Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1934

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0308201.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0308201.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0308201-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0308201-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0308201-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0308201-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0308201-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0308201-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0308201-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0308201.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR   THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
i
1932
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. BANFiELn, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.  To His Honour J. W. F'obdham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1932 is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. M. DENNIES,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1933. The Honourable W. M. Dennies,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Fifteenth Annual Report on the work of the
Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1932.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.-
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1933. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Deputy Minister  7
Machinery :  7
Collection of Unpaid Wages  8
Strikes  8
Failure to make Returns  8
Unemployment     8
Act respecting Relief Measures  9
Indenture of Agreement  10
Numbers receiving Relief  12
New Legislation  14
Statistics of Trades and Industries  16
Comparative Pay-rolls  16
Total Pay-roll  17
Adult Males at Low Rates of Wages  17
Pay-roll Comparison by Industries  18
Wage Changes  19
Average Industrial Wage  20
Employment Fluctuation  ,  21
Nationality of Employees  24
Statistical Tables   25
Summary of all Tables  38
" Hours of Work Act"  39
" Male Minimum Wage Act"  40
Labour Disputes and Conciliation  41
Summary of Strikes  44
Employment Service   45
Business transacted  '.  46
Other Branches of Activity  47
Tables   48
Inspection of Factories  49
Safeguarding Machinery   49
Sanitation and Lighting ;  50
Hours of Work  51
Child-labour   51
Freight and Passenger Elevators  51
Report of Minimum Wage Board  53
Change in Personnel of Board  53
Minimum-wage Protection   53
Arrears collected   53
List of Court Cases  54
Fruit and Vegetable Emergency Order  55
Statistical Data   55
Spread of Minimum-wage Legislation  61
Comparative Wages in Canada and Western States  62
Trade Schools   65
Meeting Existing Conditions  65
Service Record   66
Marital Status   67
Trend of Wages, 1918 to 1932  67
Inspection Difficulties   69
Appendix (Summary of Orders)  70
Associations of Employers  74
Union Directory   76  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1932.
The outstanding feature of labour affairs in the Province during the year 1932 was the
unprecedented amount of unemployment which continued over the entire period. The usual
seasonal increase in employment did not materialize during 1932, and the opening of a few mills
and camps did not greatly affect the unemployment figures.
The Province faced a situation similar to that which obtained in 1921, when relief had to be
continued throughout the summer months, the difference being that in 1932 the need was very
much greater.
In the lumber industry the full impact of the crisis is shown by the fact that during 1929 a
total of 1,079 firms reported to the Department, while for 1932 the number was reduced to 555
firms, and for the month of greatest employment the numbers were 27,041 and 11,505 respectively.
Contracting similarly registered a drastic reduction, the firms reporting being 1,272 in 1929
and 736 for 1932, the number employed decreasing from 12,491 in the peak month of 1929 to
5,204 for 1932.
AVith our cities crowded with unemployed, employers have, to a larger extent than formerly,
been able to secure labour upon their own terms, and it has been difficult to understand the
attitude of some employers whose men are obliged to live in camps in keeping up the charge for
board at a figure entirely out of harmony with the wages paid, despite the claim from certain
quarters that wages had been reduced because of the decrease in the cost of living.
Coming into close contact with the hardships created, this Department would be remiss in
its duty if it did not issue a warning that greater consideration must be given to amplify the
purchasing-power of the wage-earners.
Present methods are not such as create a demand for the goods produced, and thus we have
what is called overproduction. There need be no excess production if the wage-earner was in a
better position to buy.
Stabilization of industry along lines calculated to eliminate vicious competition should be
the aim of all manufacturers.
Labour has long ceased to be a commodity, and the attitude shown by the recognized trade
unions during the last three years has demonstrated that at all times they have been willing to
co-operate with employers in the finding of a solution capable of extending the cordial relations
existing between employer and employee.
At this time, when world-wide attention is being directed in an endeavour to cure our
economic and industrial ills, it is perhaps opportune to suggest that any permanent reconstruction of our business and social life will depend more upon the value we place upon our neighbours' welfare than upon financial gain for the individual.
If the reorganization period through which we are passing fails to produce more effective
means of control, our present troubles will be repeated in a few short years.
Financial power, when properly controlled, can be of great benefit to mankind, assuring
stability and fair conditions for all, but a continuation of the methods which have brought about
our present troubles would be a blot on the intelligence of the present generation.
The present state of affairs is not one of our customary cyclical depressions, and may be
attributed not as much to overproduction as to faulty distribution.
MACHINERY.
Every day brings some new marvel in machinery which lightens the burden of the operator,
at the same time eliminating a number of workers from the pay-roll; and while we are congratulating ourselves on what machinery is doing for us, we should ask ourselves, " What is
machinery doing to us?"
Industry has its experts inventing new machines and improving those already in use. Is it
not time for industry to set some of its talents to work in an attempt to solve the problem of the
unfortunate employees who are being thrown out of work with the advent of every new machine?
Years ago new machinery created new jobs, but during the last twenty years the invention
of new machinery set such a pace that the development of new industries has not been sufficient
to absorb the displaced workers. G 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
There seems to be no limit to man's inventive genius. Is new machinery going to leave as a
by-product a state of permanent and increasing unemployment? Is the machine used to create
wealth to be finally a machine to create poverty, and be the agency in building a permanent
unemployed class and an increased measure of distress?
This is not only a social problem, but is also a business problem, for with millions out of
work the Government cannot allow its citizens to suffer, and relief measures have to be undertaken.    This in turn increases taxation and business has to pay its share.
The jobless and his family are not proper consumers. Their restricted requirements add
little or nothing to the demand which makes for industrial progress.
Can industry afford to allow a continuance of present conditions where everybody is losing,
nationally and individually?
We hear it said: " Keep Government out of business." If that is correct, then business
must undertake the care of those who are thrown out of work. If industry demands that a
surplus of labour be ready to fill the work-benches when called, it becomes incumbent upon
industry to accept its joint responsibility with other agencies in contributing time, talent, and
treasure to provide for those who through no fault of their own, and from no desire, are temporarily excluded from the industrial field.
COLLECTION OF UNPAID WAGES.
The matter of claims for unpaid wages is continually being brought to the attention of this
Department.
In our last report we pointed out the difficulty many employees have in collecting wages,
usually in sums which make the engagement of legal assistance unprofitable.
Complaints from employees unable to procure the wages they have earned have increased
during recent years to an extent that leaves no question of the need for more efficacious legislation to cope with the condition.
STRIKES.
Attention is called in the section of this report dealing with strikes to an organization whose
activity was responsible for a number of the disputes during the year, and in practically every
instance where a strike was called by this organization it ended without advantage to the
employees.
The number of working-days lost was 37,740, a decrease of 41,570 from 1931, the number
of disputes being eleven.
FAILURE TO MAKE RETURNS.
The negligence of some employers to complete their annual return to this Department as
required under the " Department of Labour Act" led to a test in the Courts during 1932, when
one firm was summoned for failure to make the return.
While the Department has no desire to resort to Court proceedings to compel the making of
returns, it should again be pointed out that the completion of the information required is
obligatory under the Act and when not sent on time greatly retards the work of the Department.
UNEMPLOYMENT.
The year under review has shown no abatement of unemployment in British Columbia. In
addition to local conditions, the ever-increasing migration of unemployed from more easterly
Provinces has tended to increase our difficulties and magnify our problems.
The " Unemployment and Farm Relief Act " of 1931, expiring on March 1st, 1932, was
extended until April 30th, 1932.
On May 13th, 1932, the Dominion Government passed the "Relief Act, 1932," under the
provisions of which relief was continued to those in need of same within our boundaries.
In cities and municipalities the cost of relief was borne upon a three-way basis as formerly,
the Dominion, the Province, and the municipality contributing in equal proportions, except in the
case of single men and transients, who were a total charge on the Dominion and the Province.
In unorganized territory the cost was shared equally between the Dominion and the
Province.
As far as possible, single men were retained in the unemployment relief camps built by the
Province, where food, clothing, shelter, medical attention, and the necessaries of life were pro- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 9
vided, together with a small cash allowance for a certain number of hours' work per month, as
a result of which much useful work on roads and highways was accomplished.
On November 1st, 1932, an agreement was entered into between the Dominion and the Province, whereby the Federal Government undertook to bear the whole cost of relief to single
homeless persons in urban centres approved by them.
Under this agreement a Commission was established, known as the Special Relief Commission Board of Administration for Single Men.
The Commission consisted of John Gurney Fordham (Chairman), John Stoughton Dennis,
and AVilliam Alexander Carrothers, who gave their services without remuneration, all administrative costs connected therewith or incidental thereto being borne by the Province.
It is only fitting that an expression of appreciation be given to these public-spirited citizens
who freely and voluntarily continued to serve on the Commission until June 30th. 1933.
The Dominion Government, in keeping with its policy already established throughout other
parts of Canada, decided to place the unemployment relief camps in British Columbia under the
administration of the Department of National Defence, and an agreement to this effect was
entered into between the Dominion and the Province on May 1st, 1933.
The Department of National Defence, on account of its widespread organization, and being
deemed the agency most readily available and suitable for this purpose, has control of the camps
in an administrative but in nowise a military sense.
Under the Department of National Defence the camps are being operated under a similar
policy as heretofore.
The " Relief Act, 1932," and the agreement entered into between the Dominion and Provincial Governments follow:—
22-23 George V.
CHAP. 36.
An Act respecting Relief Measures.
{Assented to 13th May, 1932.1
AVhereas, by reason of the prolonged world-wide economic depression, recovery to a more normal
economic condition has been retarded in the Dominion of Canada; and whereas the Provinces require
assistance in carrying out necessary relief measures and to meet financial conditions as the same may
arise; and whereas it is in the national interest that Parliament should support and supplement the
relief measures of the Provinces and grant them financial assistance in such manner and to such extent
as the Governor in Council may deem expedient; and whereas it is necessary to make special provisions to deal with the situation in the National Parks of Canada and in the drought-stricken areas
of the Province of Saskatchewan; and whereas for these and similar purposes the powers necessary
to ensure the speedy and unhampered prosecution of such relief measures and the maintenance of the
credit of the Dominion and the Provinces thereof should be vested in the Governor in Council: Now,
therefore, His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House of Commons of
Canada, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Relief Act, 1932."
2. The Governor in Council may, on such terms and conditions as may be agreed upon, and notwithstanding the provisions of any Statute or law:—
(a.)  Enter into agreements with any of the Provinces respecting relief measures therein:
(6.)   Grant financial assistance to  any Province by way  of loan,  advance,  guarantee,  or
otherwise:
(c.)   Take all such measures as in his discretion may be deemed necessary or advisable to
protect the credit and financial position of the Dominion or any Province thereof:
(d.)  Loan or advance money to or guarantee the payment of money by any public body,
corporation, or undertaking.
3. AVithout restricting the generality of the terms of the next preceding section hereof, and notwithstanding the provisions of any Statute or law, the Governor in Council may:—
(a.) Provide for special relief works and undertakings in the National Parks of Canada, and
for the continuance during snch period as may be necessary and advisable of the relief
measures heretofore undertaken and now being carried on at the cost of Canada in the
drought-stricken areas of Saskatchewan by the Saskatchewan Relief Commission:
(6.) Assist in defraying the cost of the sale and distribution of the products of field, farm,
forest, sea, river, and mine:
(c.) Take all such other measures as may be deemed necessary or advisable for carrying out
the provisions of this Act.
4. The Governor in Council may pay out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund such moneys as may
be necessary for all or any of the purposes of this Act.
5. The Governor in Council shall have full power to make all such orders and regulations as may
be deemed necessary or desirable to carry out the purposes and intention of this Act. G 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
6. All orders and regulations of the Governor in Council made hereunder shall have the force of
law and may be varied, extended, or revoked by any subsequent order or regulation; but if any order
or regulation is varied, extended, or revoked, neither the previous operation thereof nor anything duly
done thereunder shall be affected thereby, nor shall any right, privilege, obligation, or liability acquired,
accrued, accruing, or incurred thereunder be affected by any such variation, extension, or revocation.
'7. All Orders in Council and regulations made under the provisions of this Act shall be laid before
the House of Commons forthwith after the making thereof if Parliament is then sitting, or, if not, said
Orders in Council or regulations or an abstract thereof disclosing their essential provisions shall be
published in the next following issue of the Canada Gazette.
8. A report shall be laid before Parliament within fifteen days after the expiration of this Act, or,
if Parliament is not then in session, shall be published and made available for distribution by the
Department of Labour, containing a full and correct statement of the moneys expended, guarantees
given, and obligations contracted under this Act.
9. This Act shall expire on the thirty-first day of March, 1933, and any obligation or liability
incurred or created under the authority of this Act prior to the thirty-first day of March, 1933, may
be paid and discharged out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund notwithstanding the expiration of this
Act on the said date.
Indenture of Agreement entered into this first day of November, a.d. 1932.
Between
The Government of the Dominion of Canada   (hereinafter called the "Dominion"),
represented herein by the Honourable Wesley A. Gordon, Minister of Labour, of the
first part;
* and
The Government of the Province of British Columbia (hereinafter called the
"Province"), represented herein by the Honourable S. F. Tolmie, Premier, of the
Second part.
Whereas the " Relief Act, 1932," empowers His Excellency the Governor-General in Council to
enter into Agreements with any of the Provinces, on such terms and conditions as may be agreed upon,
respecting relief measures therein, and to authorize the payment out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund
of such moneys as may be necessary for this among other purposes of the said Act:
And whereas the Province desires to enter into an agreement with the Dominion for the purpose
of obtaining financial assistance in the establishment and prosecution of a scheme of relief for the
benefit of single homeless unemployed persons within the said Province upon the terms and conditions
hereinafter set forth:
And whereas His Excellency the 'Governor-General in Council, having approved of the terms and
conditions of the said proposed agreement, has authorized the Minister of Labour to execute the same
on behalf of the Dominion:
Now, therefore, it is mutually agreed by and between the parties hereto as follows:—
1. In this Agreement, unless the context otherwise requires :—
" Commission"  means  the  Administrative  Board   to   be   constituted   by   the   Province   and
entrusted  on  behalf  of  the  Province  with  the  administration  of  the  scheme  of  relief
provided by this Agreement:
" Single homeless persons " means persons, who having no settled place of abode within the
Province of British Columbia, are living within the said Province without employment
or any other visible means of maintaining themselves:
" Urban centres " means the Cities of Victoria, Vancouver, and New Westminster, and such
other areas as the Commission, with the approval of the Dominion Commissioner of
Unemployment Relief, may designate.
2. The Province will assign to the Commission the duties of administration of the scheme of relief
to be carried out under and pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement, and such duties shall be
performed by the Commission without expense to the Dominion save as hereinafter provided.
3. The Commission shall cause all single homeless persons in urban centres to be registered, and
shall arrange to select and place as many of the persons so registered, as are able and in a fit physical
condition to be so placed, in camps or on farms as hereinafter provided.
4. The Province shall immediately establish, equip, and maintain at its own expense, under the
control and management of the Commission, camps at two or more leading centres within the Province
of British Columbia where single homeless persons selected by the Commission may be admitted and
provided with food, fuel, clothing, and shelter, and, so far as may be possible, employed on useful work.
5. The Commission shall manage and operate the camps so established as distribution centres,
from which single homeless persons, eligible for farm-work, will be sent out to farms where employment
is available for them; but the Commission may arrange to send single homeless persons eligible for
farm or other work direct from convenient centres within the Province to farms where employment is
available for them.
6. The Commission in its discretion may pay to any municipality or charitable organization an
amount up to but not exceeding the sum of 40 cents per day to provide food, fuel, clothing, and shelter
for any single homeless person within such municipality.
7. The Commission shall, in carrying out the scheme of relief provided by this Agreement, observe
the strictest economy, bearing in mind, however, that the intent of this Agreement is that no single »'!'■■ y.'-' ■ .." .  '■' ■-
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 11
homeless person shall be allowed to suffer for want of food, fuel, clothing, or shelter; but as soon as
the said scheme of relief has been put in operation, no further relief shall be granted by any municipality, being an urban centre, to single homeless persons, unless any such person is a woman or by
reason of physical incapacity is ineligible for residence in a camp or for farm-work.
8. In aid of the carrying-out of the scheme of relief provided by this Agreement, the Dominion
will pay to the Province :—•
(a.) The actual cost of providing the necessary food, fuel, and clothing for each person
placed in residence in a camp as hereinbefore provided, not in excess of the sum of
forty cents (40c.) per day for each such person, and against such allowance the Province may charge the cost of providing light, heat, and water, as well as such cooks and
assistants as may be required at each such camp, and one Superintendent of Commissariat for all such camps; it being agreed that wherever fuel is available at places
convenient to the location of any such camps, then and in such event the Commission
shall direct that those persons receiving assistance, as above referred to, at such camps
shall be put to work to provide the necessary fuel:
(6.) The actual cost of providing food, fuel, clothing, and shelter for single homeless persons
not in excess of forty cents (40c.) per day for each such person under the terms of
clause 6 of this Agreement;   and
(c.) Five dollars ($5) per month for each person placed on a farm as hereinbefore provided;
but this monthly allowance shall not be paid, except in the discretion of the Commission,
for any month, in respect of any such person, if he or she has spent less than the full
period of such month on the farm on which he or she has been placed.
9. The Dominion will, from time to time, advance to the Province such sums of money, by way of
accountable advances, as may be required to provide for the payment of the items of expense chargeable to its account under the provisions of this Agreement, and the Province will forthwith deposit the
sums of money so advanced to the credit of the Commission in a special account in a branch of a
chartered bank of Canada, acceptable to the Minister of Finance of Canada, and instruct the bank to
honour cheques drawn on the said special account only when the said cheques are signed by the
Chairman of the Commission and an official of the Province to be appointed by Order of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, it being the intent that no moneys shall be withdrawn from such
special account except for the purpose of meeting items of expense properly chargeable to the account
of the Dominion under the provisions of this Agreement.
10. The Province shall, immediately upon the execution of this Agreement, and from time to time
thereafter, deposit to the credit of the Commission such sums of money as, in the opinion of the Commission, may be required to provide for the cost of administration (including the salaries and expenses
of any staff required to be employed by the Commission) of the scheme of relief provided by this
Agreement, other than in respect of such items of expenditure as are properly chargeable to the account
of the Dominion under the terms of this Agreement.
11. The Province shall cause the accounts of the Commission to be kept in proper form and
regularly examined and statements of expenditures to be rendered in such form as is satisfactory to the
Dominion Commissioner of Unemployment Relief; and the Province shall further cause such statements of expenditures, in such detail as may be requested, and accompanied by all necessary vouchers,
papers, and other documents, to be transmitted monthly and not later than the tenth day of the month
succeeding the month in which such expenditures were made, to the Dominion Commissioner of
Unemployment Relief.
12. If, upon examination of any account or accounts, objection is taken by the Dominion Commissioner of Unemployment Relief, or by the Auditor-General of Canada, to any item being made a
charge to the accountable advance, the Province shall assume the cost of such item, and if any disbursement has been made from the accountable advance on account of such item, the Province shall
deposit a like amount to the credit of the accountable advance : Provided that if the Province fails
so to recoup the accountable advance within thirty days after the receipt of notification of objection
to the item in question, the Dominion may deduct the amount of such item from any moneys payable
by it to the Province under any contract, agreement, undertaking, or statutory obligation.
13. This Agreement shall be deemed to have come into force as and from the first day of
November, a.d. 1932, and shall have effect to supersede and terminate the arrangements for the
provision of relief for unemployed persons made between the Dominion and the Province under the
terms of the following communications from the Minister of Labour for Canada and the Dominion
Commissioner of Unemployment Relief, acting on behalf of the Dominion, to the Provincial authorities
respectively mentioned, namely: Two letters, dated May 27th, 1932, from the Minister of Labour for
Canada to the Premier of British Columbia; telegram dated September 3rd, 1932, from the Dominion
Commissioner of Unemployment Relief to the Premier of British Columbia; telegram dated October
22nd, 1932, and letter, dated October 26th, 1932, from the Dominion Commissioner of Unemployment
Relief to the Minister of Public Works for British Columbia.
