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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1935

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
BEPOET
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1933
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA.  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
GORDON McG. SLOAN,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1934. Office of the Game Commissioner,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1934.
Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. BRYAN WILLIAMS,
Game Commissioner. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
1933.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
In spite of the continuance of the depression and the many drawbacks with which the Game
Department has had to contend, it is highly satisfactory to be able to report that game conditions
are generally excellent. A better idea of the general conditions is given in the reports of the
officers in charge of the various divisions.
From these reports it is very apparent that, with the exception of deer and pheasants on the
Coast, the condition of game and fur-bearers is as good as we could possibly expect. Big game
in particular is in a flourishing condition and our experiments in stocking new country with
wapiti and mountain-sheep appear to be highly successful.
Our system of trap-line registration is not only meeting with general approval, but is producing good results with practically every species of fur-bearing animal.
On the whole, while many improvements which we had hoped for have not been possible,
we can still claim that British Columbia is the finest game and fishing country on this Continent.
The close co-operation between the Provincial Police and Game Wardens continues as
formerly. Game Wardens have this year done a considerable amount of valuable work in
assisting the police, and, on the other hand, the police have unquestionably rendered the Game
Department most valuable assistance, particularly in districts where we are not able to afford to
have our own officers stationed.- Without their assistance not only would game suffer, but there
would also be a further loss of revenue.
In addition to once more expressing appreciation to the Commissioner of Provincial Police,
the Assistant Commissioner, and all officers and men of that Force, our thanks are also due to
members of the various Game Associations who have given us most valuable assistance and
encouragement in our work.
" IN MEMORIAM."
It is with deep regret that the death of two members of the Game Department during the
year is reported.
Game Warden A. S. Cochran, after serving with the Department before and during the
World War, was reappointed in 1929 and served as Game Warden in the Windermere District
until June 18th, 1933, on which date he died after a brief illness.
Mr. T. H. M. Conly, after approximately sixteen years' service with the Department as a
clerk, passed away after a brief illness on July 15th, 1933.
ANNUAL MEETING.
The annual meeting of the various Inspectors and Sub-Inspectors in charge of each division
of the Province was again held this year, when everything which in any way affects the work
of this Department was thoroughly discussed, and many problems over which there was a considerable difference of opinion were satisfactorily settled.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
The situation with regard to fur-bearing animals is quite satisfactory. There is not the
slightest doubt that our system of trap-line registration is still producing most excellent results.
Iu fact, it has unquestionably been the salvation of our fur-bearing animals, notwithstanding
the fact that the stock of certain classes of fur-bearers, such as fox, fisher, and lynx, depends to
a great extent on their food-supply.
While there was a decrease of 8S3 beaver on which royalty was paid, this does not mean
that the beaver themselves have decreased in numbers. In fact, the very reverse is the case.
Unfortunately for the trappers, many of whom now have numbers of beaver on their lines, there
has been so little demand for this class of fur that the price of the pelts has remained very low,
though practically all other, pelts have been steadily increasing in value. Consequently, the
majority of trappers prefer to let their beaver live until better prices can be obtained.
Due to the large increase in the value of marten-pelts, the trappers who for several years
have been taking care of their stock as they should have reaped their reward.    Altogether, I 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
royalty was collected on 11,433 marten, which is far above the average for the past ten years and
the greatest catch on record since 1928, when prices were at their highest.
This has also been a record year for silver fox, the majority of which are ranch-bred. The
average number of silver fox marketed in the past ten years is only 329, but last year 917 were
marketed, and this year the number rose to 2,174. The prices of these pelts have increased
enormously, and apparently the fox-farming industry in British Columbia has not suffered in
spite of the depression.
Cross and red fox, practically all wild stock, have also been marketed in greater numbers.
The number of lynx has also improved considerably, though the total did not come up to
expectations, as the splendid food-supply of rabbits, on which these animals are principally
dependent for food, should have brought an even greater increase.
Our records show that 17,066 mink were taken this year, which is nearly 2,000 over the
average for the past ten years and the largest catch since 1926.
There was a small increase in the number of fisher taken, but a decrease was noted in the
number of weasel and muskrats, the latter being principally due to winter freezing. In spite
of the decrease, however, the number of both species taken was considerably higher than the
ten-year average.
As the price of furs seems to be steadily rising, there is every prospect for a successful
trapping season next year.
DEER ON THE COAST.
During the past year the Coast deer have been suffering considerably from disease. While
there has been quite a mortality on the islands in the vicinity of the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Island (and the west coast in particular) has suffered most severely. In that area
hundreds of deer have died during the past year, the mortality being principally due to a
disease commonly known as fluke-liver, and to a lesser degree to a sickness caused by lung-
worms. These epidemics occur periodically and are something over which we have no control,
but which will probably disappear in a short time, when a rapid increase of our stock will be
noted.
Unfortunately, disease does not seem to have attacked the deer in those particular districts
where farming is carried on and they are becoming a nuisance.
PHEASANTS.
For the past two years, while our winters on the Coast have not been exceptionally severe,
they have been sufficiently so to cause a small mortality among our pheasants. This loss, however, would not have affected the stock to any material extent had we not had two of the worst
breeding seasons that have occurred in many years. This year, at the very time that we wanted
fine weather, there was a succession of storms which caused serious losses among the newly
hatched chicks. Consequently, the pheasant-shooting was not nearly as good as we should like
to have it.
It is impossible to keep up a stock of this species of game bird unless you have a good
breeding season, but unfortunately most people do not realize this fact and the Game Department
gets blamed because the pheasant-shooting is poor.
It is true that vermin is prolific, and this has also had a very serious effect on the stock of
birds, but at no time in the history of the Province has so much attention been given to the
destruction of vermin. All Game Wardens spend a great deal of their time at this work, and
they have been ably assisted by private individuals. Still, no matter how much vermin is killed
or how many birds are released from the Game Farm, a good breeding season is of vital
importance.
While the Coast has suffered from a lack of pheasants, the reverse has been the case in the
Interior of the Province. Every district had an increased number of birds, particularly the
North Okanagan, where last season's shooting was probably the best ever known since pheasants
were introduced on this Continent.
CAPERCAILZIE.
In last year's report mention was made of the possibility of some of the capercailzie which
were imported in the year 1906 having survived. This year further reports have been received
in this connection. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 7
Birds which were believed to be large grouse were seen some distance up the Capilano River
in the vicinity of the City of Vancouver, and the description given was very much like that of
capercailzie. Another report came from the Alberni District of Vancouver Island, where two
birds said to resemble small turkeys were seen. The third report was made by a man who has
shot capercailzie in Norway and consequently knows the birds well. This gentleman positively
identified one of these birds in the Cariboo District where it had been brought to his attention*
by two prospectors. Yet another report was received from a trapper in the Cariboo District,
but unfortunately this man died before a proper description of the birds was obtained.
From the above it appears that some of these birds are still in existence.
DISTRIBUTION OF GAME.
Seventeen beaver were trapped on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve and liberated in the
Central and Southern Interior districts of the Province.
Twenty-five wapiti were obtained from the Dominion Parks Branch at Wainwright, Alberta,
and liberated at the north end of Adams Lake. In addition, thirty-one of this species of game
were captured near Penticton, where they were doing damage to the orchards, and were liberated
in the vicinity of Princeton, in the Similkameen District.
Fourteen sheep were captured at Squilax and were liberated at Squam Bay, Adams Lake.
Nineteen fallow deer were captured on James Island and liberated on South and North
Pender and Saturna Islands.
RESIDENT LICENCE FEES.
During the past year there has been an agitation to have the ordinary firearms licence fee
reduced to its old price of $2.50. The increase in the fee for this licence was made in accordance
with the wishes of a large majority of the Game Associations of this Province, who wished to
see an increased staff of Game Wardens, a better Game Farm, with the consequent release of an
increased number of pheasants, and a general improvement of the whole work of the Department. It was hoped that, by raising the licence fee, money for this purpose would be forthcoming, but unfortunately no one could foresee the continuance of the depression and that the
extra dollar charged for this licence, which in the years of plenty would never have been noticed,
would be the means of preventing numbers of men from buying licences. Nor could any one
foresee the necessity for issuing such a number of free licences to prospectors and the effect this
would have on our revenue.
At any rate, instead of increasing our revenue, we have had a small decrease and the much-
needed improvements which were anticipated have not come about. On the other hand, further
economies have had to be made.
Just what effect the dollar increase actually had on our revenue is problematical. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that there are just as many to-day agitating for a reduction of the
licence fee as there were formerly for the increase.
Had prosperity continued, while we might not have had the large increase that we anticipated, it is not at all likely that we would have had any loss. However, under present
conditions there is a great possibility that some reduction of our licence fees would result in a
larger number being sold and an increase of revenue.
REVENUE.
Though we hoped that there would be no further decrease in our revenue, unfortunately
such was not the case.
While there was a small loss in revenue from our resident licence foes and also in the sale
of confiscated furs, our great loss was in non-resident licences and trophy fees, which, in all,
amounted to $3,703.
Royalty collections and fur-traders' licence fees were higher, however, so that the total
decrease approximated only $1,500.
The prospects for increased revenue next year are considerably brighter than they have been
for several years past. The increase in the price of pelts makes it probable that more money
will be collected from trappers' licences and royalty.
In addition, a far greater number of inquiries have been received from prospective nonresident hunters and fishermen this year than for several years past. Many letters of inquiry
have already come from various parts of the United States and Europe, and also a few from India, China, and South Africa, so that, with the general improvements which now seem to
have started, our receipts should show a steady annual increase.
GAME FISH CULTURE BRANCH.
The report of the officer in charge of the newly established Game Fish Culture Branch of
the Game Department should not only be of great interest, but highly satisfactory to those who
are anxious to see an improvement in our stock of sporting fish.
Owing to the small amount of money received from the sale of resident anglers' licences, it
has been impossible to meet the numerous requests from every part of the Province for assistance
in improving fishing conditions, but these requests have all received consideration, and when
more funds are available an effort will be made to meet the requirements of those considered
worthy of development.
Owing to the necessity for rigid economy, the purchase of an oxygen-tank for the transportation of our fish to the waters where they are to be planted was not possible, but before
long such a tank will become an absolute necessity, as it will not only be an extremely expensive
matter to transport fingerlings in ordinary fry-cans, but the mortality will be far greater, to say
nothing of the excessive labour in aerating the cans en route. If our operations are to continue
as successfully as they promise to be, an oxygen-tank is necessary, and would undoubtedly pay
for itself within the first year owing to the present excessive cost of hiring trucks to transport
the fry-cans.
Once again the Department wishes to extend its most sincere thanks to Major J. A. Motherwell, Chief Supervisor of the Dominion Fisheries Department, and members of his staff, for
their co-operation and readiness to assist in every possible way. We have also received much
valuable advice from Dr. W. A. Clemens, Director of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo,
and all members of his staff.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
By J. W. Graham, Officer Commanding.
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " A " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1933.
Game Animals.
Wapiti (Elte).—These animals have shown a decided increase on Vancouver Island. They
are reported as spreading from the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, and from observations made by
two Game Wardens while on patrol up the Nitinat River last July, elk were found quite
numerous at the headwaters and west of this river. Many reports have been received regarding
wapiti at Nanaimo Lakes, which are believed to number about forty. The smaller bands along
the west coast have all been reported on the increase, while in the Courtenay District, where elk
have been observed, it has been noticed that there is a spreading of smaller bands, particularly
around Buttle Lake and Tsable River. The larger bands in the Elk Valley and up the Oyster
River have shown an increase this year.
Bear.—Bear are reported fairly plentiful throughout most of the districts of Vancouver
Island and have shown an increase in the Courtenay area. A few complaints were received of
damage done to sheep by these animals.
Brown or grizzly bear are found only in that part of the Division around Knight, Kingcome,
and Seymour Inlets, and also in Thompson and Mackenzie Sounds, where they are fairly
numerous.
