Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1935

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308214.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308214.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308214-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308214-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308214-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308214-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308214-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308214-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308214-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308214.ris

Full Text

 TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
OP  THE
PBOVINCIAL INDTTSTBIAL
HOME FOE GIEL8
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1933, TO MAEOH 31ST, 1934
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfielu, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.
pjR@ViNC!A?- LIBRARY^
VICTORIA, B. C  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twentieth Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial Home for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1934.
GORDON McG. SLOAN, K.C.,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1931h Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1931.
The Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1933, to March 31st, 1934.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls. : I
•*.*.
; f     e
^PK-M^W"
■lllllellS
o
a  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME
FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C., April 1st, 1934.
Attorney-General, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twentieth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls from April 1st, 1933,
to March 31st, 1934.
The past year has been rather quiet in comparison with the previous one and its Doukhobors.
Though they were so difficult at first, it was with regret we saw the last group leave in May,
1933.
Our own girls have been unusually easy to cope with. There has been a happy spirit in the
school, the seniors having developed into reliable girls and very helpful in training the juniors.
Our commitments were less than the previous year, the charges were very similar, and cases
came from different parts of the Province. Four girls were returned for a second period of
training, having failed on parole.
Every girl on admission has the same routine of examination—complete physical, including
general development, posture, arches, urine analysis, blood test for Kahn and slides for Neisser
infection examined at General Hospital Laboratory, basal metabolism at hospital if indicated;
also further. eye tests by specialists and glasses if necessary. She occupies a single room in
quarantine quarters for two weeks, to prevent entry of communicable diseases; then if tests
are negative she has her place in the dormitory, dining-room, training division, and class-room
allotted to her. It is always explained to a new girl that this is not a place of punishment,
just a school where many interesting and necessary lessons are taught.
Dental examination frequently reveals deplorable neglect, making many extractions necessary. A supervisor takes a group once a month, or oftener if necessary, to dentist's office in
city. More and better work can be done with proper equipment; also the trip down-town
compensates for the discomfort while there. Usually there are requests for oil of cloves preceding dental day, intimating that they would like to be included in list.
All available information is secured, including former school reports, her " own story " taken,
Kuhlmann-Anderson and Haggerty tests given, and as soon as possible psychometric examination
by Dr. Crease, Psychiatrist, Child Guidance Clinic. These tests and advice given have been
very helpful in knowing what to expect of a girl and how to plan for her future.
A girl is a junior for the first six months, intermediate next six, and senior during her
last year. More is expected of them as they progress, and for a senior to be guilty of breaking
rules and a poor example to juniors is a disappointment.
The younger juniors occupy one very large dormitory with only twelve beds, closely
supervised; then, when conduct warrants, are promoted to honour dormitory with less supervision. They have dressing-rooms and well-equipped bath-rooms in connection. This same
arrangement applies to the older girls at the other end of long corridor. A cosy club-room is
half-way between, and used jointly and almost continually. On main floor the juniors and
seniors each have their sitting-room, and they must use their own; also a large assembly-room
which they share.
Our daily routine is much the same, planned to give time for study, work, recreation, and
rest. We rise at 7, twenty-five minutes to dress and make beds; then to the club-room, with
the exception of one girl in kitchen to assist cook and two to attend to dining-room. Girls
rotate in these positions. There is the quiet five minutes; then reading of a verse or two, with
short explanation by Superintendent, or the reading in unison of a psalm, singing a hymn, and
the Lord's Prayer. Breakfast over, each girl goes to her appointed duty, which is changed
frequently  enough for her  to be trained in all departments.    Dinner  from 12  to  12.30,  all E 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
changing into afternoon dresses before going into dinner. The girls who have been in school
during the morning while the other girls were busy with the housework now wash the dishes
and tidy the dining-room. The afternoon class rest until school opens at 1 o'clock. The morning
school girls separate into sewing, laundry, knitting, or garden groups, and are so engaged until
4 o'clock. Supper 5.30 to 6. Menus are drafted one week in advance, are varied and well
balanced. Meals are served cafeteria, thus giving choice and eliminating waste. On Monday
after school each girl has her personal mending to do; Tuesday, 4.15, home-nursing; 7.15, the
Oxford Group of from three to eight members bring their message to our girls. Wednesday,
from 2.30 to 5.30, instruction in knitting is given. We knit our own sweaters, and therefore can
have two for the price of one ready-made. Six sweater suits have been completed and are very
attractive. This training will also be of benefit after release. Choir practice on Wednesday
at 7.15 for one hour, conducted by a supervisor who has had many years of music and teaching
experience. Thursday, at 4.15, first-aid class. Lectures and demonstrations are given by one
of our staff who has St. John Ambulance teacher's certificate. At 7.15, one hour of religious
education conducted by students of the Bible school, who have given this service for over four
years and with splendid results. Friday, at 4, is basket-ball in the gymnasium, supervised by
teacher, and in the evening folk-dancing and club-swinging. All these classes and meetings are
elective, never compulsory, but the attendance is regular and the interest maintained.
