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TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1934

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 TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1932, TO MAECH 31ST, 1933
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent* Majesty.
1933.
.  LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B.C.  '
To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1933.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. ■
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1932, to March 31st, 1933.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys.   DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
P. D. Walker, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Blrs. M., Matron.
Clayton, C, Assistant Superintendent.
AValdon, Mrs. M. E., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
AVorkman, Miss E., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Farm Instructor. Scott, W. J„ Plumber and Engineer.
Munroe, D. AV., Poultryman.
Peck, Miss A., Senior Female Teacher. Blagburn, E. W., Senior Teacher.
McKenzie, Miss A. B., Junior Female Teacher.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Hon. S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-ninth Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, British Columbia, for the year ended March 31st, 1933.
In presenting a report on the activities of an institution such as Biscoq, one must, to a great
extent, deal with the customary statistics and figures, and owing to lack of space leave out
entirely or scarcely touch upon the human, moral, and spiritual side of the work, which, after
all, is the greatest factor in the successful dealing with the problem boy.
Institutional staff work is not a job or a position, nor is it a place for the untrained or the
unfit; rather is it a challenge that can only be met by those who have ability, vision, and faith,
and who are prepared to sacrifice personal ambition in the interests of the boys committed to
their care, endeavouring at all times to afford them the training and example they have
needed all through life but did not get. Again, our position is very much different to that of
other schools, churches, and societies; they are in the position where they have a voice in who
shall become pupils or inmates, and they have the power to expel those who become unruly afterwards. Not so us; all who arrive must be accepted and kept, no matter how troublesome they
may become or what their physical or mental handicap may be. Our place must be a refuge or
place of safety, where every boy will have an opportunity to make good, no matter what his past
record may have been, and all boys have a record of wrongdoing before they are sent to us, and,
in spite of what may be said to the contrary, no innocent boys ever come here. The question of
whether a boy or society is responsible for their record is another matter altogether, but, at any
rate, we get the boy, no matter who is responsible; therefore we must do something for him.
The first thing we find necessary to do is to get him to forget and discard erroneous ideas of
habits, and in their place put new desires which may mean desire for class-work in the schoolroom or to take up a vocation. It is an unfortunate fact that a large number of boys received
do not like work, and consider that sponging on others for a living, or stealing other people's
property and getting through life without working, is the pinnacle of success.
There is an old adage that " An idle brain is the devil's workshop." Experience has taught
us that nothing could be truer, and the boy who has neither the opportunity nor the inclination
to be mechanically or constructively engaged is sure to fall into degenerate ways, and will
associate with others like himself, eventually becoming a menace and a stench to society, compelling the authorities to take drastic action, in the interests of the boy and the community. It
has been proven, by those closely identified with work amongst juvenile delinquents, that a
change of environment has worked wonders in boys when other remedies have failed. I believe
this is the motive that prompts Judges of Juvenile Courts to commit boys to this institution to
afford them an opportunity of getting a new outlook on life and learn the value of citizenship.
In my many years' experience in handling the delinquent and misunderstood boy, I have
found, apart from those who suffer from a serious mental disability, that most of them are
intensely human and require thoughtful and considerate care.    In other words:—
" He is just a boy and a boy must romp,
A boy must run 'till his pulses jump,
Just swing his arms and kick his heels
To give full vent to the joy he feels.
Must rush in the house and bolt his meals
And long for the things which run on wheels.
And whenever you find him sitting still,
It is not that he's tired—it's because he's ill." H
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1932, TO MARCH 31st, 1933.
On roll, March 31st, 1932  152
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1932, to March 31st, 1933     29
181
Released as wards of the Juvenile Court  49
Completed sentence  30
Transferred  to Essondale Mental Hospital  and  released  on  doctor's
recommendation       1
—   80
Total in school, March 31st, 1933  101
In addition to above there were 91 Doukhobor boys admitted to the school,
making a total of  192
Number of escapes during year     20
Number captured and returned  14
Number still at liberty     6
BISCOQ'S DAILY PROGRAMME.
1.00 p.m.   Trades   and   vocational
training commences.
1.30 p.m.    Schools open.
4.30 p.m.   Trades and schools close.
5.00 p.m.    Supper.
5.30 p.m.    Recreation.
8.00 p.m.    Retreat and flag-lowering
ceremony.
8.30 p.m.    Evening prayers.
9.15 p.m.    Lights out.
Band practices are held Saturday afternoons at 1.30 and Tuesday mornings at 10.
Sunday mornings are devoted to inspection and check-ups of clothing.
Sunday afternoons to religious services and lectures.
6.00 a.m.
7.00 a.m.
7.30 a.m.
7.45 a.m.
8.00 a.m.
9.00 a.m.
11.30 a.m.
12.00 m.
Reveille.
Breakfast.
Morning prayers.
Flag-raising ceremony.
Trades   and   vocational
training commences.
Schools open.
Trades and schools close.
Dinner and play.
SOME THINGS AVE EMPHASIZE AT BISCOQ.
(1.)  That instant obedience to the voice of authority is necessary at all times.
(2.)  That loyalty, respect, and fidelity towards the flag of our country is the duty of all
who claim its protection.
(3.) That homage, reverence, and veneration of His name is the least tribute man can pay
his Creator.
(4.)  That a healthy body is the best assurance for old age a boy can have.
(5.)  That all work is honourable, and no one has the right to sponge upon others for a
living.
(6.) That other people's property is sacrecl and must not be interfered wtih, except by the
owner's consent.
(7.)  That honesty in every form is a principle and not a policy.
(8.)  That there is nothing clever or honourable in breaking the laws of our country.
(9.) That Canada has a code of morality and a standard of living befitting her citizens, and
all who live within her borders should strive to live up to her ideals and not by any act of theirs
lower her standards.
