Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1932-33 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1934

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308223.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308223.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308223-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308223-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308223-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308223-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308223-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308223-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308223-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308223.ris

Full Text

 SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OP
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1932-33
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OP EDUCATION
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfielh, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.  To His Honour J. AV. Fordham Johnson.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour : .
I beg respectfully to present the Sixty-second Annual Report of the Public Schools of the
Province.
G. M. AVEIR,
Minister of Education.
December, 1933.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1932-1933.
Minister of Education:
Hon. JOSHUA HINCHLIFFE, B.A.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. AVillis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
L. J. Bruce, Vancouver. A. R. Lord, B.A., Vancouver.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouver. V. Z. Manning, B.A., Cranbrook.
T. G. Carter, Penticton. A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New AVestminster. A. E. Miller, Revelstoke.
H. G. Fraser, M.A., Victoria. H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Arancouver.
*W, G. Gamble, B.A., Prince George. *AV. Ray MacLeod, B.A., Pouce Coupe.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay. J. T. Pollock, Vancouver.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Kelowna. P. H. Sheffield, B.A., Nelson.
*T. AV. Hall, Prince Rupert.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Officer in Charge of Technical Education:
John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Director of Home Economics: Welfare Officer of Rural Female Teachers:
Miss J. L. McLenaohen, B.Sc. Miss Lottie Bowron.
Officer in Charge of High School Correspondence Courses:
J. AV. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed.
Officer in Charge of Elementary School Correspondence Courses:
James Haroreaves.
Registrar: J. L. AVatson, B.A. Officer in Charge of Text-books:  P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
NORMAL SCHOOL STAFFS.
Vancouver: Victoria:
D. M. Robinson, Principal. V. L. Denton, B.A., Principal.
A. Anstey, B.A. B. S. Freeman, B.A.
AV. P. AVeston. C. B. Wood, M.A.
H, B. MacLean. H. L. Campbell, B.A.
J. A. Macintosh, B.Sc. John Gough, M.A.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc. F. T. C. AVickett, A.R.C.O.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed. Miss L. B. Isbister.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A. Miss Barbara Hinton.
Miss E. M. Coney.
Miss ISABEL COURSIER. M°del  ScA°°L"
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A. Miss Kate Scanlan.
Miss I. M. F. Barron.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
R. S. Shields, B.A., New AVestminster. J. M. Paterson, B.A., Saanich  (died,
George H. Deane, Victoria. March, 1933). -
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.
Page.
Superintendent's Report  "
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  2<
Victoria  27
Excerpts from Reports of Provincial Inspectors of Schools  29
Report of the Director of the Summer School for Teachers  39
Report of the Officer in Charge of Technical Education  43
Report of the Director of Home Economics  48
Report of Superintendent of Schools, Arancouver  49
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
New AVestminster  52
Victoria  53
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind ....  55
Report of Officer in Charge of High School Correspondence Courses  56
Report on Elementary School Correspondence Courses  59
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  60
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  63
PART II.
Statistical Returns—
High Schools  (Cities)  2
High Schools (District Municipalities)  10
High Schools (Rural Districts)  12
Superior Schools (Cities)  14
Superior Schools (District Municipalities)  14
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  14
Junior High Schools (Cities)  16
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  19
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  19
Elementary Schools (Cities)  20
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  55
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  73
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  94
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  97
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  gg
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  100 PART I.
GENERAL EEPOET.  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF
EDUCATION, 1932-33.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1933. ■
To the Honourable George M. Weir, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Sixty-second Annual Report of the Public Schools of
British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1933.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 115,919 to
116,816 and the average daily attendance from 103,510 to 104,978. The percentage of regular
attendance was 89.86.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—■
Schools.
Cities.
District Rural
Municipalities, i      Districts.
Total.
High schools	
Superior schools	
Junior high schools	
Elementary schools	
Total, 1932-33
Total, 1931-32
14,301
23
6,348
49,529*
ToT201~
~707313 ~
3,108
53
257
19,865f
~23;283—
22,633
1,143
597
66
21,526
~23;332~
22,973
18,552
S73
6,671
90,920
116,816
"1157919"
* These figures include an enrolment of 83 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and
the Blind.
f These figures include an enrolment of 78 pupils in the Provincial Model School.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the— students.
High School Correspondence classes      695
Elementary School Correspondence classes      830
Night-schools  4,600
Normal School, Vancouver      233
Normal School, Victoria     150
Victoria College     240
University of British Columbia  1,739
Total  8,487
The pupils were distributed by grades and by sex as follows:—
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Grade I  -	
6,512
6,157
6,151
0,356
6,43!)
6,636
5,929
5,272
3,861
3,032
1,807
1,336
274
5,831
5,381
5,793
5,871
5,897
6,378
5,846
5,452
3,818
3,025
2,121
1,411
230
12,343
Grade II	
Grade III	
Grade IV	
Grade V	
11,538
11,944
12,227
12,336
Grade VI	
13,014
Grade VII	
Grade VIII	
11,775
10,724
Grade IX.             	
7,679
6,057
Grade XI	
3,928
Grade XII.           .     ...                            	
2,747
504
Total	
59,762
57,054
116,816 "
-
M 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
and the percentage of the pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of
pupils per teacher are shown below:—■
Schools.
a.
o zj
O a)
Tfl £
62
^7
S5i
a    S
l&i
a. o s
CuHH
6»ag a;
SocS'g
t. (-■ r* -,
Sg5-g
High schools (cities)	
High schools (district municipalities)	
High schools (rural districts)	
Superior schools (cities) $	
Superior schools (district municipalities) i.	
Superior schools (rural districts) $	
Junior high schools (cities)	
Junior high schools (district municipalities).
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities)*	
Elementary schools (district municipalities)!
Elementary schools (rural districts)	
Total	
436
104
56
1
2
34
176
8
3
1,347
556
1,006
56
4
43
2
2
63
13
492
108
56
1
2
34
219
10
5
1,410
569
1,006
14,301
3,108
1,143
23
53
597
6,348
257
66
49,529
19,865
21,526
3,729
183
3,912
116,816
12.25
2.66
0.98
0.02
0.05
0.52
5.42
0.22
0.06
42.39
17.01
18.42
100.00
33
30
20
23
26
18
36
33
22
37
36
21
31
29
26
18
20
21
15
33
28
18
33
34
18
~26~
* These figures include 16 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 83 pupils enrolled in
the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 78 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School.
J Division I. only.
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class held by these teachers :—
Schools.
f=i
High schools (cities)	
High schools (district municipalities)	
High schools (rural districts)	
Superior schools (cities) J	
Superior schools (district municipalities) %■■
Superior schools (rural districts) t	
Junior high schools (cities)	
Junior high schools (dist. municipalities)..
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities)*	
Elementary schools (dist. municipalities) f
Elementary schools (rural districts) 	
Total, 1932-33	
Total, 1931-32	
407
93
51
1
2
8
26
99
72
1
5
2
1
120
643
16
250
38
449
835
78
12
1,449
527
278
499
17309
42
11
16
69
789   1,441
1,378
73
4
"TT
41
3
2
69
13
223
~23S
10
~10~
310
56
32
1
2
29
107
6
4
292
124
255
1,218
182
52
24
5
112
4
1
1,118
445
751
2,694
492
108
56
1
2
34
219
10
5
1.410
569
1,006
3,912"
1,235
2,724
3,959
I
* These figures include 16 teachers employed in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and
the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School.
t Division I. only.
NEW SCHOOLS.
A high school was opened at Parksville and a superior school at Procter.
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in nine pioneer districts.    The names of
the districts follow :—
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Palmer Bay, Seymour Narrows Comox.
Mount Prevost Cowichan-Newcastle. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 11
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Sheep Creek Fernie.
Cranbrook Mills, Fort George Canyon Fort George.
Alta Lake Lillooet.
Naltesby Omineca.
Five Mile Creek Similkameen.
The establishment of elementary schools was authorized in the following districts, but these
schools were not opened during the school-year:—
Name of School District. • Electoral District.
Anahim Lake, Narcosli Creek Cariboo.
Camp 2, Vedder Crossing Chilliwack.
Nithi Mountain Omineca.
COMPARISON OF GROWTH OF SCHOOLS AND GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE
FOR EDUCATION.
The gradual growth of the schools and also the cost to the Provincial Government of
maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—■
Year.
No. of
Teachers
employed.
Number
of School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendttoce.
Percentage
of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure for
Education.
1877-78    	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,490
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,740
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.S6
$43,334.01
1882-83    	
50,850.63
1887-88	
99,902.04
1892 93           	
190,558.33
1897 98    	
247,756.37
1902 03    	
397,003.46
1907 08    	
464,473.78
1,032,038.60
1912  13    	
1913-14 	
1,8S5.654.11
1917  18           	
1,529,058 93
1922-23	
3,176,680.28*
1927-28    	
3,532,518.95*
1928-29	
3,765,920.69*
1929 30    	
3,743,317.08*
1930-31	
1931 32    	
3,834,727.19*
4,015,074.37*
1932-33	
2,849,972.02*
* This amount includes the annual grant to the Provincial University.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
Year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage at
High Schools
of the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1921-22	
1922-23	
1923-24	
1924-25	
1925-26	
1926-27	
1927-28	
1928-29	
1929-30	
1930-31	
8,634
9,220
9,889
10,597
11,779
12,900
13,516
14,545
14,675
16.197
18.134
18,552
83,285
85,668
86,315
87,357
89,909
92,102
94,663
95,013
96,342
97,717
97,785
98,264
91,919
94,888
96,204
97,954
101,688
105,008
108,179
109,558
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
9.39
9.71
10.27
10.81
11.58
12.29
12.49
13.27
13.22
14.21
15.64
15.80
$29.33
27.92
27.36
27.17
26.09
26.40
26.92
28.32
28.07
28.03
29.62
21.55
$35.70
34.07
33.21
32.17
31.06
31.41
31.74
33.03
32.79
32.74
1961-32	
33.18
1932-33	
23.98
■ M 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1932-33.
Grand total cost of education    $8,941,497.34
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College      $5,080.34
Special grant to Victoria College         3,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia    250,000.00
Normal School, Vancouver      13,736.41
Normal School, Victoria      20,731.06
Cost of night-schools '    12,910.81
Correspondence Courses:   Elementary Schools        7,964.06
Correspondence Courses :   High Schools      18,948.45
■        332,371.13
Net cost for total enrolment of 116,816 pupils    $8,609,126.21
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  73.70
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on total enrolment  .38
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 104,978 pupils  82.01
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on average daily attendance  .42
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 116,816 pupils for year
($2,849,972.02 —$332,371.13)       2.517.600.89
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  21.55
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days) on total enrolment   .11
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
104,978 pupils  23.98
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day  (193 days)   on average
daily attendance   .12
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows :—
EG
CD
a
O
CD
CD
a
c
rt
CO
-U
rt
S
i   CO
S3
rt >
a rt
m a
cfi
CO
M
GQ
CD
03
rt
rt
S
t-i
o
a
CD
0
CD
U
CO
rt   ■
CD^
174
1,060
81
68
509
1,261
1,660
638
' 5
55
110
37
175
844
374
542
8
14
25
40
39
185
36
86
42
395
300
322
L059~
20
133
25
51
229
206
Elementary schools in district municipalities	
45
81
Total	
1,383
4,068
207
1,935
87
346
rt
.3
ZTj
3
<
co
rt
£
c
09
3
CO
rt
rt
rt
m
u
o
,fi
o
a
a
3
o
O
a
a
S
"5
u
M
P
u
CD
a
CD CD
-M O
Ob,
rt
O
22
127
24
55
30
69
82
167
64
431
94
170
173
1,129
125
384
8
164
8
744
11
99
74
197
119   1
668   |
287   1
278   [   	
1 519
6,840
Elementary schools in district munici-
3,860
Total	
228
348
759
1,811
924
381
1,352   |
1
15,569 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 13
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 14,301. Of this number, 7,153
were boys and 7,148 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment
for 1932-33 and for 1931-32 in each city are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
Alberni District 	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
4
3
10
3
7
3
4
1
6
3
10
1
5
3
2
8
8
24
2
2
4
9
6
3
4
1
7
213
12
7
38
4
3
13
3
7
3
4
1
7
3
12
1
6
3
2
10
9
30
2
2
4
10
7
3
4
1
7
262
14
7
48
99
103
335
58
204
60
109
25
179
75
333
24
132
80
78
229
237
788
40
31
94
244
164
97
115
9
222
8,207
418
20S
1,304
Ill
116
360
Courtenay - !  	
76
224
59
115
25
167
81
Kamloops	
324
35
Kelowna 	
135
78
Merritt 	
70
237
285
1,020
38
25
Prince George 	
95
261
169
83
118
12
200
7,770
439
214
1,209
Total -	
43
413
492
14,301
14,151
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools during the year was 3,10S. Of this
number, 1,415 were boys and 1,693 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the year 1932-33
and the year 1931-32 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
ot
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
Burnaby 	
Delta	
Esquimalt —
Kent	
Langley -	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui 	
Mission	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton..	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Sumas-Abbotsford
Summerland.-	
Surrey	
Vancouver, West...
Total	
21
19
4
3
2
5
6
100
20
4
3
2
5
6
5
4
12
1
6
6
16
3
3
6
6
108
751
103
84
35
119
146
116
104
303
20
146
189
437
98
82
172
203
3,108
602
98
90
33
128
155
126
99
291
15
122
190
410
78
148
219
2,804 M 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 1,143. Of this number, 553 were
boys and 590 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, together with the enrolment for the
years 1932-33 and 1931-32, are given in the table below:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment.
1931-32.
Abbotsford  (see District Municipalities table for
1932-33)	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
2
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
26
21
41
84
30
11
15
32
59
28
22
17
124
34
30
18
22
55
19
17
18
111
67
16
37
60
21
22
38
48
102
23
Cobble Hill	
16
37
78
24
21
22
30
40
31
22
19
103
38
28
15
North Bend	
26
29
18
11
Parksville	
92
63
29
38
60
Squamish	
25
16
34
29
Total	
30
51
56
1,143
1,119
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in Division I. of the city superior schools was 23. The number of boys was
14, of girls 9.
The following table gives the names of the schools, the number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32:—
City.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
1
oh                      oa
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in Division I. of the district municipality superior schools was 53.    The
number of boys was 25, of girls 28. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 15
The following table gives the names of the schools, the number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32:—
Municipality.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
North Cowichan (Chemainus)	
1
1
22
31
29
37
Total	
2
53
66
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in Division I. of the rural superior schools was 597. The number of boys
was 263, of girls 334.
The following table gives the names of the schools, the number of teachers in Division I.,
and the enrolment in Division I. for the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32:—
District.
U u
P cD
S5H
rt   .
2"
a»
Ocm
s«
a 03
0   .
2"
Sot
District.
u u
CD CD
is
Is
rt  .
2"
•5 i
OCM
rtg
4J
rt     .
CD*1
rtco
•§ 1
?"*
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
14
16
10
21
27
15
16
14
18
11
19
11
14
12
13
18
19
13
23
18
12
10
28
14
14
13
14
25
9
16
12
12
20
11
8
14
22
13
Michel-Natal
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
20
19
18
16
14
40
26
22
7
21
15
19
23
19
20
17
29
20
Parksville  (raised to high
17
17
Procter	
11
33
Holla	
27
22
9
Fort St. John	
20
15
15
23
20
Kitchener (status reduced)	
25
16
Lumby	
34
597
627
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 6,348. The number of boys was 3,256,
of girls 3,092.
The following table gives the number of divisions, of teachers, and the enrolment in each
school for the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32:—
City.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
1
1
1
1
4
4
6
6
7
9
24
113
9
9
9
12
30
150
202
242
234
328
839
4,503
213
250
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
244
340
4,443
Total	
12
165
219
6,348
5,490 M 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools during the year was 257. Of
this number, 129 were boys and 128 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years
1932-33 and 1931-32 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of   Enrolment,
Teachers.       1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
Penticton               1
7
1
10                   257
1
267
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 66. The number of boys enrolled was
35, of girls 31.
The following table gives the number of divisions, of teachers, and the enrolment in each
school for the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32:—
t-i; „<-,.;„<-                                         Number of
District.                                      '     Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of   Enrolment,
Teachers,   i   1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
Ocean Falls i             1
3
5
66
59
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH, SUPERIOR, AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of the enrolment in high, superior, and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Number
3F   PUHLS   II.
Grades.
t, i a
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
.2 2°
t«3 3
High schools :
Cities	
District municipalities...
14,301
3,108
1,143
7,153
1,415
553
7,148
1,693
590
12,333.22
2,706.89
1,003.80
4,123
1,152
374
4,630
907
315
3,032
577
243
2,057
436
202
459
36
9
18,552
9,121
9,431
16,043.91
5,649
5,852
3,852
2,695
504
Superior schools :
Cities*	
23
53
597
14
25
263
9
28
334
20.38
42.53
522.71
10
156
4
22
169
7
10
167
2
21
53
52
District municipalities*
	
