Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1934

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308203.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308203.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308203-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308203-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308203-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308203-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308203-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308203-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308203-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308203.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
EEPOET
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1932
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British ColumMa.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1932.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C. Office of the Game Commissioner,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1933.
Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.G., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1932.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. BRYAN WILLIAMS,
Game Commissioner. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
1932.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
The splendid improvement in game conditions noted in last year's report has continued.
Also, the feeling of confidence in the present administration amongst those directly interested
has been even more pronounced than ever.
It is now generally acknowledged that game-conservation in British Columbia is on a better
footing than it ever has been before. That this is the case is due to the great interest which
the Attorney-General has taken and the helpful advice he has given in furthering the operations
of this Department.
Appreciation must also be expressed in regard to the close co-operation of the Commissioner,
Assistant Commissioner, and all officers and men of the Provincial Police Force, as well as to
the Game Associations and sportsmen throughout the Province, who have so ably supported us
in our efforts.
During the past year the great value of the Game Wardens as an auxiliary force to the
Provincial Police in times of trouble has been notably demonstrated. Time after time, calls for
assistance of the Game Wardens have been received, thereby saving considerable expense and
valuable time in recruiting special constables, who would not be nearly as efficient as the picked
men of the Game Department.
Fortunately for the enforcement of the game laws, the calls for the Game Wardens' services
did not come at the busiest time of the year for them, but, even so, much game-work had to be
neglected in consequence. While this is regrettable from a conservation point of view, it was
unavoidable.
In previous reports the risks which Game Wardens continually take in carrying out their
duties have been commented on. Not a year passes without a number of them narrowly
escaping death. This year has been no exception. One man has been killed, several have been
injured, and others have suffered severely from exposure and even from running short of food
at the end of long patrols.
" IN MEMORIAM."
It is with great regret that the death of Albert Edward Farey is recorded. Game Warden
Farey, who was stationed at Lillooet, was shot while examining a deer in the camp of Frank
Gott, when the latter picked up his rifle and, before the Game Warden had a chance to turn,
shot him in the back. Death was instantaneous. Gott escaped into the woods, but a day or two
later, while attempting to cross Bridge River and reach an Indian reserve, was accosted by
Divisional Game Supervisor Robertson, of Kamloops, and Game Warden W. O. Quesnel, of
Clinton. Gott refused to surrender and tried to escape across the river, but was shot in the leg.
The wound in itself probably would not. have proved fatal, but being in a tubercular condition
and also suffering from exposure, he subsequently died.
Game Warden Farey was an excellent type of man. Having lived the greater part of his
life in the mountains, and also having been a guide and trapper, he had all the essential qualifications required for the position he held. He first saw service with this Department on August
24th, 1917, but resigned his position in April, 1920. Later on he again served for a few months,
but was not on the permanent staff until June 1st, 1929.
REVENUE RETURNS.
Considering the enormous drop in all forms of revenue, that of the Game Department was
not nearly as great as might have been expected.
Our losses were occasioned by several things, the low prices of furs being a considerable
factor as there was a great decrease in the number of trappers, and those who operated only
took enough fur to supply money for a scanty living. This naturally occasioned a drop in
royalty returns as well as trappers' licence fees.
Also, the number of non-resident sportsmen was the lowest that we have had for years, with
a consequent decrease in licence and trophy fees. J 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In addition to the above-mentioned causes, 11,517 free prospectors' and farmers' licences
were issued this year, which undoubtedly had a very serious effect on our receipts. While these
free licences may be a necessity, it is hardly fair that the Game Department should not only
suffer a great loss of revenue, but also be charged with the cost of printing and issuing such
licences. To compensate for this a small issuing fee, similar to that in effect in Ontario, might
be charged.
As usual, there has been considerable criticism, chiefly from people who are not fully conversant with the facts, of the expenditures of the Game Department.
There still seems to be a great number of people who cannot get it out of their heads that
the cost of game-protection in this Province is borne by the general taxpayer. The very reverse
is the case. Taking the complete figures of receipts and expenditures since the Game Department was first established in 1905, the total collections from licence fees, royalties, miscellaneous
collections, and also fines under the " Game Act," there is a very large balance in favour of the
Game Department. From the fiscal year 1905-06 to 1931-32, inclusive, the total receipts from
the above-mentioned sources amounted to $3,016,672.87, while the expenditures amounted to only
$1,872,586.22, leaving a profit of $1,144,086.65.
Even during the past four years, since the reorganization of the Department, notwithstanding the fact that this year, for the first time in the history of game-protection, our
expenditures have exceeded our receipts, we still show a profit. The total receipts for these
four years amount to $802,467.77, while our expenditures amount to only $746,901.87, leaving a
credit balance of $55,565.80.
Now with regard to our expenditures exceeding receipts during the past year. Credit should
be given to the Game Department for the fact that $6,000 was expended on the hull of a launch
to replace the boat at Powell River. This boat does all the police-work in that area, and if we
had not bought it the Provincial Police would either have had to build a new boat themselves or
go to a tremendous expense in continually hiring launches. Also, the whole cost of operating
this launch falls upon the Game Department.
In addition, we also undoubtedly lost a large amount of money through the enormous
increase in the number of free licences issued to prospectors and farmers, which is being commented on elsewhere.
In addition to the matters already mentioned, credit should be given the Game Department
for a great deal of other work done during the past year which was not included in the regular
duties of a Game Warden. In addition to that given the Provincial Police, considerable assistance was given the Forestry Department in putting out fires, some of the Game Wardens
rendered valuable aid in connection with relief-work, and practically every one of them has been
useful in connection with some kind of work not included in his own duties.
While there has been a decrease in our receipts, we have the consolation of knowing that we
have managed to bring about such a large increase in our stock of game that, provided we can
even carry on as we are doing now, when more prosperous times return the amount of revenue
that we take in directly and the money that will be spent in the Province by non-resident sportsmen will far exceed all previous records.
FREE PROSPECTORS' AND FARMERS' LICENCES.
During the past year 11,517 free licences were issued, in comparison with 6,123 in 1931 and
4,520 in 1930.    Of this number, 5,411 were issued to prospectors.
Unquestionably, the free prospector's licence had a material effect in taking a good many
men away from the cities and thus saving the cost of keeping them on relief. In this way most
beneficial results have been obtained.
Nevertheless, it has undoubtedly meant a considerable loss of revenue to the Game Department and also the destruction of a great amount of game. Credit should therefore be given to
the Game Department not only for the loss of revenue sustained, but for the fact that due to
the conservation methods adopted in the past few years we had a sufficient stock of game to
enable prospectors and also settlers to obtain meat free of cost during the hard times.
With regard to the loss of game, nobody will in any way begrudge the genuine prospector
game for food while he is actually prospecting, but it is regrettable to have to state that reports
from all over the Interior make it very apparent that in a number of cases game has been
wantonly slaughtered by irresponsibles purely for the love of killing.    The number of moose which were shot and from many of which practically no meat was taken would reach a
tremendous total if they could be properly counted. In addition to moose, birds were also killed
in large numbers, even during the breeding season.
It is absolutely impossible, with the present staff of Game Wardens, to do more than check
this slaughter.   It may be unavoidable, but at the same time it is most regrettable.
TAG SYSTEM FOR DEER.
An innovation was made this year in the introduction of a tag system for deer. In spite of
the fact that all other methods in vogue elsewhere were carefully studied, it must be acknowledged that the one finally tried out here was far from being a success.
We have now devised a new system for next year, however, which will be infinitely simpler
and, it is hoped, less easy to evade.
It may be remarked, however, that it is almost impossible to inaugurate any system of this
sort which will not cause a certain amount of inconvenience to hunters and which has not some
weak point which can be taken advantage of by those who wish to do so.
As this system was a new one, and owing to it being so easily evaded, it was not enforced
as it might have been. However, it is satisfactory to be able to report that 14,838 tags were
purchased. In addition, it was undoubtedly the means of preventing some, though by no means
all, of the unscrupulous hunters from taking more deer than they are legally allowed.
ESTABLISHMENT OF FISHERY BRANCH.
Following repeated requests from all over the Province for improved sport-fishing conditions,
and particularly for the introduction of rearing-ponds, the resident angler's licence of $1 was
put into effect this year.
During this year, as no money had been collected before the Estimates were passed, the
amount voted for fish-work has been simply sufficient for the purchase of some Atlantic salmon-
eggs and for the employment of one Fishery Officer whose chief work is to carry on investigations with regard to sites for the future establishment of rearing-ponds.
During the period June to December this officer made a considerable number of preliminary
investigations with regard to locating suitable sites, water-supply, etc., for future fish-cultural
development-work.
The following is a list of waters investigated : Thulin Creek, Campbell River ; Tsolum River,
Courtenay; Oyster River, between Courtenay and Campbell River; Deer Creek, Alberni;
Mosquito Creek, Qualicum: North and South Branches of the Nanaimo River; Wolf Creek,
Nanaimo; Haslam Creek, Cassidy; Kelvin Creek, Koksilah; creek at Sahtlam, Cowichan
River; Fraynes Creek, Shawnigan Lake; Goldstream River, Victoria; Little Sumas River,
Abbotsford ; Salmon River, Salmon Arm ; Mission Creek, Kelowna ; unnamed creek, Edgewood ;
Cottonwood Creek, Nelson ; unnamed stream, Robson ; Goat Creek and Meadow Creek, Creston ;
Taft Hatchery, Eagle River, between Sicamous and Revelstoke.
During the month of December preliminary arrangements were completed to construct five
retaining-ponds, 40 by 6 by 3 feet, on Mosquito Creek, Qualicum, Vancouver Island.
At the urgent request of the Cowichan District Game and Fish Association an order was
placed with the Howietown Fisheries, Scotland, for 100,000 eyed ova, Atlantic salmon (Salmo
salar), arrangements having been made with the Dominion Department of Fisheries to hatch
these eggs at Lake Cowichan Hatchery.
Volume and temperature of the water flowing from the reservoir, Stanley Park, to Beaver
Lake was under close observation with the view of determining the desirability of building a
hatchery and rearing-tanks prior to negotiating with the Park Commissioners for permission to
build and the Greater Vancouver Water Board for a continuous supply of water.
It is pleasing to be able to report that the Fishery Branch of the Game Department has
received most valuable advice and a great deal of assistance from Major J. A. Motherwell, Chief
Supervisor of Fisheries, and other members of his staff. In addition, Dr. W. A. Clemens, of the
Dominion Biological Station, has been most interested in our work and always ready to place
at our disposal any members of his staff whose help has been required.
As a result of the work done this year we have been able to formulate plans for the future
which, if carried out, and there is every reason to expect that they will be, will unquestionably
have most beneficial results in improving our fishing. J 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GAME ASSOCIATIONS.
The Game Associations have been particularly active this year, and the work of those in the
Interior of the Province has been particularly worthy of note.
The convention of the Interior Clubs has now developed into an annual event and is of
extreme value. The results obtained from conventions of this nature are of the greatest
importance.
DISTRIBUTION OF BIG GAME.
Sheep.—During the year we have been successful in trapping a number of sheep in the
vicinity of Squilax, where complaints were made of their doing damage to crops. In all, seven
rams and fourteen ewes were captured and these were released in the vicinity of Adams River.
Numerous complaints have also been received of the damage done by sheep at Spences
Bridge, and a trap has been constructed there, though since this trap was constructed the sheep
have not put in an appearance.
Wapiti.—Arrangements have also been made for the capture of wapiti, which have been
doing so much damage to the orchards in the vicinity of Penticton. An entirely new system of
corrals and wing-fences have been built there, and the contract has been let for the capture of
these animals.
Up to date, however, owing to the extremely mild weather, only four animals have been
taken. These have been released in the vicinity of Princeton. With the advent of snow and
more severe weather, it is expected that we shall be more successful.
Fallow Deer.—Several attempts have been made to capture the fallow deer on James Island,
but owing to the abundance of feed on the island there is considerable difficulty in trapping them.
However, six have been taken and removed to South Pender Island, where they will be well
looked after.    Continued efforts will be made to capture more of these animals.
BLACK GAME AND CAPERCAILZIE.
In the year 1906 thirty-five black game and twenty-five capercailzie were imported from
Copenhagen, some of which were liberated on Vancouver Island and some on the Mainland.
Up to the year 1912 reports of some of these birds being seen were received, but as nothing
further was heard of them for a number of years, the importation was considered a failure.
This year, however, reports of the existence of these birds have again been received. On
Vancouver Island some birds were seen on the Forbidden Plateau which, from the description
given, were far too large for blue grouse and might have been capercailzie. Then, in the Interior
of the Province, a trapper in the Clearwater District described some very large dark-coloured
grouse which he was positive were not of any local species. These birds might have been black
game or capercailzie.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
By J. W. Graham, Divisional Game Supervisor.
. I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in this Division for the
year ended December 31st, 1932.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear continue to be plentiful, although we have not received the same number
of complaints from farmers this year in regard to these animals doing damage. In a few
instances sheep have been killed, and although every effort was made to locate the animals doing
damage, no results were obtained.
No brown or grizzly bear are to be found on Vancouver Island. On the Mainland—namely,
at Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlets, and also in Thompson and Mackenzie Sounds—they
are fairly plentiful.
Wapiti (Elk).—From reports received, elk on Vancouver Island seem to be increasing.
Small bands are to be found.at the head of all the inlets on the west coast. Elk have now spread
from the Shaw Creek Game Reserve into the northern and western portions of Vancouver
Island. The Oyster River band now numbers close to fifty head, and a few scattered animals
are to be found in the valleys south and west of Buttle Lake.
Mountain-goat.—These animals do not leave the ridges of the Shaw Creek Game Reserve
and are slowly increasing. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 9
Deer.—Throughout the Division deer have been fairly plentiful. The usual complaints
were received from farmers regarding damage being done by these animals, and every possible
assistance was rendered in taking care of complaints of this nature.
In some parts of the Division the use of naphthalene flakes was tried in an effort to keep
the deer out of the fields. This experiment was found successful to a certain extent where the
flakes were put out in small areas, provided they were kept dry.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In some districts on Vancouver Island beaver have been reported on the increase,
although they cannot be considered plentiful.
Otter.—There are very few otter on Vancouver Island, with the possible exception of the
Alberni and AVest Coast Districts.
Marten.—On the whole, these animals are considered scarce and are on the decrease
throughout the Division.
Mink.—These animals are not very plentiful and very few were trapped this year.
Racoon.—These animals are fairly plentiful throughout the Division, while wolverine and
ermine are scarce.
Muskrats.—Muskrats are on the increase throughout this Division and in some districts
have done a good deal of damage to property. Many permits have been issued giving farmers
permission to trap muskrats on their land during the close season, and in most parts of the
Division licensed trappers did very well in trapping muskrats during the open season, in spite
of the low price received for the pelts of these animals.
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants.—These birds are not really plentiful and very few hunters obtained their bag
limit during the opening days of the season.
Grouse (Blue).—On the southern portion of Vancouver Island these birds have been scarce,
but from the Cowichan District north, including the Courtenay and Alberni Districts, they have
been fairly plentiful and good bags were secured. The closing of an area in the Duncan and
Cowichan Lake Districts for the past two years has resulted in a marked increase.
Grouse (Ruffed or Willow).—These birds are scarce throughout Vancouver Island, but owing
to the short open season allowed, very few have been killed by hunters. The closed area in the
Duncan and Cowichan Lake Districts has helped to increase their numbers.
Quail.—Quail are fairly plentiful throughout the southern portion of Vancouver Island, but
in other portions of the island they are reported as being scarce.
Partridges.—European partridges have only been reported in the Saanich District and in
the vicinity of Victoria and are not very plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are to be found in few numbers throughout the central part of
Vancouver Island.
