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ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STATISTICS, 1932 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1934

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 ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
THE FIRE MAESHAL
FOR  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS, 1932
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.  To His Honour J. AV. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Eleventh Annual Keport of the Fire Marshal
for the year ended December 31st, 1932.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1933. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Fire Marshal       5-7
Table I.—Inspections made and Orders issued      8, 9
Table II.—Fires reported  10,11
Table III.—Causes of Fires  12,13
Table IV.—Classification of Property  14-21
Table V.—Summary        22
Table VI.—Loss of Life        23 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire Marshal,
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1933.
The Hon. R. H. Pooley, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Eleventh Annual Report as Fire Marshal for the year
ended December 31st, 1932.
The statistics which accompany this report would indicate that our- Are loss for 1932 totalled
$3,299,005, compared with $3,162,394 for 1931. Two sawmill fires accounted for $493,882 of this
loss. Of this amount, $414,000 was the estimated loss reported by the owners of one mill.
Figures just received from the insurance adjusters, and too late to be included, place this loss
at $298,800, a reduction of $115,200.    This reduces our increase over 1931 to $21,411.
One serious thing to note is the increased lire loss in a number of our cities, nearly all of
which maintain fire departments and presumably carry on organized fire-prevention work. It is
a pleasure to find that in our two larger cities, Vancouver and Victoria, whose competent chiefs
and officials carry on organized lire-prevention work, we had notable decreases in losses this
year. Victoria had a decrease of more than 50 per cent, as compared with their 1931 loss and
Vancouver one of over 30 per cent.
There has been a decided increase in the number of fires ascribed to arson. Seventeen
persons have been arrested and tried for arson and conspiracy arising out of arson. Fourteen
were convicted, two acquitted, and one case has not yet been settled. One case is worthy of
note. As a result of our investigation the assured decided not to claim the insurance of $1,600
which was carried on the property. In another case, after conviction, the assured consented to
a judgment for $2,000, money paid by the insurance company which was repaid to them. Still
another claim for $2,300 was not paid owing to the assured being convicted of fraud.
Fire Investigation.—The work of fire investigation has been diligently carried on by Mr.
AV. A. Walker, Deputy Fire Marshal, who is in active charge of this work. During the year he
has investigated 174 suspicious fires and assisted in holding fifteen inquiries, with the result as
above noted. Perhaps the most outstanding case was the arrest and conviction of Robert Adkin,
a professional arsonist, who came to us from Ontario, where he operated for some time. His
conviction and sentence to four years in the penitentiary has checked the activities of a highly
dangerous man who has a record throughout Canada. Acknowledgment is due to the Fire
Marshal's Department of Ontario, the representative of the Underwriters' Investigation Bureau,
the officials of the A'ancouver Fire Department, and the Provincial Police for assistance and
co-operation in this case.
Fire Prevention.—This important branch is continuing and an increase in the number of
inspections made by local assistants is noted, with what results we can only conjecture. I think
we can safely assume, however, that if this work had not been carried out there would have
been a very decided increase in our tire losses.
Twenty-two appeals from orders issued by the local assistants have been received and
passed on by the Fire Marshal. One appeal from his decision was made to the Court and was
dismissed.
Educational Work.—The only organized body carrying on this important work is the.
Arictoria and District Fire Insurance Agents' Association, who work in conjunction with Chief
Vernon Stewart. I cannot speak too highly of the work carried on by these men under their
efficient secretary, Mr. F. F. Fatt, ably supported by the press of the City of Victoria. There is
no doubt in my mind that the reduction of over 50 per cent, in the fire loss in Victoria this year
is due in a large measure to the work of this organization and the press of the city which gave
them such splendid publicity and support.
A study of Table III. of the report shows a large number of fires due to defective heating
appliances. During the past years we have had no control over this hazard, due to the fact that
we have had no authorized standard of safety in Canada and no laboratories for testing such B 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
appliances. I am glad to be able to report that we now have in operation at Ottawa the
laboratories of the National Research Council of Canada, where all such appliances can be
tested and approved.