(10.) That the really worth-while citizen is the man who plays a clean game, whether on
the side that is winning or on the one that is losing.
(11.)  That all improvement of a permanent nature takes place within and works outward.
(12.)  That we are either good for something or good for nothing. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33.
H 9
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1933.
No.
Tlace ot Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
966
1126
1138
1144
1163
1164
1168
1169
1170
1176
1177
1178
1179
1180
1184
1186
1188
1189
1192
1193
1194
1195
1196
1197
1198
1199
1201
1202
1204
1205
1206
1207
1208
1210
1212
1214
1215
1216
1217
1218
1219
1220
1221
1222
1223
1224
1225
1226
1227
1228
1229
1230
1233
1234
1235
1236
1237
1238
1239
New Westminster, B.C	
Kamloops, B.C	
Vernon, B.C	
Arictoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
East Prettiwell, England-
Rosthern, Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Burnaby, B.C	
San Diego, Cal	
Scotland	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Rocky Point, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Laidlaw, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Red Deer, Alta	
England	
Clear Lake, Wis	
Vancouver, B.C	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Armstrong, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Spokane, Wash	
Port Carling, Ont	
Steenan, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Russia	
Sydney, Nova Scotia	
Michel, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Nova Scotia	
Liverpool, England	
Ashcroft, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Halifax, Nova Scotia.	
London, England	
Scotland	
Victoria, B.C	
Ireland	
Vancouver, B.C	
Toronto, Ont	
Pemberton Meadows, B.C..
Victoria, B.C	
Lynn Valley, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Regina, Sask	
Marpole, B.C	
Norway	
New Westminster, B.C	
Cloverdale	
Vancouver, B.C	
Cowichan Bay, B.C	
Alberta... '..
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
English	
Russian	
Scotch-Canadian	
Serbian	
Canadian	
American	
Scotch	
English-Canadian	
Canadian ...
Indian	
Indian	
French-Bulgarian-American..
Scotch	
Indian	
English	
Canadian	
English	
American-English	
Canadian-Irish	
Canadian	
English-Canadian	
Italian	
Italian	
American	
Canadian.	
Ukranian	
Irish	
Russian	
English-Canadian	
Russian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
Scotch-Canadian	
English	
English	
Scotch	
Italian	
Irish-Canadian	
Hawaiian-French	
Scotch-Canadian	
Indian	
Canadian	
Irish-Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
English-Scotch	
Norwegian	
English-Canadian	
English	
English-Scotch	
Indian..."	
Canadian	
Years.
16
15
11
13
18
18
14
18
11
15
17
16
13
18
16
16
18
16
14
18
18
17
16
16
16
11
16
13
15
18
12
15
18
14
14
17
17
13
17
16
17
15
14
15
14
11
17
15
11
16
18
14
17
11
Years.
16
15
11
13
18
6
17
16
18
14
9
18
11
15
17
16
13
18
16
16
18
16
14
18
18
17
16
16
16
11
16
13
15
18
12
15
18
14
14
17
17
13
17
16
17
15
14
15
14
11
17
15
11
16
18
14
17
11 LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1933—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being .admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1240
1241
1242
1243
1244
1245
1246
1247
1248
1249
1250
1251
1252
1253
1254
1255
1256
1258
1259
1260
1261
1262
1263
1264
1265
1266
1267
1268
1269
1270
1273
1274
1275
1276
1277
1278
1279
1280
1281
1282
1283
1284
Greenwood, B.C	
Saffron Walden, England
London, England	
Theodore, Sask	
Hillcrest, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Anacortes, Wash	
Victoria, B.C	
Vonda, Sask	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Toronto, Ont	
Vermilion, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Calgary, Alta.....	
Port Coquitlam, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Liverpool, England..-	
Malahide, Ont	
Avonlea, Sask :	
Victoria, B.C	
Grand Porks, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Tate, Sask	
Waldo, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C ...
Fife, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Duff, Sask	
Rosedale, B.C	
Chehalis Reserve, B.C	
Marlborough, England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver1, B.C	
Idaho, D.S.A	
Rome, Italy	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C...	
Bellis, Alta	
Bellis, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Canadian-Irish	
English	
Irish-Swiss	
Dkranian	
English	
Scotch	
Canadian-American	
Irish-English	
Canadian	
Hawaiian-Chilian	
Italian...	
American ,	
Canadian-English	
Scotch	
English-American	
American	
Italian	
Italian	
English....	
Canadian-English	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Russian....	
Canadian-Scotch	
Canadian	
English	
Canadian .'.	
Italian	
Austrian-Russian	
Canadian	
Indian	
Indian '.	
English	
Canadian-Irish	
English	
Canadian-English	
Italian	
English-..	
American-Canadian (Negro)
Ukrnnian	
Ukranian	
Scotch-Canadian	
Years.
17
13
17
10
16
10
17
15
18
14
16
11
14
15
17
IS
17
15
5
3
8
7
16
IS
16
16
14
15
12
13
18
IS
S
18
13
11
10
11
12
16
10
15
Years.
17
13
17
10
16
16
17
15
IS
14
16
11
14
15
17
18
17
15
5
13
Life.
7
16
18
16 ■
16
14
15
12
15
18
IS
S
18
13
11
10
11
12
10
14
15
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)         4
Canadian  (both)       21
English (both)       16
Indian (both)  	
Irish (both) 	
Italian (both) 	
Norwegian  (both)  	
Russian (both) 	
Scotch (both)  	
Serbian (both)  	
  (
  1
  8
  1
  4
  5
  1
Ukranian  (both)    4
Canadian-American  1
Canadian-English   3
Canadian-Irish    3
English-Canadian   4
Scotch-Canadian   4
Irish-Canadian    2
American-English   1
English-American   1
Irish-Swiss   1
Hawaiian-Chilian   1
English-Scotch  2 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33.
