 6,000,000 to 15,000,000 particles of dust per cubic foot of air, and many
tests showed a still higher dust content; the higher dust contents were generally found in
long workings where the ventilation is produced by " booster " fans and limited in quantity,
but high dust counts were also found in many stoping operations and in the vicinity of ore-
transfer chutes.
Tests made in drifts for several hours after blasting showed very little reduction in the
dust content, and one series of tests in an 800-foot drift showed over 8,000,000 particles of dust
nine hours after blasting; no work of any kind had been done in this drift between blasting
and the tests. A series of tests made in one of the main levels of a large mine where 32,000
cubic feet of air was passing per minute showed over 4,000,000 particles of dust per cubic foot
of air; these tests were made at a considerable distance from any dust-producing operations
and to the ordinary senses the air appeared to be free from dust or smoke.
Many other tests taken in air that showed no visible signs of dust actually showed very
high dust contents.
In a stope where several drills were running thirty tests taken at one-minute intervals
showed over 8,000,000 particles of dust per cubic foot of air, and a simultaneous test extending
over the half-hour interval showed that very little, if any, of the fine dust settled to the floor
of the stope during this period.
. The tests generally establish the fact that once fine dust is discharged into the mine-air
there is very little tendency towards a later separation of the dust and air while in the mine,
and certainly not while the ordinary operations of the mine are being carried on.
In very few of the long prospecting and development workings where the ventilation is
dependent on " booster " fans is there a sufficient volume of air in circulation to replace the
atmosphere once in a working-shift, and in many cases the same applies to some more advanced
operations.
The ventilation of the mines is generally very satisfactory in so far as the supply of
sufficient oxygen for the respiration of the men is concerned, but, with the exceptions previously
mentioned, it falls far short of being efficient in quickly removing dust-laden air from the mines.
At present all drilling is carried on with the application of water and at all the larger
mines water sprays are in use in bulldoze chambers and at ore-transfer chutes, and it is
common practice to spray all blasted material as soon as the faces can be reached in efforts INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 39
to reduce the amount of dust produced. The foregoing tests show that these precautions
are not sufficient to reduce the dust content of mine-air to a desirable minimum, and the only
practical means available at present in attaining this minimum is by providing a sufficient
volume of constantly maintained ventilation to reduce the dust content per unit volume of air.
Where a mine is entirely dependent on the natural ventilation produced due to the difference
of elevation between the different mine openings and variations of temperature, there are
seasonal, and often daily, changes in the direction and volume of air-flow, with consequent
baffling currents and periods when there is practically no definite air-flow either into or out
of the mine, and during such periods any dust-producing operations are simply augmenting
the dust content of the still air.
This report does not deal with the nature of the dusts found in the different mines and the
degree of danger presented by the different dusts, as at the present time eminent research-
workers are not in agreement regarding which dust or dusts constitute the greatest danger
to the respiratory organs of miners; but it is beyond doubt that no dust can be helpful, and
that the only practical means so far developed to efficiently deal with the dust-hazard is a
sufficient current of air to dilute and remove such dust as speedily as possible.
That such means of reducing the dust-hazard are both practicable and inexpensive is
evidenced by the installation, during 1935, at one of the largest mines in the Province of a
modern high-speed fan capable of passing 100,000 cubic feet of air per minute through the mine,
which was already well ventilated according to current standards; this fan was installed at
a cost of less than $8,000 and has definitely reduced the dust content in the general air in
this mine.    Further details of this fan is given in the Inspector's report of the Sullivan mine.
Other progressive mine operators are giving considerable attention to the value of
augmented ventilation as a means of directly reducing the dust-hazard, and it is confidently
expected that fan-produced ventilation constantly maintained will be a standard feature at all
the larger metalliferous mines in the near future.
FIRST-AID AND SAFETY WORK.
First-aid classes were carried on at all the larger mining operations during 1935, and in
addition to these qualified first-aid men who kept up their training and practice many new
men were attracted to this work. In most cases these classes were organized in close co-operation with safety committees, and this combination tends not only towards ensuring immediate
help for those injured in the industry, but makes all concerned more safety-conscious.
In addition to the safety committees and first-aid work formerly organized and maintained
at Britannia, Kimberley, Fernie, Michel, Vancouver Island, and other mining centres, this
work advanced during the year, and at many of the more isolated mines safety committees
or first-aid work has become firmly established; these include Premier, Big Missouri, Pioneer,
Bralorne, Minto, Cariboo Gold Quartz, and Reno mines.
These safety committees function in different ways, as at some of the larger mines
meetings are held in regular form and a record kept of the matters discussed and recommendations made, while at the smaller mines the meetings and discussions are quite informal; at all
meetings those attending are encouraged to raise any points leading to greater safety in
mining.
Many practical recommendations result from these safety committees on details that may
escape the notice of those charged with maintaining safe conditions in mines, and when it is
realized that details often provide the final link to complete the circumstances that produce an
accident the value of the work of such safety committees will be understood.
Some of these meetings are held as the men come off shift, so that both shifts can attend,
while at Britannia mine a safety meeting is held underground in each section of the mine
every two weeks, and all men employed in the section are required to attend to hear or take
part in safety discussions.
The safety committee is the best safety educative system that has been evolved, as the
general body of the men can be directly reached and interested on the safety methods of
carrying out their daily work.
Of the fifteen fatal accidents described earlier in this report, it may be noted that none
of these fatalities resulted from abnormal conditions or dangers, but rather from errors of judgment and failure to observe practical safety precautions such as all safety committees
inculcate.
It is hoped that during 1936 safety committees will be organized at those mines where the
value of this work has not yet been realized.
HEALTH AND WELFARE.
The application of the X-ray as a means of determining the condition of the lungs of
underground workers was greatly extended during the year, and at some of the larger mines
all applicants for underground work are so examined before being employed; in addition,
all underground employees at Britannia, Kimberley, Pioneer, Bralorne, and Cariboo Gold
Quartz mines were examined by means of the X-ray during 1935, and it is probable that such
an examination will be made yearly. The men generally welcomed this examination. With
the exception of the Cariboo Gold Quartz mine, there are X-ray installations at the above mines.
At the Kimberley mine of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada
a modern solarium was installed during 1935 after a representative committee of the men
was appointed to visit the Bunker Hill mine at Kellog, Idaho, where a solarium was already
in use, and on the recommendations of the committee the above company built the solarium
at Kimberley.
The solarium consists of a cabinet 8.6 feet wide, 8 feet high, and 12 feet long, and is
finished in aluminium colour to provide the proper light diffusion, and is equipped with a
conveyor on which those taking the treatment travel through the cabinet; the conveyor-speed
is controlled to suit the length of exposure required by different individuals.