An amendment to the " Fire Marshal Act " recently passed gives the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council authority to pass regulations requiring all such appliances to be approved and a certificate of such approval to be filed with the Fire Marshal before they can be offered for sale or
installed in this Province. AVe are under great obligation to the Honourable H. H. Stevens,
Minister of Trade and Commerce, and Dr. H. M. Tory, President of the National Research
Council of Canada, for the personal interest and co-operation they have shown and given us in
this matter.
Theatres.—The work of theatre inspection in charge of Mr. AV. A. Oswald, Assistant Fire
Marshal in this office, has been diligently carried on. During the year 174 theatres were visited
and, where necessary, conditions corrected. Thirty-five examinations for projectionists have
been held throughout the year. Twenty-two men made the required standard and were licensed.
Eighty-two licences to regular theatres and twenty special licences were issued by the Fire
Marshal during the year.
The question of a safe standard for theatres has been under consideration for some years.
Owing to the marked difference of opinion between the Fire Marshal and theatre-owners regarding this, I ventured to recommend that the whole matter be referred to a committee of the
National Research Council for a report. This was done and the completed report is now before
you for your consideration. I trust that this report and the action taken by yourself will clear
up matters that have been a very considerable cause of friction in the past.
In connection with his duties as Theatre Inspector, Mr. Oswald has been active in the work
of inspection of public buildings such as hotels, apartment-houses, schools, gasoline service-
stations, public garages, and wholesale gasoline plants. Seven hundred and nineteen orders
were issued under his instructions to remedy dangerous conditions. Thirty-seven plans of
public buildings have been checked over and approved during the year. In addition, he has
assisted in the investigation of fires and prepared plans to be used as exhibits in Court.
Government Institutions.—Regular inspections of all Government institutions have been
made during the year. I am glad to note that improvements in the water-supply at Tranquille
have been made, a fire-hall built, a hose and ladder truck put in commission, and a splendid fire
department organized with a competent man in charge. These improvements mark a decided
advance in the safety of this institution and the lives of the inmates from fire.
At Essondale the fine standard of fire-protection equipment has been maintained under the
efficient supervision of the Superintendent, Dr. Crease, and Chief Hughes, of the Fire Department. The only exception noted is that owing to economic conditions existing it was found
necessary to return one full-time fireman to hospital duties. I am glad to note, however, that
his services are still available in case of emergency.
The situation regarding the fire protection at the New Westminster institution has given us
considerable worry in the past owing to the age and type of construction of the older portions
of the building and the inadequate water-supply. I am glad to be able to state that steps are
being taken to remedy this condition by the provision of a sufficient water-supply taken from the
Vancouver and District AVater Board mains, which, with the installation of larger mains and a
circulating system completely around the building, will provide ample water for domestic and
fire-protection purposes. In addition to this, the obsolete electric wiring in the basement has
been removed and the wiring brought up to a safe standard. This work, together with the
installation of fire stops in the basement to prevent the rapid spread of fire, will help to make
this building reasonably safe and protect the lives of the helpless people who occupy it. We
gratefully acknowledge the co-operation of the Honourable R. AV. Bruhn, Minister of Public
Works, and the efficient members of his staff in planning and carrying out the greatly needed
improvements.
Minor improvements have been carried out in the institution at Marpole in order to keep
it up to a safe standard. While this building is, perhaps, not well adapted for the purpose for
which it is used, every possible care is being taken to make it reasonably safe.
AVe feel that in all our public institutions the standard of safety has been raised each year
and that the money for their protection has been well laid out, and to-day they compare favourably with any in Canada. REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932. B 7
In conclusion, I may say that December, 1932, marked the close of the most strenuous year
I have ever experienced in the years I have been connected with the work of fire prevention and
investigation, due, perhaps, to the unusual economic conditions existing. While the work has
been heavy, it has been lightened by the co-operation and support given by yourself as Minister
of the Department, which I gratefully acknowledge. Thanks are also due to Colonel McMullin
and his officers, to my fellow fire marshals, to the Underwriters' Investigation Bureau representing the insurance interests, to the local assistant fire marshals throughout the Province, and
the members of my staff. They have all helped and, like myself, regret that more has not been
accomplished.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. A. THOMAS,
Fire Marshal. B 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE I,
-INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
City Municipalities (33).