H 11
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS—Continued.
Hawaiian-French   1
Irish-English   1
French-Bulgarian-American    1
American-Canadian-Negro   1
Austrian-Russian
Canadian-Scotch .
Total  101
WHERE BOYS AVERE BORN.
Alberta       10
British Columbia      57
Saskatchewan
Ontario 	
England 	
Scotland 	
United States ..
Ireland 	
Italy	
Russia 	
Norway 	
Nova Scotia
Total ,., 101
Arson 	
Incorrigibility 	
B.E. & S	
Theft 	
False pretences 	
Damage to property
Indecent assault 	
Assault 	
Vagrancy	
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
 :. 2 Unlawful possession of firearms      1
  16           Burglar's tools in possession        1
  23           Sexual immorality        1
  44           Carnal knowledge      1
  1           Damage to H.M. property      1
  2           Buggery       1
  2                                                                            	
  3                          Total  101
PLACES OP APPREHENSION.
Agassiz  	
Armstrong  ....
Burnaby  	
Chemainus 	
Chilliwack   "...
Cranbrook 	
Duncan 	
Fernie 	
Fort St. John
Greenwood ....
Hope 	
Kamloops  	
Kelowna  	
Nanaimo 	
Penticton	
Pemberton  1
Prince George   1
Prince Rupert   4
New AATestminster  12
North Arancouver   2
Roberts Creek   2
Rossland  1
Saanich   1
Squamish    1
Surrey   1
Trail  1
Arancouver  33
Arictoria   15
Total  101
5 years 	
Indefinite	
Sec. 17, J.D.A.
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908        4
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929     47
2 years    32
3 years       8
4 years      1
AGES OF BOYS IN
10 years  1
11 years  3
12 years  7
13 years  6
14 years :  6
15 years  15
16 years  13
Average age, 16.
Total  101
INSTITUTION.
17 years  21
18 years  15
19 years  11
20 years  3
Total  101 H 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholics  30 Christian Science       2
Methodist   2 Seventh Day Adventists       1
Presbyterian    17 Four Square Gospel      2
Church of England  26 Brethren      1
Baptist   3 Pentecostal      2
United  12                                                                       	
Lutheran  1                         Total ,  101
Salvation Army   2
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have parents both living  57
Number who have both parents dead  7
Number who have father living and mother dead  17
Number who have mother living and father dead  10
Number who have stepfathers  6
Number who have stepmothers ,  4
HOAV ALL ARE EMPLOYED.
Farm and dairy   10           Dining-rooms       4
Poultry   :  6           Blacksmith       3
Carpentering   5           Plumbing        2
Painting   2           Garage      1
Shoemaking   3           Gardens      2
Tailoring  2           General outside work      17
Cottage duties   4                                                                       	
School all day  37                         Total  101
Kitchen and bakery  3
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1933, the mouths of all of the boys entering the
institution have been examined and record charts made. Because of the influx of over ninety
Doukhobor boys the dental work has been greatly increased. I found the teeth of these boys
very much below the average, no doubt because of their dietary habits. They do not permit the
use of milk or any animal product for the growing child or adult.
" During the year the teeth of 149 boys were examined and, because of so many of the teeth
being hopelessly diseased, it was necessary to extract 126. This work was done with local
ansesthetic so as to reduce the pain to the minimum. Nineteen boys had minor treatments for
gingivitis, 28 were treated for prevention of decay, and 58 fillings were inserted. All patients
were taught methods of brushing and caring for the teeth to prevent disease.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Medical Report.
" The Superintendent.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir.—During the past fiscal year my work was greatly increased by reason of the influx
of Doukhobor boys, numbering ninety-one, which necessitated having an interpreter while
investigating each case and thus taking up a great deal of extra time.
" The majority of these boys were suffering from goitre; infected and enlarged tonsils and
bad teeth were very prevalent.
" We had an epidemic of influenza, which was of a rather severe character, one of the
buildings being used exclusively as a special ward for the Doukhobor patients. In the severe
cases relays of attendants were on duty day and night, keeping the cases under observation, the
milder ones being segregated on a separate floor of the building. Cases with complications of a
severe form were sent to the Royal Columbian Hospital at New AVestminster for treatment. REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33. H 13
" Outside of the above epidemic the school had a very clear bill of health, being free from
infectious and contagious diseases, which, considering the class of boys admitted to this institution—a great many of which are expected to be carriers owing to their associations and home
environment—was very creditable under the circumstances.
" Our routine practice, of keeping all suspicious cases under observation upon admittance
till a clear bill of health can be given before associating with other boys of the school, is mainly
responsible for the excellent showing of the institution.
" Cases admitted to the Royal Columbian and St. Mary's Hospital, New AArestminster, B.C.,
were as follows: Infected hands, 5; fractures of the humerus of the elbow-joint, 3; acute
rheumatism, 2; fractures of the radius and ulna, 1; fractures of the tibia and fibula, 3;
abscesses, 7;  fracture of right leg, 3 ;  heart cases, 4 ;  eye cases, 3.
" The following conditions have occurred which did not necessitate hospital treatment:
Scabies, 5; sprained elbow, 1; infected throats, 2; sprained ankles, 1; sprained knee, 1;
sprained wrist, 1: enlarged glands, 1; abscesses, 2 ; sore ears, 5 ; impetigo, 7 : infected hands,
5 ; abscesses which necessitated opening under local anaesthetic ; influenza ; pleurisy ; rheumatism ;   enlarged tonsils;   athlete's foot.