Saturday afternoon and the first Sunday of the month are visiting-days for relatives, but
they are only expected to come every second week unless under unusual circumstances. Out-
of-town visitors are allowed to come when in the city. Two letters are written every three
weeks to relatives, but relatives may write as frequently as they wish, and small gifts of candy,
fruit, etc., are allowed. All letters are censored, incoming and outgoing; also parcels carefully
scrutinized, because, though the majority of our parents are willing to co-operate with us, there
are a few who are not dependable, and supervision must be maintained in the visiting-room.
Saturday evening is usually spent around the fireplace, dancing and sharing the parcels brought
in during the afternoon by the visitors.
On Sunday we go to church up on the hill—the Catholics to their own and the Protestants
to the Presbyterian or Anglican. While we all wear uniform in the school, we dress for church
and going to the city. If a girl has not suitable clothes for going places, she is supplied.
Sunday afternoon, from 3 to 4, we have service taken by Salvation Army, Baptist, Presbyterian,
and Anglican in turn for each Sunday in Ihe month. These services are enjoyed by the girls,
as the best of speakers and programmes are provided. Sunday evening, and other evenings too,
we enjoy good music over the radio.
Every girl attends school here. A girl's former school rating, coupled with tests given on
admission, determine her school placing, though she is closely observed and her grade changed
if advisable. The morning class, from 9 to 12, has up to Grade VI. pupils. These are "specials,"
requiring extra training in certain subjects, and with limited mentality. The afternoon class
from 1 to 4, is for Grades VII. and VIII. Study period is from 6.15 to 7 each evening. Our
course of study is that prescribed for public schools, and text-books recommended by the
Department of Education. Not all subjects can be taken, as only half a day is given to academic,
the other half to domestic training. Many have been out of school for several years, and in
order to have them benefit the course must be made very interesting, and much repetition is
required. Our girls are inclined to be spasmodic, beginning everything new with vim, hut
lacking concentration and soon losing interest. The girls with limited mentality cannot be kept
too steadily at book-work, or they become confused, irritable. Interesting projects such as
lumbering, gold-mining, cotton from seed to finished product, and instructive conversation during
hand-work period gives them information without strain. Their interest is centred now on
a doll's house, six rooms, furnished completely and electric-lighted. Toys, trays, picture-framing,
reed baskets, and ferneries are also included in hand-work.    School is closed during August.
Love of the beautiful is fostered, desire for harmony and daintiness with little expense.
In the experimental garden they are taught to prepare the soil, plant, transplant, layer, cultivate,
and finally the gathering and storing for winter of vegetables, seeds, and bulbs. This knowledge
they apply in the large garden, and often after returning home.
The girls beyond Grade VIII. go into commercial class, the course being given by the
stenographer, who attends to office routine in the morning and her class in the afternoon.    Not many junior positions are available, but our girls have the advantage of being competent maids
as well, and in several instances are combining the two trainings. The Y.W.C.A. have given
the privilege of practising on their typewriters, even supplying dictation and paper to our
released commercial girls.
One girl with insufficient vision, pronounced incurable by specialist, is attending regular
school in morning, typing class in afternoon, and one lesson weekly in Braille, given by teacher
provided by Canadian National Institute for the Blind.
Another girl took course in beauty-parlour requirements during the past year, leaving here
at 8.15 a.m. and returning after 6 o'clock. A bachelor uncle supplied money for her fees and
school supplied car-tickets, lunch, and uniforms. She was successful in all examinations, and
since release has been' employed on commission basis in good parlour. She has living-quarters
near her work, and comes to the school once in six weeks to cut girls' hair, for which she is paid.