The conveyor is driven by a %-horse-power motor through a Tex-rope drive to a variable-
speed Reeves transmission which is direct-connected by a flexible coupling to Work gear-speed
reducer; the drive from the speed-reducer to the conveyor consists of roller chains and
sprockets.
The control cabinet is constructed of sheet steel and houses all the switches for controlling
each individual lamp, voltmeters, motor-starting switch, fan-switches, speed-control, and
tachometer.
The equipment of the solarium cabinet consists of six 110-volt quartz mercury vapour lamps
(three lamps mounted on each side of the conveyor) arranged to give equal radiation; each
lamp is provided with an automatic starter, separate voltage regulator and voltmeter; these
lamps are air-cooled and automatically started by a preheater and relay cut-out. As soon as
the arc is established the relay automatically cuts out the heater.
The lamps operate at approximately 75 volts direct current, and it is important that each
burner be kept absolutely clean, as any dirt or finger-prints would be etched into the quartz
and could not be removed.
During the time that the solarium has been in use 92 per cent, of the men at the mine
have taken regular treatments, while advantages of the installation are also enjoyed by the
mill crew, school-children, and the general public in the community, all treatments being given
free of charge by the company.
It is stated that a one-minute treatment of these ultra-violet rays is equal in effect to
eight hours' sunshine, and those using the solarium regularly report a marked decrease in
colds and minor winter ailments.
The total cost of the solarium was $15,000.
QUARRIES.
There was considerable increased activity in quarrying and in sand and gravel production
during 1935 as compared with 1934, and this was reflected by the greater number of men
employed. There were 536 men employed in quarries and sand-pits, as compared with 377
men in 1934, and there were 270 men employed in processing plants in 1935, as compared with
187 men in 1934.
There was one fatal accident in quarries during the year; this was largely due to the
deceased block-holing with an air-drill with his back to the broken material on the quarry-face.
A small slide of material occurred and he could not see it or hear it because of the noise of
the drill. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 41
Orders were issued prohibiting men from drilling with their back to potentially dangerous
ground.
LILLOOET MINING DIVISION.
BY
Thomas R. Jackson.
Pioneer Mine.—Operated by the Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Limited. H. T. James,
general manager; E. F. Emmons, mine manager; Paul Schultz, mill superintendent. For
information re power and mill plant, bunk-house, hospital, etc., see former reports.
No. 2 shaft has been sunk to a depth of 3,313 feet. During the year the following work
was done: Drifting, 6,978 feet; crosscutting, 2,350 feet; raising, 1,510 feet; and sinking,
794 feet.
Ventilation of the mine is accomplished by natural means and the use of fans where
necessary. There is a good natural current of air prevailing and on the fourteenth level it
remained fairly constant between 13,000 and 14,000 cubic feet per minute. On account of
the depth the temperature of the air in the levels below the fourteenth level increases and
ranges from 60 to 84 degrees towards the shaft-bottom. The temperature will be greatly
reduced when all the new lower levels are connected. The writer has advocated to the management the use of an efficient fan in view of the deep workings. One fatal and several serious
accidents occurred during the year; these were all investigated. A number of mine-air
samples were taken in the worst-conditioned places, and the analysis showed that some of the
places contained air that had to be improved if work was to be continued. Several committees
are functioning along welfare, safety-first, and co-operative lines and take up the different
points of interest with the management. There were 280 men on the pay-roll at the end of
the year.
The writer found the provisions of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " consistently
adhered to.
Arizona Mine.-—Operated by the B.R.X. (1935) Consolidated Mines, Limited. E. R.
Shepherd, general manager. The main adit was driven 1,840 feet from the portal and drifts
several hundred feet north and south from this point. At the end of the year a winze was
being sunk in the north drift. An Ingersoll-Rand 500-cubic-foot-per-minute compressor is
being installed to augment the present power-installation. Ventilation is maintained by an
electric-driven fan situated at the mine portal and was found to be satisfactory throughout
the year; air samples taken at the working-faces were also found to be satisfactory. Twenty-
six men were employed during the year; the company bunk-house was not in service and men
arranged for housing accommodation privately. General conditions were found to be good
on the different inspections and there were no serious accidents; minor accidents were treated
by the first-aid man on the premises. Accident-prevention measures are ably maintained, the
" Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " being well observed.
Bralorne Mine.—Operated by the Bralorne Mines, Limited. Richard Bosustow, general
manager; Fred E. Gray, general superintendent; Ted Chenoweth, mine manager; Don
Mathieson, assistant mine manager. For information re power and mill plant, bunk-house,
hospital, etc., see former reports.
During the year a total of 19,556 feet of exploration and development work was driven
in the Bralorne mines (including the Bradian), besides 688 feet of raises, 127 feet of shaft,
and 168 feet of winzes. A winze was started from the 1,100 to the 1,200 level; King No. 2
shaft was started from the 1,100 level down and at the end of the year was almost down to
the 1,200 level. A crosscut was started from the King mine on the 800 level to connect with the
Empire shaft and it was driven 2,849 feet during the year. The Empire shaft was equipped
with a new double-drum electric hoist and cages. An electric triplex pump was placed on
the 600 level for pumping the water from the Empire workings. No major changes were
made in the mill or power plant, although another 926-cubic-foot-per-minute air-compressor
was installed in the Empire (Bradian) compressor plant. A new school-house was built and
the teaching staff increased to two.    Forty-one new modern houses were constructed for the G 42 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
employees and a regulation-sized hockey-rink was built for recreation. Safety-first committees
were organized in both mine and mill and regular monthly meetings are held at which conditions
affecting safety are discussed. There is also a co-operative committee composed chiefly of
underground men. The business of this unit is to bring to the notice of the officials of the
company any complaints so that they can be adjusted amicably. The mine is ventilated by
natural means augmented by fans where necessary. At the last measurement there was
25,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing into the main adit. There was 10,000 cubic feet
of air per minute passing through the eleventh level. A large number of mine-air samples
were taken during the year, and with the exception of a few of them the analysis showed the
air composition to be in compliance with the Act. One fatal and several serious accidents
occurred during the year. Accident-prevention measures are diligently applied both by
employees and officials and a keen interest was displayed in first-aid work. Three hundred
and twenty men were employed. The provisions of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation
Act" were well observed throughout the year.
Wayside Mine.—Operated by the Wayside Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited. P. E.