Migratory" Game Birds.
Ducks.—It is only in the northern part of Vancouver Island and the West Coast District
that ducks could be said to be plentiful.
Brant.—During the spring migration, 1932, these birds were very plentiful, although very
few were killed during the open season.
Geese.—With the exception of the west coast, these birds are reported as being scarce
throughout the Division.
Swans.—A few swans have been seen occasionally in the Campbell River and Quinsam
Lake area.
Shore-birds are fairly plentiful throughout the southern portion of Vancouver Island.
Vermin.
Cougar.—Cougar are still a menace to farmers on Vancouver Island. In some districts
complaints have been received and attended to by Game Wardens, which resulted, in many
instances, in the destruction of the animal doing damage. Since the return of the bounty
recently it is felt that hunters will be more active and that more cougar will be killed. J 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wolves.—A few years ago wolves were practically extinct on Vancouver Island, but are now
steadily increasing, and while no bands have been reported, odd animals have been seen in
different parts of the island and a few have been killed.
Domestic Cats.—During the year the Game Wardens have been very active in the destruction of domestic cats which have been allowed to run wild. These cats do an enormous amount
of damage to game birds, and every possible step is being taken to keep their numbers down to
the lowest possible minimum.
Noxious Birds.—Crows, eagles, owls, and hawks have been destroyed in fairly large numbers
by Game Wardens and interested sportsmen throughout the year.
Game-protection.
This Division has been constantly patrolled by the Game Wardens in spite of the large
territory which each individual Game Warden has to cover.
Owing to unusual conditions in respect to unemployment, the enforcement of the " Game
Act" has been rather difficult at times.
One hundred and twenty-seven informations were laid during the past year, resulting in
123 convictions, one dismissal, and three withdrawals. Twenty-eight of these convictions were
obtained under the Special Fishery Regulations, and one under section 11, subsection (2), of the
" Game Act," resulting in a fine of $500 being imposed.
A great deal of credit is due to the members of the British Columbia Police, who have
always co-operated with this Department and were willing to assist whenever and wherever
possible in enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act," and the Game Wardens have in turn
done their utmost to assist members of the British Columbia Police in their work.
Game Propagation.
The propagation of game has been successfully carried out on Vancouver Island. Approximately 1,000 pheasants were released during the year. All the birds released were in good
condition and were liberated in suitable places.
Game Reserves.
There are five game reserves on Vancouver Island—namely, Mount Douglas Park, Little
Saanich Mountain, Shaw Creek, Elk Lake, and Strathcona Park, including Forbidden Plateau.
These reserves have proved a great asset from a game standpoint, as they are wonderful
game-breeding areas and replenish the surrounding districts.
Fur Trade.
There is not a great deal of information to give on the fur trade on Vancouver Island.
About the only part of the Division in which trading in furs is carried on is along the west
coast, and even this trade is not extensive, as the majority of the fur-trappers ship direct to
Vancouver or some outside market.
FUR-FARMING.
There are a number of fur-farms on Vancouver Island doing fairly well, but owing to the
low prices of fur very few new applications for fur-farming permits have been received during
the year 1932.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There are now 457 registered trap-lines in this Division.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few registered guides in " A " Division.
Special Patrols.
Special patrols have been made at intervals throughout the year, and when possible joint
patrols have been made in company with members of the British Columbia Police, thus
eliminating a great deal of expense for both Departments. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. 3 11
i Hunting Accidents.
I am pleased to report that hunting accidents have again decreased in number, there being
only two reported in this Division during the past year. These were in the Victoria District, and
were as follows :—
On October 10th, 1932, while hunting at Sheringham Inlet, Richard F. Holdcroft accidentally
fell and discharged the shotgun he was carrying and suffered a wound in the right forearm;
while on December 11th, 1932, while hunting at Sooke, Theodore Martin, of Saanich, B.C.,
accidentally shot Walter Singer, seriously wounding him. To date Mr. Singer is still confined
to hospital.
Summary of Game Conditions.
Game conditions as a whole on Vancouver Island are fairly good. All districts have been
continually patrolled and complaints investigated. In my opinion, pit-lamping, although carried
on to a certain extent, has considerably decreased owing to constant night patrols being
carried out.
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation of the assistance and support
given me throughout the year by the Game Wardens of the Division, as well as for the co-operation extended by members of the British Columbia Police.
"OB" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By' C. F. Kearns, Divisional Game Supervisor.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division during
the year ended December 31st, 1932.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Mule-deer are plentiful throughout the Division, while white-tail deer are scarce in
the Kettle Valley, Okanagan, and Similkameen Districts, but fairly plentiful otherwise.
The seeming abundance of deer, to the casual observer, is usually gauged by the depth of
snowfall in the mountains which drives these animals to the lower levels. In the early fall
does and immature bucks appear everywhere at a reasonable elevation, but there is a decided
lack of the larger bucks. This condition does not fail to give rise to the usual contention that
the bucks, as a result of the buck law, are gradually being eliminated. However, during the
latter part of the past season there was no complaint on the scarcity of bucks. There is no
section of this Division where the keen hunter cannot secure a buck deer in the open season,
provided he is willing to go sufficiently far from the main highways. The season 1931 was
particularly noted for a heavy bag of deer, and the hunter was rare indeed who failed to secure
his two bucks.
During the past year the early snowfall was light, with the possible exception of a relatively
small section of East Kootenay, and the large bucks were not down until well into December.
Moose.—Moose are definitely increasing and extending their range in the East Kootenay
District from the Montana boundary north to Golden and following the big bend of the Columbia
River to Revelstoke. In the Flathead and Bull River Districts, and from the vicinity of
Columbia Lake to Revelstoke, moose may be considered plentiful. These animals have been seen
on the west side of Kootenay Lake, where they have been unknown in the past.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Flathead, Elk River Reserve, White River, and White Swan Lake
Districts Elk are plentiful. That they are increasing is borne out by the fact that they are
extending their range near Elko, Cranbrook, Windermere, Golden, and north through the Big
Bend in the vicinity of Bush River.
Caribou.—Caribou have been protected in this Division for many years, with the exception
of that portion north of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Caribou are definitely
increasing, certainly in that section between Revelstoke and Golden and north of the Arrow and
Kootenay Lakes. Bands of caribou are to be found on practically every range within the
Division, and presumably their increase is governed by the extent of suitable pasturage, which,
due to the elevation these animals customarily frequent, is limited. It is felt that caribou in
this Division have now reached sufficient numbers to permit a short open season. J 12
•
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are not plentiful in the Boundary, Lower Okanagan, and
Similkameen Districts. In the remainder of the Division, however, they are, considering the
type of country they frequent, very numerous.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals have not such a wide range as other game, but are numerous in certain localities. In the sections contiguous to the Elk River Game Reserve, Fernie and
the Cranbrook areas, as well as in the Flathead country, sheep are numerous, and are also
fairly plentiful in the Kootenay Valley. Small bands of these animals are to be found at the
headwaters of Sable Creek and on the range bordering the Incomappleux River. There is evidence that the sheep in the Ashnola District are extending their range to the west, while the
band in the vicinity of Okanagan Falls has increased to the extent that they have been observed
from the road near Vaseaux Lake.
Bear.—Black bear and brown bear are plentiful throughout the Division. Continual complaints are being received of black bear doing damage in fruit-growing areas. Grizzly bear may
be found on the highest ranges anywhere in the Division, but are possibly more numerous on the
watersheds of the Arrow and Kootenay Lakes and in the Revelstoke and Big Bend areas, as
well as in the Kootenay Valley and Fernie District. These animals are not plentiful in the
Similkameen, Okanagan, and Boundary areas.   "
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals in this Division, with the possible exception of a section of the Boundary, Lower Okanagan, and Similkameen Districts, have more than held their own. There is
still plenty of fur, and despite the prevailing low prices a trapper with a fair length of trap-
line can realize a substantial reward for his season's labour. There are approximately 450
registered trap-lines in the Division, and one cannot fail to be impressed with the unfailing
optimism voiced by the trappers, and these men are confidently hoping for a return to the higher
prices and eager markets of a few years ago.
In some districts we have, perhaps, too many small trap-lines. However, irrespective of
actually providing money, some men trap for the sheer enjoyment of the life in the wilds, and
for this reason it is a difficult matter to deny any individual the privilege of registering a small
piece of trapping country. Fortunately, many trappers are realizing that a short line will not
stand regular trapping too closely and are therefore applying for a lay-over for one or two
seasons in order to give the fur-bearing animals a chance to increase. On the larger trap-lines
the practice is to trap only a portion of the line each year, reserving the remainder for the
following season.
Some fur-bearing animals in the Division are actually increasing. This is particularly true
of muskrats and beaver. Otter and fox have never been very plentiful, while fisher and wolverine are seldom numerous in any locality. Mink, marten, lynx, and weasel may be regarded as
reasonably abundant throughout the Division.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue, Ruffed, and Franklin).—An increase of grouse is reported throughout the
Division. There seems to be a more noticeable increase in the ruffed grouse. When it is considered that these birds occur principally in the valleys nearly always traversed by main
travelled roads, their increase is very gratifying. It reflects the policy of conservation and the
attitude of the hunting public in an unmistakable manner.
Prairie-chicken.—These birds are increasing in the Kootenay Valley, but cannot be considered really numerous.    There are a few of these birds in the Boundary District.
Ptarmigan.—These birds occur principally in the higher Rockies, but are also found in
small flocks on the highest levels throughout the Division.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are plentiful in the Similkameen and Lower Okanagan. They are
increasing in the Creston area and in the vicinity of Grand Forks. The three-day open season
in the Creston District has done no apparent harm, and with the release of some new birds
next spring the pheasants may be considered permanently established in that neighbourhood.
Although the Nelson area, on account of the heavy snowfall and lack of open country,
cannot be considered a suitable locality, the few pheasants released some years ago have survived. This also is the case at Harrop and Procter, on the West Arm of Kootenay Lake, and
on the east side of this lake at Crawford Bay. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 13
Partridges.—European partridges appear to be increasing. They have appeared and disappeared on occasions in practically all parts of the Division. These birds are still found in
fair numbers in the Lower Okanagan and Similkameen Districts, but an opinion of their future
increase or otherwise is pure conjecture.
Quail.—Quail are in fair numbers in the Lower Okanagan and Similkameen and appear to
be holding their own.
Migratory Game Birds.
Water-fowl occur in fair numbers on the lakes and sloughs throughout the Division and
afford fair sport in the Similkameen, Lower Okanagan, Boundary, Arrow Lakes-Revelstoke,
and Cranbrook Districts.
At Kootenay Flats, from the mouth of Kootenay River to the International Boundary, and
from Canal Flats to Golden, unsurpassed sport may be had hunting water-fowl.
The Game AVardens in the Columbia Valley remark on the number of ducks in that area,
while the Game AA:arden at Golden states that he has been informed by old-time residents that
geese and ducks are more plentiful than at any time during the past ten years.
Geese are very plentiful in the areas mentioned during the southern migration.
The Duncan River and tributary waterways at the head of Kootenay Lake are favoured
spots for the nesting of both ducks and geese, but are little hunted except by local residents.
Vermin.
Forty-three hawks, 44 big-horned owls, 27 house-cats, 42 coyotes, 411 magpies, 280 crows,
3 eagles, 4 dogs, and 3 cougar have been destroyed by Game AArardens on patrol in the Division
during the year.
In addition, trappers in this part of the Province have taken 286 coyotes, 3 cougar, and
13 wolves. Coyotes still seem to wax prolific in spite of the numbers killed every year. Cougar
are not plentiful, while wolves do not appear to increase to any extent.
Game-protection.
Much credit is due to the Game AArardens of this Division for the effective manner in which
they have carried out continuous patrols throughout the year. Each Game AVarden has an
extensive district, in some cases really too great, and it naturally follows that a great deal of
travelling is necessary. During the winter months, in the greater part of the Division, patrolling
is almost entirely a matter of snow-shoes and back-packing. It is worthy of note that all
expenses in connection with patrols throughout the Division have been kept down to an absolute
minimum. There were a number of convictions for infractions of the " Game Act" during the
year.
Game Propagation.
A number of pheasants from the Provincial Game Farm were released in the Revelstoke
and South Okanagan Districts.
Game Reserves.
AVithin the limits of this Division are the extensive and well-stocked Dominion Parks of
Revelstoke, Glacier, Yoho, Kootenay, and Assiniboine, while in the south-east corner of the
Division A\7aterton Lakes Park forms a portion of the boundary between British Columbia and
Alberta.
As these Dominion parks are well patrolled and game is carefully protected therein, we
naturally benefit from the consistent overflow of big game from these reserves.
We also have the Elk River Game Reserve in the Fernie District, which is an ideal breeding-
ground for big game generally, more particularly elk, moose, and sheep. The animals have
spread from this centre to the surrounding districts in surprising numbers. This reserve is very
carefully patrolled and given close attention by the Game AVardens at Fernie and Canal Flats.
The deer sanctuaries at AA'igwam River and in the vicinity of Elko and at Columbia Lake
have an immense benefit as winter yarding-grounds for these animals. Regular patrols of these
areas have been made by the Game AVardens from Fernie and Cranbrook during the past year.
Vaseaux Lake, in the Lower Okanagan, and the lake-front at Nelson are bird sanctuaries
and their benefit is incalculable. The nesting geese, ducks, and swans at Vaseaux Lake in the
spring are a most inspiring sight from the standpoint of the water-fowl conservationist.    The Nelson Lake front is a wonderful feeding-ground for wild ducks, principally mallards.    The lake
at this point seldom freezes and feed is put out for the birds in the extreme weather.
Fub Trade.
The majority of trappers in this Division ship their fur to the dealers at Arancouver, who
are reaping the reward of many years' fair dealing and established reputations. The fur which
is exported to Eastern centres or to the United States is negligible.
Fur-farming.
There are a number of fur-farms in the Division, and it is unfortunate that the slump in
fur prices has hit the owners of these fur-farms. In spite of their difficulties, however, the
individual fur-farmers are still optimistic and are confident that their present scientific furr
farming methods will ultimately result in better prices being received and in an increased
demand for the pelts of farm-raised animals.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There are some 917 (lapsed and current) registered trap-lines on file in this Division, and
the system of registration is operating with entire satisfaction.
Special Patrols.
Extensive  patrols  have  been  made  as  conditions   warranted.    Game   AVardens   Sinclair,
Cameron, and AVashburn made extensive patrols into the Flathead country and the Elk River
Game Reserve during the summer and early fall,  and  also during the winter,  the  average
duration of each patrol being from two weeks to a month.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 16th, 1932, J. Shutty, of Kaslo, B.C., while stalking a hawk on his own
property, stumbled over a log and shot himself in the body with a shotgun. He subsequently
died.
On October 28th, 1932, W. K. Martin, of Riverside, B.C., was accidentally shot by B. F.
Wilson, his hunting partner. Wilson was releasing the hammer on his 30-30 rifle when his dog
jumped against him, causing him to stumble, and at the same time his thumb slipped from the
hammer of the rifle, resulting in the fatal wounding of Mr. Martin.
On November 25th, 1932, Nels Nelsen, of Revelstoke, while hunting on skis, slipped and fell,
his shotgun discharging, injuring his left hand so severely that it was later amputated at the
wrist.
Summary and General Remarks.
The winter of 1931-32 was a severe one and particularly hard on deer. A great number
were killed during the open season and it is reasonable to suppose that a number perished
on account of the abnormally heavy snowfall. There is an agitation from time to time to reduce
the season on deer by closing it two weeks earlier. This agitation is due to the fact that in a
winter of early snowfall the deer come down low and are easily killed. However, when it is
taken into consideration that the purpose of game-conservation is to ensure a plentiful stock
for hunting, it does not seem that we have any reason for alarm.