673
302
371
585.62
166
195
184
76
52
Junior high schools :
6,348
257
66
3,256
129
35
3,092
128
31
5,711.22
220.15
54.04
2,317
103
27
2,373
79
23
1,658
75
16
District municipalities..
6,671
3,420
3,251
5,985.41
2,447
2,475
1,749
Grand total	
25,896
12,843-
13,053
22,614.94
2,447
2,641
7,593
6,036
3,928
2,747
504
* Division I. only. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 17
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 49,529. The number of boys was 25,620,
of girls 23,909.
The number of schools, the number of divisions and of teachers, and the enrolment in each
city are shown in the table below:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
'Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
Alberni 	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
5
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
54
1
3
1
16
4
11
11
S
17
12
12
3
15
9
1
16
2
18
7
8
20
19
53
11
7
5
10
25
16
12
4
2
34
751
10
38
21
124
4
11
11
8
18
14
12
3
16
9
1
16
2
18
8
9
20
20
59
11
7
5
11
25
10
12
4
2
37
810
16
38
24
133
141
443
448
305
566
448
439
111
569
359
35
597
67
709
208
291
765
696
2,076
389
239
197
384
889
567
493
145
55
1,246
28,064
83
1,360
879
4,606
146
458
435
Courtenay	
301
593
463
442
115
619
349
38
Kamloops -	
638
65
Kelowna	
696
286
312
779
712
2,754
407
233
190
387
911
606
491
189
48
1,258
28,644
School for Deaf and Blind*	
84
1,441
865
4,694
Total ...   ...
121
1,316
1,410
49,529
50,649
* Provincial Government School. M 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 19,865. The number of
boys was 10,261, of girls 9,604.
The following table gives the enrolment and the number of schools in operation in each
municipality during the school-years 1932-33 and 1931-32 :—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Enrolment,
1931-32.
19
15
2
5
3
9
1
2
16
7
11
8
2
1
1
1
6
10
8
4
1
21
5
3
118
37
4
11
7
18
12
6
30
28
18
19
17
2
14
4
36
56
10
10
8
48
19
21
126
38
4
11
7
18
15
6
30
28
18
20
18
2
14
5
36
56
10
10
9
48
19
21
4,373
1,128
125
412
250
620
472
216
1,113
999
616
666
656
49
583
181
1,408
1,989
292
317
295
1,592
737
776
4,363
1,114
116
378
230
Delta                                      	
594
484
Kent	
198
1,058
956
Matsqui      J	
571
648
638
Peachland	
50
574
102
1,362
1,942
263
339
310
Surrey	
1,505
753
768
Total    	
167
553
569
19,865
19,436
* These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 78 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The number of pupils that were enrolled and the number of teachers employed in the
elementary schools of the rural districts were as follows:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Pupils.
Boys.
Girls.
Number of
Teachers
employed.
766
21,526
11,038
10,488
1,006 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 19
SALARIES.*
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary paid to teachers for the
month of June, 1933 :—
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
$175
230
100
228
170
162
157
275
204
277f
102
243f
180
175
231f
296t
307f
202+.
209
182
190
210
270
214
210
140
319
343f
280
239
338
$135
130
130
128
120
120
157
133
130
130f
162
120f
120
120
119f
137f
93f
128J
121
100
124
140
147
121
108
140
102
96f
140
111
137
$148
162
141
147
138
130
157
164
158
170f
162
147f
146
138
138t
181t
187t
153$
165
141
140
15S
179
154
178
140
211
193f
200
166
223
$142
160
1C8
150
216
187
160
157
137
180
151
223
130
261
170
175
120
232
253
183
126
153
190
207
240
178
1S4
110
270
293
237
243
258
$94
85
78
90
97
78
78
90
99
94
101
102
100
84
85
85
77
98
83
94
85
80
90
102
96
81
96
100
85
71
98
85
88
$108
108
106
Courtenay  	
108
115
Cumberland	
105
92
Enderby	
118
114
111
126
Kamloops - -	
132
115
119
Ladysmith	
115
101
109
119
118
109
96
Port Moody	
105
113
133
121
106
117
105
127
134
134
Vernon 	
116
114
$343f
$93f
$161t
$293
$71      $114
District Municipalities.
$244
150
222
130
200
192
157
175
297
130
199f
180
229
$124
120
183
120
120
100
120
130
184
130
94f
120
98
$166
130
196
125
136
147
132
150
233
130
120t
139
158
$217
162
120
118
152
150
239
125
110
140
111
200
288
102
140
140
170
180
$78
67
102
72
99
74
100
86
65
70
78
76
86
97
72
90
78
70
$117
93
111
92
108
Delta       ..    ..  	
85
129
99
83
89
87
101
Oak Bav 	
151
99
99
102
98
104
* In the above table the salary is quoted in dollars only.
t These figures include salaries paid to teachers in high and junior high schools.
t These figures refer to Alberni District High School. M 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
SALARIES—Continued.
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
District Municipalities—Continued.
$150
184
100
240
$125
133
120
152
$133
151
132
182
$110
100
184 ■
114
158
208
$85
S5
80
74
100
88
$92
90
104
84
117
124
Eor all district municipalities
$297f
$94f
$151t
$288
$65
$102
Rural Districts.
$279f
$100f
$154f
$280
$50
$98
t These figures include salaries paid to teachers in high and junior high schools.
The average salary paid teachers employed in all public schools (elementary, superior, junior
high, and high) of the Province for the month of June was $118; to teachers employed in
elementary and superior schools, ,$106; and to teachers employed in junior high and high
schools, $159.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1932-33.
Minister's Office:
Salaries       $8,177.70
Office supplies   115.84
Travelling expenses   565.00
  $8,858.54
General Office:
Salaries   $20,063.03
Office supplies   2,188.12
Travelling expenses   71.36
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc	
Correspondence Courses, High Schools :
Salaries   $16,197.79
Office supplies   4,976.40
Revision of courses  655.00
Travelling expenses   63.95
Science equipment   107.35
22,322.51
55,095.48
Less fees
Correspondence Courses, Elementary Schools:
Salaries 	
Office supplies 	
Industrial Education:
Salaries 	
Office supplies 	
Travelling expenses
Night-schools 	
$22,000.49
3,052.04
$6,837.15
1,126.91
$9,178.52
1,281.08
2,401.12
12,910.S1
18,948.45
7,964.06
25,771.53 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 21
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries   $65,727.08
Office supplies   3,944.94
Travelling expenses   21,765.84
$91,437.86
Less amount paid by School Boards         7,027.26
Normal School, Vancouver: ■ $84,410.60
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)      $31,225.83
Office supplies          1,431.62
Travelling expenses   10.80
Fuel, light, and water         2,140.57
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  423.92
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  442.47
Incidentals   346.20
$36,021.41
Less Normal School fees       22,285.00
Normal School, Victoria:   13,736.41
Salaries (part by Public Works)      $29,178.63
Office supplies          1,241.15
Travelling expenses   66.06
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)          2,383.48
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)         1,629.77
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  369.93
Incidentals   362.04
35,231.06
Less Normal School fees ,...     14,500.00
School for the Deaf and the Blind:   20,731.06
Salaries (less deduction for rent, etc., $4,188)     $23,200.66
Office supplies  874.06
Travelling expenses   38.40
Fuel, light, and water  '.         2,216.36
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   423.29
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment  825.53
Provisions        2,302.90
Incidentals   239.51
30,126.71
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta          2,550.00
  27,576.71
High. Junior High. Superior. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities  $276,065.78 $100,857.09 $785.40 $593,470.00       971,178.27
Salary grants to district
municipalities       73,061.20 6,793.81 1,554.80 337,137.15       418,546.96
Salary grants to rural school
districts       55,148.27 3,347.27 31,576.04 716,174.52       806,246.10
$404,275.25    $110,998.17    $33,916.24    $1,646,781.67
School buildings, erection and maintenance and special aid to school districts  31,739.05
Rural Female Teachers' Welfare Officer :
Salary        $1,529.70
Expenses          1,454.70
■  2,984.40
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses  10,707.00 M 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
Examination of High School and Entrance classes    $29,800.56
Less fees for examination and certificates      25,843.12
Conveying children to central schools	
Summer Schools        $4,892.56
Less Summer School fees        3,895.94
Official Trustee, Community School Districts (5 months) :
Salary          $906.00
Expenses   425.04
Less paid by districts
$1,331.04
392.19
Incidentals and contingencies 	
University of British Columbia ..
Special grant to Victoria College
$3,957.44
61,426.32
996.62
938.85
2,835.66
250,000.00
3,000.00
Total cost to Government     $2,849,972.02
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High. Junior High.
Cities   $1,269,199.17    $470,558.33
District municipalities        225,919.34       14,765.45
Rural school districts         49,940.54 6,083.59
Superior.
$1,282.15
2,146.90
24,554.58
Elementary.
$2,791,994.34
683,562.37
551,518.56
4,533,033.99
926,394.06
632,097.27
$1,545,059.05    $491,407.37    $27,983.63    $4,027,075.27
Grand total cost of education    $8,941,497.34
EXAMINATIONS.
High School Entrance Examination, June, 1933.
The High School Entrance Examination was held on June 28th, 29th,  and 30th at 225
centres throughout the Province.
Under the regulations of the Department, pupils attending a public school in a district
where a high or a superior school is in operation are promoted on the recommendation of a
committee composed of the Principal of the school, the Principal of the high or superior school,
and the Provincial Inspector of Schools.
The number of pupils who were successful in obtaining certificates follows:—
On recommendation   4,121
On examination   1,775
Total  5,896
Ruth Roland Ross, a pupil of Gilmore Avenue School, Burnaby, had the honour of leading
the Province with a total of 538 marks out of a possible 600.
The names of the winners of His Excellency the Governor-General's bronze medals were:—
District.
Name.
School.
Marks
obtained.
No. 1
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
No. 5
No. 6
No. 7
No. 8
No. 9
No. 10
Norma E. Brenen	
W. Macdonald Young	
Margaret K. Thompson....
Ruth R. Ross 	
Rutic E. Kazantseff	
Robert Y. Mitchell	
Norma A. Kinnard	
Betty M. W. Docksteader
Gunhild H. Dellert	
Marcelle labour	
Esquimau School	
Duncan Consolidated School	
Charles Dickens School, Vancouver...
Gilmore Avenue School, Burnaby	
Poplar School, Matsqui	
Barriere River School	
Vernon Consolidated School	
Central School, Trail	
Kimberley School	
Borden Street School, Prince Rupert.
507
523
530
538
505
495
527
515
519
514 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 23
High School Examinations, 1933.
The following are the results of the examinations held in the various high schools and
superior schools throughout the Province:—
No. of
Candidates.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
No. issued
Statement
of Marks
only.
June.
Grade IX                                                             	
156*
150*
68*
100
3,487
316
815
2
44
24
13
23
1,136
118
166
2
110
110
52
77
2,006
198
504
2
Grade X                                                              	
16
Grade XL.   ..                                                                        	
3
Grade XII. (Junior Matriculation)	
Grade XII. (Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance)...
345
145
Academic Standing for Pirst-class Teacher's Certificate	
Total	
5,094
1,526
3,057
511
August-September.
15
976
30
384
2
14
321
24
91
2
1
497
6
219
158
Grade XII. (Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance)...
74
Academic Standing for Pirst-class Teacher's Certificate   ...
1,407
452
723
232
* Under the regulations of the Council of Public Instruction, the teachers of superior schools have the
right in Grades IX. and X. and the teachers of high schools have the right in Grades IX., X., and XI. to
determine promotions. As a result, the number of candidates sitting for examination in these three grades
is comparatively small.
Gbade XIL
The total number of candidates writing Grade XII. (Junior Matriculation and Normal
Entrance) papers at the High School and Matriculation Examinations in June, 1933, was 3,903,
of whom 1,886 were writing the complete examination for the first time. The following is a
classification of the standing secured by these 1,886 candidates:—
Passed Junior Matriculation    -  883
Passed Normal Entrance      10
Passed Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance     86
     979  (51.9%)
Granted Partial Standing       891  (47.2%)
Failed  '.        16  (0.9%)
Total  1,886  (100.0%)
Of the 359 Grade XIL candidates who secured "complete" standing at the August-September
Examinations, 1933, 224 had written a full examination for the first time in June, 1933, and
obtained partial standing. Thus of the 1,886 who wrote the full examination for the first time
in June, 1933, 979+224, or 1,203, completed their standing in one year (1933). This is 63.7
per cent.
Senior Matriculation.
Eight hundred and seventeen candidates wrote Senior Matriculation papers at the High
School and Matriculation Examinations in June, 1933; 355 of these were writing a complete
examination for the first time. The following is a classification of the standing secured by
these 355 candidates :— 	
M 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
Passed Senior Matriculation   135
Obtained   Academic   Standing   for   First-class   Teacher's
Certificate        2
1      137  (38.6%)
Granted Partial Standing     212 (59.7%)
Failed          6  (1.7%)
Total     355  (100.0%)
Of the 93 candidates, writing on Senior Matriculation papers in August-September, 1933,
who obtained " complete " standing, 46 had written a full examination in June, 1933, and secured
partial standing. Thus of the 355 full Senior Matriculation candidates writing the examination
for the first time in June, 1933, 137+46, or 183, completed their standing in one year (1933).
This is 51.5 per cent.
The following summary shows the total number of candidates writing each paper and the
average mark obtained on each paper at the June Examinations by Grade XII. and Senior
Matriculation candidates:—
Subject.
Grade
XIL
Senior Matriculation.
No. of
Average
No. of
Average
Candidates.
Mark.
Candidates.
Mark.
2,012
56.3
366
58.0
1,989
58.3
1,961
58.5
353
57.1
1,993
52.5
'    158
57.3
2,085
59.7
371
60.3
1,993
59.4
371
54.0
2,054
48.8
371
47.0
1,070
56.0
168
55.0
209
65.6
2
89.0
28
69.4
2
55.0
484
55.6
867
64.2
121
61.3
835
64.2
123
53.5
1,739
60.0
325
47.2
1,697
69.5
324
62.7
48
04.7
7
80.4
49
62.6
7
62.7
273
66.2
473
56.5
1
76.0
79
64.1
77
75.9
69
70.0
76
69.3
109
61.7
82
68.8
107
67.3
48
74.3
49
69.1
8
67.3
374
51.6
English Composition	
English Grammar	
English Literature	
Social Studies (History)	
Algebra	
Geometry	
Chemistry	
Physics	
Agriculture	
Biology	
Geography..   	
Latin Authors	
Latin Composition 	
French Translation  (Literature).
French Grammar  (Language)	
German Translation  (Authors)...
German Grammar (Composition)
Arithmetic	
Health	
Music	
Nutrition and Physiology	
Foods and Cookery	
Clothing and Textiles	
Applied Art :.....	
Wood and Metal Work (Theory)
Woodwork (Practical)	
Draughting	
Sheet-metal Work (Practical)	
Machine-shop Work (Practical)...
Greek I	
Trigonometry	
His Excellency the Governor-General's silver medals which are awarded annually to the
five leading Junior Matriculation students were won this year by the following:—
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Ocean Falls	
86.7
86 3
86.0
Lord Byng, Vancouver	
Victoria 	
85.6
84.2 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 25
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded annually by the University of British Columbia
to the student obtaining the highest marks in the Junior Matriculation Examination and to the
six others who lead in their respective districts were won by the following:—
District.                         Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
Crofton House School (Private), Vancouver.
Victoria	
Ocean Falls 	
87.0
84.2
86.7
82.0    -
86.0
82.8
83.3
$150
No. 1
150
»    2
150
„    3	
Elizabeth Janet Houston..	
William Finlayson	
150
„    4
„    5
Richmond  	
Penticton   :	
150
150
„    6
Mary Anita McCulloch	
150
The winners of the Royal Institution Scholarships awarded by the University of British
Columbia to the three students obtaining the highest standing in the Province .on the results of
the Senior Matriculation Examination were:—
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
90.2
85.4
81.6
$150
150
Charles Henry Davenport	
Revelstoke	
150
" EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT."
The appropriation for the fiscal year 1932-33 was $12,000, which was $3,000 less than the
previous year's vote. Three meetings of the Commission appointed to administer the Act were
held during the year, and, in all, 184 applications for assistance were considered. One hundred
and sixty-six pupils were awarded grants, but the remaining applications had to be rejected
as the candidates were over age, or their fathers had not been residents of British Columbia
at the time of enlistment for service in the Great War. Of the 166 students who were granted
assistance, five dropped out before the end of December, and two left school in March—one in
order to accept a position, and the other owing to ill-health.
Geographically, the grants were distributed as follows:—
Alberni  1
Armstrong  3
Atchelitz   1
Blind Channel  1
Blackpool   1
Burnaby    5
Canoe  1
Chilliwack    2
Cloverdale  2
Cobble Hill  4
Courtenay     2
Fernie   3
Fort Langley   1
Ganges  2
Greenwood   1
Hatzic   1
Kamloops   3
Kelowna   1
Langford  2
New Westminster  6
Oak Bay   4
Peachland     2
Penticton  2
Port Clements   1
PortKells  1
Robson  1
Rossland   1
Saanich  9
Sardis   3
Sidney   2
Slocan City  1
Smithers   3
Stewart  2
Telkwa    1
Vancouver    54
Victoria  20
Westbank   1
Westwold   1
Wilmer  1
West Vancouver   4
North Vancouver     2
In the examinations conducted by the Department of Education, one student completed the
Commercial  Course,  six gained  Junior  Matriculation  standing,  two  passed  both  the  Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance Examinations, and eight other students gained partial
standing in Junior Matriculation. One boy completed Junior Matriculation and Normal
Entrance, and wrote off two additional subjects, obtaining an average of 72.14 per cent. Almost
all students in the lower high-school grades gained promotion.
The results of the examinations of the final year of the high schools, as well as the reports
of the principals on the work of all students who were awarded grants, indicate that the latter
are taking full advantage of the financial assistance rendered by the Government towards their
high-school education.
The total cost of administering the " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act" for
1932-33 was $31.50.
DEATH OF MR. J. S. GORDON AND MR. J. M. PATERSON.
The Department of Education suffered a serious loss in the death, during the year, of
Mr. J. S. Gordon, B.A., Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver, and Mr. J. M. Paterson, B.A.,
Municipal Inspector of Schools, Saanich.
Mr. Gordon was an outstanding educationist in this Province for many years. After serving
as teacher in elementary schools and later in high school, he was appointed Provincial
Inspector of Schools in 1902. He became the first Inspector of High Schools in this Province
in 1910, a position which he filled for two years, when he accepted appointment under the
Vancouver Board of School Trustees as Municipal Inspector. In 1929 the name of his office
was changed to Superintendent of Schools.
Mr. Gordon was a life member of the British Columbia School Trustees' Association and
for many years a member of the Board of Examiners for the Province, as well as a member
of the Senate of the University of British Columbia. He was a most conscientious, methodical,
and hard-working official, and his administration of the ever-expanding school system of
Vancouver over a period of twenty-one years was characterized by marked efficiency and
progress.
Mr. Paterson, at one time the Principal of Revelstoke High School and later of Esquimalt
High School, was appointed Provincial Inspector of Schools in 1919, and after most successful
work in the Prince Rupert and Nanaimo Inspectorates was selected as Municipal Inspector of
Schools in Saanich, a post which he occupied at the time of his demise.
His engaging personality made him popular with students and teachers alike, and he had,
in a high degree, the faculty of inspiring both teachers and pupils to do their best.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Tour obedient servant,
S. J. AVILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. MR.  J.  S.  GORDON, B.A.
Superintendent op Schools, Vancouver.    Died June 25th, 1933.  PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 27
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF D. M. ROBINSON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The 1932-33 session opened on September 14th. The enrolment for the preliminary term was
230—168 young women and 62 young men. During the session two students withdrew. At the
close of the term in December six students who had previous Normal School training were
granted diplomas. Three students whose work was not satisfactory withdrew and three discontinued the course.
At the opening of the advanced term in January 216 of those attending during the preliminary term returned. These were joined by one student with previous Normal training and
by two teachers from Saskatchewan who attended for three months; these two completed at
Easter. During the term one student was compelled to withdraw on account of ill-health. Thus
we closed the term in June with 216 enrolled; 205 of these were recommended for interim
certificates. The following summary will show clearly the enrolment and results of the entire
session:—
Young
Women.
Young
Men.
Total.
168
1
6
155
7
62
2
2
56
4
230
3
Withdrew (illness, unsatisfactory work, etc.)	
8
211
Failed....	
11
There were no changes on the staff during the year and the work of instruction was apportioned as in 1931-32. The instruction in physical education was carried out during the session
by Sergeant-Instructor Frost.    Very satisfactory work was done in this department.
During the session our students had abundant opportunity for observation and practice-
teaching. All were placed in large graded schools in the city for seven weeks and in small one-
or two-room schools in district municipalities or rural districts for one full week. This week
spent in small ungraded schools has been particularly helpful. In these schools students have
had an excellent opportunity of observing the organization, management, and daily class-room
procedure of an ungraded school. To all teachers who have so heartily assisted in this department of teacher-training we wish to extend our thanks.
The session just closed has been a very successful one. Members of the staff and the student
body have been in close co-operation. The students have shown a wonderful spirit of enthusiasm
in all school activities—a spirit that is certain to make for success if carried out into the schools
of the Province.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF V. L. DENTON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1932-33 began on September 14th, 1932, and ended on June 9th, 1933. During
the fall term 147 students attended. Of this number, five, who were receiving further training,
were awarded diplomas in December. During the second term, January to June, four students
withdrew, two came in for further training, and one attended for a refresher course. At the
completion of the training in June, 126 students were awarded Normal diplomas, nine of whom
obtained honour standing.    Thirteen failed to qualify. M 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
The following table presents a summary of the enrolment:-
Women.
Men.
Total.
73
1
3
8
58
1
1
5
131
Refresher course	
2
4
Failed  ...
13
Total	
85
65
150
In the Strathcona Trust physical-training course 128 secured Grade B certificates. Miss
Elaine M. Spencer received the award of the gold medal for greatest proficiency in this work.
During the session the students obtained practice-teaching in the municipal schools of
Victoria, Oak Bay, Esquimau, and Saanich and in near-by rural schools. May I at this time
express the thanks of the Normal staff for the valuable assistance received from the principals
and teachers who were engaged in this very important part of the work.
In conclusion, I may note that throughout the year there was hearty co-operation between
staff and students in all departments of the Teacher-training Course. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 29
EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL INSPECTORS
OF SCHOOLS.
INSPECTORS OP HIGH SCHOOLS.
INSPECTOR J. B. DeLONG, B.A., VANCOUVER.
A number of the high-school buildings of my district are in poor repair and really should be
replaced by new ones, but trustees feel that this is impossible at the present time. Trail is the
only School Board which has made any marked improvement to school building during the year.
This city is adding a four-room addition to the high school. The work is being carried out as a
relief measure and is costing the trustees very little.
The extension of the High. School Course from three to four years caused confusion for two
or three years, but the difficulties have been solved, and during the past year the schools have
been functioning very smoothly and efficiently. When the new course was inaugurated three
years ago a large proportion of the schools started off with the idea of allowing the brighter
pupils to cover the course in three years. These superior pupils sat for their final examinations
in June, 1932, and made a very creditable showing; but the outcome of this policy was that
some Grade XII. classes in the school-year 1932-33 were composed of pupils of less than average
ability, and for this reason the showing of some schools in the examinations of June, 1933, was
rather poor. Practically all the larger high schools are now working on a straight four-year
basis, while about half the one-room schools are still attempting to cover the course in three
years.
I wish to take this opportunity of paying a tribute to the high-school teachers of my district.
In many schools classes have been overcrowded and salaries have been reduced to such an extent
that teachers are getting less than when they were engaged several years ago, but the quality
of the teaching has not deteriorated. Teachers are working just as faithfully and conscientiously. They are keeping their ideals high, and seem to feel they are getting their reward
in the love and admiration of their pupils and in the satisfaction of knowing that they have been
the means of raising these pupils to a plane of higher thinking and nobler living.
INSPECTOR A. SULLIVAN, B.A., VICTORIA.
In this inspectorate the majority of high schools have four divisions or less. On Vancouver
Island there are only the Nanaimo and Oak Bay High Schools which have more than four. On
the Mainland, Chilliwack, Kamloops, Revelstoke, Richmond, North Vancouver, and West Vancouver have more than four. It is obvious, therefore, that teachers in the smaller high schools
cannot take full advantage of the options offered in the Four-year High School Course, especially
if they teach also, as they do at Harewood and Ladysmith, Senior Matriculation subjects.
This year High School Graduation Diplomas were granted for the first time. It will be
interesting to observe the value placed by employers and the public generally upon this diploma
given by the principal of a school with the approval of the Department of Education. To obtain
it a student must spend four years in high school and must also secure at least 120 credits. To
obtain a Junior Matriculation or Normal Entrance Certificate he must write upon the Departmental Examination, but he may spend only three years in high school. If the accredited high-
school system be adopted in future, in whole or in part, the Graduation Diploma and the Junior
Matriculation Certificate will have closer relative values.
Several high schools in this inspectorate have spacious grounds, the majority of which are
used as playing-fields. Among the largest are the school-grounds at Chilliwack, Cumberland
Duncan, Ladner, Langley, Matsqui, Oak Bay, Richmond, North Saanich, Salmon Arm and
Tsolum. Where agriculture is taught a portion of the ground is set apart for gardening, as at
Chilliwack and Richmond. The buildings and grounds at Salmon Arm are exceptionally neat
and well kept. The Science Laboratory at Duncan has been enlarged. The grounds at Port
Alberni are being improved each year, and at Tsolum the building has been painted and a new
cement walk from the main road to the school has been constructed.
Thoughtful people are turning their attention to the subject of education to-day as never
before.    Secondary education in particular comes under the search-light of criticism, especially -rr **r? ——■   -
M 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
with regard to its cost and the number and nature of the subjects taught. High-school principals
and teachers are giving heed to reasonable criticism. They are also critical of their own work in
the class-room. The watchwords of all who have to do with the training of children must
continue to be Research, Review, and Revision, based upon wise experiment and continual study.
INSPECTORS OP ELEMENTARY AND SUPERIOR SCHOOLS.
INSPECTOR L. J. BRUCE, VANCOUVER.
Because of their financial difficulties the Rural School Boards and qualified voters have
made no marked improvement to the school-grounds, buildings, nor equipment during the year.
The plan outlined by the Department for regrouping the elementary work into five divisions
was adopted, under my direction, in the rural schools of Bowen Island, Brackendale, Galley Bay,
Lund, Palmer's Camp, and Port Hardy, and also in all the one-room schools of Langley Rural
Municipality. In each case I suggested modification of the plan according to the needs of that
particular school.
I do not know of any case where the Boards of School Trustees in the rural municipal districts are not enforcing the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" relating to compulsory
attendance of children.
INSPECTOR F. G. CALVERT, VANCOUVER.
There was a wide range in the quality of the teaching and the efficiency of the work in the
rural schools. This is just as true with regard to the work in the schools of the rural municipalities. In a few schools the teaching was ineffective; in some the work was fair; in a goodly
number the work was well up to the average; and in a few the work could be classed as
excellent.
A vast difference is noticeable in the attitude of the ratepayers and School Boards in the
various rural school districts towards the maintenance of their schools. In some of these districts the residents display a pride in the local school. The grounds are well kept; the building
is kept in good repair, some improvement being made each year; and school equipment is well
provided. Not so in other districts. Ratepayers and not School Boards are responsible for many
of the poorly equipped schools. Even though the rural districts are feeling keenly the results of
the depression, yet in some of these communities there is no attempt to reduce the cost of
education to such an extent as to impair the efficiency of the school.
In all ungraded schools there has been a tendency to group classes in certain subjects.
This is quite necessary. While no teacher has as yet adopted in toto the plan outlined by the
Department for the regrouping of the work prescribed for eight grades into five divisions, nevertheless the ingenious teacher finds ways and means of so organizing the classes and the prescribed courses that the work may be covered, at least in the essentials.
The matter of school attendance has given some School Boards considerable worry. The
Boards of School Trustees in rural municipal districts of this inspectorate do not hesitate to
enforce the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" relating to compulsory attendance when it is
necessary. A warning letter is generally effective. Boards of School Trustees in rural communities are not so happily situated. Trustees in rural sections hesitate to create hostile neighbours by Court cases. Generally speaking, attendance in this inspectorate has been quite
satisfactory.
INSPECTOR T. G. CARTER, PENTICTON.
I found that, without exception, the teachers were interested in their work, and that they
were all earnestly endeavouring to promote the welfare of their pupils and to improve their
own teaching technique.
In a few of the larger ungraded schools the work was organized according to the regrouping
plan outlined in the circular sent out during the fall term. While there is no doubt that this
plan simplifies the programme of the teacher in the one-room school, I feel that, unless it is put
into general operation, some pupils moving from school to school will be handicapped through the
gaps left in their instruction.
/ PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 31
During the year the school buildings were, on the whole, maintained in a satisfactory state
of repair, but, owing to the general desire to keep costs to a minimum, comparatively few additions were made to school equipment. Chiefly because of the discontinuance of the departmental assistance for school libraries, it has become increasingly difficult to persuade Boards
to purchase the supplementary reading material so essential to the teaching of certain of the
school subjects, such as geography and history.
In general, the attendance, favoured by good weather and freedom from epidemics, has been
good. This condition in the upper grades is also partly attributable to the desire of the parents
to keep their children in school rather than to allow them to spend their time in comparative
idleness.    Little difficulty is experienced in retaining children at school.
INSPECTOR E. G. DANIELS, B.A., BURNABY.
In spite of monetary embarrassment the work of the teaching staff' has been characterized
by honest effort and dogged determination. They have been considerably handicapped in their
work by insufficient supplies. Much time has been wasted on this account, especially in
primary rooms.
In Burnaby great care is taken regarding school attendance. The Board has never hesitated
to enforce the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" when there was any reasonable justification for so doing.
Owing to lack of funds the maintenance of buildings and grounds has been at a minimum
of expense.
One objective of the past year has been to lose as little as possible of the educational
ground gained during the previous four or five years. Reactionary agitators are usually those
who have little educational background, who cannot appreciate real progress, and whose only
policy is one of so-called economy.
Once again in the school-year just closed the work of our teachers was enriched by a series
of lectures given by a member of the staff of Vancouver Normal School. In order that the
lesson-procedure of our primary teachers might be strengthened and their general technique
improved, Miss L. G. Bollert kindly consented to address us. The fact that an average of fifty-
five teachers attended these meetings indicates the great interest and genuine appreciation of
the staff.    To Miss Bollert we were sincerely grateful.
INSPECTOR H. C. FRASER, M.A., VICTORIA.
The work has been going on quietly. It has been a year when little new equipment was
added to the schools and few additions made to the libraries. Just the necessary outlay in
keeping school-grounds and school buildings in shape was made. The School Boards of
Oak Bay and Esquimau have, as usual, kept their grounds in good condition; Esquimau
especially has grounds and situation of which to be proud. Playgrounds of Shawnigan Lake
and Langford have been enlarged and graded to give the children some chance for organized
games.
The Superior School at Cassidy was closed entirely and one division of the Waterloo School
was eliminated.    Lakeshaw School was closed also.
The character of the teaching has not changed perceptibly. In general it has been good,
although some teachers, no matter how they strive, cannot rise above the mediocre. In the
larger centres the better teachers usually are found, although in the ungraded schools some
excellent work is being done.
No rural school under my direction has adopted in its entirety the plan outlined by the
Department for bringing the work prescribed for eight grades into five divisions. Modifications
of this plan have been carried out, however, for some years, more especially with Grades III.
and IV. and Grades V. and VI.
Compulsory attendance from 7 to 15 has received its share of attention in this inspectorate.
It is surprising how many infractions of this regulation occur. In every instance, however, the
School Boards are faithful to their duty, when it is brought to their attention, and usually
delinquent parents are ready to comply with requirements. A few evade the provisions of the
" Public Schools Act" by claiming that they are giving instruction in the home. Usually in these
cases the child is found to have made little progress on his return to school. M 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
INSPECTOR W. G. GAMBLE, B.A., PRINCE GEORGE.
The establishment at Prince George, as a distributing centre, of a library operated by the
Public Library Commission has been of very great value to rural school districts, especially to
those which are somewhat isolated.
The general character of the teaching in the rural schools in this inspectorate is of a high
order, and compares very favourably with that in the elementary city schools and in superior
schools of the smaller centres.    Of exceptional merit was the work done at Loos.
Most of the rural schools have adopted the plan, or some modification of the plan, outlined
by the Department of Education, with reference to the regrouping of the work into fewer divisions. Where the plan has been adopted, much valuable time has been saved and the efficiency
of the teaching has not been appreciably reduced thereby.
No difficulties have been experienced by School Boards in this inspectorate with reference to
compulsory attendance, except in some districts where the children were said to be insufficiently
clothed to attend school during severe weather. Much has been done by various local branches
of charitable institutions and fraternal organizations to alleviate this condition. The teachers
also in many districts have done much to help in obtaining clothing and necessary supplies for
the poorer children.
The rural-school teachers especially are to be commended for the interest manifested in their
school-work and in the general improvement of conditions in their communities. Invariably
these teachers are conscientious workers, and endeavour to improve their educational standards
by home study or by taking advantage of Correspondence or Summer School Courses. In very
many districts the influence of the teacher is reflected in the greater interest of the parents in
the education of their children, and in the greater co-operation of the members of the. community
in whatever makes for greater efficiency in the education and development of the child as the
future citizen of our country.
INSPECTOR G. H. GOWER, M.A., COURTENAY.
The present financial situation is reflected in lower school expenditures in almost all districts. Except at Jackson Bay, where a one-room school-house is in course of erection, no new
buildings have been undertaken during the year and little has been attempted by way of improvements to existing school buildings and grounds. In most districts the minimum amount is
being expended on school supplies and equipment.
Notwithstanding the financial stringency that prevails, the general standing of the schools
has not changed materially since my last report was submitted. On the whole, the work of the
year progressed smoothly and a creditable standard of efficiency was maintained.
INSPECTOR T. R. HALL, B.A., KELOWNA.
The effects of the economic depression were generally observable in the schools. Salary
cuts were general, there being only one or two exceptions. Reductions in salary were, however,
for the most part reasonable, although here again there appeared to be the occasional exception.
The average School Board has shown appreciation of the services of the teaching body and has
been reluctant to reduce salaries. Expenditures for supplies and maintenance have been
considerably reduced; this is especially noticeable in the failure to provide funds for supplementary readers and library books. Fortunately, several schools were quite well equipped in
this respect, but unless provision is made for replacements the advantage gained in former
years will soon be lost. The same thing holds true in maintenance of buildings. In the past
the majority of the school buildings were in good repair. Most School Boards have been wise
enough to maintain their buildings in good condition; unfortunately, others have pursued the
penny-wise-and-pound-foolish policy of failing to protect capital invested by a reasonable
expenditure for maintenance. In general, it may be said that while careful economy has been
exercised, a majority of the School Boards have had sufficient foresight not to reduce supplies
to the point where efficiency is threatened, or expenditure on maintenance to such an extent
that buildings are unduly deteriorating.    Where an unwise economy has been practised and
such cases are not numerous—it is what one might expect from the previous history of the
districts concerned. It is pleasing to reflect that there are far fewer cases of this kind than
of districts in which one finds pupils housed in bright, attractive, well-maintained schools.
This is due to the fact that School Boards have not confused economy and parsimony. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 33
I feel safe in saying that in the ten years during which I have inspected the schools of this
inspectorate I have never seen so high a proportion of good teaching. Unfortunately, there
have been some cases of ineffective and unsatisfactory work, but the proportion of such is
surprisingly small. Schools in larger centres have as their principals men of experience,
judgment, and sane outlook; these schools maintained the high standards which one has learned
to expect. One of the most pleasing features of my year's work has been to note the undoubted
improvement in the work of the rural schools. This is evident not only in the semi-graded
schools, but in those of one division. Much good work and some of really excellent character
has been done in these schools.
I am of the opinion that the plan outlined by the Department of Education for a regrouping
of the eight grades will prove beneficial in rural schools, although I think the experiment will
have to be carried on for at least another year before definite conclusions can be drawn.
Most of the schools have had satisfactory attendance, although there have been a few
notable exceptions. During times like these the opportunity to supplement the family income
by having the child pick fruit or do similar work presents a temptation which is often all too
strong; moreover, the local School Board feels reluctant to take steps to enforce attendance
in such cases. Happily, these cases are infrequent so far as children under 15 are concerned,
nor are they numerous in any case. While it by no means follows in all instances, the school
taught by a capable and enthusiastic teacher usually has an excellent attendance. In both
rural and city municipality schools the attendance has, with one exception, been good. Absences
are checked by the principal; the co-operation of the school nurse is frequently valuable. Where
necessary the matter is referred to the Board, and in few cases where it- is deemed advisable,
through the Board to the police.
There is still too much tendency in some directions to regard the important work of
physical education as an option to be included on those occasions when the daily time-table
easily permits. Aside from all other considerations, a few minutes spent in the right type of
physical exercises raises the general tone of a school, and the result is not to waste precious
time, but eventually to save it.
May I again pay tribute to the splendid spirit and progressive outlook which characterizes
the teachers of this inspectorate, and express the pleasure which it has given me to be associated
with them in the work of education. I should like at the same time to express my appreciation
of the fine work of those numerous School Boards which have endeavoured during these trying
days to expend public funds judiciously and at the same time not to sacrifice the educational
interests of our children.
INSPECTOR T. W. HALL, PRINCE RUPERT.
Despite the economic conditions obtaining during 1932-33 in this Province, and the ensuing
curtailment of expenditures upon our schools, there has been in this inspectorate no loss of
efficiency in the teaching of the children.
Teachers have shown a splendid faithfulness to their pupils and to their School Boards,
although, due somewhat to the change in the financing of rural schools, they have received
lessened salaries. One is convinced that the efforts of our teachers are not solely founded upon,
nor measured by, any monetary basis.
Rural-school teachers in one-room schools have materially benefited by the plan of organization suggested by the Department in September, 1932. Many, many times, young teachers have
asked for guidance to be able adequately to teach all the grades confronting them. I suspect
at times they have felt appalled. Experienced teachers in most cases had evolved a plan of
organization of their own, but to both types the suggested scheme of rearrangement and
regrouping was definitive, clarifying, and sincerely welcomed.
School Boards handicapped by a restricted budget have not allowed our schools to fall into
disrepair. Whilst many need repainting, indifference has not been the reason for the omission.
Some schools, indeed, such as Kitwanga, Masset, MacKenzie, and Sandspit, have greatly
improved their buildings, increased the equipment, and beautified the grounds.
In the enforcing of the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" regarding the compulsory
attendance of children over 7 and under 15 years, no Board has been negligent. With very
few exceptions, children love going to school and their parents make every effort to ensure
their regular and punctual attendance;   and when one considers the occasional severity of the M 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
weather, the distances some little children have to walk, the conduct and co-operation of both
child and parent are most commendable.    1932-33 was in some respects a difficult, year.
In the " little lost valleys " the lessons mailed by the Correspondence School are keenly
appreciated, for not only do the big envelopes from the Department contain " Instruction,"
they contain " Happiness."
The generous grants from the Government, the clearer understanding by the School Boards
of the cost of education taught them directly by the transition from the " assisted " to the
" rural" school, the decreased number of peripatetic teachers, augur favourably for the continuance of the high standard of achievement maintained by the pupils in this district year
by year.
INSPECTOR A. R. LORD, B.A., VANCOUVER.
The work done in the municipal schools, taken as a whole, was below the average of former
years. A comparison with my records for the same schools in 1922-23 indicates a lower standing in the basic subjects of arithmetic, language, and spelling. The Lonsdale School in North
Vancouver was an outstanding exception.
In many rural districts, as a result of decreased purchasing-power, supplies and equipment
are at a minimum. Occasionally the teacher has supplied the most urgent needs, but in most
cases decreased salaries have been a serious obstacle. In general these schools, especially those
which formerly were in the " assisted " class, have shown a tendency to deteriorate. There are
some pleasing exceptions. Dog Creek ranks easily first in interest displayed by the residents
and in the excellence of its equipment, grounds, and outbuildings. Pemberton Meadows, Bridge
River (through the B.C. Electric Railway Co.), and Alexis Creek have also shown a commendable spirit in this respect. Lillooet, Williams Lake, Dog Creek, Pioneer, and Lome Mine have
made comparatively slight salary reductions.
The regrouping of work into five divisions was attempted under my direction at Lone Butte
and very fully reported on by the teacher, William J. Shenk. Certain difficulties developed
and certain modifications were necessary, but the scheme as a whole proved decidedly beneficial.
Only one other school, in charge of an inexperienced teacher, possessed eight grades, but some
phases of the plan were tried out in three schools of six or seven grades. Again the results
were satisfactory.
The provisions of the " Public Schools Act" relating to compulsory attendance were
adequately enforced in Coquitlam Rural Municipal District through the efforts of the School
Board Secretary, Mr. J. W. Harris. Since the retirement of Mr. Harris similar results have
been secured through the co-operation of the Provincial Police.
The School Boad of one municipal school district in my inspectorate has made little effort
to enforce attendance. Truancy in that district is rare, but many parents, including trustees,
keep their children at home to work for considerable periods.
INSPECTOR V. Z. MANNING, B.A., CRANBROOK.
As a result of the trying times very little new accommodation has been provided. The
increase in the size of classes has enabled some districts to carry on without adding additional
rooms. At Creston two classes are housed in large rooms that have been fitted up in the
basement. This is a growing community and a new elementary school will be required at an
early date.
In spite of the depression a few school districts made no reduction in the salary scales.
Among the larger centres the greatest reduction in salary was experienced by the Fernie
teachers, who received a cut of 25 per cent. One rural district reduced the teacher's salary
to $620 per year and another to $750. In neither of these rural communities was there
justification for such a cut.
Although many teachers were in receipt of a lower rate of pay, and although a number of
pupils came to school rather poorly equipped, there was no decline in the effective work done
in the class-room.
As a general rule, very little attention is paid to beautifying the school-grounds. Less
attention has been given this important matter since the withdrawal of assistance from the
Department. For a number of years the grounds of the Crawford Bay School have been
outstanding in point of appearance and utility. In Marysville recently, under the direction of
Mr. H. S. Waites, Secretary of the Marysville School Board, many improvements have been made. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 35
in the school building and grounds. The following have been provided: new class-room floor, new
furnace, flush-toilets, wash-basins, playground equipment, and a new close-wire school fence.
At the Roosville School the teacher, Miss May Tully, and her pupils raised funds to fence the
school-grounds, build a swing, and plant trees.
A number of teachers in rural schools have adopted in part the plan outlined by the
Department for a regrouping of the work prescribed for the eight grades into five divisions.
Now that this plan is included in the Programme of Studies for Elementary Schools, I believe
that it will be followed more generally by teachers of large classes in ungraded schools.
In the city municipal districts the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" relating to
compulsory attendance have been effectively carried out. This inspectorate does not include
any rural municipal districts. In the rural areas many Boards are inclined to shirk their
responsibility in this respect, although the present Act makes it possible for them to carry
out the regulation with a minimum of inconvenience and embarrassment.
INSPECTOR A. F. MATTHEWS, M.A., KAMLOOPS.
The quality of the work performed by the teachers was fully up to the standard of
preceding years. In the great majority of cases School Boards retained the services of teachers
with successful experience in their work, and thus maintained the standing and efficiency of
their schools.
The quality of the work, in general, of city and graded schools has been equal to the
standard maintained in previous years.
There is still much room for improvement in the school accommodation and equipment
provided in many of the smaller rural schools. In several districts the site of the school
should be changed to a more central location and better equipment provided. In the following
districts improvements have been made to the school property and equipment: Little Fort,
Chinook Cove, Pine, Vavenby, and Vinsulla.
The plan for the regrouping of work in the grades as outlined by the Department was
carried out in a number of rural schools. This plan has met with the approval of the teachers
and has resulted in a great saving of time in the regular school programme. It is, perhaps,
too early to judge the result of the scheme in its effect on the work of Grade VIII., but it
has undoubtedly added to the efficiency of the teaching in the other grades.
INSPECTOR A. E. MILLER, REVELSTOKE.
As far as effort and achievement by teachers and pupils are concerned, the year under
review ranks as one of the best I can remember. It can be truly said that the good results so
very generally obtained are praiseworthy indeed.
The various school districts, through the co-operation of ratepayers and trustees, have
managed, in spite of the all-prevailing depression, to do a great deal towards bettering conditions
in a material way. The municipalities (Enderby, Revelstoke, and the two Salmon Arms) always
endeavour, as far as finances will permit, of course, to keep buildings and other school property
in a good state of repair. Among the rural districts that have in recent months undertaken and
completed worth-while improvements, or added to equipment, are Albert Canyon, the two Arrow
Parks, Ashton Creek, Beaton, Beavermouth, Begbie, Bowie, Brisco, Burton, Cartier, Castledale,
Craigellachie, Deep Creek, Eagle Valley, Edgewater, Fauquier, Field, Forde, Galena, Galena Bay,
Glacier, Glenbank, Golden, Grandview Bench, Grindrod, Hillcrest, Horse Creek, Hupel, Malakwa,
Mara, Moberly, Mount McPherson, McMurdo, Nakusp, Needles, North Enderby, Parson, Radium
Hot Springs, Seymour Arm, Silver Creek, Solsqua, Sunnybrae, Tappen, Tappen Valley, and
Trinity Creek.
INSPECTOR H. H. MACKENZIE, B.A., VANCOUVER.
Generally speaking, very little has been done during the past two or three years to improve
school-grounds. Modern education has seemed to pause for an instant in piling ossas of
techniques upon pelions of materialistic and mechanistic philosophies and, looking backward to
catch a gleam of the " Glory that was Greece," has turned once again to stress physical and
health education so that at last the old motto, " Mens sana in corpore sano," bids fair to have a
chance to be put into actual practice instead of being merely smugly and complacently quoted.
In far too many rural areas, however, the playground, with all that might be accomplished there, M 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
enters not as a factor in the education of the growing youth. An outstanding example of what
may be accomplished in the way of physical education is afforded by the Mission Central School.
The principal and staff of this school are to be highly commended for the excellent results
obtained in this field of educational endeavour.
During the last year or two the work of the elementary schools has been very adversely
affected by the lack of sufficient reading material in the various subjects. Old stocks of supplementary text-books in reading, history, and geography have become depleted and, in a great
many cases, owing to lack of funds there has been no replenishment. More serious still is the
fact that a great many parents have been unable to purchase for their children the prescribed
books not supplied free by the Department of Education. Unless a child is equipped with at
least the basic text-book prescribed for pursuing the work in each subject of the curriculum, not
only is his own progress retarded, but that of the class or grade in which he is enrolled.
The plan advanced by the Department for the regrouping of the grades in pursuing the work
prescribed in the various subjects has been received by the teachers in the ungraded schools as
a timely help.
In reference to the matter of compulsory attendance, I may say that, generally speaking and
under normal conditions when a case of unwarranted continued absence from school is brought
to the attention of a Board of School Trustees, prompt action is taken by the Board, and usually
a letter from the Board to the parents is sufficient to bring about the return of the absentee
pupil. During the last two or three years, however, a situation having an economic foundation
has arisen which is rather serious in its adverse effect upon the progress of many children and
upon the organization of many schools. I refer to the withdrawal at different seasons of the
year of a large number of children to engage in such work as berry-picking and hop-picking. In
the Fraser Valley many children leave school early in June to work in the strawberry-fields. In
September large numbers engage in hop-picking. In the latter case whole families leave for the
hop-fields. In these present days the only opportunity offered to many families throughout the
entire year is this short period of seasonal employment.
INSPECTOR W. RAY MacLEOD, B.A., POUCE COUPE.
This inspectorate comprises all that portion of British Columbia lying to the east of the
Rocky Mountains. Sixty-three school districts are included in this area, all of which are
classified as rural school districts. Each district has but one school. Of these, four are graded
and contain three divisions each. They are Dawson Creek, Fort St. John (Superior), Pouce
Coupe (Superior), and Rolla (Superior). One school, Tate Creek, has been closed for several
years, and three others, Transpine, Doe Creek, and Bear Flat, were closed during the year
through lack of pupils. However, the Doe Creek School was able to reopen and Bear Flat School
will probably be active again shortly. Three new schools, Carpio, Hanshaw, and Lone Prairie,
were opened, and three others, A^alley View, Erinlea, and Wagner, were authorized and will
probably open during the school-year 1933-34.
The very rapid settlement and development of this part of British Columbia during the past
two or three years by people drawn from sources where educational systems vary considerably
from ours have presented many problems in the field of school organization and administration,
so that a great deal of my time and attention has been claimed by this branch of the work.
School-sites and boundaries of districts must still in most cases be considered as only temporary
and as matters for adjustment in accordance with changing needs.
In this district the system of financing the rural schools in British Columbia has been a real
boon, and the schools have been able to function continuously, unimpaired by temporary and local
financial exigencies.
Commendable interest and pride in the local schools are manifest in every district. Perhaps
this is in some measure due to the close relationship that exists between school and community
llfe—the school is the social as well as the educational centre. Improvements to buildings and
grounds are continually being made, the labour in most cases being voluntarily rendered.
Early in the year a good new building was erected at Fort St. John to provide accommodation for the senior division, which had formerly occupied temporary quarters at some distance
from the rest of the school. At Sunrise and Clayhurst fine new schools were built on the sites
of those destroyed by fire last year. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 37
The ratepayers at Rose Prairie and Montney, finding that their schools were faulty as to
location, size, and construction, have taken steps to provide new buildings to be available for
use during 1933-34.
Heavier enrolments are recorded in most of the schools. Two of the class-rooms at Pouce
Coupe are small and inadequate to present needs, while the opening of a second division at
Sunset Prairie will soon become urgent.
On the whole, the schools in this inspectorate are a credit to their communities. Most of
them are large, well-lighted, well-constructed log buildings which bear impressive evidence of the
skill and spirit of the pioneer. Young Canadians receiving their education in such schools are, in
a measure, fortunate; they can hardly escape the awakening in themselves of the same spirit
and the development of the same resourcefulness.
School Boards generally have clone exceptionally well in the matter of providing ordinary
supplies and equipment. In too many cases, however, it seems to have been impossible to meet
their further responsibilities of supplying text-books and other requisites to indigent pupils: too
often it has been left for the teacher to meet the situation as best she can, which is usually to
meet it at her own expense.    Formerly, when salaries were higher, this was more easily clone.
Most of the teachers are drawn from the older-settled parts of the Province—chiefly from
the Coast cities. Many of them are for the first time removed from the comforts and amenities
of their former life and from the companionship of friends. However, they quickly adapt themselves to their new surroundings. Their culture and ready sympathy eminently fit them for the
work they have chosen, and their influence in the communities they serve cannot be overestimated.
The character of the teaching generally is of a-high order. Teachers and pupils seem to
share a common appreciation of the importance of the day's work. Perhaps this is more likely
to be true where the conditions under which an education is to be gained are hard—and conditions here were especially hard during the year under review. The teachers, with only one or
two exceptions, have shown a disposition to welcome suggestions for improvement and have been
quick to act on them intelligently. I feel that much improvement has been effected, particularly
in the work of the primary grades.
In several schools the new plan of grouping the work of the several grades under five divisions is being applied. It should result in better work being done, but I would hesitate until it
has been in operation for the full two years to report as to its success.
" Hard times," the severity of the winter, and the great depth of snow all combine to
militate against good school attendance. The teachers, however, were very faithful to duty and
kept their schools open during severest weather, though only a few pupils might be present.
Under the conditions just indicated, compulsory school attendance is of course not applicable.
In only rare cases was it felt by teachers and School Boards that pupils were absent from school
unnecessarily. I am glad to be able to say that commendable effort is made by the great
majority of parents to keep their children regularly at school. Special mention should be made,
I think, of the Hanshaw School as one where attendance was particularly good.
Increased interest is being taken in athletics and organized games. In June successful field-
days were held at central points in the several parts of the inspectorate. Physical exercises and
health education are also receiving greater attention.
Judged by results in the various lines of school activity, standards of efficiency are being
well maintained.
INSPECTOR J. T. POLLOCK, VANCOUVER.
The attitude of the teachers to their work and the skill displayed in carrying out their
duties, in the great majority of cases, were highly commendable.
During the trying times of depression it was difficult to secure money in many districts.
However, repairs were attended to and improvements made in several districts. In Nanaimc
the grounds were improved, more lights installed, and the buildings repaired; at loco the
grounds were improved, cement walks laid, and a new heating plant installed ; the Howe Sound
School was reshingled and rooms renovated; at Kelly Creek, Annie Bay, and Lang Bay the
grounds were improved and the buildings repainted or the interiors redecorated.
The plan outlined by the Department for a regrouping of the work prescribed for eight
grades into five divisions has met with the approval of many teachers. Where it has been tried,
after careful consideration to adapt it to their special situations, the teachers have found it helpful. There will, however, be a danger of much confusion when a change of teachers takes
place, as frequently happens in some districts, unless the new incumbent is informed of the
nature of the working of the plan by the teacher previously in charge of the school.
In spite of the financial difficulties which now confront us in every quarter and the consequent heavy reductions in salaries, it is gratifying to note that the teachers remain devoted
to their duties.
INSPECTOR P. H. SHEFFIELD, B.A., NELSON.
Owing to the imprisonment of the members of the faction alleged to be responsible for
damages to the Doukhobor schools in the past, this year has been entirely free from bombing and
burning of schools and other outrages. As a result, much better progress has been made in these
schools than was made in previous years.
The disturbance in world conditions has had its influence upon the schools. Knowing how
difficult it has been for citizens to pay taxes, School Boards have kept their budgets as low as
possible, with the result that in many districts painting and repairs to buildings have not been
done and worn equipment has not been replaced. Under existing conditions one hesitates to
recommend the purchase of new equipment or supplementary and reference books even when
such material is almost indispensable. In numbers of cases children who, in ordinary times,
would have continued at school after reaching the compulsory age-limit have discontinued
attendance due to the pressure of economic circumstances.
The attitude of the teachers of the district towards their work has, with very few exceptions,
been highly commendable. Due to reductions in salary many of them have not been able to
purchase the usual number of books of reference and pedagogical magazines. On the other hand,
increased use has been made of such books as were available in the Provincial and local libraries.
I have been particularly pleased with the improvements in the quality of teaching in the
rural schools of this inspectorate. While many of the schools have excelled in one or more
respects, a number have been characterized by exceptionally good work in every grade and
subject. I have noted that the schools where exceptional work is done, not only are staffed by
competent and earnest teachers, but also are characterized by a commendable spirit of co-operation as between the teacher on the one hand and the School Board and citizens on the other.
The quality of the instruction in language has improved considerably since texts in the
subject have been authorized for Grades III. to VIII., inclusive, due to the improved deflniteness
and continuity of the lessons.
Very little has been done in the district during the year in the way of improvement of
school-grounds and school buildings. The scarcity of money has been largely responsible for
this attitude. There are, of course, some notable exceptions. During the summer just past a
•very fine two-room frame school was erected at Slocan City to replace the building constructed
over thirty years ago. Extensive repairs and improvements to the buildings at Deer Park,
Kinnaird, Lardeau, and Longbeach were completed recently. At Trail some extensive improvements, including the planting of trees and shrubs, have been made to the Central, East Trail,
and Tadanac Schools. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 39
SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS.
REPORT OF JOHN KYLE, A.R.C.A., DIRECTOR.
A Provincial Summer School for Teachers was held in Victoria and Vancouver from July
3rd to August 4th, 1933.
The registration fee charged was $3; the tuition fee was $12 for one or two subjects or
$17 for more than two subjects.
The enrolment by classes in Victoria was as follows:—
Primary Grade Course     96
Rural and Indian School Problems      69
Teaching English to new Canadians     23
Art Course (First and Second Year)      21
Geography     17
Vocal Music      18
Orchestral Music      25
Speech Training—Art of Expression      9 i
Typewriting and School Service      35
Penmanship      11
The enrolment by classes in Vancouver was as follows:—
Physical Education      31
Commercial Subjects      32
The total individual enrolment was 245 students.
The following members comprised the teaching staff :—
Victoria—
Gerald H. Barry Rural and Indian School Problems.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A Primary Grade.
Miss Ethel M. Coney Vocal Music and Subjects for B.C. Certificates
in School Music.
V. L. Denton, B.A Geography.
Dr. John M. Ewing, B.A Psychology.
Miss Nancy Ferguson, B.A Folk-dancing.
Miss Barbara Fraser, A.T.C.M Accompanist.
H. B. MacLean Penmanship.
Mrs. Wilfrid Ord, F.T.C.L., M.R.S.T Speech Training.
Miss E. Pearmain        ) ,
_  „■ .. ,       'f School Service.
Vaughan G. Pritchard)
P. H. Sheffield, B.A English for New Canadians.
Harold Taylor Orchestral Music.
S.-H. Welch Librarian.
W. P. Weston Art (First and Second Year).
F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O Subjects for B.C. Certificates in School Music.
Vancouver—
W. K. Beech, M.A., B.Paed Commercial Course.
W. G. Brandreth, M.I.H., B.P.E Physical Education Course.
Graham Bruce, B.A Commercial Course.
Miss S. MacDonald Accompanist.
Mrs. Winifred Reid. Commercial Course.
Miss C. Watkins Folk-dancing.
PRIMARY GRADE COURSE.
In the above course a comprehensive survey was given of modern methods in teaching
primary grades. Special consideration was given to the two subjects of Reading and Manual
Arts.
In Reading, special stress was put upon the building-up of a pre-primer course based
upon the child's natural activities, word recognition, devices for practice, and the extension
of the reading vocabulary. M 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
In Manual Arts, a course was followed which could be carried out with such simple waste
material as may be obtained at no cost—cardboard boxes, spools, sticks, wrapping-paper, string.
A class of twelve little beginners, who had not previously started school, gave the instructor
an opportunity to demonstrate the methods in a practical manner.
The course included Reading, Language, Number-work, Nature, and Health.
Special lectures were given in Psychology by Dr. Ewing; Drawing, Mr. Weston; Language,
Mr. Sheffield; Manuscript Printing, Mr. MacLean; and regular lessons in Singing Games were
givep by Miss Ferguson.
COURSE FOR TEACHERS IN RURAL AND INDIAN SCHOOLS.
The course of lectures and practical work for teachers in rural and Indian schools was
designed with two major aims in view:—
(a.) To place before the teachers of these schools the latest approved methods in rural
teaching and administration.
(6.) To enable those in possession of British Columbia Teaching Certificates to gain a
definite technique in the teaching of non-English-speaking children, thereby the better fitting
them for positions on the staff of Indian and other rural schools dealing with this type of child.
Sixty-nine teachers registered for the course. This was an increase of thirty over the
registration last year for a similar course. About 75 per cent, of these teachers were also
registered for the Primary Course.
While pactically all the subjects taught in rural schools received consideration, special
emphasis was placed on the teaching of Reading, Arithmetic, Language, Geography, Nature,
and Health; considerable time being spent in the demonstration of special methods of teaching
Reading, Language, and Number-work to non-English-speaking beginners.
The practical value of the course was increased by the presence daily from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
of a small Demonstration Class of nine girls just promoted to Grade V. and three just starting
in Grade VII. With the help of these children many demonstration lessons were given. It was
obvious to me that the student-teachers benefited more from the observation of these type
lessons than from the more formal lecture part of the course.
It would be advisable in another year to organize a Demonstration Class of about thirty
children in connection with the course for rural and Indian school teachers, and that this
class include children of all grades, from III. to VIII., in equal numbers, and that the hours
during which the class is in session be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. daily during the full five weeks
of the Summer School.
The student-teachers constructed various types of Reading, Number, and Colour Charts.
These charts showed a very great advance over similar charts constructed last year. Such
charts will be of the greatest use to the teachers in their own schools during the next year.
TEACHING ENGLISH TO NEW CANADIANS.
This course was intended for:—
(a.) Teachers already employed in schools where there are new Canadians who wish to
improve their knowledge of methods and procedures by becoming conversant with those found
to be most useful in such schools.
(b.) Teachers who are interested in schools for new Canadian children and who wish to
secure positions in such schools at some time in the future.
(c.) Teachers who wish to become acquainted with the methods and procedures found to
be most useful in teaching adult foreigners in night-schools.
The aims and purposes of the course were as follows:—
(a.) To acquaint the students with the nature of the problem, the number of new
Canadians in the various Provinces, the principal areas in which these new Canadians are
settled, the background of the various immigrant groups, and the specific social problems to
be met in dealing with each group.
(b.) To acquaint the students with the rudiments of sociology so that they might see and
understand the social processes by which cultural assimilation of immigrant groups takes
place; to outline type activities by which the teacher can hasten the operation of these forces;
to suggest an ideal of the national spirit of the Canada of the future. PUBLIC SCHOOLS RErORT, 1932-33. M 41
(c.) To outline alternative procedures by means of which children of new Canadians may
acquire the arts of speaking, reading, and writing English in the shortest possible time.
(d.) To acquaint the teachers with the available equipment (books, pictures, seat-work
supplies, etc.)  which may be used in this work.
(e.) To outline activities which will provide exercises in the skills of speaking, reading,
and writing English in the class-room and on the playground.
(/.) To outline the adaptation of the usual reading programme so that the teachers may
apply to special situations their knowledge of the usual lesson procedures.
(g.) To make the teachers familiar with a programme of work in Phonics and Phonetics
by means of which the faulty pronunciation and enunciation of children of immigrant groups
may be corrected.
(h.) To provide the teachers with a bibliography showing where all extant material on this
problem may be secured.
The attendance of the teachers enrolled was almost perfect, which indicated that they
were getting what they came for.
ART COURSE  (FIRST AND SECOND YEAR).
The students attending the Art Course covered the work extending from Primary Grade
to Grade IX.
The following were the divisions :—
(a.)  Object Drawing with pencil, crayon, pen, and brush.
(?).)  Nature Drawing with pencil, pen, and brush.
(c.)  Design and illustrative work for use in teaching History, Geography, Health, and
Nature-study.
(8.0  Art Geometry.
(e.)  Lettering.
(/.)  Blackboard Drawing.
The work was in keeping with the new Drawing Manual published for school-teachers.
GEOGRAPHY.
The Course in Geography included, in a general way, the following topics: (a) Specific
objectives in teaching Geography; (6) the content suited to the various grades; (c) necessary
place-facts;   (d) pupil activity;  (e) teaching technique.
These were discussed with particular reference to the Geography of British Columbia.
There were laboratory periods for the organization of material and the making of Geography
projects and teaching devices.
VOCAL MUSIC.
There were two classes in Vocal Music, one of which covered the work required in the
elementary school, and another in which credits could be earned towards the B.C. School Music
Certificate.    The latter group studied Rudiments of Music and Harmony.
ORCHESTRAL MUSIC.
The orchestra reviewed several overtures and symphonies, with special concentration on
Haydn's Symphony in G Major.
The aim was to give practical experience in conducting, sight-reading, and orchestration in
general.    The result was highly satisfactory.
SPEECH TRAINING.
This course was designed to emphasize the value of the art of the spoken word to the teacher,
by: (a) Developing memory, concentration, observation; (b) developing the whole personality,
physical, mental, spiritual; (c) training the speaking voice and giving specialist knowledge of
standard English: (d) training in the technique of the art and the qualities of good expression.
After daily individual practice in reading aloud, reciting, and speaking, a satisfactory
theoretical and practical demonstration was given by each member of the class. Selections from
Shakespeare, Dickens, Keats, Tennyson. Browning, Canadian and modern authors were studied
and a short play was given at the closing exercises. M 42
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
SCHOOL SERVICE.
A five-week Course in Typewriting was given for those who had no previous training, in
order to give them mastery over keyboard operation by the Touch System and ability to type
ordinary material at a slow rate with perfect accuracy.
Instruction was also given in the most practical methods of duplication, and teachers had
an opportunity to duplicate material of their own, such as notes, lessons, and assignments.
PENMANSHIP.
The purpose of this course was twofold: To improve the technique of the teachers' own
penmanship and blackboard writing; and to illustrate modern methods of pedagogy for the
various grades of elementary and high schools.
The teachers taking this course devoted much time daily to penmanship and blackboard
practice. The improvement in their work was very marked, the majority reaching a very high
standard of excellence.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
Courses in Physical Education were conducted in order to prepare school-teachers for the
Physical Education Elementary School Certificate (A), and the Junior and Senior High School
Certificate (B).
The " A " Certificate embraces : Physical Education I.—practice and theory ; School Games ;
Folk-dancing; Swimming; School Remedial Exercises ; Anatomy; Hygiene; Physiology ; and
First Aid.
The studies for the " B " Certificate consist of Physical Education II.—practice and theory;
School Games and Folk-dancing; Swimming II.; School Remedial Exercises; Physiology;
Applied Anatomy; Hygiene; First Aid II.
COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS.
The courses in above subjects were arranged to fill the requirements for the B.C. High
School Assistant Commercial Teacher's Certificate and also the B.C. High School Specialist
Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
The subject-matter for the former consisted of Stenography—theory and practice; Typewriting—theory and practice; Book-keeping—theory and practice; Business Practice and
Statute Law'; Penmanship; Arithmetic of Commerce and Finance; Economics and Economic
Geography.