Ritchie, managing director; J. A. McKenzie, mine manager; E. Lovitt, engineer; O. Matthews,
mill superintendent. Mine ventilation is natural and at the present time quite adequate for
all mining purposes. The winze-workings will be ventilated by means of a fan. Accident-
prevention measures are well attended to and a first-aid attendant and qualified doctor render
the necessary care and treatment to the injured. One serious accident occurred during the
year. There were forty men employed between surface and underground workings, and some
temporary improvements were carried out on the housing accommodation of the mine employees
and office staff, pending the construction of a modern bunk-house. A 100-ton mill was erected
during the latter part of the year. The " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" was found to
be fully observed.
Pacific Eastern Mine.—Operated by the Pacific Eastern Gold Mines, Limited. Charles
R. Cox, superintendent. Development at the end of the year consisted of 634 feet of adit-level
leading to the hoist-room and rope raise, ore-pocket and shaft-station, situated 550 feet from
the portal. The sinking programme necessitated a 3-compartment shaft 542 feet deep, with
a 12,000-cubic-foot sump, a pumping-station at the 370-foot level, and a main crosscutting-
station at the 520-foot level. The crosscut from this station had advanced to 853 feet at the
end of the year. The power ventilation consists of a 720-cubic-foot Gardner-Denver com-
pressor operated by a 100-horse-power synchronous motor, and the usual blacksmith-shop
equipment, including an Ingersoll-Rand " C " sharpener. Ventilation is provided by a 1,600-
cubic-foot Sirocco fan and 3,000 feet of 12%-inch diameter fan-pipe. Hoisting is by a Mead-
Morrison double-drum hoist, handling two 1-ton automatic dump-buckets. Pumping from
the 370 station is by a 500-gallon Pomona pump and from the bottom by a 75-gallon electric
centrifugal pump. All power is provided by the B.C. Electric Company and the drifts are
lighted throughout. Satisfactory camp accommodation is provided for forty men and there
is a qualified first-aid man at the mine; there were several serious accidents in the shaft-
sinking operations but no fatalities. There was an occurrence of methane gas underground
in December; details of this are given elsewhere. General conditions were found to be
satisfactory throughout the year and in compliance with the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation
Act."
The following mines were regularly inspected during the year: Bonanza Cache Gold
Mines, Limited, Lillooet; Mix Gold Mines, Limited; Pilot Gold Mines, Limited; Congress
Gold Mines, Limited; Federal Gold Mines, Limited; and the Olympic Gold Mines, Limited.
The above are all adit operations and conditions were generally found to be satisfactory during
the year. In the Pilot mine there was a double blasting fatality which is given in detail
elsewhere in this report.
Minto.—Operated by the Minto Gold Mines, Limited, Bridge River. Warren Davidson,
superintendent; Chris. Madson, mill superintendent. This mine was operated throughout
the year. Diesel engines supply the power necessary for compressed air and electric lighting.
The underground workings are not extensive and the ventilation is by natural means; several
mine-air samples were taken in the course of the year and the analyses of the samples showed
the underground air to be satisfactory. The camp accommodations are modern and satisfactory and the underground operations were found to be in good condition at the different INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 43
inspections throughout the year.    There were two serious and several minor accidents, all
of which were investigated.
CARIBOO MINING DIVISION.
BY
Thos. R. Jackson.
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mine.—Operated by the Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company,
Limited, Wells. R. R. Rose, managing director; R. E. Vear, mine superintendent; J. D.
Boulding, mill superintendent; and P. Johnson, master mechanic. This property is situated
at Wells, on the north-east end of Jack of Clubs lake, at an elevation of 4,000 feet. There
are 130 men employed underground and seventy-five men on the surface. Accommodation
is provided for single men in the bunk-houses at the mine, while twenty-six married men and
families live in company-owned houses on Wells townsite.
The 1,500-foot adit-level is the main haulage-level and the mine is worked on the 1,400-,
1,300-, 1,200-, 1,100-, and 1,000-foot levels above and on the 1,600- and 1,700-foot levels below it.
Nos. 2 and 3 shafts were sunk below the 1,500-foot level during the year. Natural ventilation
is utilized between the 1,500- and 1,000-foot levels, while fans supply fresh air to the main
adit-face, 1,600- and 1,700-foot levels, and to other drifts where necessary. The main adit
was 4,335 feet in length at the end of December.
During the year the mill was enlarged to treat 150 tons of ore per day. The dry was
extended to give more accommodation and a new powder-magazine was built. Twenty-four
new houses were built in Wells for married employees and a completely equipped nine-bed
hospital was erected. One 75-k.v.a. generator was added to the power-house equipment during
the year. There were two serious but no fatal accidents. A qualified first-aid man treats all
accidents immediately and all employees are provided with small first-aid kits which they are
required to keep in their immediate possession. The hospital is fully modern in construction
and equipment and is supported financially by the company and the employees. Conditions
were found to be fully in accordance with the requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines
Regulation Act."
Island Mountain Mine.—Operated by the Island Mountain Mines, Limited. M. D. Bang-
hart, general manager; R. Shraeder, mill superintendent. This mine is situated on the
Quesnel-Barkerville highway opposite the Cariboo Gold Quartz mine. Two bunk-houses and
a dining-room provide adequate accommodation for the crew of 100 men. Ventilation is both
natural and mechanical. The lower levels are well connected to the upper levels by raises
and manways. Two fatal accidents occurred during the year; these are dealt with elsewhere
in this report. Recreational facilities are provided in the bunk-house adjacent to the dining-
hall, and there are two qualified first-aid men employed at the property. A number of mine-air
samples were taken in places that were suspected to contain less than the required quantity of
oxygen, but the samples showed by analysis that the composition of the air was quite satisfactory.    The " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" was fully observed.
Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C., Ltd.—This company operates at Wingdam, with
D. Campbell-Mackenzie as general manager; Leroy Cokely, assistant superintendent; and
T. W. Scott, mine manager. This property is operated from three shafts known as No. 1,
Melvin, and Sanderson. No. 1 shaft is kept clear of water and is regarded at present more as
a proposed second outlet and ventilation medium to the Melvin shaft than as a main unit.
In the Sanderson shaft-workings the Inspection Branch ordered a second exit to be
provided and this is now completed; during the year this shaft was altered to provide for two
hoisting compartments instead of the single compartment that has been in use for many years,
and this has very materially increased the hoisting capacity. The main power plant consists
of modern Diesel units which replaced the power units destroyed by fire during the year.
Modern accommodation is provided for the employees, who numbered 153 at the end of the year.