Deer.—Reports have been received of deer not being as plentiful as in previous years. In
the Courtenay District during the last few years large numbers of deer have died from two
distinct forms of disease, locally described as " liver-fluke" and " lung-worms." Cougar also
have no doubt been the cause of the decrease in deer in some parts of Vancouver Island.
Around the agricultural areas deer are still fairly plentiful and have been the cause of many
complaints from farmers. Naphthalene flakes have been used at times to keep deer out of the
fields and in some instances have proven quite successful in preventing any further damage
taking place.
Mountain-goat.—On the Shaw Creek Game Reserve mountain-goat have not been observed
away from the high levels where they originally took up their abode after liberation.    Owing to REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
the amount of snow in that vicinity at the time when a patrol was made into the reserve last
summer, the Game Wardens were unable to reach the usual haunts of these animals, but it is
believed that they are increasing slowly.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—A good increase in some portions of the Division has been noted in respect to
beaver. Complaints have been received of these animals doing damage to private property and
to public roads.
Otter.—These animals are scarce throughout the Division.
Marten.—While not plentiful, marten are to be found throughout the Division.
Mink.—These animals are not very plentiful, although in certain sections good catches have
been obtained.
Racoon.—Throughout the Division racoon are fairly numerous.
Muskrats.—Muskrats are plentiful and continue to be a menace to the agricultural lands,
but have been trapped quite extensively by trappers and others under authority of special
permits when these animals have been found to be doing damage.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—These birds are reported as being fairly plentiful in the Cowichan and
Alberni Districts and scarce along the west coast of Vancouver Island. Cold weather prevailed
in all districts during the nesting season, which resulted in late hatches and small birds.
Grouse (Ruffed).—No increase has been observed in any part of the Division and these birds
are not plentiful.
Quail.—In the vicinity of the City of Victoria quail are plentiful, but in other portions of
the Island are scarce.
Partridges.—European partridges have only been reported in the Saanich District and in
the vicinity of Victoria and are not plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—In the higher mountain regions of Vancouver Island a few ptarmigan are to
be found.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Throughout the whole of this Division ducks have been reported as plentiful.
Brant.—Brant are considered scarce. In the months of March and April, during the
migration period, large flocks of these birds have been observed going north to their breeding-
grounds.
Geese.—These birds are scarce, with the exception of the west coast of Vancouver Island,
where they have been reported fairly plentiful.
Swans.—Quite a number of swans have been seen in small flocks in the Campbell Lake,
Courtenay, Qualicum, and Cowichan Lake areas.
Vermin.
Cougar are reported as still quite numerous and bounty was paid during the year for the
destruction of 501 cougar on Vancouver Island, while a number were destroyed by Game
Wardens. Many complaints were received of damage done by these animals both to private
stock and to game. These complaints were investigated by Game Wardens and in a number of
eases with good results.
Wolves are increasing and several have been destroyed in the Alert Bay District. Complaints have been received from Heriot Bay regarding a number of sheep killed by these animals.
During the year 294 domestic cats gone wild have been destroyed by Game Wardens.
Noxious birds destroyed by Game Wardens during the year are as follows:—
Crows   530 Hawks      43
Ravens   ..'.     77 Owls       3
Eagles        20
Game-protection.
Continuous patrols have been carried out during the year and, despite the large territory
to be covered by each Game Warden, good results have been obtained. The unemployed situation made the work of the Game Wardens far more difficult than in past years.    Eighty-four I 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
informations were laid, resulting in seventy-eight convictions for violations of the Game and
Fishery Acts and regulations. Nine of the convictions were obtained under the Special Fishery
Regulations and sixty-nine under the " Game Act," eight of which were for violations of section
11 (2) of the Act.
Game Propagation.
During the year 885 pheasants were liberated on Vancouver Island from the Elk Lake Game
Farm, as follows :—
Saltspring Island      70 Nanaimo     88
Duncan  149 Parksville      54
North Pender Island       6 Courtenay      88
Victoria-Sidney  268 Alberni     88
Sooke     30 Ladysmith     44
All of the birds released in the above-mentioned districts were in excellent condition.
Game Reserves.
In this Division the game reserves are Mount Douglas Park, Little Saanich Mountain, Elk
and Beaver Lakes, Shaw Creek, Strathcona Park, and the Forbidden Plateau. Apart from these
reserves, there are also the following bird sanctuaries in the Victoria District: Victoria Harbour
Bird Sanctuary, Shoal and Roberts Bay, and Esquimalt Lagoon.
As these reserves are carefully patrolled they have proven a great asset from a standpoint
of game-conservation.
Fur Trade.
There is not a great deal of trading in fur carried on in this Division, as the majority of fur
trapped is shipped direct to Vancouver or other outside markets. Royalty is collected only in
small amounts, due to the fact that this tax is only collected on export or upon shipment to a
tanner within the Province.
Fur-farming.
A number of fur-farms are still being operated on Vancouver Island, and although the low
price of fur has been a drawback, some of these fur-farmers seem to be doing fairly well.
Registration of Trap-lines.
In this Division there are approximately 484 registered trap-lines. The system of registration has proven most successful and is a great aid in the conservation of fur.
Registration of Guides.
Very little information can be given under this heading, due to the fact that there are
practically no registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
Many patrols were made by the Game Wardens during the year, but two special patrols
were made up the West Coast, one into Shaw Creek Game Reserve and one to Port Renfrew by
way of the Shaw Creek Game Reserve.    These patrols have had a very good effect.
Hunting Accidents.
There was but one hunting accident in this Division during the year, which resulted in the
death of one Stanley Bayne, of Beaver Creek, Alberni, B.C.
On June 29th, 1933, Mr. Bayne was reported shot in his field by some person or persons
unknown. Mr. Bayne was conveyed to the West Coast Hospital, where he died the following
day. After investigation Ralph Emery was placed under arrest on a charge of " manslaughter,"
and a preliminary hearing was held at Alberni, when he was committed for trial at the Assize
Court in Nanaimo.
It was found that Emery had been out driving and had taken a rifle along with the intention of shooting a deer which he had often seen in the Bayne field. Two shots were fired at the
deer, which was in a direct line with the Bayne farm, and unfortunately Mr. Bayne was in that
direction and was hit by one of the bullets which resulted in his death. On October 12th, 1933, Emery was tried at the Assize Court in Nanaimo and was found
" not guilty."
Emery was not a British subject and was not the holder of a firearms licence. He was
therefore charged under the " Game Act" and was fined the sum of $60, which he paid.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The usual complaints have been received from farmers regarding damage done by deer.
Doe deer especially are becoming a nuisance to the farmers and many requests have been
received for an open season on doe deer. These deer breed in close proximity to farms and
scarcely ever feed in the daytime, but at night leave their young and make raids on the farmers'
crops.    It might be advisable to open the season on doe deer during 1934.
Game conditions have been fairly good and, despite the many unemployed, the licence returns
show a little decrease over 1932, but in some parts of the Division returns show an increase. A
close check has been kept ou the issuance of farmers' ordinary firearms licences and prospectors'
firearms licences.    Very few non-resident firearms licences were issued.
The deer-tag system now in use is a decided improvement, although in some instances it has
been brought to notice where the tags have been experimented with and infractions committed.
This, however, might be avoided by some slight amendment to the regulations.
All parts of the Division have been continually patrolled and complaints investigated and
attended to by the Game Wardens in their respective districts.
Considering the large area being patrolled by the eight Game Wardens in this Division,
results have been most satisfactory. I again wish to express my appreciation of the co-operation
and support given me throughout the year by the Game Wardens, and I also wish to thank the
members of the B.C. Police Department for their assistance and co-operation.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division for
year ended December 31st, 1933.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Mule-deer are plentiful and white-tail deer are also numerous, with the exception of
Kettle Valley, Okanagan, and Similkameen Districts, where they are comparatively scarce. It
is unanimously conceded that deer are more abundant in all sections than at any time within
the memory of the oldest residents. This does not refer to specific localities like the Kettle
Valley, which has always been a favourable winter ground for these animals, but to some
sections where a score or more years ago deer were almost a rarity. During the past year
numerous complaints were received from farmers and fruit-growers in the Kootenays, Arrow
Lakes, and Okanagan sections, particularly with reference to damage done by deer during the
early spring and summer with regard to browsing on young fruit-trees. In this connection
naphthalene flakes were supplied gratis by the Game Department and in the majority of cases
were very efficacious in keeping deer from orchards and garden-plots.
Moose.—Moose are still increasing and extending their range and have definitely established
themselves in sections where they were hitherto unknown, and there is no reason why they
should not continue to spread in suitable sections of the country.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are particularly plentiful in the Rocky Mountain section of the East
Kootenay and continue to increase and extend their range.
Caribou.—These animals did not suffer to any great extent from the short open season last
fall and are in sufficient numbers to permit an open season next year.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are well established and distributed over the Division, and
with the exception of the Similkameen, Lower Okanagan, and Boundary Districts are definitely
numerous.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals are well established in the Rocky Mountains and are particularly plentiful in that area adjacent to the Elk River Game Reserve. In other sections,
owing to the lack of suitable terrain, they are not numerous. Small bands are to be found in
the watershed north and east of the Upper Arrow Lakes and the headwaters of Sheep Creek
north of Rossland, the vicinity of Okanagan Falls, and in the Ashnola section of the Similka- I 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
meen.    From information received their numbers are not appreciably diminishing, although no
great increase has been noted.
Bear.—Black and brown bear are well distributed, as also are grizzly on the higher ranges.
These latter-mentioned animals are not plentiful in the Similkameen, Okanagan, and Boundary
Districts.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The main fur-catch for this section of the Province is mink, marten, lynx, and weasel, and
these fur-bearers may be regarded as fairly plentiful. Otter and fox are trapped occasionally,
while fisher and wolverine are sparsely distributed. Beaver and muskrats are definitely on the
increase. With the present system of trap-line registration the danger of overlapping any
particular locality has been limited to a great extent, and there is no reason why the 500 trap-
lines in this Division should not continue to produce a varying income for the individual trappers
—according to the price of fur—for an indefinite period.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue, ruffed, and Franklin's grouse are well able to stand the present open seasons, and
while in the neighbourhood of the larger settlements their numbers are not numerous, they are
still firmly established and apparently in no danger of undue decimation by hunters.
There are a few flocks of prairie-chicken in the East Kootenay Valley, but are not numerous,
although they appear to be increasing. A few of these birds are. also found in the Boundary
District.
Ptarmigan are to be found in small numbers throughout the Division, but owing to their
comparative inaccessibility they are little hunted.
Pheasants.—These birds are abundant in the Similkameen and Lower Okanagan and have
increased considerably in the Creston and Grand Forks area, where the initial stock was released
a few years ago.
Partridges.—With the exception of the Lower Okanagan and Similkameen Districts, where
these birds are in fair numbers, they do not appear to show any inclination to establish themselves in the remainder of the Division. Partridges are often reported in the Boundary, Arrow
Lakes, West Kootenay, East Kootenay, and Columbia Valley, but it is considered that these
birds are more or less transient in those sections.
Quail.—Quail appear to be holding their own in the Lower Okanagan and Similkameen,
where they are found in fair numbers.
Migratory Game Bikds.
The main nesting-places for water-fowl are the Lower Okanagan, the Duncan River at the
head of Kootenay Lake, and the Kootenay River from Kootenay Lake to the International
Boundary, and the Columbia River from its source in Columbia Lake to a short distance below
Golden. However, a myriad of small lakes and sloughs throughout the Division also supply
considerable nesting-sites for limited numbers of geese and ducks. There was a marked and
definite increase during the past season both in the local-bred ducks and migratory water-fowl
from the north. Very good sport was obtained, particularly in the Creston area and in the East
Kootenay north from Canal Flats. A few swans were noted in migration, but do not appear to
nest in this Division, with the exception of the Vaseaux Lake Bird Sanctuary.