14. This Agreement shall be subject to termination on thirty days' notice in writing from the
Minister of Labour, and in the event of its being so terminated, the unspent portion (if any) of the
accountable advance shall immediately be remitted to the Dominion, together with all necessary
vouchers, documents, and other papers.
. 15. Unless sooner terminated, this Agreement shall expire automatically on the thirty-first day of
March, a.d. one thousand nine hundred and thirty-three, and the Province shall thereupon refund to
the Dominion the unexpended balance (if any) of the accountable advance : Provided that the Minister
of Labour may authorize such amount to be held in the special account aforementioned as may be G 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
sufficient for the payment and discharge of any obligation or liability incurred by the Dominion under
the provisions of this Agreement prior to the said date.
In witness whereof the Honourable AA'esley A. Gordon, Minister of Labour, has hereunto set his
hand on behalf of the Dominion; and the Honourable S. F. Tolmie, Premier of British Columbia, has
hereunto set his hand on behalf of the Province.
Signed on behalf of the Government of Canada by the Honourable Wesley
A. Gordon, Minister of Labour, in the presence of—
AV. M. Dickson.
Signed on behalf of the Province of British Columbia by the Honourable
S. F. Tolmie, Premier of British Columbia, in the presence of—
P. Philip.
W. A.  GORDON.
S. F. TOLMIE.
The seriousness of conditions in the Province can be readily seen from the following
summary, which shows the numbers in receipt of relief from May 1st, 1932, to March 31st, 1933.
THE "RELIEF ACT, 1932."
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief from May 1st, 1932, to March 31st, 1933.
(Figures shown for each month separately.)
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
May only, 1932.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Total, May	
June only.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Forestry	
Total, June	
July only.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Forestry	
Total, July	
August only.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Forestry .'....
Total, August	
September only.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Forestry	
Total, September	
9,816
3,654
13,470
10,438
4,622
15,060
11,011
4,240
15,251
11,095
4,385
15,480
11,339
4,567
15,900
30,273
10,404
40,677
32,345
12,743
45,088
35,506
11,827
47,333
35,989
12,0S4
48,073
36,271
12,374
4S,645
4,800
4,542
8,286
773
18,401
6,068
5,707
8,087
1,056
3
20,921
7,801
6,922
6,741
1,195
34
22,753
7,413
5,736
6,528
1,262
39
20,978
6,677
4,930
5,517
1,126
29
18,279
44,889
18,600
8,286
773
72,548
48,851
23,072
8,087
1,056
3
81,069
54,378
22,989
6,741
1,195
34
85,337
54,497
22,205
6,528
1,262
39
84,531
54,287
21,871
5,517
1,126
29
82,830 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 13
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief from May 1st, 1932, to
March 31st, 1933—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
October only.
Municipal	
Provincial	
Camps	
Relief organizations	
Total, October	
November only.
Municipal	
Provincial '.	
Special Relief Commission—■
Camps	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, November	
December only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single "women	
Special Relief Commission—
Camps	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, December	
January only, 1933
Municipal—
Resident families.	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Special Relief Commission—
Camps -	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, January	
11,904
4,872
16.776
12,990
5,504
18,494
12,948
1,027'
6,331
36
20,342
14,350
1,108
i,806
48
22,312
. 38,096
13,052
51,148
41,704
14.S85
56,589
41,315
3,223
19,176
122
63,836
47,562
3,520
20,454
172
71,708
I
7,280
5,443
3,827
1,110
17,666
693
6,186
4,430
1,538
7,571
1
20,419
479
629
6,191
31
5,781
1,509
8,355
2
22,977
3,182
937
6,750
48
6,141
1,651
9,144
2
27.S55
57,280
23,367
3,827
1,116
85,590
55,387
26,575
4,430
1,538
7,571
1
95,502
54,263
4,250
479
629
25,507
15S
6,191
31
5,781
1,509
8,355
2
107,155
61,912
4,628
3,182
937
27,260
220
6,750
48
6,141
1,651
9,144
2
121,875 G 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief from May 1st, 1932, to
March 31st, 1933—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
February only.
Municipal—
15,267
2,002
48,684
5,664
63,951
7,666
2,928
1,102
2,928
1,102
Provincial—
6,976
52
20,967
187
27,943
239
7,301
70
6,043
1,612
10,257
4
7,301
70
Special Relief Commission—
6,043
1,612
10,257
4
24,297
75,502
29,317
129,116
March only.
Municipal—
■    15,932
2,123
46,284
5,424
62,216
7,547
4,910
1,744
4,910
1,744
Provincial—
7,584
45
23,133
164
30,717
209
6,775
87
6,054
1,439
11,135
5
6,775
87
Special Relief Commission—
6,054
1,439
11,135
5
Total, March	
25,684
75,005
32,149
132,838
NEAV LEGISLATION AFFECTING LABOUR.
Legislation affecting labour as passed at the last session of the Legislature is summarized
as follows:—
Unemployment Relief.
The " Unemployment Relief Act, 1933," validates agreements between the Province and the
Dominion on the one hand, and the Province and the municipalities on the other, for purposes of
unemployment relief. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council is empowered to make further agreements ; to contribute to municipalities the proportion of the cost of relief measures agreed upon;
to advance by way of loan to any municipality such moneys as the latter is empowered by the
Act to borrow; and, either alone or in conjunction with the Dominion Government and the
municipality, to institute such measures for the relief of the needy as may be necessary or
advisable. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council is also authorized to make provision for borrowing money for relief purposes from the Dominion on the security of Treasury bills. The
Schedule to the Act contains an agreement between the Dominion and the Province for the
purpose of settling on the land certain selected families who are residents of Canada and who
would otherwise be in receipt of direct relief. The cost is to be borne from relief moneys and
contributed by the Dominion, the Province, and the municipality concerned, the Dominion contributing one-third of an amount not exceeding $600 per family, and the Province and munici- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 15
pality giving the other two-thirds in a proportion to be agreed upon between them. The Province
is to be responsible for the administration of land settlement and must set up an advisory
committee upon which are included representatives of the Dominion Land Settlement Branch
and of the Colonization Departments of the Canadian National and the Canadian Pacific
Railways.
Coal-mines Regulation.
The section of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" which required the Inspector to report
dangerous conditions by reason of the approach of workings to old or abandoned workings was
replaced by a new section. This provides that where the workings in a mine are approaching
any old or abandoned workings, the owner, agent, or manager in charge of the present workings
shall report the circumstances in writing to the Inspector before the present workings reach
within 300 feet of the abandoned workings, and no work shall be done within 300 feet of the
abandoned workings until a definite method of proceeding has been approved by the Inspector.
The section does not apply to cases where the abandoned workings can be readily examined and
a knowledge of prevailing conditions readily obtained.
Licensing of Chauffeurs.
The " Motor-vehicle Act" was amended with respect to the section requiring a chauffeur in
charge of a motor-vehicle carrying passengers for hire to have a permit from the Chief of Police
of the municipality. The Chief of Police is now empowered to cancel the permit if he deems
the holder to be unfit to act as chauffeur. In such case he must send within twenty-four hours
a written notice, stating the grounds of cancellation, to the holder of the permit, who may then
appeal to the Council of the municipality. A licensee who is engaged in operating a motor-
vehicle for a fire department is exempt from carrying his licence on condition that it is kept at
the fire station. Chauffeurs' licences issued for the year 1933 are extended to midnight on
February 28th, 1934.
Licensing of Salesmen.
The " Insurance Act" was amended to require insurance agents and salesmen to be licensed.
Certain exceptions are made, however, including any person acting on behalf of a society which
makes contracts of life, accident, or sickness insurance, unless the Superintendent of Insurance
notifies him and the society to the contrary. G 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The hopes prevailing when the year 1932 began, looking toward a betterment of industrial
conditions during the year, failed to materialize, and the total pay-roll, as calculated from employers making returns, decreased to the lowest point since 1921.
During the year 1929 the highest figure was reached, $145,120,325.98 having been paid in
salaries and wages.
For the past year the total was $72,606,374.57, or a reduction of approximately 50 per cent,
from the 1929 total.
These figures prove the seriousness of our present industrial condition, and should provoke
serious thought in every person having the future of our Province at heart.
As will be noted in the table showing the average weekly wages paid, drastic reductions have
been made in all branches of industry, with one exception—garment-manufacture.
RETURNS FROM 3,529 FIRMS.
The firms who made their returns in time to be included in the total numbered 3,529, a
decrease of 559 from the 1931 total, and it was gratifying to note that a greater percentage of
operating firms made returns than in previous years.
TOTAL PAY-ROLL.
The 3,529 firms reported a total pay-roll of $72,606,347.57, a decrease of $23,690,193.20 from
1931, or 24.6 per cent.
The pay-rolls and number of firms reporting since 1921 are as follows:—
Tear.                                                                                                 No. reporting. Total Pay-roll.
1921   2,275 $79,742,380.10
1922   2,809 86,192,190.73
1923   3,375 106,796,958.96
1924   3,566 107,798,771.36
1925   4,138 115,943,238.60
1926   4,521 129,420,599.55
1927    4,597 130,047,021.92
1928   4,846 136,784,484.18
1929   5,065 145,120,325.98
1930   4,704 127,160,467.53
1931   4.088 96,296,567.77
1932   3,529 72,606,374.57
The above figures demonstrate better than words the industrial conditions which exist
throughout the Province, and it is small consolation to employers and employees to be told that
our present condition is not a local one, but is more severe in other parts of this and other
countries.
Relief-work and the wages paid are not included in the total, it being felt that by so doing
the continuity of our figures and averages would be seriously interfered with.
TOTAL PAY-ROLL OF ALL INDUSTRIES.
In order that a fair picture of the total pay-roll of the Province may be had, we have, in
addition to the 3,529 firms reporting a total of $72,606,374.57, made up the following table.
Employers' returns received too late to be classified in the above amounted to $448,286.14, and
those on our list who have thus far failed to file a return we have estimated at $1,000,000. The
ascertained pay-rolls of transcontinental railways and other industrial railways (not including
logging-railways or those operated by coal-mines) was $9,802,413.29, a decrease of $2,000,000
from the previous year. Dominion and Provincial workers, $2,500,000; wholesale and retail
firms, $2,500,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 17
In operations such as delivery, cartage and teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture
operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation, $3,000,000; ocean-going vessels,
$7,500,000; and an allowance of $1,100,000 to cover industrial firms which could not be included
in any of the above.
The total industrial pay-roll of the Province, including the estimates given above, would
therefore be:—
Pay-roll of 3,529 firms making returns to Department of Labour     $72,606,374.57
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  448,286.14
Employees in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending in
returns  (estimated pay-roll)  1,000,000.00
Transcontinental railways  9,802,413.29
Dominion and Provincial Government workers  5,000,000.00
Wholesale and retail firms  2,500,000.00
Delivery,   cartage   and   teaming,   warehousing,   butchers,   moving-picture
operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation         3,000,000.00
Ocean services and express companies         7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous           1,100,000.00
Total  $102,957,074.00
The following table shows the percentage changes in the amounts paid to officers, superintendents, and managers, to clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, and to wage-earners for the
last five years:—
1926
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen	
Wage-earners	
Totals	
Per Cent.
9.29
9.31
81.40
100.00
Per Cent.
9.48
9.53
S0.99
I
100.00
Per Cent.
10.38
11.03
7S.59
100.00
Per Cent.
11.57
13.45
74.98
100.00
Per Cent.
12.77
14.93
72.30
100.00
The above figures convey in a graphic manner the fact that the wage-earner is the one who
has had to bear the brunt of the past few years, though it must be recognized that all have
suffered; the fact that the wage-earning group shows a decline and the other two an increase
does not necessarily mean that the amounts paid have increased, but rather that more of the
wage-earning group had been laid off, or placed on short time, and that the process of wage-
cutting had been more severe in the wage-earning group than in the other two.
Further evidence of this can be found in the next table, which shows the numbers of adult
male workers who are in receipt of a weekly wage of less than $19 per week, the total for 1932
being 20,431, as against 4,391 in 192S, 5,592 in 1929, 7,253 in 1930, and 16,264 in 1931.
Adult Male AVorkers employed at Low Rates of AVages.
Weekly Rate.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
Under $6	
$6 to $6.99   	
49
45
37
158
139
297
382
1,249
867
1,454
1,635
2,695
1,796
3,806
2
3
12
53
54
97
204
359
528
965
1,438
1,311
1,952
2,520
1
11
10
9
44
72
194
171
317
019
502
1,199
1,260
1
3
10
26
70
44
214
143
283
679
574
1,092
1,252
1
97
27 '
49
110
494
588
1,267
1,550
1,409
3
47
57
88
182
184
816
954
1,024
1,950
1,948
3
35
81
79
147
526
550
1,174
953
1,973
2,675
3,322
1,989
2,757
107
167
7 to 7.99 	
420
8 to 8.99    	
367
9 to 9.99 	
683
10 to 10.99	
914
11 to 11.99 	
810
12 to 12.99	
2,145
13 to 13.99	
1,809
14 to 14.99	
2,204
3,159
2,754
15 to 15.99   	
10 to 16.99	
17 to 17.99   	
2,318
2,574
18 to 18.99	
Totals	
14,609
9,498
4,409
4,391
5,592
7,253
16,264
20,431 G 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PAY-ROLL COMPARISONS.
All tables except three show a reduced pay-roll varying from $22,000 in the paint-manufacturing industry to $5,618,000 in the contracting group. The lumbering group lost $3,742,000;
smelting, $2,579,000; metal trades, $2,000,000; Coast shipping, $1,933,000; and public utilities,
$1,789,000. Metal-mining and the pulp and paper industries lost approximately $1,100,000 each;
builders' materials and coal-mining, $950,000; food products, $785,000; ship-building, $651,000;
wood-manufacture, $443,000; house-furnishing, laundries, etc., $284,000 each; miscellaneous
trades and industries, $242,000;  garment-making, $196,000;  breweries, etc., $186,000.
The tables showing an increased pay-roll are headed by explosives and chemicals, with an
increase of $441,000, due to the fertilizer plant at Trail having increased its production; printing
and publishing shows an increase of $281,000, while oil-refining advanced by $244,000, and it
might be well to draw attention to the increased number of employees in this industry; in 1931
the month of greatest employment was August, with 543, while in 1932 the greatest number
employed in any one month was 792. The oil-refining plants are increasing the number of
employees, and it would be well for workmen who fear other industries are displacing the
products they are now producing, to consider adapting themselves to some other line of work;
and in this, employers can be of great assistance by refusing to hire any new men, giving the
experienced employee the first opportunity of the work offered.
The pay-rolls covering the past three years can be conveniently compared in the following
table:—
Industry.
1930.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1931.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1932.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
38
89
8
26
122
1,209
12
490
71
52
9
80
46
957
747
175
154
25
11
144
16
43
2
94
84
$919
2,102
33
5,666
7,864
15,052
388
12,044
833
954
244
1,819
532
24,884
9,159
8,794
3,055
1,550
296
4,193
5,515
1,570
6,138
11,490
2,054
,439.87
.053.S3
,669.01
528.68
.024.07
.002.85
,751.18
250.99
225.55
187.58
538.21
.588.56
,736.45
763.99
.847.72
,660.08
,746.40
,226.44
917.32
,899.99
461.04
,146.20
961.84
.070.60
.769.08
37
81
9
25
107
988
10
466
64
49
49
712
690
158
162
12
8
130
15
42
2
96
86
$894
1,717
26
4,671
6,902
12,534
266
9,425
717
823
194
1,562
387
12,904
6,699
5,103
2,762
1,083
217
3,425
4,702
1,244
5,920
10,532
1,574
,220.28
,974.02
,389.75
,819.52
,829.90
,934.72
,411.14
,376.67
,166.22
,488.92
,744.37
,167.21
,314.96
,625.88
,501.54
,304.96
,949.55
,745.80
,519.99
,317.87
,906.14
,179.26
,029.71
,761.26
,888.13
34
83
9
27
104
736
8
352
52
44
8
77
48
555
663
170
156
22
7
137
12
33
2
102
$708,598.88
845,388.07
26,213.95
3,684,582.87
4,969,953.55
6,916,656.31
876,974.39
8,640,814.40
521,428.S1
539,027.06-
154,144.55
1,279,086.40
343,104.43
9,162,387.48
4,683,727.11
4,090,145.20
2,520,176.90
1,327,883.43
195,093.23
3,706,983.84
3,504,110.12
693,969.27
3,341,108.46
8,743,713.45
1,131,111.41
4,704
5127,100,467.53
4,088
0,296,567.77
3,529
$72,606,374.57
THREE INDUSTRIAL DIATISIONS.
Dividing the Province for this purpose under three headings—namely, Greater Vancouver,
Rest of Mainland, and Vancouver Island—we find that 46.80 per cent, of the total pay-roll is
confined to the Greater Vancouver area, an increase of 2.20 per cent, over 1931. The Rest of
the Mainland decreased from 39.52 per cent, to 36.89, or 2.63 per cent.; while Vancouver Island
increased from 15.79 for 1931 to 16.31 in 1932. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 19
It is fully expected that these percentages will be greatly changed; the increasing activity
in lumbering and mining will have the effect of increasing the percentages of the other two
sections at the expense of Greater Vancouver.
The percentage arrived at for the $72,606,374.57 was applied to the other items making up
the general total, giving the following division of the industrial pay-roll of the Province for
the past four years:—
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
$68,730,605.09
83,790,637.05
39,571,007.37
$65,031,766.92
70,296,482.05
31,805,564.74
$58,964,436.78
52,143,086.62
20,833,485.28
$131,941,008.68
$48,183,910.64
37,980,864.59
16,792,298.77
Totals	
$192,091,249.51
$167,133,813.71
$102,957,074.00
DECREASE IN NUMBER OF APPRENTICES.
The number of apprentices, as shown in the summary of all tables, totals 722, a decrease of
183 from the 1931 total. Since 1929 the number of apprentices employed in industry has dropped
from 1,676 to 732, and while this may appear serious it does not mean that 944 apprentices have
been laid off, but rather that those listed in 1929 have to some extent completed their training
and are now listed under males 21 years of age and over.
Doubtless cases have occurred where apprentices have been laid off before having completed
their training, due to the fact that we have no apprenticeship law in British Columbia.
Increases in the number of apprentices were noted in explosives and chemicals, 16; manufacture of food products, 29; miscellaneous trades and industries, 17; the principal decreases
occurring in contracting, 55; garment-manufacture, 25; metal trades, 50; printing and
publishing, 48;  smelting, 11;  public utilities, 24;  and in the manufacture of wood (N.E.S.), 11.
AVAGE CHANGES.
The average weekly wages paid to adult males declined in every table, except in the garment-
manufacturing industry, the average weekly rate increasing by $1.56 per week.
The method adopted is the same as in previous years. Using the summary of all tables as
an example, we find 2,204 males over 21 years of age receiving from $14 to $14.99 per week. In
our calculations we set the weekly rate at $14.50. The same applies to the other rates until we
reach the $30 to $34.99 class. As many of the 6,632 would be in receipt of sums varying from
$30 to $34.99, we have set the weekly wage at $32 per week.
AVhere steps of $1 were shown in the table, such as $14 to $14.99, we have calculated at
$14.50, and where steps of $5 appear, such as $30 to $34.99 and $35 to $39.99, the calculations
were $32 and $37 respectively.
The 842 receiving $50 and over was taken to mean $50 only.
The following table shows the average weekly wage in the various industries from 1926 to
1932, and, as already stated, are for adult males only, and for the week of employment of the
greatest number. It does not necessarily mean that the average weekly wage multiplied by the
number of weeks in the year would give the annual earnings, as there would be broken time,
weather conditions, temporary out-of-work periods to contend with, and we have no knowledge
of how many weeks during the year the 63,804 were employed. G 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average Full Week's AVages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1920. 1927. 1928. 1929. 1930. 1931
1932.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods...
Lumber industries ,
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting ,
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Manufacture of wood (N.E.S.)	