Considerable attention was given by officials and employees to first-aid work and accident-
prevention methods, and at the different visits of inspection the provisions of the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act" were found to be well observed and any points raised were remedied
at once. G 44 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
The following mines were regularly inspected during the year: Quesnelle Quartz, Hixon
creek; Reward Gold Mining Company, Cottonwood; and Richfield Cariboo Gold Mining
Company, Barkerville; the above mines were operated only during part of the year. In
general the above operations were found to be in satisfactory working condition and any points
that did not fully comply with the regulations of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act"
were remedied.
ASHCROFT MINING DIVISION.
BY
Thos. R. Jackson.
Vidette Mine.—Operated by the Vidette Gold Mines, Limited, with Gordon F. Dickson as
managing director; Richard Avison, mine manager; and L. E. Marston, mill superintendent.
There is a comfortable bunk-house capable of accommodating fifty men and two other buildings
are fitted up for the men who are on the graveyard shift. There was one serious accident due
to a fall of ground. The general conditions were found to comply with the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act."
The following mines were regularly inspected during the year: Martel Gold Mines,
Limited, Gladwin; Savona Gold Mines, Limited; Hamilton Creek Gold Mines, Limited, and
Telluric Gold Mines, Limited, at Vidette lake; and Pavilion Gold Mines, Limited, Moran; the
above mines were operated only during part of the year. In general, operations were found
to be in satisfactory working condition and any points that did not fully comply with the
regulations of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" were remedied.
Placer Operations.
The following placer operations were inspected during the year: Gaugler placers; and
Cumings & Campbell, Limited, placers at Gladwin; Alberta Pacific Oil Company and Baird
placers at Lillooet; Lowhee and Sang Dang placer at Wells; Slade Cariboo placers at Wingdam; Placers Engineers at Keithley; Bullion Placers, Limited, at Likely; Hixon Creek placers,
Hixon. There were 150 men employed at the above placers, the Bullion and Hixon operations
being the largest, with forty and twenty-four employees respectively. General conditions
were found to be satisfactory during the year and all recommendations made in the interests
of safety were given immediate effect.
SOUTHERN COAST INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
James Strang.
VANCOUVER MINING DIVISION.
Fifteen operations were visited at various times throughout the year; the total number
of men in and around the mines averaging about 750. The need for more efficient systems of
ventilation is being stressed at all the mines. Generally the main levels are well ventilated,
but in many cases the working-places, although fairly well ventilated, do not have sufficient
air travelling to carry away quickly the fine dust raised by blasting and mucking. In some
of the mines dust samples have been taken under varying conditions in drifts, crosscuts,
winzes, and raises, and much information has been gained as to the need for carrying greater
quantities of air directly to the working-faces.
The condition of manways and ladders was generally good and where any improvements
were necessary there was no hesitation in carrying them out. The explosive in general use
is Polar Forcite. Blasting is done by fuse, but in shaft-sinking and in some raises and winzes
it is done by electric detonators.
Only one fatal accident occurred in the district, a report of which was submitted to the
Chief Inspector; but quite a number of lost-time injuries occurred which could have been
avoided had ordinary precautions been taken and a more general use made of gloves, safety-
shoes, and goggles. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 45
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd.—C. P. Browning, general manager, Britannia
Beach; C. V. Brennan, assistant general manager; C. G. Dobson, mine superintendent; G. C.
Lipsey, assistant mine superintendent; and N. D. Bothwell, safety engineer. A greater
number of men were employed than in 1934.
In the East Bluff mine the ore is broken by the Britannia method of powder-blast mining,
the ore being drawn through the various chambers on the 1,200-foot level. Preparations for
mining are being made between the 1,400- and 1,200-foot levels. Ten bulldoze chambers have
been built on the 1,400-foot level and it is the intention of the company to install a larger fan
on this level to deal with the smoke and dust from the chambers. In the West Bluff section
production is chiefly from the pillar stopes;  the ventilation here is good.
In the Victoria mine, where the square-set or rill method is used, timbering is well done
and ventilation is good. The stopes are all tightly filled with glacial material drawn from two
glory-holes. This method, besides supporting the workings, helps to keep the air-current well
up to the working-faces.
At the Victoria shaft a larger hoist-motor was installed, thereby increasing the hoisting
efficiency. Work was resumed on the 4,100 adit this year, an advance of 1,269 feet being made.
This will eventually be the main haulage-level for the whole operation. Two exhaust-fans
with 20-inch air-lines keep a fair current of air at the face.
It is pleasing to note that the interest in first-aid work is unabated. Forty-one men
received various grades of awards from the St. John Ambulance Association and in the last
three months five instructors have held classes for men, women, boys, and girls at different
times.
Education in safety methods has been stressed in all departments. A few of the improvements this year are: Storage-battery tail and head lights for the Victoria shift train which
illuminates the ground 100 feet ahead of the car; an effective dust-settler is being developed
for bulldoze chambers; improvements in the design and clearance of mine transfer chutes;
brackets for the Victoria cages which makes for safer handling of drill-steel; a study of
various types of safety-toed rubbers for possible adoption underground.
Although the number of severe accidents has not been large, there is room for improvement
in the general accident-rate. This can be helped considerably by encouraging the use of
goggles, gloves, and safety-shoes in various classes of work.
This year the mill came under the inspection of the Inspector of Mines and general
conditions were found to be good. Alterations and improvements include, at the Beach,
a splendid new bunk-house and dry-house. The bunk-house has sound-proof walls and rooms
contain two beds with individual dressers and clothes-closets.
B.C. Nickel Mines, Ltd.—The property of this company is situated near Choate and is
under the supervision of C. B. North. Inspections were made throughout the year and general
conditions were found to be good. Ventilation generally was good and where timbering was
necessary it was well done. Good first-aid equipment is kept at the mine and a competent
first-aid man is employed.
Clayburn Co., Ltd.—The fireclay mines of this company are situated at Kilgard and work
has been very irregular throughout the year. General conditions in the mines were found to
be good.    Timbering was good and the ventilation was ample for the number of men employed.
Siwash Creek Placer Mine.—This mine is situated near Yale. A visit was made to the
property when it was reported that a blasting accident had occurred. Three men were working
here. Two men were injured in an accident reported to have been due to a premature explosion.
This accident was investigated and fully reported to the Chief Inspector. General conditions
were found to be fairly good.
The properties of the Ashloo Gold Syndicate, Loughborough Gold Mines, and Gem Gold
Mines were inspected and conditions found to be satisfactory. Ideal Gold and Nickel Mines,
Limited, worked for a time during the year.
ALBERNI AND NANAIMO MINING DIVISIONS.