Vermin.
Ninety-four hawks, 745 crows, 832 magpies, 71 owls, 18 eagles, 64 cats, 20 dogs, 54 coyotes,
and 3 cougar have been destroyed by Game Wardens on patrol during the year. Coyotes taken
by trappers also amounted to 286.
Game-protection.
The present period of depression has been particularly trying from a standpoint of game-
protection, and a general impression appears to be current that the Game Regulations are more
elastic than in previous years. A bombardment of requests to kill deer for food during the
close season, not only from country residents and prospectors, but also from people in the urban
centres, who feel that they should also participate. Needless to say, while worthy cases have
been given every consideration, considerable caution has been exercised and any permits issued
by Game Wardens have been strictly governed by local game conditions. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 13
The position of the Game Wardens in endeavouring to enforce the Game Regulations has
been far from envious, especially in districts like Fernie, where the closing-down of the coalmines has resulted in a large proportion of residents being dependent entirely on relief measures.
A number of prosecutions in that section, as well as in other parts of the Division, resulted in
the paradoxical situation of the Game Warden who laid the information and prosecuted for a
violation of the " Game Act" also requesting the presiding Magistrate to exercise leniency on
account of the distressing circumstances of the accused. In this connection a number of deferred
sentences were imposed for game violations during the year.
The Game Wardens have been very active throughout the Division and patrolled constantly
both winter and summer. Convictions for offences under the " Game Act " during the year
numbered seventy-eight; this total also including prosecutions under the Special Fishery
Regulations.
Game Propagation.
As well as stocking the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand Forks, and Creston Districts,
pheasants from the Provincial Game Farm were also released at suitable points on the Upper
and Lower Arrow Lakes and Columbia Valley. These birds are doing well and have increased
their numbers since being liberated. It is hoped fresh stock will be turned loose next spring,
and it is believed that the above-mentioned areas, particularly the Columbia Valley, will prove
as successful an experiment as in the case of the Okanagan District.
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve has been patrolled constantly both summer and winter by the
Game Wardens stationed at Fernie and Canal Flats. This area is a magnificent stretch of well-
watered mountainous country with abundant pasturage. Not only is it an ideal propagation
area for elk, moose, sheep, goat, and deer, but it offers a sanctuary for fur-bearing animals. Its
value is amply proven by the abundance and variety of game both within and without its
borders. The big-game hunting in the White River area and the Palliser Valley adjacent to
the Game Reserve cannot be surpassed for sheep, goat, elk, moose, and both white-tail and
mule deer.
Patrolling the game reserve during the winter-time is an arduous and difficult matter on
account of the numerous streams, rough going, and, in places, heavy snowfall. In this connection Game AVarden Sinclair, of Canal Flats, is to be commended for the capable manner in
which he has continually made extensive and arduous patrols during severe winter weather.
These patrols are necessary to ensure that the stock of fur-bearing animals, particularly beaver
in the Middle and North Forks of the White River, are not molested by poachers.
The deer sanctuary along the Wigwam River, near Elko, is and has been a great benefit as
a winter yarding-ground for deer, particularly during the later part of the open season. There
is a strong feeling among the sportsmen that this sanctuary should be converted into a game
reserve, which would simplify the task of protective measures thereon, as at the present time
hunters are not debarred from taking firearms across the sanctuary or closed area.
Vaseaux Lake in the Lower Okanagan and the lake-front at Nelson still continue to
demonstrate their great worth as sanctuaries for water-fowl.
Fur Trade.
The bulk of the fur trade in this Division goes to Vancouver and comparatively little fur is
exported direct to the Prairie Provinces or the United States. Since the price of fur has shown
an upward trend a number of local dealers have taken out fur-traders' licences.
Fur-farming.
The various fur-farms in the Division appear for the most part to have weathered the slump
successfully, and now that prices are looking up again they express a great deal of optimism for
the immediate future.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There is no complaint with regard to our present system of trap-line registration and it is
operating very successfully. I 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Guides.
There are fourteen registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
While few patrols could be classed as " special," the following are worthy of mention:—
Game Wardens Cameron and Washburn made a patrol into that section of the Elk River
Game Reserve embracing the watersheds of the Bull and Elk Rivers during the month of
January, 1933. They carried supplies on their backs and were absent twenty-one days. They
reported very heavy going in powdery snow, particularly over the Brule Creek Divide in
sub-zero weather, when it was 40° below zero. During the trip they spent only two nights under
a roof. Much definite information was obtained regarding big game and winter-feeding conditions and no evidence of trappers poaching in the game reserve was observed.
For many years Game Wardens have been handicapped by the difficulty of securing information and convictions against non-residents, particularly those who enter British Columbia by
the isolated passes through Alberta and across the United States border. Convictions, difficult
enough when a Game Warden is alone, were further complicated by the necessity of bringing
the accused about 100 miles or more on foot through rough country, particularly when a large
outfit of pack-horses was concerned. In some instances the only convenient manner of bringing
offenders before a British Columbia Justice would be to re-enter Alberta or the United States,
which would remove the offender from the jurisdiction of a British Columbia Game Warden.
It was felt that a Justice of the Peace should accompany Game Wardens on such patrols,
and for this purpose I was appointed a Justice of the Peace. Subsequently I accompanied
Game Wardens Sinclair, Washburn, Cameron, and Ranch on patrols to the Alberta and United
States boundary and the Palliser and Elk River Valleys in the Flathead District. These patrols
resulted in thirteen convictions under the " Game Act." The offenders were tried in the locality
where they were found and minimum fines were imposed in nearly all instances, which were paid.
Hunting Accidents.
On March 15th, 1933, Mrs. Harrington was shot in the left thigh with a 22-cal. high-powered
rifle by Mr. Harrington, of Peachland. Mr. Harrington was passing through the doorway of his
home when the rifle went off and Mrs. Harrington fell to the floor. Her left thigh was shattered
and she was removed to the Penticton Hospital.
On June 2nd, 1933, Miss Ruby Sweet, Waldo, age 15, was accidentally shot in the hip by
R. E. Shumard, age 18, who was shooting gophers on his stepfather's ranch. Shumard's firearms
licence was cancelled.
On November 5th, 1933, Nils K. Johnson, Grand Forks, was out hunting with Ted Wright,
also of the same city. Both hunters were crossing windfalls when Johnson took his rifle by the
muzzle to knock some brush out of the way, when it was discharged, the bullet passing through
his chest, killing him instantly.    Age 16.
On November 23rd, 1933, Crossley Taylor, of Gray Creek, while out duck-shooting, slipped
and shot himself in the upper arm.    He died on November 24th from his injuries.    Age 31.
Alexander Sherwood, of Fernie, disappeared while hunting with three companions near
Manistee Lake on December 10th, 1933. His companions searched assiduously for him, later
assisted by the British Columbia Police and Game Wardens and a number of local residents.
Their search was hampered by a heavy snowfall and his body was not located until December
23rd. The Coroner's inquest held at Fernie on January 3rd brought in a verdict of accidental
death through a gunshot wound from the deceased's own rifle. The deceased, according to those
who knew him well, was in the habit of hunting with the safety-catch off his rifle, and it is
presumed that he slipped and fell while going down a side-hill.
Summary and General Remarks.
The present winter has been a very open one and from present indications will not be hard
on game. Not so many deer were killed this season as formerly, although there was a two-week
open season on does. There has been some slight feeling that our open season on deer was a
trifle too generous, but it does not seem that the bag taken was any larger, if as large, than in
previous years. Big game was easily obtained* in the East Kootenay, especially moose, elk,
sheep, goat, and both white-tail and mule deer, while a number of bear  (brown, black, and REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 15
grizzly) were shot during the spring. The only natural comment to be made after viewing our
stand of wild life during all seasons of the year, particularly on the winter feeding-grounds, is
that in this Division we have plenty of game. Even the most pessimistic hunter will endorse
this statement unhesitatingly.
During the past year the Game Wardens, in addition to their regular duties, have cooperated with the other forces as they have been accustomed to do in previous years. Much
cordial assistance has been tendered the Game Wardens by members of the British Columbia
Police and the Provincial Forest Branch, both in the way of personal service and the use of
equipment.
The constructive suggestions and recommendations of the various Rod and Gun Clubs in
the Division have also been most encouraging and helpful in all matters relating to game
propagation.
"C" DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1933.
Game Animals.
Moose are steadily increasing throughout the northern part of the Kamloops District and
are frequently seen very close to Kamloops, and particularly in the Deadman Creek District,
north and south of the 51st parallel of latitude.        7
There is a tendency for moose throughout the whole Division to trek south. Reports are
continually coming in showing a steady increase in numbers heading southward. Residents in
the mountainous country near Barkerville report a thinning-out in the number of moose, but
this may be attributed partly to the ever-increasing number of prospectors throughout the
northern area and perhaps more particularly to a natural migration to the south. However, the
consensus of opinion among the residents and from the observations of the Game Wardens is
that moose have increased in number to a surprising degree in this Division.
The mountain-sheep liberated near Squilax several years ago are doing exceptionally well.
Fourteen sheep were trapped from this band during the year just ended and were liberated at
Squam Bay, on Adams Lake, where they are doing splendidly. This area is more in keeping
with the type of country which these animals usually frequent.
We have had no success at Spences Bridge in our efforts to capture mountain-sheep liberated
there a few years ago and which have been a source of trouble to the farmers at certain periods
of the year. It is hoped that these animals will eventually make their trail to the corral which
was built for their capture and where the usual salt-lick has been placed. At Shorts Creek, in
the Okanagan, there are, roughly speaking, about seventy mountain-sheep under protection.
West of the Fraser River mountain-sheep are reported as being quite numerous and those
that range east of the river in the Jesmond area appear to be holding their own. In other parts
of the Division they are in fair numbers only.
In the Clearwater Valley and the Blue River District caribou are fairly numerous. In the
Salmon Arm area and Williams Lake District, also the headwaters of the Willow, Swift, Bowron,
and Swamp Rivers, these animals are about the same in number as last year.
In some districts in this Division bear are becoming a menace to the stock of farmers,
especially in the northern portion of the Cariboo, North Thompson, and Nicola areas.
I would recommend that a trained predatory-animal hunter be stationed at divisional points
in the Interior. The use of well-trained dogs is essential. Both black and grizzly bear have
increased, especially the latter, in the northern parts of the Clinton District. The shortage of
the berry-crop was mainly responsible for bear acquiring a liking for the stock of farmers.
Reports to hand show that deer are quite numerous, with the possible exception of certain
parts of the Okanagan, where it is said no appreciable increase has been noted. A suggestion
is made for a shorter open season. In the Peachland District the farmers are and have been
suffering a certain amount of damage in the orchards by deer rubbing their horns on the bark
of the fruit-trees. In some cases newspapers have been wrapped around the trees for protection
with a certain amount of success. I am seeking the aid of the Dominion Experimental Farm
authorities at Summerland in an effort to find a suitable repellent during the winter months. I 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
One farmer erected a 9-foot fence in his efforts to keep deer out of his orchard, but without
complete success. This area has always been a yarding-place for deer during the winter. The
open season on does would no doubt tend to decrease the number of deer in the Okanagan.
There are a few mountain-goat in the Jesmond District, also in the vicinity of Mitchell Lake
and Horsefly River. In the Mica Mountain area, Clearwater, and south of Mahood Lake a few
of these animals are to be found.
Wapiti (elk) are stated to be ranging east of Canim Lake and the Mahood Lake Districts
and have been observed quite recently, but it was not determined whether their numbers have
increased or otherwise.
Fur-bearing Animals.