$27.32
27.38
22.24
30.06
29.59
29.06
23.79
26.20
29.48
25.67
36.69
27.00
26.90
25.56
27.92
33.34
24.61
31.48
21.94
38.25
27.47
28.74
32.90
29.26
25.26
$27.62
26.96
22.36
29.79
29.79
30.24
25.38
26.60
29.15
27.46
31.41
26.44
29.42
25.93
29.76
32.89
25.99
30.96
24.95
36.72
27.11
29.11
31.15
28.83
25.60
$28.85
26.28
22.97
30.50
31.89
30.58
26.24
27.70
28.60
27.44
32.49
26.96
27.88
26.53
31.04
33.27
27.15
30.23
23.62
40.94
26.82
28.85
32.54
30.04
25.02
$27.70
28.04
26.58
30.18
32.84
30.57
24.61
26.56
28.68
26.74
36.61
23.16
29.03
26.54
29.50
35.24
26.21
30.50
25.58
40.81
27.87
30.25
33.09
30.70
25.49
$27.40
27.38
25.06
29.03
31.36
30.34
26.66
27.79
28.34
25.54
37.85
27.16
28.31
25.69
29.96
33.31
25.88
29.78
25.85
39.34
27.39
30.35
30.05
30.02
26.03
$27.58
25.81
20.40
28.40
29.63
27.41
26.78
23.43
22.51
23.18
31.29
25.29
25.81
21.09
27.74
30.02
23.43
31.24
26.11
39.78
25.94
29.58
30.44
29.11
23.67
$25.65
21.95
14.28
28.04
26.50
24.78
23.34
21.88
24.07
20.05
23.40
23.26
21.62
18.73
24.24
25.50
22.78
29.34
25.00
37.05
24.63
26.17
22.98
28.89
20.01
AVERAGE INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all industrial workers covered by the tables, and numbering
63,804, was $23.62, as compared with $26.17 for 1931.
Since the compilation of these statistics began, the highest average weekly wage occurred in
1929, the amount being $29.20; the 1932 figures being the lowest on record, and $5.58 below the
1929 average.
The average weekly wage for industrial workers (adult males only) since the compilation
of these statistics is as follows:—
1918   $27.97
1919   29.11
1920   31.51
1921   27.62
1922   27.29
1923   28.05
1924   28.39
1925   27.82
1926   $27.99
1927   28.29
1928   28.96
1929   29.20
1930   28.64
1931   26.17
1932   23.62
AA'EEKLY WAGES, 1932, COMPARED WITH 1931.
Of the twenty-five tables, only one (garment-making) registers an increase in the average
weekly wage; the others show reductions of from 22 cents in the public utility group to $7.89 in
the jewellery-manufacturing industry. The increase and decreases dn weekly wages are shown
in the following table :—
Increase.
Garment-making    $1.56 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 21
Decreases.
Breweries   $1.93
Builders' materials   3.86
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing.. 6.12
Coal-mining  36
Coast shipping    3.13
Contracting    2.63
Explosives and chemicals   3.44
Food products   1.55
House-furnishing   3.13
Jewellery-manufacture  '.  7.89
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing .... 2.03
Leather and fur goods   4.19
Lumber industries   2.36
Metal trades   $3.50
Metal-mining      4.52
Miscellaneous trades and industries      .65
Oil-refining      1.90
Paint-manufacture       1.11
Printing and publishing     2.73
Pulp and paper manufacture      1.31
Ship-building      3.41
Smelting      7.46
Street-railways, gas, w-ater, power,
telephones, etc 22
Manufacture of wood (N.E.S.)      3.06
Chart showing Fluctuation of Industrial AVages.
SOX
207.
is?;
57.
1930
1331
1932
■
ir
T
U-
_ zr
it
-14-
T
■
tr
44^
±
I         III
3   »
8 ■* -S
a .
H in
"3 to
tsts
OS   t-
io ci
bio'bio'bio'b   fe
tH   ci   w   oo  CO  tP   tP   o
o   o   o   o   o   o   o
"0
es
IO   ©   IO   ©   LO   ©   LO    o
H   fl   N   CO   CO   ■*   11    LO
r-
©
©
rH
©
00
o
00
CN
CO
o
0!
t-
00
T-i
t-J
Cl
t-
tH
CN
rH
fc-
IO
rH
IO
b
Cl
IO
Cl
b
CO
»o
eo
Ci
IO
b
IO
OS    o
O     rH
00
00
Q0
0s
CO
©
rH
CO   fees   CM
CN
CO
IO     tH
H    CN
©
CN
L0
©
H
IO
CN   r-
tu
2    LO   ©   IO    ©   LO   ©   IO
£    H   Cl   Cl    CO   CO   ^   ^
t-J  00-
LO ©   LO   ©   LO   ©   LO   ©    £r
rH CM   Cl   CO   OO   Tfl   ^   o    °
u ococooo^
0 +J    +J     4w    4_>    +->    +J    -(-)      irf
'S IO   ©   LO   ©   LO   ©   IO   ©
£ HOICMCOCO^IIB
P «■
EMPLOYMENT FLUCTUATION.
The following chart covering the years 1921-20-30-31-32 depicts the employment curves
applicable to the firms who made returns to this Department.
From December, 1921, which marked the end of the depression at that time, there was a
steady increase to July, 1929, when approximately 98,000 were employed. The decline from
July, 1929, to December, 1932, wiped out all the previous gains, and we finished the year slightly
below the 1921 figure.
The tendency throughout the world is definitely toward recovery; this is being now felt in
this Province, and we confidently expect that the low point has been reached. G 22
DEPARTMENT
OF LABOUB
The following cut is only applicable to the industries making returns to this Department:—
AVERAGE   MONTHLY   NUMBER =' WAGE-EARNERS  (Male s Fema'el
I3SI-29-30-3I-32
JAN. FEB. MARAPL. MAY JUNE JULY  AUG. SEPT OCT.  NOV   DEC
1 OO.OOO
X
95,000
s
90,000
A
85,000
80,000
\
\
\
1929
75,000
70,000
65,000
 - •?*-"  "
"~--*-^.
\
1930
 .
■^'
60,000
.*"
-'"
N
55,000
\
\
-Wi
^GuL-l^rZ—
\
*■+*•****'
, .
— ~-
■^^•■^v.
1931
^r
„-*'*'
\
50.000
~^—w.
?SS'
^~  '
■^.
^'-t
\
—
■^T-.N
45,000
____--
REFERENCE
Employment  in	
'?**.,
I9ZI
1932
1921    shewn   thus          	
40,000
19 30                                           .-
19 31            "              "              	
1932.         ••               ••               ..«,.,«,■./««.
1               II                1               ll
SEASONAL FLUCTUATIONS.
The variation of employment in each industry for the past two years is shown in the follow
ing chart, the peak and low months being the same.
In the builders' material group a steady decline took place, being a reflection of the very
unsettled conditions in the contracting group.    Coal-mining changed from January to March,
when 3,811 were employed, declining to October, when a slight recovery occurred for the balance
1
of the year.   Contracting maintained fairly steady employment until the last two months of the
year, when employment dropped suddenly.
Food products revealed the usual seasonal variations, August remaining the peak month,
the low changing from March to January.    The lumber industry began the year with its lowest
mark, May being the highest;   the number employed in the closing month being greater than
for the month of January.    Metal trades and metal-mining varied but slightly during the year.
Oil-refining is each year expanding its pay-roll and the number of employees, the smallest number
employed in 1932 being about equal to the greatest number for 1931.    Printing and publishing
did not vary a great deal during the year.   Pulp and paper lost ground during the summer, but
partially recovered in the latter months of the year;   the same applied to smelting, while in the
public utility group a gradual falling off occurred throughout the entire year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 23
pa
<3
H
r-l
o
fe
H
H
ff>
«i
J
IS
1
M
H
02
H
m
H
<D
H
l>s
M
O
H
IS
+^
p
-U
K
02
cl
ft
w
tn
fc
M
■r;
N
s
'<
T3
a
>>
S
h
+J
o
02
M
3
&
"d
X
fl
8
fl
h
«
c>
cl
01
fc
£
s
H
+j
<
a
a
a
-<
r>
o
&
d
a
E*
CD
fcq
o
o
0
o
«3
--J
H
CJ
W
M
i-i
>
IS
V,
H
S3
b-
O
m
M
f
tn
o
fl
R]
CJ
-1
,Q
H
Ci
bfl
C
&
o
^3
EH
ri o ©
a o o
O        ^
+j o £?
o<^
«   s
s a ^
w-rt
El
E rt >*
fl a
OM
"3.
3
N
H
h
cj
T!
go
0
5
a
iMMO00C00:HC0fe-OTHt-C0H'*t-a)OONO<M10
N00ri«)00Ob-C0OCJOrf)5   00riaClM05Ot*NlO
CO'*   © Cl t>- CO CO ■* CO   CO <N © © LO Cl LO   tH © CO ©
OO" CO*" CO*"        ^h" i-T        OO" ci" d" rH rH rH «
©  LO
©   tH
©  CO
£1 u u
cj qj oj
U   & JD JD
■ ■   * 5) O
a a
3   oi   o   <u   gi   ^
c y a c u*
(. f, j,
.     Q)    0)    O)
S? * « J=
gaaa„Bg§B
fl'S   3   3- h   5   60 SB> B
■    2J    ft)    -> - '"'     ""     - ■
hftSo^QQhflhhQbbpflfl^flOO^h
(M©rHT-HC0-rHC000TH©C0rHWlOC0©C0C-lCl©rH0SC0
Ci-^-HK'i-I*#©C1C0,HHrHlOCat-©©T-(©©©COt-©-*
"HH  t- 00  ©  M  ©  iO  IO IO (DNIO  05; © ■*• b-  rH N  IO ©  ©__
CO" ^" LO"        05 rH"        rH  cf Co" rH rH  Cl" Cl"
0)
CJ
,o
A
£
a
CJ
CJ
w
cj
CJ
o>
P Q
00
ID
C/J
Ct
<* ■« a
9 o
a § s o g
d   d   3 ^   3   <   <   5   o r"   S 5   »^ 5   5   3   3   »   i   » .«  S
OS
3 .
to h
fl K
•«3 S
t~*©'#t-O5C0©©(NrH©©(MC0rH(M-rriT^Tf(iH©rHb-
00©rHC]rHt^rHt-©©L0C0  1O©©C0IO00©(MrHlOl>
l*^     t^_ A^    \r>     rV^     .«J     *»^\    lr^     \r^i w*.     a1^     y,^     .^     **     a*     **."■  1     _     \r*.     .—I
1     I.N     r-l     l"-     T—I     l.-»    liJ     \iJ
CO  W  CO  rH  CO  LO  IO
co" co" CO
Tt^ ci lo_ ©^ ©_ eo ci
rH CO" CO" d" rH
rti  ID  rH Cl^ ©^
io" rH
a a
U tH U
CJ CJ CJ
JD JD JD
a a a %
k,   5J d QJ    y
**?   O O CJ    u
CJ    O    O    OJ
JD   JD   +J   X!
ssHa
CJ   CJ ■  ■   ■■
1   CJ CJ CJ
JD .O ,Q
a a s
CJ CJ
^H       ri       CJ
oo^cj^ooop
K<«hOpfigQfi<(nhQnfib<ihiBObo
a a    a
CJ    CJ
Q fl
t-rH©rH©THrH©00(NCOCOCOTHt-10   10CO©ClrH©© CNC1
Tt<(M-rfi(MC0rHLOL—   lO-*L0©©rHlOt-©TtHT-Sb-©C0© t-©
■-    ■"- CO   (M   Ci   CD   Ci   CO   IO   rH   rH   Oi   rH   C-
i  tr-  rH  l— CD   tD
rti  rti  Ci
Ci
rH CO  CO" Cl" Cl"
I CO
i   CO
©   rH
3   .
W    rt    rt     ^H
r'   r^   cj   ej
luS^rtCJ^^CJCJ
!Or3^>-5G0.^^pHfc
CJ   w
rt
d   fl
a =
1 a
60
9%
fl   ci   to +j
a 3 -c a s s
,S "on   fl   0 .fl
t,  u -	
pq pq
.55 o o
, to'. a a
■III!
rt   to   Pi E
^ o _ 3
4J    ih    rrt     CJ
fl  a o h
°Wo=t£a>rt£P
o ic s fl a.;
f?:   OJ ■ U
c; a
p   5
•5 rH 4H   ¥  .
3a
rt   rt   o   ^   fl
a; cj .rt a 3
fl 3 a *
? „s ■«< s
P4 Cm 02 02 i G 24                                                    DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
Several changes are made in the table showing the nationalities of employees.    Natives of
English-speaking countries accounted for 75.26 per cent.;   natives of Continental Europe, 14.57
per cent.    The employees from other countries and nationality not stated, 1.77 per cent., and for
Asiatics 8.40 per cent.    The actual number of Asiatics employed was 6,594, as compared with
6,283 for 1931.    The percentage figures for the four divisions will be seen in the following
table:—
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1
1931.      I      1932.
1
Natives of English-speaking countries    .
Per Cent.
72.51
15.05
10.20
2.24
Per Cent.
72.65
17.02
9.33
1.00
Per Cent.
70.34
18.56
10.01
1.09
Per Cent.
72.01
16.07
8.97
2.95
Per Cent.
73.60
15.48
7.07
3.85
Per Cent.
75.26
14.57
8.40
1.77
From other countries, or nationality not
I
100.00
100.00           100.00
1
100.00
100.00
100.00
FEMALE WORKERS.
Female employees in industry increased to 10.04 per cent, from 9.75 in 1931. Industries
affording greater employment for females during the year were headed by food products, up
613; printing and publishing, 16; and garment-making, 20. Decreases are noted in the following : Public utilities, 263; miscellaneous trades and industries, 232; laundries, cleaning and
dyeing, 120;  pulp and paper remaining the same, with 78 each year.
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLL.
Employers within the Province with a pay-roll of over $100,000 numbered 110, against a
total of 145 for the previous year.
When tabulating these firms, public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale or retail firms, transcontinental railways, or deep-sea vessels are not included in the total.
The 110 firms are distributed as follows: Lumbering, 23; food products, 18; metal-mining
and public utilities, 8 each; coal-mining and Coast shipping. 7 each; contracting and printing
and publishing, 5 each; pulp and paper, 4; breweries, distilleries, etc., garages and oil-refining,
3 each; laundries, etc., metal trades, miscellaneous trades and industries, ship-building, and
smelting, 2 each; and 1 each in explosives, garment-making, builders' materials, paint-manufacture, house-furnishing, and the manufacture of wood (N.E.S.).
Of the 110 firms, four had a pay-roll of over $1,000,000; one of them paying out over
$2,000,000 and one over $3,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 25
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following1, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.— Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. —Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lin.e, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.— This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.— Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting.'— Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing axd heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises Arms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufactureof.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15 Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises hoth wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, j*nd supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Were
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No.  1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 3Jj Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.. §183,178.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      88,043.13
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    432,868.75
Total $708,589.88
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females
January 	
February ...
March	
April	
May	
June	
344
310
310
327
335
347
148
119
52
112
103
114
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
292
301
2S9
314
342
305
36
58
58
75
91
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
J6.00to   $6.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
8 00 to     8.99  ..
1
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
4
3
3
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13 00 to   13,99. ..
81
81
17
28
3
11
1
14 00 to   14 99...
26
5
11
7
56
6
13
5
31
1
16
26
16
5
14
66
5'2
21
11
2
9
1
15.00 to   15,99...
•
16 00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99.
19.00 to   19.99...
2
20.00 to   20.99  ..
21.00 to   21.99...
5
22 00 to   22.99.
23 00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
26.00 to   26.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
35 00 to   39 99..
40.00 to   44.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan ,	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
243
107
5
1
2
2
15
12
4
2
6
ii'
177
41 G 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 83 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     3198,687.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         98,804.75
Wage-earners (including piece-workers}       547,896.32
Total $   845,388.07
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June ....
Males.
Females.
749
728
723
675
677
664
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
658
655
638
561
546
483
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
to
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
9
37
17
12
35
17
12
78
49
102
42
60
27
33
38
24
34
38
13
14
13
7
37
28
16
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria    ...
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
321
363
7
34
S
4
40
7
111
.....
"l9'
Females.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $5,672.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       4,605.31
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     15,936.64
Total   $26,213.95
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
June	
9
10
6
12
23
35
4
4
4
3
7
6
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
29
31
31
18
19
20
6
7
9
8
9
13
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
86.00 to   $6.99
1
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
12
9.00 to     9.99..
1
1
1
10.00 to   10.99..
1
8
1
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
1
7
14.00 to   14.99..
6
3
9
1
15.00 to   15.99
16.00 to   16 99
17.00 to   17.99..
1
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99.
20.00 to   20.99..
j'-
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22 99.
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
1
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99
1
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99.
1
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finlmd, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
12
2
4
Females.
10
2 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 27
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 21 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $223,464.qq
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       182,268.77
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    3,278,850.10
Total $3,684,582.87
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April 	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
3,739
3
3,597
3
3,808
3
3,551
3
3,311
3
3,282
3
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
Males.   Females.
3,107
3,291
3,180
3,085
3,103
3,111
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14,99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
21 Yrs.
& Over.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
2
27
12
33
40
98
65
50
44
174
77
56
280
275
148
251
220
212
885
200
149
78
Under
21 Yrs.
1
13
12
7
15
10
1
19
6
5
14
9
15
4
1
11
2
1
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria 	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
960
1,673
45
3
27
11
320
121
357
72
185
33
218
62
Females.
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 10/f Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $637,157.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       446,838.61
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,885,957.94
Total $4,969,953.55
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March..,
April
May	
June
4,370
4,287
4,418
4,330
4,263
4,402
22
23
23
26
36
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
4,597
4,420
4,476
4,254
3,960
4,193
46
43
40
27
28
25
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.!
to 7.!
to 8.!
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
10
4
7
78
134
27
62
159
98
171
139
85
671
188
288
365
179
265
71
57
975
28
524
476
270
87
107
Under
21 Yrs.
21
2
1
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
1
28
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America,..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,286
1,958
45
40
16
18
94
17
5
259
7
6
272
65
35
221
19
27 G 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 736 Firms.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-workers
ments, 1932.
rs $1.1<
17,468.00
0,311.00
8,877.31
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
)	
9-
...    4,7'
Total	
   168,395.86
$ 6,916,656.31
 $876,974.39
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
5,19£
4,85i
4,818
5,125
5,14;
5,155
5
5
5
0
6
6
Julj
4,8?.0
4,857
4,812
4,867
4,155
3,764
6
6
5
5
5
5
January ....
February...
623
604
647
457
440
434
Jul J
600
500
532
499
404
371    .
September .
October ....
November,.
December...
September..
October	
November ..
December ..
June
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
P^E.MALKS.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 ¥rs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
10
19
12
10
13
10
13
31
16
8
11
3
8
4
1
5
8
8
4
15
6
16
3
11
3
10
14
1
2
5
1
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6
3
J9.
3
14
19
11
30
29
1SS
24
302
299
814
287
273
385
292
278
686
728
967
319
288
305
137
109
545
624
381
86
197
1
99
1
2
6
3
13
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99  .
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24 99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 tn   49.99..
1
1
12.00 to   12.99.  .
2
7
12
13
15
14
32
27
51
38
45
37
45
50
54
27
26
21
19
46
26
8
2
i "
1
1
3
1
i
1
3
21.00 to   21.99...
2
4
2
4
23 00 to   23 99.
2
24 00 to   24.99...
i
26.00 to   26.99...
2
6
1
1
5
1
27 00 to   27.99...
1
1
28.00 to   28 99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35 00 to   39.99. ..
40.00 to   44.99.   .
45.00 to   49.99...
60.00 and o\
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
4,100
3,285
134
14
13
44
212
78
72
437
74
18
5
1
245
299
22
3
4
Great Britain and Ir
United States of An
Great Britain and
Italv	
Italv	
21
6
10
24
4
Germany and Austr
Germany and Aust
Russia and Poland .