General conditions were found to be satisfactory at the properties of the following
companies inspected in 1934: Vancouver Island Gold Mines, Limited; Hercules Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company; Shoal Bay Gold Mining Syndicate (White Pine mine) ;
Northern Mining and Milling Company (Thurlow gold mine).    A good first-aid room with G 46 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
complete equipment was built at the beach camp of Hercules Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company.
CLAYOQUOT MINING DIVISION.
Working conditions were found to be good at Abco Mines, Limited, Big Boy mine, and
Ormond Mines, Limited.
NANAIMO MINING DIVISION.
Tyee Mine.*—This property, owned by the Tyee Consolidated Mining Company, Limited,
is situated on Mount Sicker near Duncan. The only work done during the year was the
cleaning-out of the No. 3 adit on the Lenora claim and the retimbering of the upper section
of the shaft on the Tyee claim. Work was discontinued in July. The management was
notified that the upper part of the Tyee workings must be dewatered before any advance of
the Lenora workings can be permitted.
Georgina Gold Claim.*—J. T. Williams and associates are developing this claim, situated
on Nanoose creek, about 18 miles north of the city of Nanaimo. A small shaft was sunk on
the property on the side of the creek to a depth of about 35 feet on the pitch of the vein and
drifting from it was carried under and across the course of the creek. The work done was
entirely of a prospecting nature and as such was found to be in a satisfactory condition.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John G. Biggs.
Twenty different mining developments in this district were inspected several times during
the year.    One fatal and three serious accidents occurred in this district.
KAMLOOPS MINING DIVISION.
Kamloops Homestake.—Operated by the Kamloops Homestake Mines, Limited. Angus
McLeod, manager. The hanging-wall in this property is a talc-schist that requires very careful
timbering to protect the mine, and during the year this and other matters pertaining to safety
were found to be well attended to. Thirty-nine men were employed here at the time of the
writer's last inspection.    A 50-ton mill and necessary camp buildings were built.
OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION.
Nickel Plate.—Operated by the Kelowna Exploration Company, Limited. W. C. Douglass,
manager. An electric hoisting unit was installed on the main slope and it is supplied with
440 volts from a bank of transformers near the hoist-station, the power being carried underground at high tension. Early in the year connection was made with the power-supply of
the West Kootenay Power Company and the hydro-electric installation owned by the mining
company was shut down. A new pipe-line has been laid up 20-Mile creek and provides an
ample supply of water to the Nickel Plate and Hedley Mascot mills. The surface incline has
been tracked with 30-lb. steel and new haulage-ropes were installed to handle the 5-ton-capacity
skips; on this installation the use of friction-brakes has been discarded and control is now by
motor-driven drums. The mine, tram, and mill were found to be in satisfactory condition and
the provisions of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" fully observed. One hundred
and ninety-five men were employed at the end of the year.
Hedley Mascot.—Operated by the Hedley Mascot Mining Company, Hedley. W. R. Lindsay, manager. Transportation between the mine and mill is by a Quad aerial tram on which
skips of 2.5-ton capacity run on double-track cables of 1%-inch diameter, which are supported
by six towers spaced over the 4,700-foot length of the tramway, which, is at an angle of 40
degrees. The traction-rope is %-inch diameter and is controlled by a 75-horse-power motor
and friction-brakes. A camp has been established near the mine and provides satisfactory
accommodation for the forty men employed; the camp is heated efficiently by an " Iron
Fireman " installation.    A mill of approximately 150 tons capacity was nearing completion
* By George O'Brien. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 47
at the end of the year. The requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" were
found to be observed.
The Windpass mine was inspected and conditions were generally found to be satisfactory.
The following properties were examined and working conditions found to be satisfactory:
Nicola Mines and Metals, Limited, in the Nicola Mining Division; Hedley Amalgamated, Gold
Mountain, and Hedley Sterling in the Osoyoos Mining Division; Lakeview-Dividend, Morning
Star, Susie, Grandoro, and Mak Siccar in the Osoyoos Mining Division.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
ATLIN MINING DIVISION.
Two visits were made to the Atlin district during the year on account of the number of
underground placer operations. Of the thirty-three separate producing properties, twenty-
eight are, with one exception, small underground operations employing from two to seven men.
Most of the operations in the district are on Spruce creek. With the exception of the Columbia
Development Company, all of the operations on this creek are underground. The Columbia
Development Company operates two steam-shovels, a second shovel having been taken in during
the year.
Colpe Mining Co., Ltd.—This is the largest underground operation and has worked
continuously during the year. The second exit ordered at this mine has been completed
and, in addition to providing a second means of exit, also greatly improved the ventilation.
Conditions here on the last inspection were good. Twenty-nine men were employed on two
shifts.
All the other underground operations were inspected on both visits.
The greatest danger on this creek is in the lack of secondary exits to provide means of
escape and insufficient ventilation. Recommendations were made with the view to remedy
these conditions.
Air samples were taken in three of the small operations, all of which showed deficiency in
oxygen and excess in black-damp.
Timbering generally was well done and kept up sufficiently close to the face.
One fatal accident occurred in the Buchanan and Cummings lease, in which a miner was
killed by a cave-in. Apparently a small sluff or run of ground had been following the drift
from some distance. This had not been blocked above the lagging, leaving a space of from 2
to 3 feet open above the timbers. When the cave occurred at the face, it broke down the
false set and two main sets closest to the face. A miner was caught in the cave-in and instantly
killed.
This practice of neglecting to block up ground that has a tendency to run is a bad one.
The attention of those engaged in the district has been drawn to it.
The cost of timber is extremely high, low-grade spruce and pine only being available.
Other placer operations on Otter, Boulder, McKee, Ruby, Pine, Gold Run, Birch, and
Wright creeks and O'Donnel river were inspected.
None of the lode operations in the district operated during the year.
About forty-five men, whites and Indians, were employed on Squaw creek during the
summer, principally on individual operations. The Gold Run Exploration Company, the only
company operating, employed twelve men.
Whitewater, Tulsequah River.—This property was operated by the E. C. Congdon interests,
of Duluth, Minn. At the time of inspection the installation of a fan was recommended to
improve the ventilation.    Operations were suspended for the winter.
Prospecting operations were carried out in the McDame and Tibbett Creek areas in the
Liard Mining Division. -    NAgg RiyER ^^ Dmsl0N
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Ltd.—Operations at the
Hidden Creek, Bonanza, and Granby Point mines of this company ceased on July 31st. All
plant and equipment was withdrawn from the underground workings and the mines abandoned. G 48 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
In the Alice Arm area the Esperanza was reopened and a 25-ton mill constructed. The
Dolly Varden was worked under lease.