In the Williams Lake and Clinton Districts beaver have increased along various trap-lin'es
on account of water conditions having improved and the desire of trappers to conserve these
animals. Beaver were trapped on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve during the early summer
and were liberated in various localities in this Division for the purpose of conserving irrigation-
water. If the animals liberated are treated in an intelligent manner they can be of assistance
to the farmers depending on water for their crops. It is where efforts are made to take all of
the water from the dams that these animals suffer and become easy prey to predatory animals.
I would suggest the restocking of certain registered trap-lines with beaver where the trapper
has suffered loss through poaching or other causes.
In the Lillooet and Nicola areas fur-bearing animals are not numerous. At Alexis Creek
foxes have increased considerably, the same condition applying to the Williams Lake District,
also the Cottonwood River basin. Lynx in the Kelowna District show an increase, but around
Vernon they are not so plentiful. Marten and fisher have grown in numbers in the Williams
Lake area.
Trappers on a good many lines are refraining from trapping until a higher price is obtainable on fur.
Upland Game Birds.
Partridges in the Kamloops District are scarce. Pheasants in the Vernon, Cache Creek,
Kelowna, and Kamloops Districts have done exceptionally well and are increasing. Any Coast
sportsmen who are under the impression that the pheasant-supply exists only at the Coast would
have a different impression should they happen to be hunting in these areas during the first few
days of the open season. Pheasants liberated some time ago around Alkali Lake, in the Cariboo,
also the Fraser and Chilcotin Districts, are doing well.
In the Nicola country reports are not very encouraging on upland game birds. Prairie-
chicken are on the decrease in the Quesnal District, due no doubt to the severe winter of 1932.
The late spring this year was responsible for a poor hatch of ruffed grouse in the Barkerville
country. Blue grouse were quite plentiful, except on or near main-travelled highways in the
Williams Lake area. In the vicinity of Clinton they were somewhat scarce, and this also
applies to willow and Franklin's grouse in the Kamloops District. Owls and coyotes did considerable damage to upland game birds, and until a bounty is placed on this vermin grouse will
not appreciably increase in any district.
Two dead grouse were sent to Dr. E. A. Bruce, Animal Pathologist, Dominion Experimental
Farm, Saanichton, B.C., for examination. Both of these birds were found under a tree in the
Kamloops District and showed no signs of having been shot. According to Dr. Bruce's examination, these birds showed signs of extensive bruising and both had pneumonia. Dr. Bruce was
inclined to think that pneumonia was a secondary condition in birds weakened by some injury.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and geese were reported as having increased in numbers throughout this Division,
with the exception of the northern portion. In the Okanagan Valley, from Kelowna to Armstrong, geese were reported scarce. Wilson snipe in the Okanagan Valley show ah increase.
Water conditions still continue to improve.
The Blackwater fur-farm in the Cariboo is an example of what a little protection will do
toward increasing the duck-supply. The ducks have increased there to a surprising degree
since the property was converted into a fur-farm. If there were more fur-farms of this type
in the Province there would be a considerably greater supply of water-fowl. Vermin.
In the Kamloops country a very successful crow and magpie shoot was held by the sportsmen of Kamloops during the nesting season and over 1,000 birds were destroyed. An incentive
was added through the generosity of the local business houses, who donated numerous prizes.
In the Okanagan Valley crows and magpies are well under control. This valley is a shining-
example of what a little destruction of vermin will do toward increasing the stand of game birds.
Cougar are on the increase and will continue perhaps for some time unless a larger bounty
is placed on these animals.
Coyotes, as a whole, have not shown any increase. Trappers are very active in keeping
these animals down, as the price for the pelts is a fair incentive.
At all points in this Division it is said that big-horned owls are very numerous and may be
partly the cause in the decrease of grouse and other game birds. In the Merritt District eagles,
bear, and coyotes were exceptionally troublesome to farmers' stock. Nine coyotes, six bear, and
fifteen eagles were killed by the local Game AVarden. Game AVarden Still, of A-'ernon, killed
158 crows, 125 magpies, 46 hawks, 7 coyotes, 8 big-horned owls, and 8 house-cats gone wild.
Three golden eagles and three black bear doing damage to stock were also killed by this Game
AVarden.
Assistance was also rendered to trappers and farmers, resulting in the destruction of
twenty-five coyotes in the Vernon District.
Game-protection.
There were 102 prosecutions under the " Game Act " and Fishery Regulations during the
year, resulting in ninety convictions. Patrols were continually made and many infractions of
the Game and Fisheries Acts were prevented, which should, of course, be one of the main objects
of any Game Warden.
Game Propagation.
Seventeen beaver were trapped by Game Warden Kibbee at the Bowron Lake Game Reserve
for distribution in other parts of the Cariboo and Southern Interior to conserve water for
irrigation purposes. There were no losses in transportation and the special metal containers
used in their transport were very satisfactory. Owing to the high water prevailing so late in
the season at Bowron Lake, fewer beaver were trapped. I would suggest that heaver be distributed during the coming year on certain trap-lines where conditions are suitable. Some of
the trap-lines to-day were depleted long before the system of trap-line registration came into
effect. A rough estimate of the number of beaver on each line could easily be obtained from the
trapper when he purchases his licence and when submitting his return of catch. Reports to
hand are that more of the trappers are conserving these animals.
Twenty-five wapiti (elk) were liberated at the north end of Adams Lake and were in
splendid condition. These animals were a gift from the Dominion National Parks Branch and
were shipped from AVainwright Park in Alberta. They are for the first winter being fed a little
hay until they get accustomed to their new surroundings.
A large number of pheasants were liberated in this Division at points as far north as Alkali
Lake, in the Cariboo, where they are doing well. The high flood-water was responsible for the
loss of many pheasants' nests in the Kamloops area.
Game Reserves.
The Bowron Lake and Yalakom Game Reserves, together with the sanctuary at Tranquille,
are the only ones of any importance in the Central Interior. Bowron Lake is more of a beaver
sanctuary than a big-game reserve and on this area hundreds of beaver receive protection.
Fur Trade.
Fur is purchased here in a small way, but the greater portion of it goes to the Coast
markets, where accurate records are kept.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is carried on to a very limited extent and has suffered greatly from the depression, but should receive added impetus from the expected higher prices on fur.
2 I 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system should receive greater publicity at this time. Arery little is known about this
system and it is now several years since a newspaper article describing same was published.
I have not heard a single complaint from any trapper regarding this system of registration.
The policy of giving a reliable trapper a substantial area over which he acquires the sole
trapping rights has been followed in this Division. The short trap-line principle is not a success
where there are too many trap-lines. This creates a tendency to overtrap and trouble of some
sort usually arises.
Indians in the Chilcotin have been reported in the past as neglecting to respect the rights
of others in regard to trap-line registration, but during the latter part of the year they confined
themselves more to their own trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
There are over thirty registered guides in this Division. I would again suggest that certain
areas be registered in the name of guides—somewhat similar to the system of trap-line
registration.
In having a certain amount of territory registered in his name for hunting, a guide would
feel that game-protection would be to his own advantage and also that of hunting-parties. By
this means a system of trails would no doubt be kept in condition by the guides.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game AVardens Maxson and Still to points east of Peachland,
and resulted in a number of prosecutions against Indians of the Nicola District for killing deer
out of season.
Another patrol was made by Game AVardens Maxson, Ewart, and Jobin to the Coquihalla
during the early part of September. Several Indian parties were checked up on their way to
hunting-grounds. <
Game AVarden Jobin made a special patrol into the Stoyoma Mountains, Anderson River,
Juliet, Prospect, and Spius Creeks during the first week in December. Several trap-lines were
patrolled. Mileage covered, 142 miles. All of the foregoing patrols had a beneficial effect on
Indians and others.
Hunting Accidents.
On February 27th, 1933, Hector Marlett was accidentally shot by his cousin, Maurice
Marlett, while out hunting deer at or near Moha. Death was not instantaneous, but took place
two days later at Lytton. Apparently Maurice Marlett tripped over a log and his rifle discharged.    Provincial Police investigated this accident.
On June 14th, 1933, AValter Hints, a prospector, living below AVhite's Landing on the Fraser
River, rescued four men who had been wrecked on an island near his camp. Two of the men
left during the day and the other two, Alfred Cederberg and Eric Backlund, stayed with Hints.
At about 7 p.m. Hints went out to get some game for food, as the wrecked men had lost all their
food-supplies, and as he, Hints, was short of food himself; the two others remained in camp for
a while and then strolled up the trail in the opposite direction to that taken by Hints. Backlund and Cederberg were stooping over examining a location-post when Hints, who had made a
circle round the camp, saw them and, mistaking them for deer, fired. Both men were hit in the
shoulder, Backlund seriously and Cederberg slightly. First aid was rendered to the badly
wounded man, but he died shortly after. Provincial Police took action in the case after being
notified by Mr. Hints, and after an investigation he was exonerated of any blame.
There is a tendency in most hunting accidents of this nature for hunters to fire too quickly
before ascertaining as to what they are shooting at.
Summary and General Remarks on Game Conditions.
AATith the exception of the northern portion of this Division, weather conditions not having
been severe, all game animals are in better shape. Very little grain was fed to pheasants and
other game birds owing to the lack of snow on lower levels. The deer season was a success in
every way, as the early snowfall brought these and other game animals down to the lowlands.
The number of firearms licences sold in this Division has slightly increased over the previous
year.    The number of free farmers' licences has also increased. One of the greatest possible attractions the Cariboo could inaugurate would be to construct
proper and well-gravelled roads into the best hunting and fishing areas. During the wet weather
the condition of the roads in the Cariboo District, which are off the main-travelled highway,
is very poor.
The deer-tag system is still regarded by many as a nuisance, but as this is a conservation
measure it really should not be objected to.
The policy of bringing game animals in from the Dominion National Parks should be continued oh a much larger scale, as there are still many places where these animals could be
liberated to advantage.
I wish to say, in conclusion, that this Department has received splendid support from the
local Game Association and others in this Division, which has been greatly appreciated. Continued co-operation of many sportsmen with game officials in the course of their duties has been
very encouraging and we are indebted to them for the assistance rendered. The usual harmony
exists between all law enforcement branches and every effort is made to assist whenever and
wherever possible.
"D" DIA'ISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1933.
Game Animals.
Moose, caribou, and mule-deer are, despite the greater hunting activities of farmers, prospectors, and homesteaders, in very good condition and numbers.
AArapiti on Queen Charlotte Islands are reported on the increase. A band of thirty-six is
reported on the west coast of Graham Island. These species are also reported in greater
numbers along the Canadian National Railway, between the Alberta boundary and Tete Jaune.
The close season on these animals should be maintained in this Division.
No reports have been received regarding big-horn sheep. AATeather conditions have been
most favourable for all species of sheep and as a result a healthy increase is anticipated.
Mountain-goat are to be found in every district and, as conditions are favourable, a substantial increase in their numbers is expected.
Throughout this Division grizzly bear are increasing. The bag limit and close season in
vogue during this year should be maintained. Black bear are increasing and are becoming a
nuisance.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are on the increase throughout the Division. An exceptionally good
catch of fox, mink, and marten is expected. The usual annual catch of beaver and muskrats
is also anticipated.
Upland Game Birds.
A very late and wet spring was the cause of great mortality among the young of grouse of
all kinds. There is a sufficient, stand of birds, however, to ensure a good supply during the
next season, providing weather conditions remain favourable.
Migratory^ Game Birds.
Ducks and geese are increasing throughout the Division and many nice bags were obtained
during the past open season.
Swans, numbering about 200, were reported on the Nadina River, in the Burns Lake District.
It is definitely established that a number of these birds winter on the Tahtsa River and the
Nadina River in the Burns Lake area, also on the Bella Coola River and the Queen Charlotte
Islands in the Prince Rupert District.    A permanent close season is recommended on these birds.
Vermin.
Very few cougar are to be found in this Division, but wolves are doing considerable damage
in some parts of the Division, according to reports received. I 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Coyotes have been very numerous and, as they are quite easy to trap and the prices for
their pelts have been fair, a large number of these animals have been trapped.