In reference to the killing of doe deer, when does become so numerous that they are disproportionate to the bucks, it might be advisable to alter the present regulation. AAre might even
have a short open season on does without any harmful results in any year. However, the
general feeling is that our present season is of ample length, the bag is generous, and the regulations are as agreeable to the sporting public as it is possible to make them.
The tag system for deer has been generally satisfactory, but it can be improved. The present
tags and lead seals are not able to stand rough handling, and the seal could quite easily be used
again by the substitution of a small piece of lead. I would strongly endorse the recommendations of the Game AVardens in this. Division that the seals now in use by the Department of
Agriculture for branding cattle-hides would be more satisfactory.
AATith regard to the numbers and diversity of game in " B " Division, it is most gratifying to
hear the congratulations of non-residents anent our profuse wild life and our generous seasons
and bag limits. It is a matter of perpetual astonishment to visitors from the United States that
so many varieties of big game and game birds can exist in such numbers so close to settled localities. It is also a matter of gratification, that such is the case not only to the members of
the Game Department, but to the great sporting public, whose enthusiastic co-operation has
contributed in no small degree to the large stand of game in this Province.
During the past year the Game AArardens have, in addition to their regular duties, acted
as Assistant Fire Rangers, co-operated with the British Columbia Police, the Mothers' Pensions
Board and Relief Officers, City Police Officers, etc.
In concluding, it is a pleasure to express the cordial appreciation of all Game AA7ardens in
this Division to the Officer Commanding, N.C.O.'s and men of the British Columbia Police, the
District Forester and Rangers of the Provincial Forest Branch, for the assistance which they
have been only too willing to give the Game Department.
It might also be added that the constructive suggestions and recommendations of the
various Rod and Gun Clubs have been most encouraging and helpful in all matters relating to
game-protection.
We are also indebted to the kindly offices and interested co-operation of the various
Dominion Parks officials within this Division, and the assistance also furnished by various
State Game AA7ardens adjacent to our southern boundary. In this connection the efforts of both
the Sheriff and Game AATarden of Okanagan County are worthy of particular mention.
"C"  DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS,  YALE,  OKANAGAN,  CARIBOO,  AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Divisional Game Supervisor.
I beg to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Division during the
year ended December 31st, 1932.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black and grizzly bear have shown a small increase in the Hanceville District, and
these animals are also to be found at the head of Quesnel Lake, where they are quite numerous.
Black bear are in fair numbers in the AA7illiams Lake area.
Caribou.—Caribou are numerous in certain sections near Barkerville, and are also to be
found in the Williams Lake, Quesnel, and Cariboo Districts. Caribou are also reported in the
Seymour Arm District.
Moose.—These animals have increased to a certain extent in the Hanceville District and
are to be found in fair numbers up Deadman Creek and at the headwaters of Clearwater River.
Moose are steadily increasing throughout the Clinton area to the north and east.
, Deer.—In certain sections of the Division there is a preponderance of does, but in other
portions there are no complaints because of any scarcity of bucks. Deer are plentiful throughout the Division and are becoming a pest in the Peachland District because of the damage
they do to fruit-trees.
Naphthalene flakes, which can be purchased from any drug-store, have been used with a fair
amount of success to keep deer away from orchards and other crops. This material has been
used for this purpose in the States with a good deal of success.
Mountain-goat.—At the end of Canim Lake and Mahood Lake south, and in the Mica
Mountain District, goat are reported in good numbers, and they have been seen northwards of
Clearwater River extending over to the Blue River District, also on the south side of the
North Thompson River between Vavenby and Blue River.
Mountain-sheep.—The mountain-sheep liberated at Squilax a few years ago have increased.
Twenty-one sheep were captured at Squilax in a corral by means of a salt-lick and were liberated
in the Squam Bay area, Adams Lake. Several animals were seen near the end of the present
year near Squam Bay.    In the Lillooet area and north sheep are to be found in fair numbers.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are to be found along certain portions of the Fraser River in this
Division. Five elk were seen at the east end of Canim Lake and Mahood Lake south. A band
of eight or ten of these animals is reported to be in the mountains south-east of Nazko Post-
office, while one elk has been seen 10 miles west of Alexandria.
Fur-bearing Animals.
In the northern portions of this Division, particularly in the Hanceville and Williams Lake
Districts, beaver are slowly increasing.    On a good many of the registered trap-lines the beaver J 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
were thinned out considerably, due to times of depression and thoughtlessness on the part of
some trappers. People must live, however, and some trap-lines must suffer, but there are other
trappers who have carefully guarded their possessions, and after allowing beaver to increase
on their trap-lines they have taken only a few without causing any serious depletion.
AATith the exception of the southern portion of the Division, reports indicate that fur-
bearing animals such as lynx, muskrats, and in some parts marten and fisher show a slight
increase. The southern portion of this Division reports the fur-bearing animal stand as
normal.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Grouse in the northern areas have shown up very well. In the Nicola District
ruffed and blue grouse are reported in fair numbers, whereas ruffed grouse are scarce in the
Lillooet area.
Pheasants.—Pheasants have increased considerably, especially around A'ernon, Kamloops,
and Salmon Arm.
Partridges.—Hungarian patridges are not reported numerous save around Kelowna and
Vernon, and certainly are not numerous near Kamloops or Salmon Arm. These birds appear to
be continually on the move.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and geese in the Hanceville District are said to be fairly plentiful. The northern
portions of this Division do not get all of the usual fall flight, due to the early freezing of the
lakes. Water conditions throughout the Division are improving and a number of small lakes
which were formerly dry now have water in them.
Vermin.
Coyotes and cougar are increasing in numbers, and this also applies to hawks and big-horned
owls. In the Okanagan an active war on the part of sportsmen and Game AA7ardens goes on
against the crows and magpies. A crow-trap was erected in the Kamloops District, but owing
to the prevalence of feed around it very few birds were caught.
Cat-traps were set in various parts of the Division and a number of domestic cats which had
been allowed to go wild were caught.
Game-protection.
This Division has been patrolled as usual and every facility at our disposal for the protection of game has been utilized. There were eighty-nine prosecutions, resulting in eighty-six
convictions, one withdrawal, and two dismissals, during the year.
Game Propagation.
The mountain-sheep liberated this year at Squam Bay should increase in number if cougar
are kept down, as the territory in the vicinity of Squam Bay is considered an excellent breeding-
ground.
The pheasants liberated in the Kamloops District last spring did very well and are
increasing rapidly.
Twenty live beaver were distributed in this Division, as follows: Five animals were released
in the AArilliams Lake District and three were liberated on a registered trap-line. The creeks
on which these beaver were liberated are used for irrigation purposes. Six heaver were
liberated in August and September on the Ellis Creek watershed near Penticton, where they are
now reported to be well established. Two animals were liberated near Kelowna and four more
near a lake north of Kelowna.
All of these beaver were trapped on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve and were released
for the purpose of assisting in supplying irrigation-water to ranch property.
Game Reserves.
The Yalakom and Bowron Lake Game Reserves and the Tranquille Sanctuary are the only
reserves in this Division. Bowron Lake Reserve is noted for the number of beaver to be found
within its boundaries, and it is hoped that from this reserve quite a number of beaver can be
trapped and distributed on various streams and lakes throughout the Interior. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 17
Fur Trade.
As most of the fur trapped in this Division is shipped to Vancouver or exported from the
Province, I am not in a position to give very much information on the value of the fur trade
to the people residing within this Division, but I may say that considerable money is received
from the sale of fur and there appears to be no great decrease in the amount of fur taken
each year.
Fur-farming.
In this Division, with the possible exception of a few fox-farms, very little fur-farming is
being carried on. Most of the fur-farmers have suffered owing to the low prices obtainable
for their farmed fur.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system of trap-line registration has been carried on throughout the Division, and there
is no doubt that this system is responsible for the decided increase in the number of fur-bearing
animals in the Division.
Registration of Guides.
There are thirty-nine registered guides in this Division, some having first-class equipment
and others somewhat limited.
Special Patrols.
Several special patrols were made in this Division during the year. The advantage of this
is the effect it has on the Indians and other settlers in the more remote parts of the Division
in the prevention of game violations.
Hunting Accidents.
Three fatal hunting accidents occurred during the year.
Mr. C. J. Little, of Vernon, was fatally wounded as the result of the discharge of a shotgun
in the hands of Mr. I. AArard, this accident taking place on September 28th, 1932.
On September 24th, 1932, Mario Comazzetto, of Kamloops, met his death while carrying a
gun on a mowing-machine. Owing to an obstruction which suddenly halted the machine he
was thrown forward, causing the gun to go off and resulting in his death.
On December 2nd, 1932, T. S. Anderson was accidentally shot by O. Parmintier in mistake
for a wounded bull moose, this accident taking place in the vicinity of Paul Lake near
Likely, B.C.
On October 25th, 1932, Charles A. Kreetzer, while climbing a bluff, stumbled and fell on his
gun, which resulted in his middle finger being shot off.
On April 24th, 1932, Mr. B. Dalton accidentally shot himself through the finger near Merritt.
AVarnings have no effect on the number of hunting accidents, but where a case is one of gross
carelessness a heavy penalty would certainly act as a deterrent to others.
Summary- and General Conditions.
A very late snowfall occurred in the southern part of this Division, hut there was no
appreciable increase in depth. Deer remained much higher up and approach was very difficult
owing to the hard snow.
The suggestion has often been made that the season for deer should open later, as the
weather'in the Interior is too hot to keep meat of any kind in any quantity. Requests have
frequently been made that the season should be open for doe deer, but it would be much better
to curtail the season on bucks, which might bring about the same results.
Moose and other big-game animals have come up to expectations.
■ Geese and ducks have shown an increase and pheasants and other upland game birds in
general have been plentiful.
The tag system for deer came in for adverse criticism. The increase in the price of licences
was regarded as something to be expected, as the sportsmen had asked for it, but the additional
charge for deer-tags did not appeal to the majority of hunters. Had the cost of the deer-tags
been embodied in the price of the licence there would have been no objection.
There should be some control of the sale of poison to trappers.    This business has reached
considerable proportions in the Province, and it is almost impossible to catch any one using
poison in taking game animals.
2 I would like to express my appreciation of the support given me by the Game Associations
and all interested sportsmen and nature-lovers in the protection of game, and for the loyal and
much-appreciated co-operation furnished by members of the British Columbia Police.
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Divisional Game Supervisor.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1932.
Game Animals.
Moose are still increasing in the Fort George and Omineca Districts, and are spreading
westerly, while caribou, which are not greatly hunted, are in no danger of decreasing in numbers. Some elk ha.ve been seen in the vicinity of Yellowhead Pass and Lucerne and have been
reported as far as Tete Jaune. A good herd of these animals is established in the Toad River
District. Notwithstanding the good reports received of elk in the Division, I would recommend
no open season on these animals. No information has been received regarding the elk liberated
on Queen Charlotte Islands.
Specimens of Stonei sheep have been obtained in the Toad River area (north of the Peace
River) and Dahl sheep are reported to the north of the Liard River. No information has been
received covering the Sheep Creek-Wapiti Pass District, the habitat of the Rocky Mountain
sheep.
Mountain-goat are numerous throughout the Division.
In the Fort George and Omineca Districts mule-deer are reported as increasing, and in the
vicinity of the Blackwater River and at the head of Nechako River white-tail deer are to be
found. Coast deer are quite numerous along the coast, although some islands have been hunted
extensively and a scarcity of bucks is reported. This condition applies especially to the islands
in the vicinity of Prince Rupert—namely, Porcher and Smith Islands. The suggestion has been
made that the season be opened on does, but a close season on deer covering the islands
mentioned would be preferable.
Grizzly bear are very numerous in the Fort George District, while black bear are far too
numerous and have been doing considerable damage to domestic stock.
Fur-bearing Animals.
All species of fur-bearing animals are reported in fair numbers, but have been hard to
catch owing to continual changes in the weather.    However, an average catch is expected.
Beaver are reported on practically all trap-lines occupied by white trappers.
Upland Game Birds.
The various upland game birds to be found in this Division—namely, blue, ruffed, and
Franklin grouse, and prairie-chicken—are numerous. In the vicinity of Prince George pin-tail
grouse find a ready refuge in the game reserve, and a noticeable increase in their numbers has
been observed in the Fort George District.
Migratory Game Birds.
The northern portion of the Division, situated north of the Canadian National Railway, is a
breeding-ground for ducks and geese, and as the flights of Arctic migrating birds do not strike
this area, it is generally conceded that the fall concentration of ducks and geese are locally
bred birds.
Flocks containing from 200 to 300 birds were noticed at various well-known concentration
places in the Division, and appear to be increasing in numbers over previous years.
Swans have again been reported as wintering on the Tache River and Takla Lake. These
birds are also found near Bella Coola and Masset.
Vermin.
Many complaints have been received from every portion of the  Division  regarding the
increase in the number of wolves.    Some areas report these animals to be running in packs, and
consequently a small bounty has been suggested by many trappers and farmers. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 19
Coyotes are quite numerous throughout the Division, while some cougar have been reported
in the vicinity of Tete Jaune, Strathnaver, and Woodpecker, but I am pleased to state that in
the northern portions of this Division there are practically no cougar.
Game-protection.
Numerous general and special patrols were undertaken by Game Wardens of the Division,
and every mode of transportation was resorted to in connection with these patrols. The assistance given by the British Columbia Police in our work is worthy of notice, as they launched
and prosecuted twenty-one cases under the " Game Act," against sixty-nine cases by members
of the Game Department, making a total of ninety cases for the year.
Game Propagation.
Hungarian partridges were introduced into the Aranderhoof area, and these birds are
increasing in that district. In the Telkwa District, where pheasants have been liberated during
the past few years, these birds are increasing.
Game Reserves.
The three Game Reserves of Kaien Island, Kathlyn Lake, and Fort George, established as
safety-zones for people living in the vicinity and as refuges for all game, are fulfilling the
purpose for which they were established.
The Kunghit Island Game Reserve is so remote and inaccessible that no patrols have been
made and no information is available.
The establishment of a reserve south of Ootsa Lake has been suggested from time to time,
and as this area would be highly suitable for such a purpose, it is suggested that steps be taken
with a view to eventually creating a game reserve in the Ootsa Lake District.
Fur Trade.
Prices paid for the pelts of fur-bearing animals have been very low, and the trappers have
therefore taken only sufficient fur to cover expenses.
As most of the fur is shipped to A7ancouver, it is impossible to come to any decision as to the
extent to which fur trade has suffered from the present depression.
Fur-farming.
The licensing of all fur-farms is again advocated in order that with the funds so obtained
close supervision and inspection may be made of the fur-farms to the benefit of all concerned
in this industry.
Good reports have been received from various fur-farmers as to the increase in their stock,
but it is felt that generally the quality of the furs produced is overlooked in favour of the
quantity.
The successful breeding of fisher by L. Tereschuk, of Prince George, is again brought to
your attention. Experiments in the breeding of this highly valuable fur-bearer are still proceeding, and when definite data have been obtained a further report will be submitted.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This work is progressing very favourably and is approaching completion. The results of
this method of conserving fur-bearing animals are being noticed everywhere.
Beaver, muskrats, marten, and mink are increasing on all properly handled registered trap-
lines. The fine work carried out by a few very successful trappers in farming their trap-lines
is being imitated by many, and the conservation of fur-bearing animals is benefiting accordingly.
Registration of Guides.
The necessity of revising the regulations in regard to guides, their helpers, cooks, horse-
wranglers, etc., was forcibly brought to my attention last season when Alberta cooks, horse-
wranglers, and outfitters came into this Province with various hunting-parties to the detriment
of our own residents.