" In conclusion, I wish to commend both Mr. and Mrs. Brankin for the great interest they
have taken in the care of the boys admitted to this institution, especially in the Doukhobor cases
which required special attention. Great credit is also due the staff, who had a great deal of
extra work by reason of these cases, for the results obtained.
" Yours, etc.,
" C. R. Symmes, M.D."
EDUCATIONAL.
During the year, owing to the number of Doukhobor boys admitted of school age, our
Educational Department was taxed to capacity, and we were indeed fortunate in having a
principal of the calibre of Mr. Blagburn, who so successfully met the new conditions with the
co-operation of the other teachers—namely, Miss A. Peck, Miss A. B. McKenzie, and Mr. W.
Hardy.
Report of Division I.
" Sir,—The school attendance of the year 1932-33 was increased by the arrival of the
Doukhobor boys. Out of the total number coming to this institution, sixty-three were of school
age. This necessitated the engaging of extra teachers, as these boys were kept at school during
the summer months. At first they gave considerable trouble, as most of them had never attended
school before and had no desire to do so. AArithin a month, however, all had settled down to
school routine.
" Commencing the fall term, Miss McKenzie and Mr. Hardy were assigned the task of
teaching these pupils, and much credit is due for the progress made during the ensuing months.
By the end of March many of the boys were capable of doing Grades II. and III. work.
" The attendance of the Industrial School boys showed such a decline that two teachers were
able to handle all grades. The attitude to studies in Division I. showed a marked improvement
during the year, and in Grade ATII. this was especially so. In an institution of this kind it, is
almost impossible for boys to concentrate on home-work, as there are so many other boys to
distract their attention, but the Entrance class put in many extra hours of voluntary study in
this manner.
t " Eric W. Blagburn."
Pupils on register, April 1st, 1932     20
Pupils admitted during the year      5
Pupils received from Division II      9
34
Pupils removed for various reasons     17
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1933     17
Number of Doukhobor boys attending special classes during the year     63 H 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Report of Division II.
" Sir,—The following shows the movement of the boys in this division from March 31st,
1932, to April 1st, 1933 :—
On register, April 1st, 1932     16
Received from Division III     22
Admitted        8
46
Sent to Division 1       9
Discharged for various reasons     16
On register, April 1st, 1933     21
Grade III., 2;  Grade IAr., 6;  Grade V., 4.
" On the whole the boys have made good progress. Grades IA". and Ar. have covered the
course of study in a satisfactory manner. Grade III. is composed of a group of boys who are
doing the regular work of this grade and a number of others who. for various reasons, have
required special work in some subjects.    Most of the boys have displayed interest in their work.
'• I greatly appreciate the support and co-operation of the staff on all occasions.
" Ayra E. Peck."
Educational Standing of all Boys in the School.
Grade I	
Grade II  2
Grade III  14
Grade IV  - 6
Grade V  9
Grade VI  14
Grade VII  22
Grade VIII  18
Grade IX  8
Grade X  1
Special Grade   6
Grade XI  1
Total  101
SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT.
" David B. Brankin, Esq.,
Superintendent, Provincial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—I inspected your school on November 1st, 1932. At that time there were 100 pupils
enrolled : Division I., 18 ; Division II., 19 ; Division III., 25 ; Division IA'., 38. The unusually
large enrolment was due to a large number of Doukhobor children present owing to the troubles
which had developed among this class of people in the Kootenay District.
" The accommodation provided and all physical conditions had been well met to provide for
this unusual influx.
" This unusual demand on your institution made the work of the teachers very trying, as
these children were not accustomed to institutional life. However, every teacher entered into
the work with commendable zeal and. at the same time, displayed a sympathy that was productive of good results.
" Your school is well equipped ; the general tone was all that could be expected. It was
pleasing to see teachers, dealing with children subjected to institutional life, able and desirous
of giving attention to individual differences and displaying real sympathy to those pupils who
appreciated personal consideration.
" I consider that the work being done along the lines of educating those taking work corresponding to the Public School Course is conducted in your institution in a very successful
manner.
" Yours very truly,
" J. T. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33. H 15
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Showing Classified Expenditure and Per Capita Cost.
I would respectfully point out that the per capita cost includes all purchases made by contract and allows full market price for milk, eggs, vegetables, and fruit brought from our own
farm, and with the thought in mind that our population is growing boys and young men, who
must be provided with substantial, wholesome, and appetizing meals, the cost per meal is very
reasonable.
Sample Menu for One AArEEK—Staff.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon and eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea
or coffee.
Dinner.—Roast beef, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, butter, fruit pudding, sauce, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, cold meat, jellies, custard, cake, tea.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea, or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast pork, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, apple sauce, brown and white bread,
butter, bread pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish or eggs, French-fried potatoes, cheese,
fruit, cake, jam, tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, hot cakes, brown and white bread, butter,
tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter,
gooseberry pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salad, fried potatoes, cold meat, sausage,
cheese, fruit, cake, jam, tea.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, eggs, boiled eggs, toast, marmalade, hot cakes, brown and white bread,
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, beans, Yorkshire pudding, brown and white
bread, butter, milk pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salad, baked potatoes, salmon, cold meat,
cheese, fruit, cake, jam, tea.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast pork, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, apple sauce, brown and white bread,
butter, fruit pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salad, potatoes, meat, stew, jam, cheese,
fruit, cake, tea.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, eggs, bacon, toast, marmalade, hot cakes, brown and white bread, butter,
tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast chicken, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter,
cake pudding, sauce, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish, chipped potatoes, salad, cake, fruit,
jam, tea.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, Yorkshire pudding, blueberry pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salad, fried potatoes, haddie, cold meat,
cheese, fruit, cake, jam, tea. H 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Sample Menu for One AVeek—Boys.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, dates, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big boys, milk
for small boys.