AVolves have been increasing steadily over a period of years. From every district in the
Division complaints have been received dealing with the unusual number of these animals, their
depredations, kills, etc. Packs are reported in the Pine Pass, Hard River, Peace River, Finlay
River, McGregor River, Prince Rupert, Telegraph Creek, and Bear River Districts.
Owing to the great number of deer killed by wolves, settlers, relief-men, and homesteaders,
there is grave danger that the animals are being destroyed at a greater rate than they can
increase, and should such a condition be allowed to go on over a period of years the ultimate
extinction of the deer may be anticipated.
The placing of a bounty, the use of poison, the appointment of special trained hunters, or
a combination of all these remedies, is suggested. Conditions are very serious indeed and
should receive all consideration.
Game-protection.
Game Wardens and Constables of the British Columbia Police have been very active in the
enforcement of the " Game Act" and Regulations.    Seventy prosecutions were instituted.
During the year 94,589 miles were covered by the Game AVardens, as follows:—
Miles. Miles.
Train   22,511 Launch   16,269
Car   57,931 Steamer       2,348
Foot      6,720 Dog-team       2,996
Horse      3,548 Aeroplane      2,257
Game Propagation.
European partridges imported from Alberta were liberated in the A7anderhoof District,
while pheasants were liberated and are doing nicely in the Telkwa and Smithers Districts.
AVapiti introduced on Queen Charlotte Islands are doing better than anticipated and are
increasing in numbers.
Game Reserves.
Four game reserves are to be found in the Division. Fort George (including the City of
Prince George), Lake Kathlyn near Smithers, and Kaien Island (including the City of Prince
Rupert), established as safety-zones and bird-refuges, are well looked after and bird-life is
increasing. Kunghit Island Game Reserve, southernmost island of the Queen Charlotte Group,
has never been patrolled during past years. The boundaries of the Lake Kathlyn Game Reserve
have been cut out, cleared, and marked posters and signs erected. Work performed by Game
AVarden C. D. Muirhead, Telkwa. Similar work will be carried out with regard to the Fort
George and Kaien Island Game Reserves during the coming season.
Fur-farming.
A number of fur-farms are now solidly established. The production of pelts in lieu of
breeding stock is the main object. Very good results have been obtained. The licensing of
fur-farmers and closer supervision and regular inspections by competent animal pathologists
is recommended.
Registration of Trap-lines.
New maps were received and considerable work done in re-registering trap-lines. Owing to
the introduction of aerial photography making it necessary that all maps be reproduced, it was
required to remap a great number of trap-lines.
The trappers are very well satisfied with the registration of trap-lines. A number of
trappers are now fur-farming, in lieu of trapping, their beaver, and the results obtained by the
white trappers are being watched with interest by the natives. Quite' a number of Indians are
following their white brother's footsteps and are taking greater interest in the conservation of
the fur-bearing animals on their lines. We may look forward with confidence to trappers
eventually farming the fur on their trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
The introduction of more severe regulations covering all duties  of our guides  and  the
exclusion of the non-resident from guiding operations in the Province is recommended.    Forty-
five non-resident big-game hunters visited this Division during the year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 21
Special Patrols.
Numerous special patrols have been made in each district. In the Peace River area a
special patrol made by Game Warden J. S. Clark in the Hay River District and in the Prince
Rupert District and a patrol made by Game AA'arden E. Martin in the Taku River area are
worthy of mention.
Hunting Accidents.
Harold C. Mabley, of Fairview, Alberta, accidentally wounded Norman Mclvor, of the same
address, whilst hunting in the vicinity of Beaver River on July 5th, 1933.
AValter Taylor, Smithers, B.C., on October 1st, 1933, near Barret, accidentally shot Thomas
Monks in mistake for a deer.    The victim subsequently died.
Gunnar Clavering, Prince Rupert, B.C., on October 7th, 1933, in the vicinity of Prince
Rupert, accidentally discharged his shotgun, causing a wound in his left wrist.
John Andrew Hansen, Vancouver, B.C., on December 6th, 1933, in the vicinity of Butedale,
shot Freeman G. Brynolson, of Seattle, AVash., in mistake for a deer. The victim died of his
wounds.
Dan Shpikula, Fort St. John, B.C., accidentally shot himself on December 6th, 1933, while
carrying a rifle.    This accident took place in the vicinity of Beatton River.
Summary and General Remarks.
Conditions have been very good during the year, with the exception of an abnormal increase
in the number of wolves. AArarm weather from February to April and an early spring proved
very beneficial to all game animals and birds.
In concluding, I wish to express my appreciation to all Game AVardens and the Inspector,
N.C.O.'s, and Constables of the British Columbia Police for their splendid co-operation in
enforcing the " Game Act" and Regulations.
"E" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By J. G. Cunningham, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in this
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Owing to the exceptionally mild season, the deer were not forced down from the
mountains on the Mainland until after the season had closed; consequently the average hunter
was disappointed. As was the case last year, the Squamish, Pitt, and Harrison Districts proved
to be the best areas in which to hunt deer. The Howe Sound Islands did not show up well, and
it will be several years before the deer will be plentiful there again, as disease has killed off
the majority of the animals. It is pleasing, however, to be able to report that this disease
appears to have just about died out. The Department would be well advised to secure some of
the deer being taken at James Island for liberation on the Howe Sound Islands.
Mountain-goat.—These animals appear to be holding their own, many being seen and taken
along the Coast and at the heads of the various lakes in the Division. A report was received
that goat were very plentiful in the immediate vicinity of Pemberton, on the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway.
Bear.—Black bear continue to be a nuisance throughout the Lower Mainland and many
permits have been issued to destroy these animals during the close season.
Moose.—It has again been reported that two or three moose have been seen in the Upper
Pemberton Valley, but it is doubtful whether these animals will ever migrate any farther west
or south in this Division.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are not plentiful in this Division, though the Pemberton Valley, Upper Stave River,
and Skagit Districts prove to be fairly well stocked. The holders of registered trap-lines in
these areas are looking after the stock on their lines.
Registered trap-line holders report an increase in marten. These animals are very easily
trapped out, and I believe that this would be the case now if it were not for the present system
of trap-line registration. I 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mink are fairly plentiful along the coast. Muskrats are very plentiful and prices on their
pelts advanced over the dollar mark this winter, resulting in the trappers going after these
animals a little harder than usual. The number of muskrat-pelts arriving on the Arancouver
Fur Market from Vancouver Island is steadily increasing, and the planting of these animals
on the Island by the Game Conservation Board and by private individuals a few years ago has
meant considerable revenue being derived from their pelts by trappers, though it has been
proven that muskrats have been a detriment to farmers on Vancouver Island.
Otter were taken in only few numbers in the Division. There was a decline in the number
of racoon taken, while skunks and civet cats are becoming a nuisance throughout the Fraser
Valley.
In spite of the fact that there is no protection on red foxes throughout the Lower Mainland
south of the Fraser River and west of Chilliwack, and though trappers and others have been
encouraged to destroy these animals, reports indicate that they are still increasing. The pelt
of the red fox taken on the Lower Mainland brings about $8 to $15 on the fur market.
Upland Game Birds.
It is to be regretted to have to again report a very poor season on pheasants. The breeding
season was even worse than that of 1932, and owing to an exceptionally wet May and June the
majority of the early broods were lost. AAThen the season opened pheasants were scarce, and
the majority of those found proved to be very small immature birds.
On December 12th an ice blizzard in the Chilliwack-Sumas District resulted in the loss of
a large number of birds which had survived the shooting season. If the Department hopes to
have the continued support of the pheasant-hunters, it will be necessary to make provision for
the liberation of more pheasants and afford better hunting or the revenue will certainly decrease.
Partridges do not do well in this Division and have been steadily decreasing for years.
There is a possibility that they may come back if we had a few dry seasons, and I would
advocate that the season on these birds be closed throughout the whole of the Lower Mainland
this coming fall.
Grouse (blue) were not as plentiful on the opening date as they were in 1932. The rainy
spring had a very bad effect on these birds as well as the pheasants. Quite a number of daily bag
limits, however, were obtained on Bowen and Gambier Islands.
Ruffed (willow) grouse were also affected by the wet season, although reports have been
received to the effect that they were more plentiful around Squamish than they have been for
several seasons past. The sportsmen of Squamish are advocating the opening of ruffed and blue
grouse on the same day, as in that district both species are found in the same area. We must
give this bird every protection or it will not be long before it becomes extinct.
Migratory' Game Birds.
Migratory game birds were more plentiful this season than they have been for some time.
The winter was exceptionally mild but wet, making conditions ideal for ducks, and as we did
not have the usual freeze-up they stayed with us all winter. As has been the case for a number
of years past, the private shoots had the best of it, though it must be admitted that it is these
private clubs (through their activities in feeding birds, and also due to the fact that in most
cases they only shoot during the week-ends, thereby allowing the ducks to feed unmolested
during the balance of the week) who are responsible for the ducks staying with us in such
large numbers.
Game AVarden A. J. Butler caught and banded approximately 3,900 ducks during the year
on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, as compared with 1,413 during the same months in 1932.
Mr. A. L. Hager and Mr. George C. Reifel banded approximately 5,500 birds between them,
making a total of about 9,300 ducks banded in the Division during the year. Mr. Reifel is the
largest bander.
The number of birds banded at the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve has been steadily
increasing from 533 birds in 1931, 1,413 in 1932, and 3,900 in 1933.
Wood-ducks were very plentiful on the opening week-end, and it is to be regretted that
there were a great many of these birds killed. It is felt that the daily bag limit on wood-ducks
should be cut to five birds. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 23
Snow-geese and brant were just as plentiful as ever, although there were very few good bags
taken. Brant-shooting around Boundary Bay depends solely on the moon, tides, and weather
being just right, and such occasions were very scarce during the_ past season.
AVilson snipe were plentiful in certain areas, but taking the Division as a whole they were
not plentiful.
Swans were observed in small numbers during the past season. Some of these birds were
seen on Lulu Island, Sea Island, Pitt Lake, and on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, near
Chilliwack.
Band-tailed pigeons were not as plentiful as in past seasons and very few complaints were
received as to damage by these birds from farmers.
Vermin.
Coyote-tracks were observed in the Squamish Valley and reports were received of these
animals being seen at Pemberton.    Coyotes are, however, not plentiful in this Division.
Wolves are again putting in an appearance in the Squamish Aralley and are a serious menace
to the deer in that area.    It is felt that a bounty should be placed on wolves as well as cougar.
On the Lower Mainland cougar are not plentiful, although several have been killed in the
Harrison Lake area.
The house-cat is the greatest menace to our game birds.    Cat-traps have been provided to
Game Wardens throughout the Fraser A'alley, with the result that a great number of cats have
been taken.
The Game Wardens in this Division have been most active in the destruction of crows,
resulting in an increase in the number killed over the preceding year.    The following is a
summary of vermin killed by Game AVardens in this Division during the year 1933:—
Crows  2,380 Owls       26
Cats      556 Eagles         19
Dogs       40 Coyotes          1
Hawks      126 Red fox          3
Game-protection.
Again, as was the case in 1932, enforcement of the various Acts pertaining to game and
game fish was a difficult one. A great number of our sportsmen are out of work, and in a
number of cases brought before the Courts the plea of poverty was heard, and this plea is being
abused. In no case where such a plea was entered was it proven that the accused found it
necessary to hunt for the purpose of obtaining food. The minimum fine of $10 seems a little
high during these hard times and Magistrates were inclined to accept pleas of poverty or
distress.
During the week-ends all the officers from Headquarters were actively engaged with the
regular patrol officers in enforcing the various Acts, resulting in the laying of the same number
of informations as in the previous year—namely, 168.
We are also indebted to certain officers of the British Columbia Police for valuable assistance rendered throughout the season.
Game Propagation.