There is a reward for good conduct, both during term and at its close. Twenty-five cents
a month is given to a girl with 100 points, and she is credited with five days off her time;
90 points, 20 cents and four days; 80 points, 15 cents and three days. AVhen a girl has 100 per
cent, for twelve months to her credit she wears a distinctive uniform of pink instead of blue.
After a girl has been six months 100 per cent, she is a councillor, and school problems are
discussed with her.
Our honour girls are taken on a pleasure-trip each month, down-town shopping and tea;
sometimes to tea with friends, a picnic, boat ride, or to a matinee if picture is suitable. The
management allow us this privilege, not charging admission. The choir attend the Musical
Festival on invitation of secretary, and tickets for other concerts have been supplied. Eighteen
girls were given six swimming lessons at pool, Second Beach, by an expert provided by Sun
newspaper.
We have a gymnasium, with stage, used for large concerts, club-swinging, soft ball, basketball, and other games. The baseball-field adjoining the gymnasium is kept in good condition
by the girls, and the Friday game under direction of school-teacher is very popular.
We had four runaways during this year, and it was rather more of a shock than usual
because we had been free for over fifteen months from such. The first two went one afternoon
in their garden clothes, khaki shorts and blouse, and walked to New Westminster to visit a
cousin of one, where the welcome was not cordial. That evening they asked a policeman to
telephone, saying they would like to come home. Their requests were granted. The other two
were pining for city life and old haunts. They were found there, brought home, cold, hungry,
and dirty, and were not allowed to tell a wonderful tale to the others of the joys of the outside.
They admitted bad luck, no money, and very little food. Of the latter two, one was definitely
feeble-minded and the other subnormal. These runaways were not planned, or, if planned,
not shared, as the other girls do not enjoy the " period of mourning " that follows a runaway,
and will try to prevent it by argument first, or, if that fails, come openly to the office for
assistance.    Most of the girls are fair enough to see that this is not tale-bearing.
During the past season we had most enjoyable concerts brought to us by the Women's
Musical, Philharmonic, Red Cross, Sea Guides, St. Cecilia Choristers, Burnaby Choir, Memorial
Church Young People, Pals' Club from the Y.W.C.A., and others. They have brought pleasure
to us, and we in turn have surprised those who came expecting to be depressed, to find a group
of attractive, well-behaved girls, following, in as far as possible, the ordinary life of the average
school and working girl. The majority are here because of broken homes, lack of supervision
and good example in poor environment.
Our location makes it possible for us to have outside contacts which are of benefit. We
have disapproved of many of their former habits and friends, and we must provide substitutes.
If the girls are to be prepared for re-entry into community life, they must live under normal
conditions while in the school. Our neighbours are interested in a friendly way, and have
often remarked on the happy laughter coming from the grounds.
Our girls are taught to work, to avoid waste, to be careful of equipment, and willing to do
without some things in order to get something we want very much. I take them into my
confidence as I always have my own family; that we have only so much to spend and must
plan wisely in  order  to have little  extras.    We  take extra  care  in darning our  every-day E 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
stockings so we can have a nicer pair for church.    Our curtains in the dormitories are only
9-cent factory-cotton, but they are dyed a pretty shade and are very effective.
When a girl has completed her training and is ready to go out on her own, in the greater
majority of cases she goes to a position directly from the school. Our girls are well trained in
all branches of housework, are competent, have a clean bill of health, and we have no difficulty
in placing them. I state frankly that they have been in this school, but emphasize, also, these
facts just mentioned. We provide them with an outfit; place them, and maintain a friendly
supervision, though we have no authority. They are welcome to spend their off-duty time here
in the school, and there is seldom a Sunday or Thursday that we do not have some of the
outside girls to tea. They know that they may telephone us if in any difficulty, and we will go
to them at once. If it is necessary for them to find another position, they sometimes stay with
us for a few days in the meantime.
The Matron spends Wednesday visiting the girls in their homes or places of employment,
and is made very welcome. Many of our girls marry early and are taking good care of their
homes and little ones. We had two weddings this past year of our girls—one in the Superintendent's suite and the other in the church we attend. We receive many interesting letters
from girls out of town, also from parents.