Other European cou
Russia and Poland
Other European co
11
5
All other countries
15
saa
All other countries
ed	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 29
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 352 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,260,773.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,284,149.57
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   ....   6,095,891.83
Total $8,640,814.40
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
3,583
3,635
3,726
4,051
4,546
5,603
805
825
829
852
988
1,683
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
6,552
6,598
5,664
5,452
4,352
3,740
2,756
2,940
2,158
2,513
1,529
June	
936
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99  ..
4
25
37
107
60
155
90
351
467
208
608
358
379
453
275
804
287
337
285
406
383
i06
241
180
115
575
245
166
89
86
37
32
23
27
54
52
13
33
22
14
43
27
18
20
10
3
8
12
7
3
2
2
2
1
2
1
210
578
180
173
174
209
113
344
504
433
363
156
123
127
98
56
38
39
36
24
34
5
8
3
8
2
69
28
8
13
50
51
12
45
48
23
11
3
2
3
5
5
4
8
6
n
5
5
2
2
3
20.00 to   20.99...
21 00 to   21.99. ..
22.00 to   22.99...
23 00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99.   .
27 00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99
30.00 to   34.99.   .
40.00 to   44,99  ..
45.00to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria.	
Central European and Balkan States ...
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
J apan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
3,492
2,483
108
9
20
9
57
151
40
522
44
21
1,310
3
651
15
2,990
794
63
1
7
12
60
89
39
95
44
3
4
279
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 52 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   109,228.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         45,724.11
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       366,476.70
Total     $521,428.81
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
121
122
128
134
130
138
293
317
340
370
387
375
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
130
136
142
157
151
131
330
334
370
387
323
276
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ... .
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22 99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
3
2
2
14
5
10
5
4
1
3
3
3
2
1
10
15
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
1
1
5
4
61
100
60
34
35
10
15
3
16
5
3
3
2
6
14
1
3
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland ,	
Other European country	
China	
Hi ndustan	
Japan 	
Ali other countries	
Nationalitv not stated.	
Males.      Females.
50
38
197
105
7
3
10 G 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 44 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $113,514.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     86,311.76
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   339,201.30
Total $539,027.06
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
441
61
443
76
410
67
384
61
337
59
332
58
July 	
August.,.
September,
October ...
November.
December..
Males.   Females.
356
367
401
417
57
62
68
67
63
59
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00	
to   $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and over.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
5
17
3
10
24
14
9
23
28
31
17
21
25
9
20
12
14
11
14
10
15
2
24
7
3
5
IS
13
9
6
18 Yrs.
&over.
3
1
3
1
7
1
11
2
9
10
7
1
4
3
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
288
135
6
2
4
1
3
12
10
17
17
1
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers §25,784.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   61,516.25
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   66,844.30
Total $154,144.55
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
April.   	
52
51
61
51
61
50
1
1
1
1
1
1
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December...
50
51
51
51
51
51
1
1
1
1
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
UnderW.OO	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8,99..
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 and over
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
26
22 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 31
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 77 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $128,316.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      243,663.15
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       907,107.25
Total $1,279,086.40
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March. .
April..   .
May	
June
519
515
534
526
521
504
1,007
1,001
1,087
991
985
972
July	
August ...
September.
October ...
November.
December .
484
486
485
466
479
959
930
934
908
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
•40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.99.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to   39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Malks.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
7
3
2
4
6
10
7
19
17
13
26
13
39
31
33
24
25
38
36
33
13
6
42
18
3
2
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
4
9
17
13
33
122
390
109
97
58
18
21
5
3
3
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland    	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
236
257
12
5
2
15
Appren
tices.
488
405
20
10
7
4
30
24
2
1
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering Jf8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $ 66,228.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     56,906.20
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 219,970.23
Total $343,104.43
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.. ..
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
209
200
201
201
66
67
61
60
61
62
July	
August	
September..
October 	
November..
December ..
191
196
196
199
200
210
66
74
72
62
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Mai
ES.
Females. .
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
i
3
3
1
16
5
5
9
2
9
12
8
12
6
16
10
14
12
2
4
6
2
12
6
3
4
6
5
3
1
2
1
3
3
3
1
1
2
6
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
1
1
3
2
1
4
1
12.00 to   12.99
6
6
5
17
6
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
1
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
1
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
1
12
2
5
3
2
3
2
1
19.00to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99 .
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99  .
Nationality of Employees.
Countrj^ of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland    	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
108
59
9
26
1
2
11
9
47
26
2 G 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 555 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   879,636.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       493,742.76
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,789,009.72
Total $ 9,162,387.48
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females.
January.
February
March...
April...
May	
June ....
8,0S0
8,107
9,255
10,836
11,504
10,551
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
8,908
9,000
9,706
9,238
8,327
8,289
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Appren-
tices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
45
103
28*
139
413
523
408
1,128
960
1,087
1,260
777
608
898
726
334
82S
405
198
866
402
181
264
175
156
683
251
99
59
83
5
12
21
18
23
21
3/
32
27
26
7
25
15
6
2
13.00 to   13.99.
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17 99. ..
18.00 to   18.99...
19 00 to   19.99
1
21 00 to   21 99
23 00 to   23.99  ..
24 00 to   24 99  ..
26 00 to   26.99  ..
27.00 to   27.99...
28 00 to   28.99
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99  ..
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
6,063
1,791
439
14
2L
50
116
271
382
2,598
309
69
1,093
409
1,159
28
189
Females.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 663 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,071,931.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       965,816.68
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,645,979.43
Total     $4,683,727.11
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Femalei
January
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
2,792
2,775
2,810
2,887
2,894
2,864
56
61
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August. ...
September
October ...
November .
December..
2,651
2,866
2,784
2,759
2,568
2,563
61
51
51
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26 00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
c'6.99.
7.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
30
26
23
67
60
57
45
51
143
68
137
134
137
174
105
172
119
184.
163
56
100
69
90
473
184
52
34
25
36
25
30
24
29
44
21
27
26
13
33
17
5
7
4
5
10
2
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
8
4
3
2
1
11
17
6
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, F'inland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   .   ..  	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries '.	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
2,087
1,291
97
7
12
23
20
8
6
70
16
6
17
Apprentices.
12
18
19
8
13
19
14
11
11
6
4
5
1
4
57
6
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 33
Table No.  16.
METAL-MININQ.
Returns covering 170 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.      $321,654.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        258,756.20
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,509,735.00
Total  $4,090,145.20
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
2,768
2,711
2,722
2,736
2,884
2,903
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
April ..  	
May	
June	
21
21
20
20
19
19
July ,
August	
September,.
October    ...
November...
December...
2,891
2,996
2,973
2,920
2,724
2,681
19
20
19
18
16
16
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to   $6.'
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
10
4
15
1
11
26
21
65
29
62
114
86
208
492
169
498
67
270
88
252
113
235
69
457
274
111
27
Under
21 Yrs.
2
10
5
1
1
6
2
5
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,223
960
136
5
6
11
140
52
378
613
69
35
37
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 156 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $530,610.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      646,449.95
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,343,116.95
Total $2,520,176.90
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
1,072
1,019
1,041
1,013
1,064
1,124
256
267
287
294
285
279
July 	
August...
September
October ..
November
December
1,103
1,117
1,057
1,038
1,058
959
262
272
283
305
312
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
5
6
4
30
12
31
10
10
6
17
6
4
6
1
5
3
8
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7 99
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99  .
2
5
21
14
10
24
10
59
50
52
23
39
67
93
109
119
39
176
64
20
45
18
28
83
29
17
5
14
1
6
8
10
12
37
12
156
24
25
7
3
4
6
1
5
7
5
22
10
3
2
3
2
9
1
5
"Y"
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99 .
18.00 to   18.99  .
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99
1
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
1
1
2
27.00 to   27.99..
2
29.00 to   29 99..
30.00 to   34.99..
1
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
677
560
23
3
4
3
6
17
22
85
14
3
25
3
12
1
14
251
111
10 G 34
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 22 Firms.
Table No.  19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 7 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pa}
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers
'ments, 1932.
129,903.00
139,063.43
758,917.00
Salary and Wage Paj
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earnets (including piece-workei
'ments, 1932.
(52,257.00
57,008.31
86,827.92
)	
8)	
Total    $1,327,883.43
Total       $196,093.23
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
612
590
562
530
667
657
Julj
792
762
735
662
575
567
January....
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
81
84
85
85
88
89
12
12
15
13
13
13
Julj
AUtf
84
84
81
79
78
80
12
12
September..
October.
November ..
December...
September..
November ..
December...
12
10
10
10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
i
I
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1 Yrs.
iover.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.
7 00 t.o     7
9
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 to    7
8.00 to     8
)9  .
99
1
19
1
2
1
2
4
9
5
1
35
35
7
16
17
41
14
43
16
11
33
17
15
24
129
119
103
54
24
34
1
99
1
t
6
2
3
6
1
8
4
3
4
3
1
3
1
4
9
1
4
2
4
2
1
1
1
1
9.00 to     9.99
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99
16.00 to   16.99
17.00 to   17.99.
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99 .
28 00 to   28.99
2
12.00 to  12.99...
2
2
2
2
1
1
16 00 to  16.99.  .
20.00 to   20.99.
1
26.00 to   25.99.   .
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29
30.00 to   34
99..
30.00 to   34.99  ..
99
6
2
2
35.00 to   39.99...
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
40.00 to   44.99...
46.00 to   49.99...
45.00 to   49
99..
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
357
288
25
1
Canada and Newfoundland
50
38
1
10
Great Britain and I
United States of An
3
Australasia
1
3
1
25
90
1
1
2
Itn.lv	
Italv  	
1
Germany and Austr
Germany and Austri
Russia and Poland
Other European cot
Russia and Poland
45
AU other countries
Nationality not stat
All other countries
«d 	
tf
d	 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 35
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 137 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $529,042.25
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,314,893.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,863,048.59
Total $3,706,983.84
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March.  .
April	
May	
June
1,159
1,146
1,110
1,139
1,109
1,081
130
125
133
125
126
122
Month.        Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September.
October....
November .
December..
1,081
1,076
1,087
1,092
1,09b
1,124
121
120
127
123
120
137
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
9
7
14
12
17
13
6
10
4
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
2
2
5
4
8
3
8
8
17
25
13
5
9
3
28
2
7
1
2
1
1
i
l
1
$6.00 to  $8.99.  .
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00to    8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20 00 to   20.99.
3
1
4
5
17
15
8
4
6
17
12
5
11
12
32
8
12
11
11
41
6
11
11
6
45
57
312
212
95
12
4
5
1
3
5
3
2
2
3
6
1
1
3
21.00 to   21.99...
3
3
27.00 to   27.99...
28 00 to   28.99 ..
1
1
2
30.00 to   34.99...
35 00 to   39.99.
2
2
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan    	
J apan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
764
398
33
3
1
1
2
1
13
6
2
16
32
123
37
7
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $327,127.CO
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      409,524.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,767,459.12
Total  $3,504,110.12
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January..
February
March...
April
May	
June
2.476
2,497
2,314
2,264
2,286
1,893
75
74
76
78
72
74
Month.
Males.
July ,
3,699
1,600
September..
1,683
October	
1,855
November..
1,991
December...
2,037
73
70
74
79
75
74
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
3
194
37
119
65
161
13
541
140
26
395
54
104
30
53
56
196
159
30
17
49
Under
21 Yrs.
5
11
Females.
18 Yrs.
&, over.
1
10
3
41
4
4
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,009
930
78
10
3
12
87
30
35
61
22
12
46
47
11 G 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 33 Firms.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 2 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.,
Wage-earners (including piece-workers
ments, 1932.
rs              .     $12
6,092.00
0,392.95
7,484.32
3,969.27
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
        10
)        46
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total	
599,282.60
2,5S7,769.86
 $3,341,108.46
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
Females.
Month.
Males.
females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
females.
January	
457
609
463
634
462
461
July.	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
405
407
424
422
322
353
January....
February...
March....
April	
May	
June	
2.61E
2,62':
2,641
2,404
2,25c
2,16t
2
2
2
2
2
2
July 	
August.   . . .
September..
October.
November ..
December...
2,053
2,057
2,073
2,126
2,181
2,218
2
•7
2
April	
2
2
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
FEMALES.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Appren-
tices.
Employment pi
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
49
12
10
7
29
20
23
13
36
'   26
33
77
93
89
146
169
178
192
223
227
201
138
128
145
78
188
49
3
1
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
3
1
2
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
$6.00 to   $6.
7.00 to     7.
8.00 to     8.
9.00 to     9.
)9...
)9...
)9...
3
1
)9...
2
1
2
1
2
3
7
5
6
6
2
2
1
1
4
10.00 to   10.99...
11  00 to   11.99...
1
1
12 OO to   12
1
13.00 to   13.
14.00 to   14.
15.00 to   15.
)9...
4
2
)9...
67
15
26
11
20
12
170
13
27
31
23
50
32
21
114
77
16
3
4
16.00 to   16.99...
1
9
2
17.00 to   17.99...
1
1
1
1
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
9
20.00 to   20.99...
10
8
2
1
2
21.00to   21.99...
21
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
1
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over. ..
50.00 and o
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
402
323
28
1
Canada and Newfoundland
658
1,220
58
2
8
6
469
62
113
102
43
Great Britain and I
United States of An
lerica	
Australasia
4
7
1
2
19
2
Italv	
Italv	
Germany and Austr
Central European a
Germany and Aus
nd Balkan States.
Norwav. Sweden. Denmark. Finland.
Russia and Poland
Other European coi
Russia and Polanc
47
16
All other countries
National] tv not stat
All other countrie
ed	
ited  .. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 37
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 102 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $691,226.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,767,258.50
f-earners (including piece-workers)     6,285,228.95
Total $ 8,743,713.45
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
3,513
3,417
3,436
3,490
3,520
3,490
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
1,535
1,517
1,508
1,499
1,524
1,641
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
3,450
3,552
3,454
3,417
3,253
3,205
1,519
1,536
1,484
1,460
1,446
1,461
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
2
5
3b
69
73
53
66
43
124
47
158
227
104
276
61
167
141
100
136
1,460
373
151
44
50
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
3
3
19
27
246
157
130
74
501
126
95
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
11
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgi lira -.	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland    	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated-.	
Males.       Females.
,788
355
146
20
2
40
35
97
13
6
18
3
97
1,257
450
74
2
15
"5'
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 88 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $229,880.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        80,508.10
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      820,723.31
Total  $1,131,111.41
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.    Females.        Month.       Males. Females,
January .
February
March. ..
April
May	
J une ...,
1,061
1,161
1,123
34
39
34
34
64
77
July	
August	
September..
October	
November...
December ..
1,021
970
987
979
898
S28
28
23
24
17
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
d over
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
6
19
12
24
77
77
83
69
111
60
47
96
38
63
45
12
51
33
28
3B
28
9
61
29
13
5
Under
21 Yrs.
18
21
25
18
16
21
20
27
16
25
4
2
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.   18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
1
11
4
3
3
11
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
FYance 	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria :	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
Chi na	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
761
333
28
2
1
6
18
19
18
83
30
10
23
1
.67
11
2 G 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 3,529 Finns.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1932.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $9,209,898.25
Clerks,  Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc  10,840,234.95
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)  52,496,241.37
    $72,000,374.57
Returns received too late to be Included in above Summary      $448,280.14
Estimated   pay-roll   of   employers   in   occupations   covered   by   Department's
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received       1,000,000.00
Transcontinental   Railways    - -     9,802,413.29
Dominion and Provincial Government workers     5,000,000.00
Wholesale and Retail Firms     2,500,000.00
Delivery,    Cartage    and    Teaming,    Warehousing,    Butchers,    Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation     3,000,000.00
Ocean Services and Express Companies     7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous        1,100,000.00
 30,350,699.43
Total $102,957,074.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January	
February	
March  ..   	
April	
May	
June.   	
July	
August	
September	
October    	
November	
December	
Males,
46,589
4,531
45 810
4,549
47,087
4,615
48,800
4,616
49,767
4,801
49,547
5,510
48,008
6,382
48,373
6,586
47,942
5,789
46,946
6,140
43,218
5,071
42,043
4,392
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America.  	
Australasia	
Belgium...  	
France	
Italy.	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
28,196
21,148
1,488
140
145
222
1,735
921
1,617
5,240
886
241
3,270
421
2,597
97
1,152
Females.
Females.
5,808
2,060
187
3
14
20
79
100
60
157
89
14
15
291
8
133
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren-
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
107
147
217
74
38
$6.00 to   $6.99..
167
151
599
38
59
7.00 to     7.99..
420
164
202
25
43
8.00 to     8.99..
367
163
209
43
61
9.00 to     9.99..
683
199
201
68
51
10.00 to   10.99..
914
240
269
85
93
ll.OOto   11.99..
810
155
205
27
43
12.00 to   12.99..
2,145
212
691.
57
59
13.00 to   13.99..
1,809
150
1,141
64
39
14.00 to   14.99..
2,204
140
884
26
36
15.00 to   15.99..
3,159
152
897
12
29
16.00 to   16.99..
2,764
102
491
3
22
17.00 to   17.99..
2,318
76
318
9
18.00 to   18.99..
2,574
73
282
3
12
19.00 to   19.99..
2,660
59
632
16
20.00 to   20.99..
3,430
33
249
23
21.00 to   21.99..
3,245
90
152
26
22.00 to   22.99..
3,599
40
61
7
23.00 to   23.99..
2,389
22
43
5
24.00 to   24.99..
4,486
29
34
2
25.00 to   25.99..
2,595
4
49
9
26.00 to   26.99..
1,823
1
5
2
27.00 to   27.99..
1,885
7
10
10
28.00 to   28.99..
2,491
7
9
12
29.00 to   29.99..
1,346
1
3
1
30.00 to   34.99 .
6,632
2
16
14
35.00 to   39.99..
3,255
1
6
3
40.00 to   44.99..
1,888
807
842
1
45.00 to   49.99..
	
	
	
	
Totals	
63,804
2,420
7,876
517
722 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 39
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Administered by the Board of Adjustment, consisting of Adam Bell, Chairman; Robert
Morrison and Norman de W. Lyons, members.
Due to conditions prevailing, very little difficulty arose in the enforcement of this important
legislation; the majority of industrial undertakings coming within its scope have been on short
time during the year.
The Board desires to call to the attention of all employers that the present would be an
opportune time to so arrange their plants that when normal conditions return it will not be
necessary to request overtime permits from the Board.
Previously the reduction of hours worked per week had for its aim the protection of the
worker against fatigue; to-day, because of world-wide business conditions, we are compelled to
take more definite action in the matter of hours of employment.
The tendency of all employers should be toward a shortening of the hours of labour in order
that as many workers as possible will be put back to work when conditions improve.
Recent developments would indicate that all employees will never again be absorbed in
industry unless a further reduction in working-hours is put into effect, and the Board of
Adjustment is considering the cancellation of some of the permanent exemptions granted when
the "Hours of Work Act" became effective, January 1st, 1925; it being felt, the Act having
been in force for eight years, that in the majority of cases the regulations could now be cancelled without seriously interfering with the industrial undertakings affected.
The question of further reducing the working-hours is a serious one for all employees. Presuming that all will be allowed to work at their occupations only thirty hours per week, at the
rate of, say, 75 cents per hour, this would mean a weekly wage of $22.50; if previously they
worked forty-four hours per week at the same rate per hour, their weekly pay would be $33;
the shorter week would mean a wage reduction of $10.50 per week. It will therefore be seen
that the purchasing-power of the individual worker is reduced by $10.50 per week.
It may be argued that by employing additional men the spending-power will be the same,
but study of the proposal does not bear out this contention, unless, of course, commodities now
considered necessary to the well-being of every family are correspondingly reduced, and so far
there has been no evidence that this will take place.
To bring back prosperity, wages should increase in proportion as the number of working-
hours are reduced.
Manufacturers by the installation of machines have been able to discharge many employees
and at the same time increase production. AVhere, by this means, profits have been increased, a
fair proportion of these profits should have been passed on to those retained on the pay-rolls.
Further adjustment of hours of labour must be made, but this should be effected without
decreasing the purchasing-power of the wage-earners.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS.
The average weekly hours worked as calculated from the returns made by the 3,529 firms
reporting was 47.69, compared with 47.37 in 1931, 48.62 in 1930, and 48.25 in 1929. A perusal of
the following table will show that in the industries coming within the scope of the " Hours of
Work Act" the average decreased, and in those not governed by this legislation the increase in
the average exceeded the recorded decreases.