The following is a list of the pheasants received from the Elk Lake Game Farm for liberation in this Division during the year 1933:—
Lulu Island   220 Ladner   230
Cloverdale-Langley     220 Chilliwack   160
Sumas-Matsqui   160 Agassiz      88
North Vancouver   104 Pitt Meadows  260
South AArestminster      12 Mission-Nicomen   128
Burnaby        20
In addition to the above, some 212 birds allotted to the Sumas, Chilliwack, Agassiz, and
Mission Districts were returned to the Elk Lake Game Farm in view of the severe weather in
those localities.    These birds will now be held over for liberation in these districts in the spring. I 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
On October 10th, 1933, five wapiti were liberated at McNab Creek, Howe Sound. This consignment consisted of two young bulls and three cows, received from the Vancouver City Parks
Board. Up to the time of writing this report, the animals, with the exception of one young bull.
are doing well. The young bull was found dead on the beach shortly after liberation, but to
date the cause of death has not been discovered.
Game Reserves.
Throughout the Division the game reserves remain the same as in past seasons. The
McGillivray Creek Game Reserve boundary will have to be changed shortly on account of one
of the farmers owning property in that area wishing to dispose of his land. The loss of this
piece of land will not affect the reserve in any way.
A considerable number of complaints have been received from persons living within the
boundaries of the North Vancouver Game Reserve, due to the increasing number of bear in that
area.    AVe have also received complaints in regard to deer doing damage.
Blue grouse are increasing in numbers in the North Vancouver Game Reserve area.
Fur Trade.
The fur-traders are still complaining about the royalties on some of the pelts, principally
marten and beaver. Prices took a jump after the close of the spring trapping, and the dealers
in many cases were fortunate in being able to make good gains on the fur on hand. In most
cases this sudden rise in the price of fur did not benefit the trapper, as he had already disposed
of his fur. Muskrats were bringing a fair price throughout the fall, ranging from 50 cents for
early-caught pelts up to more than $1.
Fur-farming.
The number of fur-farmers has decreased considerably in the past few years. Those now
in the business have had experience and are making a success of the enterprise. Occasional
complaints are received in regard to the Department collecting royalty on fur-farmed animals,
and suggestions have been received that it would be better to collect a licence fee for fur-
farming permits.
Owing to the great amount of work and correspondence necessary in ascertaining whether
or not certain foxes have been registered, the fur-traders complain of the different fees for
royalty on the pelts of farmed animals, claiming that a flat rate would be more suitable. Personally, I feel that a flat rate of 50 cents on all farmed foxes would be better than the present
system of 75 cents on unregistered pelts and 5 cents on registered pelts.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division is working very smoothly. At the time of
writing this report there is not one outstanding trap-line dispute in the Division.
Registration of Guides.
There is only one registered guide in this Division, and this guide operates outside of the
western part of the Province generally.
Special Patrols.
As the Division is regularly patrolled, we have not found it necessary to carry out any
special patrols, although many lengthy patrols have been undertaken.
Hunting Accidents.
A number of hunting accidents occurred in this Division during the year.   Six accidents
occurred, one of which resulted in death, and four of the six were due to the hunter's own
carelessness.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Taking the Division as a whole, game conditions were not as good as expected. The total
revenue of the Division decreased a little more than $2,000, the loss being principally in resident
ordinary and  general  firearms  licences.    The  non-resident  general  firearms  licence  and  the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 25
season and daily anglers' licences fell off to a certain extent. There was an increase of revenue
from the resident anglers' licences and fur royalties.
The revenue of the Division for 1933 amounted to $66,747.12, compared with $69,082.51 for
the year 1932. Records show a decrease of 742 free licences to farmers and prospectors. The
majority of prospectors' licences issued at this office are granted to youths ranging from 18 to 24
years of age. In many cases these youths know nothing of mining or firearms, and it is felt
that if the Department could place a fee on the issuance of prospectors' firearms licences there
would not be so many required.
Taking everything into consideration, so far as this Division is concerned, it is felt that we
came through the year very well, and I wish to express my appreciation of the splendid co-operation of the officers and men of " E " Division, British Columbia Police, Game AVardens and staff
at Headquarters, and also for the assistance rendered by members of Game Associations of the
Lower Mainland.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF THE ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By Game Warden J. W. Jones.
I respectfully beg to submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake
Game Farm for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
Pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1933     1,375
Breeding stock (approximately)        375
Hen pheasants  300
Cock pheasants      65
Strayed from breeding-pens      10
Number of eggs laid (approximately)     5,500
Eggs shipped out to game-bird farmers       720
Small late eggs used for feeding       250
Eggs set under hens    4,500
Eggs hatched     3,250
Young pheasants raised to maturity     2,700
Casualties owing to grass-snakes, etc       300
Birds strayed from rearing-field         75
Birds killed in pens by rats      150
Birds liberated in Province during 1933    2,906
There were a large number of unfertile eggs this year.    This may have been due to the late
cold spring.    The birds did not begin to lay until the middle of April.    The melanistic mutant
crossed with the other pheasants did very well.    We raised about 200 of these birds and will
liberate them with the other pheasants at various points in the Province.
AA7ild turkeys raised—
Toms     3
Hens      1
Old stock, gobbler      1
Turkeys shipped from North Dakota     2
Geese in pens  12
(These birds look well and we hope to have some young next year.)
Partridges in pens   36
(This number includes six young raised last year.)
We received ninety wild-turkey eggs from Seattle, AVash., last year and every one was
unfertile.
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 100; hawks, 50; horned owls, 1; barn-rats, 600.
As well as various duties attended to on the farm, every effort has been made to maintain
game patrols, and special attention has been paid to all complaints regarding game. AVe also
assisted Game Warden AValker a number of times in taking deer off James Island and helped
him erect a pen for catching these deer. AVe have also during the past year done considerable
repair-work on the pens at the farm; this in some instances meaning rebuilding of some of
the pens. I 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF OFFICER I/C GAME FISH CULTURE.
A. G. Bolton.
I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the Game Fish Culture Branch
for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
During the calendar year 1933 many investigations were conducted with regard to selecting
sites for proposed hatcheries and rearing-tanks, artificial and natural retaining-ponds, feed
conditions, etc.
Five artificial rearing-ponds, 40 by 6 by 3 feet, were constructed at Qualicum, Vancouver
Island, the water-supply coming from Mosquito Creek. This plant was in operation from April
to October, inclusive, and used for the purpose of holding brown trout and Atlantic salmon.
A million-egg hatchery and sixteen rearing-tanks, 15 by 3 by 3 feet, were built near Beaver
Lake in Stanley Park, Vancouver, the property being donated by the Parks Board and the
water-supply given gratis by the Greater Vancouver AA7ater Board.
At Kelowna 57% acres were purchased, containing five natural retaining-ponds, the idea
being to hold fry until yearlings, and when ready for liberation they would migrate through a
series of artificially made waterways into Mission Creek and from there to Okanagan Lake.
The 140,000 Kamloops trout fry held in these ponds made a most noticeable growth owing
to the abundance of natural feed.
The general success of this operation speaks very well for the time and care given by
members of the Kelowna Rod and Gun Club.
As it was the desire of this Department to establish a fish-hatchery and battery of rearing-
tanks on A7ancouver Island, a thorough survey was made of the east coast of the Island by
Dominion and Provincial Government engineers and fish-culturists to locate a suitable site. One
was located in the Alberni District, but obstacles which could not be overcome were put in the
way of purchase, and as it was the desire of all concerned to establish a fish-cultural plant
centrally located on the Island, keen disappointment was felt, inasmuch as satisfactory sites
are very difficult to obtain.
After further investigations had been made with regard to water-flow and temperatures,
suitability of site, etc., a piece of property was purchased in the Sooke District, Vancouver
Island, adjoining Veitch Creek, where it is proposed to erect a million-egg hatchery and not less"
than eight rearing-tanks, 16 by 3 by 3 feet, in the early part of 1934.
The Rod and Gun Clubs of Revelstoke, Cranbrook, and Quesnel all received subsidies to
assist them in their private ventures in fish-culture operations.
One hundred thousand Atlantic salmon eyed eggs were purchased and imported from Scotland, these eggs being hatched at the Lake Cowichan Hatchery of the Dominion Fisheries
Department, and held until October, when plantings were made in Cowichan Lake, the fry
being marked by removal of the adipose and left ventral fins.
Four hundred thousand cut-throat trout eyed eggs were purchased from the Cranbrook Rod
and Gun Club, 25,000 being planted in the Tsolum River, Courtenay, Vancouver Island, the
balance being hatched at the Stanley Park plant; some being held in the rearing-tanks and the
remainder distributed throughout the waters of the Lower Mainland as advanced fry.
Members of the Biological Board of Canada (Nanaimo Station) very kindly made two
surveys at the request of this Department—namely, Jones Lake, Hope District, and Salmon
River, Salmon Arm District.
Investigations have been made, with the assistance of members of the Biological Department
at Nanaimo, with reference to establishing ponds for the development of natural feeds such as
shrimp and fresh-water flea, it being the confirmed opinion of those concerned that if the lakes
and rivers were more abundantly supplied with natural feed the migration of the trout would
not be so noticeable.
As at December 31st, the rearing-tanks at Stanley Park contained approximately 16.000
steelhead fry, 45,000 Kamloops fry, and 75,000 cut-throat fry, these to be held until April, 1934,
and then liberated.
A summary of the plantings made during the year 1933 will be found on page 35. APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from the sale of resident firearms and anglers' licences and game-tags  28
Revenue derived from the sale of non-resident, licences  29
Revenue derived from the sale of fur-traders' licences and from royalty or tax on fur  30
Comparative statement showing pelts of fur-bearing animals on which  royalty has been
collected during the period 1921-33, inclusive  31
Statement showing particulars of various pelts on which royalty has been paid in calendar
year 1933  32
Bounties paid during year 1933  33
Comparative statement of bounties paid from 1922 to 1933, inclusive  33
Statement of collections from fur trade, 1931 to 1933, inclusive  33
List of fur confiscated for infractions of the " Game Act," 1933  34
List of firearms confiscated for infractions of the " Game Act," 1933  34
Comparative statistics, 1913 to 1933, inclusive  35
Statement of plantings of trout during 1933  35
Predatory animals and noxious birds destroyed by Game AVardens in the year 1933  35
Hunting accidents  36
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid in 1933 :  37
Prosecutions, 1933 ;.. 38
List of guides  40
Game-bird farm returns, 1933  42
Statement of migratory game birds banded by members of the Game Department, 1933  46
Returns of trappers, 1932-33  46
Fur-farm returns, 1933 (Statement No. 1)  46
Fur-farm returns, 1933 (Statement No. 2)  47
Personnel of Game Department, 1933  47 I 28
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> REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 29
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-rf.sident Licences, January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933.
Government
Agents.
General Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences.
Bear, Deer,
and Anglers'
Licences.
Weekly Bird
Licences.
Daily
Anglers'
Licences. .
Season
Anglers'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
2
2
1
1
1
1
6
17
1
7
1
7
2
5
14
4
4
3
1
2
1
1
5
2
2
9
9
4
1
1
1
1
1
50
12
16
10
24
168
14
300
3
4
8
42
3
37
3
8
1
8
34
39
25
7
10
5
19
2
1
3
3
3
5
36
8
22
1
6
11
$77.00
27.00
19.00
17.00
27.00
245.00
26.00
352.00
7.00
4.00
11.00
48.00
3.00
67.00
3.00
11.00
1.00
11.00
85.00
57.00
35.00
10.00
6
4
2
3
1
12
8
2
2
5
5
1
1
3
23
5
4
5
1
1
1
29
33
1
$60.00
40.00
20.00
30.00
10.00
120.00
80.00
20.00
20.00
$137.00
267.00
$100.00
100.00
$100.00
Atlin
139.00
47.00
50.00
87.00
75.00
440.00
106.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
447.00
77.00
50.00
79.00
36.00
50.00
98.00
Hope	
3.00
50.00
10.00
117.00
13.00
11.00
50.00
10.00
30.00
230.00
50.00
40.00
61.00
$5.00
46.00
50.00
365.00
300.00
850.00
50.00
600.00
50.00
550.00
407.00
New Westmin-
125.00
1,050.00
60 00
Pouce Coupe
50.00
50.00
225.00
650 00
17.00
7.00
24.00
2.00
2.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
5.00
50.00
10.00
167.00
792.00
Prince Rupert....