PORTLAND CANAL MINING DIVISION.
Premier Gold Mining Co., Ltd.—B. F. Smith, general manager, and J. G. Pearcey, mine
superintendent.    Conditions generally were found to be good on the various inspections made.
The first District First Aid Competition in the Northern District for the Department of
Mines Cup was held at Premier on May 23rd, four teams competing—Anyox, Premier Mine,
Premier Mill, and Big Missouri. The Anyox team, captained by Sam Reid, was declared the
winner after a very close contest. The meet was very successful, the presence of the Anyox
team greatly assisting to that end. The competition has done a great deal to stimulate interest
in first aid in the district.
Big Missouri.—Five thousand nine hundred and four feet of underground workings were
driven during the year.    Conditions generally were good at the time of inspection.
Diamond-drilling was done on the Hercules and Salmon Gold, and prospecting on the
Unicorn, Troy, Spider, and several other small properties in the Salmon River area.
The Dunwell, Ben Ali, United Empire, Excelsior, L. and L., and Black Hills were worked
part of the year, and a little work was done on the Glacier Gulch, George Enterprise, Sunbeam,
Lakeview, Portland Canal, Roosevelt, L.L. and H., and Lucky Date properties in the Bear
River section.
Helena Gold Mines, Limited, did some work on their Georgia River property.
QUEEN CHARLOTTE MINING DIVISION.
The old shaft-workings of the Sunrise property on Graham island were tapped by an adit
and drained.
SKEENA MINING DIVISION.
The Surf Point mine on Porcher island was operated throughout the year and conditions
on inspection were found to be good.
The Surf Inlet mine on Princess Royal island was under development during the year.
OMINECA MINING DIVISION.
No underground work was done on the Dardanelles group of Omineca Gold Quartz,
Limited, on Copper creek. The Columario near Usk was closed down in June. Conditions
were found to be good at the property of Nicholson Creek Mining Company.
The Mamie, Rio Grande, and Glacier Gulch properties in the Smithers section were under
development.
Prospecting only was done on properties in the Telkwa, Houston, and Topley sections.
In the Aiken Lake area Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company drove about 1,000
feet of workings during the year.
Northern Ventures abandoned underground operations on Vital creek and are arranging
to commence hydraulic operations.
Germansen Creek Placers, Limited, on Germansen creek, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company on Slate creek, and Omineca Placers, Limited, on Manson creek operated during
the season.
Several individuals worked underground on Lost creek.
WEST KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
H. E. Miard.
This district includes the Nelson, Trail Creek, Ainsworth, Slocan City, Slocan, Lardeau,
Revelstoke, Arrow Lakes, Grand Forks, and Greenwood Mining Divisions. During 1935 considerable activity prevailed in the gold-mining section of the inspectorate, particularly in the
Nelson and Trail Creek Mining Divisions, while but a very moderate improvement could be
observed in the silver-lead-zinc belt, the most important development in the latter part of the
district being the reopening of the Mammoth mine at Silverton, which has been operated con- INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 49
tinuously since the month of May. A steady and reasonable price for silver would do much
towards rejuvenating the industry in at least four of the mining divisions previously
enumerated.
In the course of regular inspections eighty-four underground operations were visited.
Of these, twenty-six had been abandoned at the end of the year, for an indefinite period in
a few instances, but, in the majority of cases, for the winter season only. Work on the
Rossland leases has been proceeding on a much reduced scale and in a desultory manner since
the month of August. In the early part of the year these operations gave employment to
more than 250 men.
During the year 279 certificates of competency as blaster were granted under the provisions
of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act." Of these, twenty-seven were issued as substitutes, while the scope of thirty-two was restricted to hand-steel operations and ten more
covered incidental blasting and transportation of explosives only.
The ventilation of underground workings continued to claim its share of attention, and,
while undeniable progress can be recorded, it must be admitted that better conditions should
exist in some cases in this respect. The ominous prominence assumed by the dust problem
within recent years accentuates the desirability of keener interest being taken everywhere in
this supremely important matter. While general metal-mining technique has taken gigantic
steps forward during the past two or three decades, the ventilation of drifts and stopes is
still but too often abandoned to the whims of uncontrollable natural agencies. Satisfactory
results are obtained at some operations from skilfully conducted air-currents moving under
the influence of differences in temperature only, but in other cases the need for properly
managed ventilation induced by mechanical means is becoming constantly more evident.
Samples of mine-air were taken and sent to Ottawa for analysis, when doubts were
entertained regarding the efficiency of the ventilation. Naturally, a few of these samples disclosed conditions which were not exactly what they should have been, although only two
contained more than 0.01 per cent, of carbon monoxide (0.02 and 0.03 respectively). A minute
quantity of it was found in two other samples, while the presence of traces of a different
inflammable gas, supposed to be hydrogen in two instances and definitely identified as such
in two other cases, was also recognized. The lowest percentage of oxygen found was 20.51
and the highest carbon-dioxide content of any sample was 0.5 per cent., both accompanying
the maximum ratio of combustible gases recorded. As, normally, the appearance of carbon
monoxide and hydrogen in the atmosphere of a metalliferous mine denotes incomplete removal
of powder-fumes, the presence, or absence, of even a mere trace of these gases in the air some
time after blasting may be taken as an idea of efficiency as far as the ventilation is concerned.
Where stoping by the shrinkage method is in vogue, it is occasionally found that, in order
to meet the demands of the mill, ore has been drawn to such an extent that the surface of the
broken rock stands at an inconvenient distance from the back. When this happens, one of
the advantages of the shrinkage method is lost, with the result that the conditions prevaiMng
resemble those accompanying ordinary overhand stoping and must be met in the same way.
The managements of all operations at which such a state of affairs could be brought about
were advised that, whenever the surface of the broken ore stands more than 10 feet away from
the back, substantial platforms must be erected to permit the carrying-out of drilling pnd
blasting operations under safe and convenient conditions until the surface of the broken rock
has been brought up again within a reasonable distance from the solid ore.
With the shrinkage method, the final drawing of stopes may present greater risks th<-n
their advancement, this depending largely upon the nature of the ground, the width of the vein,
and the length of time during which the broken rock has remained partly undisturbed.
Careful scaling is indispensable as the broken ore goes down, and timbering is often necessary.
The difficulties presented by the drawing operation and the possibility of accidents defend
largely upon the distance between levels and, generally, increase in direct ratio thereto.
Verv good reasons may be advanced in support of the contention that this distance should
never exceed 125 feet.