80.36 per cent, of all employees reported were working forty-eight hours or less per week;
7.70 per cent, were working between eight but not more than nine hours per day; and 11.92 per
cent, were working in excess of nine hours per day.
In this connection it should be explained that the 11.92 per cent, working in excess of nine
hours per day are those who do not come within the scope of the Act; while the 7.70 per cent,
include operations allowed certain exemptions by the regulations. G 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following table shows the trend of average weekly hours in all industries covered in
this report for the past five years :—
Average Weekly Houbs of Work, by Industries.
Industry.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
Breweries	
Builders' materials, etc	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives, chemicals, etc	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
Lumber industries—
Logging	
Logging-railways	
Lumber-dealers	
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc	
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified)
48.22
47.55
40.58
48.02
53.05
44.83
45.32
51.75
44.54
45.30
44.75
40.42
40.02
48.40
49.10
40.70
49.29
49.03
47.97
45.42
53.93
47.64
54.16
44.44
45.42
48.24
44.45
53.07
45.69
40.77
46.77
46.96
44.40
48.03
51.05
45.16
46.04
51.01
44.87
45.53
44.24
46.62
46.70
47.31
48.01
47.63
49.14
49.12
47.86
45.87
53.90
46.10
51.01
45.00
45.44
48.35
44.15
52.72
44.61
47.03
47.18
47.09
45.00
48.03
53.94
45.10
45.30
52.23
44.08
45.25
44.07
46.06
46.67
48.44
50.09
47.59
48.68
48.95
47.84
45.88
52.29
47.32
54.61
44.40
45.52
48.32
44.35
52.01
46.25
45.92
46.98
45.64
44.82
46.75
53.09
44.08
44.80
48.84
44.53
44.29
43.06
45.93
46.07
48.46
49.13
47.65
47.33
47.39
47.52
45.85
51.46
48.89
50.47
44.33
45.29
48.11
44.13
52.04
44.85
45.20
46.17
40.64
46.00
46.44
51.11
43.97
49.70
49.25
46.58
41.53
39.10
46.44
46.69
48.28
49.34
45.80
48.55
48.4S
47.12
45.70
50.34
46.51
47.03
44.07
44.61
44.79
42.81
53.24
45.43
44.72
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
British Columbia is the only Province in Canada that has a minimum wage for adult males
on its statute-books.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act," like the " Women's Minimum Wage Act" and " Hours of
Work Act," is administered by a Board appointed under the provisions of the Act.
The first " Male Minimum Wage Act" in British Columbia was passed in 1925. Under that
Act the Board of that time made Orders in two cases fixing minimum wages for male employees
in the Lumber Industry and in the Catering Industry. The minimum wage in the Lumber
Industry was the cause of protracted litigation in the Courts and was subsequently annulled on
the judgment of the Supreme Court of Canada.
A new " Minimum Wage Act" was passed in 1929, under which one Order is in force at the
present time governing Stationary Steam Engineers.
Industrial conditions during recent times have not been propitious and the Board has not
been pressed by applications from employees covered by the Act to establish wages in other
occupations.
The Act, however, gives power to the Board to proceed of its own volition without having
received application or complaint, and after due inquiry fix minimum wages.
The closest attention is being paid by the Board to developments in the United States under
the " National Industrial Reorganization Act," which marks a radical departure from the
former attitude with regard to minimum wages in that country.
The Male Minimum Wage Board in British Columbia consists of Adam Bell, Deputy
Minister of Labour, Chairman; George H. Cowan, K.C, Vancouver, member; Norman de W.
Lyons, Victoria, member. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 41
LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
During the year 1932 the Province has been fortunate in so far as labour disputes are
concerned. The number of disputes, although the same as last year—namely, eleven—while
affecting more workers, were of shorter duration, resulting in 41,570 fewer working-days being
lost; the number of men affected being 4,136, as compared with 2,322 in 1931, and the working-
days lost 37,740, as compared with 79,310 in 1931.
Eight of the disputes which occurred during the year can be traced to a certain group
who seem determined to create trouble between employer and employee wherever possible. It
would be well for workers to weigh carefully the arguments of these supposed friends before
deciding to strike under present conditions.
The work in this branch of the Department's activities is constantly increasing; some
criticism can be heard that the Department is not active enough in its efforts to bring about
a settlement of disputes, and in this connection it might be well to state that, regardless of how
anxious the Department is to effect a settlement, unless the parties to the dispute are agreeable,
all attempts to mediate are futile. There are times when the disputing parties can be brought
together without difficulty, and a settlement suitable to both speedily consummated ; while in other
cases it may require weeks of patient effort on the part of the Department before the parties
can be brought together.
It is a recognized fact that the majority of strikes which have occurred during the last two
or three years have not been between employers and employees who belong to any of the old
and established trade unions, but have been brought about by an organization which has sprung
into active being since the present abnormal conditions began, and which will disappear, for lack
of fertile ground, when trade conditions revive. But in the meantime it is essential for every
employer and employee to endeavour to understand each other's difficulties and come together in
that spirit of fair play which alone will bring a revival of business conditions.
Employers are beginning to realize that the established and recognized trade unions have
been the main bulwark of safety during the last few years. There can he no doubt that had
the organization which has caused many of the strikes since 1929 been able to gain control of
our National and International Unions, we would have witnessed an industrial upheaval which
would have shaken the foundations of established Government.
Greater co-operation between Associations of Employers and Union officials is the only
avenue by which the sinister influence now at work can be held in check and finally eliminated.
The loss of purchasing-power, temporary lowering of living standards, and the spirit of
antagonism resulting from every strike is something which in this age of education should be
avoided;  there need be no dispute which cannot be settled, if both parties are willing to mediate.
Unfortunately, employers too often think in terms of profit, while with the employees it is
usually a question of being able to meet their bills or go into debt.
The Department has been successful in its efforts at conciliation in the past, and again offers
its services in the earnest hope that the spirit of fair dealing will continue to smooth the road
toward economic readjustment.
BRICKLAYERS AND CARPENTERS, VANCOUVER.
Bricklayers and carpenters working on one building ceased work on January 18th, 1932, as
a result of notice of a reduction in wages, effective in three days. Two Unions were involved.
The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and the Amalgamated Carpenters of Canada,
both claiming they had agreements with the Contractors' Association, to which the contractor
involved belonged; which provided that notice of a change in conditions should be given prior
to April 1st in any year.
The Contractors' Association contended that these agreements had been broken in the spring
of 1931, as the Unions had allowed their members to work for other contractors at less than
Union rates, and had given notice of a reduction in wages.
'   This led to the strike of July 2nd, work being resumed when the contractors agreed to pay
the agreement rate of $1 per hour pending further negotiations.
The Contractors' Association then gave notice of a reduction to 84 cents per hour, but the
Unions refused to accept these notices as being effective prior to April 1st, 1932, under the terms
of the agreements. The Bricklayers' Union claimed a verbal agreement with the contractors which provided for
$1.35 per hour from June 1st, 1929, subject to ninety days' notice; the Contractors' Association
held that this agreement had expired.
Negotiations between the parties were brought about by representatives of the Provincial
and Dominion Departments of Labour.
Several conferences were arranged and early in February work was resumed; the rate for
carpenters remained at $1 per hour until March 31st, while the bricklayers' rate was reduced
from $1.35 per hour to $1.22%.
PIN-BOYS  (BOWLING-ALLEY), VANCOUVER.
Employees in one establishment ceased work on March 2nd, 1932, against a reduction in
wages from 3 cents per string to 2 cents, also abolition of the " boss " system and recognition of
a committee of the Amusement Workers' Union of Canada and said to be affiliated with the
Workers' Unity League. The strikers were replaced, but the establishment was closely picketed
and police were called upon to deal with disturbances in connection with the picketing. The
employer was successful in this dispute.
SALMON-FISHERMEN, RIVERS INLET, ETC.
A dispute involving some 1,400 salmon-fishermen commenced on July 10th, when members
of the Fishermen's Protective Association demanded a rate of 40 cents per fish for sockeye,
the canners having offered a price of 27% cents per fish,
As a result of negotiations between the Canners' Association and the Fishermen's Union
the men returned to work at a rate of 30 cents per fish.
SHINGLE-WEAVERS, VANCOUVER.
Members of the Lumber Workers' Industrial Union of Canada ceased work July 6th, following a reduction in wages from 10 to 15 per cent. Negotiations between the parties concerned
resulted in the men returning to work July 11th, the employer having agreed to withdraw the
wage cut.
SHINGLE-WEAVERS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On July 12th the employees of one firm became involved in a dispute, making a demand for
an increase in wages and a signed agreement. At the request of the Mayor of the city the
Deputy Minister of Labour and the AVestern Representative of the Dominion Department of
Labour met the parties interested. A complete resumption of work was delayed for a clay by a
dispute as to the employment of a certain number of Chinese workers to replace strikers who
had secured work elsewhere. The strikers also demanded a signed agreement with a Union said
to be connected with the Lumber and Agricultural AA'orkers' Industrial Union, but this was not
conceded.
SHINGLE-AA'EAVERS, EBURNE.
Shingle-sawyers and packers forming the night shift in one establishment ceased work
September 7th because of a misunderstanding of new grading rates. The men returned to work
September 12th on the understanding that the grading rates as explained by the night foreman
prior to the walk-out would be in force.
SAWMILL-AVORKERS, SOUTH AVESTMINSTER.
The workers in one plant went on strike when the management refused a 10-per-cent.
increase above the rates of 24 cents and 31 cents an hour, with higher rates for the skilled
classes.
The employer claimed he was paying higher wages than any sawmill in British Columbia
and was operating at a loss.
It was also stated that only thirty-five employees were in favour of the strike, the others
being deterred from working.
On September 27th, at the request of a large number of employees, the management
reopened the mill, operating one shift only, at the same time stating that all former employees
would be reinstated if application was made within forty-eight hours. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 43
A strong picket had been maintained by sympathizers from cities near by, and on the
reopening of the mill an attempt was made by the picketers to keep the workers from entering;
anticipating trouble, police were secured and the pickets were dispersed, one arrest being made.
On September 29th the mill was again in full operation, the strikers having returned to
work at the same rates of wages as prior to the dispute.
SHINGLE-SAAVYERS AND PACKERS, RUSKIN.
A dispute Involving shingle-sawyers and packers occurred in one shingle-mill at Ruskin.
Forty employees ceased work, demanding an increase in the rates paid for day-men and
packers.
Negotiations between the parties resulted in the employer granting an increase of 5 cents
per hour for day-men and 1 cent per thousand for packers. Work was resumed under these
conditions.
SAWMILL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
One sawmill in New Westminster, operating on a co-operative basis since April, 1932, became
involved in a dispute on November 12th; some 200 employees ceased work as a protest against
low earnings resulting from this system.
The arrangement was that the workers would receive 50 per cent, of the normal wage scale
and a share of any surplus from mill operations.
For the month of October no surplus was available for distribution. The sawmill was
picketed, but no disturbance occurred.
Negotiations between the parties concerned resulted in the reopening of the mill on
November 15th under the same conditions as prior to the dispute.
COAL-MINES, PRINCETON.
The Princeton unit of the Mine AVorkers' Union of Canada presented certain demands to
the management of three mines in the Princeton area; the demands being for a 10-per-cent.
increase in wages, a restoration of rates as at March 31st, and certain changes in working
conditions.
On November 27th the employees of the mines ceased work. The management of one
colliery, after conferences with a committee representing the Union, reached an agreement
whereby the miners' demands were substantially granted and work was resumed in that mine
on December 12th. On December 15th the Deputy Minister of Labour and the AArestern Representative of the Dominion Department of Labour visited the district with the view of effecting
a settlement.
The officials of the colliery, while assuring the Government officials of their willingness to
grant certain concessions if a meeting could be arranged between themselves and the employees
of their mine, refused to recognize the Mine AVorkers' Union of Canada or deal with their
representatives.
The miners, on the other hand, insisted on dealing through a committee of the Union.
Many attempts were made to bring the two parties together, but without success, and the
Government representatives left the district when the colliery operators stated that it was not
their intention to make any further efforts to reopen the mines.
One of the Union leaders, arrested on a charge of being a member of an unlawful association, was released until the date of the trial on $10,000 bail.
The mine being still closed at the end of December and no further attempts at a settlement
being made, the dispute is therefore recorded as lapsed.
COAL-MINES, PRINCETON.
On December 12th, 1932, 145 eoal-miners, members of the Mine AArorkers' Union of Canada,
employed in one colliery, ceased work in sympathy with four men who had been laid off for
absenting themselves from work on December 24th in protest against the decision of the management that no holiday would be granted that day. This mine had been involved in a strike
earlier in the month. Negotiations between the president of the company and the representatives of the employees resulted in the reinstatement of the discharged men, and work was
resumed Monday, January 2nd, 1933. G 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, 1932.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Total Time
lost in
Working-
days.
(1.) Bricklayers and carpenters
(2.)  Pin-boys   (bowling-alley)
(3.)   Salmon-fishermen,   Rivers
Inlet and Port Essington
(4.)   Shingle-weavers,   Vancouver
(5.)   Shingle-weavers,   New
Westminster
(6.)   Shingle-weavers and packers, Eburne
(7.)   Sawmill-workers,  South
Westminster
(8.)   Shingle-weavers, Ruskin....
(9.)   Sawmill,   New   Westminster
(10.)   Coal-miners, Princeton	
(11.)  Coal-miners, Princeton..
Commenced January 18th, 1932, against reduction
in wages; terminated February 3rd, 1932.
Partially successful 	
Commenced March 7th, 1932, against reduction
in wages; employees replaced. Terminated
March 24th in favour of employer	
Commenced July 10th, 1932, for increase in rate
for fish over that offered by the canners; terminated July 17th.    Compromise	
Commenced July 0th, 1932, against reduction in
wages ; terminated July 10th. Employees successful 	
Commenced July 12th, 1932, for an increase in
wages and a signed agreement; terminated
August 5th.     Compromise 	
Commenced September 7th, 1932, against new
rates; terminated September 12th in favour
of employer 	
Commenced September 13th, 1932, for increase in
wages; terminated September 29th in favour
of employer	
Commenced October 18th, 1932, against reduction
in wages ; terminated October 20th. Compromise 	
Commenced November 12th, 1932, against cooperative arrangement; terminated November
15th in favour of employer ,
Commenced November 27th, 1932, increase of 10
per cent, in wages and certain changes in
working conditions and recognition of Union.
Lapsed 	
Commenced December 26th, 1932; terminated
January 2nd, 1933 ; dismissal of four miners.
Settled by negotiation	
Totals	
100
3,200
50
40
37
100
40
200
200
145
4,130
1,400
480
29,500
200
S40
90
1,000
60
500
2,800
870
37,740 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 45
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer
and Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets 1
A'ancouver   (Women's Branch),  cor.  Homer and Duns- I     Jas. Mitchell,   Superintendent.
muir Streets 	
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets ")„„.„,„
,..  ,    .    /TTr ,   ^        ...       , . -r,        , ^      r,^      ,    > H. Crisford, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women s Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets f
New Westminster M. Standbridge, Superintendent.
Nanaimo J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops J. H. How, Superintendent.
Penticton A. Gilley, Superintendent.
Nelson J. M. Dronsfield, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert... J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
(" G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets   J R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
I H. Parry, Clerk.
ATictoria, Langley and Broughton Streets W. A. Turner, Clerk,
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the fourteenth annual report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1932.
There are ten offices in operation in the Province, as follows: Vancouver (2), A'ictoria (2),
New AArestminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Nelson, Kamloops, and Penticton. Separate offices
are provided in Vancouver and Alctoria for the employment of women, and separate sections for
dealing with the employment problems of men handicapped through service overseas or in
industrial occupations. Owing to changing industrial conditions and the need of retrenchment,
the Revelstoke office was closed on March 31st and the offices in Cranbrook and Prince George
on August 31st. The temporary offices usually operated in A7ernon and Kelowna were not
opened during the period under review. On March 31st Mr. W. S. Dickson, who had been in
charge of the Vancouver office since the organization of the Employment Service, was superannuated, his place being filled by Mr. J. Mitchell, Assistant Superintendent of the A'ancouver
offices.
The calendar year ended December 31st, 1932, was the fourteenth in which the British
Columbia Government has carried on public employment work in co-operation with the Federal
Department of Labour and with all of the other Provinces in the Dominion except Prince Edward
Island. The primary function of the Employment Service is to bring together, with a minimum
of delay and without direct cost to employer or worker, men or women seeking employment and
the employer seeking workers. The functions, as defined in the " Employment Offices Co-ordination Act" (chapter 57, R.S.C. 1927) are as follows:—
(a.)  To aid and encourage the organization and co-ordination of employment offices and
to promote uniformity of methods among them:
(I).)  To  establish  one  or  more  clearing-houses  for   the  interchange  of  information
between employment offices concerning the transfer of labour and other matters:
(c.)  To compile and distribute information received from employment offices, and from
other sources, regarding prevailing conditions of employment.
Each Provincial Government maintains a complete autonomy in connection with the administration of the Employment Service, but, in return for statistical information supplied and the
adoption of a standard system, receives from the Dominion Government subventions amounting
to approximately 30 per cent, of the gross expenditure incurred in operating the offices. The
close co-ordination of effort which is attained under this arrangement has caused the employment offices of the different Provinces to be considered as a single organization, which is known
as the Employment Service of Canada. G 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The original arrangement is carried on1 from year to year by the execution of an agreement
between the Dominion Minister of Labour and the Provincial Governments, which provides that
the Provinces, in the operation of the employment offices, shall register all applicants offering
themselves for employment and to undertake to supply suitable workers for all employers
listing vacancies, without charging any fee or commission to employer or worker. The Provincial Governments also agree that the officials of the Employment Service shall not accept any
responsibility with respect to rates of wages or other working conditions offered or asked, but
shall merely communicate the information available on these subjects to the applicant or
employer, as the case may be. It is further agreed that where employment offering is reported
to be affected by an industrial dispute, workers referred to such employment shall be notified of
the existence of the dispute. Another important feature is that the Provinces agree to make a
special endeavour to find suitable employment for handicapped men suffering from the effects of
active service during the war, and the Dominion Government provides employees to co-operate
in this work and bears the entire expense of their employment.
Every office of the Employment Service offers facilities for both men and women who are
seeking work in any occupation and for employers requiring any type of help. Obviously, it is
neither practicable nor advisable to segregate the various functions of the offices in the smaller
centres, but. where the volume of work warrants it, such division of function is made and
separate offices are maintained for men and women, with further divisions by occupations.
To co-ordinate the efforts of the various local offices and to facilitate the transfer of labour
from districts oversupplied to those where a scarcity exists, eight clearing-houses have been
established. Those for Provincial clearance are situated at Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg,
Regina, Edmonton, and Vancouver, and for interprovincial clearance, operated by the Dominion
Department of Labour, at Ottawa and AVinnipeg.
For many years the Employment Service has provided a regular channel of information for
the Department of Immigration relative to the availability of labour in Canada, which is proving
of material assistance to that department in dealing with applications for the admission of
workers from outside of Canada. Since the passage of Order in Council P.O. 1413 in August,
1929, any workers entering Canada under contract of employment must secure special authority
from the Minister of Immigration, and the policy has been to refuse applications where, in the
opinion of the Employment Service officials, competent help was already available in Canada.
The railways, since 1919, have accorded workers shipped through the offices of the Employment Service to points where the fare is in excess of $4 the privilege of a reduced rate of 2.7
cents per mile, and this concession, during the years when additional labour was required in the
Prairie Provinces, was made available on a still more favourable basis to men and women
shipped by the employment offices to engage in this work.