The requirements for the latter were: Auditing; Business Finance; Office Practice and
Organization; History of Commerce and Industry; Commercial Correspondence and Filing;
Commercial French or Spanish; Shorthand ; Typewriting. TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF JOHN KYLE, A.R.C.A., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
This report deals with the following: (a) Establishing and maintaining manual-training
centres in elementary schools and Industrial Arts centres in junior and senior high schools; (b)
establishing and maintaining technical courses in high schools ; (o) establishing and maintaining
commercial and agricultural courses in high schools; (8) establishing and maintaining technical
schools where vocational and trade classes may be held; (e) establishing night-schools for adult
education.
MANUAL TRAINING  (WOODWORK).
The Department of Education has a definite manual-training course in woodwork for Grades
VI., VII., and VIII., including theoretical lessons on tools, materials, and design. At the same
time, manual-training teachers have the privilege of introducing and are encouraged to introduce
original models suitable to the pupils of the district in which they teach. Pupils are also permitted to design or select projects which they desire to make within the scope of certain limitations of difficulty. By these means interest is captured, originality and creative skill are
encouraged, and monotonous repetition is prevented.
The following districts have manual-training centres in operation: Burnaby, Chilliwack
City, Chilliwack Municipality, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Chase River, Esquimau,
Fernie, Harewood, loco, Kamloops, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Maple Ridge, Merritt, Nanaimo,
Nanaimo Bay, Nelson, New Westminster, Oak Bay, Ocean Falls, Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Port
Moody, Powell River, Richmond, South AVellington, Summerland, Surrey, Trail, Vancouver,
Vernon, Victoria, and West Vancouver.
The total number of centres in the Province in which elementary-school manual training is
taught, together with the number of pupils attending, are given hereunder:—
Elementary-school manual-training shops '.       95
Elementary-school manual-training instructors       53
Elementary-school pupils attending 7,965
High-school pupils attending elementary-school centres     662
JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS  (INDUSTRIAL ARTS).
A separate and distinct course of work is arranged for junior high schools (Grades VII.,
VIII., and IX.). This course includes woodwork, metalwork, electricity, and printing. Because
of its varied nature this course is known as Industrial Arts.
The total number of centres where Industrial Arts and technical work are taught in junior
and senior high schools, together with the number of pupils attending, are given hereunder:—
Number of junior and senior high-school centres      19
Number of junior and senior high-school workshops at centres      37
Number of junior and senior high-school instructors       39
Number of junior and senior high-school pupils taking courses 4,730
As the same shops are used at some centres for the work of elementary schools and of junior
and senior high schools, it will be necessary to add to this statement in order that one may know
how many individual shops, instructors, and students there are in the Province. These are as
follows:—
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
workshops        132   •
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
instructors        89
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
pupils  13,357
HIGH SCHOOL TECHNICAL OPTIONS " A " AND " B."
High School Technical Options "A" (Woodwork) and "B" (Metalwork) are accepted by
the University authorities in lieu of a second science or second foreign language, with credits
counting towards the Junior Matriculation Certificate. M 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
The following high schools have introduced these courses in order that students may continue in high school the manual-training studies begun in elementary and junior high school:
Kamloops Junior and Senior High School; Kelowna Junior and Senior High School; Nanaimo
Junior and Senior High School: T. J. Trapp Technical School, New Westminster; Oak Bay High
School; Penticton Junior and Senior High School; Britannia High School, Vancouver: John
Oliver High School, Vancouver; King Edward High School, Vancouver; King George High
School, Vancouver; Kitsilano Junior and Senior High .School, Vancouver; Lord Byng High
School, Vancouver; Magee High School, Vancouver; Technical School, Vancouver; Victoria
High School.
In addition to the High School Technical Option Courses " A " and " B," there is, in some
high schools, a straight Technical Course for Grades IX. and X., and this is planned to form
a connecting-link with the Vancouver Technical School so that transference may be made and
technical work undertaken along specific trade lines.
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
Vancouver Technical School offers four courses, as follows:—
Course I.—Junior Matriculation Course of four years leading to the University as outlined
in the Programme of Studies issued by the Department of Education, with the addition of an
extra science and technical training, all of which forms an excellent preparation for the Applied
Science Course in the University.
Course II.—General Technical Course of four years for British Columbia Technical School
Graduation Diploma. Entrance to this course is by the British Columbia High School Entrance
Examination or its equivalent. Compulsory subjects are: English, health, physical education,
social studies, practical mathematics, draughting, and applied design. There is a choice of
sciences and workshops. The sciences are: Mechanics, physics, electricity, chemistry: while
the practical shop-work includes woodwork, sheet-metal work, machine-shop work, electrical
work, and printing. This course does not lead to University, but to apprenticeships in the
varied industries of the Province. In Grade X. the student selects one major technical shop-
work subject and one minor shop-work subject. The work in the major shop subject selected
must be continued as such until the completion of the term. The work in the minor shop subject,
however, may be changed each year if desired. The shops are well equipped and the instructors
have trade experience. It is hard to imagine any more appropriate training for one wishing
to participate in industrial activity.
Course III. is a Vocational Course of two years (Grades X. and XL) for boys who cannot
stay four years as required by Course II., but who wish to be prepared for apprenticeship.
Applicants for this course must have successfully passed Grade IX., either in the Technical
School or junior high school. They must select from the shops available a major shop subject
and a minor shop subject. The shops comprise those for woodwork, sheet-metal work, machine-
shop work, motor mechanics, electricity, and printing. Students study the sciences relating to
the shop-work, and if, at the successful completion of his course, a student wishes to continue
his work he will be admitted to Courses IV.
Courses IV. are Special Vocational Courses for two classes of students: (a) Those who
have finished Course I., II., or III., or have at least three years' high-school training so that
they may profit by the instruction given; (b) craftsmen who desire further instruction in some
particular line or on some particular machine. All students must be over 17 years of age and
fees, on a sliding scale, are charged for the course. The shops available are carpentry and
cabinetmaking. sheet-metal work, machine-shop work, electrical work, motor engineering,
Diesel engineering, and printing.
The future development of the Technical School lies, as was pointed out last year, in the
direction of those activities for which the Provincial Government demands special credentials
and for which suitable specific training is difficult to obtain. Not only should the Technical
School be the headquarters for training apprentices as carpenters and joiners, plumbers,
electricians, plasterers, and painters and decorators, but it should be the centre of study for
those who desire British Columbia papers as engineers of the first, second, third, or fourth
classes; British Columbia papers as shot-lighters, overmen, or managers of mines (both coal
and metalliferous) ;   navigation papers  for masters and  mates   (both  coast  and  deep  sea) ; PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 45
qualifications in aeronautics, for moving-picture operators, and in all occupations which, for
public safety, the Provincial Government demands special specific training.
Day students in the Technical School, Vancouver, numbered 973, which was a reduction
from last year owing to the fact that some of the high schools have also been providing straight
technical courses in addition to the technical option courses leading towards matriculation.
There is a grave danger here of overlapping and it is therefore a situation which must be
kept well in hand. As a rule, high schools in Greater Vancouver should be discouraged from
doing straight technical courses in Grades X. and XL when attendance at the Vancouver
Technical School is possible. If, in some cases, this is not advisable, the line should certainly
be drawn at the completion of Grade X.
THE T. J. TRAPP TECHNICAL SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
This school has a range of courses which includes junior high, technical high, vocational,
commercial, and home economics.
The courses are systematically arranged to suit those who wish to go to University; the
shops are well equipped, the staff excellent, and the work accomplished leaves nothing to be
desired.
The enrolment numbered 457.
AGRICULTURE.
Agriculture as a subject of study is at once scientific, technical, vocational, and educational.
Moreover, it is a basic subject in the scheme of life and ought therefore to have a place in the
high-school system.
It is encouraging to report that the following high schools include agriculture on their
curriculum, and in many of these schools a serious attempt is made to link up the work of the
school with that of the farm:—
Students.
Chilliwack     57
Maple Ridge     33
New Westminster     57
Richmond      35
Salmon Arm     56
A full list of school districts participating in the work of technical education is appended,
and this shows an enrolment of 12,022 students.
Students.
Summerland     16
Victoria     155
Total  409
School District.
Course.
No. of
Strdents.
Burnaby.	
Chilliwack	
Delta	
Kamloops _.
Kamloops	
Kamloops 	
Kelowna	
Kelowna 	
Maple Ridge	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
Nelson	
Nelson...	
New Westminster.
New Westminster
New Westminster.
New Westminster
North Vancouver-
Oak Bay	
Oak Bay -	
Oak Bay	
Ocean Falls...	
Ocean Falls	
Commercial	
Agriculture.-.	
Commercial ...
Commercial	
Technical	
Home Economics..
Technical	
Home Economics..
Agriculture	
Technical— ..-.
Home Economics..
Commercial	
Technical	
Home Economics..
Commercial	
Technical	
Home Economics..
Agriculture	
Commercial	
Commercial	
Technical	
Home Economics..
Technical	
Home Economics..
213
57
19
42
144
135
133
129
33
234
125
143
158
126
145
207
48
57
70
43
59
48
40
20
Average
Attendance.
181.00
17.76
37.00
130.00
127.00
126.00
122.00
225.00
120.00
128.50
149.00
123.00
139.58
203.51
40.45
06.00
41.50
57.50
47.00
40.00
20.00 M 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
AGRICULTURE—Continued.
School District.
Course.
No. of
Students.
Average
Attendance.
159
128
170
191
133
28
28
22
35
56
16
16
2,437
3,202
1,852
79
175
204
289
141
155
44
145.00
120.00
167.00
184.50
128.00
Commercial	
26.18
26.89
Revelstoke	
Commercial	
16.00
14.72
2,236.62
3,092.48
1,772.58
Vancouver	
Art	
68.80
170.00
197.00
279.00
122.00
38.37
Total             	
12,022
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF DECORATIVE AND APPLIED ART.
It is not difficult to see the close connection between art and technical craftsmanship. The
selling quality of the thing produced is controlled by its appearance even more than its usefulness. The underlying principles of beauty can be taught and are being taught in this school.
Excellent instruction is given in pottery and clay modelling, in the decoration of wood and metal,
in lettering and illumination, in show-card and poster work, in applique and embroidery, in figure
drawing and composition, and in interior decoration. The character of the work is modern
without any neglect of fundamental draftsmanship or the study of principles.
Students attending the day classes number 79 and those attending evening classes number
250.    All these students pay tuition fees.
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
Two objects are kept in view in organizing night-schools. One is to give opportunity to those
who would improve themselves at the work by which they earn their daily bread. The second
is to give opportunity to those who would develop a hobby—some activity in which they find
intense interest. When the first and second are one, then success is well assured. Both are
important factors in life.
Night-schools, with a total enrolment of 4,600 students, were conducted in the following
cities, municipalities, and rural districts in the Province: Abbotsford (30), Any ox and Granby
Bay (88), Armstrong (25), Blakeburn (13), Burnaby (158), Chilliwack Municipality (58), Coal
Creek (IS), Comox (14), Corbin (58), Courtenay (77), Cumberland (10), Dewdney (10), Esquimau (16), Kaslo (40), Kelowna (14), Kent (28). Langford (18), Langley Prairie (32), Maple
Ridge (67), Michel-Natal (63), Mill Bay (21). Nelson (20), North Vancouver (40), Ocean Falls
(105), Parksville (36), Pitt Meadows (47), Port Moody (40), Powell River (46), Progress (30),
Renata (14), Richmond (85), Saanich (17), Salmo (28), Shawnigan (25), South Wellington
(15), Trail (38), Vancouver (2,046), Victoria (993), West Vancouver (104), and Whaletown (13).
The undermentioned subjects were included in the night-school courses: Academic courses
for junior and senior matriculation, mathematics, history, algebra, geometry, trigonometry,
French, Latin, singing and choral, English for new Canadians, commercial English, commercial
French, commercial Spanish, public speaking, shorthand, typewriting, secretarial practice, business correspondence, book-keeping and accounting, cost accounting, salesmanship, commercial
arithmetic, technical drafting, machine construction and drawing, machine-shop practice, motor
mechanics, automotive electricity, electric engineering, stationary engineering, Diesel engineering, PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 47
mining and engineering, acetylene welding and cutting, heating and welding for steam-fitting
trade, building construction for carpenters and mill-workers, sheet-metal work, general and
decorative concrete work, plumbing, painting and decorating, sign and pictorial painting, plain
and ornamental plastering, radio course, wireless telegraphy and telephony, printing and press-
work, show-card writing, cabinetmaking, carpentry and joinery, art metalwork, cookery, dressmaking, millinery, china-painting.
TEACHER-TRAINING.
No successful scheme of technical education is possible without a measure of teacher-
training, and for this reason the Department of Education has, for some years past, operated
teacher-training classes on Saturdays and at Summer Schools, whereby the following certificates
may be obtained :—
(a.)  B.C. Manual Training Teacher's Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(b.)  B.C. Industrial Arts Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools.
(c.)  B.C. Technical School Certificate.
(8.)  B.C. Physical Education Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(e.)  B.C. Physical Education Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools. i
(/.)  B.C. School Music Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(g.)  B.C. School Music Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools.
(h.)  B.C. High School Assistant Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
(i.)  B.C. High School Specialist Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
The following was  the  enrolment  in  the  above  Teacher-training  classes:    Manual  and
Technical, 54; Commercial, 52 ; Physical Education, 86; Music, 26.
VANCOUVER APPRENTICESHIP COUNCIL.
Attention should be drawn to those men connected with the building trades who form the
Vancouver Apprenticeship Council and whose one desire is to see that the young men of British
Columbia are given an opportunity to become skilled craftsmen.
It is only natural to expect that this Council are facing great obstacles at the present time,
but their organization is held together with a sincere desire to improve conditions of vocational
training. For this reason they have a great interest in the Vancouver Technical School, and the
Superintendent of Apprentices has been actively engaged during the past year in compiling
courses of study in carpentry and joinery connected with the erection of timber-constructed
dwellings. An excellent series of lessons in roofing and the use of the carpenter's square is also
embodied in this course.
Classes for plasterers meet every Saturday morning at the Vancouver Technical School, and
classes for apprentices in plumbing, sheet-metal work, machine-shop work, motor mechanics, and
printing meet as night-schools, and all come within the ambit of the Apprenticeship Council.
TECHNICAL SUBJECTS BY CORRESPONDENCE.
It is encouraging to see the beginning of advancement in the above direction, as it will be
quite impossible to have apprentice classes throughout the Province. The young man engaged
in industry can, however, study his trade by correspondence no matter where he may be.
Already students are enrolled in: (a) Mechanical drawing; (6) carpentry and joinery; and
(c) machine-shop work.
In a few years considerable development may be expected in this direction.
ADMINISTRATION.
The amounts spent on administration of technical work from July 1st, 1932, to June 30th.
1933, were as follows :—
Night-schools   $12,910.81
Teacher-training        1,475.66
Administration     12,860.72
Total  $27,247.19
According to the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Dominion Government of Canada on the
work of technical education, British Columbia ranks second for the number of technical students
attending day-schools and third for the number of students attending night-schools. M 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
TECHNICAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS JESSIE McLENAGHEN, B.Sc, DIRECTOR.
The number of students taking home economics as a second science for Junior Matriculation
increased slightly over that of last year. In June, 1932, 127 students wrote on these examinations ; in June, 1933, 156 students. Two centres, Powell River and North Vancouver, presented
candidates for the first time, but in spite of the fact that in both instances this option proved one
of the most popular, the School Board in each case deemed it advisable to eliminate it for the
coining year. While this action proved a great disappointment, we are, on the other hand,
encouraged by the fact that Kelowna offered home economics as a matriculation option for the
first time last September, and Kamloops has plans complete for offering it in September, 1933.
Trail and Port Moody have discontinued classes temporarily, but Nelson has plans complete for
extending the work into the high school next year.
No Summer School class was offered this year, but the benefit from the Clothing class of last
year has been very evident.
It is with regret that we report the discontinuance of the course in Home Economics offered
by the University of British Columbia in 1931. In view of this fact, and in view of the fact that
certain students had entered the newly established course in good faith and had already completed two or three years of the curriculum as outlined by the University authorities, the Provincial Parent-Teacher Federation passed a resolution offering bursaries of $200 a year to those
students wishing to complete their work at another university. These bursaries are paid out of
the accrued interest from the Home Economics Trust Fund, and are administered by a permanent
committee appointed for that purpose. In 1932-33 six girls took advantage of this opportunity.
The total number of home-economics centres that were in operation during
the year was  86
The total number of home-economics teachers was  76
The total number of pupils taking home economics was as follows:—
In elementary schools 7,526
In junior high schools 2,985
In high schools 2,002
Of these, the total number taking:—
(1.)  Home Economics (A) was     495
(2.)  Home Economics (B) was     622
(3.)   Home Economics (C) was     885
The total number of students taking home economics in Normal Schools
was      380 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 49
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF J. S. GORDON, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS.
To report on conditions in the Vancouver schools for the school-year 1932-33 is to turn from
years of " expansion and confidence " to one of " contraction and perplexity." It cannot, therefore, be regarded as a pleasant duty. One would be gratified were it possible to report, in the
main, that the year was a period of even marking time; but it was scarcely that. The sum total
of its activities may be more fittingly described as a slightly forced retreat educationally, despite
strenuous efforts to maintain ground previously gained. When due allowance is made, however,
for the existing financial depression, one can take a modicum of comfort out of the fact that the
year closed with school conditions as satisfactory as they were. The main facts regarding them
are given in the brief detail under the following headings :—
SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION.
No attempt was made during the year to increase school accommodation, for two good
reasons. In the first place, there was no money available for the erection of new buildings or
for additions to old ones; in the second, there was not the urgent need for increased accommodation that was anticipated a year ago. When schools reopened in September we found our school
population was practically the same as for the previous year; there was an increase of only
thirty-five on an enrolment of 39,947 in September, 1931.
While the school population increased very little, the tendency was the same as in the three
preceding years in regard to distribution of pupils. The elementary-school enrolment had decreased 438, while that in junior high and high had increased 40 and 433 respectively. Consequently, to find accommodation for the students of high schools, overcrowded a year ago, we
had to utilize vacant rooms in elementary schools. The prospects now are that this expedient
for securing accommodation for an increasing high-school enrolment will have to be followed for
a few years, even if the size of high-school classes is considerably increased.
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION.
Working on a greatly reduced budget for the year necessitated care in reorganizing the
schools for September; but, not expecting any considerable decrease in the number of elementary-school pupils, a reduction of only six was made in the staffs of elementary schools.
Had we been able to foresee the actual conditions for September last, a greater reduction of staff
would have been made. No change was found necessary in the number of junior high-school
teachers, but the number of high-school teachers was increased by nine.
The school organization for September, 1932, as compared with that of the previous year,
may be tabulated as follows :—
Type of School.
Year.
Pupils.
Teachers.
1931
27,434
744.0
1932
27,002
737.0
1931
529
32.0
1932
523
33.0
1931
4,399
150.5
1932
4,439
150.5
1931
7,585
249.0
1932
8,018
258.0
Pupils per
Teacher.
Elementary (regular classes)
Elementary (special classes).
Junior High	
High ;	
36.87
36.64
16.53
15.85
29.23
29.49
30.46
31.08
In February 1,092 six-year-old pupils entered the schools; but only eight additional appointments were found necessary. In March, however, the Board decided to close eight special
classes—the Preventorium class in Beaconsfield School, the Detention Home class in Hastings
School, the three classes in the Open Air School, the Crippled Children's class in David Lloyd
George School, the Sight Conservation class in General Gordon School, and the Hospital class of
the Model School. The continuance of the last three to December 31st, 1933, was made possible
4 M 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
by the Department's assuming financial responsibility for them. The other five were closed at
the end of April. This reduced the number of teachers in the elementary schools, whose salaries
are paid by the Board, to 770, the same number as in September. Later the burden of financing
the Preventorium class was assumed by the Rotary Club. The pupils in the Open Air School
were distributed among the regular classes of the city. To date no provision has been made for
the pupils in the Detention Home.
On May 31st four special classes in Beacons Held, Dawson, Strathcona. and Tennyson Schools
were closed, the teachers assigned to other duties and the pupils distributed in the regular grades.
REDUCTION OF SCHOOL SERVICES.
Reduction of school services, solely for economy, began with the opening of the school-year.
Two out of three attendance officers, Messrs. G. W. White and C. W. Feast, whose services were
much needed, retired ; but no successors were appointed. Inspector T. A. Brough, B.A., who had
rendered the Board excellent service for twenty-eight years—one term as elementary assistant,
three and one-half years as high-school assistant, ten as high-school principal, and fourteen as
Inspector—resigned; and no successor was appointed, though this left the Board with only
one Inspector for 1.177 teachers.
No further reduction was made during the first term; but in the second, in addition to the
closing of the five special classes mentioned above under " School Organization," several other
reductions were made. Miss Elsie Roy, Assistant Supervisor of Primary Work, and Miss Jean
Cantelon, Social Service Worker in the Bureau of Measurements, were assigned to teaching
positions, the latter beginning on March 1st and the former on April 1st. Miss E. M. Robertson,
Special Instructress in Remedial Work, was notified that her services would be required only to
June 30th. and for only two-thirds time as from April 1st. Miss E. L. Roberts, Assistant Supervisor of Music, was also assigned to a teaching position on May 1st.
The eighteen assistant nurses were given two-thirds-time work and one of the two assistant
medical officers half-time work from April 1st: while the half-time medical officer retired on
March 31st, without a successor being appointed. The services of the entire Dental staff—six
dentists and three attendants—were dispensed with on March 31st. There is a possibility,
however, that in future dental work may be financed by the Red Cross Society.
It was also decided to close the Vocational Guidance Department at the end of June.
No reduction of service was made in the School of Decorative and Applied Arts: but the
Board decided to limit its financial support to the school, after April 1st, to the providing of
e'ass-room accommodation, janitor service, light and heat. It will not be an easy matter to
finance this school on fees and Government grants.
SCHOOL INSPECTION.
Reducing the inspectorial staff from two to one at the opening of the year made a change in
the method of school inspection imperative. It was quite evident that, with one Inspector,
inspecting class-room work in the usual way, with over 1,100 class-rooms and 1,177 teachers, the
letter or even the spirit of the " Public Schools Act" could not be complied with. The Board
accordingly decided, with departmental approval, on a change. It assigned Inspector Graham
to the inspection of elementary schools and appointed Robert Straight, B.A., Director of the
Bureau of Measurements, as Inspector of high and junior high schools for half-time. Even with
this change it was still impossible to have individual class-room inspection carried on satisfactorily by Inspectors. It was therefore decided that the Inspectors inspect schools, rather than
class-rooms, taking cognizance of general school conditions and seeing how the principals are
organizing and supervising the work in their schools. For the inspection of and reporting on
class-room work the Board decided to depend upon the principals of the various schools, most of
whom have from half to full time free from class-room teaching to organize and supervise.
After a year's close observation of this new method of inspection,-1 am fully convinced that it
is an important move in the right direction. In time, under proper management, it should prove
not only more economical, but more satisfactory in other respects, than the old method. The old
method, if followed, would cost at least $24,000 more per annum than the method followed last
year. I venture the forecast that this additional expenditure will be regarded as unwarranted
for some years. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 51
SCHOOL MAINTENANCE.
It is gratifying to be able to report that, despite the financial depression, the school buildings
were kept in fairly good condition during the year, with an expenditure of about $125,000—less
than 2 per cent, of their cost. Considerable improvement was also made on a number of school-
grounds.    The year closed, therefore, with Vancouver school property in many respects improved.
SCHOOL FINANCE.
Early in 1933, in contemplation of a greatly reduced city budget, the Board decided to reduce
the salaries of all its employees, as from February 1st, by 10 per cent, on salaries under $1,200
per annum and 20 per cent, on salaries of that amount or over. By this means and by the
reduction of estimates along every other possible line, the Board made its estimates for the year
slightly over $400,000 less than the amount they expended in 1932. Notwithstanding this, they
were urged later by the City Council to make a further reduction of $500,000. They agreed to
meet the Council half-way—making a further reduction of $250,000. How this reduction will be
effected cannot be reported now. It will mean a further curtailment of salaries in some form.
Whatever it has to be will be graciously accepted, for the morale of Vancouver school-workers is
good.    All are preparing for the worst while hoping for the best. M 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OP NEW WESTMINSTER.
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1932-33 was one of real educational growth. With the beginning of the
school term in September a completed 6-3-3 policy was inaugurated—six years in the Elementary,
Grades I. to VI.; three years in the Middle School, Grades VII. to IX.; and three years in the
Senior High Schools, Grades X. to XII. Senior Matriculation, Grade XIIL, was also carried on
in the Duke of Connaught High School.
The attendance was as follows: Elementary, 2,076; Junior High, 839; Senior High (Duke
of Connaught and T. J. Trapp Technical High Schools), 788; a decrease from last year of 71
pupils.
The work done throughout was of a very satisfactory standard. In the elementary grades a
definite improvement was shown in the foundation subjects, and while certain subjects in Grade
VI. were found to be somewhat heavy as to the amount to be covered, certain readjustments are
being made which will remedy this condition. By continual supervision of principals and
teachers and the co-operation of parents, retardation in the grades was considerably lowered and
grading showed a definite uniformity.
In the middle school the expectations of those who fathered this plan were to a great extent
realized, and a very satisfactory year's work resulted not alone from a study standpoint, but also
from the actual retention in the school of many pupils who would otherwise have left school, and
from successfully bridging the gap formerly existing between the elementary and senior high
schools.
The work of the senior high schools in most departments continued that high standard of
work characteristic of other years.
All phases of student development received careful attention. Physical development received
its due attention from teachers trained in our best Canadian schools. In music the Lister-Kelvin
Junior High School Choir (Mr. F. O. Canfield, Principal; Miss E. Milleclge, Conductor; Miss
M. F. Richards, accompanist) was successful in winning the Junior High School Shield offered
at the Vancouver Musical Festival.    The art-work in all schools was worthy of mention.
May Day again was an outstanding feature of our school activities; pleasing features being
the presence of the Duke of Connaught High School Bugle Band, the consolidated gymnastic
display by the boys of the T. J. Trapp Technical High School, and the folk-dancing and maze
drills by hundreds of pupils.
We regret to report the sudden death in England of one of our highly respected teachers who
had lately been superannuated, Miss Rosa Ashburne; a teacher whose personality and influence
were felt in the many activities in which she has so cheerfully assisted.
Our exchange teacher this year was Miss Vera Bowell, who taught at Teddington, Middlesex;
Miss Alice Best, of Sunbury, Middlesex, came to us. From excellent reports received from England of Miss Bowell's work and from our knowledge of Miss Best's work here the arrangement
was mutually beneficial.
The closing school term marked the retirement of two most faithful servants of the Board
of School Trustees—Mr. Robert H. Gray, Secretary of the Board, who retired at the age of 83,
and Miss Ethel M. Gray superannuated. Our sincere wish is that both may enjoy many years
to come and may receive those dividends of pupil love and affection which both so richly deserve.
The newly appointed Secretary of the Board is Mr. Edgar N. Chappie.
Two departments of our school-life closely related, but not always so prominently before the
public as other phases of our education system, and yet upon the efficiency of which so much of
the success of our pupil development is due, are the Medical Department, Dr. D. A. Clark and
Miss A. S. Stark, R.N., and the Dental Department, Dr. J. A. Sampson and Miss M. Rennie.
The medical inspection of the school-children for the year ended June, 1933, showed that the
general health and physical condition of the pupils was very satisfactory and the nutritional
standard maintained a good average; minor defects which were brought to the parents' attention were promptly attended to; throughout the year there was an absence of any acute infectious disease;  cases of contagious skin-infections were comparatively few and kept well under PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
M 53
control by those responsible. This department also performed yeoman service co-operating with
the Parent-Teacher Association in the distribution of free milk and the giving of warm clothing
to those in need.
In September, 1932, the Dental Clinic made a survey of all pupils in the schools. The
increase in applications eligible for treatment over the last survey was roughly 150 per cent.
This is explained no doubt by economic factors, as well as the fact that the work of the clinic is
becoming better known and parents are realizing its purpose and value. Some 1,200 pupils were
put on the waiting-list at the close of the survey; regular appointments were made, urgent cases
being treated first. In addition to the regular appointments an average of sixty-four emergency
cases were treated each month. The value of the work done by these departments is daily
appreciated.
Again it is a pleasure to refer to the hearty co-operation and able assistance given at all
times by the Department of Education; to the support at all times of the Parent-Teacher Association ; to the unstinted loyalty of capable and highly trained teachers; and to the careful attention given to all school problems by the Board of School Trustees, keen business-men giving of
their time and ability without remuneration that the coming generation may be able to meet its
responsibilities successfully.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA.
REPORT OF GEORGE H. DEANE, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR  OF  SCHOOLS.
I beg to submit the following report on the public schools of the City of Victoria for the
school-year 1932-33 :—
The loss of revenue on account of reduced Government grants to the city created a difficult
problem for the School Board. However, by continuing its policy of rigid economy and through
the co-operation of the teaching staff, the Board was able to meet the situation and maintain
educational facilities and standards of efficiency without increasing the taxpayer's burden.
The following return gives the reduction in school expenditures covering a period of four
years:—
1930.*
1931.*
1932.*
Estimated,
1933.*
Salaries (other than janitors)
Interest and sinking fund	
Other expenditures	
Gross expenditures	
Receipts  (all sources)	
Net expenditures	
$419,770.14
88,850.04
' 131,875.55
$420,953.02
88,850.04
123,409.16
$392,748.80
88,120.04
116,236.85
$640,405.73
155,711.53
$633,272.22
168,162.30
$597,105.69
142,114.28
$363,923.60
85,935.07
107,777.30
~$557,635.¥r
105,645.00
$484,784.20
$405,109.92
$454,991.41
$451,990.97
I
* These are calendar years.
The above analysis shows that since 1930 gross expenditures have decreased $82,859.76, and
of this amount the sum of $55,846.54 (67 per cent.) is accounted for by the reduced salaries of
the staff.
During the school-year ended June 30th, 1933, the total enrolment in the city schools
remained about the same as the preceding year. The attendance, however, as at October, 1933,
is about 4.3 per cent, lower. In the last three years the enrolment in the elementary schools
has decreased 6.2 per cent, while that of the high school has increased 7.2 per cent. The
percentage of pupils who pass the High School Entrance Examination and do not attend high
school is now very small, and fewer pupils are leaving the high school than formerly. This
increased attendance at the high school is due mainly to the lack of employment opportunities,
but to a certain extent results from a growing appreciation of the value of a high-school
education with respect to future vocational activities.
General conditions in the Victoria schools were satisfactory and the examination results
reflected  credit on the  staff.    Large  classes  make  it difficult  to  give  the  duller  pupils  the M 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
necessary attention and at the same time provide the brighter ones with opportunities to
progress according to their abilities. It might be well for training-schools to give greater
emphasis to this feature of class organization and management.
In comparing the pupils of to-day with those of some years ago, it is difficult to estimate
the influence of modern conditions. There is no evidence of a lowering of morale and the
competent teacher has no difficulty in arousing interest in class-room studies. Further, the
general attitude of the pupils is good and they take a keen interest in extra-curricular activities.
At the same time the teacher is finding it more difficult to have pupils put forth the effort
necessary for mental development and thoroughness in academic studies. In considering this
situation, one questions whether the average home is discharging its responsibilities. A high
standard of achievement cannot be attained unless home control and environment are
satisfactory.
At the close of the year Victoria College suffered a heavy loss when Professor W. H. Gage
resigned to accept a position on the staff of the University of British Columbia. On account
of his outstanding abilities, his pleasing personality, and his unsparing effort towards promoting
the welfare of the College, Mr. Gage was held in the very highest esteem. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
REPORT OF S. H. LAWRENCE, PRINCIPAL.
I have much pleasure in laying before you a report of this school for the year 1932-33.
Notwithstanding that we were in the midst of the depression and had to practise economy, it
has been one of encouraging success.
The Psalmist assures us that " He who goeth forth with weeping, bearing precious seed,
shall doubtless come again rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him." That has been verified
to a pleasing degree in the progress of this school.
Beginning in an obscure and humble way, it has, by patient, steady, persevering, yet quiet
and unostentatious effort, attained to a position of usefulness that its most sanguine friends
hardly dared to anticipate fourteen .years ago, and in the words of St. Paul, " It doth not yet
appear what it shall be."
The introduction of a carefully graded programme of physical exercises was a step forward
in our work, and has already done much to correct bodily defects and build up a strong
physique to keep pace with expanding mind.
The class in shoemaking for the deaf boys, in addition to that in manual training, has
afforded an opportunity for its members to acquire knowledge and practice in a vocation that
will stand most of them in good stead in after-life. The class in reed-work is fitting the blind
boys to become absorbed in the activities of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind after
they leave here.
The classes in cooking and dressmaking for the girls continue to evoke deep interest, and
the work accomplished in them shows commendable progress. Music and typewriting round
out the activities outside of the regular literary studies.
When one reflects that all these vocational activities are carried on without interfering
with the regular class-room work, it will be readily seen that there is not much idle time during
the school-year.    While we can hardly claim what was said of the Village Blacksmith—
" Each morning saw some task begun,
Each evening saw its close "—
yet we can say, in the words of an old familiar hymn, we " nightly pitch our moving tent a
day's march nearer home."
In the department for the blind we followed the programme of studies as prescribed for the
public schools. One or two pupils did Grade IX. work and two others almost completed the
work of Grade X.
It might be of interest to mention here that among those who graduated from the University
of British Columbia in April was one who took his matriculation from this school.
In the department for the deaf, however, the trail is not blazed for us. Before a deaf
child can be taken along the more or less beaten path of a curriculum he has to acquire a
language. To do this requires patient effort, both on the part of the teacher and also the
pupil. His progress, therefore, cannot be accurately measured in the terms of grades. Speaking
generally one might say that the progress in the acquisition of language denotes the extent
of his knowledge.
The school has been very fortunate in having a staff of teachers and other officials who
devote themselves unreservedly to the care and advancement of the pupils. Unfortunately,
teachers are not all like Tennyson's Brook, going on for ever. I regret exceedingly that I shall
have to lose the services of two who have proved their worth. I refer to Miss Thompson and
Mrs. Burke.
Miss Thompson was with the school for nine years and the work that she did will never
be effaced from the children's minds. However, she disregarded the advice of Horace Greeley,
and has gone East for a change. Miss Dorothy Dewar, who spent last year at the school,
studying the nature of the work and observing how it was done, has been appointed in Miss
Thompson's place. Miss Dewar has had some experience in teaching in the public schools,
and I am persuaded from what I observed of her last year that she will give a good account
of herself. —
M 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
In the case of Mrs. Burke, who also resigned, I knew of her intention for some time. She
had been for many years associated with school-work, having taught in Australia before coming
to British Columbia. Her experience very largely drew her into pioneer work. She was the
first to organize a school for the blind in Vancouver. In 1916 she got together a few blind
children in her own home, and taught them there gratuitously until her efforts and success were
recognized by the Vancouver School Board.
In 1922 Mrs. Burke and her little school became part of this school, and she was associated
with us from that time on. Her heart is still in the work, and had her strength permitted she
would still be a member of the staff. The vacancy on the staff caused by Mrs. Burke's resignation has been filled by the appointment of Miss Bond, a senior matriculant from Lord Byug
High School, and also a graduate of the Vancouver Normal School.
Miss Bond made an enviable record at both of these places and comes to her new position
with very fine testimonials. I therefore feel that we can go forward into the new school-year
confident that the children will not materially suffer.
This being a residential school having between sixty and seventy children within its walls
for the whole school-year, the care and comfort of that number is no small part of the work.
As much home atmosphere as possible is necessary, for a very considerable percentage of the
children need motherly guidance.
This part of the work is under a matron and three lady supervisors, or house-mothers.
Their untiring devotion to the children and the watchful care exercised over them is certainly
evidenced in the children's happy smiling faces and robust bodies, and any words of praise
that I might use would be like trying to add a perfume to the rose. They are ready at all
times, day or night, to sacrifice self for the welfare of the child.
Shortly after the Christmas holidays we had an outbreak of whooping-cough. It was
communicated by a day pupil who had the disease very lightly. It was detected, however,
before it gained headway and was confined to three or four cases. Had not the household
staff been on the alert it might have proved far more serious.
In closing this report, I want to express my deep appreciation of the readiness of the
Department to respond to any demand made on it, and to thank you, Sir, personally, and
through you, the Honourable the Minister of Education, for your kindly support and advice
in the general carrying-on of the work.
HIGH SCHOOL CORRESPONDENCE COURSES.
REPORT OF J. W. GIBSON, M.A., B.PAED., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
The enrolment in High School courses shows a gain over that of last year, being 695 for
the year ended June 30th last as compared with 617 for the previous year. The courses offered
were substantially the same—namely, courses leading to Junior Matriculation, Entrance to
Normal, the Commercial Diploma, and High School Graduation. A new course in Mechanical
Drawing and Draughting was offered for the first time, and plans are in hand to offer one or
two additional technical courses, such as Building Construction and Technical Drawing with
Machine Construction. There is a strong demand for more advanced work and also for' a
widening of the field of instruction along the line of vocational education. We have had to
refuse requests for instruction in a number of courses that we have not yet been able to offer,
such as Commercial Art, Household Art, Electricity, Music, German, and' Spanish.
The unemployment situation has caused a good many young people to consider self-
improvement and re-education with the hope of improving their chances of securing positions.
Up to a certain point our present courses have been of much value in many of these cases.
Just as soon as funds will permit, I would recommend the widening of the field of instruction PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 57
to include other subjects of vocational value for young men and women and also courses in
preparation for Senior Matriculation.
As might be expected, more students are enrolled in Grade IX. than in any other grade.
Approximately 57 per cent, of the total enrolment is in that grade, and Grade X. comes next
with 20 per cent., then Grade XL with 13 per cent, and Grade XII. with 10 per cent. Approximately 37 per cent, of the students registered for courses leading to Junior Matriculation,
33 per cent, for partial courses for personal improvement, 15 per cent, making good certain
subjects for credit, 8 per cent, in full courses for Normal Entrance, and 7 per cent, for the
commercial diploma.
More attention has been given during the past year than formerly to the question of
vocational guidance. We are frequently asked by parents as well as students what courses
and subjects should be included in order to prepare for definite vocations. Much still remains
to be done along this line. No more important educational service can be rendered to-day
than that of helping boys and girls of high-school age to decide upon the best vocation for each
to follow, and then giving them authentic information as to the best line of study to pursue
in order to reach the desired goal.
MODIFICATION OF THE SCALE OF TUITION FEES.
At the beginning of the school-year a small advance was made in the scale of tuition fees,
with certain exemptions extended. All students pay the annual registration fee of $2 regardless
of age or number of subjects carried. Students under 15 years of age pay no tuition fees. The
dependents of returned soldiers pay no tuition fees, and in a few cases, where inability to meet
the cost of tuition had been fully established, tuition fees were remitted. This has now been
extended to include students whose parents are on Government relief.
Students 15 years of age pay, in addition to the registration fee, a tuition fee of $1 per
subject up to maximum of $8 per grade. Students 16, 17, or 18 years of age pay tuition amounting to $2 per subject, those 19, 20, or 21 years of age pay $3.50 per subject, and those over 21
years $5 per subject.
Under present circumstances it is practically impossible for some parents to purchase the
necessary text-books for a high school course for their children, and as a result these children
have been denied the instruction that otherwise would be theirs. There is immediate and
pressing need for a fund on which to draw in order to meet just such cases. We have no such
fund of our own, but thanks to the sympathetic interest of the Imperial Order of the Daughters
of the Empire we have been able to obtain a limited amount of help in securing much-needed
text-books and supplies for a few of the most needy cases that have arisen during the year. I
wish to assure the I.O.D.E., through their Provincial Educational Secretary, Miss A. B. Cooke, of
Victoria, whose assistance along this line has been so generously given, that many boys and girls,
both in elementary and high school correspondence courses, are deeply grateful for this timely
assistance.
RELATIONSHIP TO THE SMALLER HIGH SCHOOLS.
During the past year several of the smaller high schools and superior schools have taken
advantage of the offer to assist in meeting the needs of certain students desiring optional subjects—such as the special sciences, foreign languages, and commercial subjects. For the very
moderate tuition fee of $5 per subject per student the teacher can be relieved of the added
burden of teaching one or more subjects that may be required by a very small number of the
students. - This plan has already given very satisfactory results in a number of schools, and
School Boards are coming to realize that it is advantageous alike to teachers and pupils to have
the special needs of certain pupils provided for through correspondence courses. This co-operative scheme of instruction makes possible a greatly enriched curriculum in any small high school;
in fact, through the aid of the High School Correspondence Courses it is now possible for pupils
attending the smallest high school in the Province to have as wide a choice of options as can be
found in almost any of the large high schools.
The practical value of this plan may be illustrated by taking a concrete example: A pupil
is going into law or medicine when he leaves school and wishes particularly to have a high
school course in Latin. If the teacher undertakes the teaching of this subject he will have to
count on spending from three to four hours per week or possibly 140 hours during the year. A
high-school teacher's time, even in a small school, is rated at approximately $1 per hour.    Cer- M 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
tainly he should not be expected to spend so much valuable time on one pupil, especially when
the other pupils should receive a due proportion of it. If the student or the School Board should
decide to have that subject handled by correspondence the cost would be exactly $7 ($2 registration and $5 tuition), or 5 cents per hour for the required 140 hours, and the time and energy of
the teacher would be conserved for the benefit of the larger classes.
THE QUALITY OF CORRESPONDENCE INSTRUCTION.
We have now completed four years of high-school correspondence work in the interests of
approximately 2,000 students in British Columbia, most of whom would have been denied high-
school education had this plan of correspondence education not been attempted. The work was
initiated to meet a real need and chiefly with a view to providing the best possible system of
instruction for those who had the scholastic ability but not the opportunity to attend our public
high schools. The purpose to be served by such an undertaking so quickly recommended itself
to the people of the Province that unfavourable criticism was seldom heard. I wish here to pay
tribute to the instructors whose unfailing fidelity has done much to ensure whatever measure of
success we may have achieved. Our instructors are the friends of our students and this has
become more and more evident with the passing of the years.
Those of us who have been in closest touch with this problem during the past four years
have not made, at any time, extravagant claims for correspondence instruction as a means in
secondary education. AVe have always been aware of losses sustained due to lack of personal
contact with our students. It is doubtful whether this deficiency can ever be entirely overcome,
ak hough a travelling supervisor might do much in this connection. We are finding out more
and more, however, the truth of the statement that it is the child's own reaction—his own mental
and physical activity—that produces in him those beneficial changes that we call education. It
is the teacher's main function to guide the process of the child's learning and presently to withdraw from the scene as the learner gains the power of self-direction. Self-conquest and self-
direction on the part of the student are essential to success in any system of correspondence
education, and our students have not all made equal progress along this line. Those who fail to
realize within themselves these elements of strength, and who cannot or will not make a genuine
effort to acquire them, seldom go far in correspondence courses. Through special guidance in
the method of successful study we try to encourage our students, and particularly our younger
students, to form good study-habits from the beginning. High purpose, strong determination,
and good technique are the main factors leading to success.
RESULTS  OF INSTRUCTION.
During the past two or three years careful surveys have been made in American colleges and
State Departments of Education with a view to the collecting of evidence and the evaluation of
results pertaining to correspondence instruction. Similar investigations have been carried on in
other countries, especially in Australia and New Zealand, where correspondence education has
made great advances during the last decade. A recent report prepared by officers of the National
University Extension Association dealing with this subject states that not less than 150 public
institutions are conducting correspondence instruction, with not less than 200,000 students. A
summary of the findings based on signed questionnaires is in part as follows : " The replies to
the questionnaire asking for appraisal of correspondence courses are decidedly favourable to
ranking them on a par with residence courses. They may be interpreted as a striking tribute to
the superior excellence of correspondence over residence courses in some respects, particularly
in the amount of work required and accomplished and the knowledge or mastery acquired." The
reasons assigned by pupils and instructors for the comparative excellence of correspondence
instruction are almost identical with the testimony of correspondence students and their parents
in British Columbia: "Lessons require more individual thinking and thoroughness; more time
permits attention to every phase of the subject; choice of subjects is determined by interest and
need (true only of voluntary or optional courses) ; more individual attention is given to the
students than is possible in class-room instruction." The chief drawbacks given are also
familiar: " Lack of personal contacts with instructors and class groups; lack of library
facilities ; lack of oral expression; insufficient correction and comments by the instructor." The
last drawback lies within our control and the others can be greatly reduced. We already have
the hearty co-operation of the Provincial Library Commission.    The general conclusion of the I
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 59
report referred to is that " Correspondence students do make good by such arbitrary standards
as are commonly employed to measure achievement."
The " arbitrary standards " referred to are of course term tests and final examinations. At
the last annual Provincial examinations fifty-three students studying by correspondence participated, some writing on only one or two subjects and some writing on the trill list required for
Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance. On papers written by students who had completed
at least half the work assigned, 78 per cent, obtained over 50 per cent, (average 65.3 per cent.)
and 22 per cent, were under 50 per cent, (average 39.2 per cent.). The average on all papers
was 64.4 per cent., as compared with 61.2 per cent, on the same subjects for the Province. The
examination results would be still better if we could insist on having all papers completed before
taking the final examinations. Students who are repeating subjects on which they had previously failed are usually the greatest offenders. They delay in starting and so find themselves
unable to finish the correspondence lessons when examination time comes.
Before concluding this report I wish to express sincerest thanks to a large number of
elementary-school teachers, who are in close touch with many of our younger students, and
especially those teachers who give valuable assistance by supervising term tests for students sent
out regularly during the year. We owe much to these teachers for their genuine co-operation
in advising and encouraging students in their respective districts. School Boards have also
shown increasing interest in the progress of correspondence education and are coming to recognize the fact that High School Correspondence Instruction can do a good deal to help them in
the solving of their local problems connected with secondary education. In several cases during
the past year School Boards have made arrangements whereby students were enabled to carry-
on their high-school studies through correspondence. Our Inspectors of Schools have been of
great assistance in different parts of the Province in giving advice to many from whom we would
not otherwise have heard.    To them we would extend our heartiest thanks.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CORRESPONDENCE COURSES.
The enrolment for the school-year 1932-33 by grades was as follows:—
Grade 1  122 Grade  VI     92
Grade  II  128 Grade  VII     71
Grade III  116 Grade   VIII     85
Grade  IV  115 	
Grade  V  101 Total     830
Of this number, 725 may be regarded as active pupils. For the year previous the number
of active pupils was 768. The number of pupils recommended for high school in June. 1933,
was 12.
The demand for instruction by correspondence for boys and girls in the elementary-school
grades who live beyond the reach of elementary public schools has not diminished, as the
attendance report goes to show. It is a public service that has been appreciated from the
beginning and has great possibilities not only for the younger boys and girls, but also for adults
who have not had an opportunity to profit by formal instruction in school. Special courses for
such adults are needed as the standard children's courses are in many ways unsuited to them.
There is a third class of adults for whom educational aid is frequently in demand; that is,
young men and women of other nationalities who have come to Canada to make homes for themselves. These young foreigners may have had a fair education in their respective native
countries, but now feel the need of training in the use of the English language and in our system
of education. Correspondence instruction for boys and girls in the elementary-school grades is
capable of great development and during the coming year every course will be examined with a
view to its improvement. The growing demand for correspondence instruction for those who
are unable, for various reasons, to take advantage of regularly organized schools will call for a
somewhat larger appropriation for the coming year and in all probability for a number of years.
No one who realizes the great value of this service to the Province will regard such an expenditure other than as a profitable investment. M 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH.
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE.
Unfortunately, it is necessary to draw the attention of teachers once more to the manner in
which free supplies may be obtained from this office. Whenever possible the Free Requisition
Form should be used, and when used it must be properly completed in detail. Before this office
forwards free books we must know what the stock on hand at the school is, and how many pupils
there are in the grades, and for which school the books are required. If there are no Free
Requisition Forms on hand, we may supply the needs if application is made by letter containing
the above information.
It is obvious from correspondence received by us during the school-year that Teachers' and
Principals' Record Books of Free Texts are not all kept in the manner in which they should be;
in fact, some have been " missing " when the new teacher reported for duty. We ask for the
co-operation of all inspectors, principals, and teachers with a view towards a marked improvement in these matters.
It is pleasing to report a splendid increase in the use of second-hand free books. Under the
plan whereby " a pupil who supplies himself " with a book which would otherwise be issued free
we have distributed to pupils this year $3,046.75, covering claims from 453 schools. We thank
all inspectors', principals, and teachers for their efforts along this line.
The total number of free text-books issued during the school-year 1932-33 to the public
schools (elementary, superior, high, night, etc.), and in connection with the Correspondence
Courses for High School and Elementary School pupils, was as follows: 9,022 Canadian First
Reader; 8,844 Canadian Second Reader; 8,942 Canadian Third Reader; 9,036 Canadian Fourth
Reader; 10,035 Canadian Fifth Reader; MacLean Method Writing Books—8,011 Compendium
No. 1; 8,768 Compendium No. 2; 9,271 Compendium No. 3; 10,200 Compendium No. 4; 8,688
Senior Manual; 79 Teachers' Writing Manual; 9,010 Spelling for the Grades; 9,691 New Canadian Arithmetic, Book I. (Sheffield & Brown) ; 10,426 New Canadian Arithmetic, Book II.
(Sheffield & Brown) ; 7,410 Junior High School Mathematics, Book I.; 6,858 Junior High School
Mathematics, Book II.; 838,372 sheets of Drawing Paper, 6 by 9 inches; 33,616 sheets of Drawing
Paper, 9 by 12 inches; 89 Teachers' Manual of Drawing and Design; 179 Teachers' Record Book
of Free Texts; 22 Principals' Record Book of Free Texts; 2.171 Monthly Reports of Attendance
(Cities) ; 594 Monthly Reports of Attendance (Municipalities) ; 1,188 Monthly Reports of
Attendance (Rural); 100,617 Monthly Reports to Parents; 1,342 Register of Pupils; 15,156
Progress Record Cards; 228 Smith and Roberts' Arithmetic, Book I.; 104 Smith and Roberts'
Arithmetic, Book II.; 21 Citizenship in British Columbia, Angus; 141 Progressive Road to Reading, Book I.; 121 Progressive Road to Reading, Book II.; 32 Progressive Road to Reading, Book
IIIa. ; 234 Everyday Canadian Primer; 3 Silent Study Reader. Book I.; 161 Silent Study Reader,
Book II.; 68 Silent Study Reader, Book III.; 44 Silent Study Reader, Book IV.; 15 Silent
Reading, Book I.: 4 Silent Reading, Book II.; 6 Silent Reading, Book III.; 47 British Columbia
Third Reader; 21 Trees and Shrubs, Food, Medicinal, and Poisonous Plants of British Columbia;
81 Syllabus of Physical Training; 21 Flora of" Southern British Columbia; 20 Bird Study in
British Columbia ; 33 Wall Maps, North America, Spring Rollers; 34 AVall Maps, World, Spring
Rollers; 31 Wall Maps, Canada, Spring Rollers: 32 Wall Maps, British Columbia, Plain Rollers;
30 AVall Maps, British Isles, Spring Rollers; 179 Flags; 3,162 Annual Reports; 318 Manual of
School Law; 8,070 Programme of Studies, Elementary; 204 Programme of Studies, Junior High;
111 Programme of Studies, High;  13,700 Honour Rolls.
Three free libraries of approximately twenty-five titles were issued to new schools and the
usual service was given the School Boards who wished to purchase books of this kind.
The usual report forms were forwarded to all School Boards where and when required.
To purchase and distribute the free books, etc., listed above required an expenditure of
$52,089.65 and 3,878 free requisitions were received and filled.
The total cost of free supplies, including the amounts paid to pupils who supplied themselves
with books which would otherwise have been given free, is $55,136.40.
During the school-year 1932-33, 6,585 orders were filled from dealers, School Boards, etc.,
throughout the entire Province and the sum of $181,938.86 was deposited in the Treasury from
these sales. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 61
In districts where there are no dealers saleable books may be ordered by the School Boards,
and if the orders are submitted by the Secretary, and in reasonable quantity, the dealers' discount will be allowed. AArhen the books are resold to pupils a fair overhead may be charged, but
they must not be resold at more than the Department's List Price.
The following is a copy of the Annual Report of the Text-book Branch for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1033:—
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE,  TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1933.
In presenting the First Annual Report of the Text-book Branch, as called for under section
162a, clause 5, of the " Public Schools Act," I am pleased to report a most successful year's
business.
Stock.
In spite of existing economic conditions our new buying was not in excess of our sales,
and although our stock on hand is large, it can be accounted for by the unbalanced stock we
were required to take over from the old Free Text-book Branch at April 1st, 1932. On the
reorganization of the Text-book Branch to be an operating unit instead of, as formerly, a
distributing centre only, the Branch was charged with $150,902.32. This constituted the
original Operating Account, and represented the stock on hand and the book debts. The stock
so taken over being, in some lines, disproportionately large, a reserve stock was created to
take care of such quantities as were obviously surplus to the requirements estimated. This
reserve remains at practically the same figure to-day, but will be used to some extent during
1933-34.
Of the book debts taken over, $191.43 has this year been written off to bad debts; a further
$193.14 is represented by three accounts which are extremely doubtful.
Our stock and shipping rooms are now so arranged that the minimum amount of handling
is required and necessary precautions have been taken against the outbreak of fire.
Sales.
Our total sales for the year amounted to $211,881.48, and discounts allowed to dealers, etc.,
totalled $29,558.20; the distribution of free texts, etc., cost $56,795.31, against an estimated
figure of $57,200, and in the above $56,795.31 is an item of $2,968.40, which was the amount
paid to pupils who supplied themselves with used copies of free books which would otherwise
have been issued free by the schools. This represents a 232%-per-cent. increase over the
previous best year since this scheme was adopted in September, 1929, and means a direct
saving of approximately $6,000.
Profit.
It will be noted that the net profit for the year amounts to $16,137.38, but in this regard
I would like to point out that this is our first year of operation on a commercial basis, and it
is quite possible that after another year we may find we could, and should, absorb more items
under our overhead charge. It is my belief that this Branch can, run on a straight commercial
basis, pay all overhead without increasing the cost of the books to the public. Until we have
this further experience behind us, I beg to recommend that we carry on for one more year
on the same basis as 1932-33.
General Remarks.
From a summary of past Public Accounts it will be noted that the Free Text-book Branch
has been costing from $9,000 to $21,000 per year since 1912 in salaries, freight, and office
expenses. Now, through greatly increasing the work done in this Department, and handling
all prescribed text-books for the Province instead of only the free books, the Branch is able
through its resales to run on a commercial basis at no cost to the taxpayer, and, in fact,
have a net profit of $16,137.38 as above reported.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of the splendid spirit of loyalty and
co-operation shown amongst the employees of this Branch, and for the courtesy and co-operation
shown by all members of the Department of Education, School Boards, and dealers throughout
the Province. M 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
Profit and Loss Statement for Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1933.
Sales:
Gross sales   $211,881.48
Less discounts, etc      29,558.20
Net sales   $182,323.28
Merchandise inventory, March 31st, 1932:
Reserve stock      $44,271.58
Active stock      102,735.11
Purchases:   $147,006.69
Cost    $110,900.91
Freight and duty         4,202.13
    115,103.04
Less: $262,109.73
Inventory, March 31st, 1933:
Reserve stock      $41,780.53
Active stock        72,617.85
    114,398.38
Net cost of goods sold      147,711.35
Gross profit     $34,611.93
Expenses:
Salaries and wages     $12,417.55
Freight and delivery          3,165.23
Packing and office expenses         1,450.34
Bad debts written off   191.43
    $17,224.55
Reserve for bad debts   500.00
Reserve for obsolescence of stock   750.00
      18,474.55
Net profit for fiscal year ended March 31st, 1933     $16,137.38
Certified correct. Certified correct.
J. F. Meredith. P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge.
Balance-sheet as at March 31st, 1933.
Assets.
Cash on hand and in bank          $217.54
Merchandise as per inventory      114,398.38
Accounts receivable:   $114,615.92
Departmental       $2,586.96
General   112.42
$2,699.38
Less reserve for bad debts  500.00
        2,199.38
$116,815.30
Liabilities. ■ =
Treasury cash advance          $200.00
Text-book Branch Operating Account     115,865.30
Reserve for obsolescence of stock  750.00
$116,815.30
Certified correct. Certified correct. —	
J. F. Meredith, p. q. Babe,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33. M 63
THE STRATHCONA TRUST.
REPORT OF J. L. WAT/SON, B.A., SECRETARY, LOCAL COMMITTEE.
INSTRUCTION  OF  TEACHERS  IN  PHYSICAL  TRAINING,  1932-33.
A total of 364 prospective teachers received theoretical and practical instruction in physical
training at the Normal Schools during the year 1932-33. In addition to the ordinary programme,
instruction in outdoor athletics and games, such as football and badminton, was given after
the usual training-hours.
The gold medals, awarded annually by the Local Committee to the students at the Normal
Schools gaining the highest marks in physical training, were won by Miss Florence M. Grove,
Vancouver, and by Miss Elaine M. Spencer, Victoria. It is worthy of mention that the winners
of these medals also obtained very high standing in the other subjects of the Normal School
Course.
PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1932-33.
At the annual meeting held November 18th, 1932, provision was made for the granting of
eighty-three prizes of $7 each for competition in the various schools for the year 1932-33.
A total of seventy-six recommendations was received from Government and Municipal Inspectors,
and the sum of $532 distributed as prizes.
PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1933-34.
For competition in the various schools during 1933-34 eighty-three prizes of $7 each have
been granted. These prizes are to be allocated as follows: Three prizes to each of the nineteen
inspectorates; eighteen to Greater Vancouver; four to Arictoria ; and two each to New Westminster and the Municipality of Saanich. For purposes of competition and inspection the
schools in each of the eighteen inspectorates are to be divided, where possible, into three
groups, namely: Group A, of five divisions or more; Group B, of two to four divisions,
inclusive; Group C, of schools containing only one room or division. In any inspectorate or
municipality where this classification is not applicable, the matter of deciding what schools
or divisions of schools are entitled to receive awards is to be left to the discretion of the
Inspector in charge.
The full amount of the award is to be expended for a picture or some piece of apparatus
(suitably inscribed) for the room or school in which the prize was won. Only those teachers
who are the holders of physical-training certificates granted under the Strathcona Trust are
eligible to compete.
CADET CORPS, 1932-33.
During the past year 6,170 cadets were trained, a decrease of seventy-three as compared
with 1931-32.    There was also a decrease of four in the number of active cadet corps.
At the annual inspection Oaklands Cadet Corps, Victoria, in charge of A. J. Stevenson, was
given the highest marks for general efficiency. Second place was awarded King Edward High
School Cadet Corps, Arancouver, under command of Captain P. C. Tees, M.M.
A total of $319, divided into twenty prizes, was distributed in accordance with the schedule
adopted at the last annual meeting held November 28th, 1933. The following schedule was
adopted: 1st prize, $30; 2nd prize, $25: two prizes, $20 each; two prizes, $18 each; three
prizes, $16 each:  four prizes, $14 each;   7 prizes, $12 each.
During the past year 2,200 cadets received general instruction in first aid. Two hundred
and eighty-two of that number passed examinations set by the St. John Ambulance Association,
receiving awards as follows: Medallions, 3; vouchers, 2; senior certificates, 45; junior certificates. 232. First aid was also included in the Physical Education Courses given at the
Vancouver and Arictoria Normal Schools, but no examinations were held for certificates.
During the year large classes in swimming and life-saving were held in Victoria for school
cadets, the swimming-tank at the Bay Street Armoury being made available without cost to
the cadets or the Board of School Trustees. In ATancouver a small class in life-saving was
conducted. M 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
One hundred and forty-four boys attended special courses in signalling, and received
certificates and the usual bonus. General instruction in signalling was given to a large percentage of the members of cadet corps.
RIFLE SHOOTING.
A great many cadet corps took part in the Youth of the Empire Miniature Rifle matches
with excellent results. In the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association matches a British Columbia
school team won the Canadian Shield and one other team gained second place in another
Dominion-wide competition.
From the grant for rifle shooting, 1932-33, were distributed: 33 prizes of $1.50 each;
33 prizes of $1.25 each; and 33 prizes of $1 each. The amount expended under this head
was $123.75.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
The funds at the disposal of the Local Committee for the year 1932-33 amounted to $1,664.31,
and the expenditure for the year $1,012.94, leaving a balance of $651.37. Of this amount, $581
has been voted for physical-training prizes for 1933-34.
Receipts.
1932-33.    Balance on hand from 1931-32   $617.11
Interest to November 30th, 1932  13.47
Interest to May 31st, 1933  9.18
Allowance to Secretary added to fund  10.00
Grant for 1932-33   1,014.55
$1,664.31
Expenditures.
1932-33.    Prizes for physical training   $532.00
Prizes for cadet-training  319.00
Prizes for rifle shooting  123.75
Gold medals (two) for Normal Schools   36.00
Revenue stamps  .1  2.19
$1,012.94
Balance on hand  $651.37 PAET II.
STATISTICAL RETURNS.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B.C. M 2
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
)L.
TEACHER.
to
03
V
6
Si
rt
<A   „   0)
lis
**,—^
S
'o
■S.a
to «
5«
O.S
*
•« "6
o cu
IP o
ij
^, a
a; S
ISfi
o
n
s
fj a
Number of Pupils.
SCHCK
a)
-a
O
o
H
0
CD
O
e3
Alberni Distri
:t....Div. 1
emic
ial	
.emic	
ial	
emic.-.
ial	
emic.-.
$ i
E> 025 102
19
19
28
33
12
10
13
17
7
9
15
16
16.12
17.34
23.74
28.10
1
19
1,325
1,280
1,490
1,750
1,350
1,350
2 .100
192
192
192
186
186
186
19
"
33
28
"
„     4
Div. 1
„     2
„     3
Principal
Div. 1
2
„     3
,.     4
„     5
,,     6
,,     7
„     8
„     9
„ io
ining 	
omics 	
ii          	
Armstrong	
99
39
31
33
52
17
14
15
47
22
17
18
85.30
28.34
26.71
28.11
33
■ 28
19
19
39
33
31
"
"
H.  C.   Etter,  M.S.A  Spec
Miss M. W.  How, B.A  Acac
Chilliwack
103
40
57
83.10
33
31
39
1,8001191
28
22
38
37
36
29
34
33
40
38
lenient
10
13
8
24
10
17
20
10
21
18
try Scl
18
9
30
13
20
12
14
23
19
20
lool a'
24.95
17.96
34.85
35.43
34.68
25.60
29.97
32.37
37.12
36.61
so.
18
22
G   L   Phillips,  B.A	
1,700 191
1,700 191
1,700 191
Miss K. M. N. O'Meara, B.A.
Miss J. MacNaughton, B.A,
38
37
1,5001191
1.5001191
33
40
38
36
29
34
Miss W.  D. Rushforth, B.A...
1,000
1.550
1,500
1,500
1,450
1,300
1,600
1,350
1,300
2,280
1.440
1,328
1,380
1,360
1,275
1,280
1,765
1,200
1.200
1,620
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,575
1,467
1,575
1,449
1,485
1,332
2,754
1,485
2,040
1,400
1,300
2,775
2,160
191
191
191
191
Seel
"
"
Miss B. M. Wellington, B.A...
Manual Tvt
Home Econ
1914
191i
191i
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
1894
1864
1894
1854
1854
185A
1854
190
193
193
193
193
193
193
Courtenay	
335
19
18
21
151
10
8
9
184
9
10
12
309.58
16.68
15.79
19.19
111
99
75
11
50
8
2
3
21
18
"
"
Div. 1
2
„      3
„      4
G   C   Barclay, B A.
58
37
27
16
29
28
33
34
27
18
11
4
21
13
12
14
31
19
16
12
8
15
21
20
51.67
33.24
21.38
13.52
25.53
26.97
30.57
32.41
21
18
11
8
37
27
16
"
Miss L.  G.  Jackson, B.A	
33
34
29
28
"
„      6
„     7
Div. 1
2
„     3
Div. 1
„     2
„     3
„     4
Div. 1
Div. 1
o
„     3
„     4
„     5
„     6
ining
Div. 1
2
..     3
Principal
Div. 1
Miss M.  A.   Maltman,  B.A
"
W. C. Kelly, B.A.
204
16
21
23
93
9
11
14
111
7
10
9
183.63
14.11
17.19
20.72
67
57
43
6
37
10
Miss E. M. Bowering, B.A. .
23
21
"
"
60
25
15
30
39
34
10
6
18
20
26
15
9
12
19
51.74
22.76
10.41
25.17
33.95
23
"21
6
10
25
Miss M. E. Macqueen, B.A
15
"
39
30
"
Miss I. M. Dee, B.A.
'*
R. I. Kellie, B.A	
EndeTby	
109
25
19
26
22
43
31
38
54
10
9
19
7
24
26
16
55
15
10
7
15
19
5
22
92.30
22.62
17.72
23.79
21.89
39.72
20.85
32.61
39
8
30
10
15
4
25
3
19
Miss E. L. Dwinnell, B.A
26
22
Miss M.  E.  Cottingham, B.A.
31
38
43
W. R.  Pepper, B.A.   (Prin.)..
Manual Tr-s
193
1864
1864
Grand  Forks
179
31
23
21
101
14
10
9
78
17
13
12
162.68
26.70
19.12
18.90
69
43
48
22
19
9
21
23
	