Dinner.—Sausage and onions, potatoes, vegetables, fruit pudding, sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, jelly and custard, cake, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Big boys, salts, porridge, jam, milk, brown and white bread, butter, tea for
big boys, milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Stewed beef and vegetables, potatoes, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, baked beans, stewed apricots, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed figs, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big boys, milk
for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast pork, potatoes, brown and white bread, bread-and-butter pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, syrup, vegetable soup, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, brown and white bread, butter, marmalade, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, ginger pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, macaroni and tomato puree, stewed prunes,
tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, raisins (stewed), brown and white bread, butter, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Chicken with vegetables, potatoes, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, stewed apples, macaroni and cheese, tea
for big boys, milk for small boys.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, stewed apples, brown and white bread, butter, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, vegetables, potatoes, brown and white bread, cake pudding, sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, stewed fruit, fish, baked beans, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed prunes, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, mashed potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, ginger pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, beans with tomato puree,
tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Fresh greens when available with salads.    Fresh fruits when in season.
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries .: '. '.  $6,679.54
Meat and fish from butcher  1,864.61
Bread   3,099.28
Flour, rolled oats, etc  380.39
Oil for cooking for Doukhobors   94.10
Ice .: :.:  258.73
Carried forward   $12,376.65 REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33. H 17
Cost of Provisions—Continued.
Brought forward  $12,376.65
Milk from farm  2,565.27
Eggs from poultry-farm   628.97
Poultry from poultry-farm   958.10
Aregetables from farm   1.102.67
Beef from farm   81.34
Pork from farm  134.26
Fruit from farm   133.51
Aregetables from Colony Farm  60.75
Potatoes purchased  17.25
$18,058.77
Meals supplied—
Boys  217,623
Staff     35,789
Total   253,412
Average cost per meal, 7% cents.
Kitchen Expenditure.
Supplies purchased  $12,454.65
Produce from farm       4,017.05
Produce from poultry        1,587.07
Salary, three officials (less perquisites)       2,739.00
Light, water, and fuel         920.00
$21,717.77
Average cost per boy per day, 30% cents.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA  COST.
This includes cash expenditure for all purposes during the year and covers all attendants,
instructors, teachers, doctor and dentist salaries, all repairs, extensions, replacements, food,
clothing, footwear, light, water, fuel, and food for stock.
(1.)  Office expenses   $761.17
School supplies   339.21
(2.)  Travelling expenses   126.85
Gasoline, oil, and repairs  ,  329.15
(3.)  Purchase of clothing and shoes  3,734.97
Supplies for Shoe-shop  2,249.58
Supplies for Tailor-shop   28.88
(4.)  Janitors' supplies  1,062.23
(5.)  Light  1,978.00
Fuel   :  5,609.03
Water  1,129.26
(6.)  Provisions   12,454.65
(7.)  Doctor-
Supplies, hospital costs   1,396.72
Salary    600.00
Dentist—
Supplies  11.76
Salary   600.00
(8.)  Laundry   3,705.97
Carried forward   $36,117.43 '   .
H 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST—Continued.
Brought forward  $36,117.43
(9.)  Feed for stock—
Farm    2,060.33
Poultry  4,944.26
(10.)  Purchase of live stock   276.00
(11.)  Arocational purchases for various departments   988.04
(12.)  Incidentals and contingencies   1,708.17
Salaries :  43,796.02
Total cash expenditure  ,  $89,890.25
Less cash from sale of poultry, eggs, stock  $6,024.88
Money refunded for board and room     9,490.39
Doukhobor allowance  16,290.60
    31,805.87
Balance   $58,084.38
Per capita cost per boy per month  $24.16
Per capita cost per boy per day 80%
TRADES AND ArOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
It has always been our aim to emphasize the importance of work, and officials are ever urged
to make this thought uppermost in the minds of the boys in their care.
Tailoring Department.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 446 pairs   $660.00
Tweed pants, large, 47 pairs  169.00
Tweed pants, small, 117 pairs   298.00
Uniform pants, 7 pairs   50.50
Khaki pants, 17 pairs   17.00
    $1,194.50
Aralue of work for other departments (time only) —
Aprons. 150   $15.00
Clothing for concert   10.00
Curtains, 11 pairs   6.50
Dusters   1.00
Table-covers, 100   8.00
Mats '.  4.00
Pillow-covers, 139   20.00
Sheets, 108  10.00
Towels, tea, 150   5.00
Mattress-covers, 143   32.50
Covers made for poultry-brooders  7.92
         119.92
Repairs (general) —
Carpet repairs   $5.25
Gym-mats  8.00
Overalls    222.00
Aprons, kitchen   3.00
Sweaters     5.00
Raincoats  15.00
Mackinaws     8.00
Carried forward      $266.25    $1,314.42 Tailoring Department—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward      $266.25    $1,314.42
Repairs (general) —Continued.
Blinds   3.00
Suits pressed        20.00
Small repairs        170.00
  459.25
Value of time spent on other duties          310.00
Total credits     $2,083.67
Debits.
Salary of Instructor (less perquisites)     $1,475.50
Material purchased and repairs to machines  28.88
Light and water used ,....,  79.60
Total debits      $1,583.98
Balance of credits over debits       $499.69
Average credit per boy per month, 20% cents.
Note.—The reason why so little material was purchased was owing to the strict economy
practised, old clothes being remade and using up the stock on hand.
Shoemaking Department.
New shoes made, etc.—
312 pairs at $4.90      $1,528.80
Boots repaired, 2,642 pairs       2,952.94
Total credits     $4,481.74
Debits.
Salary of Instructor  $1,368.00
Material used   2,148.61
Repairs  100.97
Light and water  110.60
Total debits     $3,728.18
Balance of credits over debits        $753.56
Average credit per boy per month, ?,XVa cents.