In order to stop this practice and protect our own outfitters, guides, etc., it is respectfully
suggested that a resident outfitter's licence of $25 be put into effect, and that the resident J 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
guide's licence be raised to $10 and a fee of $5 charged for cooks, horse-wranglers, etc., employed
in connection with any big-game hunting-party.
Special Patrols.
Numerous patrols were undertaken by members of the Department in the ordinary course
of duty.    The following outstanding patrols are brought to your attention:—
Caribou Creek Patrol.—This patrol was made by Game Warden V. L. Williams, assisting the
British Columbia Police (Constable G. Soles, of Prince George) in a search for the remains of a
prospector. The remains were brought back to Prince George. Mileage, 100 by car, 800 by boat,
300 on foot, making a total of 1,200 miles.
Atlin-Tulsequah Patrol.—This was a general game and police patrol undertaken by Game
Warden E. Martin, of Prince Rupert. A total of 1,625 miles was covered by means of boat, train,
automobile, and aeroplane.
Fort Nelson Patrols.—Game AVarden J. S. Clark and Special Game Warden B. Arilleneuve
have made numerous patrols. Game AVarden Clark, who is in charge of the Fort Nelson Detachment, has had a lot of trouble with his outboard motor and was unable to cover his district
during the summer months. However, one patrol made during the winter from Fort Nelson to
Hay Lake and Kotcho Lake is worthy of mention. One thousand nine hundred miles were
covered by dog-team, the snow at times reaching a depth of 6 feet, causing the patrol officers a
lot of hardship and discomfort. The trip was completed without mishap, however, and resulted
in creating a good moral effect on the native and white trappers.
Hunting Accidents.
Two hunting accidents have been reported.
Charlie Niddle, an Indian of the Fontas River (Fort Nelson) District, on May 2nd, 1932,
shot at a beaver, which he missed, and the bullet hit his brother, Johnny Niddle, who died on
May 5th, 1932. This case was fully investigated by Coroner J. S. Clark, of Fort Nelson, who
found that it was purely accidental.
George Bell, on November 5th, 1932, was carrying a 12-gauge shotgun while hunting ducks.
A twig caught the trigger of the shotgun, discharging the gun and inflicting a wound in the right
foot, necessitating the amputation of his big toe.
Summary and General Remarks.
Game conditions have been very favourable during the year. The breeding season was
exceptionally good for upland and migratory game birds. At the time of writing this report
conditions have been very good for the conservation of animals of the deer family, as light
snowfall and mild weather form ideal grazing conditions. If the present weather continues all
game animals will come through the winter in first-class condition.
Considering the area required to be patrolled by Game VFardens of this Division, the results
obtained during the year have been remarkable, but these results could not have been secured
without the assistance of the British Columbia Police, and I again wish to express my appreciation of the fine spirit of co-operation shown by officers and constables of the British Columbia
Police Force in administering and enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act" and regulations
thereunder.
In closing, might I mention that " D " Division comprises an area of 300,000 square miles,
this area being patrolled by nine permanent and one special Game Warden.
"E" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By J. G. Cunningham, Divisional Game Supervisor.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " E "
Division for the year 1932.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Deer have been plentiful, but not nearly so many were killed as during the season
1931. The hunting for deer on the islands of Howe Sound proved disappointing to many sportsmen, but certain districts on the Mainland proved to be holding up under the strain of incessant
hunting. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 21
Goat.—Mountain-goat are increasing in certain districts, due to the fact that fewer sportsmen have hunted them than in past years. A number of these animals were taken in the Stave
and Powell Lake areas, and many goat were reported along the Seymour Range and at other
points situated within the North Vancouver Game Reserve. I observed a fine number of these
animals in the Powell Lake District, and it was encouraging to see the number of goat at the
upper end of the Goat Island Game Reserve, Powell Lake.
Bear.—Black bear are far too plentiful in this Division, especially in the Fraser Valley and
North Vancouver Districts. Many complaints were received from North Vancouver and
numerous permits granted to kill bear doing damage, while in many cases the Game Wardens
were called upon to dispose of some of the bolder animals.
Moose.—I have again received information that moose signs were seen in the Pemberton
Valley during the fall of 1932.
Fur-bearing Animals.
An unusual number of beaver are being caught throughout the Division, and some complaints of these animals becoming a nuisance have been received from the Burnaby District. A
fair number of beaver were trapped in the Stave Lake District.
It seems that marten have not been so plentiful, but I believe the reason for this is that
trappers are not anxious to trap them on account of the prevailing low prices.
There has been a good demand for mink this season and these animals are fairly plentiful,
but the price, in spite of the demand, has not increased to any extent.
Muskrats are plentiful as in former years, but the price offered for their pelts has been very
low. During the latter part of this year muskrat-trapping has been very difficult owing to
excessive rainy weather and exceedingly high water.
Otter, racoon, and skunk are to be found in this Division. The first two animals do not
appear to be increasing, but skunk are reported.as being a pest and are very plentiful.
Red fox have again done damage on the Lower Mainland.
Upland Game Birds.
In the spring pheasants appeared to be very plentiful and prospects for the fall season were
good, but owing to a poor breeding season poor shooting was obtained in some parts of the
Division during the open season. A great number of pheasants are hatched in July, and that
month proved to be one of the worst we have had for years, as it rained almost continuously, and
many fields where pheasants were nesting were flooded and consequently the nests were
destroyed.
We still have a number of sportsmen advocating an open season for hen pheasants, but the
average sportsman is against any such open season.
Partridges do not seem to be increasing in this Division. There is an agitation for the
extension of the open season on these birds on the Lower Mainland, and this probably would be
advisable.
Blue grouse afforded splendid shooting during the early part of the season in the Howe
Sound District. Blue grouse have been fairly plentiful, but no large bags were secured during
the short open season allowed for the hunting of these birds.
Migratory Game Birds.
There are conflicting opinions as to the condition of migratory game birds in this Division,
but from close observation I feel that ducks have been more plentiful this year than for some
years past. According to the banding records of the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve this
season, migratory game birds have certainly increased.
Game Warden A. J. Butler captured and banded 1,414 birds between October 16th and
December 9th, compared with 533 birds in the same period in 1931.
In addition to this banding-station, Mr. George C. Reifel has been operating a banding-
station on Westham Island, resulting in a further 3,000 ducks being banded.
With reference to the open season on wood-ducks, very few of these birds were killed, and
I do not think that a short open season on these birds would decrease their numbers to any
great extent. J 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Geese and brant have been as plentiful as in past years. Some fair bags of snow-geese were
obtained, but the weather has not been favourable for good brant-hunting owing to the lack of
strong south-east winds at the proper stages of the tides.
A fair number of swans have been seen at different times during the past season, while
band-tailed pigeons have not been as plentiful as in past years.
Vermin.
There are a few coyotes in the district, while several complaints have been received in regard
to cougar doing damage.    One of our Game AVardens was successful in trapping a cougar.
Domestic cats running wild are the worst menace to game birds and do considerable damage ;
675 of these cats were destroyed during the year, compared with 611 in 1931.
The crow-trap at Essondale continues to work satisfactorily, and Game AVarden Urquhart,
as a result of this trap, has accounted for 695 crows. Steps are being taken to erect a similar
trap at a piggery near Chilliwack.
The following is a summary of the vermin destroyed by Game Wardens in this Division
during the year 1932 :—
Crows   2,108 Eagles       22
Cats      675 Owls      29
Dogs         49 Cougar       1
Hawks         103
Game-protection.
The depression has again made the enforcement of the various Acts pertaining to game and
game fish a difficult matter. Game AATardens have been very active and have brought many
offenders before the Courts, where, in a number of cases, we have received very poor support.
About 90 per cent, of the people charged with violations of the " Game Act" have entered a plea
of guilty, but in a number of cases the local Municipal Magistrates were disinclined to inflict a
fine of any kind, resulting in one instance in a dismissal on a plea of guilty.
The officers and men of the British Columbia Police Force have again rendered valuable
assistance in enforcing the " Game Act," and the Game AVardens of this Division have reciprocated in helping the Police Force in their work.
The new angler's licence imposed on residents of the male sex over 18 years of age necessitated a closer check on all streams, naturally resulting in better protection for game fish. The
sport fishermen of the Lower Mainland assisted wonderfully in this work by taking out their
licences, although there were the odd few who thought they would take a chance, resulting in
a number of fines for the offence.
Game Propagation.
The following is a list of the pheasants liberated in this Division during the year, making a
total of 1,002 birds :—
Roberts Creek      10 Agassiz       60
Lulu Island   116 Mission       80
Ladner  136 Coquitlam. Pitt Meadows   148
South AVestminster    20 Port Moody     40
Cloverdale  128 North Vancouver      24
Langley Prairie     40 Chilliwack  100
Abbotsford, Sumas, Matsqui   100
In addition to the above birds received for distribution from the Elk Lake Game Farm on
Vancouver Island, we had for liberation some twenty-one pheasants which had been raised from
eggs gathered in by our Game Wardens. These eggs were collected from nests found during
clearing onerations and would have been a total loss had we not had the co-operation of Mrs.
B. M. Webb, of Sardis.
Game Reserves.
The game reserves in this Division remain the same as in past years. Owing to one of the
parties leasing property on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve not being satisfied with conditions, there was a danger of our having some trouble, but so far everything in connection with
this reserve is satisfactory. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 23
The goat on the Goat Island Game Reserve, Powell Lake, certainly appear to be increasing,
while game conditions on the North Vancouver Reserve are greatly improved.
Fur Trade.
At the time of writing this report there is a better feeling among the fur-dealers in Vancouver than at any time during the previous year. Prices are apparently as low as they will
ever be, and the dealer knows just about where he stands. Fur prices in general have been very
low and trappers have suffered accordingly.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farming industry has been very badly hit and a great number of the larger fur-
farms have had to go out of business, although there is one farmer close to Vancouver who
claims that he can break even or make some profit on raising mink at present prices.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division has worked very smoothly, though there is
the odd dispute arising between Indian and white trappers in the Pemberton District.
Registration of Guides.
The following guides' licences were issued during the year: Allan Wilson, Agassiz; F. A.
Phillipps, North Vancouver.
Special Patrols.
As this Division is very regularly patrolled, it has not been necessary to make any patrol
which could be classed as a special patrol.
• Hunting Accidents.
There have been fewer hunting accidents reported this year, only four being brought to my
notice, against sixteen in the year 1931. Two of these accidents were due to carelessness in
handling loaded firearms; one person was shot by some person unknown and another is still
missing, presumably having fallen off a cliff while hunting.
Summary of General Game Conditions.
Game conditions throughout the Division proved as satisfactory as in the previous year;
the depression, being more and more felt, was a cause of a considerable decrease in the number
of firearms licences issued, with the exception of farmers' and prospectors' free licences. Owing
to the large number of unemployed taking out the provisional free miner's licence, there was
naturally an equal rush for the free firearms licence, and this privilege was greatly abused.
A great many complaints were received in regard to immature prospectors shooting game
just to see the animals drop, as very little meat was taken in many instances.
Taking everything into consideration so far as this Division is concerned, I feel that we
have done very well, and in concluding I wish to express my appreciation of the splendid cooperation of the officers and men of the British Columbia Police Force and Game Wardens
throughout the Division, and also the Game Associations and sportsmen of the Lower Mainland.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF THE ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By Game Warden J. W. Jones.
I respectfully submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake Game
Farm during the year 1932.
Weather conditions were bad for pheasants during the summer and we had considerable
trouble with rats in the rearing-field. Considering these handicaps, I think we had a fairly good
year, and the following birds were raised and distributed:—
Pheasants in pens as at December 31st, 1931   1,420
Breeding stock (approximately)        400
Hen pheasants      320
Cock pheasants         80
Strayed from breeding-pens during year         12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Number of eggs laid (approximately)   5,500
Set under hens     4,500
Hatched 3,500
Young pheasants raised  3,007
Shipped and liberated in the Province   1,987
Pheasants in pens as at December 31st, 1932 (approximately)   1,020
Casualties, owing to rats, cats, etc  393
Strayed from rearing-field  (approximately)    100
Eggs shipped out to game-bird farmers, etc  750
Small late eggs used for feed   200
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 80;  hawks, 60;  barn-rats, 400.
In regard to the melanistic mutant pheasants, these were crossed with other pheasants and
appeared to be quite hardy and easier to raise than the pure melanistic.
The pair of copper pheasants received last spring are looking very well, but did not lay
this year, though I am looking forward to their doing so next spring.
The wild turkeys have not had any young this year, and I am afraid we will not do any
good with them until we obtain some new blood. AVe have only one hen left, the other hen and
the gobbler having died.
Every effort has been made to maintain game patrols, and special attention has been paid
to all complaints regarding game-work and cougar-hunting. Two cougar were destroyed, one
in Sooke and the other in the Gordon Head District.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms and anglers' licences and game-tags :  25
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident licences  26
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from royalty or tax
on fur .'  27
Statement showing pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has been collected during
the period 1921-32, inclusive  28
Particulars of various pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has been paid during
1932  29
Bounties paid during the year 1932 :  30
Comparative statement of bounties paid from 1922-32, inclusive  30
Statement of total collections from fur trade, 1921-32, inclusive... :  30
List of furs confiscated for infractions of the " Game Act"  31
List of firearms confiscated for infractions of the " Game Act"  32
Statement of predatory animals and noxious birds destroyed by Game AVardens during the
year 1932  32
List of guides, 1932  33
Hunting accidents, 1932  34
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid in 1932  35
Prosecutions, 1932   36
Returns of trappers, 1931-32  39
Fur-farm returns, 1932 (Statement No. 1) ,  39
Fur-farm returns, 1932 (Statement No. 2)  39
Statement of migratory game birds banded by members of the Game Department, 1932  40
Personnel of Game Department  40
Game-bird farm returns, 1932  42
Comparative statistics, 1913-32, inclusive  46 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 25
Iff
©
i-
©
iff
c
iff
Iff
iff
©
i-
ir
ir
c
k:
Iff
c
ir
ir
ir
ir:
©   IT
© c
c
ir
©  IQ  ©   IQ   ©   IQ  ©   C
©    LO   ©   ©     LQ
CI iff t-
Iff
(M
IO   t-   Ol
T
C
OJ
t-
OJ
Iff
Ol  o
c
Ol  o
OJ
01 © o
©  ©  ©  CN
© fc~ ■ ©   L-  IO  t-
LQ   tt  ©   Ol  ©   LO    Ol
H  01  -t
CO
©
rH  CO  ©
Tt
cr
i-
a
O"
Of
•HH    Lff
CO  Iff
or
t-    Iff)    Tf
©  O-
iff t-
©   r-
Cv
HOLOMO^ClOh    ©
IQ  M  «
h-
IO  01   Tf
CO
C
c
V
Os
a
Ol  CC
cc
CO   O"
cc
IQ   Ol  CC
Ol  -
©  0
ir
cc
©rHlOXrHIO©-^©     t-
©   l>  Lff
C
CO  CO  CC
1-
©
t!
t~
a
c*
©  CO
X cr
o.