"
Miss M. 0. Muirhead, B.A	
"
'
Kamloops
75
33
42
63.49
21
23
22
9
176
21
10
11
20.41
21
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to  another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 3
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
SCHOOL.
TEACHER.
S
u
9
is
3 cd o
a f- S
2 « p;
<! —^
5=
"o
S c
o °
W '|
en cd
rttW
as
*
U —
CD   O
IS
CD 3
>>
o
H
3
rt cd'
OS
s g
Number of Pupils.
H
'a
rt
u
e
M
rt
u
0
u
CJ
§
ci
&
U
,,     3
„     4
,,     0
„     6
„     7
„     8
„     9
      „   10
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic-
Academic—
$
1,890
2,160
2,070
1,800
1,890
1,740
1,675
1,300
1,400
1,890
1,620
2,430
1,620
1,575
1,440
1,440
1,350
1,800
1,200
1,400
1,200
1,200
1,223
2,310
1,585
1,295
1,585
1,223
1,513
1,585
1,440
1,398
2,964
2,212
1,840
1,600
1,840
1,620
2,000
1,020
1,620
3,071
2,621
2,621
2,621
2,621
1,905
2,293
2,457
1,987
1.739
2,293
1,822
3,030
2,621
1,822
190
183
190
183
183
183
183
183
183
25
49
13
48
29
38
46
29
35
10
25
4
26
7
30
16
5
28
	