The new " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" prescribes a definite course of action on
many points which the legislation that it superseded, on March 23rd, 1935, left undecided.
However, one of the immediate and highly beneficial effects of this enactment was the fact that
it was read more attentively than the old Act had ever been, and brought to the attention of G 50 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
the operators a number of important features of the latter, carried into its successor, to which
seldom more than a passing thought had been bestowed in the past. At the smaller operations
some difficulty is experienced in obtaining satisfactory compliance with the provisions of
General Rule 76 (a), as far as having clear and explicit details of the daily examination of
the workings entered in the report-book is concerned. This of course is no new experience,
for it was but seldom that one found a small mine at which the demands of former General
Rule 16 were strictly complied with in this respect. Special rules have been instituted at
seven of the larger operations, in accordance with the requirements of section 29 of the new
" Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act."
Ninety-seven accidents were reported during the year. Of these, three were fatal,
involving the loss of four lives, thirty-one were serious, and sixty-three slight. The fatal
accidents are described in detail in another section of this report. One, claiming two victims,
was due to a fall of rock in a stope; another resulted from carbon-monoxide poisoning; while
in the third case a man fell into a raise the top of which was adequately protected. Among
the other mishaps recorded, many were clearly avoidable and would not have occurred had
appropriate precautions been taken, often by the man injured. The wearing of gloves, goggles,
and hard-toed boots, when clearly indicated, would undoubtedly shorten the list of minor
accidents considerably.
Three blasting accidents were investigated (one having actually taken place in 1934).
As results of these inquiries, Certificate of Competency as Blaster No. 7221 was cancelled,
and Certificates of the same class Nos. 7315, 583, 7230, and 10490 were suspended, each for
a period of three months. With our present knowledge of the matter, the high quality of all
blasting supplies in use, and the very precise regulations governing the handling of explosives,
accidents of this source should be a thing of the past. When such mishaps occur they may
almost invariably be ascribed to carelessness.
During the summer well-attended first-aid classes were conducted by Dr. N. E. Morrison,
of Salmo, in the Sheep Creek section of the Nelson Mining Division. The isolated situation
of the majority of the metalliferous mines, coupled with the comparatively small number of
men employed at each separate operation, complicates the work of disseminating knowledge
of this all-important subject, and ambulance classes can be held only at the cost of considerable
inconvenience to the lecturer and, at times, to those attending.
There was one prosecution instituted under section 44 of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," this arising out of a breach of General Rule 5, and a conviction was obtained.
The only dangerous occurrence reported was the failure of a skip-coupling in a shaft.
No personal injuries resulted and the material damage done was limited to the destruction of
the skip.
It would not be possible to describe the conditions prevailing at each individual operation
without exceeding considerably the space that can be allowed to this report. However, it may
be stated that a large number of the properties enumerated in the following list are old
operations, reopened after being abandoned for many years in some instances, and presenting
all the difficulties that can normally be expected in such circumstances, this fact being particularly noticeable in the case of mines worked by leasing miners whose financial situation does
not permit the undertaking of extensive repairs.
NELSON MINING DIVISION.
The following properties were operated throughout the year: The Reno, Queen, Kootenay
Belle, Gold Belt, Salmo-Malartic, Second Relief, and Arlington, in the Salmo district; the
Yankee Girl, Ymir Centre Star, and Goodenough, at Ymir; and the Granite-Poorman, at
Blewett, near Nelson. At the Wilcox, Ymir, Porto-Rico, and Ymir Dundee, ore was mined
and either milled or shipped during the summer, while development-work was carried on for
several months at the Bunker Hill, Nugget, Golden Fawn, Blackcock, Gold Cup, Howard, Gold
Fern, Wisconsin, and Bayonne mines, still continuing at the three operations first mentioned,
while a little was done also at the Tamarack and the Perrier. Late in the year two new
operations were started—the Ore Hill, in the Salmo district, and the Creston Hill, near
Kitchener. Small groups of lessees worked at the Venus, near Nelson; the Emerald, at Salmo;
and the Keystone, near Erie;  but these properties were not visited. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 51
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, employed a crew
of seven men for several months in development-work at the Kootenay Lake limestone-quarry,
near Procter.
Mills were operated at the Reno, Queen, Kootenay Belle, Second Relief, Yankee Girl,
Wilcox, Granite-Poorman, and by the Ymir Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited.
TRAIL CREEK MINING DIVISION.
Considerable activity prevailed on the Rossland leases until restrictions had to be placed
upon the volume of the monthly shipments to the Trail smelter. The following properties
were inspected during the year: The Le Roi, Black Bear, Josie No. 1, Josie No. 2, Annie,
Centre Star, Iron Mask, War Eagle, Poor-man, Idaho No. 1, Idaho No. 2, and Iron Horse, all
owned by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and operated
by lessees; the Evening Star, Columbia Kootenay, O.K., and Gold Drop, also worked by leasing
miners for some time; the San Francisco, on which little was done beyond repairing the lower
adit; the I.X.L. and the Velvet-Portland. At the last-named property activities during the
summer were practically limited to milling ore previously mined, very little underground work
being done, with the result that the list of repairs somewhat overdue grew to an uncomfortable
length, but is now receiving much-needed attention. A few lessees worked also for some time
at the Jumbo and Morning Star, but these small properties were not visited. The Velvet mill
was the only one operated in the Division, beside that of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company at Trail.
AINSWORTH MINING DIVISION.
The two major operations in the Ainsworth Mining Division were the Utica and the
Whitewater Deep. At the former, development-work continued until the early part of
November, when the camp was closed for the winter, while, at the latter, underground operations were carried on with a small crew and the mill treated mostly low-grade ore brought
over from the Rambler dumps.
SLOCAN CITY MINING DIVISION.
There was very little activity in this part of the district. Small crews were employed at
the Ottawa, and for a short time during the summer at the Chapleau. Four lessees worked
at the Meteor during the greater part of the year.
SLOCAN MINING DIVISION.
The most important operation in this Division is the Mammoth at Silverton, which employed
about ninety men at the mine and mill ever since operations were resumed in May. Other
properties visited were the Bosun, Highland Chief, Victor, Black Colt, and Noble Five, the
latter having been operated only during the summer and early fall. Small crews were employed
also at the Palmita, the Molly Hughes, and for a short time at the McAllister, while four leasing
miners worked at the Standard. Only the Mammoth and Noble Five operated mills in the
Division during the year.
LARDEAU MINING DIVISION.