Having stated the official status and legal duties of the Employment Service of Canada, it
should be recorded that during the past two years the industrial conditions have been such as to
necessitate the acceptance of many duties connected with the registration and distribution of
persons in receipt of relief which were not included in the original plan for the operation of the
Service. The registration of unemployed referred to in the last annual report was continued
throughout the year, and the offices co-operated with all branches of Government in dealing with
problems which arose out of existing industrial conditions and numerous changes in policy in
dealing with the situation. As during the previous year, the Department has had the responsibility of the shipment of men to relief camps, the expense of transportation being borne jointly
by the Dominion and Provincial Governments. In addition, it has co-operated with the Department of National Defence in supplying men for the clearing and grading of a number of emergency landing-fields, which are considered necessary before a transcontinental aeroplane service
can be operated safely.
At the end of the period under review, employment was at a low ebb, without any immediate
improvement in prospect.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED DURING THE YEAR.
On another page the work of the offices is shown in detail by tables, the figures showing the
applications, vacancies, and placements, by offices and by months. It is difficult, if not impossible, to analyse these figures on any basis of comparison with any other year in the history of
the Employment Service, with the possible exception of 1931.   The number of applicants shown REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 47
does not portray the real situation, and this is due to the fact that men sent to relief camps are
not shown on the office records as unemployed as long as they remain there. In the report of
placements the figures for Victoria and Nanaimo show a much larger number of placements
than during normal years, but this is due to the degree of co-operation existing between the
municipal officials and the employment offices, with the result that city relief employment on a
rotation basis is handled through the offices. Although this system has reduced the value of the
figures for comparative purposes, the work of the offices in question has been greatly increased,
owing to the willingness of the unemployed workers and the municipal officials to leave the
assignment of the men to the employment offices. There was no seasonal demand in the vegetable, fruit, or fishing industries, due to the surplus of labour in the districts in which this work is
carried on, and the opportunities for employment were further reduced by a heavy decrease in
the acreage normally used for the production of hops. Employment opportunities for handicapped men were greatly reduced owing to the fact that there was little or no building in
progress and manufacturing was greatly reduced. In addition, the handicapped men were confronted with the competition of a large surplus of men who are physically fit.
Conditions in the Prairie Provinces again prevented us from taking advantage of the opportunity of placing from 5,000 to 10.000 workers in the harvest-fields, work which has, in the
previous years, been of a great deal of assistance to newly placed settlers on the lands in this
Province; the returns from this work enabling them to remain on their farms during the winter
months and to engage in land-clearing instead of gathering in the cities and towns, increasing
the competition for the comparatively small number of jobs available during the winter months.
The brightest spot in the industrial life of the Province during the year has been a marked
activity in the field of metalliferous mining, which has absorbed a large number of men in
operating mines and also furnishing employment for some of the older, more experienced miners
in development-work on new properties. Placer-work has also been greatly stimulated, and this
has offered opportunities for employment for large numbers of venturesome spirits who are
willing to try anything once.
OTHER BRANCHES OF ACTIVITY.
Reference was made in a previous report to the active manner in which the immigration
laws of the United States are being enforced. The last census in that country disclosed the
presence of a large number of Canadians and citizens of other countries who had entered the
United States illegally, and there has been a steady stream of deportees coming into British
Columbia from the United States during the year. In Canada a person who has acquired a
domicile by a period of unbroken residence of five years cannot be deported unless it can be
shown that he entered Canada by false pretences, or has been convicted under the " Narcotic
Drug Act," or for advocating the overthrow of the Government by force. In the United States,
however, an immigrant never acquires a domicile, and unless he becomes a citizen of that
country is liable to deportation, regardless of the legality of his admission and the period of his
residence, if he is convicted of any offence or becomes a charge on the community. The rigorous
enforcement of these laws has further increased the number of deportees arriving in this Province, and practically all of them immediately become public charges here, as it is that condition
that brought about their deportation. As a set-off, however, the provisions of P.C. 1413, which
prohibits the admission of contract labour, except by special permission of the Minister of
Immigration, has been more strictly enforced, with the result that fewer persons are being
admitted to this country from the United States and other countries than ever before.
The employment offices have always acted as general information bureaus for employers,
workers, public and semi-public bodies, and persons in other parts of Canada and other countries
who desire information regarding industrial conditions in British Columbia before moving here.
The existing immigration regulations have, of course, greatly reduced the number of prospective
immigrants from other countries, but the Employment Service offices are now regarded by all
classes in the community as a reliable source of information on employment opportunities or
related subjects.
During the period of stress through which the country is passing, the Employment Service
officials have endeavoured to make the department of service to other branches of Government,
being careful at the same time not to lose sight of its real functions or to destroy its usefulness
by becoming known as a relief agency.   The success of the Department has resulted from the G 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
adoption and adherence to a policy approved by all Governments since its inception of equal
opportunity to all regardless of race, creed, colour, or political affiliations. Acting, as it does,
as a connecting-link between employers and workmen, it often becomes a shock-absorber in
disputes between these two contending forces, and, although not always able to please every one,
the officials have acquired a reputation for fair dealing, which enables them to handle difficult
problems during present conditions with a degree of success which would otherwise have been
impossible. The Employment Service in Canada has endeavoured to set a high standard, and
it is no small tribute that the United States is now adopting a system of public employment
offices patterned after the system worked out in this country.    .
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBL1 OFFICES, 1932.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
1,825
2,715
10,640
3,054
3,703
4,009
631
9.109
225
01,046
21,543
300
15,058
3,812
333
802
7,774
2,847
784
1,652
214
401
91
6,059
3,420
169
11,833
1,225
333
791
7,773
2,837
773
1,625
213
460
93
5,984
3,434
169
11,832
1,225
4
2
1
100
20
Prince George	
Prince Rupert -	
Vancouver (Women)..-	
Totals
137,730
37,670
37,542
127
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1932.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
January	
February 	
March	
April 	
May	
June	
July '.	
August	
September.	
October	
November	
December	
Totals
14
11
10
13
10.
•11,
9
9
11:
9
11
14
90
,123
026
933
302
533
700
149
900
,907
,055
386
137,730
2,713
2,882
2,693
4,440
3,465
3,374
2,935
2,336
3,282
2,651
2,880
4,019
2,710
2,847
2,70S
4,434
3,469
3,362
2,933
2,316
3,278
2,642
2,830
4,007
37,670
37,542
4
7
11
31
2G
0
10
13
0
3
T27~ REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 49
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 13th, 1933.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting herewith the annual report of the Factory Inspection
Branch for the year 1932.
At no time is factory inspection more difficult than during an industrial depression of the
present magnitude. Employment is intermittent and uncertain and manufacturing at a low ebb.
Under such conditions, greater diplomacy and good judgment are necessary in order to maintain
conditions that will meet full requirements for the safety and health of employees.
During the year, 1,109 inspections of factories were made. These included visits to all
classes of industry mentioned in Schedule A of the " Factories Act," and corrective measures,
where necessary, were ordered to be taken relating to the safeguarding of machinery, overcrowding of work-rooms, the installation of sanitary conveniences, heating and ventilation of
work-rooms, and the removal by mechanical means of dust and deleterious gases.
Our visits of inspection in the various parts of the Province revealed that industrial activity
is still far below normal and that the revival in business which was hoped for has not generally
materialized. With few exceptions, short-time work and a reduced staff were evidence that the
managements of industries were still patiently waiting for a return of better times, which have
so often been claimed to be in sight but up to the present have not arrived. Conclusive proof of
the confidence of the executives guiding some of our industries that the return of better times
will not be much longer delayed is exemplified by the fact that extensions to plants and the
purchase of additional machinery were made during the year.
We have had under observation several industries which for some considerable time have
been doing experimental work towards the development of a product entirely new to the Province, and which, we are pleased to be able to state, have been brought to a successful productive
stage during 1932.
It is remarkable, at times, the difference in the attitude of some of the owners and managers
of plants in greeting the Inspector while on his official visit. We have the type of executive who
welcomes our visit and appears grateful for any suggestions whereby the safety and welfare of
employees is made more secure. More and more the stress of the times seems to have under
development a type of employer who, if he were not restrained, would trade on society's economic
distress by observing only the law of necessity, his interpretation of which, we are inclined to
believe, would mean excessive hours of labour and unhealthy working conditions for his
employees.
It has always been important for the Department to enforce the statutory hours of labour
permitted to be worked by women and young girls. It is more important to-day, when there
are so many unemployed, that there should be no illegitimate overtime.
In order to prevent unfair competition between the employers who wish to obey the laws
governing hours of labour and the installation of necessary safety devices to protect the life and
limb of workers, and those who are set on evading the law, we have found it necessary to make
frequent inspections, both night and day, of certain factories in which, as past experience has
proved, sweat-shop conditions would be attempted if our efforts were relaxed.
SAFEGUARDING MACHINERY.
The mechanical safeguards installed on machinery in the factories of British Columbia will,
I feel sure, stand favourable comparison with those of any Province in the Dominion.
The part which protective devices and safety equipment has played and will continue to
play in the protection of life and limb against injury constitutes a notable achievement, and has
been a large factor in the results which have been obtained in industrial accident-prevention.
As stated in previous reports on this subject, power-driven machinery, as designed and
manufactured to-day, has the moving parts, such as gears, sprockets, etc., equipped with guards
before the machine leaves the manufacturer's shop. AA^hether the equipment on these machines
is going to perform its part in accident-prevention depends largely upon the attitude of the fore-
4 G 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
men and operators of the machines. All the safety precautions taken by the manufacturer may
be rendered valueless by removal of the guards or otherwise making them inoperative. Any
foreman or superintendent who knowingly allows the employees under his charge to subject
themselves to unnecessary hazards by the above means is assuming a grave responsibility and,
to our minds at least, is occupying a position the importance of which he does not fully realize.
We will cite one instance of several where our investigation disclosed that the removal of
guards was responsible for injuries being received by workmen which will seriously interfere
with their earning capacity for life. In this particular case the workman was operating a
rip-saw equipped with a hood, so designed and installed that it would limit the size of material
to be sawn to the capacity of the saw. The operator, in order to take a cut of a greater depth
than the saw's capacity, removed the guard, with the result that a sweater which he was
wearing at the time came in contact with the unguarded saw, causing him to receive major
injuries.
The earning of a living to-day is difficult enough without the added misfortune of having
one's earning capacity impaired by means of injuries received in industry. Whenever a workman
receives serious injuries it very often alters the course of his own and dependents' lives; he not
only suffers pain, personal expense, and possible permanent crippling or disablement, but he
may lose his position and be compelled to start over again after recovery, upon a lower wage
scale. His children may be obliged to leave school before their education is completed, thereby
depriving them of advantages which they otherwise would have had in preparation for earning
their living.
Owing to industrial inactivity and the consequent reduction in the number of employees at
work in the more hazardous industries, we have had fewer accidents of a severe nature to
investigate during the year under review.
COMPLAINTS.
The nature of some of the complaints received during the year indicates that abnormal
industrial conditions have developed a suspicious state of mind on the part of some employers
engaged in highly competitive business. Upon investigation, a number of complaints charging
excessive hours of work were found to be not in accordance with the facts. AVhen the results
of our investigations were made known to the complainant, the answer was almost invariably
given:   " Oh, I thought they were working overtime."
As in former years, we have received valuable co-operation from employees in bringing to
our attention hazardous working conditions which have developed through a variety of causes.
The fact that the hazards complained of are either removed or minimized as far as possible is
tangible evidence that these matters receive our prompt attention.
SANITATION AND LIGHTING.
The provision of sanitary and adequate toilet facilities in factories is highly important. It
is perhaps needless to say that most employers wish to make proper provision in this respect,
yet there are always some who, perhaps, not being informed of these requirements, through
negligence, or for financial reasons, fail to provide suitable toilet accommodations for their
employees until forced to do so.
In interviews with principals interested in the establishment of a factory or before taking
over new premises, we noted, during the year under review, a more general desire to ascertain
the statutory requirements in this respect, so that proper provision could be made in advance
before building operations commenced or a lease taken on premises.
Satisfactory lighting is important to the comfort of the employees and the cleanliness of the
walls of the work-room is a contributing factor towards the efficiency of the lighting system.
While natural light is greatly to be desired, it is not always possible to take advantage of same
owing to the location of the work-room. Consequently artificial lighting has to be resorted to
during the entire work-day. Under such conditions the system of lighting installed is governed
by the type of machine used, the work to be performed, and the amount of vibration involved.
In garment-manufacturing and those industries in which power-operated sewing-machines are
in use, if the machines are placed on a solid foundation, it is generally possible to provide
individual lighting with adjustable reflectors. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 51
HOURS OF AVORK.
By virtue of our authority we are privileged to visit all classes of industry where three or
more persons are employed, and are thus afforded an opportunity of realizing and appreciating
the efforts being made by the majority of employers to keep their staffs intact by various
methods of spreading the amount of work available among their employees.
Numerous instances could be cited throughout the Province where, in their efforts to contend with abnormal industrial conditions, sacrifices have been made by both employer and
employee to keep the wheels of industry turning, even though it has not at times been profitable
to do so.
Seasonable demands which overtax the plants' capacity for short periods during the year
have, as in the past, prompted requests for permission to work female employees overtime.
Before acceding to these requests we interview the executives of the firms for the purpose of
ascertaining if some system could not be introduced whereby either additional employees could
be added to the staff or a double shift inaugurated. It is only when the impracticability of the
adoption of either of these plans is clearly proven that the requested permission for overtime
work is granted, only seventeen permits being granted during 1932.
In marked contrast to previous years, inspection of Oriental laundries revealed that the
proprietors of these establishments are observing the statutory limitations with respect to the
hours between which a laundry may operate. AVe are of the opinion that previous Police Court
proceedings, coupled with the fact that these laundries are feeling the effect of industrial
inactivity, are in a large measure contributing factors in forcing the owners to observe the law.
Our records show that since subsection (2) of section 4 was incorporated in the "Factories
Act" a total of $6,069 in fines has been imposed by various Magistrates throughout the Province
on proprietors of Oriental laundries who were convicted for violation of that section. During
the year Police Court proceedings were taken against the proprietor of one laundry for operating
after 7 p.m.    He was found guilty by the Magistrate and fined $50 and costs.
CHILD-LABOUR.
This type of labour in British Columbia is almost unknown. The few requests we receive
to permit children to be employed in factories come from the parents or friends of the parents
of children who, because of extenuating circumstances, require the assistance of the children's
earnings. Before permitting a child to be employed in any factory during the school term, an
exemption certificate, as provided in section 159 of the " Public Schools Act," must first he
procured from the local administrator of the compulsory-attendance law. The conditions of
employment are then investigated and if deemed satisfactory a permit is issued.
Because of the laborious nature of the work and the hazards involved, we had, for the sake
of the child's welfare, to prohibit the employment of one child during the year.
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER ELEVATORS.
Vertical transportation as exemplified by the passenger-elevator is without question the
safest means of travel to-day. There are, however, certain hazards in connection with the
operation of elevators to which the public are subjected and which could by mechanical means
be eliminated. As stated so often in previous reports on this subject, statistics prove that the
installation of hoistway-door interlocks would prevent from 85 to 90 per cent, of all accidents
occurring on elevators.
Taking into consideration the large number of persons daily using this means of transportation in office buildings, stores, etc., it is a remarkable achievement on the part of the operators
and those persons in charge of the equipment that we are able to report the non-occurrence of
any fatal or serious accidents to the public during the year.
Considerable time and effort has been spent this year in obtaining complete specifications of
both passenger- and freight-elevator installations throughout the Province. The detailed
information contained in these specifications has proved valuable to the Department and we are
endeavouring to have this survey fully completed before the end of another year.
During the year 315 passenger and 458 freight elevators were inspected and orders issued
for improvements where necessary for safety. In recognition of the necessity for regulations governing the installation and operation of
passenger and freight elevators, a committee with a representative from each Province in the
Dominion, and acting in conjunction with the Canadian Engineering Standards Association at
Ottawa, has been formed to consider the preparation of a uniform Safety Code, applicable to all
the Provinces. We sincerely hope that when the final draft of this code has been completed, its
adoption in the interests of public safety will receive statutory support.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS.
During the year 1932, 548 males and 203 females renewed their licences; 100 males and 41
females wrote examinations and obtained licences as elevator operators. Twenty-three men
and five women applied for and received temporary licences, but for some reason did not appear
for examination at the end of the probationary period.
As in former years, a number of applications were refused because the applicants were either
not of age, aliens, or misrepresented themselves as employees by attempting, in collusion with
some other employee of the building, to procure a licence for the purpose of learning to operate
the car.
CONCLUSION.
AVe desire to extend the thanks of this Department to all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 53
REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Members of the Board.
Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Helen Gregory MacGill 1492 Harwood Street, Vancouver.
Thomas Mathews  (died November 29th, 1932), succeeded by
Herbert Geddes, Importer 322 Water Street, Vancouver.
Officials of the Board.
Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Essie Brown, Inspector 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—AVe have the honour to submit herewith the fifteenth annual report of the Minimum
Wage Board of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1932.
CHANGE IN PERSONNEL OF BOARD.
It is with a feeling of sincere regret that we record the passing of Mr. Thomas Mathews,
whose death occurred in November. Mr. Mathews had been associated with the Board as a
member since 1918. His integrity, kindly understanding, practical business ability, and long
association with minimum-wage matters had proved to be of invaluable assistance in solving the
innumerable problems that came before the Board. His innate sense of fairness, his unbiased
attitude towards employees and employers, together with his ability to consider both sides of a
question before reaching a decision, were characteristics that contributed towards his success as
a Board member.
Those who worked with him will always feel it a privilege to have known such a fine type
of man.    His sudden passing was a real loss to all.
No successor was appointed to fill the vacancy on the Board up to the end of the year,
and the remaining members shouldered the responsibilities for the balance of 1932. However,
before this report went to press, Mr. Herbert Geddes, of Vancouver, was named by Order in
Council to bring the Board up to its full strength, and for the short time he has been connected with it is entering upon his duties with understanding and zeal that augur successful
co-operation with his colleagues in their important work.
MINIMUM-AVAGE PROTECTION.
Minimum-wage legislation in this Province during the past year has called for more tact,
patience, and careful administration than in any other period since its inception. Prevailing
stressful conditions, over which the Board has no control, have tended to place increasingly
heavy duties upon the members and officials.
The aim to maintain fair wage standards for women and girl employees, without undue
strain on employers, is a paramount problem.
AVhile the original nine Orders covering various occupations and industries have remained
in force, with a temporary reduction in wages for experienced employees in the fruit and
vegetable industry marking the only change in basic rates during the calendar year, the Board
has had ample demonstration of the beneficial effect of these regulations to hold wages at a
reasonable level. In keeping with the general tendency during the economic chaos, wages
would undoubtedly have been more drastically reduced by many employers had there been no
protective orders in force.
ARREARS COLLECTED.
Unfortunately some few firms disregarded the law, and paid wages and salaries below the
legal minimum. Through the instrumentality of the Board the sum of $2,840.58 was collected
and distributed to girls who had received less than the amounts to which they rightfully were
entitled.
This tangible evidence of the practical benefit of the " Minimum Wage Act" was brought
about without cost to the employees and without recourse to legal proceedings. The amount
referred to above comprised sums ranging from $1 up to substantial payments of over $125 in G 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
some instances where underpayment had occurred for a considerable time before the firm was
checked. However large or small the amount, it represents the difference between what should
have been paid and what actually had been paid.
AVhen the necessity arises for adjustments, some are made willingly and promptly by
employers, but other adjustments are effected only after many interviews, careful calculations,
and tactful persuasion on the part of the officials.
The 1932 collections fell somewhat below the amount amassed during the previous year,
and the Board would like to interpret this as a sign that there is more willingness on the part
of employers to abide by the Orders. Close vigilance, too, on the part of the Inspector for
breaches of the law has resulted in adjustments being made in many instances before the figures
assumed large proportions, and visits to new firms have made clear what is required to comply
with the regulations.
COURT CASES.
In cases where it becomes apparent that amicable and satisfactory settlement cannot be
made without drastic measures, the Board's only alternative is to take the offending employer
into the Police Court.
The following table graphically portrays the cases dealt with in this manner during the
year:—
Order and Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
(1.) Public Housekeeping—Commodore
Rooms, 889 Seymour Street, Vancouver ;  Prank  Cufari,  proprietor
(2.) Public Housekeeping—Lind's Caffi,
330 Carrall Street, Vancouver;
Mr. Kuhn, proprietor
(3.) Public Housekeeping—Rob Roy
Lunch and Sandwich Shop, 804
Granville Street, Vancouver ; R. E.