15
24
9
22
22
8
30
24
7
23.06
44.09
9.96
43.51
21.25
27.70
42.29
29.63
29.92
25
49
13
Miss L. Reid, M.A	
46
29
35
48
29
38
Miss G. Reid, B.A	
VV. H. Gurney	
W.  Kay, B.A	
F.  H.  Johnston,  B.A	
F. Potter, B.A	
     Div. 1
193
181
191
191
191
191
i
333
24
15
25
35
29
28
161
11
7
14
20
14
10
172
13
8
11
15
15
18
283.47
21.87
11.67
20.18
29.33
26.10
25.73
110
4
115
7
62
25
13
1
25
21
      „     2
14
Miss F. M. Chapin, B.A	
„     3
„     4
„     5
W. J. Logie, B.A	
35
Miss E. M. Dee, B.A	
29
28
Miss A. M.  Gale, B.A	
Miss M. A. Cunliffe, B.A.
T.  Spargo, B.A.Sc	
mith   Div. 1
„     2
„     3
t    Div. 1
o
mo:
n Shaw        Div. 1
,,     2
„     3
„     4
„     5
„     0
„     7
      „     8
192
192
192
193
193
1914
1914
1914
1914
1914
1914
1914
1914
) See
132
19
15
46
65
10
6
26
67
9
9
20
112.37
15.26
14.77
47.62
57
35
26
19
14
Miss  M.   Woodward,  B.A	
J. M. Petrak, B.A	
15
29
17
Miss M. L. Matheson, B.A	
Miss F. E. Whiteford, B.A. .
Miss V. E. Galloway, B.A.
A. S. Towell, M.A.   (Prin.) ....
Mrs. G.  B.  Clarke, M.A	
Merri
80
46
32
42
19
12
38
27
20
77.65
41.38
28.01
29
32
17
23
15
13
19
10
Nanal
Job
78
36
17
27
33
36
20
32
28
Junior
31
18
9
17
8
10
9
17
12
High
47
18
8
10
25
20
11
15
16
Sehoo
69.39
30.36
17.76
24.88
30.98
31.53
19.04
31.33
25.92
I also.
32
23
13
10
36
17
27
J.  B.  Bitch,  B.A	
20
32
28
33
36
Miss G. M. Clandinin, B.A.
Miss N.  M.  Rowbottom, B.A.
Miss M.   C.   McGregor,  B.A...
Miss E. M.  Cadow, B.A	
;      ::	
Div. 1
„     3
..      4
          ,,          D
„    6
..     7
„     8
Westminster:
ke of Connaught,
Principal
Div. 1
o
„     3
»     4
„     6
..     7
„     8
„     9
,   .          „   10
L   V   Rogers, B.A	
229
106
123
209.81
80
69
44
36
1824
1924
1924
1924
1024
1924
1924
1924
25
26
26
34
33
33
30
30
12
8
10
29
8
13
19
17
13
18
16
5
25
20
11
13
20.60
20.45
23.33
26.46
29.12
29.32
25.49
25.46
25
Miss E. H. S. Townsend, M.A.
'26
34
15
26
1	
Miss M. L. Swanson, B.A	
W   H.   Gray,   B.A.Sc	
18
33
30
30
NewV
Du
237
116
121
199.22
111
75
26
25
185
192
192
192
182
182
182
182
182
182
24
26
25
33
28
37
28
42
46
42
16
1
8
22
7
13
23
5
24
21
8
25
17
11
21
24
5
37
22
21
20.40
24.49
22.18
31.36
25.68
34.23
27.18
38.71
37.11
39.88
24
H. I. Spurr, M.A	
26
25
33
E   H.  Lock,  B.A	
28
37
28
Miss E.  B.  Davidson	
Miss F.  E. Johnston, B.A.
W Minaty, B.A	
4
42
46
38
Miss F. M.  Urquhart, B.A.
K.  E.  Miller,  B.A	
r, Trapp Technical,
Div. 1
2
„     3
R. B. Vaughan, B.S., M.A.
192
192
192
T.
331
18
33
43
140
18
33
43
191
289.99
16.72
29.67
34.47
4
18
126
93
84
24
33
43
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
f The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 4
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
«
CR
CD
O
rt       cd
m g +>
,_, o rt
rt tJ C.
3 a B
£ rt C
'o
Si
w cd
0.5
*
O O
11
.^ a
Kb
o
a
3
'&   V
CD 2i
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
CD
rt
5
CD
ai
5
-a
rt
5
H
H
CD
s
0
New Westminster—
T. J. Trapp Tech]
E
Con.
lical,
iv. 4
,     5
,     6
,     7
,     8
,     9
,   10
,   11
,   12
,  13
,   14
Miss M.  I.  Mcintosh,  B.A
Academic	
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic.
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic—
$
2,211
2,376
1,656
1,423
2,211
1,905
1,739
2,130
2,457
2,129
1,905
1,822
2,375
2,293
2,211
2,090
1.215
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
32
47
32
38
18
32
37
35
11
47
34
15
8
32
38
18
9
35
11
20
17
39
32
28
27
34
24.22
37.15
26.70
29.02
16.75
25.50
32.00
22.44
9.85
38.47
28.82
25
47
7
Miss M. E. Menten, B.A.
9
35
11
47
34
32
38
18
23
37
'
J. R. Fournier, B.A.Sc	
F. J. Simpson	
Miss L. M.  Lane, B.A	
Miss M. I. McKenzie, B.A—
F. R. Corp	
A.   M.   McDermott,   B.S.A.,
B.A	
W. Nelson 	
W. J. Williams	
'                         '
*
iv. 1
,     2
iv. 1
,     2
iv. 1
,     2
,     3
,     4
iv. 1
,     2
,     3
,      4
,     5
,     6
,     7
,     8
,     9
F. W. Harvey, M.A	
192
192
457
20
20
280
8
8
1771
1
121
12
371.81
16.76
18.68
154
191
72
12
40
8
Miss M. R. Cole, B.A	
12
8
1,8231193
1,000 121
1
1
1,2421190
1,904 190
1,2421190
1,2421190
40
11
20
16
5
7
24
6
13
35.45
16.45
16.48
12
8
12
5
8
6
J.  W.  Morrow,  B.A	
10
10
Mrs. W. L. Martin, B.A	
Prince George:
31
24
23
17
30
12
10
9
8
13
19
14
14
9
17
26.78
21.01
20.12
14.49
25.35
10
10
5
6
<3. B. Dickson, B.A.   (Prin.)..
Miss K.   0.  Reid, B.A	
17
11
23
7
Miss E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Miss M.  C.  Dimock, B.A
N.   MacLeod,   B.Sc	
Prince Rupert:
King Edward- E
2,100
1,430
1,700
1,560
1,400
1,400
1,800
1,400
1,560
1.500
184
193
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
See I
94
8
17
34
32
36
28
29
29
31
llement
40
5
11
16
32
3
10
14
12
12
iry Sc
54
3
6
18
33
18
15
17
19
80.98
7.75
17.24
30.82
27.92
33.14
26.98
28.88
28.04
25.45
28
30
36
17
8
34
,,
Miss  J.   MacDonald,   B.A	
Miss P. Gwyer, B.A	
28
29
29
31
32
30
W.  Bobbins,  B.A	
A. Sutton, B.A	
H. P. Johns, B.A	
Miss M.  Delany	
Miss E. White, B.Sc	
A.  M.   Hurst,  B.A	
M. W. Abbott, B.A	
hool also
iv. 1
,     2
,     3
,     4
,     5
,     6
1
2,700 1834
1,850|191
1,700|1764
l,600|184i
1.47211844
Revelstoke    I
244
17
27
30
32
37
21
Element
115
6
16
13
11
14
5
iry Sc
129
11
11
17
21
23
16
218.12
15.61
25.15
27.47
29.99
33 93
18.38
117
68
34
17
8
17
27
Miss E.  C. I. Barlow, B.A
J. E. Brown, B.A	
30
32
37
21
W.  G. Smith, B.A	
Miss K. M. Lehrman	
Miss M. S. Reid, B.A	
1,600
1,600
2,147
1,296
184*
See I
193
188
iv. 1
,     2
.     3
iv. 1
,     2
,     3
,     4
iv. 1
2
'.     3
\
W. McKenzie, B.A	
Rjssland    I
164
34
23
40
05
13
5
15
991
211
181
145.05
25.56
21.47
36.38
90
	
30
24
27
10
17
M. P.  DesBrisay,  B.A	
40
23
Miss E. Winch, B.A	
1,215 188
1
1
1,68011814
1,680|1834
2,100 1904
l,680|l904
25
J.   F.   Nicoll,  M.A	
97
9
41
28
37
33
4
16
6
13
64
5
25
22
24
81.92
6.45
34.50
24.24
33.82
40
23
24
....--
10
9
Miss C. M. Mercer, B.A	
W. H.  Grant, B.S.A.   (Prin.)
Miss P.   Gignac,  B.A	
37
28
Slocan 	
1,400
2,070
3,195
193
188
193
115
9
9
20
39
39
3
5
12
21
76
6
4
8
18
97.45
7.81
7.47
17.23
35.45
37
28
2
41
3
4
9
Trail-Tadanac  I
Miss N.  C.   Lingle,  B.A	
9
A.  E. Allison,  B.A.   (Prin.)..
0.  E.  Niedermann, B.A.Sc	
20
2,2501193
39
|
1
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 5
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
>>
«£■§-■§
rt ipj Ch
3 o> „,
9 m 3
<  — r-i
rt
ro
2 a
« °
oa'jjcj
en cd
o.s
*
o ^
CD   O
+*     ft
o
n
u
3
rt  CD
a g
|l
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
CD
3
cd
5
H
CD
oi
a
rt
5
.2™
Miss G. M. Anderson, B.A,
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic	
$
1   080 193
37
29
46
42
15
12
18
22
22
17
28
20
32.76
25.90
38.77
38.77
46
42
37
29
1,980
1,620
1,710
2,300
1,113
1,270
1,030
3,354
2,593
1,404
2,262
2,496
2 262
2^496
2,441
2,114
1,927
2,262
1,786
2,262
2,223
2,262
1,607
1,638
2,496
1,404
1,038
2,490
702
2,258
3,120
2,005
2,114
2,496
1,927
2,730
2,406
2,332
2,114
1,004
2,114
1,895
1,638
2,496
1,560
1,950
3,270
2,730
2,262
1,810
1,677
1,166
1,677
2,106
2,262
2,129
1,700
1,895
1,872
1,794
1,888
1,482
2 223
l!<338
1,895
193
193
193
7
C. H. Scott	
Vanco
Art
uver:
222
105
117
196.18
88
66
39
20
9
Miss G. W. Melvin	
Britannia ....Principal
,,       Vice-Principal
G   W   R   Turner, B A
1814
1814
1814
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
1834
183 J
1834
1834
29
30
36
30
22
39
44
28
39
35
35
40
38
42
37
30
32
38
9
30
13
12
38
37
13
6
23
26
29
12
14
9
32
15
20
23
24
22
1
7
28
26
29
12
14
0
30
23
21
23
25.58
28.23
30.94
34.33
20.31
37.67
42.15
24.32
37.86
32.86
33.46
38.03
34.24
36.34
34.49
29.26
29.25
30.99
29
30
36
Miss L.  B.  W.  Browne, M.A.
36
22
39
44
28
C. W. Abercrombie, M.A
„     8
Miss  E.   S.   Hathaway,   B.Sc,
M.A	
Miss  K.   Macdiarmid,   B.A
Miss E. I.  McLarty, B.A
37
30
32
38
39
35
35
40
38
42
Miss M. E. Grenfell, B.A
Miss G. A. Langridge, B.A
M. B. Saunders	
»  17
F.  N. Bennett, B.A., B.Sc
Miss H. M. Dobie, B.A.  (part
Manual Training	
W.  A.   Hill	
  | 	
630
318
312
579.49
137
229
169
95
     Div_ 1
Miss C.  B.  Mackay,  M.A
192
192
192
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
35
34
28
33
39
42
46
41
31
42
45
43
29
19
22
19
15
24
19
20
35
3
30
24
17
20
16
12
9
18
15
23
26
6
28
12
21
26
9
32.48
31.44
25.81
29.77
36.41
39.12
42.91
39.29
28.12
38.56
42.21
39.24
26.55
35
34
28
„     3
„     4
„     5
,,     G
 ,      7
„     8
,,      9
„  10
„  11
„   12
13
W. Putnam, B.Sc	
Miss K. F. Prescott, B.A
E. T. Oliver, B.A	
33
39
42
H.  H.  Smith,  B.A	
45
43
29
46
41
31
42
J. L.  Bennett, B.A.Sc	
Miss I. M. Kerr, B.A	
W.  T.  Reid,  B.A	
Miss M. E. Lawrence, B.A
S.  McEwan,  M.A	
Miss I. L.. Kirkwood, B.Sc
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic-...
Manual Training	
W.   K.   Beech,   M.A	
Fairview High School
of  Commerce,
Principal
488
267
221
438.75
117
160
114
97
Div. 1
„     2
„     3
„     4
      „     5
„     G
„     7
„     8
„     9
„   10
„   11
.,   12
„   13
„   14
„   15
„   1G
Miss E.  H.  MacQueen,  B.A...
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
192
31
28
45
42
48
39
46
40
42
43
48
47
31
32
47
49
32
15
39
46
re
19
5
8
18
14
32
31
13
45
42
48
40
42
43
32
28
26
24
29
35
22.44
21.63
38.63
35.27
38.40
34.32
37/94
33.89
37.46
33.97
43.65
44.53
25.92
25.27
39.98
38.82
28.36
31
28
Miss D. E. Whiles	
45
42
48
39
Miss H. M. Burt, M.A. .
Miss M. A. MacKay, B.A.
C.  E.  Milley, B.A.
W. F. Houston	
Miss  C.  M.   Bridgman	
31
32
46
40
42
43
48
47
Miss E. D. Perkins, B.A
E. S.  Grant, B.A.
J. M. Buckley, B.A.
47
A   G   Smith, B.A.
32
49
Miss L. M.  Howell, M.A
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 6
PUBLIC
SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933
—Continued.
TEACHER.
<6
o
s
d
rt  ^  cd
rt ^ Ph
.5 ■" 3
rt
'o
Sri
o.2
m w
m  V
o.S
ex's ^
h —
CD  O
£ H
sg
+J p,
cd a
£0i
3
Qg
cd el
Wa
«i a
fe Si
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
CD
■a
rt
5
M
CD
■a
rt
3
R
CD
ca
rt
5
R
CD
■a
d
5
.2 K
g«
Vancouver—Continued.
Fail-view High School
of Com Div. 18
Miss D. B. McLean	
Temporary...
Academic...
$
1,170
1,794
2,496
2,730
2,496
1,895
1,326
192
192
192
47
47
83
83
47
47
48.89
39.58
60.31
47
47
      „  19
      „  20
83
L.  W.  Taylor, B.A.,  C.A
W.   T.   Abercrombie,  B.A	
Miss L. A. Williamson, M.A...
Miss E. A. Gibbs, B.A	
Grandview High School
of Commerce,
867
295
572
721.34
189
398
221
59
     Div. 1
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
45
51
52
46
44
38
38
40
41
41
12
17
14
12
4
12
4
19
8
33
51
35
32
32
34
26
36
22
33
37.47
•    44.60
45.58
32.77
37.95
33.77
33.37
37.03
36.66
35.06
45
*>
51
52
,     3
,     4
,     5
,     6
,     7
,     8
,     9
.   10
40
41
41
46
44
38
38
J. F. Herd, M.A	
Special	
Academic	
1,248
2,340
1,607
2,168
1,880
3,432
2,278
2,262
2,730
N   M.  Clarke, B.A	
W. Alsbury	
S.  A.   Cox,  B.A	
W. M. Keatley, M.A	
J.  T.  Palmer, B.A	
436
102
334
374.28
122
166
103
45
,    Div. 1
F. M. Wallace, M.A	
192
192
192
183
37
36
30
37
37
40
40
39
39
39
42
37
36
41
37
41
45
43
41
40
46
46
39
44
39
45
38
39
42
40
45
42
40
38
37
36
43
15
14
24
31
17
14
17
39
10
28
37
10
19
37
12
23
26
33
40
46
46
19
7
11
18
17
22
22
36
16
13
6
23
26
22
29
14
20
22
29
22
17
8
39
22
20
45
38
32
31
40
45
24
23
38
37
36
21
34.38
33.65
27.13
31.01
32.77
33.87
34.69
34.13
35.32
36.29
37.44
35.06
33.67
36.40
30.68
37.12
40.92
40.08
31.77
39.48
42.78
38.30
35.96
40.47
36.25
42.00
37.16
33.89
37.46
32.35
39.37
31.01
34.38
31.34
32.17
34.42
38.47
37
36
30
37
      „     2
Miss H. I. Reid, B.A	
      „     3
Miss J. J. MacKenzie, M.A...
J. Hall, B.Litt	
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic...
              4
      „     5
H.  H. Grantham,  B.A	
37
      6
Miss I. J. McCulIoch, M.A
G. A. Macdonald, B.A.Sc
Miss E. G. Harrop, B.A	
2,340
2,496
2 262
2,465
2,496
2,730
2,465
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
40
40
      ,-,     7
,      „     8
39
	