Of the 132 girls who have been committed during the past five years, 41 are married, 22
living at home, 37 working and self-supporting, 1 in Mental Hospital, 3 deported, 1 dead, and
27 still in school. As to the percentage of those who have made good, that is difficult to declare
in figures. I feel very confident that more than three-quarters were definitely benefited by their
training, and even the remaining one-quarter have absorbed something worth while, though
they are not living in accordance with our views and standards. Some of our girls when first
released are inclined to take advantage of their freedom from restraint, but they later settle
and are quite satisfactory. Two years is a short time in which to completely change their
standards of living and thinking. We have many problems, and sometimes are very discouraged,
but there are so many bright spots too.
Though we do not subscribe to monthly magazines for the school, our friends have been
thoughtful, and generous in their supply. Scrap-books filled with poems, recipes, knitting, and
fashion notes are treasured, to take home on release.
Quite a number of used books have been donated for the library, which was further
augmented by a purchase of books amounting to $13.35, a donation from the Social Workers'
Club at their annual meeting.
The lavender in the school-garden was carefully dried, and yielded 7% lb. at $1 a pound to
be exchanged for new books; also each girl sent a sachet of lavender to her mother with
Christmas greetings. Little gifts for each other and the home-folk are possible because they
are made of oddments, silk, satin, lace, etc., given by friends of the school, and fashioned
daintily by clever fingers.
The garden yielded a good supply of strawberries, loganberries, and raspberries for table
use, and in addition large quantities of loganberries, raspberries, and cherries were preserved.
The canning and jam was done by the girls under the supervision of a staff, and there has been
a plentiful supply throughout the year.
The following were preserved: 38 quarts strawberries, 93 quarts cherries, 158 quarts raspberries, 171 quarts loganberries, 23 quarts peaches, 68 quarts greengages, 87 quarts pears, 115
quarts plum jam, and 52 quarts crab-apple jelly.
The vegetable-garden supply enabled us to serve a vegetable, together with potatoes, daily
throughout the year, and in addition the following pickles were made: 24 quarts pickled crab-
apples, 97 quarts mustard pickles, 15 quarts mixed pickles, and 9 quarts pickled onions.
The appearance of the grounds has been improved by a severe trimming of hedge enclosure.
The lily-pond in the sunken garden is a very attractive spot. Both the lily-pond and the pond
for the ducks in the poultry-yard were the work of the girls, and very creditable. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1933-34. E 9
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes   $30.00
Cabbage   ,. 277.44
Cauliflower   50.70
Beets  ... 30.26
Carrots  :  136.09
Beans  24.07
Peas  75.10
Onions (by pound)  i  53.10
Onions (by bunch)   78.30
Onions (pickling)    9.00
Spinach  15.25
Brussels sprouts   13.88
Cucumbers  16.00
Radish  4.60
Asparagus   4.20
Lettuce   203.38
Parsnips   25.76
Parsley   2.50
Vegetable marrow  52.50
Tomatoes   6.63
Celery  2.40
Turnips     50.77
$1,161.93
Fruit.
Apples   $29.44
Crab-apples  1.25
Cherries   1.80
Loganberries  :  16.82
Pears  3.25
Raspberries   37.83
Rhubarb   15.30
Strawberries   4.25
$109.94
POULTRY.
At the beginning of the present fiscal year we had 213 hens and cockerels, 2 geese, and
3 turkeys; 249 baby chicks were raised, also 7 baby turkeys and 4 goslings; 108 hens and
cockerels weighing 523y2 lb. were killed for table use, also 3 turkeys weighing 60y2 lb.; 1,978%
dozen eggs were produced during the year, of which 215 dozen were preserved, 210 dozen sent to
butcher to apply on meat bill, and the remainder consumed.
PIGS.
We had 11 pigs at the beginning of the present fiscal year and 20 were born during the
year;   11 pigs were killed, weighing 1,746 lb., and used for consumption in the school;   3 baby
pigs died, leaving a balance of 17.
POPULATION OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1934.
On roll, March 31st, 1933      33
Girls admitted during year March 31st, 1933, to March 31st, 1934     14
47
Released as wards of Juvenile Court     15
Released by order of Attorney-General      4
Released by Provincial Secretary        1
    20
Total in Home, March 31st, 1934     27 E 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1934—Continued.