Garage Department.
Salary of Attendant-Mechanic (less perquisites) -  $631.20
Gasoline, oil, and grease for all purposes  :.. 241.87
Antifreeze    17.50
Repairs    69.78
Light  31.00
$991.35
Less credit for hauling eggs to institutions for shipment.. $324.00
Credit for hauling hay for farm         6.00
         330.00
$661.35
Cost to institution for use of truck and passenger-car, per day, $1.81. Carpentering Department.
During the year this department has accomplished a great deal of work. AA'ith the influx
of Doukhobor boys a large amount of extra work was entailed in the way of remodelling and
fitting up their kitchen, making tables and chairs, also fitting up a suitable school-room for them.
AVork was carried on during the year on the new ATocational Building and all the farm
building roofs were reshingled and painted.
New fences, archways, bridges, and various flower boxes and stands were built for the
gardens, and two very pretty Japanese bridges were designed and constructed for the Ravine.
Numerous repairs were carried out, new chairs and trays were made for the dining-rooms,
also a new spring-board for the Gym, which has proved a great success.
The whole in the aggregate amounting to hundreds of dollars and served the twofold purpose
of teaching boys practical construction and saving money to the school.
Commercial value of the work done      $2,450.00
Salary of Carpenter-Instructor       1,526.85
Painting and Glazing.
This department keeps our buildings in good trim. New fences, signs, archways were
painted, and all the dining-chairs were given a coat of paint, greatly adding to the appearance
of the rooms.
All the glass windows are taken care of by this department, and, needless to say, where there
are over 10,000 panes of glass and a large number of husky boys, damage is unavoidable.
Plumbing, Heating, and Blacksmith Department.
In addition to the regular work of attending to the heating systems in the various buildings,
this department has kept the plumbing and water systems in repair.
A new heating system was installed in the poultry brooder-houses and also made two new
brooders.    The water-supply was installed for the new Doukhobor kitchen.
The inlet- and outlet-pipe connections were made for the septic tank of the new Vocational
Building.
In addition to all repairs, making a great many tools, this department constructed an ornamental bracket for the road-light, making a great improvement.
Cement and General AArORK Gangs.
The duties of this department are very varied and they cover a great deal of ground. New
garden beds, rockeries, terraces were made, and a new rock wall built in the Ravine. New roads
were made and graded and a great deal of land-clearing has been done.
Brick piers were made for the Vocational Building, also the cement floor and walls.
Excavation was made for the septic tank of this building and a 50-foot overflow made.
In addition to the above, the heavy snowfalls during the winter months prevented this
department from being idle.
All work is carried out in connection with the Public AVorks Department.
GENERAL FARMING AND KITCHEN GARDEN STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Debits fot the Year,
For the simplifying of administration the following subsections are grouped together under
the above heading: (a) Dairying; (b) piggery; (c) kitchen gardens and general farming; (d)
land-clearing, teaming, hauling, and road-work ;• but in the last named the value of work accomplished cannot be shown in dollars and cents.
Dairying.
Credits.
Milk, 68,332 lb. at 4 cents per pound      $2,733.30
Beef to kitchen, 1,162 lb. at 7 cents  81.34
To sale of stock  797.30
Total credits    $3,611.94 REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33. H 21
Dairying—Continued.
Debits.
Feed purchased during year         $508.15
Stock registration  39,24
Milk pails and strainers  6.73
Total debits        $554.12
Piggery.
Credits.
Pork to kitchen, 1,918 lb. at 7 cents        $134.26
Debits.
Feed purchased          $70.68
Pigs purchased from Colony Farm  36.00
Total debits        $106.68
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Vegetables—
Potatoes   $330.10
Onions  33.20
Lettuce   74.00
Beets   92.34
Chives  ;  .50
Parsley  ;  .50
Peas  24.20
Marrow  8.85
Carrots  94.46
Beans    17.70
Kohlrabi  7.52
Turnips  70.64
Cabbage   245.45
Cucumbers  „  7.22
Cauliflower    30.48
Parsnips   25.25
Corn on cob  17.20
Pumpkin   15.86
Squash    7.20
     $1,102.67
Fruit—
Strawberries   $9.55
Rhubarb   19.80
Raspberries   7.64
Cherries  ,  6.28
Apples  79.92
Plums   4.26
Greengage    5.32
Prunes   5.54
Crab-apples   2.20
         140.51
Carried forward     $1,243.1S H 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward  $1,243.18
Miscellaneous—
Mangels, 37% tons at $7      $260.75
Carrots, 7% tons at $10         72.50
Turnips, 5 tons at $10         50.00
Corn for silage, 10 tons at $5          50.00
Oats and peas for silage, 10 tons at $5          50.00
Oats, green, 10 tons at $5          50.00
Timothy-hay, 3 tons at $14        42.00
Small potatoes for pigs, 4 tons at $12         48.00
Potatoes used as seed, 3V2 tons at $12         42.00
  665.25
Total credits  $1,908.43
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,481.50
Freight on hay *  110.83
Fertilizer  69.00
Shovels, forks, etc  65.22
Rope, twine, bull-rings, etc  25.79
Seed  •  82.45
Gasoline, oil, etc  5.42
Powder and fuse   51.20
Shells   2.26
Lime   5.20
Repairs to machinery, windows, etc  36.30
Nails, rivets, etc  2.37
Brushes, pails, etc  2.80
Laundry, soap   18.88
Fuel, light, water ...*  174.50
Horse-shoeing and blacksmith repairs   196.99
Hauling hay by own truck  6.00
Total debits   $2,336.71
I
Land-clearing, Teaming, Hauling, and Road-work.