      „     9
A. F. Wilks, B.A	
,      „   10
T.  C.  MacCaughie,  M.A	
	
43
41
40
40
46
39
39
42
37
30
41
37
41
45
      „   11
H. W. L. Laffere, B.A	
      „   12
R. Rigby, M.A	
„   13
      „   14
T. H. Adney, B.A .'..
Miss E. M. Montgomery, B.A.
2,2621185
1,007|185
1,560)185
1,597|185
2,2781185
2,1841185
1.628 185
,      „   15
C. S.  Hope, B.A	
      „   10
Wm. MacB. Brown, B.A
J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc	
      „   17
    18
W. E. Reed, B.A	
    19
R.   C.   Harris,  M.A	
      „   20
J.  W. Plommer, B.A	
      ,,  21
E.   Kelly,   B.A	
1,482
1,482
1,326
2,090
2,262
1,326
1,248
2,262
2,340
2,371
1,326
2,371
2,496
1,482
1,716
2,106
2,262
2,028
2,496
2,199
2,184
1,950
3,120
2,730
2,496
2,496
2.496
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
192
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
185
2°
J. B. MacLean, B.A	
      ,,   23
Miss D. B. Russell, B.A	
    24
L. J. Fisher, B.A	
44
      „   25
39
45
38
 26
Miss D.  J.  Woods, B.A	
      „   27
Miss G. E.  Taylor,  B.A	
,.   28
      „   29
Miss L. A. Simpson, B.A	
F.  H.  Halstead	
A. V. McNeill, B.A	
42
40
39
      „   30
40
38
37
43
45
42
    31
Miss D. A. Murray, B.A	
    32
L. H. M.  Breadon,  B.A	
, 33
G. W. MacKinnon, M.A	
„             :;  34
Miss M. M. Currie, B.A	
      ,,   35
Miss E.  O. Denman, B.A	
Miss I.  E.   Clemens,  B.A
Miss O.  E.  J.  Cousins,  B.A...
G.   Manson	
, ,   36
36
	
	
      ...   37
H.   Hill	
Miss E. Gibbard, B.A	
J. R. Sanderson, M.A.. Ph.D.
King Edward,
Principal
1476
660
816
1276.68
579
441
240
179
37
Vice-Principal R. W. Suter, B.A.. B.Sc	
, ...      Div. 1
o
W. C. Wilson, B.A	
■
177
177
177
38
47
33
36
35
32
33
37
37
12
42
10
7
22
11
14
18
21
26
5
23
29
13
21
19
19
16
33.88
36.36
30.62
34.12
33.30
28.74
28.10
32.86
31.03
38
47
33
,     3
,     4
,     5
,     6
,     7
.     8
,     9
W. Y. McLeish, B.Se	
Miss S. M. Boyles, B.A	
1,7861183
2,496|183
2,4961183
1,983|183
2,4961183
2,574|187
1
36
35
32
33
37
.
C. F. Connor, M.A., B.D
D. Ogilvie,  M.A	
Miss U. F. Hall, M.A., B.A...
P.  C. Tees, B.A	
1
W. E. Grant, B.A	
37
"."
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducti
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all
ng the
pupils
numb
attenc
2r of
ing d
pupils who
iring year.
were transferred
.o another PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 7
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
rt
s
a
O
>>
08 - a>
O rt
rt rg ft
fill a
«*H — r-J
"S 2
03'ffl
in a3
o.a
*
CD 3
p U
sg
+J ft
0 a
o
M
3
Pi .;._
°g
cd el
tu-a
el a
ss
■<«i
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
CD
ca
rt
5
CD
-a
C
0
CD
rt
5
R
CD
-a
rt
3
o E
'I rt
Vancouver—Continued.
King Edward-Div. 10
W.   F.   Maxwell,   B.A	
Miss M. D. Allen, B.Sc, M.A..
Academic-
Special	
Academic...
Special	
S
2,496
2,113
1,483
2,496
2.262
187
187
187
187
187
41
47
40
37
45
38
30
36
41
44
37
38
39
39
42
23
7
15
18
42
7
25
12
23
24
19
19
35
18
40
25
19
3
38
29
11
29
21
37
14
20
20
7
38.38
39.21
30.35
32.78
40.33
35.01
33.68
30.71
38.45
39.25
30.05
32.14
35.28
30.44
38.00
41
47
____  n
„   12
,.   13
..   14
,,  15
„   1G
„   17
,,   18
      „   19
41
44
37
38
40
37
45
38
36
36
.   1
A. W. Ross, M.A	
Miss K. H. McQueen, B.A. .
Miss J. F.  C. Hopkins, B.A...
Miss M.  D.  Mawdsley,  M.A...
Miss F. H. Howden, B.Sc,
G. M.-Miller, M.A	
1,786|187
1,4721187
2,005|187
2,496|187
1,408H87
I
2.496 1 87
,    ■         „   20
„   21
22
      „   23
A.  AV.  Vining,  M.A.,  Dr.  U.
D.  B.  Pollock,   B.A	
1,511
2,253
1,395
2,319
1,030
1,482
1,407
187
187
187
187
Miss G. D. Burris, M.A	
"
39
Mrs.  E. R.  Davies, B.A	
39
42
	
„   24
J.  P.  G. MacLeod,  B.A	
W. J. Allardyce, M.A., Ph.D.
Ma
Academic—
D.  B.   Johnston,  B.A	
3,120
2,490
2,730
9 ofio
928
426
502
816.99
280
232
125
173
118
C.  H.  Corkum,  B.A	
177
184
184
29
35
37
20
42
31
37
41
39
47
47
45
45
14
23
18
6
17
26
14
35
8
33
25
18
21
15
12
19
20
25
5
23
6
31
14
22
27
24
25.04
34.73
29.88
23.37
37.93
28.95
34.53
35.35
35.32
40.54
43.65
39.07
42.02
29
D
B.  J.   Wood,  B.Sc,  M.A.
35
37
26
3
Miss E. B. Bell, M A
2,262'184
2,2621184
2,4961184
2,496|184
2,4961184
2,3321184
2,496 184
1,786 184
Ti
42
31
-     „     G
G.  W.   Clark,  M.A.	
47
47
45
45
""S7
41
39
,     7
,     8
 1	
C. D. Smith, B.A	
10
P.  L.  McCreery,  B A.
R.  H.  Manzer, M.A., B.PaedJ Academic...
Miss M.   E.  Gibbon,  B.A         ]
Miss H. M. Dobie. B.A.   (Dart
1,482
702
2,253
3,432
2,441
2,496
184
Manual Training	
Kitsilano ....Principal
501
258
243
449.47
184
117
73
	
98
29
177
185
40
38
32
39
42
34
33
31
30
35
37
34
42
45
39
39
33
15
31
20
8
19
11
13
16
36
25
36
12
39
33
....
25
7
12
31
23
23
20
15
35
37
9
42
9
27
	
36.72
36.54
27.50
37.32
40.16
31.68
27.63
30.11
33.08
31.97
32.24
31.90
37.09
36.34
33.88
36.29
30.67
40
o
38
32
39
T   G  Bragg  B A
2,496|185
2,730:185
2,480 185
2,480^.85
2,480!l85
1,U04|185
l,638!l85
2,262 185
1,550 185
1,3261185
2,005|185
1,888 185
1,7061185
T. Pattison, M.A.  (Vice-Prin.)
42
34
33
31
36
35
G
„     9
"
37
34
42
45
39
39
33
„   13
Miss M.  MacKay, B.A	
,,   15
.,   1G
„   17
Home Economics	
F. A. McLellan, B.A., B.C.H.S. J
	
1,786
A.   Bowles,   B.A	
Magee   Principal
Div. 1
o
3,432
2,730
2,574
2,114
1 482
629
314
315
565.27
269
211
109
40
185
185
185
192
36
34
38
42
44
40
33
35
33
30
46
33
12
20
13
33
9
9
21
11
14
3
22
18
29
11
31
24
14
22
30
32
30.11
29.02
33.68
37.26
35.82
33.96
25.73
32.60
30.75
25.13
39.40
36
34
"
,     3
,     4
,     5
,      G
,     7
,     8
,     9
,   10
,   11
 1	
38
42
44
40
33
R.  K.   Cameron, B.A.Sc	
2,2231192
2,496'192
2,496 183
1.981J183
2,1141183
1,5561183
"       	
"        	
"       	
ht:     V    -\r    t>    +           f'v     at'a'   a     a
35
33
30
46
	
*'
	
"       	
* The net number ot pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
>>
el
rt „  CD
^ a a
rt caPn
11 §
< — hs
e]
%
f g
72'|
M   CD
Q.S
#
"a "3
cd a
11
3 -
£ra
+J ft
S5fc
a
M
3
a cd
a a
CD  el
wa
rt a
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
a
CD
-a
el
5
M
CD
-a
el
3
CD
■a
el
5
■a
rt
3
£.2
2 E
g«
mil
Vancouver—Continued.
Magee    Div. 12
13
C. M. Haverstock, B.A	
Academic-
Special	
Academic—
Special	
Academic-
$
183
33
34
35
40
35
38
46
40
48
45
43
30
33
34
51
27
34
35
11
49
48
45
13
8
8
1
20
6
40
24
38
46
30
22
25
33
31
29.92
32.36
32.11
34.48
36.50
34.29
40.11
44.26
44.10
38.73
39.92
30.01
27.65
31.62
44.59
33
M73|183
34
35
40
35
J   E   Smith, B A-
2,490
2,332
2,262
2,005
1,550
183
183
183
183
183
Miss C.  G.  Campbell,  BA
....--
51
38
46
49
48
45
43
30
33
N    Clark    B.A.
21
l,904ll83
1,482|183
1,245|183
Miss M.  H.  Langridge, B.A...
1,482
2,008
1,245
1,796
2,105
2,004
1,872
3,144
2,730
2,496
2,441
2,496
2,184
1,895
1,895
1,248
3,120
2,519
2,496
2,496
2,184
2,574
1,638
1.560
183
183
2fi
Ho
Ma
me Economics	
nual Training	
'
Prince of Wales,
Principal
....   Div. 1
1005
474
531
858.26
85
332
321
159
108
W. R. Smith, M.A., B.Paed...
C    G.  Allin, B A.
192
184
184
184
184
184
184
184
43
33
33
42
27
23
47
26
26
33
10
19
11
10
32
17
23
23
16
7
15
26
37.14
33.31
30.02
38.37
24.99
21.39
43.50
21.11
43
2
■
33
33
„     3
E.  S.  Meek,  B.A	
4
A   T.  Hadden,  B.A.
47
42
27
23
      „     5
      „     6
Miss J.  M.  Davidson, B.A,
,     7
      „     8
26
Special	
Academic	
Temporary...
Academic	
Special	
Academic—
Special	
Academic-
Temporary—
Special	
Academic....
Temporary-.
Academic-
Special	
Temporary...
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic...
Vancouver Technical,
Principal
274
147
127
240.98
47
92
92
43
Div. 1
„      2
„     3
„ '   4
„     5
„     6
„     7
.,     8
„     9
„   10
„   11
„   13
.,   14
,,   15
„   16
„   17
„   18
„   19
.i   20
„  21
„  22
„  23
,.  24
„  25
„   26
„   27
A. D. Hotchkiss, M.A	
L. W. Heaslip	
192
192
192
192
192
192
30
38
38
37
30
24
22
26
46
39
41
43
51
32
31
34
31
35
38
30
31
35
31
52
20
38
04
30
38
38
37
36
24
22
26
46
39
41
43
51
32
31
34
31
35
38
30
31
35
31
52
20
38
64
26.87
34.71
35.48
30.82
32.73
22.58
19.28
22.81
35.53
30.69
33.07
35.91
43.29
25.47
24.35
33.70
29.80
34.96
30.76
29.48
27.66
28.15
26.85
37.09
16.81
25.75
46.50
30
38
T.   Peddie,   M.A	
38
37
36
24
22
26
S. J. Wright, B.Sc.
 |	
W. S. Campbell	
 1	
1,4441192
1
1,872'192
1,0771192
1,6771192
2,496192
1,8951192
2,496|192
1,872)192
2,4961192
2,223'192
2i496]l92
2,00o|l92
2.418'192
L.  A.  Gilbert, B.A., M.A.,
B.C.L	
H. P. Timms	
31
35
38
30
31
35
31
52
20
38
64
46
39
41
43
51
32
31
34
A.  E. Russell	
AV. S. Bell, B.A	
G. Darling, B.Sc	
F. L.  Code, B.Sc	
 1	
J.   D.   Baird,   B.A	
R.  B. Crummy, B.A	
.
C. F. Barton, B.A.Sc	
  1    	
 1	
A. F. Reid	
1,677
1,638
1,638
1.529
192
192
192
192
....      1	
...     .
S. V. Clarke, B.A	
C. W. Mitton	
2,4411192
2.4961192
E. M. White,  B.A.Sc.
  1   ....
J.  W. Inglis	
1,560
2,496
1,716
2,418
1,482
2,418
2,441
1,444
2,418
1,560
1,677
2.804
192
192
F. C. Corry	
A. Y. Faris	
E. W. Parker	
Miss R. B. RiddeU, B.A
P.  D.  Taylor	
W.  Gray, M.A	
1921
1
973
29
22
973
8
11
21
11
821.20
26.42
20.61
405
317
183
68
29
22
       2
W. R. McDougall, B.A	
2.3921187;
	
—
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to  another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
f The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 9
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
CD
el
CD
D
>>
rt       cd
k a +>
O  rt
9 rt a
H.o a
"a
ij
Ul co
as
*■ 9
cd a
S5fL|
a
b
el  cd
Q 2
a §
cm ca
£■§
<l«3
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
H
a
•a
rt
3
CD
■a
el
3
B
a
•a
el
3
Pi
■a
el
5
t- a
■°'S
W.  Stewart,  B.A	
Academic	
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic-
Temporary...
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic-
Special	
$
2,186
1,669
2,091
2,260
2 059
1871
187i
187i
187±
187J,
24
40
25
45
45
41
40
40
40
27
n
8
24
21
25
21
25
22
22
6
13
32
1
24
20
20
15
18
18
21
23.43
36.58
23.09
40.91
40.37
39.82
34.59
36.45
34.92
22.63
24
40
25
,,     4
,      „     5
E. It. Chamberlain, B.A	
      „     6
D.  L.   Shaw,  M.Sc	
41
40
40
40
45
45
„     7
J.   I).   Siddons,   B.A	
,     8
„     9
C. M. Melntyre, B.A	
1,980
1,400
1,552
1,806
1874
1874
1874
1874
      „   10
Miss P.  Hemsworth, B.A	
,,   11
.     „   12
27
Mrs. N. E. Murphy	
P. Wllcock	
2,392
1,534
1,112
1,444
1,724
184
184
184
184
184
418
34
35
29
28
24
17
41
204
14
15
13
20
12
5
19
214
20
20
10
8
12
12
22
370.66
30.28
31.80
25.17
26.33
21.36
12.99
33.72
101
34
35
117
89
51
 ,     2
Miss L. C.  Giegerich, B.A.
,,     3
29
28
„     4
Miss K. MacDonald, B.A	
C. P.  Pulton, B.A	
■     „     5
24
17
„     0
J.   C. Hembling, B.A	
•     „     7
1 8901191
41
3,384
2,798
2,373
2,365
2,542
2,626
2,626
2,475
2,542
2,212
2,250
2,542
2,115
2,090
2,373
2,542
1,756
2,181
1,756
1,970
208
98
110
176.24
69
57
41
41
H. L.  Smith, M.A	
     Div. 1
Miss R. V. Grant, B.A	
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
39
35
36
34
30
40
28
34
30
36
42
40
29
34
35
34
31
30
32
35
37
25
36
34
34
30
35
39
36
32
31
22
31
33
32
47
45
41
11
35
19
20
30
13
22
26
13
7
8
5
5
9
3
24
31
30
19
27
7
22
12
11
.    35
16
32
20
31
33
32
5
21
2
28
17
14
27
0
8
17
29
34
35
24
25
32
10
13
8
30
3
24
34
23
30
39
20
31
2
42
24
39
35.46
30.69
31.54
29.94
26.39
37.02
24.08
30.64
27.59
32.12
34.91
32.86
28.16
31.62
32.47
33.49
26.99
28.45
28.25
29.33
32.38
21.42
32.65
30.29
34.01
25.04
33.52
33.79
33.89
30.15
28.02
20.19
27.89
31.16
29.50
40.25
38.87
35.07
39
35
36
34
30
40
      „     2
Miss E.  S.  Cameron, B.A.
W. H. Webber, B.Sc	
-     „     3
 ,     4
.     „     5
Wm.  H.  Hughes,  B.A.,  B.Sc.
C.  L.  Campbell,  B.A	
      „     6
.     „     7
T. Steward, B.Litt	
28
34
30
36
42
40
-     „     8
II. D. Dee, B.A	
„     9
H. D. Wallis, B.A.Sc	
„   10
A.   M.   Boyd,  M.A	
.     „   11
J.   O.   Welch	
„   12
.     „   13
Miss M.  W. Hamilton, B.A...
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A...
34
30
35
39
36
32
31
22
31
33
32
47
45
41
29
34
35
34
31
30
32
35
37
25
36
34
.     „   14
. ...     „   15
„   16
W.   I..   Hardie,  B.A	
.     „   17
L.   Clark,   B.A	
„   18
„   19
,,   20
..   21
W.  E.   Cook   B Sc.
1,654
2,373
1,921
2,094
2,373
193
193
193
193
193
..   22   Miss   O    Til    Shields    B A
„   23
„   24
„   25
.,   26
,,   27
J. J. McKim    .
,,   28
Miss I.  A.  Thomas,  M.A	
2,365
2,542
2,047
2,373
2,194
1,756
1,756
2,475
1,959
1,646
2,542
2,060
2,475
1,371
1,688
2,246
2,093
2,308
2,093
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
.     ,,   29
„   30
Miss L. B. Maxwell, B.A	
Miss  A.   V.   Turner,  B.A	
„   32
„   33
,,   34
,,   35
„   36
      „   37
      „   38
P. H   Buck   B A
"
L. A. Campbell	
 l„	
 1	
High Schools, 1932-33 	
1304
630
668
1170.18
488
392
210
214
Total for  City
14301
14151
7153
6858
7148
7293
12333.22
112235.38
4123
4671
4630
4813
3032
2640
2057
1267
459
Total  for   City
High Schools,  1931-32 	
[760
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia,
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
JUNE 30th, 1933.
SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
TEACHER.
a
rt
1
S3
&
ol _,  oj
rt-aPn
§«2
a d a
el
"a
2c
■S.S
m   M
rt   CD
el™
as
■s-s
II
+j a.
1
a
rt  CD
eg
a el
or TJ
g B
CD .2
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
CD
■a
el
5
M
a
>a
rt
3
Pi
CD
•a
rt
U
F-I
M
M
a
-a
at
u
0
si
CD   S
Burnaby:
Burnaby, North,
Div. 1
Academic...
Temporary...
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
$
2,448
1,548
1,759
1,759
1,759
1,315
1,836
2,325
2,065
1,759
1,548
1,315
1,247
1,702
1,548
1,315
1,702
1,393
1,505
1,625
1,500
1,300
1,200
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
30
26
32
45
35
27
42
14
14
3
28
35
7
16
12
29
17
27
35
26.71
28.69
28.67
41.12
31.52
26.19
40.00
30
, ,     2
26
      „     3
D. R. McLean, B.A	
35
27
42
32
45
      „     4
      „     5
J.  8.  Burton, B.A	
      „     6
Miss E.  R.  Hardy,  B.A	
,      „     7
W. J. McFadden, B.A	
C.  G.  Brown, B.A	
Burnaby, South,
Principal
237
101
136
222.91
104
77
26
30
    Div. 1
G.   H.   Fleming,   B.A	
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
185
185
185
39
38
40
34
31
42
46
45
47
57
46
49
	
13
12
22
10
12
20
18
23
23
9
12
13
26
26
18
24
19
22
28
22
24
48
34
36
33.85
33.28
36.32
32.08
27.92
37.35
43.08
42.74
41.87
47.19
35.45
38.17
39
,      2
Miss H. E. Draper, B.A	
38
40
 ,     3
J. A. C. Harkness, B.A	
,      4
Miss J. Moase, B.A	
46
45
47
57
34
,      5
Miss M.   Herbison,  B.A	
31
42
      „     6
R.  0. Norman, B.A	
      7
N.  D.   MacDonald,  B.A	
      8
Miss 0. E. McKeown, B.A
Miss L.  M.  Swencisky, B.A...
T. J. Sanderson, B.A	
, _     „     9
 ,   10
,      „   11
46
      „   12
W. Dalziel, A.C.I.S	
C. E. Joyce, B.A	
36
13
Delta:
King George V.,
Div. 1
514
36
19
23
25
187
11
5
12
5
327
25
14
11
20
449.32
32.63
17.45
22.11
20.56
195
153
114
19
52
17
      2
Miss D. E. Kidd, B.A	
23
10
19
 ,     3
Mrs. E. A. Boxall, M.A	
      „     4
3
8
4
Miss G.  N.  Hewlings, B.A
J.  E.   Sanders, B.A	
Esquimalt     Div. 1
2,224
1,835
1,835
1,300
1,200
2,000
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,200
1,500
1,500
1,920
1,000
1,500
1,400
1,400
1.200
193
193
193
1914
1844
184
184
184
184
184
182
191
191
191
191
191
192
185
103
27
30
27
33
14
15
15
70
13
15
12
92.76
24.67
28.70
25.97
33
22
27
21
27
      „     2
27
30
      „     3
C. A. Kelly, B.A	
Miss F. I. Williams, B.A
Miss M.  Clarke, B.A	
Kent:
Agassiz   Div. 1
84
13
22
44
7
9
40
6
13
79.33
12.12
14.26
27
30
7
27
6
      „     2
12
10
H.   L.  Manzer	
Langley    Div. 1
35
15
26
27
24
27
16
6
14
12
24
19
9
12
15
27
25.86
14.58
24.94
29.07
26.98
26.75
12
10
7
6
15
,      2
Miss E. C. McEwen, B.A
Miss G. McAlpine, B.A	
26
      3
24
27
27
,      4
D. D. Rogers, B.A	
      „     5
Miss M. S. Philpott, B.A
Miss M. C. L. Astell, B.A
Miss M.  C. MacDonald, B.A.
P. G. Welland, B.S.A. (Prin.)
	
i
Maple Ridge:
MacLean    Div. 1
119
12
18
29
34
22
31
56
5
8
8
17
3
17
63
7
10
21
17
19
14
122.86
10.01
12.22
27.13
29.22
19.83
28.95
51
27
26
15
1?
      „     2
18
      „    3
29
      4
22
31
34
      5
D. S. Allan, B.A	
 ,     6
Matsqui:
Matsqui  Div. 1
146
23
16
23
58
10
5
9
88
13
11
14
127.41
19.13
13.96
19.07
53
34
29
19
18
4
12
      2
23
16
      3
Miss E. Milley, B.A	
1.2001185
Miss E. Piggott, B.A	
1,575
1.235
191
184
Mount Lehman, Div. 1
62
24
30
24
6
13
38
18
17
50.96
19.81
23.16
23
16
19
14
4
10
,      i,     2
Miss E. Nordberg, B.A	
16
14
Miss M. M. Casselman, B.A...
A. MacMillan, M.A	
Mission    Div. 1
1,750
1,600
191
188
54
20
17
19
14
9
35
6
8
42.90
14.82
15.77
16
14
14
10
11
9
2
17
* The net numher of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 11
HIGH SCHOOLS-
-DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
O
S
E?
J3    r-    4>
rt -a P3
3,1s
a » a
rt
'a
2. c
a °
cq a
o.S
*
ag
a „.
^j a.
(Si5
>>
M
3
u
3
'cd  cd
o|
bjjca
2 a
a -S
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
a
ca
rt
5
M
a
ca
rt
5
Pi
■a
3
Pi
CD
-a
el
3
d a
OS
Academic.—
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic-
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special...	
Academic—
$
1,350
1,300
2,970
2,483
2,252
2,483
2,140
2.483
191
181
34
33
19
21
15
12
29.84
29.61
33
34
        „     4
E. M.  Kershaw, B.A.Sc
1
Oak Bay Principal
104
63
41
88.25
33
34
17
11
9
193
193
193
193
193
30
23
41
33
33
48
52
43
22
13
22
6
33
52
9
8
10
19
27
48
34
28.79
21.81
37.28
29,62
30.71
45.02
47.85
35.15
30
23
,     2
Miss C.  L.   Moule,  B.A	
„     3
A. Robinson, B.A., LL.D	
Miss C. N. Burridge, B.A,
F.  Lister,  B.A	
41
      „     4
48
52
27
33
33
,     5
      6
Miss P. H.  Smith, M.A	
2.0301193
      „     7
C. A.  Gibbard,  B.A	
2,483
2,252
508
1,732
1,700
1,300
1,995
1.340
193
193
„     8
2
14
W. Menelaws (part time)	
Miss M. E. Blankenbach	
F. S. Maddock	
 1	
192
303
20
157
10
146
10
276.23
15.49
127
7
68
4
55
5
53
4
L. B. Boggs, B.A	
Div. 1
H. N. Wells, B.A	
180
15
25
30
36
34
11
9
24
14
20
4
16
12
22
14
12.34
22.38
29.41
32.35
28.75
15
,,     2
1,470 190
1.340190
25
„     3
A.   H.   Hutson,  B.A	
36
      „     4
Miss M. E. Campbell, B.A
Miss R. C. Menten, B.A	
A. R. MacNeill, B.A	
1,180
1,180
1,800
1,400
1,350
1,350
1,225
1,200
1,830
1,646
1,415
980
1,098
1,415
1,204
2.296
190
190
193
185
185
185
185
185
191
191
191
191
1914
1914
1914
191
36
34
      „     5
146
25
23
39
27
36
39
78
8
10
25
12
20
28
68
17
13
14
15
16
11
124.58
22.85
20.30
35.72
24.47
33.74
33.47
70
36
25
25
15
2
H L. Buckley, B.S.A	
Miss P. I.  MacKay, M.A.
Miss R. A. MacWilliam, B.A.
Miss H.  E.  Smith,  B.A	
23
,      „     3
36
39
39
27
 ,     4
      „     5
„     6
-   1           1
Saanich:
Mount Douglas..Div. 1
o
189
20
22
30
33
103
11
15
18
9
86
0
7
12
24
164.43
18.45
19.65
28.22
28.03
75
30
17
66
'""si
23
25!
1
1
F. Rendle, B.A	
      „     3
 ,     4
Miss N. Lynn	
A.  G.  Smith, M.A	
13
3
105
22
20
14
53
9
6
9
52
13
14
5
94.31
19.25
17.71
13.05
47
35
3
22
201
,     2
14
20
3
W. Garner, B.A	
Mount View.... Div. 1
50
40
28
30
33
21
28
48
48
24
21
15
10
11
8
28
8
27
32
19
13
20
22
13
40
21
50.01
35.99
23.59
23.47
29.65
19.76
24.83
40.75
44.20
14
20
oo
40
1,S74|191
1,2491191
1.249 191
33
30
28
3
Miss C. M. Tervo, B.A	
4
1,769
1,811
1,646
1,414
1,665
1,500
1,250
1,250
1.841
191
191
191
191
191
192
192
185
191
21
H. W   Cliff, B.A	
28
48
V.  G.  Pritchard	
48
D.  L.  Gilbert,  B.S.A	
"
3umas-Abbotsford, Div. 1
276
31
32
35
128
11
14
22
148
20
18
13
242.27
23.09
23.44
30.81
109
78
49
20
40
11
35
32
....    .1	
3
 1 1	
K. P. Caple, M.S.A	
Summerland           Div. 1
98
30
20
26
47
23
12
15
51
7
14
11
76.23
26.16
23.17
•    24.81
35
32
20
16
11
14
1,330|188
1,385 191
26
26
3
26
16
82
50
32
73.78
26
14
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
SCHOOL.
TEACHER.
d
s
u
§§ a
rt
"a
IJ
GO 9
w V
Q.S
#
a^
cd a
■a a.
a „
cd a
!er&i
a
H
3
'3  CD
CD   el
wa
> +.
Number of Pupils.
CD
-a
rt
5
H
a
SO
rt
5
Pi
a
-a
rt
5
Pi
a
'Q
ci
3
a m
P
Academic-
Special	
Academic-
Temporary...
1fl32-33___
*
1,007
1,200
1,200
1,224
1,530
1,200
2,400
2,080
1,680
1,520
1,680
1,000
Div. 1
„     3
,,     4
,.     5
uver,  West-Div. 1
o
„     3
„     4
„     5
„     6
Total for High
Total for High
Miss G.  I.  Mockridge,  M.Sc...
J. A. McCharles, B.A., M.A...
1904
184
1834
1834
183 4
186
186
186
186
186
186
17
35
43
43
34
5
15
17
16
18
12
20
26
27
16
15.94
27.52
34.91
36.77
31.02
17
35
43
34
43
Miss M. H. Graham, B.A	
172
31
27
30
45
39
31
71
15
10
20
14
10
24
101
16
17
10
31
29
7
141.45
28.21
24.23
29.25
35.24
32.60
26.38
77
43
35
17
31
27
Miss A. Hale, M.A	
Mrs. W. Reid	
18
39
31
30
18
7
2
J.  Sinclair, B.A.Sc, B.A.
Schools, District Municipalities,
Schools, District Municipalities,
203
93
110
175.91
88
48
34
33
3108
2864
1415
1266
1693
1598
2706.89
2506.28
1152
1044
907
909
577
458
436
373
36
1931-32...'	
SO
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
Academic...
$
1,528
1,200
1,400
1,275
1,900
1,400
1,300
1,400
1,500
1,700
1,920
1,400
1,350
1,000
1,000
185
1894
184
184
1854
193
193
190
186
193
185
180
193
193
193
26
21
20
21
13
12
5
7
13
9
15
14
22.71
21.28
17.00
19.02
12
7
7
9
5
13
7
Miss I. A. Worthington, B.A.
E. K. G. Bichardson, B.A
Div. 1
„     2
Div. 1
„     2
„     3
7
10
11
"
41
30
31
23
12
10
14
9
29
20
17
14
36.03
28.25
26.66
19.67
10
11
13
14
7
16
23
31
Miss M.  S.  Smith, B.A	
E.   G.   Gordon,   B.A	
84
30
11
15
14
18
33
7
9
8
4
13
51
23
2
7
10
5
73.49
27.94
11.29
12.59
10.39
16.83
23
11
2
6
9
31
12
3
3
9
14
6
3
16
7
Ganges Harbour
E. H. Whittingham, B.Sc
L.  E.  Wells, B.A	
3
14
Div. 1
2
Div. 1
o
','.     3
ics
tig	
T. L.  Davies, B.A	
Miss D. M. Cruickshank, B.A.
32
24
28
7
17
14
9
5
15
10
19
2
26.78
24.52
29.70
0.74
9
20
9
11
13
14
8
I.  Smith, B.A	
7
Academic—
A. S. Trueman, B.A	
1,280
1,950
1,530
2,000
2,000
1,550
1,400
1,300
	
193
193
189
193
193
193
193
193
59
28
22
17
20
28
29
28
19
28
13
12
7
10
11
17
19
31
15
10
10
10
17
12
28
60.97
23.27
21.49
13.38
18.39
24.81
27.31
24.57
17.51
20
5
11
6
11
10
6
5
13
1
5
6
7
12
8
Miss M. E. Wattes, B.A	
Div. 1
„     2
,,     3
„     4
„     5
I. F. Douglas, B.A	
20
28
Miss M. Burdett, B.A	
28
19
29
D. W. Oswald, M.A	
124
57
67
112.58
47
29
28
20
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to  another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
i The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by ad pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 13
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
el
CD
5
CD
o
el
rt        cd
W a +j
a rt
§1 §
3es
el
"a
8 a
■3.8
W co
co a
£!»
Q.S
*
u Z3
a a
11
Cl   CD
$   W
^^
si
o
M
b
'U   CD
a §
a rt
tea
ei a
a %
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
H
a
•a
rt
M
C5
-a
rt
5
Pi
-a
rt
5
Pi
a      g.S
ei      art
3   \Sa%
W  J. Wilby, B.A	
Academic—
Special	
Academic-
$
1.550 193
19
15
5
7
14
8
15.02
13.13
15
4
      „     2
Miss M. J. V. Mclnnes, B.A...
Miss M. B. Henderson, B.A-.
M. K. Hill, B.A	
1,250
1,530
1,500
1,650
2,790
1,890
1,755
1,800
1,400
1,600
1,500
2,002
1,748
2,700
1,748
2,050
1,500
1,900
1,600
1,250
1,900
1,425
2,520
1,400
1,350
1,550
1,425
1,680
1,080
193
180
183
1804
10
5
4
3
4
4
34
30
18
22
12
13
9
.   10
22
17
9
12
28.15
27.00
17.39
21.00
10
17
4
7
5
4
4
5
15
6
6
6
Miss E. A. Coles, B.A	
Ocean Falls,
W. Plenderleith, B.A	
Div. 1
W.  I.  Griffith,  M.A	
193
193
193
1874
183
183
193
193
193
13
19
23
9
11
14
4
8
9
11.69
15.59
18.60
13
      „     2
Miss I. Kalph, B.A	
19
     „     3
D.  Cochrane, B.A., M.Sc.
J.  E.  McLean,  B.A	
23
55
19
17
18
32
29
50
34
8
12
7
24
17
29
21
11
5
11
8
12
21
45.88
15.15
14.20
17.33
26.93
24.37
45.77
10
5
6
50
23
4
4
4
"~29
19
4
5
14
13
1
8
3
18
Oyama   	
R. B. Masterton,M.A.,B.Paed.
Powell River          Div. 1
„     2
      „     3
M. A. Cameron, M.A. (Prin.)...
Miss H. B. Robertson, B.Sc...
H. W. Gwyther -
Manual Training
J.   S.   White   	
"
192
192
190
192
192
186
186
186
185
185
187
187
111
48
19
70
24
7
41
24
12
97.08
39.62
16.59
50
19
29
28
14
11
18
9
„     2
Miss R. 0. Stewart, B.A.
67
16
.      20
17
31
7
8
8
36
9
12
0
56.21
14.55
15.78
15.47
19
o
10
28
17
11
7
7
9
7
3
Saanich,   North,   Div. 1
      „     2
Miss H. A.  J. -Marshall, B.A.
37
26
19
15
16
18
10
8
21
8
9
7
31.25
21.19
16.46
14.41
10
15
17
""l8
7
10
6
3
15
1
,     2
P. E. Roberts, B.A	
      3
G. H. Lee, B.A	
60
21
22
25
13
36
15
6
10
5
24
6
16
15
8
52.07
20.98
21.14
22.06
11.99
15
10
7
15
13
5
6
10
16
5
7
15
1
2
1
,.     2
8
5
University Hill, Principal
38
15
23
34.06
15
10
8
5
H   W. Fowler, M.A	
Academic....
32-33	
1,8901193
l.ftO'lOS
22
26
9
15
13
11
19.52
22.91
13
91
      „     2
Miss J. E. 0. French, B.A
Schools, Rural Districts,  19
Schools, Rural Districts,  19
18
8
48
24
24
42.44
18
8
13
9
Total for High
Total for High
1143
1119
553
502
590
617
1003.80
971.83
374
420
315
355
243
196
202
147
31   32 	
1
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to  another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British C ilumbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. ;
M 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
TEACHER.
cd
CJ
S
6
cd  „   cd
5 S a)
Jig
eg
cd
5 c
A o
Q.5
*
1 o
a cd
*§,
"cd a
a
5
Numbei
of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
>
CD
■a
rt
3
•a
el
3
a
•a
e:
3
Pi
CD
cd
0
Pi
CD
■a
ed
$
1,518
185
23
14
9
20.38
10
4
7
2
Schools, Cities, 1932-33	
23
23
14
13
9
10
20.38
16.57
10
6
4
7
7
6
2
2
Schools, Cities, 1931-32	
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
Chemainus	
Pitt Meadows	
Total for Superior
Total for Superior
P. E. Wilkinson	
A. P. Robertson	
Schools, District Municipalitie
Schools, District Municipalitie
S
1,520
1,400
1884
189
22
31
14
11
8
20
53
66
25
33
28
33
s, 1931-32.
20.61
22.87
42.53
42.79
20
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
Ashcroft ,
Athalmer-Invermere..
Baynes Lake	
Blakeburn	
Brechin	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Cedar, North	
Chase	
Fort George	
Fort St. John	
Hazelton	
Hedley	
Hope	
James Island	
Lillooet	
Lumby	
Malcolm Island	
Michel-Natal	
McBride	
Pouce Coupe	
Procter	
Queen Charlotte	
Quesnel	
Rolla	
Rutland	
J. M. Orr	
J. E. Hanna	
Miss M. E. Lawrence, B.A..
D. M.  Fitzpatrick	
D. E. Breckenridge	
R. W. McGowan	
H. C. Ferguson	
F. R. E. Davies	
W. H. Gray	
G. H. Stocks, B.A	
R. G. Sprinkling	
A.  B. Young, B.A.....	
G. A. Clark	
J. Tribe	
P. H. Rose	
G. Grant, B.A	
G. E. Falconer, B.A	
G. H. Dyson, B.A	
S. Muraro	
Miss O. D. Mouat, B.A	
Miss E. M. Magee	
D. Mcintosh	
M. E.  Newman	
J. C. McGuire	
E. F. Hurt, B.A	
F. L. Irwin	
Academic
First	
Academic.
First ,
Academic.
First	
First	
Academic.
First	
$
1,530
187
14
8
6
1,350
186
16
5
11
1,300
187
10
o
8
1,520
1844
21
14
7
1,260
193
27
9
18
1,500
181
15
6
9
1,650
192
16
10
6
1,008
190
14
5
9
1,400
189
18
9
9
1,400
189
11
6
5
1,100
184
19
11
8
1,400
1924
11
4
7
1,400
192
14
8
6
1,500
190
12
5
7
1,410
191
13
6
7
1,150
192
18
7
11
1,260
192
19
8
11
1,360
190
13
6
7
1,850
1744
20
13
7
1,450
193
19
7
12
1,200
185
18
10
8
1,330
1924
16
4
12
1,340
185
14
6
8
1,800
193
40
25
15
1,400
193
26
8
18
1,440
190
22
7
15
1
12.02
17.16
9.79
20.03
13
24.98
9
13.61
6
13.83
5
12.21
4
16.27
4
10.28
2
16.29
7
10.29
12.95
3
9.31
3
13.21
5
17.26
11
18.18
10
12.34
7
17.80
18.07
9
15.32
9
13.63
7
11.94
2
31.06
20.77
8
20.59
1
12
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
number of pupils who were transferred to another
f The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 15
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
CD
a
o
s
CD
>>
cd
a p. cd
m%~
■3b«
fig
< —1-7
rt
t£
"a   .
8 c
.a a
CJ -M
f» rt
CD
fi.S
*
CD
S§
a S
<D  E3
o
b
Average Daily
Attendance, f
Numbei
of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
rt
5
H
CD
13
rt
5
M
CD
V
ci
0
Pi
CD
■a
rt
3
Pi
a
-a
rt
3
Academic...
1,050
1,800
1,200
1,500
1,500
1,580
1,450
1,600
193
1884
192
183
193
192
187
184
7
21
15
19
23
19
20
17
3
7
4
10
6
6
12
6
4
14
11
9
17
13
8
11
6.79
18.95
13.90
19.16
18.51
19.54
18.43
15.39
7
6
9
10
2
13
5
3
5
4
1
6
3
2
2
7
8
6
9
7
i
6
1
1
-33	
F. H. Hoadley	
3
F. G. Cook...,.	
10
Wellington, South	
S.  0. Harries	
4
Schools, Rural Districts, 1932
Schools, Rural Districts, 1931
Total for Superior
597
627
263
257
334
370
522.72
540.32
156
162
169
236
167
140
53
68
5?
-32	
21
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year.
( M 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933.
TEACHER.
CD
cd
V
>»
cd
S   rH   CD
2§»
rt-art
a cd
g rt a
°j= a
ft]
■a J
«   CD
e^m
as
<-. -a
a cd
a a
•° a
a a
a
a
3
"el cd'
0|
Sea
a a
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
>
el
3
CD
•a
rt
3
*a
el
3
Kamloops           Principal
Academic...
First	
Special	
«
2,775
1,375
1,470
1,425
1,305
1,400
1,375
1,395
1,500
1,600
1
182
182
182
182
182
182
35
35
31
39
33
29
10
10
23
17
17
20
25
25
8
22
16
9
32.72
33.80
27.02
36.33
33.11
28.29
39
35
35
31
,',     5
33
29
Home Economics	
Manual Training	
Kelowna    Principal
Div. 1
„     2
2,610
1,472
1,202
1,615
1,300
1,295
1,202
1,350
1,330
202
97
105
196.28
101
101
Academic-
191            34       17       17
191            38       13       25
191            34       24       10
191           45      21      24
191            40      25      21
191            45      22       23
J                  -1
30.80
31.33
33.59
35.48
44.08
43.15
34
38
46
45
34
45
      „     4
.,     5
„     6
Home Economics	
Manual Training	
Miss M. E. MacKenzie, B.A	
Academic	
Academic	
Special....--.-
Miss S. D. Woodworth, B.Sc
H   H   Hill   B.A Sc	
Nanaimo:
John Shaw Principal
Div. 1
242
122
120
218.42
91
79
72
Second	
1,338
1,324
1,324
1 295
1911
1914
1914
191 I
38
36
32
29
32
34
33
18
15
17
18
18
18
19
20
21
15
11
14
10
14
35.62
34.59
30.21
26.46
31.18
32.87
30.02
38
	