15
88
1,596
58
10
8
385
278
230
345
20
11
639
920
2,900
1,069
166
63
216
480
100
814
6
1,501
50,112
153
10,246
10
59
11
4
13
35
7
6
11
Merritt	
7
3
62
324
94
46
4
92
176
2
94
4
Trail	
76
4,267
21
170
72,429
5,598
District Municipalities  (28).
17
34
118
52
4
141
3
4
Delta	
7
3
12
4 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 9
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS—Continued.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
Surrey	
District
Municipalities
—Continued.
2
21
Tadanac _	
West Vancouver                                                      	
Totals	
392
30
Village Municipalities (16).
Abbotsford	
25
250
51
31
3
60
Creston	
2
Hope	
24
Silverton	
10
1
18
Totals	
420
55
Fire Districts
(12).
71
3
172
4
546
109
234
61
13
40
5
3
1
8
1,200
70
74,441
72,821
00,136
56,954
43,075
5,753
0,852
6,912
1931	
1930	
1929.   .
6,832
4,938
1928	 B 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
City Municipalities (33).
5
2
9
12
7
14
4
3
12
5
1
20
3
13
9
4
38
29
114
35
16
4
3
12
33
10
12
2
15
1,210
12
210
$14,489
270
Chilliwack	
3,608
10,466
11,719
69,103
4,980
4,826
5,523
716
219
32,312
4,836
7,776
24,665
2,965
64,050
69,791
205,005
12,347
7,367
583
6,408
4,406
45,266
26,558
5,930
350
Trail	
6.047
323,156
20,653
82,694
Totals	
1,884
$1,079,084
District Municipalities  (28).
95
24
2
9
12
19
1
2
4
19
29
15
7
14
23
42
10
2
35
48
5
5
7
2
54
12
32
$48,070
36,275
1,070
8,756
10,287
5,196
Delta. . ..                  ..           ..    ..
13
2,610
7,559
33,016
58,970
11.921
Kent	
5,348
8,194
435,408
4,613
34,414
1,318
58,734
30,771
11,339
11,646
11,009
7,466
88,888
2,642
7,520
Totals..     ....
529
$943,059 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 11
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting        29, loss
Brick or concrete      198,    ,,
Frame  2,713,    „
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Village Municipalities (16).
9
5
1
2
8
3
1
3
16
6
1
$2,351
22,033
1,377
Hope                                                   	
3,275
2,740
6,000
5
7,210
45,389
11,997
9,571
Totals	
55
$111,948
Fire Districts (12).
45
138
102
3
1
29
15
29
31
18
63
$245,939
347,811
247,894
70
10
57,657
461
51,883
73,184
11,795
128,210
474
$1,164,914
2,942
$3,299,005
2,942,
$2,412
208,077
3,088,516
',3,299,005 B 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Ashes against wood	
Brush drying on stove ignited	
Candle carelessness	
Carburettor back-firing	
Car upset	
Chair too near stove	
Children playing with fire	
Clothes falling on furnace-pipe	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe	
Coal-gas explosion	
Coal-oil carelessness	
Collision	
Curtains from candle	
Curtains from lamp	
Curtains from stove	
Defective brooder	
Defective chimney	
Defective fireplace	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe	
Defective gas-heater	
Defective gasoline-stove	
Defective gasoline-torch	
Defective kiln	
Defective matches	
Defective oil-burner	
Defective oil-stove	
Defective stove or stove-pipe	
Defective vacuum-tank	
Defective wiring	
Dust explosion	
Electrical appliances	
Exhaust-pipe broke, flames ignited framework...
Exposure	
Extract boiling over	
Film piling up in sound-head	
Fire-crackers	
Fire from mechanical stoker ignited wood	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
Gas explosion	
Gasoline carelessness	
Gasoline-furnace back-firing	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe	
Gasoline-torch carelessness	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected	
Grease on stove	
Hot brick placed in bed	
Incendiary	
Lamp explosion	
Lamp upset	
Lantern upset	
Lightning	
Live coals	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with	
Matches, mice with	
Naphtha carelessness	
Oil-furnace back-firing	
Oil-pipe burst	
Oil-stove explosion	
Oil-stove upset	
Overheated electric motor...	