24.00
2.00
100.00
102.00
3.00
10.00
10.00
13 00
13.00
5.00
Telegraph
Creek
450.00
900.00
450.00
Vancouver	
225.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
66.00
13.00
65.00
1.00
9.00
15.00
290.00
1,486.00
18.00
100.00
25.00
330.00
10.00
500.00
300.00
336.00
9.00
15.00
Totals
72
$4,550.00
46
$1,150.00
4
$20.00
951
$1,378.00
158
$1,580.00
$8,678.00 I 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' Licences and from Royalty or Tax on Fur,
January 1st, 1933, to December 31st, 1933.
Government
Agents.
Resident
Fur-traders.
Non-resident
Fur-thaders.
Royalty or Tax
on Fufi.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
3
4
1
2
20
4
1
1
22
13
17
11
10
10
47
3
4
10
$75.00
100.00
25.00
50.00
21
23
3
29
1
31
8
46
3
1
4
1
1
1
20
10
9
7
4
137
68
89
2
13
2
2
4
8
25
504
8
65
3
1
4
$101.70
136.78
14.70
117.12
2.00
72.65
40.29
1,199.24
8.40
2.18
26.63
.30
20.85
.40
91.90
5.65
34.65
17.20
1.55
5,709.88
587.53
3,763.67
5.05
180.95
1.30
4.05
9.00
35.04
317.68
26,874.92
35.09
167.43
2.40
2.25
2.05
1
1
1
1
6
2
2
$176.70
236 78
Atlin	
39 70
167 12
2.00
72 65
40 29
500.00
1,699.24
8 40
2 18
100.00
126 63
.30
Kelowna	
20 85
Lillooet	
.40
Merritt	
25.00
116 90
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
25.00
59 65
New Westminster...
17 20
550.00
325.00
425.00
$5.00
5.00
5.00
4,193.67
275.00
5.00
460.95
Rossland	
Smithers	
250.00
250.00
1,175.00
75.00
100.00
250.00
Telegraph Creek	
567 68
Vancouver	
30.00
10.00
10.00
28,079.92
Vernon	
Victoria	
277.43
Williams Lake	
Windermere	
Wilmer	
Totals	
183
$4,575.00
1,158
$39,592.48
14
$70.00
$44,237.48 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 31
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£ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 33
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1933.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
Alberni	
1
118
5
215
48
4
5
7
1
12
35
7
5
7
1
2
1
2
103
3
40
7
$1,180.00
50 00
Clinton	
Cumberland	
2,150.00
480.00
Duncan	
40.00
Fort Fraser                 	
50.00
Kamloops	
70.00
10.00
Merritt	
120.00
Nanaimo             	
350.00
70.00
50.00
70.00
10.00
20.00
10.00
20.00
1,035.00
30.00
400.00
70.00
Totals	
1           1           628
$6,285.00
Comparative Statement op Bounties paid from 1922-33.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922..:	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923	
14,840.00
1924.   .
172
20,398.40
1925
24,397.00
1926                 	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927           	
65,377.95
1928                    	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
1931
42,036.15
1932                        	
80.00
1933                        	
6,285.00
Totals	
3,117
4,234
59,453
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$403,907.80
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921-33.
Calendar Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-trade
Licences.
Total.
1921	
1922                	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
1923                 	
67,524.18
1924	
62,446.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926                    	
62,535.13
1927                 	
71,324.96
1928               	
58,823.07
1929           	
47,329.89
1930                	
45,161.11
1931                  	
45,981.08
1932    	
40,363.79
1933                  	
44,167.48
Totals..
$608,719.84
$81,475.00
$690,194.84 I 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1933,
to December 31st, 1933.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Fuk confiscated.
Date ol
Confiscation.
m
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Jan.      24
Prince George	
i
i
1
1
5
3
1
1
1
17
1
4
1
20
29
8
2
26
2
64
1
20
9
6
7
30
Feb.      25
Gilker, C. R '.	
Old Clutise (Ind.)	
Alberni	
Telkwa	
Westholme	
17
Castell, F	
20
1
22
Winstanley, E., et al
Margetish, G	
31
April      3
Alberni	
10
May        2
13
Nass, Joe	
Taylor, W. E	
Telkwa	
Kyuquot	
Flanagan, W. S	
,29
Aug.     19
Sept.    30
Nov.        3
28
Viertl, Antone	
Thomas, H. J	
Prince George	
Dee.      22
Alert Bav	
Totals	
2
10
1
1
24
151
6
4
42
1
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1933.
to December 31st, 1933.
Date of
Confisca
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Firearms
confiscated.
tion.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.       26
1
1
1
1
3
1
1*
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Feb.       22
March     6
Friedrich,  Karl            	
10
Nelson, Wilfred	
Campbell, Thomas	
April     28
May      10
Pouce Coupe	
13
Flanagan, W. S	
13
Flanagan, W. S               	
15
Judd, C	
15
Sept.       2
2
Hilton, John	
11
Bower, Harry	
13
Clark,  G.  P	
14
Braiden, R. N	
16
Hunka, Pete	
26
Shin, Fong	
Oct.       21
It
31
Emery, Ralph	
Nov.      21
Stafford, M	
1
Totals	
19
3
* Pistol. f Automatic shotgun.
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and firearms under the
Act " during the calendar year 1933 amounted to $419.29.
Game REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 35
Comparative Statistics.
Calendar
Year.
Prosecutions.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases        Firearms
dismissed, confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences, Fees,
and Furs.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
. 538
498
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
1.16,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922 	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71 324 96
1923	
1924	
1925.    	
1926	
1927	
1928 	
58,823.07
47,329.89
45 161 11
1929	
1930	
1931	
46,091.08
40,363.79
44 167 48
1932  	
1933	
Game Fish Culture Branch—Summary of Plantings for the Year 1933.
District and Area.
Plantings,
River or Lake.
Cut-throat Trout.
Eyed
Eggs.
Fingerlings.
No. 1.
No. 2.
Atlantic
Salmon.
Finger-
lings,
No. 2.
kamlooi's
Trout.
Fingerlings.
No. 1.       No. 2.
Totals.
Vancouver Island—
Courtenay	
Cowichan.	
Lower Mainland and
Coast—
loco	
Harrison	
Stave	
Powell River	
North Vancouver...
Sechelt	
Gambier Island,	
Cloverdale	
Cloverdale	
Cloverdale	
Coquitlam	
Hope	
Port Haney	
Abbotsford	
Abbotsford	
Abbotsford	
Totals	
Tsolum River	
Cowichan Lake..
25,000
Deer Lake	
Deer Lake	
Hayward Lake	
Powell Lake.	
Goldie Lake	
Halfmoon Bay Lake...
Linfoot Lake....	
Nicomekl River....	
Salmon River	
Serpentine River	
North Alouette River.
Coquihalla River	
Kanaka Creek	
Little Surnas River	
Clayburn Slough	
Matsqui Slough	
60,000
20,000
64,000
16,000
28,000
10,000
20,000
12,000
8,000
218,000      20,000
14,716
10,000
15,000
15,000
20,000
500
3,500
500
14,716
10
15
15
20
,000
,000
000
000
500
,500
500
000
,000
,000
000
000
,000
,000
,000
000
14,716
60,500      4,000      317.216
Note.—The balance ol Atlantic salmon fry being held in Lake Cowichan Hatchery until spring of 1934.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds destroyed by Game Wardens during Year 1933.
Bear       19 Eagles        94
Cougir       32 Hawks      514
Coyotes       114 Groundhogs       46
Crows  5,547 Magpies  2,093
Cats  (domestic)   1,000 Owls      285
Dogs      120 I 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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as.; REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 37
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st, 1933, to December 31st, 1933.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
a .3
CJ  ~
HO
tf 3
3*
f"a
an
M o
at
Amount.
Atlin—
Ulleary, G. C, Springlield, Ohio	
Poss, J. A.,  Springfield, Ohio	
Alberni—
Dent, H. A.,  Seattle,  Wash	
Whaley, K. S., Seattle, Wash	
Fernie—
Lutz., Jas., Trail Creek, Montana	
Greenw-ood—
Bauers, E., Seattle, Wash	
Harley, C. S., Seattle,  Wash	
Lillooet—
Arnold, L. M., Seattle, Wash	
New Westminster— ,
Hollingsworth, O. E., Bellingham, Wash.
Brents,  P., Bellingham, Wash	
Markham, J., Centralia, Wash	
Pearson, G., San Bernadino, Cal	
Hahn, B. A., Seattle, Wash	
Schoessler, W. B., Kennebee,  S.D	
Sill, E. G., Seattle, Wash....	
Harley, C.  S„  Seattle, Wash	
Keastor, J. B., Pasadena, Cal	
Potts, J. R., Seattle, Wash	
Cameron, Bruce, Mt. Vernon, Wash	
Bates, D. H., Portland, Ore	
Pouce Coupe—
Leckrone, Dr. M. B., Eochester, Ind	
King, Dr. M. 0., Eochester, Ind	
Marguarde, Dr. G., Chicago, 111	
Shearer, M., Eifle, Col	
Prince George—
Stanton, Dr. E. McD., Schenectady, N.Y.
Stanton, Dr. E. McD., Schenectady, N.Y.
Callahan, H. B., La Crosse, Wis	
Hite, Wm., Pond Creek, Okla	
Zanuk, D., Hollywood, Cal	
Enright, R., Hollywood, Cal	
Bingham, ,T., Toledo, Ohio	
Estrade, J. B., Mexico City	
Vancouver—
Freeman, T. L., Louisiana	
Benham, J. D., Chicago, 111	
Cornett, M. E., Klamath Falls, Ore	
Hanley-Law, C. J., Melbourne, Australia
McGuire, II. F., Belfast, Ireland	
Kingery, Dr. L. B., Portland, Ore	
Eugh, Dr. T., Klamath Falls, Ore	
Windermere—
Krippner, Wm., New York, N.Y	
Williams Lake—
Ayers, J. C, Fort Collins, Col	
Barton, J. F., Longview, Wash	
Waffensmith, J. W., New Haven, Conn	
Scott, R. J., Trail Creek, Mon	
Totals	
13
15
2
15
lo
$30.00
30.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
60.00
45.00
30.00
30.00
90.00
15.00
45.00
00.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
105.00
45.00
60.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
60.00
30.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
$1,255.00 I 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1933, to December 31st, 1933.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
s fi
-. a
: O
r   co
a 2
: O
: fi
SO
Ho
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Exceeding bag limit on big game	
Game on premises of a boarding-house, etc	
Hunting game betwreen one hour after sunset
and one hour before sunrise	
Killing or having in possession game animals
of the female sex	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game
animals during close season	
Possession  of game animals under 1 year of
age  	
Possession   of   pelts   of   fur-bearing   animals
during close season	
Possession of untagged deer	
Running deer with dogs	
Removal of evidence as to sex of a game animal
killed or taken	
Selling   or   buying   game   animals   or   parts
thereof 	
Trapping or snaring big game	
Game Birds.
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
Hunting or in possession of migratory game
birds during close season	
Hunting migratory game birds between one
hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise 	
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during close season	
Selling game birds	
Trapping game birds	
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence..
Trapping during the close season	
Trapping without first registering trap-line	
Trapping on a game reserve	
Licences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence-
Buying or trading in fur without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult holder of a licence	
Making a false application for a licence	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence    :	
Non-resident angling without a licence	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging
same from an automobile or other vehicle....