 1     30
 1     32
	
0   Wardill              	
Second	
Special.. -
29
32
34
33
,,     5
1,19111914
1,222)1914
,.     7
1,222
1,'251
1,440
	
"
	
 1..	
        1           1
Manual Training	
Home Economics
1 See
High S
cbool
also.
 1 |	
1,398
1           1
Nelson  Principal
2,652
1,579
1,579
1,498
1,377
1,498
1.498
234
123
Ill
220.941   128
106
	
Academic	
Special	
Academic	
1904
1904
1904
1904
1904
100A
39
45
38
32
34
40
40
31
29
22
22
19
18
16
25
18
16
18
17
23
19
14
18
15
22
15
11
36.55
32.38
32.46
31.76
39
	
45
0. H. Carlson	
38
 1       32
Miss E. Etter         	
33.49
34.75
36.41
29.58
24.77
40
31
34
40
Special	
..
1,498|1904
1,49811904
1
29
Manual Training	
1,760
1,559
....   I
	
	
. I           I          .
New Westminster:
1,573
1   423
•192
192
328
33
33
31
37
33
39
36
39
39
39
Elemy
174
16
16
19
17
19
22
19
19
23
23
Sdioo
154
17
17
12
20
14
17
17
20
16
16
1 also.
292.15
30 18
100!  106
122
33
Academic...
First	
29 031             1
33
,,     3
J. Chell, B.A	
A.   Turnbull, B.A.   (Prin.)	
1,8211192
2 2931192
li423[192
1,3391192
1.100U92
1,015(192
1,4231192
1.015U92
1,7391 | Se<
2,129| f
27.38
34.92
 1	
31
„     4
Academic--.
Second -
First	
Academic	
Second	
Academic...
Special	
.... [     37
1     33
1     39
 1     36
391
39!
391
	
33.36
27.03
35.60
36.39
31.84
,,     7
„     8
Miss H.  Gilley, B.A	
9
Miss M.  Smith	
Miss C. Reid, B.A... .
W.  Steele	
....
F. 0. Canfield	
Lister-Kelvin,
2,411
1,821
1,739
1,423
1.339
359
193
166
315.78
1   1171   145
1
97
Div. 1
Academic	
192
192
192
192
26
25
36
37
37
26
	
15
15
13
25
21
22
24
24.17
22.94
33 84
26
A. J. Dodd, B.A	
 |
25
„     3
S.   T.   Moodie	
1       36
,.     4
S.  W.  Hodgson, B.A    .    ..
33.681           |     37
35.201     37
1           1
,,     5
1,0151192
1
.
1
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 17
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
TEACHER.
<d"
d
CJ
S
CD
O
ci
cd _, <d
rt naH
S I a
5 rt a
•Q — f-s
03
■sj
M   CD
as
<D 'o
^ a
cd a
a
B
3
J5*~
el  cd'
o§
a rt
si -a
et a
a -2
< -*1
Number of Pupils.
SCHOOL.
>
a
■a
0
CD
-a
el
3
H
CD
-a
el
3
New Westminster—Con.
Miss A. M. Mercer	
First	
S
1.435
192
37
36
18
15
19
21
31.49
33.52
37
36
,     7
Academic...
First'.	
Academic	
Special	
Temporary...
1.5731192
W.  T.   Plaxton	
Richard McBride,
Principal
2,538
1,339
1,423
1,423
1,739
1.739
234
102
132
214.86
110
73
51
192
192
192
192
19'»
30       12
34      25
38 19
39 14
37       13
Elementary £
I
18
9
19
25
24
chool
26.55
26.78
34.91
35.77
33.95
also.
i
2
Miss H. F. Gilley, B.A	
i
34
39
37
38
4
5
Miss E.  Till	
1.3391 ) Sef
Manual Training	
931
\
R. W. Ashworth	
Herbert Spencer, Div. 1
2,129
930
192
192
178
33
35
83
14
21
95
19
14
157.97
30.85
29.71
76
33
35
38
64
Miss M. A. McCurdy, B.A	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
F:rst!	
Academic...
First	
W.  L.  Rand, B.A	
2 223
l'.64B
1924
1921
68
59
37
60
54
35
33
28
35
37
33
26
9
25
17
00.57
50.13
29.39
41.92
40.66
68
Vancouver:
37
H. D. Herd   (Prin.)	
2,48611924
1.82811901
60
54
„     4
D   P. McCallum     	
1,097
1,595
1,541
Mrs.   V.   O'Hara	
	
1
"
H.  B.  King, M.A.,  B.Paed
J   W. B. Shore, B.A	
Kitsilano.-.. Principal
,,       Vice-Principal
3,432
2,106
1.326
210
133
77
162.10
37
114
59
Miss M.  Lade,  B.A	
192*
41
44
41
40
42
34
39
41
42
42
41
37
42
41
43
40
42
45
42
43
41
41
37
37
35
43
41
30
42
39
39
40
42
37
39
38
41
17
17
22
20
41
27
42
41
27
1
	
42
43
41
20
37
3 7
35
41
39
42
39
30
40
24
27
19
40
42
34
19
15
10
41
41
43
40
42
45
15
43
42
37
39
38
41
37.39
30.96
38.43
38.11
36.60
27.10
37.71
38.09
37.19
33.37
34.12
32.04
38.54
37.61
38.77
39.10
36.81
32.46
40.53
40.45
35.81
34.78
33.50
36.93
29.97
39.15
36.82
32.27
36.94
37.39
35.23
37.86
36.99
34.93
36.04
37.29
42.03
41
o
1.2481192*
44
Miss H. C. Crawford, B.A	
1,528
1,528
1,092
1,419
1,529
1,809
1,550
1,404
1,528
1,710
1,298
1,404
1,500
1,435
063
1,528
1,716
1,472
1.726
192J
192*
1924
1924
192 4
1924
192*
1924
192*
192*
1924
192*
1924
192*
192*
192*
192*
192*
192*
41
Miss S. Bolt, B.A	
40
Miss E. R. Henderson, B.A	
42
34
	
■
39
41
42
42
G   Hunter, B A              	
41
„   12
„   13
Academic	
37
Miss F. Higginbotham, B.A	
43
41
39
42
39
39
40
42
37
39
38
41
42
41
43
40
42
45
42
43
41
41
37
37
35
	
Miss  E.   M.   Pearson	
Miss C.  E.  Eastman,  B.A	
Miss E.  G. Moffat, B.Sc	
Miss  C.   Black,   B.Sc	
      ,,   16
,,   17
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic	
Temporary.-■
First	
Academic....
First -
W   Schmidt, B.A	
1.52011924
1,998
1,998
2,028
1,014
1,710
1,542
1,248
1,341
1,622
1.170
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
192*
192*
1921
„   2G
Miss  R.  A.   M.  Marin,  B.A.,
A.T.C.M —	
:.
,.   29
L. E. Brown	
B.  W.  Taylor     	
	
I. Parfitt	
„   32
,,   33
1.435I192A
1
Special	
Academic...
Special	
Academic...
Special	
1,716
1,809
1,435
1,248
1924
1921
192*
192*
1
      „   35
Miss M. McManus, Mus.  Bac,
M.A	
Miss D.  Partington, B.A	
„  36
 ,  37
Miss E.  F.  Ballard, B.A	
1,404
1,710
1,528
1,279
1,248
1,952
"       	
"          	
Miss J.  E.  Casselman, B.A	
	
	
"
"
! 	
1
* Tbe net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year.
2 M 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
L.
TEACHER.
CD
ci
CD
pi
>-
e)
cd c cd
cog-
|s§
g« a
el
S
"a
a -;
■S.s
m w
rt   CD
as
CD   O
ag
a .-
+> a
cd a
!5^
a
a
3
'%   CD
a |
M*a
ei  a
S3 -j
Number of Pupils.
SCHOO
>
CD
•a
el
5
>
-a
ei
5
CD
ca
rt
3
Vanco
Kit
uver—Continued.
M. W. Mitchell, M.A., B.Paed...
Academic	
Special	
Academic. ..
$
2,300
1,716
1,248
1,482
1,240
1,482
2,090
1,326
Miss A.  E. Thompson, B.A	
 |	
D   H.  Rae,  B.A.Sc	
S.  Walmsley,  B.A	
I
G. B. White, B.A	
Principal
-Principal
Div. 1
,,     2
„     3
„     4
,,     5
,,     6
„     7
,,     8
„     9
,,   10
,,   11
„   12
„   13
,,   14
„   15
„   16
„   17
,,   18
„   19
„  20
,,   21
„   22
„   23
„   24
,,  25
„   26
,,   27
,,   28
,,   29
„   30
„   31
„   32
„   33
„   34
„   35
H.   N.  MacCorkindale,  B.A
Point Grey.
3,100
2,595
1,716
1,528
1   950
1493
756
737
1345.50
480
529
484
•   	
Miss J. Faunt	
193
193
193
35
25
34
37
36
32
36
3 6
34
36
39
34
41
39
38
40
41
40
39
39
38
43
34
42
41
41
39
41
41
41
41
42
41
41
41
....    ...
8
22
34
9
36
18
27
26
34
9
29
14
22
8
28
41
20
12
20
22
19
31
41
41
41
42
41
20
27
3
28
14
9
10
27
10
20
19
31
10
40
40
19
27
18
21
15
11
41
39
41
41
41
21
32.81
22.68
32.69
33.68
33.48
30.58
32.76
32.22
31.55
33.56
35.97
31.40
37.62
36.43
35.03
37.41
35.85
37.82
35.58
35.91
33.19
35.94
31.52
37.97
37.27
38.66
37.20
38.43
37.73
39.04
38.16
38.73
38.72
37.62
37.52
35
Academic.--
Special	
Academic-
25
C.   G.   McCartney—	
34
1 .5281193
37
2,092
1,326
2,106
1,482
1,804
1,014
1,528
1,248
1,528
1,556
1,435
1,716
2,090
1,435
2,030
1,716
1,528
1,482
1,407
1,326
1,170
1,903
1,711
1,903
1.435
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
36
Miss F. V. Brown, B.A	
J.   H.  Creighton, M.A	
Academic...
32
36
W.  D.  Franklin	
36
Special	
Academic	
First	
34
Miss M. K. McMillan, B.A
36
42
41
41
39
41
41
41
42
41
41
41
39
34
41
39
38
40
41
40
39
39
38
43
34
Mis? H.  C.   Coles,  B.A	
Academic	
First	
A. F. Black, B.A	
Miss B.   H.   Killip	
Academic	
Special	
Academic	
Miss Z. B. Hutchinson, B.Sc.
E   S. Sims,  B.A	
Academic...
First	
E. R. Ballard. B.A	
Miss M.   I.   Macdonald,  B.A,
C. C. Watson ...               	
Academic	
First	
Special	
Miss D.  M. Washington, B.A...
A.  R.   Wilson, B.A	
Academic...
First*.	
1.3951193
41
1,170
1,326
1,326
2,090
1,903
1,950
1,888
1,528
1,716
193
193
193
193
193
Academic	
First	
C.  H.  Skelding, B.A	
Special	
Academic...
Special	
First.	
 !....    ...
Miss B.  M.   Carruthers,  B.A
Miss L. F. Hull	
1,317
	
Principal
^-Principal
Div. 1
„     2
„     3
„     4
„     5
„     6
„     7
„     8
,,     9
„   10
,,   11
„   12
„   13
„   14
„   15
„   16
„   17
1,482
1,890
1,638
3,322
2,184
1,716
1,716
1 71 6
Special	
Academic	
Special	
Academic-
H. B. Fitch, M.A	
1338
715
623
1232.74
451
546
341
Vic
H. I. Gamey, B.A	
„   —
193
193
193
34
38
35
36
36
35
37
32
43
42
37
41
38
43
41
38
37
i
14
14
12
10
9
17
10
43
42
15
17
19
28
11
9
11
20
38
21
24
20
26
20
22
22
24
19
15
30
29
26
33.43
35.43
34.69
31.95
29.48
32.23
32.41
29.78
38.55
32.51
37.13
38.80
34.89
41.13
35.31
35.71
34.94
34
38
35
E. B. Broome, B.A	
1,9031193
2,1061193
1,8091193
1,0381193
1,7171193
1,9651193
1,996[193
1,6381193
1,2481193
1,8091193
1,6221193
1,8971193
1.326J193
1 3261193
36
H. W. Gamey, B.A	
36
G.   B.   Cant    	
35
Miss G.  AV.  Killip	
Academic..-
Special	
Academic-
37
D.  R.  Jones,  B.A	
32
43
F.   F.   Rolston	
42
K.  A. Waites, B.A	
37
41
38
43
41
38
37
A. A. Hards, B.A	
Academic...
F. Waites, B.A	
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 19
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.    SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1933—Continued.
SCHOOL.
TEACHER.
a
rt
CD
cfi
CD
o
al
el
§■§«
a w cd
S rt a
5-° 3
rt
is
'a
2 a
■3.3
rt a
>>m
P.S
#
<g-a
cd a
fa
is
tr-§
1st*
a
a
b
£?4~
el  CD
0|
bca
CD i.
Number of J?upils.
P
CD
•a
3
>
a
ca
rt
3
CD
-a
rt
3
Vanco
uver—Continued.
apleton.... Div. 18
„   19
„   20
„   21
„   22
.,   23
„   24
„   25
„   26
„   27
„   28
„   29
„   30
„   31
„   32
„   33
„   34
„   35
„   36
„   37
D.  M.  Flatter,   B.A	
Academic	
Special	
Academic	
*
1,462
1,638
2,106
1,279
1,323
1,950
1,715
1,638
1,326
1,248
1,965
1,529
1,244
1,170
1,606
1.529
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
193
41
48
45
44
50
33
38
41
42
39
39
40
39
39
40
37
37
40
43
44
48
24
36
25
23
27
18
14
39
28
28
32
16
14
40
24
41
21
8
25
10
38
14
24
25
12
11
39
8
21
23
43
20
36.74
39.50
40.41
37.83
39.55
30.14
37.33
40.12
38.76
38.54
36.71
37.05
38.13
34.87
34.70
36.40
34.15
33.48
36.95
35.50
38
41
42
39
39
40
39
39
40
37
37
40
43
44
41
48
45
44
50
33
G. F. Turner	
G.   S.   Wilson,  B.A. ...
L. C. McNeill, B.A	
Academic	
V.   W.   Mulvin  	
Academic	
Special	
Academic-
Special	
First	
Academic-
Special	
Academic	
Special	
First	
Academic
Miss E. Robinson	
T.   Herd  	
Miss E. M. Reid, B.A	
C. Crabb 	
Miss D. Peck, B.A	
Miss R.  Rannie	
W.   Hyndman  	
A. V. Quigley	
Miss E. J.  Rolston, B.A	
1 .7161193
W.   Wilson	
Miss 0.  E.  Elliot, B.A	
2,028
1,435
1,794
1,622
1,716
1,407
1,717
1,111
1,279
967
193
193
193
Miss M. K. Anderson, B.A	
Miss B. Allen	
G.   Allen,   B.Sc	
Miss N.  Bain	
Miss W.   Straight,  B.A	
Miss J. Whyte, B.A	
High  Schools,   Cities,   1932-33
High Schools,  Cities,   1931-32
Total for Junior
Total for Junior
1462
723
739
1325.20
558
536
368
6348
5490
3256
2835
3092
2655
5711.22
4987.91
2317
2016
2373
2029
1658
1445
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
JUNE 30th, 1933.
SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
Penticton          Principal
Div. 1
Academic-
Temporary...
First	
Special	
lities,  1932
lities,  1931
1,995
1,010
1,120
1,540
1,085
1,120
980
940
1,260
1,319
472
-33
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
39
36
40
39
33
34
36
12
18
25
20
15
17
22
27
18
15
19
18
17
14
31.61
28.22
36.35
31.28
28.73
32.61
31.35
39
36
„     3
Miss E. C. Stott	
33
34
36
40
39
„     4
C.  O. Bell	
Miss   E.   A.   Thomas	
A. O. Silvester	
6
Manual Training
 !	
	
High Schools, District Municipa
High Schools, District Municipa
1
257
129
128
220.15
103
79
75
Total for Junior
257
267
129
133
128
134
220.15
231.39
103
92
79
85
75
-32....
90
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS-
-RURAL DISTRICTS.
JUNE 30th, 1933.
SCHOOL-YEAR ENDED
Ocean Falls      ,   Div. 1
.,     2
First	
$
1,710
2,790
1,620
1,620
1,440
193
193
193
16
23
27
10
13
12
6
10
15
12.24
20.10
22.70
16
W.   Plenderleith,   B.A.  (Prin.)..
Academic	
Special	
1932-33—
27
23
Home Economics    .. .
Manual Training	
High Schools, Rural Districts,
High Schools, Rural Districts,
66
35
31
54.04
27
23
16
Total for Junior
Total for Junior
66
59
35
33
31
26
54.04
50.09
27
23
23
21
16
1931-32—
15
* The net number of pupils enrolled is that number remaining after deducting the number of pupils who were transferred to another
division and also those who left for other public schools in British Columbia.
t The average daily attendance is based on aggregate attendance made by all pupils attending during year. M 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
n
o
co
H
P
l-s
p,
H
C
g
<
O
o
a
o
03
s
o
o
W
o
zri
PC
-1
EH
3
m
■asocUnj joq^o
A"UB JO SJ.3I[OR9X
JO SOU-R^g SpXBAlO^
scftreif) 'iAOf) oi uoii
-ippu tu stooqog qScj-i
~pxi-8 'qSfH -loiuhr
'jouadng' 'A'reiuaui
-913 UI sasoclinj
Xiv joi g,"ou;sia ^q.
ojn^ipuadxHC xv^ojj
.CM
b*
fc-
o
O
CM
03
in
ot
©
a
T-i
'sjooqog
t[3tH P11^ 'llSlH
lorauf 'jouadng
'JCiu^uauiata; ui
s-taqo'Eaj, jo sauiqtsg
Spx&MO:}  '%JLOQ
A"q pit'd Tunomy
. o
00
6&CI
lO
CO
l>
Cl
o
co"
©
00
CO
©
LO"
Cl
©
©
CO
lO
b**
<
rA
O
w
-5
g
p
CM
o
Pi
P
pq
i
p
'X   ©P1«0
•XI epiuo
"IIIA «PWO
CO
CO       001O
rt       CO
CO       ■* 01
t&       CO CO
©        CO
©       CO
CO
CO
"HA erjiMQ
CO
CO
UO CM
CO-^
b-
t-
©o
■*CO
©
b*
CO
CO
*IA op^O
to
lO
MO
eo
CO
OS
©
00
00
CO
A apwf)
rt
CM
CM
CM
Cl
b-
b-
00
CO
00
CO
"Al spwf)
Cl
110
no
CO CO
CO Cl
©
LO
CO
•*
CO
'III 9P«JO
CM
r-f
O CO
■* r-<
CO
LO
©CM
rt rt<
©
CO
CO
©
"II apmo
b-
t-
LO Ol
01 r-\
fc-
co
CO
©
O
•j ap^jf)
H
rt
■H
lO CO
01 CO
CO
o
CO
CO
C3
CO
©
CO
4- 'aomspua^y
^11B Q. as ma Ay
25.87
35.92
40.70
24.98
CM       WCXlOHOMGOTfl-iM
O       OOOOlONKIr-OMH
t^       COrtrHrtt^OeOC3ld'^TtH
(M       C0C0'*'*C0,^-*COCOC0CO
rt
W      ■*'*t--rr*C0ClC3ClCOOlCi
■H       LOCOCS'»t|,*Tf<COClrtC10
id     t^ ci i> co lo id o co co o co
t-^        01 Cl CO CO ■* ■* CO CO CO tJH CO
©       rt rt b-© CO rt rt CO
iJH       © t-X © b-rt CO CO
ih     co©'ed©'b^ciid-*
©      ClCMCOCOCO-^cOCO
to
CO
id
b*
Cl
■SPTD
TfiNt-00
rH Cl tH t-1
rt       i-i CO rt< CO CM ■* CD t- CO CO CO
t-      MrttMrtNrtWrtrtrtrt
LO       LO t- O O CO CC Cl © © CO C]
©       rtrtCldClOlr-lOIrtr-ICl
Cl
6
r-\        CO© ©b-
r-l       rt Cl rt r-
01
«
Cl
©
CO©©
Cl rt rt
©
rH
©
LO
10
©
CO
■s^oa
Wt-c»0
HHCMH
O        L- Cl CO W CO CO Cl CO 01 •* 01
CO        ©LO©CJ©C:rHCl©COrt«
Cl                                                                           g
©        lOHCIr-
CO       rt rt Cl C
Cl
© -hc:
Cl CM CI
C
	