00   l>  OC
Tf    CO
LQ  CN
lff  C
cr
TflO.CO©©©LO©-f     ©
E-
01
CO  O  CN
r-
Iff
O-
r-
Tj
Tf    Tf    O"
00   r-
Tf   ©
rH   r-
ffv
CI   r-i   rH
©   00   t-   rH   rH     ©
&S-
1-1
Ol
CM
rH
t- "* w
x
©
OJ
T-
co
a
;r
oe
fc- c
Q-
CM   r-
CM   ©  ©
Tf a
Tf     CC
C
CN
cr
: r- ©
©   rH   Ol   X   ©     .rH
& «
CO Tf
I-
rH
1-
i-
0
ir
©     Tf
Iff
©   0-
©   ©  Iff
Tf
x >r
If
ec
r-
!   rH   ©
01   t-   Tf   IO   CO     r-t
fmj
CC
rH
CM   rH
Iff)   CN
r-
c^
r
rH
03   rH   rH   rH
Tf
io"
r- x
Ol
Iff   tH   LO
©
CO
©
-t
H
T-
HH   Tf
0"
I-  C
©
©  ©  OC
© r-
© c
-t
Tf
t-    : Tf ©
03   ©   ©   X  IO    ©
fe
& °
O   rH
Iff
ffi iM t-
Cfi
iff
0"
Ol cc
Ol   Iff
iff
Iff   CO  0
rH   CN
©   IT
Os
a
Tj
:  CO  r-
rH   CO   ©   L-
■  Ol    ©
tH
1-
t-
Ol   ©   CO
rH
fcj
co ■
U3 O Iff
10
©   Iff    Lffl
Iff
c
iff
ir
ir
Iff Iff
r
iff \r
ir
iff © id
© c
©   Iff
r
ir
C
LO  ©  I-
©   ©   IO   ©   ©     LQ
01   O  t-
fc-
Iff)   f-   t>
t-
ITS
t-
i>
t-
t- o
iff
01 o
t-
r-OO
©  IT
LQ  t-
c
b-
IT
l~- IO c
Iff)  LQ  CM  IO  IO    CM
+j
CO  03  f-
or
est t- 00
t^
Iff)
©
O"
©
Ol  ©
-t
00 ©
N
CO  Iff  CC
CO  t;
Lff   ©
•?
h
tf
rH   a
or
01  00  Ol  Ol  ©    ©
a
■H  CI
D
W  H  C
iff
CN
H-
ir
it;
tH   r-
Tf    Tj
Tl
cm t- r-
rH   L-
©  X
C
h
t-   T
0-
Ol  ©  Ol  CO  ©    ©
<
CI
CI   Tf   rH
H
Ol
c
Tf
01    Tf    OJ
Or-
X  01  LQ
©
CD
©   01  X
a
O  ©  CO
T
©
Iff
N
©
CO   ©
CO
CO  ©
CO     Iff     Tf
© cr
CO   ©
cc
c
rH   C
*-
CO   Iff  Ol  Ol  CO    X
as fc- r
CO  ©  CN
a
h-
©
0"
rH   Lff
''I
rH  CN
©
t~  CO  ©
CO   r-
rH   t-
i-
\r
0
© ir
..
00   Tf   r-
© cc
00
*H
Iff    00    Tf
M
1-
T—
i-
©
Iff
rH   T-
©
IQ   CO  ©
O
01   t-
o
Tf   r-
©   LQ   O"
X
&
rH
01           r-
Tf
rH
© o c
©
c
© © ©
©
Q
©
Cff
c
© a
c
©  C
a
©   ©   C
CJ   ©
c
c
©
© c
■_
©  ©  C
c
C
©
© © ©
H   ©  ^
©
©
cr
© ©
T-\    Iff
c
©  ©
©  ©
©   ©   ©
t- -f  cc
©■  ©
00  o
c
cr
OJ
© ©
©    Tf
©
X
'©  ©  C
03   ©   IT
■
©  Tf  CO
t©
—
1-
tc
or
01  t-
X
-
ir
©
CO
a
a
3
CO  HI-
r-
r-
CM   iH   t-
C3
t^-
c
'Z
iff
s
©    ©
•--
CO    T]
i—
Tf    CI    C<
CO     Tj
© t-
Cf
©
c
X  t-
T|
rH   IO   C-
)-
o-
rH
CI   tH
89-
00   "*   CM
©
T-
r-
t-
©  CO
-1-
r
iff
©  .©    Tf
Cr-
rH   CC
CN
«
© I-
r-
rH   LQ   t-
1"
CO
Iff"
j
<4
tfa
6
co
1-
rH
©  T*1
©
©
01
ti
©
©
r-
1-
©
1-
©
iff
cc
:0
i-i   Lff)
©   ©
CO  CO
CC
©
o ©
00    Tf
I-
oc
t-
Iff
t-    Tf    CC
Tf    Ol    O
©    ©    Tf
CO   Ol
co -f
oc
Ol   t-
© fc-
rH  CC
K
X
CM
©
X
CI
cc
©     Tf
X  t-
CO   T-
X
-t
t-
©  ©  IT
rH   IO   Or*
r-i   LO   l-
c
If
0
CO
rH
CO
CD   tH
i-
e
CI   rH
CO  rH  0!
T-
rH
00
lO
: ©
©
o    :
©
er
©
©
o
©
©
—
c
C
©    :
-
-
©
-W
i ©
c
©    ;
c
©
©
©
©
©    :
C
c
©
a
; io
10
iff     :
IT
IO
Iff
Iff
©
©
LQ
1"
©
»r
io    :
ir
ir
LO
<
j afr
CO
CN
CN
rH      J,
t-
©
Tf
6
: tH
h-
th    :
lffl
rH
iff
r-i
Tf
Ol
LO
h-
0
r-
co    :
ir
Cr-
CO
rH
rH
,"
© .
,
©
© © ©
©
©
©
; ©
©
©   ©
©   ©
■~
© ©
© © c
©
~£
iff
iff © ©
C
lffl
Iff
: iff
Iff
Lff   Iff   ©
Lff;  Lff
LQ   Lff
C
IQ  ©
iff lq ir
©
52
GO.
<
«•
r-i
rH
-
CCj
Iff)  ©  01
-f
CO
|Q
;  r-
CO
CO    ©    Tf
rH  r-
©   Iff
o
rH   Ol
rH   CO   i>
©
!zi
T~(
CN!
Ol          r-
-f
r-
©
a
©
LO
mm
<
; i-
rH
©
as-
6
H
X
CO
o © ©
©
o
c
©
—
© ©
© c
©
©  ©  ©
©   ©
©
©
c
© ©
~
©
©  ©  C
©
—
©
© © ©
©
©
© © ©
~
©
©
c
c
©
© ©
©
© ©
c
©  ©  ©
©  ©
©   ©
©
C
©
© ©
©
C
© © c
c
c
©
+j
© © ©
©
©
© © ©
—
©
©
©
—
©
© ©
©
© ©
c~
©  ©  ©
©  ©
©   ©
©
©
©
© ©
©
C
© © ©
c
c
©
a
<
03  CM  IQ
Iff
o
00 t- cc
Iff
h-
v
w
a
«
© cc
CT-
Tf   r-
©  Iff  t-
©     T-
Iff     Ti
■rr
■
r»
r-i   r-
©
IQ  IO  CV
c
j
t-
r-
\r,
N 00 W
-f
rH   r-
r
rH  01
CO CO CC
©    0^
Ol  ©
H
©
L*
Iff
ir
IQ  Tf  OC
-
56-
rH
r-i
rH
CO
02
CM
©  01  Lff
10
c
00  tr- CO
Iff
a
or
X
CC
©  CC
OS
Tf   r-
r-
011O  t-
©   r-
IQ     Tf
a
©
i-
rH   T-
CR
cr
IQ   IO   0*
c
c
Tf
o
!«5
t-
r
iff
CM  CO  Cd
Tf
-t
rH   r-
y
rH   CC
00 X cc
©   O
01   ©
H
©
IT
)-
»ff
LO   Tf   0*
0
tl
©
r-t
rH
rH
01
CM  r-i
r-i
CO
cf
©  ©  ©
©
© © ©
©
©
©
©   ©
©
©
©
© o ©
<r~
©  ©
©
©
c
©  ©
c
c
©   ©   ©
c
c
©
©  ©  ©
©
© © ©
©
©
c
©   ©
©
©
c
© © ©
©
o ©
©
©
c
©  C
C
c
© © c
c
©
a
CM  -^  CO
Tf
Ol   Ol
Ol
01
OC
Tf     ©     C
^r
©  Ol
CO
03
-t
CI   ©
Tf
c
Ol © c
c
c
©
t-    rH    CN
r-
b- ©  ■*
Tf
«
0
rH  C;
rT
r-
tr
00 (Jp f-
©
CO  I-
i-
0^
c
t-   0-
0-
0
03  CO  t-
CO cc
a
<i
6<S-          r-
CM
rH
r-i
CM
CO
Tf
►fa
Ol
HO
6
©   rH   ©
H
©   t-  ■*
01
ro
CN
rH   Ol
T~
©
t-   Iff   r-
or
LQ   OC
cc
CC
c
© CC
03
c
CO  CO  CC
0*
1-
©
T-
tH
H
T-
01
CO
rH
01
©  O
©
C
©
C
c
©   ©
©  ©
C
©   ©   ©
©  ©
e
c
—
© c
c
©
© © c
c
c
©
©  ©
C
©
©  ©  ©
©
©
©
©
c
©
©   ©
C
©  ©
©
©   ©   ©
o ©
©  ©
©
©
c
© ©
©
c
©
a
©  ©
©
c
CO  ©  ©
-f
"
-t
sc
©
©
©     Tf
Tf
00  Ol
or
Ol   ©   ©
Ol  Ol
X  X
TT
-t-
cc
01  ©
»r
l>
r-i   X  C
-
c
01
© cc
a
N co cc:
C
r-
Iff
«
©    Iff
©   r-
i—
t-   rH   ©
©  0-
©   r-
C-
c
© ©
CO
►J
i)
eft-
T-
-^
iff
«
«
CO
r
tH
CO
00  CN
rH   ©
OJ
o
rH
©   rH
d
r-i
X
iff
m
H   Iff  ©
-V
a
r-
Iff
t- ©
,~
00 01
cc
Ol  IQ  Iff
th b-
IO   Cr-
X
t^   r-
r-
©
Ol   CO ur
© c
©
rH
r
0
t-
Cf
ir:
in
©
r-
rH   CO   r-
Iff   Ci*
©   ©
cr
cr
rH   r-
p-
CO   01
LO  IT
co
is
rH
rH   r-
rH
Tf^
rH
©   ©   ©
C
C
O  ©  ©
©
©
c
©
C
©
© ©
-
© ©
—
©  ©   ©
© ©
©  C
c
C
c
©  C
©
c
©
c
c
©
© iff ©
iff
©
lO  ©  Iff
o
©
is
©
Iff
Iff
© ©
©
© Iff
©
©   ©   ©
© ©
LO  ©
c
c
Iff
C
+j
00 01 Iff
C
*i
01  CO  00
iff
©
H-
Of
T-
c
CO  iff
Iff
t- Iff
Iff
Tf   rH   ©
© I-
t-  X
ir
r-
X
© w
cr
c
©   ©   r-
io a
01
a
H 03 r|
r
c
W   H  C
a
/
l~
r/
fr
©
CO  ©
r
t- c
1-
CO   L-  Iff
■HH   ©
CO  ©
h-
1-
T-
r-
CO   ©  t-
00  CO   t-
T-
cc
CO oc
H t* C£
CO  ©
t- ©
CI
CN
t
Tf   t-
tH
H CO r-
1-
Ol
0-
V
01 © 0
CN
rH
d
6»
so-
■* cc C
M
or
rH  ©  ©
CT
Ol
r-
0
c
r-
Tf    ©
©
CO  r-
0
©     Tf     ©
Ol c
rH   ©
d
0-
v
Iff    Tt
c
rr
00 © or
t- c
CI
©  Tf   f.
or
Ol   Iff  CO
«
T-
Tl
b-  r-
©  CC
c
rH   ©   ©
© c
Ol   CC
ir
1-
C
©  O-
O
Tf  tH
Iff   ©   Tt
OS
r
r-
t_  ,_
CC
r-i  ff
-
CO  CO  t-
YH  C\
CM   X
0-
o*
Tf  CN
r-
OJ   t-   CO   H   r
5
Ol
CO          rH
©
rH
4J
CI
a
S3
n
3
'C
t-
T
03
Q
'3
c
-
a
5
u
r
4-
s
a
£
4*
C
9
f-
it
9
'J
o
O
c
i
1
6
C
c
c
+•
c
o 3
i
B
a
R
(-
+-
C
C
i
P
a
s
1
a
J
ft
o
c
5
0
c
c
A
c
i
s
c
!
a
a   a
5'c"
cu   a
o c
fl   c
P
c
c
c
B
1
M
c
3
a
m <
1 £
£
JB
1
b
4
CU
*   >
C5    B
b £
5
c
c
I
r
%
1
S3
4-J
O
<
<
<
*
c
C
c
P
f»
fc
C
c
e
tr
^
K
1*
H
f
Je
^
^ p.
p.
P.
p.
ft
P.
0
^
Pi
t:
X
t"
r>
t>
o
a
•sa
o
a
-1
CO
Ed
O
o
© J 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-resident Licences, January 1st, 1932, to
December 31st, 1932.
Government
Agents.
General Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences.
Bear, Deer,
and Anglers'
Licences.
Weekly Bird
Licences.
Daily
Anglers'
Licences.
Season
Anglers'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.     Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
1
1
3
4
11
2
6
20
9
17
3
2
1
24
4
4
1
1
1
5
1
7
1
1
3
3
5
?25.00
1
1
1
24
12
14
13
41
202
6
347
11
26
119
10
37
6
22
1
6
30
46
430
11
6
20
4
9
4
2
4
7
4
1
53
16
33
4
34
$32.00
16.00
14.00
21.00
52.00
272.00
16.00
387.00
5
3
10
6
5
1
1
3
6
2
1
3
20
1
44
1
3
1
1
1
1
31
30
1
$50.00
$107.00
16.00
Atlin	
$50.00
50.00
200.00
64.00
71.00
25.00
30.00
100.00
60.00
50.00
10.00
282 00
Cumberland	
397.00
76 00
250.00
687 00
Fort Praser	
10.00
550.00
17.00
30.00
176.00
12.00
65.00
7.00
40.00
1.00
9.00
47.00
47.00
784.00
14.00
24.00
25.00
4.00
9.00
5.00
4.00
4.00
9.00
7.00
2.00
567 00
Greenwood	
25.00
10.00
30.00
65.00
Grand Forks	
206.00
Hope	
12.00
100.00
125.00
$3.00
60.00
20.00
10.00
355.00
27.00
Kelowna	
50.00
1.00
30.00
200.00
10.00
440.00
39.00
Nanaimo	
25.00
175.00
25.00
25.00
272 00
300.00
1,000.00
357 00
New Westmin-
2 399 00
Penticton	
39 00
Pouce Coupe
Powell River	
800.00
5.00
10.00
30.00
10.00
10.00
864.00
55.00
Prince George...
1,300.00
75.00
1,389.00
19.00
Prince Rupert-
Princeton	
5.00
150.00
154 00
Revelstoke	
	
4.00
Rossland	
9 00
Salmon Arm	
200.00
50.00
1,600.00
125.00
10.00
10.00
17.00
212 00
Telegraph
Creek	
5.00
50 00
111.00
27.00
80.00
10.00
46.00
310.00
2,151.00
27 00
Vernon	
200.00
125.00
300.00
10.00
705.00
20 00
Williams Lake...
Wilmer	
200.00
	
246 00
Totals
112   | $7,000.00
1
31
$775.00
3
$15.001 1,615
1
$2,426.00
181
$1,810.00
$12,026.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 27
Revenue derived from Sale of Pur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and from Royalty
or Tax on Pur, January 1st, 1932, to December 31st, 1932.
Government
Agents.
Resident
Fce-tkaders.
Non-resident
Fur-traders.