Carrying or in possession of an unplugged
pump-shotgun or an automatic shotgun	
6
13
21
3
13
2
1
4
12
IS
1
T
11
18
43
11
3
42
1
100
42
2
110
$10.00
25.00
110.00
260.00
90.00
85.00
70.00
10.00
20.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
70.00
20.00
270.00
90.00
120.00
65.00
25.00
340.00
50.00
770.00
10.00
30.00
100.00
165.00
185.00
40.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 39
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1933, to December 31st, 1933-
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
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Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Firearms—Continued.
Carrying firearms or traps within a game
reserve 	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway
in a municipality	
Miscellaneous.
Acting as a guide without ascertaining if
hunter was in possession of a licence	
Exporting fur without a permit	
Non-resident acting as a guide	
Obstructing or furnishing false information
to a Game Warden or Constable	
Possession of fur during prohibited period
without a permit therefor..-.	
Trespassing	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding daily bag limit on fish	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited area	
Fishing or in possession of fish during close
season 	
Jigging fish or using set-lines	
Netting fish illegally	
Possession of sturgeon under 3 feet in length.
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
Using more than one lure on a line	
Gaol Sentences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence:
Angling with more than one line	
Buying or selling game animals or birds	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited waters.
Furnishing false information to a Game
Warden 	
Failing to produce firearms licence when requested by a Game Warden	
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
Killing big game during the close season.	
Killing big game under 1 year in age	
Killing pheasants when snow was on the
ground 	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence   	
Netting fish illegally	
Pit-lamping	
Possession of game animals during close season
Possession of untagged deer	
Possession of game birds during close season...
Running deer with dogs	
Trapping without a licence or during close
season	
Trapping on a game reserve	
Totals	
78
78
90
70
158
24
$40.00
30.00
10.00
10.00
20.00
95.00
35.00
110.00
12.00
4.00
15.00
26.50
1.00
22.00
40.50
$3,531.00
474
498
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops. Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " B " Division : Vancouver,
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from two to ninety days. I 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Guides, 1933.
Barkerville District.
Cochrane, J. D Barkerville.
Hodges, N. T	
House, Jos. S	
McCall, James	
McCall, Max A	
McKechnie, Duncan	
McLanders, P	
Reed, F. DeWitt Barkerville.
Rivers, Henry  „
Thompson, Norman  „
Thompson, W  „
Wendle, Jos  „
Youngs, G. A  „
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts.
Blackman, William Valemont.
Brammer, C Likely.
Collins, H Cache Creek.
Collins, W. A Williams Lake.
DeWees, Richard Likely.
Dickson, Fred Likely.
Fletcher, William Pavilion.
Franks, R. J Kamloops.
Hansen, Lee Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Hartong, W Goldbridge.
Higgins, E.. Bridge Lake.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hutch, John Keithley Creek.
James, Jack Lillooet.
James, William Lillooet.
Johnson, J. W Likely.
Jones, W. D Quesnel.
Kustney, Herman Canim Lake.
LeBeck, Ole Swift Creek.
McClary, Wayne Lac la Hache.
Mackill, James Kleena Kleene.
Manson, William Lillooet.
Mobley, C. W Tappen.
Parminter, Ross ! Likely.
Pinkham, E. H Horsefly.
Pinkham, H. E Canim Lake.
Purjue, E Hanceville.
Ray, John B Clearwater Station.
Rioux, E .« Fawn.
Schwartz, H Bridge River.
Shields, James Alexis Creek.
Tibbies, F Quesnel.
Tibbies, J Quesnel.
Tighe, J. H Likely.
Turner, George Kleena Kleene.
Twan, David Castle Rock.
Walters, G Horsefly.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Walters, R. T 150-Mile House.
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B Telegraph Creek.
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek.
Gleason, Henry Telegraph Creek.
Jack, Henry Atlin.
Fort George District.
Carr, Stanley J Tete Jaune.
Chesser, C. A Mount Robson.
Cochrane, R. R Mount Robson.
Colebank, G. A Hixon.
Colebank, Gale Hixon.
Dennison, G. M Red Pass.
Goodell, L. E .-Shere.
Hale, Leslie .Dome Creek.
Hargreaves, G. E .Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, R. F Mount Robson.
Harrison, Bryan Wistaria.
Haynes, E. B Dome Creek.
Johnson, L. M JMcBride.
Saladano, J Mount Robson.
Schive, T Mount Robson.
Shovar, D McBride.
Smith, J. M Red Pass-Snowshoe.
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Beirnes, Geo. M Hazelton.
Hamilton, G. G Rose Lake.
Henson, C. F Ootsa Lake.
Ashman, L Corbin.
Baher, M. C Natal.
Barbour, George Wilmer.
Boiven, William Natal.
Hazelton District.
Jack, Tommy Hazelton.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Morgan, James E Ootsa Lake.
Kootenay District.
Butwell, F. H Golden.
Canning, Fred Skookumchuck.
Eberts, Max Natal.
McGinnes, E. C Natal. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933. I 41
Kootenay District—Continued.
Moore, J. S Wardner. Thomas, W. S Parson.
Nixon, J. H Invermere. Weideman, D. W Leanchoil.
Schofleld, B Windermere. York, H. M Invermere.
Sherk, W. P Castledale. York, R. A Invermere.
Thomas, Guy A Parson.
Peace River District.
Beattie, R Hudson Hope. Golata, F Rolla.
Beckman, W. H JFort St. John. Garbitt, T Hudson Hope.
Callio, Joe Hudson Hope. Gibson, H. B Dawson Creek.
Callio, Peter Little Prairie. Noske, Narcisse Rio Grande P.O., Alta.
Calliou, John Moberly Lake. Ross, J. A Hudson Hope.
Cameron, Patrick South Pine River.       Rutledge, L Hudson Hope.
Cassie, F. C Arras. Wanyandi, St. Paul Goodfare, Alta.
Esswein, P. B East Pine. Wilde, Thos Fort St. John.
Gladu, Pascal Kelly Lake.
Vancouver and Victoria Districts.
Appleby, Gordon Hope. Seuce, Herbert .Lytton.
Bidstrup, Holger Lytton. Service, John Lytton.
Haig-Brown, R. L Alert Bay. Tom, Harry Lytton.
Mansell, Fred North Vancouver. Wilson, Len Agassiz.
Philipps, F. A .North Vancouver. I 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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I 43
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02 02 EH ri REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 45
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Migratoby Game Birds banded by Members op the Game Department
and Returns op Birds killed during 1933.
Kind of Birds banded. No. banded.
Mallard   2,502
Teal (green-wing)      521
Pintail       752
Baldpate (widgeon)         92
Wood-ducks          5
Coots          1
Shoveller         1
Heron   1
Total   3,875
Birds banded and killed, 1933. No. killed.
Mallards        91
Baldpate  (widgeon)         2
Teal (green-wing)          8
Pintail        12
Total        113
Returns from 1,451 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1932-33.
Big Game.
Deer 	
Moose 	
Mountain-sheep
881
466
10
Mountain-goat
Wapiti  (elk)   ..
Bear 	
119
2
387
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   2,875
Fisher   1,039
Fox   446
Lynx   753
Marten   1,901
Mink   2,602
Muskrats  33,267
Otter :      163
Racoon     1,028
Skunk    41
Weasel  20,827
Wildcat •      89
Wolverine        94
Badger   9
Predatory Animals.
Cougar           80 Wolves
Coyotes       661
23
Fur-parm Returns, 1933 (Statement No. 1).
Kind ol Animals.
Beared.
Died.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dee. 31st,
1933.
3,324
20
3,788
3,175
582
2,549
23
2,104
465
90
2
1,243
54
3,131
96
2,454
10,785
Marten	
Mink	
Cancelled permits, 47 ;   Nil returns, 20 ;   no returns received from fur-farmers, 37.
Muskrat-farmers wbo were not able to advise of number of animals on respective farms, as follows :
C. W. Albrecht, Quilchena ; A. L. Bell, Redonda Island ; B. C. Boyce, Kelowna ; Blackwater Furs, Ltd., Vancouver ; G. E. Edwards, Golden ; E. Fabel, Jaffray ; oV. D. Hallett, Masset; U. S. Larkey, Eraser Lake ; S. E.
Manring, Mazama; E. Newbrand, Nakusp ; H. Proctor, Granite Valley, Kettle Valley P.O.; W. P. Sheek,
Castledale ; H. W. Smale, Fort Fraser. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1933.
I 47
Fur-farm Returns, 1933 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1933.
54
7
9
9
11
1
20
6
2
12
517
40
1
40
Cancelled permits, 16 ; Nil returns, 33 ; no returns received from fur-farmers, 10.
Beaver-farmers  who  were  unable  to  advise  of  number  of  animals  on  respective  farms,
Blackwater Furs, Ltd., Vancouver ; G. W. Edwards, Golden ; S. E. Manring, Mazama.
follows :
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1933.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C Victoria.
Game Commissioner A. Bryan Williams Vancouver.
Inspector F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Kelly Vancouver.
Fish Cultural Branch.
Officer i/c Fish Culture A. G. Bolton	
Fishery Officer C. O. Mellor	
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity	
.Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Sub-Inspector J. W. Graham	
Stenographer .Miss J. C. Thomson-
Game Warden R. Marshall	
Game Warden A. Monks	
Game AVarden O. Mottishaw	
Game Warden S. H. McCall	
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield	
Game Warden B. Harvey	
Game Warden • F. P. Weir	
Game Warden B. Cash	
..Nanaimo.
.Nanaimo.
..Duncan.
.Alberni.
..Alert Bay.
.Victoria.
..Nanaimo.
..Courtenay.
.Lake Cowichan.
.Victoria.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Sub-Inspector C. F. Kearns	
Stenographer Miss G. M. Lowery	
Game AVarden I. J. Brown	
Game Warden W. J. Nixon	
..Nelson.
..Nelson.
..Golden.
..Invermere.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Canal Flats.
Game AA7arden N. Cameron Fernie.
Game AVarden ML J. AVilson Revelstoke.
Game Warden L. F. Washburn Fernie.
Game AArarden M. B. Ewart Penticton.
Game AA7arden '. B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game AVarden J. AV. Stewart Greenwood.
Game AVarden W. H. Cartwright Creston. I 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Sub-Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Clerk D. AV. Rowlands Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden AV. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden F. E. Aiken Williams Lake.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden N. L. Robinson Lillooet.
Game Warden AV. O. Quesnel Clinton.
Game Warden L. Jobin .Nicola.
Game Warden W. A. Broughton Alexis Creek.
Game Warden S. H. Jackson Kamloops.
Game AVarden R. AV. MacMartin Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game AATarden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Clerk S. G. Copeland Prince George.
Game AVarden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game AATarden D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Stenographer Miss H. Walker Prince Rupert.
Game AVarden C. R. Goss Ocean Falls.
Game AVarden J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game AA'arden S. F. Faherty Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden G. M. Kerkhoff Fort St. John.
Game AATarden V. L. Williams Finlay Forks.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
" E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector J. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Game AArarden A. P. Cummins Vancouver.
Game AVarden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game AVarden T. D. Sutherland Sechelt.
Game Warden AV. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game AATarden L. H. AA7alker Ganges.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden E. AV. Baker Arancouver.
Game Warden G. AVilliams Abbotsford.
Game AArarden J. A. Stuart Mission.
Game AA'arden , H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden , F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game AATarden J. W. Jones Victoria.
Game Warden E. Boorman Victoria.
Game Warden AAr. Mudge Victoria.
Game AATarden (Probationer) F. S. Poison Victoria.
Labourer J. E. Smith Alctoria.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
J. C. Smith Comox. C. Shuttleworth Penticton.
VICTORIA.  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.
825-634-8007

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