Overheated machinery bearings	
Paper from stove	
Short circuit	
23
1
16
32
5
2
4
1
62
4
8
2
6
1
6
1
167
32
7
1
1
1
1
16
16
3
48
1
21
2
150
1
193
1
1
8
1
15
3
24
1
9
4
2
32
1
55
3
10
1
11
44
26
22
2
1
8
1
1
2
1
1
2
85
$4,551
49
1,221
14,020
2,700
72
85
20
13,696
3,787
514
2,150
136
30
69
375
128,583
3,347
6,458
88
29
205
430
326
2,557
2,349
62,105
700
25,945
414,041
25,737
415
335,125
4,443
249
3,393
26
5,917
382
86,169
676
4,857
5,040
26
10,435
16
243,681
2,761
8,361
1,850
16,318
848
1,106
6,947
253
250
2,000
101
1,950
69
136
5,400
80
72,108 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 13
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Smokers' carelessness	
Sparks from boiler	
Sparks from burning rubbish	
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from Christmas crackers	
Sparks from fireplace	
Sparks from furnace or furnace-pipe	
Sparks from locomotive	
Sparks from mill burner	
Sparks from smudge fire :	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe	
Spontaneous combustion	
Static electricity	
Stove explosion	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sulphur  burning	
Sun's rays	
Tar boiling over	
Thawing pipes	
Unknown	
Wood ignited from burning of bricks	
Wood too near furnace	
Wood too near stove	
Totals	
577
2
7
8
242
2
235
8
1
3
1
39
30
3
6
132
1
2
4
9
399
1
3
14
$96,950
130
894
6,004
104,111
8
6,150
1,570
27
24,882
885
32,749
36,457
1,819
212
169,614
20
73
1,464
1,288
1,265,500
90
252
10,093
2,942
$3,299,005 B 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.-
—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED
AND
CAUSES.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Apartments 	
     133
         1
Candle carelessness 	
Clothes too near stove 	
Coal-oil carelessness 	
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
6
1
5
2
1
2
2
3
2
S3
1
5
1
3
1
4
1
26
5
1
2
1
1
2
4
4
8
1
42
15
1
44
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
6
1
31
1
$887
9
173
23
306
24
26
934
2,350
507
521
7
962
35
30
468
7,860
12
59
1,829
2,213
20
190
Defective furnace 	
Electrical  appliances  	
Live coals 	
Match  carelessness 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Sparks from fireplace 	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected...
Sulphur  burning 	
Grease on stove 	
$19,445
482
     157
3
1
4
          1
$3,821
2,700
47
2,150
700
40
10
1,830
182
4,276
200
4,311
802
177
11,171
Car upset 	
Coal-oil carelessness 	
Collision   	
Defective vacuum-tank 	
Electrical appliances 	
Gasoline carelessness  	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe 	
Match  carelessness 	
Short circuit  	
Sparks from burning rubbish 	
Ashes against wood 	
32,423
Bakeries	
$15
10
61
Exposure 	
86
125
Banks   	
Barber-shops 	
$4,646
1
Smokers' carelessness 	
Carburettor  back-firing  	
Incendiary   	
4,647
289
Barges 	
       50
$650
560
880
7,797
4,114
1,150
885
7,088
650
37,523
1
•
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Stove insufficiently protected 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
61,297
10
Barracks 	 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 15
TABLE  IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Battery plants
Blacksmith-shops
Boarding-houses
Boat-houses
Bottling-works
Clubs
Dairies
Defective  furnace
Oil-stove   upset   ....