Fur Tax or
Royalty.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
7
1
1
20
1
2
1
1
23
15
10
6
10
10
39
1
3
10
$175.00
45
3
11
4
20
4
19
16
36
2
3
25
1
2
10
2
17
9
150
64
37
15
11
2
7
23
514
4
43
24
2
$223.65
9.75
101.38
13.51
83.20
11.30
74.90
129.20
797.56
.80
4.60
223.31
1.00
3.31
23.97
.35
64.54
13.17
5,939.10
552.29
593.83
338.48
58.91
7.52
19.99
157.45
26,496.84
80.24
121.61
111.63
1.40
1
2
1
1
1
1
•      3
1
6
$398.65
9.75
Atlin	
101.38
25.00
25.00
38.51
$5.00
113.20
11.30
74.90
10.00
139.20
500.00
25.00
'     1,297.56
5.00
30 80
4.60
50.00
5.00
278 31
1.00
3.31
25.00
48.97
35
25.00
89.54
13 17
575.00
375.00
250.00
150.00
5.00
5.00
6,519 10
932.29
843 83
483 48
58 91
7 52
250.00
250.00
975.00
25.00
75.00
250.00
269 99
Telegraph Creek	
407.45
15.00
5.00
30.00
27,486.84
226 61
Williams Lake	
361.63
Wilmer	
1 40
Totals	
161
$4,025.00
1,125
$30,253.70
17
$85.00
$40,363.79 J 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
«
ft
§
W
S*
o
PI
W
o
H
w
K
o
gj
S3
i
a
B
M
E-l
H
M
O
O
O©XXXC0©t-   ©   rH   X   ©
CD
cc
XXrH©l>'rHCl©XrH©t-
CO
Ol
•pa;^ai[oo
10CO-f©t-l001CO©rH©CO
1-
t-
©©©lff)C0"-fCl©©C0lOIO
01
Cl
,U[u.ioa
LO  ©   LQ  CO   t-  ©  ©  LQ  t-  Tf  ©  01
rH
Tf
jo ^unouiy
Tf" rH   ©" ©* X*   ©" H   rH   ©" ©" rH   ©"
©'
t-"
Ol   LO   ©   LQ   Tf   IO   ©   Iff)   Tf   Tf   Tf   CO
©
■HH
m-
IO
so-
se-
t-  Tf   f-  1>  Ol   05  Tf   t-  Tf   rH   ©  X
©
t-
rHTfOl          rHC001CO©IOTfTf
co
7I0Ai
rH   01                                   rH                           rH   rH
©
Tf
X
XC001©©COXlOTfC001
©
IQ
01
CO
Tf
'l^PIFAY
LOt-XClrHOlOl©
Ol
1'
01X©rHXlOOlt-C0-H<©©
IQ
LO
Cl
Ol   05   rH   IO   ©   Ol   ©   X   Ol   Iff   ©   00
CO
•atiijaAio^w
COOlOlOlOlCOlOTfOOCOClOl
co"
rH
rH
00
t-
WCOXX©01t-01050CCt-
Tf
rH
X©©t-WLOC0XrHC0©lO
IO
CD
Tf
•psi?aAV
Ol©TfX01©C0_l>©©X00
05
©" Tf" t>" OS Iff" ©" x" ©" t-" cnT 'of x"
©
01
ClClCOOldCOCOTfCOLOTfTf
1-
Tf
os"
CO
rHlOOOrHOlXOlTflffb-CO©
r^
01
Tf
OHHOOOOIMHOIM^^
©
•jfnnqg
COt-X©Xt-rHTHt-XLQ©
CO
tH   rH
Os"
CO
rHOiTfLOO©XTHrH©rHIO
*t*
oo
CO
0
lO©©©LOClCOTfl>©t-10
■uoooi?h
©   ©^ 01   LQ_ Cft   rH   Tf   rH   CN   t-^ rH LQ
©
rH
OS
Ol" ©" LO" Tf" Tf" LO" t-   t>" Iff" CO" CO" CO"
OS
Iff
Tf"
©L0Ol©C0C0XrH©Xt-Ol
©
t™
rH
O
©rHCO©rHX©XlQCO©©
©
Q
'^3WO
©C5xt-t-t-©.©xxx©
CO
Tf
rH
os"
01
X
LO01©©rH©"-f©©©©©
X
©
»
-... . . _
XCO-f©C0tMXC0©©Cl©
lO
CM
IO
rHClXlffCOTfXrH©^   ©   LQ
rH
<!
•s^'ej^sriH
LO05»rHt--XC0   1OOl-f©©
CO
t-
t-C001©©Tf©©lffiX©©
01
«
rH   rH                                                           rH   rH
©
Iff"
1H
H
<
rH
X
C001©rHlOXXXCDIOXb-
b-
X
©
X
cirtt-ooii.O't'cociacit-
©
o
■stain
©flJClClt-HIQfflClOW©
«    O
Ph
©" X" ©" ©" X" Tf" ©" tH  x  x" ©" Ol"
rH
H
■HrHrHClrHdrHrH                   rHrH
X
rH
lq"
rH
CO
H
XrHCO©LO©X©LQ01©©
X    X
£
ClXTfXC0Cl©rH©t-©lO
10
Tf
o
•ua^jUH
rHrH©t--10C5©©01rH©t-
Tf
k
HOIOHt-QriHrlOJMOO
01
*i
o
rH   rH   rH   rH                   rH   rH   rH
01
©
rH
*xuavi
©   10
Tf    Iff
© ©
X ©  Iff   t-  CO  Tf  ©  CO
XlffCOOSXXCil—
©
©
IO
CO    Iff
d  X ©  X  Tf 01  CO  CO  LO  Iff  LQ CI
ri S
fe
THrHOlTfCDXOTfOlrHrHTH
CO   ill)
0
P.
"*   co"
£
•(pauiJ^)
01
ci .  :
w
Q
[5
aiiia 'xotf
©
rH
2    i
rH   |    .
X
-Xj
t-CO©rHClrH©rHX©©Tf
IO
LO
©TflQXC5XO5C0Olt-C0Tf
IO
OS
Ol
tf
•paa 'xo^
(M  Tf  ©  (N  IO  X W   ©  ©  IO  IQ  ©
w
rH  rH  Ol" Ol" rH  rH
co"
rH
P
1-1
r-T
C5©Ol©lO©Ol©©rHClC0
01
o
©
•ssojo
lOLQOlOlTfClTfrHLOOOOX
IQ
Ol   CO   Tf   05   rH   «   CO   ©   ©   ©   IQ   IO
«
©'
'xo^
rH   CI  Ol"          rH
H
©
OlXTf©X©TfC0©©t-t-
X
©
©
•J3AIIS
©OOHH^Ht-t-OllOOH
-f
'xo^
rH010lTf©1001rH0105
©
CO*
X
05
01
00
rHCOlOt-TfXOSb-ffirHCOX
©
CO
rHCOt-0101COTfXTfX©lQ
©
uaqsi^
t-IOWCOLOOHMt-COOIfl
©
Tf
rH  rH
co"
01
b-
©
C0©Cl©rHXXOlt-b-C0Tf
©
LQ
b-lOrHrHcOt-rHCOXCOOlOl
01
©
'j9Auaa;
Tf   CO   CI   ©^ 01   Tf   Tf   ©_ t-   rH   rH   W
H
© Cl" Tf x" X" Tf" ©" Tf" i> x" CI
00*
©
ClMClrlrtCllNHHHH
01
01
CO
os"
rH
O5l-t-©O5LO©LOlff)lOrH01
Ol
©
Xol©C0©©ClC0©©Tf05
01
©
'j^ag
TfrHCOCOrHlOIOt-rHrHCOlO
X
NMHHHHHrlHH
©"
rH
Tf
u
Ol
CO
1
rH
« C
CI
C ed
a
0) OJ
m   t-i
3*
"s3    „"
o
+j     <D
rHClCOTfLO©t-X©©r-
in P.   r.
01   Cl  Cl  01  01  Cl  01   Ol   01  CO  CO  ©    CH    <3
©©©©©©©©©©©00
r-
t-
I~
I-
rH   r- REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 29
IM
CO
03
a
0
PS
•n
H
1-3
5
o
>
<
ft
■auj:raAioA\
"JI°A\
•*BapnA\
■I3SB3AV
•j[unjis
•uooorji
OCflOCOt-^MLTOOCOHH
rf © CD Ol rH 00 CN O © 'CO Cl
O   t-_ Ol   hH tH   tr  H W
o ci t~
rH Ol
■J9H0
DIOOM
•s^uasisnK
•quiK
•U9JJBK
•xua't;
■(panuB^)
3nig 'xo^j
■paa 'xo^
'SS0J0 'xo^j
•J9AHS 'xo^
•jausi^
■J9AB9g
Mrag
« t- s t- o n
t-   ^   tt  H   M
n n oo o
CO  Cl t-
LQ   CO   00   ■+   CD   ©
IO  HH  C:  ^  r- l>
TH  Ol  CO  rH
rH    : oo Ht)
cd    :    : ©
ire oi   ;    :    : co
CO   -*   TtH   f
CO CD     :  tH tH
ci    :    : oo
cd th    : co co
CO  L-  rH  t- CD CD     !  CI
i-i     ',  O rH  t- CI
COt-COCIClClrHCDCOClCOm
C0CD1O00 O  Hj  ^ rH
CI   O  CI   rH   CI
■a
M 5
g _g S § ci &i ri
o a
2 S I
p 'h S
S s S 3 S  3 3  ! S o S a  s = « a J
& 3
0>    o
2; &
m g
£ a
S s
o « ,
a w
a a
'£ 'E
a
; a S
d   c   C   ^  d  o
 ! —.   —  .  „ .M J 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1932.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougar.
Coyotes.
Big-horned
Owls.
Magpies.
Total.
1
3
4
$10.00
30.00
40.00
Totals	
8
$80.00
Note.—No bounties were paid during 1932 until an Order in Council was passed and came into effect on
November 30th, 1932, authorizing payment of bounty of $10 on each cougar killed.
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922—32.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
3,116_
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
3,606~~
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
8,230
7,095
20
89
_7,204
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923 	
14,840.00
1924    .
172
20,398.40
1925         	
24,397.00
1920  	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927     	
65,377.95
1928 	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929    	
42,122.00
1930 	
36,090.25
1931  	
42,036.15
1932 	
80.00
^59,453
~~69,43lT
Totals	
20,615
$397,622.80
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921-32.
Calendar Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-trade
Licences.
Total.
1921	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
$30,790.80
1922	
57,458.89
1923	
67,524.18
1924	
62,446.68
1925	
56 287 78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
45 161 11
1930	
1931	
45,981.08
40,363.79
1932	
Totals	
$569,127.36
$76,900.00
$646,027.36 REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 31
List of Purs confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1932,
to December 31st, 1932.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind of Furs confiscated.
QQ
U
Ph
u
rU
M
M
A
O
o
N
ta
lS             J
Jan.
26
26
31
Feb.
2
2
,,
2
,,
19
March
1
,,
15
April
23
26
May
11
Nov.
27
30
Dec.
5
9
„
15
,.;
20
21
"
27
Mackwood, A.	
Ogato, N	
McDougall, T	
Anderson, Lem...
Anderson, Lars...
Henshaw, B	
Auger, N	
Lillja, J. A	
Clarke, J. D	
De Georgio, A	
Becker, E	
Davies, J. H	
Wilson, C	
Norris, ,T	
Cummings, W. J.
Allen, H. J	
Pederson, T	
Wadhams, J	
Keni, A	
McLellan, W	
Totals....
Tupper Creek.
Ocean Falls....
Nicola	
Kuskonook	
Kuskonook	
Cloverdale	
Fort Nelson...
Decker Lake..
Alberni	
Fernie	
Forest Grove.
Victoria	
Alert Bay	
Valdes Island
Coquitlam	
Ladner	
Fort St. John.
Alert Bay	
Fort Nelson...
Nanaimo	
1 D "
' D"
'C"
'B "
'B "
' E"
•D"
'D"
'A"
, B „
'C"
' A"
' A "
'E"
■B"
' E"
■D"
' A"
' D"
'A"
15
31
38 I
37
37
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur under the
calendar year 1932, $743.60.
1 Game Act "  during J 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1932,
to December 31st, 1932.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.     Shotguns.
Jan.
11
25
ft
25
25
Feb.
6
M
10
15
26
29
March
15
tJ
29
April
16
May
3
,,
16
June
6
t1
30
)t
30
.
30
July
7
Aug.
4
j;
12
()
12
Sept.
15
24
,,
24
Oct.
17
,,
17
Nov.
15
18
,,
29
Dec.
2
9
,,
27
,,
27
"
28
Wine, A	
McAdam, J. A	
Murphy, J	
Pavka, S	
Bailey, W. G	
Scott, C	
Munro, A	
Landstrum,  O	
Nugent, E	
Davies, R. J	
Hamanishi, T	
Loomis,  A. A	
Smith,  G	
Hume, A. W	
Harvey, D. McD..
Lang, J. E	
Whittle,  R	
McGuire,  J	
Lang, R. S	
Southwick,  T	
Kosko, A	
De Frane, J	
Spoonimore, G	
Tooms, G	
Price, B	
Paul, B	
Chalmers, W	
Lewis, E	
Parman, B	
Sandberg, S	
Berle, J	
Kobayashi, R. M.Atkinson, C..~.	
Atkinson, J. C	
Springer, H	
Totals	
Merritt	
Kamloops	
Kamloops	
Port Coquitlam	
Nanaimo	
Kamloops	
Prince Rupert	
Monterey Prairie..
Duncan	
Port Moody	
Alberni	
Nazko	
Groundbirch	
Clinton	
Duncan	
Powell River	
Powell River	
Powell River	
North Vancouver..
Fort St. John	
Alberni	
Alberni	
Cawston	
Merritt	
Chilliwack	
Duncan	
Kamloops	
Nanaimo	
Duncan	
Tulameen	
Ocean Falls	
Moses Inlet	
Pouce Coupe	
Ponce Coupe	
Port Coquitlam	
"C"
U-C"
:,  C„
'E*'
'A"
'C"
'D"
ijj'fi
'A"
'E "
'A"
'C"
•D"
'C"
'A"
'E"
•E "
■E"
'E ".
'D"
'A"
'A"
'B"
'C"
'E "
'A"
'C"
'A",
'A"
■C"
, D „
' D"
•D"
; D „
'E"
1
* Automatic.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds destroyed by Game Wardens during Year 1932.
Bear         1
Cougar       31
Coyotes       91
Crows    4,801
Cats  1,183
Dogs        126
Eagles       46
Groundhogs         37
Hawks      393
Magpies  1,463
Owls      210 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 33
List of Guides.
Barkerville District.
Cochrane, J. D Barkerville.
Hodges, N. T	
House, Joseph S  „
McCall, James  „
McCall, Max A	
McKeehnie,  Duncan  „
McLanders, P  „
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B , Telegraph Creek.
Fort George District.
Reed, F. DeWitt Barkerville.
Rivers, Henry  „
Thompson,  Norman  ,,
Thompson, Wilfred  ,,
Wendell, Joseph  ,,
Youngs, Grover A  ,,
Carr, Stanley J Tete Jaune.
Colebank, G. A Hixon.
Colebank, Gale Hixon.
Dennison, G. M Red Pass.
Goodell, L. E Shere.
Hale,  Leslie Dome Creek.
Hargreaves, George E Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, Roy P Mount Robson.
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts
Harrison, Bryan Wistaria.
Haynes, Emmett B Dome Creek.
Johnson, L. M McBride.
Saladano, Joseph  Mount Robson.
Schive, Teddy  Mount Robson.
Shovar, Dorrell McBride.
Hooker, James B Dome Creek.
Blackman, William Valemount.
Collins, W. A Williams Lake.
DeWees, Richard Likely.
Dixon, Fred Likely.