Le Roy and R. W. Carlyle, proprietors
(4.) Public Housekeeping—New England Rooms, 050 Seymour Street,
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. William
Graalfs, proprietors
(5.) Public Housekeeping — Dominion
Caf6, 214 Abbott Street, Vancouver ; Chow Yip Poo, proprietor
(6.) Public Housekeeping—Paul's Ice
Cream and Pastry, Ltd., 2822
Granville Street, Vancouver; Nels
Neilson, proprietor
(7.) Mercantile—Small's Bakery, 641
Fort Street, Victoria ; James Small,
proprietor
(8.) Mercantile—Hill's Bakery, 2242
Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver;
Mr. and Mrs. Hill, proprietors
(9.) Manufacturing — Orlin's Confectionery, 220 Broadway West, Vancouver ; Mr. Orlin, proprietor
(10.) Office—Cut-Rate Cleaners, 1103
Commercial Drive, Arancouver;
Sam Zacks, proprietor
(11.) Personal Service—Vancouver Hair-
dressing Parlour, 420 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver; Mrs.
Helen Dallas, proprietor
Paying less than minimum rate to chambermaid
Paying less than minimum rate to waitress
Paying less than minimum rate to waitresses
Paying less than minimum rate to chambermaid
Paying less than minimum rate to waitress
Paying less than minimum rate and working employee excessive
hours
Paying less than minimum rate to salesgirl
Paying less than minimum rate to salesgirl
Paying less than minimum rate to candy-
maker
Paying less than minimum rate to  cashier
Paying less than minimum rate to beauty-
parlour operator
Fined $25 or ten days in prison
and ordered to pay arrears.
Fined $25 or ten days in prison.
Arrears paid before sentence
imposed.
Fined $25 or ten days in prison.
Arrears ordered paid in following sums : $52.33, $22.75,
$26.91.
Employers produced time-book
in Court, although they denied any such record existed
when Inspector made her investigation. This showed
wage paid for hours worked.
Girl's evidence shaken on
cross-examination.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay
$15 arrears to employee.
Settled out of Court by payment of $76 to waitress.
Fined $25.
Employee's evidence shaken on
cross-examination.
Process-server unable to locate defendant, and Sheriff
in possession of plant.
Settled out of Court on payment of arrears amounting
to $109.80.
Settled out of Court on payment of $50 in arrears to
employee. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 55
It will be noted that the majority of cases were for infractions of the Public Housekeeping
Order, six out of the eleven being In this category. Conditions of employment in this class of
work give rise to grounds for dispute between employer and employee. There is seldom a definite understanding regarding the number of meals to be supplied. The length of time permitted
for meals tacitly agreed to at the commencement of employment is not always adhered to while
the positions continue. If girls realized the importance of keeping accurate records of wages
paid and hours worked, it would tend to eliminate much argument when a dispute arises.
Employers are required by law to have these figures, but the workers must in many instances
rely only on their memories when adjustment becomes essential.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE EMERGENCY ORDER.
About the middle of the year the Board was approached by employers and employees alike
in the fruit and vegetable industry for relief measures in connection with the prevailing regulations. After due inquiry, and meetings with delegations from both sides, it was decided to
put into effect an Emergency Order. This was accordingly framed, and under it a 10-per-
centum reduction was legalized in the wages of experienced employees, effective from June 15th,
1932, to November 15th, 1932.    The existing rates for inexperienced workers remained unchanged.
The Order was promulgated in the following terms:—
Order No. 17a (Emergency).
RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Effective June 15th, 1932, to November 15th, 1932. i
AVhereas on the 3rd day of September, 1926, an obligatory Order was issued by the Minimum
Wage Board relating to the fruit and vegetable industry under the provisions of the " Minimum Wage
Act," being chapter 173 of the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1924," by paragraphs 2 and 3
of which Order a minimum wage in respect of the said industry was fixed for experienced female
employees therein:
And whereas the said Order became effective sixty days from the said date thereof, and has since
been continuously in force:
And whereas the Board, in the exercise of the discretion vested in it by the said Act, and without
reconvening or calling any conference, has reopened the question respecting the minimum wage so
fixed by the said Order, and has considered the question:
Now the Board doth order, in amendment of the said Order of the 3rd day of September, 1926,
that for a period of five months from the 15th day of June, 1932, to the 15th day of November, 1932,
the minimum wage fixed by the said Order for experienced female employees in the fruit and vegetable
industry (including the respective rates per hour or per piece fixed in respect thereof) shall be reduced
by the deduction therefrom of ten per centum of the amount thereof; and that except to the extent
and for the period of five months herein provided the said Order of the 3rd day of September, 1926,
shall continue in full force and effect as if this Order had not been made.
Dated the 14th day of June, 1932.
Adam Bell, Chairman,
Helen Gregory MacGill,
Thomas Mathews,
Members of the Minimum Wage Board.
Each employer shall post, and keep posted, a copy of this Order in each room in which employees
affected by the Order are employed.
Convenient summaries of all the Orders of the Board are to be found in the Appendix to
this report.
STATISTICAL DATA.
Continuing its policy of gathering statistical data, the Board sent questionnaires to individuals and firms throughout the Province employing women and girls.
In response to this annual call 3,184 employers forwarded completed returns. This was an
increase of 72 over the year 1931. The number of women and girl employees, however, dropped
in 1932 to 17,903 from the 1931 total of 18,154, a decrease of 251. This very slight reduction is
encouraging, when one remembers that in 1931 there were 2,307 fewer women and girls employed
than in 1930. It is hoped that for next year the Board will be able to report increased employment, as there seems to be a general trend towards more normal economic circumstances. G 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Wages and Hours averaged.
The average weekly wage for women 18 years of age or over showed a decline from $16.71
in 1931 to $15.53 in 1932, but coupled with a lower wage was a shorter average week. In 1932
this was 42.07 hours, compared with 43.03 hours for the previous year.
Individual averages in the nine occupations or industries may be noted in the following
tables, compiled from employers' pay-roll returns. These figures, which warrant careful study,
delineate fluctuations in labour conditions among women workers over years that will go down
in history as periods of rapid change.
Mercantile Industry.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
$45,
402
3,810
3,430
374
984.50
109.00
$8.47
9.82%
42.30
374
3,813
3,398
415
$48,293.00
$3,738.50
$14.20
$9.07
10.88%
43.58
435
4,223
3,670
553
$54,384.13
$5,177.00
$14.82
$9.36
13.09%
44.05
458
4,314
3,723
591
$56,065.22
$5,367.50
$15.06
$9.08
13.70%
43.16
478
4,237
3,563
674
$53,270.55
$6,467.50
$14.95
$9.00
15.91%
43.57
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced workers is $12.75; 1,416 or
37.16 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
1,453 or 38.14 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 941 or
24.7 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $12.75 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers
over 18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a
pro rata basis.
It will be noted that, although 28 more firms reported in 1932 than in the previous year, the
total number of employees in this industry was 3 less than in 1931.
This classification still holds second place in point of numbers employed, the first ranking
occupation being the Office, as in former years.
AATith mercantile trade at an unparalleled low ebb, it was not surprising to learn that wages
and hours revealed a decided drop over the 1931 figures.
Laundry Industry.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years...
Average hours worked per week	
62
864
818
46
19,979.00
$351.00
$12,20
$7.63
5.32%
39.49
52
991
924
67
$12,721.50
$635.00
$13.76
$9.48
6.76%
42.87
64
1,114
991
123
$14,451.00
$1,181.00
$14.58
$9.60
11.04%
45.24
70
1,203
1,056
147
$15,420.50
$1,444.50
$14.60
$9.83
12.22%
45.30
66
1,090
962
128
$14,036.49
$1,234.00
$14.59
$9.64
11.74%
45.39 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 57
'
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $13.50; 126 or
14.58 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
152 or 17.59 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 586 or
67.83 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $13.50 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers
over 18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a
pro rata basis.
Commercial laundries have been hard hit by restricted use of their facilities during the year
by the average householder. Laundry-work is something that the economizing housewife can
do at home, in an effort to balance her budget. As the more modern apartment blocks provide
electric washing facilities for their tenants, many of whom are eager to save on laundry costs,
the resultant shrinkage of trade from this quarter naturally affected the steam-power plants.
The increasing use of washing-machines in private houses has served also as a means to
divert service from the power-laundries into home channels, with the result that the plants were
able to cope with the business that offered in a shorter week than previously prevailed.
An appreciable drop of 3.38 hours in the average week is recorded under the 1931 figure.
This naturally carried with it a corresponding decrease in the average wages for experienced
workers, which fell from $13.76 in 1931 to $12.20 in the year under review.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Number of firms reporting....	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week ,
1932.
361
1,871
1,830
41
$26,448.00
$504.00
$14.45
$12.29
2.19%
43.26
1931.
375
2,206
2,152
54
$34,079.50
$455.00
$15.72
$11.67
2.45%
45.46
1930.
394
2,456
2,345
111
$36,582.50
$1,538.00
$15.60
$13.86
4.52%
44.90
1929.
431
2,608
2,496
112
$41,291.00
$1,565.50
$16.54
$13.98
4.29%
45.61
1928.
430
2,469
2,377
92
$39,267.25
$1,257.50
$16.52
$13.67
3.73%
45.73
:'il
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 538 or 28.75
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 690
or 36.88 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 643 or 34.36
per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than
the $14 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18
years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata
basis.
While this group deals primarily with hotel and restaurant help, there is still a misapprehension in the minds of some people that the Order also covers domestic workers in private
homes. This class of employment (together with fruit-pickers and farm-labourers) is specifically
excluded from the scope of the Act. Complaints are received by the Board from women and
girls who learn with disappointment that their work in a domestic capacity for individual
families is not governed by minimum-wage regulations.
AArorkers, too, who through force of circumstances have turned temporarily from their
regular positions to housework feel the lack of legislative protection to which they were accustomed when times were better. Former office-girls, factory-hands, and saleswomen, having been
thrown out of work when staffs were reduced, realize the benefits their erstwhile vocations
carried, and look forward to a revival in trade that will enable them to resume occupations in
which hours and wages are regulated by law.
■ G 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Office Occupation.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years...
Average hours worked per week	
1932.
1,772
4,614
4,575
39
$83,938.50
$408.00
$18.35
$10.40
0.85%
41.18
1931.
1,771
4,696
4,611
85
18,346.50
$966.50
$19.15
$11.73
1.31%
41.48
1930.
1,935
5,187
5,029
158
$102,354.05
$2,050.00
$20.35
$12.97
3.05%
42.02
1929.
1,985
5,259
5,077
182
$104,340.19
$2,322.00
$20.55
$12.75
3.46%
42.02
1928.
1,829
4,668
4,504
164
$91,042.73
$2,131.00
$20.21
$12.99
3.51%
41.91
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 905 or 19.61
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount,
2,970 or 64.37 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 739 or
16.02 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $15 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over
18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata
basis.
Figures received by the Board indicate that this line of work absorbs more feminine
employees than any other for which the Board has promulgated Orders. This year's statistics
reveal that less than 1 per cent, of the office-workers were under 18 years of age, the lowest
proportion of younger employees recorded in any occupation since tabulations have been made.
Personal Service Occupation.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under IS years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
1932.
122
393
380
13
$5,302.00
$100.00
$13.95
$7.69
3.31%
36.82
1931.
Ill
361
347
20
$5,190.50
$219.50
$15.22
$10.97
5.54%
40.72
1930.
110
391
349
42
$5,829.85
$396.00
$16.70
$9.43
10.74%
39.34
1929.
1928.
106
371
338
33
$5,885.00
$270.00
$17.41
$8.18
8.89%
40.28
96
349
323
26
$5,496.24
$303.50
$17.02
$11.67
7.45%
36.38
1
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.25; 63 or 42.75
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount,
162 or 41.22 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 168 or
42.75 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $14.25 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers
over 18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a
pro rata basis.
Increases in the number of firms and also in the number of employees are noted in this
line of work. Average wages, however, experienced a decided decline from 1931. A much
shorter average working-week prevails under this heading than during the previous year.
Whereas in 1931 the week averaged 40.72 hours, in 1932 it fell to 36.82 hours. Beauty-parlour
operators and theatre ushers are grouped in this classification, and their short, broken hours
naturally produce a short average week.
The lower wTages recorded, however, are compatible with reduced hours on duty. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 59
Fishing Industry.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting...	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
1
55
48
7
$592.00
$42.00
$12.33
$6.00
12.73%
45.64
2
98
96
2
$1,351.50
$24.00
$14.08
$12.00
2.09%
23.48
3
71
67
4
,473.50
$55.00
$21.99
$13.75
5.63%
57.68
22
22
4
15
15
$498.75
$22.67
50.18
$292.54
$19.50
46.13
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15.50; none of
the employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 4 or 7.27 per
cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 51 or 92.73 per cent, of all
employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $15.50 included
inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who worked less than
48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
The Order relating to this industry excludes those engaged in canning fish. When the
conference originally considered the question it was brought out that most of the women connected with this work were Indians, who are wards of the Dominion Government. Had the
Order been drafted to cover fish-canneries, complications might have arisen on account of a dual
authority of Federal and Provincial legislation. Bearing this in mind, fish-canning plants were
not brought within the scope of the Order.
At one time Scottish girls were employed in a number of establishments dry-curing and
smoking fish for export. They had learned the business in Scotland and taught it to some
Canadian employees, but the work is far from pleasant and seems to be passing out of the hands
of women employees.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced -	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
112
1,646
1,628
18
$28,013.00
$139.00
$17.21
$7.72
1.09%
39.77
112
1,806
1,789
17
$32,770.00
$133.50
$18.32
$7.85
0.94%
39.90
154
2,028
1,871
157
$34,057.42
$1,671.50
$18.20
$10.65
7.74%
41.02
142
2,023
1,781
242
$32,418.50
$2,719.00
$18.20
$11.24
11.96%
40.94
135
1,866
1,612
254
$29,530.00
$3,024.50
$18.32
$11.91
13.61%
41.13
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 189 or 11.48
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount,
1,132 or 68.77 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 325 or
19.75 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $15 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
In addition to operators employed by telephone companies throughout the Province, switchboard attendants in business, professional, and commercial offices are included in the above
figures. Telegraph operators are also embraced in this grouping, but owing to the introduction
of improved machines there is a more restricted demand for feminine telegraphers, and less
inducement for girls to train for this type of work than was the case some years ago when '
G 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
openings were more numerous and wages were sufficiently high to attract girls to this specialized
calling.
Manufacturing Industry.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced .	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
1932.
290
2,188
1,838
350
$26,036.50
$3,340.00
$14.17
$9.54
16.00%
41.23
1931.
274
2,308
2,045
263
$31,610.00
$2,540.00
$15.45
$9.66
11.39%
38.07
1930.
310
2,507
2,076
431
$34,082.60
$4,455.50
$16.42
$10.34
17.19%
44.48
1929.
351
2,760
2,243
517
$37,550.80
$5,216.00
$16.74
$10.09
18.73%
44.90
1928.
336
2,524
2,051
473
$34,084.50
$4,729.00
$16.62
$10.00
18.74%
44.70
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 485 or 22.17
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
562 or 25.68 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 1,141 or
52.15 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $14 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Barring the two seasonal industries (fishing and fruit and vegetable), the manufacturing
group is the only one in which the average weekly hours for 1932 were in excess of those for
the previous year. An increase of 3.16 hours per week is noted, bringing the current average
to 41.23, as against the abnormally low of 38.07 hours reported in 1931.
The swing towards a lower wage level was a distinctive feature in this industry in 1932,
as in all other classifications.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees ...
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees....
Average hours worked per w7eek  (time-
workers)	
1932.
02
Time.
2,360
1,807
553
$27,873.00
$4,702.50
$15.43
$8.50
Piece.
102
76
26
$1,119.50
$178.50
$14.73
$6.87
23.52«
46.58
1931.
1930.
41
Time.
1,705
1,559
146
$28,028.00
$1,956.50
$17.98
$13.47
Piece.
170
164
6
$3,006.00
$71.00
$18.33
$11.83
8.11«
45.08
51
Time.
2,346
1,936
410
$34,097.11
$4,555.00
$17.61
$11.11
Piece.
138
116
22
$3,205.50
$187.00
$27.63
$8.50
17.40%
48.78
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.40 (except from
the period from June 15th to November 15th, 1932, when a 10-per-centum reduction is effective) ;
188 or 7.64 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received $14.40,
960 or 38.99 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 1,314 or
53.37 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $14.40 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees
who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Returns were received from 21 more firms in 1932 than in 1931, and 587 more workers were
included in the reports.    It must be remembered that those engaged in the actual picking of REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 61
the fruit are exempt from the provisions of the Act, as are also women or girls employed in
farm labour.
Owing to the perishable nature of products handled under the Fruit and A^egetable Order,
and the uncertainty surrounding their time of arrival at the packing-houses, jam-factories, and
canning plants, the work of the majority of women and girls is concentrated in a short intensive
period.
There was a marked decline in the average wages earned by the workers and a slight
increase in the hours.
Summary of all Occupations.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced.
Employees   under   18   years,   or   inexperienced ,	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced.
Employees  under  18  years,   or  inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years,
or inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
3,184
17,903
10,436
1,467
$225,280.00
$12,934.00
$15.53
$8.82
8.19%
42.07
$285,
$10
3,112
18,154
17,079
1,075
396.50
739.50
$10.71
$9.99
5.92%
43.03
3,456
20,461
18,450
2,011
$320,517.66
$21,266.00
$17.37
$10.57
9.83%
43.95
3,602
20,766
18,390
2,376
$324,376.19
$24,757.00
$17.64
$10.42
11.44%
43.87
3,425
19,377
17,191
2,186
$301,223.03
$23,470.00
$17.52
$10.74
11.28%
44.05
In the nine occupations and industries covered by the Board's Orders 17,903 women and girl
employees were reported. Of this total, 3,910 or 21.84 per cent, were listed as receiving the
actual weekly minimum wage for their respective classes of work. Refuting the contention of
opponents to this type of wage legislation that there is a tendency for the legal minimum to
become the maximum, our figures show that 8,085 women or 45.16 per cent, of all reported were
paid in excess of these amounts. The balance of employees, comprising 5,908, or 33 per cent, of
the total, were recorded as having received wages lower than the full weekly minimum. In this
group are included young girls and learners for whom lower rates are set, and those who worked
less than 48 hours, and whose wages were paid on a pro rata basis.
SPREAD OF MINIMUM-WAGE LEGISLATION.
As wage security is the basis of all security for workers, minimum-wage legislation provides
women and girls with this much-to-be-desired factor in their wage-earning lives. As a class
they have less experience in collective bargaining than men, and their mode of life is customarily
unfavourable to co-ordinated protection. As a consequence, when the economic structure is subjected to such batterings and vicissitudes as have occurred in recent years, the need for a
stabilizing influence in their wages is very vital.
Eight of the nine Provinces of Canada have recognized this need and minimum-wage laws
appear on the statute-books of all them except Prince Edward Island.
AVhile this report is literally for the year 1932, its actual preparation cannot be commenced
until the beginning of the following year, and it is interesting to note that in April, 1933, President Roosevelt sent the following message of the Governors of thirteen States of the Union, of
great industrial importance, which, up to that time, had no minimum-wage laws :—
" May I call your attention to minimum-wage law just passed by Legislature of New York
and approved by Governor Lehman, which declares it against public policy for any employer to
pay women or minors a wage which is both less than the fair and reasonable value of services
rendered and less than sufficient to meet the minimum cost of living necessary for health. This
represents great forward step against lowering of wages, which constitutes a serious form of
unfair competition against other employers, reduces the purchasing-power of the workers, and
threatens the stability of industry. I hope that similar action can be taken by the other States
for protection of the public interest." G 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
• Since then the States of New York, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Utah, and Connecticut
have passed Minimum Wage Acts, and similar legislation is pending in Arizona, Oklahoma,
Massachusetts, and Illinois. The Massachusetts Bill is of the same type as the laws enacted
in other Eastern States, and will supplant its present non-mandatory law.