The only properties operated in this Division during 1935 were that of the Meridian Mining
Company, Limited (Criterion and Eva), and the Teddy Glacier, at which exploratory work was
definitely abandoned early in September. The Gold Finch was also visited in view of a possible
resumption of operations rumoured at the time. The only mill operated was that of the
Meridian Mining Company, Limited.
REVELSTOKE MINING DIVISION.
There was very little activity in this part of the district. Development-work proceeded
throughout the year at the Allco Silver, and a small crew was employed for a short time in
prospecting operations on the Mastodon group.
ARROW LAKES AND GRAND FORKS MINING DIVISIONS.
There was very little activity in the Arrow Lakes Mining Division beyond prospecting and
a few leasing operations worked on a very small scale.    In the Grand Forks Mining Division G 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1935.
the Yankee Boy was operated throughout the year and the Union during the summer only.
At the latter property, only the minor part of the material treated at the mill was obtained
underground, where only a very small crew was employed. Calgary interests began operations
at the Molly Gibson, near Paulson, during the fall, and the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada, Limited, operated a limestone-quarry at Fife until late in the year.
GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION.
In the vicinity of Greenwood the Dentonia was operated continuously, while small crews
were employed at the North Star, Bay, Skylark, No. 7, Elkhorn, and on the Rainbow group
during part of the year. Operations were suspended at the Providence early in May. At
Beaverdell, the Bell, Highland Lass, Sally, Wellington, Bounty, Revenge, and Tiger worked
throughout the year. Exploratory and development work were carried on at different periods
and during various lengths of time at the Rambler, Black Diamond, Buster-Alaska, Sweet
Mary, and Olympic, and a small group of lessees worked at the Carmi. The only mill operated
in the Division during the year was that of the Dentonia Mines, Limited.
The writer desires to express appreciation of the co-operation of the different managements
of the operations mentioned in this report in all matters and recommendations pertaining to
the advancement of mine safety.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald.
Thirteen properties were visited during the course of inspection; of these, the Sullivan
mine at Kimberley and the Monarch mine at Field are the most important and were inspected
regularly, while less frequent visits were made to the smaller operations. At a few of the
smaller mines it was found necessary to direct the attention of the officials to certain matters
not strictly in accordance with the requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation
Act." In this connection, however, operators and managers as a rule displayed a readiness
to co-operate in the matter of complying with the regulations and the adoption of safety-first
methods in and around the mines.
All serious accidents reported to our office were immediately investigated and reported in
detail; it is a pleasure to be able to record that no fatalities occurred around any of the mines
in this district during 1935.
FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION.
Sullivan.—Owned and operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of
Canada, Limited. General superintendent, A. B. Ritchie; mine superintendent, W. Lindsay;
and safety engineer, J. M. Wolverton. After a long and successful career in charge of the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company's operations at Kimberley, Mr. Montgomery was
transferred in May to take charge of certain of the company's Eastern properties, being
succeeded at Kimberley by A. B. Ritchie.
Under the direct supervision of Grant Henderson, ventilation engineer, the ventilation of
the Sullivan mine in general has been maintained at a high standard, an important step in
this direction being the installation on the surface at No. 11 shaft of a Jeffrey 8-foot-diameter,
2-stage aerovane fan, operating at a speed of 575 r.p.m., and producing an average quantity
of 92,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 2.25 inches. At the No. 9 shaft,
also on the surface, a 5- by 2%-foot Jeffrey fan is operating steadily at a speed of 275 r.p.m.
and producing an average quantity of 62,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge
of 1.2 inches. In addition to the above permanent installations, several smaller fans are in
constant use as boosters underground;  ventilation in general being good all over the mine.
The dust problem is receiving very close attention at this mine, and atomizers, water
sprays, and water curtains are installed and operated in stopes, ore-pockets, loading-chutes,
and many of the main roads in an effort to combat this hazard. In all drifts, after blasting,
the muck-pile and walls are thoroughly wetted, and this operation is repeated as often as may be considered necessary while the muck-pile is being moved. All plugging and block-holing
is done by means of wet pluggers, fifty of these machines being in use.
The Edison K-type electric cap safety-lamp is now used exclusively by the workmen, 500 of
these lamps being put into use on October 1st, while, in addition, a total of sixty flood-lights are
used in the various stopes; this type of lamp is also used by the barmen. The work of accident-
prevention receives the most careful attention of the general superintendent and all members
of his staff by their attendance at all safety committee meetings, where a free and full discussion is invited on all matters pertaining to the safety of the workmen employed in each
department in or around the mine. To provide adequate accommodation for the increased
force of men employed a new dry has been erected on the site occupied by the former change-
room; this building is of two-story construction, is fire-proof throughout, and equipped with
lockers to accommodate a crew of 1,000 men. During the year a modern solarium was installed,
details of which are given elsewhere.
Throughout the year general conditions in this mine were found to be very satisfactory
and the requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" fully observed.
Visits of inspection were made to the following properties, where general conditions were
found fairly satisfactory: B.C. Cariboo Goldfields Midway mine at Aldridge; Ewen and
Oscarson claims; C. Olson claim; C. Ofnar claim; Roberts and Steuart claim; the four latter
being underground placer operations in the vicinity of Moyie River falls. In the Perry Creek
locality the following properties were inspected at different times: Perry Creek Gold Mines,
Limited; the Sawmill Creek mine of the Kimberley Goldfields Consolidated; the Birdie L.
mine, which is operated by R. L. Bird and associates; and the North Star placer mine, operated
by D. A. Mcintosh and associates.
WINDERMERE MINING DIVISION.
Excelda Mine.—Owned and operated by Thunderbird Mines, Limited. J. P. Farnham,
general manager. A crew of fifteen men was steadily engaged during the summer months.
The surface plant consists of a 2-stage, Gardner-Denver compressor, driven by a Hercules
gasoline-engine, and is located in a central position on the property at an elevation of 8,510 feet
above sea-level. At all visits of inspection, working and living conditions were found to be
very good and the requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" well attended
to. Operations at this mine were suspended for the season in November and are expected to
resume in May of next year.
GOLDEN MINING DIVISION.
Monarch and Kicking Horse.—Owned and operated by Base Metals Mining Corporation,
Limited. J. T. Emmons, general manager; Thos. Oxley, mine superintendent. After being
closed down from the middle of February until June 1st, during which interval general repairs
were attended to, the mill resumed operations and worked steadily until December 14th, on
which date it was again closed down pending further development being carried on at both
mines. Working and living conditions were found to be good at all inspections and the requirements of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" well complied with.
The writer thanks the officials of the different companies for their co-operation in dealing
with the different points raised during the year.
19 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0308250/manifest

Comment

Related Items