Fletcher, AVilliam Pavilion.
Hansen, Robert L Bridge Lake.
James,  Jack Lillooet.
James, William Lillooet.
Johnson, J. W Likely.
Jones, AV. D Quesnel.
Kustney, Herman Canim Lake.
McClary, Wayne Lac la Hache.
Manson, AVilliam Lillooet.
Ashman, Levi Corbin.
Baher, Martin C Natal.
Boiven, AVilliam .Natal.
Butwell, Frank H Golden.
Canning, Fred Skookumchuck.
McGinnes, Earle C Natal.
Moore, J. S AVardner.
Mobley, C. W Tappen.
Parminter, Ross Likely.
Pinkham, II. E Canim Lake.
Pinkham, Edward Horsefly.
Purjue, Elmer Hanceville.
Rioux,  Ed Fawn.
Tibbies,   Fred Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Tighe, James H Likely.
Twan, David Castlerock.
AValters, Glen Horsefly.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
AValters, R. J... 150-Mile House.
Kootenay District.
Scofield, Bernard AVindermere.
Sheek, W. Pat Castledale.
Thomas, Guy Anthony Parson.
Thomas, AVillard S Parson.
AA'eideman, O. AV Leanchoil.
York, H. M Invermere.
York, R. A Invermere.
Peace River District.
Beattie, Robert Hudson Hope.
Beckman, W. H Fort St. John.
Calliou,  John Moberley Lake.
Cameron, Patrick South Pine River.
Cassie, F. C Arras.
Gladu, Pascal Kelly Lake.
Alta.
Golata, F. AV Rolla.
Noske, Narcisse Rio Grande P.O., Alta.
Ross, James A Hudson Hope.
Rutledge, Leo Hudson Hope.
Wanyanda, St. Paul Goodfare P.O.,
Wilde, Thomas Fort St. John.
Hazelton District.
Beirnes, G. M Hazelton. Jack, Tommy Hazelton.
Vancouver and Victoria Districts.
Mansell, Fred North A'ancouver.      Tom, Harry Lytton.
Philipps, Frank A North Vancouver.      Bidstrup, Holger Lytton.
Scuce, Herbert Lytton. Haig-Brown, R. L Alert Bay.
3 J 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
co
os
CM
03
OS
a
3
8
3
O
O o
CO (S     ■
a. tt) c3
fHgr3
oj ai
$a
■£7010*0)1*    a;    OJ    w    OJ
S3 S S &■<« S & SB 3
QKZflaifiPa!
i    |
J ■*
r=J         W
o   &j
leg below left knee
len	
a
R-
C
-i-
cc
a
r-
■?   a   3
o   oj   fl   o
ffi iri w W
■g ^ o ~ ^ .5 .;? 5
o'S+JS & « .a. ^
+j   o +j   o   o   c   o
£ a ~ a * - - -
o o ^  fl  d  a
+J   oj   w   o>   OJ
o   £
S  S-l   "»    " | ^   5   rl     ^
TO r** -^ *w taw r*, »j-i r#- rl
cfl   «   o   B '
O   O   c   °   o
C   o   o
3^    ri
^   V.    ^(=HtWr^tH_   ,
tjo g fcB
d   **> fl
r3r-r=
^        fl
rfl  -3
4)    fl    ^   ^    fl
fl   rt -i-i  f^  JJ
O      ,fl <DrMrW OJrW 0> 0>
15   O r3   fl   fl "d   fl ns ^3 .
<i 2 << g
13    O    OJ    OJ   •
^ r^Tjf-jP^r-Jr-jrt'O
00    OJ    J»    OJ    OJ
OJ    OJ    CO    OJ
S <j S -j) <i a    ts
u  c   s   o   (j ■-;   .
< < Q <! <J S <j
&wl
"OOJOJOcSrtScSa
gb^XMM-HrtrHS
CPh
ge';f g »*
s3  p •*  oj  oj ri  o
W Ph S rt t> j -J3
OJ
a   _
■  iA  'sn
3
C
W
OJ
O     ;
oj ^
, .5 a
I   rH       !   +J   £j       !     OJ       J       J
jj^S o t,<H ays -
4j-H«2saiSajqjd
tH    <+H   =JH    <W     JH     ^     h
OJ    OJ   %    0)   5    ^   ^
a; m xn xn S5 Ph b
n
«j d ^
1 in'
1   rH
fl    Oj"
; ■a
o3 5
O :
60
+J"    .   OJ
<+H Q ^
O M fl
OJ
--*.,
H-fe
'III-^
56 = o c c ^ a
BZairihOios r,.aj
o3
r^
9« "
<a'M
.     OJ        r
O
03
r-'
Tu
o
CD
t3
W PQ
r-
^J^
m
1
SS
IO
CD
CC
IT
on
iN
rH
^ a
CM
tN
Cl
c^
rH
O
2 *
>
o
2 -
"
y.
0.
Q
Or
d
d
f=
+J
<u
s
t>,«i
:-r-
d
fl
a-E
ol""
p.
o
rfl
ft
+-1
+J
a>
a
P= u
aj
C
r»
C^
r-H
S
CD
O
o
r^
r5
d
rO                    d
ar3
la
«
O 03
u
U<J
r-l
CD
r3"H
+3
4H   OJ
D
§|
(U
^3 «
CflO REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 35
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1032, to December 31st, 1932.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
03 fl
>1
03 po
s1
dP5
OJ  H
1    rl
pqo
H o
Species.
+J!
fl
A
O
u
CD    ■
0. <u
fl   .
Si
o
QU
^ an
3
Atlin—
Gault, R. E., Skagway, Alaska	
Fernie—
Kettering, O. L., Greensburgh, Pa	
Dunn, AV. W., Jr., St. Paul, Minn	
Greenwood—
Fairbanks, F. M., Seattle, Wash	
Golden—
Kemp, L. L., Bristow, Okla	
Mix, L. B., Bristow, Okla	
Benham, J. L. D., Chicago, 111 ...
Freeman, T. L., Lake Charles, La	
Freeman, A. B., New Orleans, La	
Yeast, F. \V., Fox Valley, Sask	
Yeast, F. A., Fox Valley, Sask	
Nanaimo—
Nicholls, L. B., Seattle, Wash	
Parker, J. K., Seattle, Wash	
New Westminster—
Meek, P. F., California	
Eddy, G., Seattle, Wash	
Belknap, L. F., Medford, Ore	
Lee, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Stearns, R. W., Klamath Falls, Ore	
Milhollin, H., Bremerton, Wash	
Biddle,  S., Vancouver, Wash	
Hollingsworth, O. R., Bellingham, AVash	
White, R. E., Bellingham, Wash	
Parker, J. K., Seattle, Wash	
Kukols, C. B., Seattle, Wash	
Prince George—
Brennester, D. B., Baltimore, Md	
Brewster, Jack, Jasper, Alta	
Bartlette, Austin, Louisville, Ky	
Wendzel, W. S., Sunberry, Pa...	
Snyder, J. G., Traverton, Pa	
Callahan, H. B., La Crosse, Wis	
Keaster, Dr. J. B., Pasadena, Cal	
Pouce Coupe—
Booth, Miss M., Chateau de Condi, France..
Borden, R., Falls River, Mass	
Quesnel—
Markham, J., Centralia, Wash	
Keaster, J. B., Pasadena, Cal	
Cochran, J. D., Burlington, Iowa	
Telegraph Creek—
Weems, F. C, New York, N.Y	
Vancouver—
Harley, C.  S„ Seattle, Wash	
Hook, A., Bellingham, Wash	
Utterstrom, John, Seattle, Wash	
Gilmore, E. B., Los Angeles, Cal	
Wilkinson, AV. J., AVatsonville, Cal	
Nagler, F., Milwaukee, Wis	
Nuttall, N., Cheshire, England..'.	
Benham, J. D., Chicago, 111	
Freman, A. B., New Orleans, La	
De Ganahl, C. F., White Plains, N.Y	
Harris, B. B., Champaign, 111	
Bird, Alfred, New Orleans, La	
$15.00
45.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
00.00
45.00
90.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
5.00
45.00
15.00
60.00
30.00
30.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
20.00
15.00
90.00
45.00
25.00
5.00
65.00
45.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
45.00
90.00 J 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1932, to December 31st, 1932—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>>
si
oj u
mo
a
oj   .
ti a
5*
" o
OJ ^
Mo
fl
o
.a
'£
03
u
oj
C
oj
OJ
0
03
O
V
u
OJ    .
OJ oj
at
a
"3
a  .
a *^
a d
■— c
*~< oc
OJ
rn
.o
o
o>
OJ
■fl
II
Amount.
Williams Lake—
l
l
3
1
1
1
2
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$60.00
Morehouse, R., London, England	
Housser, P. W., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
15.00
30.00
Barr, C. H., Springfield, 111	
Wilmer—
35.00
30.00
45.00
45.00
Totals    	
11
21
14
6
li
14
24
9
8
$1,680.00
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1932, to December 31st, 1932.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
M>
s 0
: Q    - Q
Hi:
Y, oj
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Exceeding bag limit on big game	
Game on premises of boarding-house, etc	
Hunting game between one hour after sunset
and one hour before sunrise	
Hunting big game from a power-boat	
Hunting or killing moose, etc., while swimming
Killing or having in possession game animals
of the female sex	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game
animals during the close season	
Possession of deer under one year of age	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals
during the close season	
Possession of untagged deer	
Running deer with dogs	
Removal of evidence as to sex of a game animal killed or taken	
Selling game animals or parts thereof	
Using poisoned bait for the taking of game
animals  	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds between
April 15th and August 15th	
Game birds on the premises of a shop, etc	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
Hunting or in possession of migratory game
birds during the close season	
Hunting migratory game birds between one
hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise  	
Killing, hunting, or in possession of upland
game birds during the close season ,
Killing or in possession of migratory insectivorous birds 	
...   |
I    1
3
14
3
35
33
4
38
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
10
10
3
3
4
37
$20.00
555.00
20.00
40.00
75.00
625.00
160.00
95.00
20.00
10.00
115.00
45.00
20.00
50.00
10.00
35.00
30.00
33.50
417.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1932, to December 31st, 1932
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
fl
a
a
c
a
c
o
o
~     03
-   m
a
<£
ffl.S
o."S
at
wS
- Q
-. a
- Q
-. a
: R
S
Licences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence
Buying or trading in fur without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult holder of a firearms
licence  	
Making a false application for a licence	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a
licence 	
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling
without   a  licence	
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging
same from an automobile, etc	
Carrying or in possession of an unplugged
pump shotgun or an automatic shotgun	
Carrying firearms or traps within a game reserve ~	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway
in a municipality :	
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
Non-resident trapping illegally	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence..
Trapping during the close season	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line..
Trapping or hunting on a game reserve	
Using meat of game animals as bait for trapping  	
Miscellaneous.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals taken during the close season	
Carrying firearms in automobile, etc., during
the close season on game without the necessary permit 	
Evading payment of royalty or tax on fur	
Failing to keep a record-book or make returns
of furs purchased	
Importing live game animals without a permit...
Illegal destruction of beaver-house	
Obstructing or furnishing false information
to a Game Warden	
Trespassing	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding daily bag limit on fish	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited area	
Fishing  or  in   possession  of  fish  during   the
close season	
Jigging fish	
Netting fish illegally	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
Using more than one lure	
1
5
1
1
1
8
26
10
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
0
1
36
32
6   1102
r5   OJ
34
2
108
i       13
8
2
4
1
1
11
15
2
2
7
9
6
6
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
9
9
5
6
2
2
4
4
13
5
7
10
1
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
$325.00
100.00
845.00
12.00
50.00
450.00
30.00
50.00
115.00
70.00
77.50
20.00
125.00
160.00
20.00
60.00
40.00
10.00
30.00
50.00
50.00
10.00
150.00
60.00
30.00
7.00
61.50
31.00
10.00
64.00
5.00
$5,493.50 J 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1932, to December 31st, 1932-
Continued.
Description of Offence.
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Carrying a loaded firearm in an automobile
or other vehicle	
Carrying firearms in automobile during close
season on game without a permit	
Exceeding bag limit on big game	
Exporting fur without a permit	
Fishing without a licence in non-tidal waters..
Fishing during the close season	
Hunting upland or migratory game birds during the close season	
Killing game of the female sex	
Killing or in possession of game during close
season   	
Non-resident carrying firearms or fishing-
tackle without a licence	
Obtaining firearms licence by furnishing false
information 	
Possession of trout under 8 inches in length...
Trapping without a licence	
Trapping during the close season	
Trapping without first having obtained registration of trap-line	
Trapping on another person's trap-line	
Trespassing   	
Unlawful use of fish-roe	
Unlawful possession of automatic or pump
shotgun  	
Using poison for the taking of fur-bearing
animals  	
Totals	
See Foot-note.
OJ
to
a
m
S
00
a
0
O'
a
5
5»
r5 OJ
00
a
o
r to
3 P
fl
o
r aj
M.S
z a
a
o
- «j
3 Q
a
o
-  7J
pS
3 P
fl
o
r oj
h'.£
3 P
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
5
2
12
7
2
2
2
1
1
27
0
1
0
2
27
2
1
0
2
5, 30 days each;
6, 14 days each ;
6,10 days each ;
8, 7 days each;
1, 3 days; 1,
1 day.
2, 30 days each.
1, 7 days.
2, 90 days each.
1, 14 days; 1, 7
days.
1
2
3
6
6
1, 14 days; 4, 7
days each ; 1, 3
days.
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1, 7 days; 1, 5
days.
1, 7 days.
1
5
(i
6
3, 90 days each;
2, 30 days each ;
1, 60 days.
4
9
8
4
25
25
1, 90 days ; 7, 30
days each; 1,
20 days; 6, 14
days each; 3,
10 days each;
G, 7 days each ;
1, 5 days.
...
1
1
2
2
2
1, 30 days; 1, 14
days.
2, 14 days each.
1
]
1
1, 30 days.
1
1
1
1
4
4
2, 30 days each;
2, 7 days each.
2
3
2
2
5
2
1, 30 days ; 1, 14
days ; 2, 7 days
each ; 1, 2 days.
1, 30 days; 1, 1
day.
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
1, 90 days; 1, 14
days ; 1, 5 days.
1, 14 days.
4
4
4
4, 1 day each.
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1, 30 days ; 1, 14
days.
1, 7 days; 1, 5
days.
110
65
89
80
153
41
497
1
538
Note.—"A" Division : Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver,
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 39
Returns from 1,573 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1931-32.
Deer 	
Moose ....
Sheep ....
Caribou
Big
Game.
1,138
Goat
368
Elk .
13
Bear
89
145
4
399
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   3,118
Marten     3,849
Otter   202
Mink     3,465
Racoon  1,355
Fox     372
Muskrats    37,677
Lynx      435
Wildcat       162
Weasel 25,537
Wolverine          95
Fisher      242
Skunk        217
Predatory Animals.
Cougar        50 Wolves
Coyotes       675 Badger.
26
3
Fur-farm Returns, 1932  (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Beared.
Died.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1932.
Fox	
3,351
16
3,959
16,792
785
2,895
44
3,842
543
57
8
156
10
3,185
Marten	
114
2,841
Muskrats	
30,655
Number of permits cancelled due to fur-farmers going out of business, 36; fur-farmers submitting
Nil returns, 29 ; fur-farmers failing to submit returns at time of preparation of this statement, 37.
Muskrat-farmers who were not able to advise of number of animals on respective farms, as follows : C. W.