Sparks from chimney
Unknown   	
11
Defective chimney 	
Electrical  appliances
Exposure 	
Live coals 	
Short  circuit	
Smokers' carelessness
Sparks from chimney
Stove explosion  	
Unknown   	
Defective gasoline-stove
Unknown   	
Extract boiling over
Unknown   	
Brick-kilns  1
Bridges     1
Bunk-houses    1
Canneries  1
Carpet-cleaning  works    1
Chicken-houses   16
Wood ignited from burning of bricks
Sparks from locomotive 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Unknown  	
Unknown   	
Defective  brooder	
Defective  stove 	
Lamp  upset  	
Short  circuit  	
Sparks from stove 	
Spontaneous  combustion
Unknown  	
Candle carelessness
Exposure 	
Incendiary   	
Smokers' carelessness
Exposure 	
Smokers' carelessness
Dry-cleaning   establishments
Dwellings    1,914
Short  circuit  	
Smokers' carelessness
Sparks from chimney
Electrical  appliances
Naphtha carelessness
Short  circuit  	
Static electricity 	
Ashes against wood 	
Brush drying on stove ignited 	
Candle carelessness 	
Chair too near stove 	
Children playing with fire 	
Clothes falling on furnace-pipe 	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe
Coal-gas   explosion   	
$2,301
54
$50
25
$50
50
2,325
8
372
61
55
50
3,100
$29
1,492
$4,443
433
$375
3,571
3,553
5,000
307
350
10,105
$18
88
4,718
21
$12,920
1,639
$223
182
$145
250
845
73
$3,158
49
249
72
85
20
13,673
3,787
$2,355
75
6,071
1,521
4,876
90
27
1,025
1,315
2,790
23,261
4,845
14,559
473
1,313 B 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Electric-light poles   1
Factories  (furniture)    1
Factories (jam)   1
Factories   (mattress)     1
Factories  (roofing material) 2
Factories   (sash and door).. ,1
Coal-oil carelessness   4
Curtains from candle  :  6
Curtains from lamp   1
Curtains from stove   4
Defective   chimney     142
Defective  fireplace    31
Defective  furnace    2
Defective matches   13
Defective  oil-burner    8
Defective  oil-stove   2
Defective stove or stove-pipe   36
Defective wiring   11
Electrical appliances   123
Exposure   72
Fire-crackers     7
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected 8
Gas explosion   2
Gasoline carelessness    12
Gasoline-torch  carelessness    1
Grease on stove   23
Incendiary     25
Lamp explosion  3
Lamp   upset     8
Lightning     7
Live   coals     41
Match  carelessness   17
Matches, children with   15
Matches, mice with   1
Oil-furnace back-firing   2
Oil-stove  explosion    1
Oil-stove   upset    1
Paper from  stove   1
Short  circuit    16
Smokers' carelessness   349
Sparks from burning rubbish   2
Sparks from  bush  fire   2
Sparks from chimney   216
Sparks from Christmas crackers   2
Sparks from fireplace   224
Sparks from furnace   5
Sparks from mill burner   1
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe   32
Spontaneous  combustion    9
Stove explosion  4
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.— 113
Sun's  rays    2
Tar boiling over  '.... 3
Thawing pipes   7
Unknown     180
Wood too near furnace   3
Wood too near stove   14
Short  circuit    1
UnknowTn    1
Unknown    1
Match carelessness   1
Dust explosion   1
Unknown    1
Unknown    1
$250
136
30
40
100,095
3,328
4,041
269
934
2,299
37,531
14,093
15,557
55,645
3,381
4,037
344
3,064
1,836
4,953
28,013
2,761
4,808
3,877
805
656
5,020
128
35
1,950
15
30
25,223
20,418
424
3,054
100,269
8
5,961
998
269
31,207
9,335
157
100,199
73
214
1,204
290,827
252
10,093
      $921,245
  20
  5,565
  30
  10
$41
100
141
57,782 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 17
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Fertilizer plants    1
Fishing-boats     2
Foundries    2
Freight-cars     2
Gaols    1
Garages     34
Gasoline-stations
Greenhouses
Halls  	
Haystacks
Hospitals ..
Hotels
Ice-cream plants
Laboratories 	
1
10
05
Defective  kiln     1
Carburettor   back-firing     1
Lantern  upset     1
Defective chimney    1
Defective  furnace    1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Unknown  1
Unknown    1
Defective gasoline-torch   1
Electrical appliances   2
Exposure   5
Gasoline carelessness   3
Gasoline-torch  carelessness    1
Incendiary     4
Matches, children with   1
Short  circuit    4
Smokers' carelessness   1
Spontaneous   combustion    2
Stove insufficiently protected   2
Unknown  8
Coal-oil carelessness   1
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Gasoline-torch  carelessness   1
Short  circuit    1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Static electricity   1
Unknown     2
Defective chimney   1
Match  carelessness    1
Matches,  children with    2
Smokers' carelessness   3
Sparks from chimney   1
Unknown     3
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Gasoline  carelessness   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from chimney   2
Unknown    1
Defective chimney   1
Defective stove-pipe    2
Defective wiring  1
Exposure   13
Incendiary     1
Match  carelessness   1
Smokers' carelessness   32
Sparks from chimney   4
Sparks from fireplace   2
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown    7
Unknown    1
Sparks from chimney   1
$50
1,850
$645
35
$400
275
$205
25
1,289
6,392
5
41,033
75
14,039
15
2,800
22,679
30,996
$24
48
3,099.