Number of escapes during year       4
Number captured and returned       4
Number returned in less than twenty-four hours       2
Number returned in four days        I
Number returned in five days       I
Doukhobor girls on roll, March 31st, 1933     64
Doukhobor girls returned to relatives, April 5th, 1933     25
Doukhobor girls returned to relatives, April 29th, 1933     31
Doukhobor girls returned to relatives, May 27th, 1933      8
Number of meals served during year   50,457
Average cost per meal, including groceries, such as meat, fish, cereals,
yeast, ice, and fruit     9%nc.
Average cost per girl per month, including salaries, office supplies,
travelling expenses, furniture and fixtures, clothing, janitors' supplies, water, fuel and light, provisions, medical and dental attendance, hospital supplies, farm operations, household furnishings,
incidentals, and good-conduct money;  also maintenance of grounds.. $54.45
LIST OF GIRLS IN HOME, MARCH 31st, 1934.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to Home.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Length of Term.
359
394
395
396
397
398
399
402
403
404
405
400
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
Coronation, Alta	
Toronto, Ontario	
Milwaukee, Wis	
London,  England	
Sacramento,  Cal	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Kouye River, B.C	
Bella Bella, B.C	
Cumberland, B.C	
Toronto, Ontario	
Valparaiso —
Winnipeg, Man	
Rupert's House, Hudson
Bay Post	
Sheffield, England	
Victoria,  B.C	
Dunfermline, Scotland..
Wainwright,  Alta .—
Wishaw, Scotland	
Unknown  	
Bellevue,  Alta	
Cranbrook, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Poland  	
Vancouver, B.C	
Coleman,  Alta	
Sechelt Reserve, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
German-Canadian...
Irish	
German	
Irish-English	
Canadian-Irish..	
English-Canadian,
English	
French-English,
Japanese-Eskimo..
French-English,
•Japanese-Eskimo..
Scotch-American,
Scotch-Canadian..
Canadian	
Chilean	
German-American,
Irish-Canadian
Scotch-Canadian	
English-Scotch	
Italian	
Scotch	
English-Irish	
Scotch	
Unknown	
Italian	
SwTedish	
English	
Polish	
Irish, French-
English	
English, Spanish-
Irish	
Sechelt Band Indian
Scotch-Canadian,
French-American
Years.
1
7
13
12
15
13
10
17
13
14
10
13
2
16
5
15
3%
Unknown
13
16
19
16
3
15
8
Years.
2%
13
2
13
12
15
13
10
17
17
14
15
19
12
16
5
18
3%
Unknown
15
16
19
5
16
15
15
8
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Two years.
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
Two years.
Two to five years.
Two to five years.
Two years.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
See. 20, J.D.A.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
Returned.
Two years.
Returned.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Transferred   from   Protestant
Children's Aid Society.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
One year.
Returned.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Until 18 years of age.
Transferred   from   Catholic
Children's Aid Society. NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Canadians  (both)        1
English (both)       1
Scotch (both)       2
Irish   (both)     1
Chilean (both)    1
German (both)   1
Italian (both)   2
Swedish  (both)     1
Polish  (both)     1
Indian  (both)   1
English-Japanese    2
Canadian-English   1
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
Canadian-Irish    1
Canadian-American   1
American-Canadian   2
Scotch-Canadian   1
German-Canadian  1
English-Irish   2
English-Scotch     1
Irish-English   2
Unknown     1
Total  27
British Columbia   10
Alberta    4
Manitoba     1
Ontario   3
England     2
Scotland    2
United States  2
Chile     1
Poland   1
Unknown    1
Total  27
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible     15
Theft   1
Breaking and entering  2
Intent to defraud   1
Contempt of Court  1
Transferred from Protestant
Aid Society as in-
  1
Children's
corrigible
Transferred from Catholic Children's Aid Society as incorrigible   1
Prostitution   1
Keeper of disorderly house  1
Recidivists   3
Total  27
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Cranbrook     1
Fernie    1
Kelowna   1
Nanaimo   2
Ocean Falls   2
Powell River   1
LENGTH OF  SENTENCE.
Rutland     2
Vancouver     11
Victoria      6
Total  27
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  10
Two years      5
Two to five years      2
One year      1
Until 18 years of age      2
Recidivists   3
Sec. 59, Infants Act   1
Industrial Home for Girls Act  3
Total  27
AGES OF GIRLS IN HOME.