* "P^o-nra spjdnd
jo jaqum^i ^
Cl CD ID X
CM CO -tf Cl
r-i       OO O Cl CO O CM LO O 00 b- CO
■*        CO "*-*-*■* tji tjh Tf( co CO CO
rt
CO       ■* 01 © C. 03 t- CO OVC1 © CO </J
-^       C0C0TiHC0-?t,-*C0'*'^'^'*j3
"*                                                            to
w
b-       CO iH CO X CO CO © ©
■*       CO CO CO CO ■* --*i "* CO ^
^                     1
•uoissag ut
SBAl lOOqOg Si'BQ
Cl Cl CO Cl                    CO CO CO © SO © CD ffl © CD cj                   HrlHHnHHHiMHi-IB                         OOHHrtHHrlH   £
'© © © ©                   QOXQOQCCOCOCOQOOOOOb*                   C! ffl OJ Ci OOO OS OOD O O ___.                   00©©©©©©©   f
■(a^uji  aunr;
uo   pasuq J
lOOLOO                 OOOOOOOOOlOO                 OOONClu-OHt-ect-cO                 OOOCOOCO-.
Cl © ■** ©                   © lO © lO © LD © © LO LO ©                   COOCOXOiClOOhMOMlCO                   © © © © 1C © © ©   Jy
Wtf C3 OS 03                   ©^Oli~<©©CO©©00C3rt                   COCNOaOOt-CCHCH^M                   LOC1i-It-.©©©C,32
i-l                                     r-\ i-t t-I       rH                                H                    HrlH              H             H       rtrH"i4                   rtHrlrJ                   rt,—>—,
■ai'Boripjao
P
c
c
a
: :            :|
a
1
fee
; e
C
c,
a
a
■fe
I
i : :          |
i
:c
c
a
a
-
c
t
c
1
- e
c
c
a
a
Tf
*  * c
a
u
i
; ~
c
c
(
c
F
V
i
3
c
i—
i-
C
C
H
<
a
r'
%
a
p:
is
c
c
1
<
!
c
i-
c
i
<
c
■~
r_
g
C
r-
c
%
c
pi
cc
—
!
<
>
K
p.
c
"c
Jb.
a
>
Is
i £
c
1
1
c
i
i
s
c
rt
?
5
i
c
a
<
|s
1
1-
%
c
p.
1
ccT
a
z
r~
e
a
<
1
rt
Is
z
p
c
t
r
|
p
5
cc
<
a
PC
c
c
p
a
=
c^
<
O
O
n
o
P
<
C
c
^
i;
^P
o
H
O
ho
O
i
t-
•<
c
CC
T)
te
a
b
a
c
c
P
c
e
C
D1
■i
IC
c
b
ex
c
c
" b
E
c
e
c
c
p
1
>
>
a
c
C
o
o-
^
L-
C£
b
a
1
c
p
c
t
&
a
:
=
c-
1
CC PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 21
. 00
©
©
CO
eo
c
0*
If
t-
©
b-
co
b-
©
©"
Cl
©
b^
b-
CO
©"
a ■*
03
00
©
tfyiQ
rH
©
CO
CO
©
©
©"
©
X
03
x"
©
Cl
©
in
CO
ci
LO   T-i
cort
©
b-
©
Cl
©       00 t-
Cl       CMC!
in     rt
W      rt
rH
rH
©LO
CO CO
H      rt
b-
b-
b-
co
X CM
COCI
©      Cl
t£>      rt
Cl
eo rt
coco
b-       b*
©
©rt
cort
©
CO
rt
rt
Ttt            LO
rt       rt
LO
'
rt rt
rt CO
LO       Cl
b-
©
CO
©
CO
© CM
rt^rt
Cl
X
CO
CO
00 ©
C0C1
b-
©
CO b-
rt Cl
©
b-
Cl
rt
Cl
rt
rt
-t-
rt
Cl Cl
CO CO
rt
©
Cl CO
cort
m
b-
m
rt
to
rt
CO
CO
rt
© CO
coco
CM       CO
b-
© rt
-HH rH
rt
m
b-
W
in
Cl
LO
03
©
1
rt ©
coci
©        rH
©
© CO
ClCO
b-
©
CO ©
rt rt
©
LO
rt
■^
©©©©©b-©rtL0Clb-C0l-©X©
C0rtlOrt©©rt L0Q0©L0©C0CllOC0
rt©rtrtClrt©CMrtb-©©'©©'l>CO
cOrteocoeococoeococioicicococMci
©       W       rtClLOb-COrtb-COClOlCCb*
rt       W       CO CO Cl ©© LO CO b-rt © rt ©
eo     eo     eort^co©©cirt'©'©idrt
rH       rH       Cl CO CO CO CO CO CO CO rt CO CO CO
LO
LO       cO©©CO©b-b-LOb-Clb-©
b-       ©rtCOC100COX©CO©Clrt
©     © in ©©©m©© ci in © in
rH       Cl Cl CO Cl rt CO CO rt rt CO CO CM
rt
411.27
37.07
40.12
34.69
X
Cl
rt
.
©©Clrtincib-rtrHClCOb-rtLOlOCl
ClrtClrtrtrtrtrtClrtrtrtrtrt^lr-1
©       ©       ClClrH©XrtCM©01b-©©
rt       rH       rtClClrtrtClrt       ClrtClCM
Cl
©       ClCOb-Cl©©CO©'cjH©LOrt
tH       rHrt rH rH rH rH rH rH Cl rH rH rH
Cl
rH       XO Cl
©       rH CMrt
Cl
©
in
'
1010rtrtXCMrt©b-b*©inLOX©rt
rtClrtClrtClClClrtrtrtrtClrtrirt
co     rt     b-LOcccicc©mcortcocooo
O                   rHrH rH Cl tH rH tH Cl Cl CM Cl rH
CO
Cl        © rt rH © LO TH rt CO rH X X b-
CO       rHrH Cl rH Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl rH Cl rH
CM
X      CDC^rH
CO       CMC! Cl
Cl
CO
,
LOrt©L0C0rtrtrtX©OlCl©C0rt©
eortcocococortcocooicocococococi
Cl       rt       Clb-©rt©COb-ClCO©COCC,23
lo     rH     cicocortcortcicortrtrtcocci
X       Xb-X01rt©ClClLOb-eOrt
rt     ci ci co ci rt rt rt rt rt co rt co
rt
©       X © CO
co     cort co
rt
rH
.
ClClClClClCJOlClrtCIClOlClCIOlCl
©Ci©©©©©©©©©©©©©©
r-iHHHrlHHHHHr-lrHHHHH
Cl      © © ©O OO ©O ©©© CO £                       CO iCO CO CO CO CO CO CC CO CO CO CO                 rt CC ©
©        oC00C0O©0C©©C0O©C05                             Ci ©©©©©©©©©©©                      ©00©
rH        HHHHHHHHrtHiHHr-"                             HfHHHHi-lHrHr-IHT-IH                      rtrtrt
.
© CD rt kO lO IO © © LO LO LO LO O © Tf ■* LO                      CM        LO © ©
©©rtClcicM©©cocococo©co©rtrt                b-      b-©io
6*3-rHClrtrtrHrt©©©©w>©©©ClrtCl                   ©       COC1©
Cl rH r-{ rH rH rH               rH rH rH rH         rH rH rH rH                                    rHrHrH
©co io lo ©©©©„,                 oiooooooooiooia             lo©©
no © cm cm oo in io m §5                  ©-^©©rt--irHcoccrt©rt              t-oo©
©00CCXL^©O©a3                         ©©©©COCOXb-b-©©©                   IO©©
E
1
t
a
a
*
3
s
" c
a
a
*
'I
1
V
■Si
Bo
p
c
a
a
1
c
<
a
c
c
a
1
1
It                          c
If
t
s
:-§ p
1
i
<
e
ec
•5
c
c
<
«
>-
c
D
s
1
<
g
fa
P
"p
t
1
j
a
a,
a
!
r-
i
c
c
1
Cl
1
E
<
>
5
1
i
'1
g
t
c
1
1
pc
P
Ft
C
|
J
c7
1
c
p
c
p
a
<
&
is
1
c
4
n
\
c
c
c
+.
fcr
'1
r-
1=
g
p
'1
PC
|s
r-
1
c
Ci
c
c
c
c
c
p
p
1-
p
c
R
i
s
c
E
u
p.
a
PC
c
i
c
p
a
E
Er
<
C
|z
r-
a
<
>
c
•-
„
P
C
G
c
tr
PC
fa
(1
&
*c
C
E
1
P-
£
1
a
I
a
>
<
I
P
»-
<
Is
p
c
<
C
C!
a
1
i
1
ec
PC
P
pe
?
<
Pi
>
el
&
C
tt
p
£ c
1 p-.
c-
o-
-<t
L"
CC
t-
«
c
c
C
r
tf
M
ir
fa
_P
*[
r-
i
)I
c
c
t
f
t
c
•1
' 1
e
i
1
cr
rt
1-
c
t-
OC
©
©
f
CN
e.
"g
c
p
p
c
P!
fa
e
-1>
o
o
O
n
o
a
c
c
tr
rt
L-
C£
b
a
c
c
0
C
C
e
X
P
&
01
er
i
CC3   r3
CCJ
s
5 g I   -■
M 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
•asodinj iaq^o
JLuv jo sjaqouaj,
jo sau-B[T3g spxt!A\oq
s.yu£.if) *.iao£> 03 uoi:
-ipp-e ui stooqog qSijj
PUB 'q3m .ioiiuh
'.rouadng' 'iCreiuaui
-aia u[ sasodjnc"]
X[V Joj -iou-isid £q
ajn^ipuadxg ira^oj,
. b-  ;   :   :   :   : *:
in   ;   i   I   ;   i   !
eo  :  ;   :   ;   :  :
co  :   :   :   :   :   :
«n i'iji i i, i
co  )   :   :   :   :   :
b-   ;
ci   ;
rt   i
x   :
©   :
©"  :
:    ©
i    "*!
b^
:    co
I        rH
Cl
feed
©
C0*
b-
•StOOqOg
jotunp 'jouadhg
'ifjuiuaraata ui
sjaqowajj jo sauurBg
SpJ-EAVOl'^AOf]
£q ptud lunotuy
.©::::::
cj co  i   :   :   :   :   :
©   i   i   i   :   i   i   .
©   :   ;   :   i   :   :   .
rt   :;::::   ;
a&rt* :  i   :  i   i  i   :
>-i   ;;;;;;   ;
co   :
ci   1
■*   ;
in   :
©"   1
©
X
Cl
eo
rH
Cl
LO
in
fe-
rt,
©'
rH
H
ft
<
w
o
H
r-C
05
£
P
rt
Eq
O
Phis
P3
p
X   3P^£)
"XI sp^Ji)
'IIIA   9P^t)
: b- t-   :   ;   :   :   ;
rt    b-   :
t-     co   ;
fern
"HA api"0
:   :   :ci ©   :   :   :
;:  ;rtco  ::  :
x       :ci
t-       ; eo
Cl
CO
-^
•^
'IA ^P^3
:   :   :   :   ; ci co m
:   ;   ;   :   : co rt i-h
©      i   :
©      :   :
m   :   i   :
*   :   :   :
CM        rt            I rH
^                         j'rt
rH        Ci-^
rH      Cl Cl
CO
LO
A apui£)
:::::::©
::;:::; ci
ci   ::::::   ;
co   ::;:;:   :
x      :   ;
m       ;   !
: rt   :   :
i "*   :   i
>*             ;
rt
© rt
CO rH
©
in
AI ^P^O
© © ©   ;   ;   :x   :
rt rn   ;   :   ;ci   :
eo      :   :
©      :   ;
:   :x   ;
!   : co   ;
<x>    ^       : ci
co             :
Cl
rt rt
C1C1
X
rt
III 9P*Ja
;   : m rt   : © r-t x
:   : ci rt   : rn rn
x       :   ;
©      :   :
:      ; rn
i  i'■:"*
rH        CC            I ©
rt                          ; rH
©
rH
b- ©
rt Cl
eo
rt
•II   8P^t>
;   :   ; t-rt x   : ©
j     j     1 Cl rt           \rH
©      :   :
in      :   ;
i  ; :  :
*   i
CO        rH            Id
•<&        rH            j
Cl
in x
rt Cl
CO
rt
'I ap^JO
'.   :   :   : co ci   :^
:  :   |   :cirt  :rt
©      :   :
-n      ]   :
: co
: **
CO       rH.         : Cl
rt     rH       ;
<M
© ©
rt CO
©
rt
4- 'aout!piia^y
:m©©inrtb-XrHb-t}HrtH©©COrt
,'rtXC0MXClCl©rHb-X©mLOb-
i©10©CO©©I>©©b^©b^lOLOrH
JCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCICICOCO
CO       ©b-©©©©C!LO
rH        CO b-rH © CO LO CO CO
©       LO © © CI b^ rt rH b^
©     co co cort co rt rt co
in
©      eo      rH b*
©       CO       COrH
co     in     b- x
©       Cl             Cl
CO
X       X©rt<MClClC10
©     xeo©b-Xrt©rt
r-i     co eo rt b^ © cd in lo
co     cicieocoeocococo
b-
©
©
©
Cl
■SIJJO
: b-m   ; ©   : co ©
: co      ; co   : rt
-HXXCOX©rHCO
01 rH rH rH r-t       Cl rt
rH        rH©rHJ0CO©XX
©        Cl rH Cl Cl rt rt rt rt
Cl
rH        ©        rH rt
LO        Cl               rH
lo     ci co ci © in x x ci
rH        rH rH rH Cl rH rH rH Cl
©
CO
•BjCog
:   ; cm cm   ; ci   : ci
;   : co rt   ! co   ; co
OflCOGOOHCCCl
M Cl Cl Cl rt Cl rt rt
x     cooHHOinwio
©      rt i-i 01 Cl Cl 01 Cl Cl
CO
CS        Cl        CO t-
©       rH             rH
O          t— rHr*"00©CO©b-
Cl      rt rt Cl rt Cl Cl Cl rt
©
in
* "panojua sjidnj
jo jaqmn^i ^a^
lb-b-<M©ClCOrHrH©T-HrHb-©©Cl
Icocortcocortrtrtrtrtrtcocococo
©         t-ClClT^XrHCOCO
©     coeortrtcortrtrt
LO
©            ©           -TP   T-*
Cl      CO           CO
CO
LO        © rt © X rH rH X ©
co    cici co co rt rt co co
©
00
Cl
•aoissag ui
s-bm. looqog si-ea
;cocococococococo©coeo©coco©
!©©©©©©©©X©©©©©©
MHHHHHwHHHHHHHH
;           © co eo eo © eo © co           ©    © in           ©©©©©©©©
I                   © Ci © © © © X ©                  X       XX                   © © © © © Cl © ©
;                      rH rt rH rH rH rH rH rH                     rH               rH                     rH rH rH rt rH rH rH rt
• (a^vey; aunf
uo  pas-eq)
A'j'Biug  renuuy
:©©©©©co©©©©©cocob-co©             ©Lo©inin©m©             ©     x©              lortcocoxxxco
: © b- © © x rt © x x © cc *& *v © rt x              © rn © rt eo © co ©             rn     tHth             ^ x © © in lo lo x
6«-:ClCOrti-H©i-H©©©CJ©rHrHrHrHCD                     XC1 ©©©©©©                     ©        LO©                      HHHr-CoOIl
I rH rt rt rH rH rH         rHrH        HrtHHHH                      rtrH               rH        rH                            rH        rHrH                      Cl rt rt rt rt rH" rt rt
■d%vo\}i'iid{)
Academic.
First	
Third
First	
Second
First	
Second
Third
Second
Third
:               -c
i  :           p
!■              c,
h                     a
-4                    W
^§
—   CJ
i&H W
%
P
c
V
m
t-
: :'p
o
o
eu
02
;
TEACHER.
\V. R. Pepper, B.A	
Miss E. Wolfenden	
J. R. Leask	
Miss B. Gibson	
Miss D. Dicken	
ft. G. Moore	
Miss M. M. Anderson	
Miss E. Barton	
Miss E. E. Wallace	
Miss M. E. Austin	
Miss D. Nelson	
Miss I. Dicken	
Mrs. A. EUey	
Miss E. Ferguson	
Miss A. J. McKenzie	
;    ;
:   it
CO      '■?
w|i
«a Srt
\  .  .  .
3 fc" < W U
Miss M. D. Paterson	
Miss B. McCallum	
: cc
jo
M
2  ■
"53
«|
r-i S3
£
M
X
c
c
z
>
K
P
C
E
cc!
p
1
M
=
c
M
3
o
d
o
0
S
o
6
Is
ft"
O
o
w
u
SQ
^ rtNCOrt W© b- C
Pi     •
■3&	
.so	
IH
Pw     ......     j
0©©rtO]COrtW
rt rt rt rt rHrH
fal
P
:::::!:;£
;   :   i   :   :   i   :   i'5
i   i   i  i   :   i   i   :£
t
rt Cl a
ft    "
J§   :   :
Li     tH
rt m © b
x                !
o
o
rt Cl
>
ft :
•0
o
o
rtcM
ft    -
cJ    !
m   :
o   ;
QJ     '
CO
rcH
m
©
t-
CO
'3
y
%
Grand
Cen
Out
Greem
Kamlo
Ll0]
ci
W
H
O
CO
p
1-3
0
o
g
SI
H
H
o
O
n
o
<72
H
O
I
OS
o
o
o
012
PH
Pi
•4
e
S
H
h5 PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 23
«■
LO
Cl
©
Cl
©
rt"
b-
t-^
X
rt
©"
in
X
feed
feci
Cl
rH
in
©'
X
©
co"
-
d
.3
o
o
CJ
Cl
X
ci
rt
©
©
©
©
©
Cl
CO
©
Cl
X
©
b-
b*"
rH
Cl
©
©
rt
©"
a.
a
a
o
o
o
A
Cl
rH
CM
rH
rt
CO
rt
eo
©
CM
CO
o
©
©
CO
eo
CO
CO
CO
CO
o
,3
eort
■^ CM
rt     ci
©     rt
Cl
rt
CO ©Cl
m
Cl
rt
rt
CO
rH
CO
©
rt
-
b-b-
rt eo
LO
b-
© X ©
co co rt
b-
rH
LO CO
eo
X
CO
X
eo
o
rt b-
rt rH
X
LO
©
©
CO ©©
eo co co
X
©
rH
b- X
Cl
1C
CO
CO
CO
LO ©
Cl iH
rt
rt
X
X
© X X
CO CO CO
in
rH
b-rt
rH rH
rt
CO
rt
rt
o
pi
rtl
O
lo in ©
rH CO 01
©
b-
t-
b-
CO Cl©
rt rt cm
rH
rH
© rt
M rt
©
rt
Cl
rH
Cl
os
©
rt © © ©
rt rt eo rt
CO
CO
rH
©
Cl
©
Cl
n
©©©b-lOXb-C-
eo CO CO Cl Cl b- b- ©
©b^in'co'cocico'in
cocoeocococococo
eo      rHrt
X       Cl b*
x    **A co
X       CO Cl
Cl
X
©
rA
©
fe- io ou so/rt oo © obv © e» © cm,o cd rt oo m
X©LOX©COrHCOCOrtClX©rt©OrtO
©^x^inb^rtcoco^©rtcixLo'rtrtrt
cocococoeococococoeococococococoeoco
p"
©     c
CM      fern     ©
in     c
©
rt CO X lO X rn
© in co rt ci co
© rt© ci x ©
co co rt rt co co
t-
rt
m
Cl
CO LO © Cl CO rt
x' ci b^ in ci ci
ci co eo eo co co
0)
1 .
fcD
£ 3
OS
u *«
cu   Pi
■§!
3 "*
©rH©ci©©rtm
CIClrtClrtrtrtrt
Cl      X CO
LO        rH r-\
rH
rt
CO
Clrt©X©rteOCOrt©b-LOeO©b-b-©X
CIClrHrHrHClrtrtrtrtrtrtClrHrtrtrtrtOS
O
X          CO©©©©r-©
rH        rH rH Cl Cl Cl Cl rH
CO
©
Cl
rt
© © rH b- rt. 01
rt rH CM rH rH rH
b-b-X©COXr-<©
rH rt rt rt Cl rt Cl Cl
©       ©b-
LO       rH rt
©
CO
iH©COrHCl©C0COC1©rtC0'©©eOC0©Cl
01 rt Cl Cl Cl rH Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl h=I
B
rH        rH CO © © © © rH
©       Cl Cl rt Cl rt rt Cl
CO
©
CO
CO b- © tH Cl ©
rt rt rH Cl Cl Cl
CO X b- rH 01 rt LO rt
rtcoeortrtcocort
rH        b- ©
rH        CO CO
CO
b-
©
C0©C1©X©©©©©XXC0C1©©©©   o
rtrtrtcocortcocococococortrtrtrtcort-s
3
1-5
©     rtco©©m©©
©     eocoeortrtrtrt
b-
X
©
Cl
© CO © X CO r-
Cl COrt CO co rt
PI    CO
11
ft
to
- n
■£   d
is
|i
«     CD
o
to Pi
S 3
.3  R
S ^
S   o3
©©©©©©©©                   Cl©
Cl©©©©©©©                 ©X
rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH                      rHrH
© © © © ©©©©©.©©©.©a © c-
01
ClHCC                             Cl CM Cl Cl CM Cl Cl
© © ^_^_                     ©©©©©©©
rHrH'                                  rH rt rH rt rH rt rH
co co co co co co
CO © Cl Cl © ©
rH rH rt rt r-i rH
WL0L0©©rtrH©             ■   10 ©                 ©©rtiCCOCl©rtX©cO©rtCOCOrt©
COCMrtinmCM©in                      © ©  ,                  rH>cHCOcOCl©rH©ClLO©rt©©©©rt
WOlrteNCOC0©©CO                   CO©                   © Cl © Cl © Cl rH © Cl © Cl Cl © Cl © O C
co©©©             o in in m in w © .in             ©©©©©©©
©rtm co              ©b-b-miort©b-              inminmLOinin
C1XCOCO                      N Cl Cl OO CC Q H Ol                      t-©©C!XXX
c
c
3
EC
cj
■§§
rt Q
ft w
c
c,
a
a;
%
: p
c
c
0
f-
T
t
c
cr
1
i
c
a
a
f-
5
ft
EH
s
PI
c
c.
a,
w
a
P
m
i
p
c
c
: »c
Hi    P
IS c
H  t,
— c
Li r
E
P
c
c
a
y
'E
a
P
s
p
c
c
a
a
i-
E
t:
p
c
t
c
ft
t
o
ft
0
c
1
(2
■+■
"c
h
r?
>
c
ft
C
c
F-
r?
5
B
It
g
i
C
c
o
rA
in
FH
%
h
<
5
p
c
%
%
a
i
C
ft
PC
1
t;
c
0
p
ft
p
a
I"!
a
r.
0
rt
C
c
c
?
r?
ft
ft
C
P
c
C
0
c
ft
jl
c
H
a
r-
r"
a.
C
P
ft
J*
c
'fe
PI
V
ft
*
C
"2
cd
rC
c
e
Z
*c;
e.
•C
e
a
EH
ft
c
a
>
>
rt
a:
jP
c
%
ei
s
>
0
n
f
?
!C
c
c
p
>
02   i
ft i
to   .
3k
Cf
p
OS
tr
<
pi
Is
|
CJ
fe J5
p
c
15
c
c
6
a
>
a
E
c
ft
z
T
CC
0
2
PC
IS
PC
<!
ft
c
ft
ft
ft
<
p
rt
ec
ft
s
5
ft
o
I
s
ft
-
.Q   ba
1 a
5 §
^  o
^«
-« s
*
I g
^   C
ot   rti
>
h
c
a
e
p
a
c
eo
rt
LO
©
X
ft
C
'   0
Cl
c
"£
p
ft
is
c
*a
>
ft
c
CO
rt
©
t-
X
~
c
Cl
1-
r-
r-
1C
©
fe-
a
1
c
P
c
a
c
PC
bi
B
1
PI
CO
ft
1
>
1
c>
cr
■^
ir
«
b-
tr
j
P
(1
c
>
ft
CJ
«
rt
ir
©
d
CJ   rt!
B o
c ea
CJ    t*
Pi   oj
0    CD
fl rt
tHH
■«■ -1— M 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
W
H
O
CO
p
1-3
o
H
0
(*
i-i
o
o
W
o
K
EH
M
o
I
m
A
c
o
o
H
g
a
■osodJtvi jaqio
jCnil jo s-tatptcaj,
jo samqtcg spJuAioj
siuiufj -;ao£) o} uoij
-ippu tn STpoqo g qsi h
pun' 'qafH loiuhf
'jouadng' 'Xjuiuara
-913 ui sasodjnj
IIH JO} }Oms;a cfq
ojnjipusdxa I^o^
d
»
c
c
c
c
c
0
IT
t-
©
a
cv
X
a
■siooqog
qs;H ptra 'qajH
joiunf 'joijodng
'JUwjneraQia ui
sjoqox'ax 1° sautqug
spiUMOj '^aoo
Aq p[T3d ^imoray
ci
©
rt
©'
©
©
©"
©
X
x"
m
CM
©
rH
a
H
»
cs
W
o
H
a
Z
w
s
p
ft
P=<
o
i
pa
B
■X apoJO
•XI op^O
•IIIA  SP^O
©
Cl
'IIA =>P*JO
CO
CO
IA 8P*J£)
©
rt
rH ci in
rt rt co
X
rH
© Cl rt
CO CO CO
"A »P"J3
X
CO
©© CO rH
©
CO
rH
LO LO rt
CO coco
'AI SP^S
CO
CO
X
CO
X       CO
co     rt
CO       ©
rt     rt
©     ©
rt     «
©
Cl
©rt
cort
■III apuJO
rt
rt
rt
3
b-
CO
t-
eo
©
CO
©       rt rt
CO       rt rt
in
Cl
CO
CO
'II »P"-"{)
X
03
X
CO
Cl
feci
rH
rt
in
CO
LO
CO
X
Cl
X
Cl
"I apuJO
©
CO
©
CO
in
Cl
m
Cl
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
rt
CO
©
CM
©
Cl
4 •aouttpuaiiy
rt ©
©X
©' IO
coeo
©
rH
b^
feci
x x ir
ci © ev
x ©c
cort tj
lf
rH X © b- ©
© © rt x ©
© X b- LO b^
rt co eo ci co
324.19
40.09
40.10
37.46
30.75
148.40
39.11
39.08
37.37
30.06
145.62
36.29
39.76
27.04
c
Ci*
c
CN
IT
rt©LO©co©©©©
eo©©eox©cirtt-
ci © x ci ft ft in ci ci
CICOCICICOCOCOCOCI
»KS
rt rt
Cl Cl
X
eo
b- Cl O © Cl rt rH LO Cl
rt Cl rt Cl Cl rt Cl rt Cl
Cl        LO © rt b-
b-       rH Cl rt rt
rH
©     © co rt io
©       rt Cl rn rt
rH        b-Xb-
b-        rt rH rt
XOrHClrtXb-©©
rHClrHClrtrtrHrHrH
•sjSog
b-m
CO
in
rt©01©rHb-l-O©
Cl Cl CM Cl Cl CM rH rH rH
CO       X b- b- ©
X        Cl rH Cl rH
X       rH © rH ©
X        Cl rH Cl rt
t-      cort ©
b-       CM CM
©     ci ci © co >-h © ci ci fern        rHrHClrHCMrHrtClrH
* 'psipjua sndn,i
io jaqitm^ }a>j
X ©
eo co
©
Cl
rt 01 rH©COrHCOLOX
rtrtrtrtrtrtcocjco
LO        CO b- rt CO
in     rt co rt eo
eo
rt      © © LO rt
lo     rt eo co co
X       © Cl ©
rt     rt rt Ci
X        © Cl rH LO lO rt © rH CO
©     co co co co co co co rt eo
■UOTSSSg UI
BBM jooqog S^BCI
eo co
©©
-OT -B-H -f I -CT -OT -OT -IM -OT                     -in-fi-o-M                     -W-OT-OT-M                     -ot -OT -^
HHHHHHHHQ                      rH rH rH rH                      rH rH rH rH                      rH rH rH                     rHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrH
©©©ffi©©©©©                   ©©©©                   ©©O©                   Cl©©                   ©■©©©©©©©©
rtrtrHrHrHrHrHrH                             HHriH                      HrtHH                      ,_| ,-H rH                      HHrini-|-Hr-.Hri
• {ojna aunp
uo  pasi:q)
A\nqi;g  cci!Uuiiy
©©
in in
MX ©
© Cl rt Cl © Cl rH Cl ©                      01 rH v$ Cl                      ©©rH Cl                      rH rtf ©                      ©©b-©©©b-b-b-
© © Cl © © © Cl © b-                   ©Clrt©                   ©b-Cl©                   iMCl©                   OlXb-XOOX©©©
CtHCHOiHOiHh                      rH©rHrt                      OrH©rt                      ©©©                      CO >- MH H H tH H rl
^IrH        .h,-,,-!,-!^                             rH f-T rH ft                      HHHH                      rH        rH                      Cl rHrtrtrtrtrHrtrH
•a^Bogijjao
1
c
c
q
ec
■J
e-
P
c
a
0,
EC
ft
?5
p-
.S
c
c
&
1
p
c
c
CL
a
r'
ft
EH
P
c
a
CC
ft
?             c
S:
cV
ft
x\
P
c
a
E-"
fe
T
"    " C
c
a
Tf
t-
P
C
a
-
ft
«
B
o
B
En
>
a
a
a
<
cT
!
0
c
►
c
a
t-
Cl
0
-
1
c
c
r-
c
--
B
1
cc
e
c
p
a.
t
"3
a >
tn a
p
c
P
E
b
'c
p
c
p
'■-
c
ftft                       |        ftftjMftyHft?
c4a        h   Sfc^M£ftaVe
.1.2          °°    .§ d *"! J .1.« J .i -1
ft 13               j     QUbwwQuu'h
Miss B. E. ]
Miss A. M.
Miss D. Fis
Miss M. M.
Miss It. Cun
Miss M. W.
Miss J. Haw
Miss H. S. I
■_: rt
ft ft
■g S g "g ^.a" 5f«"3
^M^Sdo^ft'd
dsftsSrt>ftSS
►J
O
O
o
CO
t-
>
5
CJ
1»*3
X
"a
_P
"t
ft
b
P
g|
r- -
e
p
c
c
w
c
rt
£H
Cl
K)
rt
in
©
b-
OQ
©
ft
■t
u
ec
r^
a
Is
C
0*
rt
ft
s
C
Cl
eej
rt
ft
0
C
CC
CM
er
P
i
er
Tj
IT
©
t-
QE
a PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 25
c
rt
er
O.
CO
CO
CO
©
©*
in
CO       CO
©       CO
CO
CO
©©rt
©
CO
00 b-©OS
CO CO CO CO
CO
in
rt      rt lo
©            Cl
r-i
©
Cl
t-t-
rt rt
rt
©
© lOrt
co co rt
CM
b-
b*
b-©
rH Cl
b-
co
1C5 O
in
X
b-
b*
©
CO
©
©
in ©
Cl Cl
in
rt
ed
CO
©
CO
CM
b*
© rH
in rt
©
©©
eoco
in
b-
COCl
Cl rH
in
CO
© CO
CO CO
rt
t-
CO ©
rt rt
CO
X
© ©
rt co
©
b-
CO
Cl
CO
ci
©rt
CO CO
CO
b-
in x x
CO COCl
Is
in © rt co ©
t-x©rt ©
rt © co ©' in
CO CO CO CO CO
459.80
34.06
40.18
39.33
40.17
33.70
X
Cl
ift
X
b.rHCi©coxrtin©xm©©
Xin©©rt©b-rteoxt-ci©
cS ft © ci ci rA in ■*' co io in cii in
cortcortrtrtcoeocococoeoco
d
in
CO
t-
rtb-eo©©rt©b-oiei©ci©©©©
©XrtrtLO©rt©©X©rtrtCOeOrt
in^in^inrtftt-inrt©'©ftrtrt©
coeowcoeococococortcocicocococo
©
rt
ci
©
in
Cl  © © LO ©
rt rt rt Cl rH
©        © LO CO © ©
rt       rt rt Cl Cl rt
Cl
eo
©
rtrHrtrHrt LO©©rtCOClLO©'c3
Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl rH rH rH Cl rt Cl rt rt ,_,
O
o
in
CM
rtClrHClCO©].OCO©LOX©©©©rt
ClrtClClClClClrtrtClrtClrtClClrt
CM
CO
rt © b- 10' ©
Cl Cl rt rt Cl
x     x t- ci eo ©
rt      rt Cl Cl Cl rt
Cl
©
©
iq m ©.to co © rt t- lo o t- © © H2
Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl CO Cl rH rH CM rH rH CM r£j
9
©
X
Cl
t-inxb-com©©ciincob-rt©xrt
rt Cl rt rt rt rt rt Cl Cl Cl Cl rt Cl       rHrH
©
Ci
Cl
© © © © ©
co coco rt eo
rt     b- ci m co m
©     co rt rt rt eo
rt
Cl
©
Cl
Cl©rtb-b-LOO©©co©rt© fa
rtrtrtrtrtrtrteoeococococo-"
3
H3
t-
co
in
Xb-©©©LOrH©X©rtCO©inXX
eocococococorteocoinrtrtrtcococi
t-
©
rHrH rH rt rH
© © Cl © ©
rt rt rt rt rt
© © © © ©
Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl CM Cl Cl Cl Cl © 02
©©©©©©©Cl©©©©©   ._,,._
iHrHrHrHrHr-lrHrHrHrHrtrt          '              '
ClClCMrtCMCMClClClClClcM
©©©Xffl©©©©©©©
rtrtrtrHrtrtrHHrtrtrtr-
CM
C
r-
rt
c
Cl CM Cl
1,066
1,107
1,025
•     984
1,189
1,025
1,404
1,130
1,100
1,130
1,130
©©rHCO©rH©LOGOO©©in©©
LOCOCOb-COb-'-HCOCOt-©eOlOCOCl
Cirt©cort©i©rtxoxrtxt-rt
ft ft       ft ft rHrH ft        ft        rA       rHCl
©in©© in ©©©rtrtXir
©rtCOC0cort©©C0rtrtcr
rt©LOrtrt©XXrH©CMX
rH rH Cl rH rH                      rH        rH
co rt © eo rt
t- rt CO b- Cl
rH © rt LO X
rH        rH ft rH
P
a,
V
ft
P
c
2!
ft
c
EC
1
■c
p
C
c
CL
CC
ci
1
81
-Cfe
•c;
E
C
&
-6
E
p
c
-4-
ft
ai
to
a
.    . cS
- -fl^
81
W Ecc
■ « c
c
a
DG
s
cr
1
C
Xf
E
*
*  "  "  " c
k
cr
E
ce
t-
X
tr
1
1
tr
^
c
ft
c
s
<
rt
s
ft
>
?
c
ft
is
C
C
c
js
P
%
p*
e,
r^
ft
S
Pi
o
'ts
•g
o
Pd
il
c
c
'cl
CC
ft
ft
rt
rt.
£
c
%
a
a
c
c
s
r
s
<
D
P
a
£
B
tt
-
ft
rt
35
<
(2
E-
<
p
c
i
C
*
=
pj
1
C
ft
c
c
p
r*
is
t
1
f
>
5
1.
I
S
r5
1
c
PC
>
p
a
d
h-
!s
ft
>■
rt
e
C
IE
<
5
1
r
?
1*
ft
p
c
t:
P
r-
'a
p
ec
>-
ft
B
1
OS
t
'a
cp
p
€
c
&
r-
<L
|
ft
ft
*
PC
ft
B
Is
E
a
ep
;
ft
c
ft
C
rt
1
ft
<
1
£
pc
e
a
tt
(
c
<
p^
—
p
'=
pt
a
a
c
PC
c
C-T
>
1
ft
r*
E
c
ft
e
|r
0
PC
Ci
g
ft
P
c
J
x^
c
ft
CC
ft
*
i
l
>
ft
1
c
PC
r
pc
-
I>
i
|
©
>
ft
p
c
CO
C
CM
D
rt
rt
rt
>
ft
1
Cl
er
-t
IT
p-
c
p
1
a
p
ft
b
.J
1
Jtc
O
r
CI
cr
rt
ir
c
fe
X
c
c
r-
CN
er
i
c
p
c
c
ft
a
c
PC
(a
B
"3
1
p
"E
ft
b
P
pi"!S
SE
^J c
M I
<£>
3
>
CN
er
rt
US
ec
t-
X
a
c
r-
r-
r-
rt
rH
li
CT
i
c
p
c
c
ft
a
g
6
C
'=
e
E-
p-
0
I
0
J
5 a
CD    CD
■C3  ■&
EH H M 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
CO
03
H
p?
EH
O
CO
C3
b
c-5
o
H
G
g
H
>j
G
c
W
Q
m
02
H
hH
tH
hH
o
I
G
o
o
W
o
m
X
<(
H
12!
K
,3
G
s
•asodjn,! jaqcfo
Xuu jo s-iaqaijaj.
JO S9UB{^g sp.reM0j
sjuuio "JAOO OJ UOll
-ipprc ur sjooqas qSiH
pue' 'qSiH Jom'nr
•louadng' 'Aiujuaui
-aia ui sasodJti.i
' lie joj lbujsiQ Aq
a.mjipuadx[j iejoj,
b-
rt
Cl
©
rH
Cl
—
•siooqos
qSiH pun 'qSlH
joiimf '.ioi.iadhg
'A\il3}uaniai3; ui
siaqouajj jo sauiqcgg
spju.woj '^aoo
A"q pisd ^unouiy
ci   :
©
•rH
rt
©
X
b-"
H
0
H
«
C5
PC
O
«f
g
p
Oh
o
«
H
rt
a
p
■X ^P^O
'XI  :>P"-iO
'IIIA 3P"D
ffirl
01 rH
—
'IIA  apwf)
© ©
Cl Cl
lA aptls
rt
rt
: ©lo
: cort
rt
X
ci in
ci rt
'A 8P"-tfl
X b-
in     ©
b-      CM
©          :
Cl             :
rH m
in co
©
X
rH X
rt rH
•AI f>P«-iO
b-LO
co eo
CM       COX
b-       rHrH
CO               j
in
rt
in
rt
©b-
rH rH
"III »P™0
t-rt
CM CO
X
m
•& feci
CO                 |
Cl
rt
Cl
rt
tX)rH
rH rH
'IX ap^S
b-
eo
free
CO
eo
©          :
co          ;
Cl ©
rt ci
b-
© X
CM CM
"I spu-if)
LOCI
rt co
t-
b-
X
CO
x          ;
CO                   |
es m ci
Cl CO
©
©
w
4- ■aoui.'puajiy
jCi;t?ci aaujaAy
:cDiO01c^C5TtcTOa;t-C5
IioecrHrtto^coooecit-
ioit^iocdcocDo'aJt^cs
:^ccjnnnncc3«nM
i                                          °
345.15
39.51
38.99
40.44
36.45
©                   1 Cl m © Cl © IO X © CO rn
co            :rtcirt©xrt©©mci
in           i © ci ft x b^ ©' ft © © lo
m            : co rt rt co eo rt co co eo co
361.06
28.32
30.59
36.94
rt rt X Cl CO
© rH © Cl©
© b-' Cl fe-^ ©
rt co eo ci co
•SPIS
MHcoot-inffimcoccj
IClCM^CIrHrtCMcHClTH'o
:                                              O
:                                      .a
©        © © rH fe-
CS       rt Cl Cl rt
rH
b-                   :eO©rtrtb-rHXb-LOCl
t-                   ; Cl Cl Cl rH Cl Cl rt rt rH 01
rH        rt© CILOb-CO 01 CC©
©        1-IClClrHrHClrHrHrt
Cl
•SiCog
,' CO t- en b- CO CM 01 C-l t- Ci
i«'WWrtrtrt        <MrHrH~
1                                                                       ft
CO       CO Cl CM rt
t-       CM Cl Cl Cl
X                      ,'©lOb-rHXrHrtrHO©
X                   IrHClClClrHClCMClrHrH
co      iob-©©rtrtcoxfe-
CO        rH rH Cl CO Cl rH Cl n rH
* 'panojua siidnj
jo jaqumjM }3K
:rtxt"-b-LOb-rHb-inci o
Irtcococococicocortco-"
:                                       =s
co     cm ci eo x
©          -^f. -^ -r^.  CO
CO
in            : © m rt io m ci ci x in ci
©             icortineortrtrtcocico
rH               '.
*<&       © b- Cl
©     ci co rt
eo
in
rt
©
t-
rt fe- LO rH CO
rt co co coco
•uoissag ui
ST3M TOOqOS ScCUd
:                                          cu                                                    ;                                                     -»-w-t
; Cl Cl Cl Cl 01 Cl 01 Cl 01 Cl 02                          Cl Cl ci ci                             : Cl Cl © Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl                    © © ©
;©©©©©©©©©© ___,            ©©©©                   :©©©©©©©©©©             b-b-b-
IHHHHrlrtHHrt rH'                                  rl rl H H                                 !rtrt         rHrHrHrti-HrHi-H                      rHrHrH
© © © © Cl
I- t- b- b- b-
"(ajis^I  aunf
uo  pasnjq)
£ref3g  [«mray
:t-rH©COrt©rt©X©Clrt                      © rt b- b-                                 :C0©LO^C-©t-©rtX                      b-©©Cl(Mb-C0ClCO
:cocococirt©t-©cocococo              mrt©©                     :ci ©m2,rtcorteortrt              co rt rt b- b- © ci i- ci
*»:rt©LOrt©x©xxrteo©              ©©©©                     ,'rtrHxcirtcirt©oi              x h h c o c o c o
i rH        Cl" H               ft               rA rA                             rH         rA rH                                 \ rH r-i                rH rH rH rH        ft                     ft rt rt                      ft        rH
•ajBoijijjaO
w   O
H   £
ft a:
ft
o
£
1
01
Si
: ; ; pi
c
a
m
-
EQ
ci
O
ft                  -
§        I
EH              pn
c
o
o
CO
EO
ft
T.
:                 : p
c
CJ
01
CC
1
<6
ft
; ; p
c
c
m
ft
T
C
ct
X
p
ft
c
o
CJ
o
OS
ft
g
EC
p4
Pti
o
«f
Pel
H
i a,
if
PH J
. ^
H co
feS!
p
a
ft
>—
P
c
«
ft
EH
c
rt
ft
ft
<
K
c
c
ci
I
is
ft
c
r=
rt)
n
ft
p
c
5
ft
y.
ft
a
i
w
BC
0
rt
ft
e
a
St
c
1
ft
e
c
p
c
-d
tH
ft
p
o
E
Eh
<^
3
"ci
p
o
ft
ft
c^
S-'K
a
o
ft
<
ft
*a
ft
ft
a
CJ
ft
15
rt
d
>>
ft
r^
ft
ft
ft
Isj
c
p
Is
ft
ft
>
ft
rt
ft
cu
Pj.
c
K2
c^
p.
e
t
02
r*
o
ft
6
P
P
P
I*
ft
>>
'a
ft
<
P
C
a
P
C
pC
o
PC
—
k
o
ft
ft
P
p^
1
W
o
ft
P
O
o
PC
D
K
New Westminster—Con.
Richard McBride,
Supervising Prin.
     Div. 1
CM
eo
rt
in
©
t-
X
©
©
1
O
C
c
ft
CD
O
pq
'.'■-
'c
•H
*«
E
a
5
tH
ft
to
a
c
o
pQ
C
a
S
O
CM
CO
rt
h
si
c .2   ;
Sf   i
2*1 ;
cBcc
pO
Cp
w
Cl
CO
-T
in
©
fe
X
ffl
©
S
p
rO
<
o
ft
01
CO
-r?
in
©
b-
X
© PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 27
CJ
X
C
©
fe-
Ol
C
tM
©
a
a
01
©
t-
01
er
C
X
c
©
a
fees
c5
t-
©
rt
rH
LO
rt"
©
©
©
in
co"
01
X
©
©
CO
x"'
X
©
©
CO
m
rt
©      rt
rt     CM
rt
Cl
Cl
Ol
ci     in
01      CO
in     rtrt
eo     oico
m
in
©    rtin
rt        rHrH
©
01
rt
Cl
rt
01
©
CO
©
CO
© ©
rt rH
©
LO
fe-
COCl
Cl H
in     ©
CO
©
in
rH
in
rt rt
rt rH
X
in
© rt
rtrt
©
©
©
m
X
X       b*
b-
©
Cl
©
01
rt eo
01 Cl
b-
rt
X ©
CO CO
t-
t-
©
CO
fe-©
rtrt
b-      -^
01       rt
rt
rH
rt
rH
X©
rt CM
in
rH
eo
LO
rt
rt
b*
rt
rt
©
rt
c
ec
cr
©
©
©
rH
in
in
Ol
01
Cl
01
CM H
t-
rt
rt
in
in ©
coco
rt
fc-
in
in
rH
in
rH
©
rt
©
rt X
rH
01
Cl
CM
X
rt
rt
rt
© CO
co eo
©     1
t©rt
CO
in
rt
CO
X
rH
©
rH
©
CM
01
Cl
Cl
©
CO
H
CM
fern
© ©
rt rt
©
in
X ©
O feci CO
COCl
rH        © b- CO © fe-
Cl      rt ci t- © rt
x     © eo eo ci ci
in   • co co co co co
eo
©       CO ©
b-        fc-H
©       © ©
©      CM CO
rt
rt     cm b- rt co at
X       C^ClrHCC X
©    ci e: b- co! tft
in     rt eo eo co ci
©        rH CO © rt ©Cl ©
rt     ©rt©co©b-t-
©'     ft rt x in in ci co
x     eo co co co eo eo co
rH
Cl © rt
COb- rt
rt rAcG
eo co co
X       Ol rt rt © rH CO in Cl rt ©©© b* C5
©     ©rt©fe-cixrtx©©©rtrtci
cd     rA © ©eo ©in id x" -rA lo cii© in ©'
©     ci ci co co rt co co co co eo eo eo co ci
eo
CO
rH
X
©
rt
rt co
rH rH
©     t- ox ©©
b-       rt rH rt rt rH
rt
©     in rt
X       rHrH
©     rt© in ©-rt
Ol       Cl Cl CM 01 rH
©       L0Cl©b-X©X
©       rtClrtrtrtClrt
rH
■rtifOCC
rHrHrH
rt     eo t-©o co «
b-        rt rt Cl Cl Cl r-
X
r-
x t- in © x t- t-
rlHrlrlHrlrt
X
rt
01
Cl ©
Cl rH
©      X o©co b-
rH        rH rH rH rH rH
Cl
©       lO ©
X       rH Cl
rH       LO LO © © ©
•rt        Ol rH rH rHrH
X        © -^ X r-i CO © ©
X       01 rt Cl Cl Cl Cl rt
Cl © rt
CM rt Cl
©         r-i -r^i © LO X C
rt         rH rH Cl rH r-i O
Cl
© Xrt t-lT
Cl rt Cl rt r-
eo © i7
Cl rH ^
'c
c
© CO 1
rt CO EC
©
©
Ol
© CO
cool
©     in x t- © co
X       CO COCO 01 CO
CO
Ol       © b-
b-       CO CO
b-        O rt rH^O
©     rt rt rt eo co
b-        LO © rt X rH © b-
©     cocortcortrtco
rH
© Cl ©
CO CO CO
rt     rt rH © in rH x © rt in © © cr
x     ci co rt co rt co co rt co eo eo c-
co
X
°    1
©ffi               ©cicivnci               C1C1               coeo©eoco               cocoeococococococococo
fe-b-                   X©©X©                   ©©                   ©©Xffl©                   ©©©©©©©©©©©
rH rH                      rH r-i rH rH rH                      rHrH                      rHrHrHrHrH                      H ri H rl n H H         tH H rl
cocococoeococococoeococococo  o>
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©i^
©lo            b-©©co©            olo            a o cd qo in            lo©h©©©x:©co©co            us os t- ©in co o» th as co eo tavi in ©
LOrt                      © lO LO © IO                      ©LO                      C0XC1©IC0                      © © CO © Cl rt LO      ! © X © X                      b-©rHOrHrtrHXC0 10rtClClb-©
«■ © ©                      rH X X © X                      C1X                      mOOOCX                      ©rHCOrH©©©.'rH©©©                      ©XCleOLOrtrHCl©ClCl©rtrtin
rH                             rH                                                  rH.                         rl H H                                    rH rH rt rH rt        rt      j r-1                                           ClrtrtrHrtrtrtrtrtrHrtrtrtrtrt
p
c
c
1
:        1
1
c
0
S
tr
*■
c
a
1/
i
§ H
CJ          (.
CD        ■ -
CC       &■
iz!
o    :17
8      |
EC       &
■0
i
e.
a
E7
1
01
'St
; p
c
c.
c
1
•n
"   '   "   "   " c
c
V
1
ft
P
c
t
c
■J
.3
p
p-
a
pC
C
ft
r
ft
ps
p
<
0
i
X
c
«
-
ft
1
&
>
CC
EC
ft
a
e
E
1
X
Pi
r>
p^
f
c
a
PH
i
8
I
ft
I-
ft
is
!
c
ft
p.
ft
r-
P
C
ec
P
C
ft
r-
—.
£
f
r-
PC
P.
ft
DC
E-
-
E
|
C
ft
>
a.
t
I
a
ft
<
a.
1
EH
<
p
t
&
p-
&
a
c
Pi
?
1
K
©
rt!
£*
e
si
a
pH
B
s
ft
ft
i
Ci
c
ft
ft
IS
c
e
!
(«
ft
H
H"
hi
^^
|<x
p^ -
c
1
rt
ft
a
P
c
|
<
1
ft
p:
p5
c
c
<
p
?
r=
0
e,
<
C
p*
p>
j
c
ft
ft
ft
r-
a
;
It
r*
<
p5
p-
.5
c
ft
ft
ft
a
pC
E
t
ft
H
s.
H-
1
ec
P-
C
a
g
ft
c
ft
p
a
r=
<
c
ft
i-
>
ft
a
rt!
o
ft
01
er
-+
lf
>
ft
p*
ft
a
E
c
£
'c
c
C
c
ft
05
er
-1"
IT
ft
a
h
c
C!
c
P
ft
CM
*
K
rt
it
-
fr
X
c
c
©
©
r-
-rp
..   O
tt a
3 co
0)  o
O  O
p: a
ft
03
V
rt
IT
ec
b
a
c
c
C
er
e.
1
c
p
c
ft
a
£
c
PC
. 1
$ B
oj   oi
pO XJ
0 ta M 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
ci
H
C
CO
G
S3
ft
rs
Q
G
G
S?
G
<
S
(H
hi
o
c
G
o
to
02
K
i—i
Eh
-H
o
I
05
h^
o
o
a
CJ
PH
G
■3
EH
s
G
h^
G
•asoainj isqjo
Rus jo SJaqoi3ajJ
jo saunas spiutto^
s-jtiuif) lAOf) oi not;
-ippu ui Bxooqog qSfir
pUR 'q3ijj JOJUuf
'jouadng 'AMuiugui
-bia; ui sasocLm^j
n* joj iot-nsia A-q
ainiipuedxg: iujoj.
ei
;    ©
:    ci
ift
CO
rt"
CO
©
m
LO
rt
©"
■siooipg
lls?H Pire 'l[SPH
.loituif 'joii9dhg
'JCJB^U9ai9ia III
SJ9q0139X JO S9IJB[^g
SpjtfMOJ "\A.o*y
&q piL'tl ^unotuy
©
rt
©
X
rt"
©
©
©
rt
X
x"
ft
ft
<
0
w
D
<l
ft
p5
og
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
o
ft
ft
n
ft
"X apu^O
"XI aP^O
*IIIA aP^O
©
CO
©
CO
rH CO
CO CO
rt     eo x
©      ^rH
TIA ap™0
o
rt
©
rt
oi in
CO CO
fees
rt ©
oi rt
TA  3PBJ3
CO
rt
CO
rt
Ol ©
COCO
t-
© CO
rt ci
"A  9P«0
X
CO
X
CO
b-©
CO CO
co
t-
©X
rt eo
-AI PP«9
©
rt
©    ©   :
rt      rH    ;
©
in rt
eo eo
©
©
© rt
rt eo
Til  °P«JD
©
eo
©     ci   :
CO       rH    1
Ol      t-
rt rt
rt eo
in
fe
t-rt
rt
■II   spBJQ
rt
eo
rt
CO
m
m     x       ;
© in
rt co
rn
X
T epwQ
CO
in
CO
©
©     x       ;
: cort
: co eo
free
4- *aat3CBptj9ij?Y
C0©©©©©CO©
©LOinrHt-©©X
cd©'rt©coin'rt'eM
cocortcoeocoeoco
©       X CO
b-       CM X
l>      <6rA
cc     cieo
Cl
CM       ©       C0©C0©b-rt©XC0©rtcMfr-XOlCl
th     ci     in©cix©eo©©co©oirt©©©fe-
X        CC X rH i-
©     b- rt rt ir
oo    ©fe^cdir
co    rt co co ci-
in
co rt © coco
X © CO X CO
m     w     co ci co eo eo cO co eo coco rt eo rt eO oi eo
co co co co rt
•BIITO
©©©xcot-©©
rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrt
©       © Cl
rt      rHrH
Cl       rH       rt X © rt LO rt b-X©XX © X© X X
CM       rt       rH H rH rH rH Cl rHrH rH rt rt rt Cl rH rH rH
b-        ©©LOr--©©©©©
X        OlrtrHCMClrtrHClrt
01
■sioa
b-rtrt©b-©LO©
HMCHMClHrlH
CM      Cl Cl
©       rH CM
■rti      Cl      b-iocOrHb-x©x©©eoxx©m©       in
CO        I-I,       HHHiMHrlMHHHClrtHrlHH        ^
o
0
X
01
co©in©©©rtcirt
# -psiiojua stjclrm
jo ieqnm>i yam
©Oeox©©rtin
cortrtcortcoeoco
Cl       Cl rt
©       Ol CO
CO
©     co     rteociiracM©b-©nortrHrt©mcort     t
in     Ol     eo eo eo co co eo co co eo co rt co rt co co co     xf
p:
b-        CO©©©©X©rHrt
©     rtCOrtrtCOCOrtrtrt
m
■uoissag ui
bum looqog e£v(j
CO C0 CO CO CO C0 CO CO                   COCO                   CO       HHHrflHMHHrtiHHOHHHH        C
©©©©©©©©             ©©             ©     ©©©x©x©©©©©x©©©©     S
©eoeoeoeocoeococo
©©©©©©©©©
HHrtHrlHrlHH
*(3?^H  a«nf
uo pssnq)
^.iujjbs jimuuy
co©cico©m©b-             ©©             ©     ©©©©©o©©©©©©©©©©     ©             cirtrtcocirHci©ci
b-b-xioeo©©co             ©ci              co     ©©m©©©rtrt©©©© io ©loio     -r^             xco©ioco©t-rHco
6^-©XClCl©C0rt©                     rH r-i                     rH        rtrtC0ClCl©rHrHrH©©©©©OlCl        ©                     t-ri©©©X©X©
CM rH rH rH rH rH rH rH                      r-i rH                     rH        01 rA rH rA rA rA rH rH rH               rA rH rH rA rH                                  rH ft rH rH
'9%VD\}l'\JdQ
X
f
c
a
zfl
ft
X
c
a
ft
X
p
o
CJ
a>
EC
s
■ 5
o
CD
EC
H-^
ft
xi
0 *
CJ   p.
01 "H
CCfa
T
P
O
CJ
CJ
EC
H^
ft
p
c
x_
; ; ; *+:
c
ft
*o
C
c
CC
ft
x:
p
c
cu
02
ft
G
o
CJ
V
X
CJ
'a
OJ
rtl                  ?
o               .S
<J               ft
G
C
a
X
ft
P
c
CJ
CJ
X
:
ft
ft
ft
o
ft
EH
SrS
*£,
cfl
o
a
ft
r-=
1
X
ft
5
1
ft
>
rt
ft
CJ
-
ft
Is
*4
j=
rt
ft
Is
ft
|
<
-H
0)
1
ft
ft
ft
SI
.ft
s
0
ft
i
rt
fc
c
a
hi
s
P
C
pG
O
ft
ft
tH
V
Cu
P
rt
ft
SI
IS
P
rt
G
ft
ft
3
E
'c
rt
EH
!S
p
c
C
<
d
c
r=
o
EQ
ft
s
02
d   :
o   :
fl   i
1
EH G
. ee
PC
< f^
ft ft
p
ft
H
13
a
o
H
ft
1
ft
d   i
o
a !
rtt   :
p=    ;
io .J.
<j p
?ft
ftft
p4
G
ft
ft
ft
-|j
Pi
ft
"5>
ft
02
rt a
a
p
i
0
ft
ft
oi
o
CJ
d
>
ft
>
CD
C
ft
ft
^H
p
q
p
CJ
rt
r^
D
A
c
c
c
ft:
ft
r-c
pC
--i
G
o
-
a
xi
o
o
O
ft
ft
d
a
3
ft
G
c
c
o
1-9
ft
rJ
CG
M
ft
o
o
B
CC
rH
>
o
G d
Sft
Cl
CO
rt
m
CO
b-
X
rH
S
a>
p-
o
D
'ci
W
Cl
i
1
ft
CO
o
V
0>
Cl
(0
rt
in
©
t-
X
OS
c
Cl
CO
rt 10
rt rt
©
s
p
ft
Cl
CO
in
©
L-
GO
-. PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 29
ft *
C~i^-^H
rH LO ©
5jP X Cl ©
00 © © Cl
rt © t- rH
X © rH rt
o © © lo © © c io i" o io © © io © lo © io- © iso © lo in m ©
© rt co x »n in lo © ci © ci © © ci x ci o: in x r^ x n © rn ©
t-rtLOrtcoeoeocOrHconcicii-H©rH©x©cl©cicoci©
© © Cl LO 10 <" i-
in
©
fe- CO
rH
ci © rt x eo
rHrH
*
rH        rl
H
xi
rt
xt A   ;
- fl
mb.
CO
Hl=
EC
 -3 ^2
fe K      feK&-c7?pHK&.      O"      fc K      Eh fe
hidtd
"8 |h<J
psi
«e
il1
3 " « p5
"ft SO   !
:aw
si ptj B w H -d rt J 6 a
> h rt a s. a' o n &i a a % i-; a k « a « j e-' a h ti
H *"* K .1 .a .1w J.1.1S .1Itt -a .a j
pi^r'SslSHrSiSSlsSStaSS!
CJ 3
cq'Pi
' hH oj'w  :   i ^
3 'v "P    i  cci  £
3 s s h » £
a s i . .w ■
hi J d « ri d <*'.-<
hi .paon'Kpii
i-hcn
h"
Q   :
Ph       :   :
o   ;
cs   ■       .   .
a :
r-iClre^ciOCCt-CX
CD   0)
Jl  X\
Eh Eh M 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
I
o
O
CC
CC
05
W
H
O
CO
G
G
rs
C
s
G
S3
G
G
G
H
G
O
c
G
o
. m
oi
s
pH
H
hH
o
I
ui
G
c
o
G
O
02
>H
G
G
a
G
h3
G
■Dsodmj jaqjo
Aws jo siaqauaj,
jo saueiug spjBA\o^
SJUUJfj "lAOf) oj U0I1
-ippe ui sjoouos qSiH
puu" 'qSiH loionj
'jouadng' 'ssviusm
-aig ui sasocljn,x
Xiu I0J I'ouisiij A"q
ainjipuaaTxgc; x*U°A
0
X
©
©
©
10
CO
w
X
01
■stooqog
q3!H Pun 'ip3!H
JOIUUf '.TOI.I3c.llts'
'^juiuara'ai^x ui
sjsqouox jo sari«IB8
spiBMOJ "JAOf)
A"q pitfd junouiy
ci
4&
frog
rA
CC
X
b-"
01
LO
ft
a
H
P4
C5
Pd
o
M
H
P5
m
hj
s
p
PH
o
P4
w
n
a
p
S5-
'X aptua
•XI apuiO
"IIIA 3P*->3
©
rt
©     rt in eo
rt     rt coco
©
©
—
"IIA 3PWO
rt
rt
rt
rt
rl rt
rtrt
Cl
X
"ia »Pi!-ia
rH
rH
©rt
rt rt
©
©
xm
CO CO
cO     xb- b-
b-     eo co eo
"A "Pl«0
Ci
©
rH  O
CO rt
©
m
b-©
eo rt
b-
b-
© ©
rt CO
"AI SPWO
rt
rH
rt b-
Ol H
rH
eo ©
rt rt
b-
©
©
© © rt
rt rt rt
—
"III api»0
O
©
©X
Cl rt
CC
CO
CO 01
cort
b-
Ol
X
© ©
Ol CO
"II "P^O
—
©
Cl
rt
rt x
Cl rH
01
rt
eo
eo
CO
©
CO
01 ©
rt ci
"I apujg
CO©
01 CO
01
©
rt CO
rt rt
rt
in
©
rH
4. -aouupuajjy
^HBCI a3B.iaAy
©   0<J
rl LO
©X
eo oi
t-    b
CO       CO
in     er
co m rt 1- ci x n co
Xb-©©cOb-©rt
x 00 © fe- m' co © ©'
coeortcocoeocoeO
rH        ©©ClCO©ClLOClr-iC0©©rtrt©
rH       rt rt 01 fe-rt © ©Xb- ©rt rt X© W
©"     xeo©'b^b^b^rt©'x©'©'©x'©in
ci     cocococofocoeococortcocococori
CO
©     eo © in ri b-co rt 01 © rt
©     b-eo © x in © in b-© rt
©'     in rt" ci in rt rt fe- in ft rt
co     co co co co co eo co cO eo co
in
"SP!S
b- CO
©       ©©©rtXClCOrtCO
CO       Cl 01 Cl 01 rt rt Ol Cl rt
CO       Xb-LOCOrtb-©XrtC]rt©CIXCO
X      01 rt rt 01 01 rt rt rt OI 01 01 rH Ol rH
X      Clcirt©Cl©©Xb-Cl
b-       Cl rt rl rt Cl 01 Cl rt rt 01
01
. 'Bjfog
rt x
rH rH
ci     © X co n lo 0 © © cO
CO       Cl rl 01 Cl Cl Cl rl Cl 01
*#     eo.oO 00 « © rt in © © n © co ci m rt
©       rH rt rt rt Ol Cl Cl rt rt 01 rt 01 Cl Cl rt
LO        CO X CO rl X © CO rH LO fe-
©        rH rl Cl 01 rt Cl Cl Cl Cl rt
Cl
* 'paipjua siidn,i
jo jaquin^ ^a^j
COCO
ci      © rt © ci co b- ci rt ©
©      rtrtrtrtrtcortrteo
b-        rl lO CO rH r- X IO I- © CO CO Cl rt CO b-
b-     rt co co rt rt eo co CO •* -^ rt rt rt rt -n
CO
CO       X b-t-© ©© CO© 01 ©
fe-     coco co rt rtrt rt co rt co
in
■uoissag ui
BUM XOOqOg fi^Ba
-HM -t« -Cl -H -W -CJ -£1 -Cl -,TI
CO CO                  Cl Cl Cl 01 Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl
©©                 ©©©©©©©©©
rt rl                      THrHr-irHrHrHr-irHrH
-HC1 -hM -W -Cl -Cd -H -HM -Cl -^i -HN -« ~Ct -El
© © Cl 01 Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl 01 01 01
©©©©©©©©©©©Cl©©©
OIOICICICICIOICICICI
©Cl©©©©©©©©
• (a^H  aunx'
uo  pasuq)
A"iiqi3S  I^nuuy
m©               OcCrH^ti-^ir-irti-rtittio               x©rtrtrtiom©rtXrtcortrt©      ©               x©rtrHCOb-cocoinoi
rHb-                   IOC! rt©©rt©©©X                   rtrt©©OrHrHC0©rt©©©©©       rH                   rt©ri©eoxeoco©rt
^ Cl rH                      ©©COrtrtCOrtClrtb-                     •tHy^-rti-^rHrHOirit^'rtiC-l-rti'^O        b-                      fe-©©ClCOCOCOCOCOCO
rHrH                     rH 01 rt* ft rt* rH rt" rt" rl                            01 rH rA rl" rH rH rA        rH rH rH rH rl" rH rH                                  Cl" rl rt" rt" rt" rt" rH rA rH rH
•a^Bouijiao
X
c
c
a
Xf
p=
1
xs ■£
03 t
0 .p
p
c
rj
:1?
ft
E
e
0
p.
ft
1                CJ
a
p.                      CD
-    -                     rj +.
1°
■Si
H
E
X
%
c
a
:h-
S
I-
?!
i
c
E*
ft
1
T3                              -     - +
cd                         ?
CJ                 .             .t
<                    6
C
c
a
CJ
h
'd £
<3 a
«
N
w
0
1
S
Eh
ft
ft
£
•J
>
t
ft
<i
ft ft
si
cj xr
Gft
ftrt
le-jj
c
ft
r
P
C
|
2:
r
!""
r
P
c
ft
&
ft
ft
.;
<
ft
p
|
t
a
C
|
•-
c
<
I
ft
ft
- a.
[
ft
■0
a p
efl C
II
-h +■
P<
ft! ft
ft"?
8 J
P
rt
ft
ft
12
0
c
r
pi
ft
4
s
PC
a
e
pt
t
=
E-
<
ft
£
c
~:
a
"a
ft
CC
pS
c
c
£
1
PC
-
cci
c
ft
*
C
C
ft
ft
P
pc
<
H
M
s"
a
"eel
Oh_
PC
e>
pc
(
e
p
<
PS
'■c
'a
-
&
p
r-
s
e,
r
p
K
lift
ft
p
c
1
C
ft
ft
ft
c
Cj
<
<
ft
c
">
R
E-
r
ft
ft
ft
J
ft
r^r^                     EH hi S r*
■-.   C-*
riripcih         fthSsaas^Sra^ispi^cSa           <pfl^rtrtp^j^p-5r-;<i
hi
O
O
a
us
noj               rtOl cort lo © b-X ©
rtoicortm©b-x©C
rt ci ec
rt m   ;                  ri ci co rt in © t-x © ©
>
-'ft
1
CJ
ll
EH|
EH
>
..  P
a. 0
p- t
rH    f-
sj
CJ  r
d
>
,
ft
X
a
-5
:              11
" i              P
1
i
1 PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 31
X
CO
X
CO
rt
rt
eo
in
t-
rl CO
rt rt
in
eo
m
CO
X
eo
X
CO
© ©Cl c
COrt rt cr
Cl
rt
©
CO
©               rtOl
eo          rtrt
CO
X
©rt
ci co
CO
©
©©
rt rt
©
b-
rt
CO
rt
CO
rHO
-^ 01
©
©
rt
©
rt
rt
©
in
eo
LO
CO
CO co ©
Olrt
X
© b-
rt rt
eo
©
X
©
rt
CO
rt
CO
© rt
CO CO
rt
©
© 10
01 rt
rt
IM
©
©
rt
©
© rt
rt ci
rt
©
© ©
01 rl
in
rt
01
eo
LO
rH
CO
CO
in rt ci
rtrt rt
©
© X
ci eo'
X
LO
X
CO
CO        ©©©©rtXX©©LO
oi     ©o©t-rt©co©rt©
rt      ©rt CM cioirteo'rt©LO
X       CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO rt rt
CO
eo          rtCix©b-rtcit-ricoci
rH            COCOb-CClt-Xrtrt ©'rt
co         ©x©cicib^Lo'ft©©'oi
x         co co co rt rt co eo co eo co co
01
©     ci©cix©cieortcortx
01     © in ci rt ©© ri rt t-in rt
in     © ineoxci©'co'rtcortrt
r-i     eo co co 01 co rt rt rt co co co
rt
01
01
CO
©
CO
©Xrtrl©O©01
m rt © n in x in ©
ft t- © ao © feft ift in
co co eo eo co co co eo
Cl
r-i
10          ©©rHCO©©LO©
©        rH rl rt Cl rt rt rl rt
01
LO               X rl rt rt rH COrt t-rt rH -^
CO               rl Cl Cl Ol Ol rl rH rt rt CO rt
rl        b-Cl b-
rH        rt Cl rt
Cl
© © in in rt ci ri
Cl Ol Cl Ol CM rt CM
in
rH
01
XrHLOb-LO©rtb-
rH Cl Cl rt rt r-l Cl rt
©
01
Cl        Ol © © rt © IO LO m
01       01 rt rt rt rt rH 01 rt
01
ci         cortt-oiLO©©coincox
rt              OlClrlOlClClClCMClrtCl
CO      rt©t-©XrtrtXb-b-b-
rt       OlrtrtOl       rl 01 rt rt Ol rt
01
X
©
01
eocirtcob-o©co
01 Cl rl 01 Cl 01 rl 01
Ol
CO
b-     xin©rtLOrt©rt
ci     eo eo eo eo co co rt co
b-          rtCirH©©c:rt©©rtCi
b-         rt rt rt rt rt co co rt co rt rt
01
rt        rH CC -Hn O rt © © CO n 0 X
m     rt co co oi eo rt rt rt rt co co
rt
eo
01
rt
rHCO©©Cl©©©
rtrtcortrtcortrt
Cl
©
rH
©OldOlCltMOlClCl©                         (M01C1C1C1010101C101CM
©©©©©©Ci©t-in                  ci©©©©co©©©©©
HrlrHHrlrlHrtHH                             rHnrHrtrlrtrHrtrHrHrH
CM CI CM CI CM CI CM CI Cl CI Cl
ClClOiC^OlC^ClOCTiCJCi
CO CO Cl Cl Cl 01 Cl 01
c:c;c;©©cjc;©
1-HrHrHrHrHi-Hr-rH
CO ©                      iD rH-rtiG-
rH r
ririrtrt                    rHrirtrtrt©nxrt©cort                x©rtclrtxxrtrtXcin               ©ciineocococortrt
frDCOICl               rHCOrt©co©c:eocOrt                    eoeort©rt©olcl©©©x               x©rtOrtcoco©©cl©t-               xxrtcoco©rtrtrt
rH                             CMrtrtrtrH                rlrlrt                             ClrtrtrtrH        HHHH                                    Cl rH rl rt rl ri rt         H rl H                             01 rtrtrlrtrHrHrtrl
ft
" ■ *  " c
ft
1
.     -    -  CJ
-   -   -*0                       -fc
n         t
<         ft
d
1      x:
-•d    S P
i   £
-<    xr.
p.
c
c
a
a
1
* CJ
8-1
*H ft
CJ
3 .r
«   E
t
r
X
' c
c
c
•J
c
0*
1
■0
p
c
a
ft
X
P
c
'it
ft
a
c
rt
>
ft
rt
K
P
c
ft
<
ft
c
c
ft
<
ft
ft
O
-1 pi
p:p
a.
j
<
P
ft
ft
r-
t-
c
ft
<
|S
"a
s
ft
r-
P
|
>
XI
c
-
t
ft
ft
ft
8
1
*
p*
'C
ft
<
0
ft
K
p.
c
ft
t-
i
It
G x:
Mi
hH rr.
ft*
«ft
0 S t-
-£ 0 a
ft^ft
h-iftH-
HftS
32?
0 .5 a (cd ^
^ M fD 0 a
ftftft^^                    £
OftftSft              1
ftfto6<i        K
££ £ S3"          ft
SS3SS              ft
so d 5 .a
pilcq'S 5 S+-
5 f*i P ° 9 ,fc
£  u p. FG U £
ft pq O S ft ft
-^ ft-3 <3 s <
01 01 co w m a
en   en   en  co   co   cr
p-
a
c
ft
<s
r-
d                  fcfi 5) +-
—              p aC
«        £«£
3         i«'p
C5           H %\ S
P
pc
c
1
If
O
ft .
3 £
S|
ft ft
ftft
■s'gt;
5   QJ —'
ftft     -H
.   CD
a^l      |
da'm      1
s 1 k      a
S5b          <
rG
bflp-.
• E3 rt
hi £
.   C.
CJEC
p5 r=
Cj
ft
>
ft
"ft
©
p
c
0
ft
01
CO
rt
10
^
t-
X
©
a
c
©
1-
c
,
6 >
■a p
CD
ft
Es
CD
SQ
Ol
er
rt
IT
©
t-
a
c-
©
ft
rC
c
r
"ei
S
PI
a
e
c
c
■4
If
cr
b
a
C
c
P
fP
ft
P
c
a
CC
0
r-
ft
c
cr
LT
«
L-
X
p=   "
ft .9"
^ rt rt ft" rt* rH* ft ft w   S
01    CD
z &
V,   rl .
M 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
CC
to
05
w
PH
o
CO
H
A
G
rj
G
G
G
H
G
G
PH
G
o
o
W
o
02
S2
H
H
e
—i
o
I
G
o
o
G
o
02
S*
G
H
G
§
G
G
G
■asodjnj .laq^o
jCUTJ JO SJ9qOR9X
JO saiJB^Bg SpJR.UO.}
S-rtlUJO '^AOQ 0} UOI-J
-ippB in sjooqos q3tH
pttu" 'qSjH JOiutif
'loijaclng 'iCi^uaui
"9I3 ui sasocLm,!
lie joj ^'oiJisia A"q
amiipiiadx^i ifc-joj,
•siootrog
qS|H PUB 'qSlH
loiimc 'lOTiadhg
'JCjR^ii9uia[[.j at
siaqouax jo S8ui;[i;ft
Sp'lRttOJ "^AO-Q
Xq piud lunomv
ft
ft
<
(A
O
w
o
<
ft
m
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
O
ft
ft
ft
ft
"X  sptJJO
-
•XI  apBiQ
'IIIA  sp^JO
rt     in ci
x     eo n
L--       CO rt
rt       COrt
rt
"IIA  ap^O
©
©
fe- rt
oi eo
©
© CO
n 01
01
rt
■IA  aP*-"0
X
CO
X
rH
CO
rH
©
rt
01
©
m ©
rH -rfi
LO
in
'A  sp^JO
©CO b-©
coco co rt
CO
rt
©X
01 rH
©
rH
eo
©
lo eo
CO rt
X
rt
"AI epwo
; © x
■ COCO
©
CO
©
rl
Cl rH
01 rt
-*# 01
rt rH
©
LO
rt CO rl
co rt
X
b-
"III apmjD
: inx
; -rti CO
CO
X
©eo
Ol rH
in
fr-
LO
X
eo
X
eo
■II apui*)
LO X
rt co
CO
X
in
CM
©
01
in
rt
rt x
rt rl
01
©
'I ep^jf)
©Cl
cort
X
rt n
rl rt
b-
rH
Ol
b-
rl CO
Olrt
rt
©
4- "30in!puaq^v
&We<J 03BJ3AV
©b-m©rHrt©rtrtm©co©©
in lo ci x io rt in © rt oi © © © rt
in rt tft ft © tft © © ft © rt io ©' t-
eococococoeocoeoeoeoeoeocoeo
©       XCOXClCOeOb-rtb-XClCl
co     ©b-©©rtOit-©©t-rtLO
eo     oi in ci b^ © rt © co rt co t-^ ft
©     eocoeococococoeorteocico
fe
b-     eob-rteococr-HiortXOi
Cl       ©X©XCOClCO©©b-CO
ci    xx©©rH©'x'©©eo©
ci     oicieocortrtcoeocococo
rt
LO
©
Ol
©
CO
■ 'si-nO
b-eOb-rixnrtcob-n©b-ciCl
rl rl rt 01 rH 01 Cl Cl r-i 01 rl rl Cl Cl
rn       © © Cl © Cl l- Cl X Cl © CO CO
01        rl 01 rl Cl Cl 01 Cl rH C0 rH rl rl
rt
rl        b-b-©b-©rH©©©rHCC
CO        rtnrHrtrHiMrHrHOlClrl
01
©
Ol
'SjCOH
Ol
t- CS
© 01 X rt 01 rH rt 01 Cl © b-
rt 01 rt rt 01 01 01 01 01 Ol rt
co     ©©ci©xco©cob-t-rtrt
•^i        rlrt Cl rHrHrlCO 01 rlrtrl 01
rt
m     © © ci co co lo ci © rt
CO       rt rt 01 01 01 01 01 rt 01
Cl
X LO
eo
eo
Cl
$ -panoane sndtij
jo jaqum\r q.9^
X©©b-©©XLOXLOX©ClOT
cococoeortcocortcortcocortco
X        LO©rt©©©ClrHCSCCb-t-
©     eocoeoeortrtLOrtrtcooieo
X
©     co eo x © © © rt x rt © co
©     co eocort cort rt co rt cort
■*ti
CO
■uoissag ui
S'BAl lOOqOg SifBQ
01 Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl ©                   Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl ?] Cl Cl Cl 01
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©            ©©©©©©©©©©©cs
HHHrlHHHHHHHHH                            rHrHrHrlrHrtrtrlrHrtrlrH
© 01 Cl 01 Cl (?] 01 01 01 01 Cl
©©■©©©c:©©©©©
HHHHHHHHrlrlri
uo  pasnq)
©rtrHLO©COrHrHLO©©LOlOm                     ©©©LO©LOXLOeO©rtinrt                     CCO-<Si-r^-rfTtiy^rt<(X)'ii^tl        fc.
rt©rt©rt© 01 01.CO ib-rlb-©!-                   C01OC0nc0©Xb-©c0©©rt                   ©©©©©©rt©b-©©       ©
S©COrtCOCOClr-©Ci©ClCOXCOX                     t—LO©CO©C0COX©©CleOm                     '^>tO,riirtirTi-tfiC>'rtiCi'rti'rp        lO
rt rt rH rl rl rl               rHrtrt        rl                            Cl rt        rl        rH rH                     rH rH                            ClnrlrlrtrHrtrH        Hr.
■a^uoaiijgQ
X
EC
CJ
1
.  CD
-c
; : p
c
EC
ft
* c
a
OS
t-
ft
X
C
c
■'.'.
ft
X
ft
P
c
c
q
a
ft
X
' ; p!
o
CJ
0)
EC
1?
CJ
1
=5        ft
: c
c
a
XL
r-
< 2
ft
X
; ;    p
c
c,
a
cX
ft
ft
ft!
o
<
ft
H
C
a
c
1^
p?
5
0
rp
o
-
a
X
c
ft
ft'
ft fen
ftO
p:
p
F
tH
fe
ft
a
C
c
ft
ft
ft
"a
i
c
1-9
P
c
f=
c
t-
ft
a
ft
ft
a
pP
pH
w
rl
PH
a
0
PC
c
e
r-
Pti
p
c
I
CO
ft
p
a
X
a
c
p
c
O
ft
c
*c
pC
C
"a
ft
<
X
"e"
P
o
x
K
r^
r=
s
G
C
o
ft
ft
ft
P
a
c
ft"
a
B
ft
p
o
ft
ft
ft
<
1
P
C
a
w
ft
1
c
0
C
0
02
<
ft
a
5
o
0
C
<
ft
P
rt
EC
ft
a.
P
OJ
c—
CJ
-
6
O
c
O
ft
P1;
p-
p?
ft
*
rt
0
PQ
CJ
0
hi +j
c °
°it
P5h
cn cc
Si
a
a
G
"rt
ft
U
r4
O
ft
ft
rt
pft
ft
pft
rt!
P.
p3
ho
O
g
rt!
''*"   OJ
hJ
, -r
ft
O
O
ft
a
©
rt.
P
h
o p
— a
11
SO
d
r*T
©
Cl
COrt
r-   rH
©
X
©
H
01
C
c
s
"a
rt
O
"c
ft
71
M
rt
in
©
fr-
X
©
c
01
ft
"3
CU
xj
01
cr.
rt
©
t-
X
©
c PART IL—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 33
-
-
CM
rt
01        Cl rt
CO      t-
X       CM
fe-     ©rt
cm     rt co
-
© ©©
co cort
rt rt
©
Ol
co cs m
CO CO CO
©
rt
rH
t-
CO
b-
CO
fr-
eo
© 01
rt co
rt ©
rt
in
©
01 X
rt co
©
X
©
CM
©
01
CO rH
COCl
eo t-
rt eo
x in rt
©
© © Cl
rt rt rl
01
©
CM©
01 Ol
Ol
rt
rt
CO
rt
H
rt
rt
© X rt
CM CO rl
rH
CC
CO©
01 rt
CO
CO
© ©
rt CM
X rH
rt
X
in©©
Ol CO rt
t-
eo
CO
Ol © ©
rH rt
Cl X
rH
b-
X
Ol©
CO CO
X
©
rt
CO
H^
CO
rt rH
cort
r-i LO
X
b-
eo rt
COCO
b-
©
CM
CO
01
CO
Ol©rtXCOOl©b-Xb-C0©©b-b-rtC0in
eoxcob-in©©coco©oi©rtrtinx©b-
(X©ci©co'xrtftx'xrtft©'oi©rtoi©'
COCOCOCOCOClCOCOCOCOCOCOCOCOOlrtrtrl
©      oi©rt©inrt©LOrt©©LOrtXLOxco
oi     rt co iOrtXb-eOLomx©b-©eox ci©
©     tftinco©'cob^LO©©'©' in rt ©' fe- rt o' ft
rt     co co co co co co co co co co eo co co eo co co eo
LO
ol     x cm in in in ci ©
rt     ©b-ciiortrtco
©     incort©co'cix
©      cieortrtcocooi
LO
235.68
35.97
31.79
33.14
35.04
35.00
cOLncoco©t-cirtMci©b-oiin
Cl rt rl 01 01 rt 01 Ol Ol Ol 01 rt rt rt
X Cl X
rH r-i
©     b-©xciwco©xb-t-xb-rtXinin©
©       OlClrtOlrHOIOlrtOlrtrtrtOlrHrlrtrl
CO
Ci      © rt Ol 01 X CO Cl
CO       rtrtrtClrtrtrl
CO
t-          rH rl © © C
©       COCl rH rH r-
rH
©rt©b-©mrH©rlrtrtClLO©b-
rtOlOlrtClrtOlrHClClClCOOlOlOl
© ©
rH
©       LO rt X b- b- © Ol Cl CO rt © Cl IO- rt rH X X
LO       rtClrtrti-HrtrtClrt OlClOlrtClOlrHrH
CO
©         rHCO©rHC0rl©
rH         rt Ol CO Cl 01 01 Cl
CO
©      © co n t- i—
rt                rl Ol rH rH
01©©©©ClCOb-CO©rt©b-rtt-XClrt
rtcoeortrtcorteortrtrtrteortcirtcirt
©       Cl rl © © IO Cl X © © rt X ©■ © Cl © CO rt
lo     rt rt co co co rt co rt rt rt co co eo rt co co co
©
in     b-b-cicOrHrtCi
lo     cicortrtrtcoco
©
©      © rt b- CO ©
in     rt co co eo co
Cl
hm -hci -ci -W -*i -ci -ci -ci -W -ci ~w -:<m -ci -ci -ci -w
© Cl CM Cl Cl CM Cl Cl Ol CM Cl CM Cl Cl CM Cl Cl Cl
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©b-
rtrHrlrHrtrlrtrtrHrlrtrHrtrtrtrHrlrt
-Cl -Cl -Cl -Cl -W -Ct HM -Cl -Cl -Cl -Ci -:ci -ci -ci -ci
© © Cl Cl CM Cl C! Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl
©©©©CiCiO©©©©©©©©©©
rlrtrtrirtrtrtrtrtrtrtrlrHrtrHrtrt
-iM -Cl -Cl -Cl -cl -Cl -Cl                     -Cl -Cl -Cl -K1 -"Ci
Cl Cl Cl Cl CM CM Cl                      Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl
©Cl©©©©©                               Ci ©   ©   ©   ©
rtrtrtrtrHrtrt                    rtrHrlrtrl
©ri©rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrt©rtcirtci©©                oici rtXrt©LOLOrtrtrt©nrHrtrt©©                © x © eo n lo rt               cc ^ r-i-^ ^
rtrt©©O©©©©©©©©©X©XC0X                   COfe-t-rtXClrtrt©©©Clrt©©©Clrt                    © X © Ol ©rtrt                    ID © fe- © CO
©S-fe-co b-rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrt©rtrtrtrt©b-               ©xoicici©nrHCirtrt©©cirtoi©x               rtcoinrtoirico               iort©rt©
HrlWrtHrTr-(i-lrt.—irtiH       rt" rt" rl" ft                               Nrl'HfiHHHHHtHHS       rt rt rl rt                         Ol rH rt rt ft rH rt                   Ol rH rH rH
r
1
.   ,   >, eo   «
-3   ft
c
c
cT
eft
c
c.
ft
X
0
C
c
EC
t
CJ
1
<D     .
rj        -,+.
n  1
1
c
a.
£
'c;
: :  : p
c
0
xr
r
X
: p
c
c
0
CC
ft
CJ
1
S '
X
: : :             :f
C
a
X
1
c
X
ft
p
c
c
r
r
p
c
p
p=
a
1
I
ft
p
ft
p*
c
c
p.
ft
1
'[£
r-
c
<
ft
c
p
t
a
ft
ft
H-
p
c
ft
1
p
<
c
ft
ft
0
p*
r
<
0
p.
c.
s
1
ft
a
c
p
a
r*
5
CC
p
c
ft
•p
p
a
p.
q
rt
ft
a
a
r
<
a
E
C
C
a
I
pc
e
c
p
^*
1
x.
ft
«
r
c
■ c
1
PC
1
P
C
«
r-
%
r
p
p=
p
c
S
IS
C
r
P
c
p
c
%
ft
C
C
r
"0
P
r
r
n-
c
c
r
r*
ft
<
-.
c
ft
r
r
<
r
r
ft
P
ft
C
r
a
P
et
r^
p£
r
<
r
r
r
I
ec
t
a
1
C
e
c.
e
ftft
p>
P
c
"t
•r-
P
ft
P
X)
>
*
p>
^
a
fc
a
i-
K
-
h-
|
ft
f
c
ft-
C
<
i
l
X
C
ft
1
ft
<
t
c
t
e
v-
P
a
p
ps
ft
ft
tr
1
Er
h-
r-
K^ft2322p3£
SS?
gpg^p^^gr-
ftft^S^^Sr-^^^^^S^^gg         pej g rt 13 S S 3         ftSeSs
>
p
c
1
r
Oi
cr
rt
IT
©
fr-
a
a
©
CM
I-
rt
1-
CC
t-
p
>
0
OJ
"o
5
eg
O
co
a-
rt
10
©
t-
a
©
c
CM
c
rt
r-
1T
c
b
i-
f
O
fi
CD
|
CO
0.
ec
rt
10
©
t-
b"^
0 >
Sft
0)
ft
•o
M
O
rt!
02
<N
cc
rt
o .S
CD   0
£}   CD
£ B M 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
■3sodjrtj jaqTo
a"ub .10 sjeipuajj
JO S9IJUIHS spjvad?
SJUEIf)  "JAOJCJ OJ UOI.
-ippB Ul siooqog qSiH
pun' 'tpliH joiunjp
'jouacms' 'Aiviuaw
-a\H in s9sodmcx
TIB JOl l'0TJ^SI(I A*q
9.in;ipu3clxa; iinoj.
■sipoqog
qSlH PUB 'q2!H
joiunf 'joiiodng
'jQBt>uatri9{a ul
siaqoBaj. jo soiiic[i!g
SpiBAVOJ  *I|AOf)
Xq pvea Tunouiy
a
«
O
PC
o
<l
H
Z
02
hi
D
O
H
M
&
"X "PB.I3
XI np-eiQ
"IIIA  SP^O
b-
©©
Tt*   CO
©
b-
7
—
"IIA  HP^O
co
b- ©©
co eo ci
©
©
©
rl
"IA  SP^S
rt     oi x
in    rt eo
©
X
XCl rt
rt rt rt
"A  "P^O
CO
rH
m
©
rt
©
XCl
cort
©
X
AI  opujQ
CC rH
COCl
©
in
x m
eoci
CO
©
© rt
rtrt
01
©     eo
CO       Ol
CO
01
III  sp^-if)
© CO
rt Ol
©
CO
rl rt
Ol 01
in
rt
rt rH
"& rH
r-i
rH
©     © ©
©      rtrt
c
1C
©
0.
"II spiug
©Cl
eo
rH
in x
rl rl
CO
CO
rt in
C0 rH
CO
©
rt
© ■
01
•I opuig
so
CO
CO
CO
©Cl
rH CO
in
Irt © ci
:oi rt
©
©
© CO
rt
01
LO
4. •aoirapua^y
A'l.PCI 03BJ3AY
34.37
34.94
34.28
31.00
31.91
33.49
371.02
37.28
35.89
35.45
35.08
39.20
37.G7
32.8G
28.28
'ji     riinmb-xmrHb-©rtco©©©cirt
co     t-co©rtb-b-©©Lo©ci©©rtmx
ci    ©inccoftft©xft©b^©xb^b^©'co
x     cocococococoeococococococococori
Ol
573.29
28.56
33.09
33.39
33.33
©
eo
X
CM
rH
"SP!9
COhOCMWO
HHriHHrH
©        lOia'CrH-rtiO'lCiCO
©       01 rt rt 01 Ol Cl rt rt
01
rt       Xrt©e0t-©©©b-Cl©C0rt©01©
LO       rt 01 Cl CI rt 01 01 Cl rt Cl rt Ol 01 01 Ol rt
rH
©     lo co in ci
rH        rIMCl rH 01
CO
in
fc-
■Bjog
QOHCOOhh
rt CM rt CM rt rH
QO     t- co rt i- ci © ci rt
X        rt Cl Cl rl Cl rl Cl rH
X       01 mb-©rl 01 rtXinXXrHrt©XX
in        CIrHrtrlCMOlOlnClrHClCMClrHrl
©       X b- © rt
rl          rH rH Cl  Cl
CO
co
* 'panOJu9 si!dncx
io jaqura^l J3£T_
O 00 t- Cl Cl CO
CO CO CO CO CO CO
X       ClX©X©©b-Cl
x     rt eo rt co rt co eo co
CO
01      © © b- © X 01 rn &D Cl © rt rt Cl © © X
rH     rt co co eo cort rt cort rtrt rt rt cort rt
CO
O         CO © LO CO
ci     n^tin~!t<
©
LO
•UOISS9g UI
SUA\ IOOipg SABQ
—«. —cm -*. —ci —ei —:c
CM 01 CM 01 01 CM
d a OS 03 03 Cl
rH rH rt rt TH H
Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl 01                   © © 01 01 Cl Cl Cl 01 Cl 01 01 01 01 Cl Cl rl
©©©©©©©©             ©©©©©©©©©©en©©©©©
rtrtrtrtrHrtrtrH                      rtrlrlrHrHrtrtrHrtrHrlr-lrHi-lrlrt
Cl 01 01 01
© © © ©
' (9^«a aunj;
uo pesuq)
. .OBit'S pmaay
HtCrtCDt-CDOOrt                   GO l.O CO rt C3 rt ICO rt                   CDOlOOrtClrtOlrtrtrtOOOrtCCOCOio                   OCDnfrt
O rt CO I- CO 00 CO                   OlCICirtCOOrtO                   CCMClOaOGHCOOCOOOMhOlM                   CC 03 rt O
CO? rt CO C3 OO C3 CO t-                   O CO rt CO Ci tCH rt ^C                   O -OH ICO rt © rt O CO rt rt CO O -He CO r^ rt r-,                   ICO Ci O-rt
.-<.-{                   r*                        Ci r-t r-i r-i       rtrtrH                   CM rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrHrHrt       r-i r^                         rH       rH
•e^0gpj9Q
CC0
P
C
C
tr
r
XZ
k
xr.
1
c
0
1
<3r
x:
: ;  ; £
z
a
xr
B
9          r
""2 "$
1  «
*q    cr
-fe
(-
X
: ;e
c.
xr
t
p-
c
xr
1
X
I
0
r
X
1
-E
E-
ft
c
s
a
Ed
a
<
cc
I
A
CC
PL
<
ft
c
"po
\
I
1
p.
c
1
\
r
). Dewar (pt. time)
0
xr.
'c
C
p.
ft
£
C
ft
ec
-=
ft
a
|C
-o
0
c
p
'5
z
<
PC
1
a
ft
1
4.
pq
.
D. r
r   S
c
a
1
0
ft
c
■*-
i
ft
0
cc
5
xr
p
1
rt
p:
c
t>
ft
1
a
1
1
c
ct
ft
0
CC
C
c
7Z
e
p-
a
c
C
p*
C
Miss P. B
Miss A. I
Miss A. i
Miss M. 1
Miss L. T
Miss A. "\
Miss M. I
k. L. Kir
Miss A. 1\
Miss F. E
Miss L. E
Miss M. C
Miss H. S
Miss V. E
Miss I. M
S. D. Me:
,T. C. Glas
.1. V. Gra
Miss M. t
Miss B.H
Miss E. 1
Miss N. E
Miss M. 1
Mrs. M. I
Miss K. C
Miss V. S
Miss F. JV
Miss M. I
Miss B. 1
Miss B. E
Miss EC. I
F. L. Cur
Miss I. I.
ftft
Oft
S pE
hJ
O
o
PC
o
CX
3.§S
.5 S^
+j   CJ
oft
9-8
11
8 .a
e\m
>
b
a
o
c
1-
r
a
ft
0"
*
if
CC
t-
a
p
I
p
c
c
tE
o
er
•^
t£
«
b
a
c
c
r-
0
ec
•<i
if
CC
H
el
O
02
C-
cr
rt
ol
S
H
O
co
H
iz;
P
a
K
a
E
PS
<
N
j
o
c
W
o
03
c72
w
H
hH
D
I
Ul
hH1
O
o
a
o
DQ
PH
a
M
EH
r5
s
s
hi
H PART II.—STATISTICAL RETURNS.
M 35
rtL001X©t-©rH©©©Clb-01rtClrt©m©b-©
X©©©©©Cl©b-Ol©rtC0©XrtlOb-©Xb-rt
© x'©'ciinx'b-cob^©rtLoft©'cirt©^ciinrt©
cocortcocococortcortrtcocoeortrtrtcocortrtrt
ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci ci
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©
rH rH rHrHrtrHrlrHrHrHrHrHrH rt rt rl rl rl rl
©rtrtLOrtrtrtrt 10 ©rtCOrHrtLOrtrirtOl©
C0©©b-©©©©rHCl©C0Ol©rtX©©Xrt
o-Xrt ci ©rtrtrtrtri©rtx© 01 ricocicirt in
©©
X m
x ©
©rtrtcici©©rtrtrtrt©rtrtrt
Cl©©XXCl©©rl©©CO©©©
©rtcirtrt©LOrt©rtrt©rtrtrt
c^^p. a
<
ft
ft
ft £
fti
ftl^ftS^rJ^Sft^ftftSft^S
Mi*5,'      ■■rrl      cJpiHplHHHU       . « '
CD   CO   !
iaicj   ;   ;   .   . m h o o 2
CT] W  j!   I? -3 r-   p   p   c   C   '-   •- ""
.  CD   cd .2 .2  ^   ^   P   "'
COrtin©b-X©©rtClC0rtlO©b-X©
S3 | S'
ftftftft-HBOOpfiflft
S^'^ddMM^SpiW'ffi^^
ODOP5S3P3BS
B  C- H  '
iz
OhchJ
Hcihjpq
r^hi
hCJrtCMWrtlC0COt-0CC3©—cCMCOrtlOCCt-XCXOrtCM
6.2
HH    b.
«Ph
5&
H
cu
O
O   CD
rO   J3
Eh H M 3G
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1932-33.
' I
JO s
SJUBJ
-ippu
pu
'JOI
-*S
II"
am
1
jc
siaqa
A
■asodmj Jaq^o
tiB jo sianoiraj,
LTBIRg spjRA\0^
3 -^AOO 0% UOTJ
rllSpoqogqgiH
B 'qSijj Joiuhj*
adng" "^iRjuam
^[j ui sasodJti^x
JOJ .jOEtySTQ iq
ipuadxg p^o^
■spoqog
3iH PtiB 'qStH
mnf '.ioi.ior[i.ig
V3& JO saiJRIKg
sp.llLUO^  "JAOf)
^ ptud limomy
H
Q
-4
M
0
W
o
•5
H
g
03
1-1
p
Bh
Ph
O
«
«
p
P5
'X  »pi«0
■XI  aP^O
•IIIA epi"0
IIA apwf)
'IA  epiuo
b- rt b-
eort rt
in      rt rt rt rt
oi     rt rt rt co
©    ©©x   :
©    rt rt co   :
rH
'A »P«0
in cm
rt rt
t-
X
ci ©rt
Tj, -^ ^
©
01
in m ri
*AI  apwQ
in
rt
rH
-a
©
X
: © ©
! rt CO
in
rt
01
III   9P»*D
© ©
rH CO
©
fe
eort
©   :
eo   :
^
11 ap*Jf)
© m   :
•oh rt   ;
rn
X
©mm
©
eo
•I ap^jo
© X ©
rt ci co
©
© rt eo   :
co rt rt   :
eo
Cl
^ -aauepuacriy
iClPQ aSBjaAy
co©mrtrt©b-incife-rtt-©rt
in x © ci x x ci co lo I- lo ci x x
rt ft 01 X ©' X © rt CO -rA LO CO 01 ©
cocortcortcocococoeocooicoco
x     eoeoiorteoLOb-rtn©cot-cico©ciineo©   :
co     ©ci©©©cico©cin©Xri©rtcoci©©    :
©     01 ft fe-- rt co" ft ?i iq © rt co in co -A © © © ci ©    i
©     rt rt co co eo co rt co co co co co co co co eo co co eo   :
lo                                                                                        :
©     © oi ri c © o
©       rt b- 01 CO n Cl
00        ©' ift rt" © rA ft
©     co coco rt rtrt
©
"SPIO
^rH'^CO'^-rtit'CiCD'rliCOKiCDCO
rtOlOlOlrtOlrlrtrH 01 rtrH 01 rt
©       rtb-XlO©©Cl©©Xb-COXb-Xn©01©     :
©       Ol rt Ol rt rt 01 01 01 01 rt Cl rt rl 01 rt Cl Cl rt Cl     .'
oi                                                                           ;
io     © © © rt co ©
X       Ol 01 01 rt 01 01
CO
•B^og
CO©rH10©rHCOb-rtrH©CO©CO
ClCMClCMClClClrHClClCOrlrHCl
CO        ©t-©©C0©Cl©O©b-ClrH©b--fC0©C0      I
©         Cl  Cl rH  rl Cl Cl  Cl Cl  rH rH rl  CO Cl rt Cl Cl rH Cl Cl       ',
co                                                                           :
■Hi      © © X n Cl n
©       Cl CM rH CO Cl CM
rt
He "paipjua siidiij
jo .iaqum^ cjax
b- r-i b- IO Cl LO © © © LO © X © rH
C^Ttir^Tti-rti-tti-rtiCri-rfi^ti-rtiC-iCa-'ti
©    rt rt rt rt cn © rt © <o rt rt in os cpio in © rt eo   :
©     rt rt rt eo rt rt rt rt co co rt rt co -^ -^ ^i co rt rt    ;
in                                                                                 :
©     © © x lo m ri
x     rt rt eo rt rt rt
b-
•uoissag ui
SBAi XOOqOg SA"T3Ct
Ol Cl 01 Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl Ol Cl Cl Cl 01
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©
01 01 01 Cl 01 Ol 01 01 01 Ol Cl Cl Cl Cl Cl 01 Ol 01 oi     :                   Cl Cl 01 Cl Cl Cl
©©©©©©■©©©©©©©©©©©©©   1              ©©©©©©
■(al^H  aun£
uo  pasnq)
A\lBTBg    JBIIUUy
iarHrH'tirtiCirH'<tir-'rtir^rHCC
©rt©©© oi ©©rt©XrtX
ae-incoci rtrt© ci rtrirtconeo
OlrtrtrHrlrlrlrlrHnrlrHrH
b-                   CSH^TriCOi»^QT)l'<lHOHrH'!t,T)lc7.'*HCr.                   C~i 'rf C2i CZ> ^ r~t
©               ©rt©Oeoxnci©©©ci©rt©©ri©©rH               eo©©©©©
in             xcortrt©eo©©cirtci©cicocirtcOrtcix             b-rtLomcici
04-      rH rH        rHrtrlrHrlrHrtrHrtrHrlrlrHrl                            Clrtrlrlrtrl
■9JB0IJICJJ00
d
1-
i
CJ
<x.
i
St
x\
EC
p.'
ft
d
: s *:
O  «
CJ   p.
CD ■-
ECft
c
CD
bl
s   ^
9     p
o        °
ft      W
ft
X
: : p1
c
CJ
CD
xn
ft
X
c
CJ
CD
05
S
CD
xs t
<ft
c
CJ
X
p'
ft
EC     EH
H-
ft
C
O
CJ
CD
05
ft
•c                       i
O                                          "7
05                                 fe
7. ft
ft
ft
o
<
ft
tH
1
A
PP;
«P
c
BsP
: *
h ft
s s
•:-
ft
r
C
C
S
C
&■
6
-
a
c
rtl
rt
ft
o
r".
ft
c
CD
ft
ft
Is
p*
c
ft
<
o
or
rrj
CD
ft
ft
ft
a
P.
rt)
0
d
ri
i e
bl S
5. P
S^
fti.
ft Hs
rdp^
o
o
ft
'■-
%
O
<
pft
f-
s
c
ft
rtl
P.
be
o
B
d
jp
CD
rig
'd
R
o
•c
o
!3
<
a
M
03
M
CJ
o
ft
d
c
P4
ft
CJ
ft
a
c
a
ft
ft
r
ri
c
o
ft C
ft c
3^
ft hH
a
X.
rt
PC
H
pC
'i
05
Is
ft
in
ft
p£
a
rt"
«
6
ft
p*
r-
"5
"c
e
a
ft
p*
In
:= P
rt rtt
||
h,"W
c/J  en
m en
C
ft
p?
i
05
&
'>.
rt
PC
a)
T
<
<
B. Fletcher (part time)
P. C. Feast	
a
c
ft
0
rt
ft
ft
it
6
id
=3 e
j|
iri
n cc
ft
o
0
w
D
OS
rt C
■Shin
!g
h h.
° s
SpC
0
1 ct
rt
in
©
fe-
X
©
c
r-
-- e
h r
:--
r
s
cd
■a
V
ft!
w
r:
-r
©
1- 30
©
c
OJ
c:
-f i-
r-
b-
X
a
ft
0
a
c.
ft
C
ft
Ol
;-
•?
n©
£
o
O
_