Single cart, hauling soil, gravel, manure, 20% days at $4  $81.00
Single cart, hauling for gardens, 10 days at $4  40.00
Single cart, hauling tools, greens, snow, etc., 2% days at $4  10.00
Single cart for labour gang, 140% days at $4  561.00
Single cart, hauling cement, rocks, etc., 5 days at $4  20.00
Team and single cart for chores, 326 days at $1.50  489.00
Single cart, hauling for poultry, 13% days at $4  55.00
Team for labour gang, 93% clays at $8  748.00
Team for clearing land, grading, etc., 62 days at $8  496.00
Team hauling soil, gravel, etc., 7% days at $8  60.00
Team hauling wood, rock, brush, fence-posts, etc., 20 days at $8  160.00
Team hauling evergreens, 2 days at $8  16.00
Team for poultry grading, etc., 5% days at $8  46.00
$2,782.00 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 1932-33. H 23
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy      $3,611.94 $554.12
Piggery            134.26 106.68
General farming, kitchen gardens        3,908.43 2.336.71
Salary of Instructor and Assistant   2,059.50
Land-clearing, etc       2,782.00 	
$8,436.63 $5,057.01
Balance of credits over debits, $3,370.62.
Average credit per boy per month, $1.40.
BISOOQ POULTRY-RANCH STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Expenditure during the Year.
Credits.
Eggs produced during the year, 31,033% dozen;   eggs in storage from March, 200 dozen;
total, 31,233% dozen.
Eggs disposed of as follows :—
For own use in kitchen, 3,744 dozen  $628.97
For hatching purposes, 191% dozen  57.87
Eggs shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 16,620 dozen  3,573.74
Eggs shipped to Provincial Home, Kamloops, 900 dozen  199.11
Eggs shipped to Essondale Mental Hospital, 5,130 dozen  969.50
Eggs shipped to New AArestminster Mental Hospital, 1,560 dozen.. 323.23
Eggs shipped to relief camps, 900 dozen  162.00
Poultry used for kitchen, hens and cockerels .•'.  958.10
Total credits  $6,872.52
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $4,944.26
Chicks purchased during year   240.00
Salary of Instructor and Assistant, part time   1,599.15
Transportation of eggs by own truck   324.00
Express on empty crates returned from Tranquille   80.47
Fuel, light, water   371.21
Laundry, soap, etc  16.13
Lime   88.95
Filler cards, pads, wafers  27.65
Brooms, pails, cheese-cloth, paste, kerosene, lamp-wicks   25.69
Seeds  37.35
Denim for brooders '.  7.92
Association fees  1.00
Repairs to buildings  13.12
Eggs broken and unfit for use   69.65
Total debits   $7,846.55
Note.—During the year the egg market was in a deplorable condition, extras selling for as
low as 12 cents per dozen. This affected our income to a great extent. In addition, we had over
2,700 birds in moult all at the same time.
FLOWER-GARDENS.
Owing to a very late spring our flowers and shrubs were late in blooming. In spite of this
the gardens were beautiful and were very favourably commented upon by both visitors and staff. I
H 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Most of the work during the year was concentrated on the Ravine, which has been changed
from a mass of heavy underbrush and stumps to a veritable beauty-spot, planted with flowers,
shrubs, and with several rustic bridges to complete the picture.
SWIMMING AND AQUATIC SPORTS.
As in previous years, the swimming-tank was a favourite resort during the hot weather;
many boys taking the opportunity of learning to swim, and the competition between cottages
being very keen.
CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
The Kiwanis Club of New Westminster came out and gave us a very enjoyable concert.
The Apex Minstrel Troupe of Vancouver paid us a visit, which was very much enjoyed.
Members of the First Baptist Church came and gave a concert, which was a great success.
The Salvation Army of New Westminster paid us their annual visit, much to the enjoyment of all.
Our annual Gym display was held on March 1st and went over with a bang.
Amongst the Doukhobor boys who were here during the year there were many good singers,
and to see them grouped together singing their own songs was a pleasure greatly enjoyed by all
members of the staff and numerous visitors.
BOYS' BRASS BAND.
Our band is something we are very proud of and great credit is due Air. J. AV. Rushton, the
Bandmaster. Owing to boys leaving and going home and new ones taking their place it is not
an easy matter to keep the band up to standard.
During the year the boys played at Burquitlam. Surrey, and Haney Fairs; at the Returned
Soldiers' Memorial Service at Cloverdale; the May 24th celebration at Hope and at several
other functions, and in each case have proved themselves a credit to the institution.
SPECIAL VISITORS REPRESENTING ORGANIZATIONS.
The Grand Jury of New Westminster came out and went over the institution, their report
being very favourable in every way.
A number of exchange teachers, accompanied by members of the Arancouver School Board,
paid us a visit and were very pleased with what they saw.
The Jersey Breeders' Association of the Lower Mainland were here and were very interested
in our methods of caring for the stock.    They also held a judging demonstration while here.
The New Westminster Rotary Club members came out for lunch and showed themselves
real friends of Biscoq.
We had a very pleasant visit from a number of social workers and police matrons of
California.
There were also visitors from Newfoundland, Australia, Alberta. Toronto, and many other
places.
BISCOQ LIBRARY.
" Sir,—I have the honour to report that during the past year the library has been kept constantly busy, and the boys have shown a lively interest.
" The most remarkable feature was the change in the attitude of the Doukhobor boys. AVhen
they first came here I gave one of the smaller boys a picture-book to look at.; he opened it and
began to peep at the pictures, but when one of the older boys spoke to him in Russian he put it
down and refused to touch it again.
" Two months later we got, half a dozen to join the library and very soon had all those that
could speak English and many that were learning. By the end of the fall they had taken complete charge of the bookbinding (at their own request) and were borrowing at least twenty
books a week.