13 years   3
14 years   2
15 years   11
16 years   4
17 years   4
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
18 years      1
19 years      2
Total  27
Baptists     2
Church of England   5
Gospel Mission   1
Lutheran     1
Presbyterian    1
Roman Catholic      C
Salvation Army      1
United Church   10
Total  27 E 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living   14
Number who have father living and mother dead      6
Number who have mother living and father dead      5
Number who are adopted      2
Total  27
Of the above, 10 parents are separated, 3 divorced, 7 girls have stepfathers, 6 have stepmothers, and 2 have foster-parents.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Matron Mrs. C. E. M. Dickson.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Second Assistant '. Miss Mary E. Anderson.
Linen-keeper Miss Katherine M. Smith.
Sewing Supervisor Mrs. Helen M. Atcheson.
Cook Miss Martha Curtis.
Teacher Miss Doris Lumb.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener Thomas Hoskins.
Gardener Frank Holland.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman, April 1st, 1934.
Superintendent, Provincial, Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Maoam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1933, to
March 31st, 1934:—
Calls made by physician   52
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   372
Complete physical examination   14
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection   5
Total number of days in isolation   818
Smears taken for Neisser infection  337
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman   26
Treatments for syphilis intravenously   34
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously   3
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection 1,656
Urine tests   24
X-rays   1
Vaccination     5
Toxoids   2
Goitre cases treated daily   2
Basal metabolism   1
Maternity case attended in General Hospital (boy)   1
Examination by eye specialist   2
Glasses provided    1 The general health  of  the girls has  been  very  good.    Each girl  on  admission  receives
a complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
Each girl has been examined by dentist and necessary fillings or extractions attended to.
Several cases of trench-mouth were treated successfully.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Mart B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman, April 1st, 1934.
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary dental
work done for all.
Owing to the lack of equipment it has been found satisfactory to bring the girls to my city
office.
The following report applies to the period from April 1st, 1933, to March 31st, 1934:—
Visits to dentist     12
Number of girls seen     61
Amalgam fillings     35
Cement fillings      28
Extractions     26
Cleanings       19
Novacaine administrations  :     56
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman, April 1st, 1934.
' Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—I beg leave to submit the following report for the past year:—
School.—A girl is placed either into the Morning or Afternoon class, according to her ability.
The former is for girls capable of doing Grades I. to VI. work and the latter Grades VII. and
VIII.
Morning Class.—This class is conducted from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. The time is divided
between academic and hand-work.
The academic work is the usual work of Grades I. to VI. A girl is given the work in each
subject, not according to a grade, but to her ability in each subject, so that she might be doing
Grade IV. arithmetic, but Grade VI. spelling, etc.
Though " hand-work" usually entails the making of baskets, trays, toys, magazine-racks,
and other small pieces of furniture, we frequently correlate academic and hand-work in building
some project, which this year was " gold-mining," illustrating placer, hydraulic, and lode
methods, and with which each girl made an illustrated booklet.
In the spring, summer, and early fall gardening takes the place of hand-work in this class.
They are taught everything necessary in the making and care of a garden. A piece of ground
approximately an acre is set aside especially for them. Here mostly herbs are grown, such
as lavender, thyme, rosemary, wormwood, sage, and chives. We have also four perennial
borders and two large beds of strawberries.
Gardening, aside from the health standpoint, affords many opportunities for practical
concrete nature and geography lessons. E 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The average monthly attendance for this class was 9.18 and the total time 4,785 hours.
Afternoon Class.—This class, conducted from 1 to 4 p.m., takes the regular curriculum of
Grades VII. and VIII., and the average monthly attendance was 15.27 and the total number of
hours 9,674.
Sports.—In the fall and winter seasons the girls play basket-ball; in the summer, baseball.
Good sportsmanship and clean play is always stressed.
Remarks.—The mentality of. the girls is on a whole lower than that of an average pupil.
There is, however, a marked improvement in a girl's progress as her health responds to the
medical care, regular hours, and good food afforded her.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Doris Lumb,
School-teacher.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Ciiakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1034.
425-634-8043  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0308214/manifest

Comment

Related Items