Albrecht, Quilchena ; G. A. Baurle, Chief Lake ; Black Lake Fur Farm Co., Vancouver ; D. Cordila, Colley-
mount; Deep Creek Fur Farm, Quesnel; G. W. Edwards, Golden ; E. Fabel, Jaffray ; A. D. Hallett, Masset;
P. L. Lambert, Lasqueti Island; U. S. Larkey, Fraser Lake; O. Naud, Burnaby ; E. Newbrand, Nakusp;
H. Proctor, Granite Bay ; W. P. Sheek, Castledale.
Fur-farm Returns, 1932  (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1932.
115
9
165
20
20
84
8
1
2
1
319
Fisher	
53
294
2
Number of permits cancelled due to fur-farmers going out of business, 7 ; fur-farmers submitting Nil
returns, 39 ; fur-farmers failing to submit returns at time of preparation of this statement, 8.
Beaver-farmers who were not able to advise of number of animals on respective farms, as follows :
Black Lake Fur Farm Co., Vancouver ; S. E. Manring, Mazaina ; C. Nichol, Vanderhoof. J 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Migratory Game Birds banded by Members of the Game Department and
Returns received of Birds killed, 1932.
Kind of Birds banded. No. banded.
Mallards     1,097
Green-wing teal      249
Pintail          30
Baldpate (widgeon)        26
Canvas-back           1
Wood-ducks          3
Coots  8
Banded Birds killed. No. killed.
Mallards   ..'.       26
Green-wing teal   1
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1932.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General   (Minister) R. II. Pooley, K.C Victoria.
Game Commissioner A. Bryan Williams Vancouver.
Chief Clerk F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk T. H. M. Conly Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Junior Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Kelly Vancouver.
Fishery  Officer..
Fishery Branch.
..A. G. Bolton	
..Vancouver.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Divisional Game Supervisor J. W. Graham Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey % Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Lake Cowichan.
Game Warden R. Marshall Duncan.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden V. H. Webber Victoria.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game AVarden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Thompson Nanaimo.
"B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor C. P. Kearns Nelson.
Game Warden A. S. Cochran AVindermere.
Game Warden I. J. Brown Golden.
Game AVarden M. B. Ewart Penticton.
Game AVarden ~W. J. Nixon Invermere.
Game AA^arden N. Cameron Fernie.
Game AVarden A. F. Sinclair Canal Flats.
Game AArarden M. J. AVilson Revelstoke.
Game AArarden L. F. Washburn Fernie.
Game Warden B.  Ranch Cranbrook.
Game AVarden J. W Stewart Greenwood.
Stenographer Miss G. M. Lowery Nelson. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932. J 41
"C" Division  (Kamloops, Yale,  Okanagan,  Cariboo, and  Chilcotin Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Game AVarden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game AA7arden AV. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden N. L. Robinson Lillooet.
Game Warden P. E. Aiken Williams Lake.
Game AVarden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden S. H. Jackson... Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game AVarden R. MacMartin Kamloops.
Game AVarden AV. O. Quesnel Clinton.
Game Warden L. Jobin Merritt.
Game Warden W A. Broughton Hanceville.
Game Warden  (Probationer) F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Clerk D. AV. Rowlands Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon
Boundary Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor T. Van Dyk.... Prince George.
Game  Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game  AVarden J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game  AVarden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game  AATarden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game  AVarden G. M. Kerkhoff Fort St. John.
Game  Warden A. J. Jank Pouce Coupe.
Game  AA7arden S. F. Faherty Vanderhoof.'
Game  Warden Ar. L. Williams Finlay Forks.
Game Warden  (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game AATarden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Stenographer Miss H. M. AValker Prince Rupert.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Smyth Prince George.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor J. G. Cunningham ATancouver.
Game AVarden A. P. Cummins Vancouver.
Game Warden AA7. Clark Vancouver.
Game AVarden E. AV. Baker Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game AVarden L. H. Walker S. Pender Island.
Game AA'arden AA7. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game AVarden T. D. Sutherland Sechelt.
Game Warden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game Warden G. AA7illiams Abbotsford.
Game AVarden J. A. Stuart Mission.
Game AVarden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game AVarden .F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game AArarden A J.  Butler Chilliwack.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Victoria.
Game Warden E. Boorman Victoria.
Game Warden W. Mudge .Victoria.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
Special Game Warden J. C. Smith , Comox.
Special Game AVarden C. Shuttleworth Penticton. CO
as
60
S5
PS
I
M
SS
■4
.9«r
hfi
*H BB »
S3S
r5
M.S
1.S
Jo
■a zn
?a
JOrj
flTJ
S|
■O-fl
OJ OO,-,
offl.S
3M«
o cc   •
■33,—CO
ego
w 03^
T3       00
a an
03 o   .
B
%&&
S5
•OS090
'Soiona
'irenO
•SJUBSBOIId
•pojBjoqn JO
jo pasodsja
•osaao
•sqana
'irenO
'SJUBSBOqcI
•3S03Q
■sjfanci
•rpra©
•SJU'ESBOII.J
•3S08£)
•sjaBSuaqj:
■sjnBSBeiij:
5?. j  -i             i    i h    : ; ;   ;        :■
M  . .    ,    . ^
:    :        :    :    : co    : : rn oo      ■*
:   ;        :   :   : : : rn ■*      ci
: co t-      co    ; co
O Ph
<M CM
Ov>        M^        CI
O Ph'
ON 00
'SJlDtld
tH
•limit)
O CP tH co
•osaaf)
O Oh
a oo
's35[ona:
:    : co
:    : co
rH
CO      i
co    ;
•It-enf)
w I? 3 K
Ph M
0
j>
JH
Ph
-
te
.Vi
>
-
M
J4
„
n
fe
sSh
o
r^
c
a"
aT
H
M
m
o
03
■91 M M M M
oj
03 ■<
a f,   . -
fl   ai a &
ZD   r.   o
a o r
S«o"o
ih £■ >o ^ .,
R    O rH   « £
J>3     - 4j" O OJ
&2t!     rf?
h   o   d   3 O
M M ffl M M
S   oj
-   bo
fc<
a a
o3 IO
a w
ffl o
:-a as o. h
1-9    '. S
fl
O     •   03
;   ,£B>
O   -   -
.si*
03   03
fl  fl
o o
4H-^|
r- ~        ™
rH    OJ
00 a oj
OJ    ->   ^J
-£ c a
sSm g
-   OJ
CO r-rOl
I'* 3
w«a
;   p
r-l
■  a?
V
^
"C
J  s
1=1
fc? 0
0 a
Ph
2 3
ffl
rt   a.
ft "7
e
G
0   a*
c
£
fe      r,
AH   g
O    O    JH
r-   fe
3 o   - >
1 rJ     J ^ L>
: 03   . s *,-
r & ^ ■ oj
'   • B   . ^
' ""o    - fe oj
;     .  to r* 0!
I    OJ    fl
B     r?
a r?
■3 a  »
■all
so e
OflH
x
H H REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 43
CM Oi        CM CD CO
ffl    :
C- rH
ffl
rH
j tH      I  rH     ;
CO            |
CM CO     ; t-     ;
rH                           I
:    : cm t- cm    :
:    :      rH         ;
: co
I  rH
t-   ;
cm    :
rH      i
: co
: r-i
LI
rH
CO
CM
;    : -^   ; ©
|    : cm    ; tH
!    ; cm    !
© rH (M     :     ;
rH         "*     j     ■
:   ;    :    :    ; co
CM  "*H
CM
©  ^  CM rH CO ©
W  18 ffl  M  L-5
9  Ph
M .9
.SB
s >»■■ «
beO"= §
.9 a B m
k "S M a
" 1 X «
o a o
S^.ph
m s
" H   o3   O
' a
a
gfc
03 OJ
o fl
K Ph
o^ -
oj fl
* S
IO  +J
-02
SS fl"
P3
M'
ffl £
Ph  t a
2     H *-
i~ s *-i y
^ & ^ S
aaa;
rgWf.
S 3 ia '
IP
■o a o
a a oj
S Ph '
I     tO    t0    J3    £
; a (3 sd   .
: i§ *£ I 1
d  d
O   rjH
•f*   rH
a K
r=     g    ^^<
"   o     -
-h a
a £ =3 £
flOrlffi
a   .
ix M
H
-M H fc
Oj"   OJ    OJ
a a a
S S a
r4 H    03   rrj
» »t    K
3 2?
9 a"?  ^
o rT  a  o
a o-
O ©
H    H^    H
2 o.
;' 2 S M -C O "g
§1
E a
0)   d
3   Cl   o   c   fl
(-1       (11     -T?     -—       rtl
•H    fj     I—I T1
-^ H  ^ CJ
o    .   H co
U    CO .03
y ^ ^T1
00    tfirl a
©   c ^
co   g>
IB   "
p4
<J A
< K   3
3 a
a a
0*! oj f> fl
o 3 t- >
-  be ffl a
■s a
:H.B
0J    fl
d
5 fe
to *r
- rd   6 h   -
rl       U      U       h
o  si  d  o
¥^M  H 3 «
fefe^     hOOO     CD     OW     tt     WSWfflW     W     MKb^     ^S3^^
■^ rt S J 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
rS|
O
aS-i
MwS
03      ■H
a aoo
a o  .
oj
ioi o: oj
fl"5a
§ffla
M  {ffl
flco
W —ffl
a. so_t
,orfl"
fl *- to
«H-H3
fl'ol
Wgoi
■2*8
a ojz:
S.9 a
gffl-S
r?
joj so a
gffla
'0S03O
■sjiona
•limit)
•sjunsiwiu
•ps^naeqii ao
jo pssodsja
•osooo
'Sopnci
'ItunO
■SJUUSB9ntJ
'8S90Q
•sspnci
'Ijunb
■SJUBSBailJ
■osoao
01 ©  CO  Ol
'Hl-rHCO'   00©rHTHOI
©   rH       :   JO CI   CO I   tH
.   Ol rH   CO   rH   ©       I   ■
•sooner
•Iiunf)
's^tiusBeqd
•osoao
•nimt)
•s;unsi?9i(j
t-   CO   01   Hh   CO
© oo co ©    ; i-t
CO
02 i-
o) o>~
'"       i   rH
OJ    OJ
■5 £
££
tffp
O 0. r-(
■j D O
tC J- fl
tH   4->    R
« esc d
£  i m
a
■h    : <t\
r (h w
M £ P .
>-='.g s
-15
a oj
Ph   §£■
«OPh,
S wr |;
83      .    o
S * " !
5 •  "
H
its
3 a « g a a
ED    —
pi
i M
o3 ■
5
a ra  „
02 CI  p_,
Sri
.. 00
WfiOj
Op Eh' ,
HH.I
H-rf2
■ Pi
rH M CO
"jl       - CO
Ph
* ffl Ol
M -    rH
.  o p 01
i ffl O   M
^lM
. U   r
>h H    _H
4-J *H
+^ a
OJ OJ
Ph Ph
MS
o a ce
Kaooaoa.fl.2.
PhPh      PHKfflfflKM«Mo2o2
i o <! „s a s ^ «
..   r u *BJt?   - h
'  a a  fe fe  I r3 fl
I fl  a E      § 1 2
£fl a
02 02 02
o?M
j ~ n rt
i   oo   OJ w
£ ©
:    •  a oo
■ cj 3 o
,... > s
4 r3 -
rTH »
OJ      r" CD
OJ 02 02
■rH       »   O
P» fl r?
a
02 •
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1932.
J 45
Ph 6
"*  iO
'rH
H
cc
T-
r-
lO © if5 Cl
V>
CT
CD
[CD
	
T-
cm ffl    :    |    ; ■, j co
ft"
-
10
cc
' CC
00
CI   rH   tH   ©
rH  rH         CI
f
CD
6 Ph"
w 00
t-    :::;■*    :
(M
IO
■<t
CC
CN
IO
,_
:  -HH   CM  CM   tH  CO  CO
h-
**
rH          ^   J-i          CO
a.
CN
CM  CO
CC
1-
04
■*
«
rH   CO   CI
c
cc
r-
^
s
JH
OJ
w
a.
a"
tH
o3
8
O
OJ
0
d
ft
r-
c
a
>
.S
O
-t-
a
Ph   of
m
Ph
o
3
oj £
jn is
a
tH
■ fl
rfl
a
*
■-
02
C
C
fl
o
w
0
111-I4.-H
,c
a
ZQ
7
a « o t;  .a   .
S ffl w © rt 3 3
a   -.r " ffl   -  .
a
OJ
r-S
K
a
r=
3  to
& "9
»
a
!-
-§<^£«aM
s
|
fl £
"^         r-(
3
a
yfees, L.,
home, H
nomas, J
urtle, M.
aylor, J.,
7ilson, T.
7ebb, Mrs
fe
c
b-
I
.   d
O Ph
s
a
rC
02
y
-J.
fc-
b-
t-
ir
>
P*
t>
£
^5     M   .*?
iffl
rS M    r
2     O    rH
a % « a
;«'
« Spi
a m «
, a "3
H 5
OS
3   g   ffl
Si a
© "^ .
ci   _ cs
O .03
Oj
5 d *  .m 2
■- a a
„- a p
23 oj a a
e s «3
"C a fl fl
£h go
1^8^
S        .   O     tr-
a =«
ts r. a
A U
OJ
.    t-
Ir! fl
O
a' §
K r>
OJ
*   Or1"
PH   «
"H
be   .
1 D
S s
a w a s *
fl    fl    fl
d, w.o
&-§  fl
d Q .3
O ... |3
„tv5S
co   a> -S
r-l O       +J
a>    O    '"
1§ a
% -.9
* IB
3 | s
£    r'SpP
« >-a
0)        CU
Offl M
r S 8
B   > -S
?    fl °"
a o ffl
13 a
K'PI
oSji-
a -£ I a
oj   >v     -
r*'Sw
g 02    w
a n a 02
a § Fi
•2 d fl «
a.  a>  F
•^ rS        j
l&i
•- S fl"
a a 9
ops
? a •-
rH     OJ     OJ
3   - o
1 u
-ij a
fl     tt   r>
3HCg
.        CO        rM
K J -J
pp a =3
a
rjWffl
- co
3   rH, ft H i
j fl a ? .
; S a | i
I a o 2
A a a •
; £ 9
;ph aW
Kt-§
a 'o ffl S a
a 2   »te ^
_  a a 0   .
ri-l'g
'^r>
HJ*t|
^   to  oj
"   OJ    JH
3  S te ■"
3   fl   P*    fl
.   tj  ^    JH
2 r^
d O
-PQ a
 i  &
a ..
s "i
m r   - oj
O ffl   «     >
21 J-H    r)   .r,
PP .Offl
OJ -3 >H
03 *± OJ
S3 fl >
I .& a
« £   ■
ferSJT,
uftH s
a ob o
O  -j  oj o
ffl g oj
oj eh
o
a
t 02   DO
° '?   8
* b c
ISpS
S St
*3
a §uM
bE™^^
be ..
a   .
LO     OQ
io a
is co a
OJ ffl
33 ^ Ol
bo -jj ..
| & X
fl   <H     O
w is 5
oo EH "
§o   r
OO   00   uC
fl  rH
b    rfe
.ffl  "
«. S 2
rH   OJ P5 «-.
rH   jj Oi
More
■E rS    »    *
3! E   m   n
Ph a a  a
ri a rt a
o a
■rlfc^"
O
a " o
ffl a
oo >^ 9
U   r-    O
H be£
Cr   U a
O'   3 ffl
tt 8 ■§, * i   r
3?r?H
a  o o 6    .
P> O ffl V a J 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences, Fees,
and Furs.
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919 	
1920	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
1921	
1922    	
1923	
1924 -.	
56,356.68
1925	
56.287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929 	
47,329.89
45,161.11
1930 	
1931	
46,091.08
1932	
40,363.79
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.
825-1033-5002  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0308203/manifest

Comment

Related Items