" The library reopened on June 1st, 1932.
Books on hand     696
Books donated by boys      82
Books collected, renovated, and placed in library       63
841
Books discarded       xi
Books on shelves at present    830 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1932-33. H 25
Books rebound      240
Issues to industrial inmates   3.637
Issues to Doukhobors      668
Issues to staff      107
 2,412
Industrial boys who took library membership cards       145
Doukhobors taking library membership cards       55
Staff taking library cards         19
    219
Industrial boys who did not take cards (most of these went home before
the winter)       26
Doukhobors who did not take cards       37
" Charles E. Clayton,
School Librarian."
SEASIDE OUTINGS.
During the summer the Matron has taken boys by truck on different days to Crescent Beach.
These outings are also very much enjoyed and are looked forward to with great delight.
SPORTS SECTION.
Football.—Two Arancouver teams, the Blue Birds and the Monarchs, came out and gave our
boys a trimming.    However, being good sports, we say the best team won.
Many interesting games were held between the larger and smaller Doukhobor boys; in
many cases the smaller boys being the winners.
Baseball.—Coquitlam boys came up, winning 8 to 2 from our own boys and 8 to 5 from the
Doukhobors.
The boys were disappointed several times by teams promising to come out and not showing
up.    However, we have to blame the weatherman for giving us such a lot of wet weather.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
During the year religious services were held every Sunday and sometimes during the week.
The Salvation Army, Anglican, Apostolic Faith, and Christian Mission alternated with each
other. The Roman Catholic priest or teachers came out every Sunday. The following letters
show appreciation of the courtesy shown and the facilities we have to assist these unselfish
workers in their efforts to help the delinquent boy on the right path:—
" D. B. Brankin, Esq.,
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Mr. Brankin,—Referring to your letter of the 6th instant. I wish to say that I
thoroughly enjoyed the services which I held at the school during the first few months of my
ministry here. The boys were very attentive and joined in the services most heartily. I wish
that some of our congregations could hear them sing and take a lesson from them.
" I should like to express my appreciation of the courtesy of the Superintendent and staff,
and of their willing assistance in preparing for the services;
" It was with some ret that I felt obliged to discontinue the services in March, but with
two parishes on my hands, giving me five centres at which to hold services, my Sundays are now
rather crowded. I hope, however, that when conditions become normal again I shall be given the
opportunity of resuming the monthly services at the school.
" Yours faithfully,
" E. W. P. Carter." " Mr. David B. Brankin,
Superintendent of the Provincial School, for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Mr. Brankin,—It has been our privilege to conduct a meeting with the boys at
Biscoq on the first Sunday of each month during the past year. In this connection we have
indeed enjoyed the whole-hearted support and co-operation of yourself and also your staff.
" The boys have been of the very best behaviour on every occasion and have shown an intelligent interest at all meetings. There is no doubt that a good work is being done in the interests
of these youths, and we sincerely trust that we may long continue to enjoy the happy relations
that have been ours for so many years.
" With very best wishes and success, I am,
" Yours to serve,
"- AV. Kerr,
Commanding Officer.'"
" Mr. D. B. Brankin,
Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sib,—We wish to take advantage of this opportunity to thank you and your staff for
the courtesy and kindness shown to us during the past year.
" It has been a pleasure to be associated with such an institution. Believing as we do that
' Disbelief in futurity loosens the ties of morality and may be supposed to be pernicious to civil
society,' we are convinced that these hours of religious instruction play an important part in
achieving the success for which you and your staff have laboured so faithfully.
" When one considers the results of your work, it is no wonder that the Provincial Industrial
School at Biscoq meets with such universal approval.
" Hoping that in spite of the hardships and stringencies of these times your work may
continue unhindered and that God's blessing may rest upon all your efforts.
" I remain,
Yours truly,
" G. S. Paul,
Pastor, A.F. Mission."
" D. B. Brankin, Esq.,
Superintendent, Boys' Industrial School,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Mr. Brankin,—The Boys' Industrial School is attended from the Holy Rosary
Cathedral and all through the last year there has been Mass and instruction twice a month.
Besides, the boys have received instruction three times a month from lay sources. His Excellency the Archbishop has visited the institution and has taken much interest in the welfare of
the boys.    Some of the priests have also visited the school.
" The Superintendent and other officials have given us every facility in the performance of
our duties toward the Catholic boys confided to the care of the institution.
" Yours truly,
" Peter Pineault."
INTERESTING VISITORS.
Colonel Fred Lister, M.L.A., Creston; Judge E. Paterson, her mother and party, Vancouver;
E. G. Snowden, Relief Officer, Victoria; A. Peden, Alderman and Chairman of Relief Committee,
Victoria; Charles Hill, Director of Child Placement, Edmonton, Alta.; Dr. McKay and friends,
Nelson ; Major and Mrs. Matthews, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Birmingham, Vancouver ; Mr. and
Mrs. Brown, representing the Toronto Star; Mr. and Mrs. H. Duker, Vancouver; H. L. King,
Newfoundland; P. D. AValker, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Arictoria; H. Whittaker, Government Architect, Victoria;  Mrs. D. Burkett, Alexandra Orphanage, Vancouver. APPRECIATION.
I desire to express my sincere appreciation for the co-operation and assistance rendered to
the institution by the Provincial Police in all parts of the Province; Juvenile Court authorities;
Chief of Police of Vancouver, New AVestminster, and Victoria cities and other municipalities.
The valuable help rendered by ministers of the gospel and church workers of every denomination
is very much appreciated, also the concerts given by the Salvation Army and other organizations.
For the whole-hearted and sympathetic support given by the Department of the Provincial
Secretary, I am more than grateful.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfielo, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.
500-833-4304 

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