6
27
1,700
1,593
1,706
182
5
15,029
$8
298
100
901
25
$100
11,260
4,417
46,651
21,950
176
890
474
20
387
51,993
$430
1,900
680
675
101
119,553
6,497
75
10.931
50
1,332
138,318
33,754
28 B 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Launches
Laundries
Logging camps
Lumber-yards  	
Machine-shops ....
Mining  property
Offices   	
Oil-refining plants
Orphanages	
Photographic  studios
Planing-mills   	
Pole camps
Pool-rooms
Post-offices
Power-houses
Printing-offices
10
Carburettor back-firing 	
Exhaust-pipe broke, flames ignited framework
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe 	
Short  circuit  	
Unknown  	
Unknown
Gasoline carelessness
Incendiary   	
Unknown
Exposure
Gasoline carelessness  	
Gasoline-furnace back-firing
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Electrical  appliances
Exposure 	
Gas explosion 	
Grease on stove	
Short  circuit	
Smokers' carelessness
Sparks from chimney
Sparks from stove 	
Unknown  	
Oil-pipe burst 	
Smokers' carelessness
Unknown  	
Fire from mechanical stoker ignited wood-
Unknown  	
Defective  wiring
Unknown  	
Incendiary
Unknown  ..
Ashes against wood
Exposure 	
Electrical appliances
Exposure 	
Incendiary   	
Overheated machinery bearings
Short  circuit   	
Exposure 	
Short  circuit
Unknown  	
Pulp-mills    1
Railway-coaches          1
Railway-stations            1
Defective wiring  	
Sparks from burning rubbish
Exposure	
3
$7,360
1
415
1
581
2
800
1
2,200
$11,356
?,
2,118
1
$1,458
1
4,761
6,219
1
2,079
1
39,797
1
$75,032
1
676
1
2,000
77,708
2
$18
4
1,968
1
38
1
37
1
10
4
89
1
15
1
122
1
13,251
1
$101
1
275
1
2,620
2,996
26
1
1
1
1,626
$1,000
1
26,492
27,492
2
$10,982
1
2,611
13,593
1
$125
2
2,135
1
$250
2
3,912
1
823
4,985
1
$5,400
1
1,200
6,600
2
$9,156
1
963
1
9
10,128
1
38
1
6
1
4,500 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Relief camps
Restaurants
Rooming-houses
Sawmills
Schools
Sheds
11
45
17
14
13
Sheet-metal works
Shingle-mills 	
Smelting plants ....
Stables
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown  1
Defective furnace    1
Defective oil-stove   1
Defective wiring    1
Exposure   5
Grease on stove  1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Unknown     1
Clothes too near stove   1
Defective   match     3
Electrical appliances   3
Exposure   5
Gasoline  carelessness    1
Hot brick placed in bed   1
Matches,  children  with   1
Short  circuit     1
Smokers' carelessness  15
Sparks from chimney  '.  3
Sparks from fireplace   3
Stove explosion  1
Stove insufficiently protected  1
Thawing pipes   1
Unknown  5
Dust explosion  ,  1
Incendiary     2
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from mill burner   2
Unknown  11
Defective chimney  2
Defective  oil-burner    1
Defective stove-pipe  :  1
Grease on stove   1
Incendiary     2
Oil-furnace back-firing   1
Smokers' carelessness  1
Sparks from bush fire   2
Sparks from chimney  1
Unknown     2
Ashes against wood  1
Incendiary     1
Matches,  children  with    2
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Spontaneous   combustion      1
Unknown     6
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown     5
Defective furnace  1
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected 2
Gasoline-torch  carelessness  1
Sparks from boiler   2
Sparks from furnace   2
Defective  wiring  1
Exposure  1
Unknown     3
$650
1,473
50
.599
811
255
10
149
0
$4
57
37
1,207
23
16
29
35
219
150
105
5
25
71
,325
$414,
54,
3:
24,
356,
000
784
300
613
428
$2
S82
300
550
242
748
50
086
650
830
681
,000
107
650
129
10
,797
$50
125
100
130
150
$1,511
185
2,608
$4,123
8,879
15,308
853,125
23,019
3,701
2,466
26,191
555
4,304 B 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Stores        126
Stores and apartments
Stores and dwellings
Stores and hotels
Stores and  offices
20
52
1
20
Clothes too near stove   2
Coal-oil carelessness  1
Defective chimney   6
Defective  oil-burner    1
Defective stove or stove-pipe   3
Defective wiring   3
Electrical  appliances    4
Exposure   36
Fire-crackers     1
Grease on stove  1
Incendiary     7
Lightning     1
Match  carelessness   -  2
Oil-furnace  back-firing   1
Overheated electric motor   1
Paper from  stove   1
Short circuit    3
Smokers' carelessness  22
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from chimney   2
Sparks from stove  '.  1
Spontaneous   combustion     3
Static electricity   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.... 3
Unknown     19
Ashes against wood   1
Defective chimney   1
Electrical  appliances     2
Exposure   2
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Grease on stove .'.  1
Short  circuit    1
Smokers' carelessness   7
Stove insufficiently protected  1
Unknown :  2
Ashes against wood  1
Defective chimney   6
Defective wiring    1
Electrical appliances   2
Exposure   10
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Incendiary     1
Matches,  children  with  1
Matches, mice with    1
Short circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   5
Sparks from bush fire   1
Sparks from chimney   2
Sparks from furnace   1
Sparks from stove   2
Spontaneous combustion    1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.... 3
Thawing pipes   1
Unknown     11
Defective chimney   1
Electrical  appliances    1
Exposure   2
Gas-plate insufficiently protected   2
Incendiary     1
$10
20
13,535
389
6,122
1,747
38
60,365
12
175
43,493
11,536
25
55
136
50
6,225
48,355
10
49
16
1,033
46
9,116
94,224
$745
76
70
390
725
10
1,550
80
602
20
225
$500
3,671
1,500
1,674
20,277
950
5,915
10
125
69
246
150
25
422
216
8,896
22,065
13
20,233
$7,350
1,128
26
5,960
$296,782
4,493
86,957
6,658 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1932.
B 21
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Stores, offices, and rooms..
Stores and rooms
32
Street-cars
Tents 	
Theatres  ...
Tug-boats   .
Undertaking-parlours
Warehouses 	
27
Wood-working  plants    1
Woodyards    :  1
Totals 2,942
Oil-furnace back-firing    1
Smokers'   carelessness     8
Unknown    5
Exposure   1
Lightning    1
Unknown     1
Candle carelessness  !  1
Defective chimney   1
Exposure   6
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Incendiary     2
Smokers' carelessness  11
Sparks from chimney  1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Stove insufficiently protected   2
Unknown     6
Unknown    1
Unknown   1
Exposure   1
Film piling up in sound-head   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Carburettor back-firing  1
Exposure   1
Incendiary     1
Short  circuit    1
Unknown  1
Exposure  1
Defective chimney  2
Defective gas-heater   1
Exposure   6
Grease on stove   1
Oil-furnace  back-firing    1
Short  circuit    4
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from stove   1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Tar boiling over    1
Unknown     6
Unknown    1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
 2,942
$1,387
607
50,000
25
4,845
10
22,303
25
8,441
701
26
186
2,266
29,366
$23,000
249
859
$2,500
500
1,500
584
1,025
$480
88
5,359
1,779
5
4,306
75
177
881
9,557
1,250
37,729
$66,464
4,877
63,391
694
300
24,108
6,109
85
61,686
16,964
174
;,299,005 B 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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B 23
TABLE VI.--LOSS OF LIFE, 1928-32.
Occupancy.
Cause of Fire.
Loss of Life.
Adults.    Children.
Dwelling	
Dwelling	
Dwelling	
Dwelling	
Hotel	
Store and dwelling	
Totals, 1932..
Totals, 1931..
Totals, 1930..
Totals, 1929..
Totals, 192S..
Matches, children with..
Unknown	
Unknown  	
Unknown	
Incendiary	
Exposure	
5
16
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.
675-433-3174 

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