The States which previously had actively functioning minimum-wage laws are California,
Washington, Oregon, Wisconsin, North Dakota, and Massachusetts. In Minnesota the law
applies to minors only—girls and boys under 21 years of age.
Eor comparative purposes our Board has compiled the following table, to show at a glance
the rates in effect across Canada, and for the three States of Washington, Oregon, and California, whose working conditions are more nearly analogous to British Columbia's than the other
States where similar legislation has been formulated:—
Minimum Wages for Women in Canada and Western States, as at March 1st, 1933.
PRUIT AND
VEGETABLE.
FISHING.
LAUNDRY.
Province ok
State.
Wages pee Week.
Wages pee Week.
Wages pee Week.
i                                       \
Adults,           Learners.
Experienced.
Adults,           Learners. <
Experienced.
Adults,           Learners.
Experienced.
British Columbia	
$14.40              $11.00
Hourly.           Hourly.
30c.                  23c.
$15.50            $12.75 to
Hourly.               14.75
327/24C.
$13.50               $8.00 to
Hourly.               12.00
28%c.
$12.50                $9.00
10.00
$12.50                $9.50 to
11.50
Note.—Reduced rates in italic effective till April 1,
1933   (10%) ;   5% reduction for adult learners
with more than 12 months' experience in shops
and stores.
$14.00
12.00
$9.50 to
11.50
$12.00        Note.—10% reduction effective for 1 yr.
10.80                 until Feb. 28, 1934.    Reduced rates
in italic.
$12.00
10.80
$9.00 to
11.00
8.10
9.90
Ontario..
Hourly. Hourly.
Between 18 Under 18 and
and 60 yrs. over 60 yrs.
25e. to 18c. 15c. to 20c.
$12.50 to
11.00
$7.00 to
11.00
$12.00 and        $7.00 to
9.00                10.50
$11.00                $6.00 to
10.00                10.00
Hourly.           Hourly.
33 %c.                25c.
Temporary to Jan. 1/SS
25c.                 20c.
Hourly.          Hourly.
33y3c.               28c.
Temporary to May 1/SS
25c.                 20c.
$16.00              $14.00
38c. pt. time.
To Apr. 1/SS
SS%c. pt. time
Oregon	
Hourly.           Hourly.
27 %c.                 22c.
22 y2c.
$13.20    $9.00 to     $6.00 to
12.00             8.50
$13.20               $9.00 to
12.00
$13.20                $9.00 to
13.00 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 63
Minimum Wages for Women in Canada and Western States, as at March 1st, 1933
—Continued.
MANUFACTURING.
MERCANTILE.
OFFICE.
Peovince oe
State.
Wages pee Week.
Wages pee Week.
Wages per Week.
Adults,            Learners.
Experienced.
i                                          \
Adults,            Learners.
Experienced.
Adults,           Learners.
Experienced.
British Columbia	
$14.00                $7.00 to
Hourly.              13.00
29y6c.
$12.75                $7.50 to
Hourly.               12.00
26?iec.
$15.00             $11.00 to
Hourly.               14.00
31 %c.
$12.50                $6.00 to
10.00
$12.50                $7.50 to
11.00
$14.00                $7.50 to
12.00
$14.00                $5.00 to
12.G0                11.50
$15.00                $7.00 to
14.00                13.50
1S.50
12.60
$12.00                $5.00 to
11.00                11.00
10.80                  h-50 to
9.90                   9.90
$12.00                $7.00 to
10.80                11.00
6.S0 to
9.90
$12.50 to           $6.00 to
10.00                11.00
$12.50 to           $6.00 to
8.00                11.00
$12.50 to           $6.00 to
8.00                11.00
Quebec	
$12.50 to          $5.00 to
9.00                11.00
$11.00                $6.00 to
10.00                10.00
$16.00                $9.00 to
38c. pt. time.         16.00
ssy3c. to
Apr. 1/SS
pt. time
$16.00              $12.00 to
38c. pt. time.          16.00
(Unclassified)
ssy3e. to
Apr. 1/SS
pt. time
(As in Laundry or
Mfg. Orders.)
Adults,      Minors.
$13.20    $9.00 to     $6.00 to
12.00             8.50
Adults,      Minors.
$13.20    $9.00 to     $6.00 to
12.00             8.50
Monthly.          Weekly.
$60.00                $9.00 to
12.00
$13.20                $9.00 to
12.00
$13.20                $9.00 to
13.00
$9.00 to
13.20 G 64
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Minimum Wages for Women in Canada and Western States, as at March 1st, 1933
—Continued.
PUBLIC
HOUSEKEEPING.
PERSONAL SERVICE.
TELEPHONE AND
TELEGRAPH.
Province or
State.
Wages pee
Week.
Wages pee Week.
Wages per
Week.
Adults,
Experienced.
Learners.
i                                          \
Adults,           Learners.
Experienced.
Adults.
Experienced.
Learners.
British Columbia	
$14.00
Hourly.
29 %c.
$12.00
$14.25             $10.00 to
Hourly.               13.00
2911/16C.
$15.00
Hourly.
31%c.
$11.00 to
13.00
6-day wk.
$12.50
7-day wk.
$14.50
$9.00 to
13.00
$14.00                $6.00 to
12.00
$14.00
$7.50 to
12.00
6-day wk.
$13.00
7-day wk.
$14.00
11.70
12.60
$11.00
12.00
$15.00             $10.00 to
IS.50                12.00
$12.50
11.25
$12.50
11.25
$12.00                $8.00 to
10.80                12.00
7.20
10.80
$12.50 to
10.00
$12.50 to
10.00
$12.50 to           $6.00 to
11.00                10.00
$12.50 to
7,00
$5.00 to
11.00
$11.00
10.00
$8.00 to
10.00
$16.00
38c. pt. time
SSVsC. to
Apr. 1/SS
pt. time
$16.00             $12.00 to
38c. pt. time          16.00
(Unclassified)
SSVsc.to
Apr. 1/SS
pt. time
$16.00
38c. pt. time
(Unclassi
ssy:ic. to
Apr. 1/SS
pt. time
$12.00 to
16.00
fled)
$13.20
$9.00 to
12.00
$13.20                $9.00 to
12.00
$13.20
$9.00 to
12.00
Wk.    $14.50
Day        2.50
Hr.            .35
$12.00 to
14.00
$9.00 to
13.20
$13.20
$9.00 to
13.20 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 65
TRADE SCHOOLS.
The matter of so-called trade schools has occupied the attention of the Board, and a study
is being continued in an endeavour to prevent what might become an abuse. With the bona-ff.de
schools the Board has no quarrel, but some establishments have been set up which, through
clever propaganda, have induced girls to pay high fees in return for courses of doubtful value.
The training in such places is not always adequate; and, having parted with their tuition fees,
when the pseudo-graduates sever their connections with the school they And themselves insufficiently equipped to secure positions in the already overcrowded labour market.
Public opinion, in one instance, helped to bring about a changed attitude on the part of the
management of a firm that employed their so-called students to produce commodities that were
in direct unfair competition with plants paying all their employees according to the minimum-
wage regulations. Their sales showed such an appreciable drop that the " school" idea was
abandoned, the heads who had introduced it were replaced, and all workers put on an equality
with the fairer firms. The Chairman of the Board personally held meetings with the representatives of the factory and obtained assurances from the new management that their previous
practice of using " students " would be discontinued.
By a Court ruling persons who had paid tuition fees in return for training were classed
as " students." As such they were held beyond the scope of the Act, and so not considered
employees as denned by the Statute. With this judgment serving as a precedent, the Board is
powerless to deal with the situation under the " Minimum Wage Act."
In order to check what might threaten to become a growing menace to the strength of the
Board's regulations the passing of a " Trades School Act" is being urged from certain quarters.
Under such an Act exploitation of defenceless girls would be lessened, while trade schools giving
training of value would be protected. The Board is cognizant of the seriousness of the matter
and is preparing to meet the situation when the time is opportune.
MEETING EXISTING CONDITIONS.
From the answers to questions dealing with wage reductions and shortening of hours during 1932, it has been found that some employers reduced the personnel of their staffs, some cut
wages, and others shortened the hours. Some firms resorted to all three expedients in an effort
to mitigate the far-reaching results of sluggish trade conditions.
On the other side of the picture appeared the more encouraging aspect of the problem—
namely, the firms who considered it unnecessary to reduce wages, or otherwise alter the conditions under which their employees worked. The appended tables show the details of the changes
put into effect in the different occupations, including the percentages of wage cuts :—
Table showing Changes made by Employers in an Endeavour to cope with
Present Conditions.
a;
s|
33
"3 to
Sa
Public
Housekeeping
Occupation.
a
o
gg
OO
a
Iff
to > B
u U °
a) 53 a
P-i.gbO,
Telephone
and
Telegraph
Occupation.
s-3,2
rt ^^
« 3 B
rt-^^j
4. +J GO
.-* a> a
B w<rj
rt
o
Number   of   firms   showing
no change 	
164
15
125
70S
51
109
73
26
1,271
Number   of   firms   showing
reduction in staff	
67
17
102
225
28
1
59
6
505
Number  of  employees laid
off 	
316
88
242
358
48
181
192
53
1,478
Number of employees placed
on short time	
213
107
121
230
51
213
396
139
1,470
Number   of   firms   showing
62
14
79
319
13
2
29
23
541
Number   of   employees   af
fected by wage cuts	
3S6
82
328
814
41
13
232
652
2,548 G 66
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table showing Percentage of Cuts in Various Occupations and the Number of
Employees affected thereby.
Percentage
of Cut.
Mercantile
(No.
affected).
Laundry
(No.
affected).
Public
Housekeeping
(No.
affected).
Office
(No.
affected).
Personal
Service
(No.
affected).
Manufacturing
(No.
affected).
Fruit and
Vegetable
(No.
affected).
Total.
1%
1
1
2
2
2
1
3
3
2
14
16
4
7
2
9
5
148
37
10
97
6
59
16
373
6
11
7
14
1
52
85
6%
4
4
7
8
12
26
14
13
73
7%
7
3
10
8
2
9
10
21
9
1
15
16
10
131
35
102
337
29
64
603
1,301
11
4
1
2
3
10
12%
8
1
40
25
2
76
13
1
15
7
23
14
7
2
9
8
26
15
14
25
43
5
16
15
118
16
4
1
15
14
121
155
17
1
16
17
18
3
7
10
19
7
7
20
12
39
62
12
125
22
13
7
19
39
23
3
3
24
1
4
5
25
2
8
40
2
110
102
27
2
2
28
5
5
30
1
1
5
2
9
31
7
5
12
33%
3
1
13
17
35
3
1
4
37%
1
1
38
3
3
40
14
3
17
45
3
3
50
4
4
8
53
1
1
Totals....
386
82
328
814
41
232
888
2,771
SERVICE RECORD.
Since the labour market has suffered so severely from the disturbing influences of the past
few years, employees who, in other times, might have changed positions have considered themselves fortunate if they were permitted to remain with their present employers.
In comparing the figures of 1932 with those of the prior year, it is noted that the totals
denoting long service have risen. While 1,177 employees were put down in 1931 as having been
with the same firm for a period of ten years or over, 1,310 were in this category for 1932.
We always expect to find a large number reported as having been employed for less than one
year, for the seasonal occupation of the fruit industry alone contributed 1,502 workers whose
employment was for the short time necessary to deal with the fruit-crop. In addition to this
substantial figure, as all firms report for the week of greatest employment, the mercantile group
obviously sends in its returns for the Christmas period, and their staffs are temporarily augmented at this time. These extra hands would, therefore, have to be recorded as having been
with their respective employers less than twelve months.
The office occupation supplies 600 workers who have remained over ten years with the
employer who made the report to the Board.    This calling has always shown more stability of REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 67
employment than the other groups.    Analysis of the following table will reveal other points of
interest regarding labour turnover in the nine classifications:—
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in
Continuous Service of Employer reporting.
•3
rt
03
to
fH
Fh
CJ
>
O
si
a
+j
Fh
u
u
u
IH
G
M
Name of Industry.
'o
(H
CJ
rt
CJ
CJ
CO
V
rt
CJ
CJ
CJ
!»
C  «     .
7. ?<d
o a
CJ
B,
u
(H
|H
N
U3
CD
00
Oi
o
rH
rt
CJ
l£s
CJ ^
4-1
■3
o
o
0
tH
str§
o
H-)
+J
+J
+j
+)
+J
%
u
rl
cq
CO
r^
W
CO
t-
O0
Oi
H
£H2
Kfe
Mercantile	
30
1,421
427
388
410
303
215
189
107
7°,
59
189
3,810
402
20
86
93
144
162
85
81
44
34
26
32
57
864
62
30
634
288
240
208
132
97
68
39
29
13
93
1,871
4,614
393
55
361
Office    	
82
7
55
576
139
446
55
555
47
669
55
462
40
352
15
317
8
209
14
169
6
151
4
626
3
1,772
122
1
Telephone and telegraph-
4
80
77
205
308
258
114
132
123
88
56
201
1,646
112
Manufacturing	
148
585
288
278
254
167
108
84
67
45
33
131
2,188
290
422
1,502
93
156
143
64
25
26
16
3
2
10
2,462
62
Totals	
798
5,023
1,767
2,013
2,209
1,511
1,007
868
609
438
350
1,310
17,903
3,184
MARITAL STATUS.
While one often hears general observations deploring the increasing numbers of married
women holding positions, from actual figures submitted to the Board there has been very little
variation in the percentages of married, widowed, and single women gainfully employed in
British Columbia since these records were made.
The following table shows that 19.51 per cent, of all reported in 1932 were married, 3.76 per
cent, were widows, and 76.73 per cent, were single. Tlie 1931 percentages were 19.49, 3.8, and
76.71 respectively, so the changes are not very marked.
The question of employed married women has always been a contentious one, but it is unfair
and unreasonable to condemn employers who carry this class of help on their pay-rolls, or to
judge harshly the married employee, without having inquired very thoroughly into all the
circumstances surrounding such employment.
Name of Industry.
Married.
Widowed.
Single.
Total.
Mercantile	
Laundry	
Public housekeeping	
Office	
Personal service	
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Totals	
Per cent	
582
228
507
428
68
29
94
455
1,102
159
51
173
131
17
27
73
42
3,069
585
1,191
4,055
308
26
1,525
1,660
1,318
3,493
673
19.51%
3.76«
13,737
" 76.73 %"
3,810
864
1,871
4,614
393
55
1,646
2,188
2,462
17,903
"100%~
TREND OP WAGES, 1918, 1930, 1931, 1932.
A handy comparison of wages in the non-seasonal callings is set out in the following tabulation for the years 1918, 1930, 1931, and 1932. It is hoped that by next year there will be an
upward trend in wages to report, so that the averages will begin to reach the higher levels again
from which unfortunately they have been dropping lately. G 68
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.
1930.
1931.
1932.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$14.82
$9.36
13.09%
$14.20
$9.07
10.88%
$13.38
$8.47
9.82%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$12.20
$7.63
5.32%
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$14.45
$12.29
2.19%
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$18.35
$10.46
0.85%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$13.83
$6.96
15.38%
$13.95
$7.69
3.31%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees..—	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$17.21
$7.72
1.09%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%
$16.42
$10.34
17.19%
$15.45
$9.66
11.39%
$14.17
$9.54
16.00% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932. G 69
INSPECTION DIFFICULTIES.
At no time during the history of the Board's activities since 1918 have the officials been
confronted with greater difficulties in administering the Act and regulations than during the
period under review. Yet with the limited staff the problem of enforcement has been zealously
and conscientiously met. As Vancouver is the centre of population in the Province, the
Inspector located in that city has had a most strenuous year. When one remembers the
multiplicity of nationalities now located there the question of language often looms up on the
horizon, and the services of interpreters have to be resorted to in dealing with disputes in which
some of the parties thereto can neither speak nor understand English. Racial customs of
countries, whose standards are different from ours, often have caused trouble when employers,
unwittingly or knowingly, attempt to force upon their employees the conditions that prevailed in
the lands of their origin, or to which they were accustomed before locating in British Columbia.
Employers of some nationalities are slow in adopting the progressive attitude, so necessary in a
comparatively new country.
While most individuals and firms, who have women workers on their staffs, express a
practical willingness to obey the provisions of our Orders, there have been others who resented
having their working conditions checked by the Board's officials. Regrettable as it may seem,
the Inspector has had some very unpleasant experiences during 1932. The outcome of some of
these resulted in the employers being brought before the Police Magistrate for refusal to produce
the information required by .the Inspector, or for neglect to comply with the Magistrate's decision
regarding his or her violation of the law.
CO-OPERATION ACKNOWLEDGED.
It is fitting, therefore, that the appreciation of the Board and its officials should be publicly
acknowledged here for the co-operation and help extended by the majority of employers in the
Province, by employees, and by public-spirited citizens in general, who have assisted the Board
in its duties of administering the Act, which has a threefold purpose to serve, involving:—
First: The problem of the employee to maintain and enjoy a decent standard of living.
Second: The problem of the employer to continue and, if possible, extend his business.
Third: The duty of the Board to take cognizance of the problems of both employee and
employer, to make regulations, and, with all the resources at its disposal, to see that those
regulations are observed.
Under normal conditions the Board's work is hedged with difficulties, but during the past
year its task has been much more arduous than ever, but lightened at times by helpful co-operation from many to whom its grateful appreciation is extended.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
Herbert Geddes. G 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
"MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
Copies of the " Minimum Wage Act" will be mailed on request made to the Minimum Wage
Board, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended:—
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly rate, 26y16 cents.
$7.50 for 1st   3 months.
$9.00 for 1st  3 months.
8.00
,   2nd 3
„
10.00    „   2nd 3
8.50
,   3rd 3
,,
11.00    „   3rd 3
9.00
,   4th 3
,,
12.00    „   4th 3
9.50
,   5th 3
„
10.00
,   6th 3
„
Licences required in this
10.50
,   7th 3
,,
class.
11.00
,   8th 3
"
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum working-period 48 hours.
Order has been in force since January 1st, 1928, superseding Order of February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$13.50.
Hourly rate,  28%  cents.
$8.00 for 1st  4
8.50    „   2nd 4
9.00    „   3rd 4
10.00    „   4th 4
11.00    „   5th 4
12.00    „   6th 4
months.
$9.00 for 1st  4 months.
10.50    „   2nd 4
12.00    „   3rd 4
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week. Maximum working-period 48 hours, governed by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31st, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitresses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids, in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female
elevator operators. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 71
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Tears of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$12.00
$12.00
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked. Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours.
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's board
of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
filing clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$15.    MoDthly   rate,   $65.
Hourly   rate,   31%   cents.
$11.00 for 1st  6 months.
12.00    „   2nd 6
13.00    „   3rd 6
14.00    „   4th 6
$11.00 for 1st  3 months.
12.00    „   2nd 3
13.00    „   3rd 3
14.00    „   4th 3
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed by Order, 48
hours.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Experienced Workers.
Under 18 Tears of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate, 29 "/„ cents.
$10.00 for 1st  6 months.
11.00    „   2nd 6
12.00    „   3rd 6
13.00    „   4th 6
*$10.00 for 1st  3 months.
11.00    „   2nd 3
12.00    „   3rd 3
13.00    „   4th 3
'    Licences required in this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, for whom
no apprenticeship is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted. G 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less
than $10.80 a week.     (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushers.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919.
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.    Hourly rate, 327/M cents.
$12.75  for  1st   4  months.
13.75    „    2nd  4
14.75    „    3rd   4
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Order has been in force since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.00.    Hourly rate, 31%  cents.
$11.00  for  1st   3  months.
12.00    „    2nd  3
13.00    „    3rd   3
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked. Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
AVhere telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the
number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920, superseding Order of September 23rd, 1919.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 73
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.00. Hourly rate, 29%
cents.
$8.00 for 1st   2 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   2    „
12.00    „   3rd   2    „
$8.00 for 1st   4 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   4    „
12.00    „   3rd   4    „
$7.00 for 1st   6 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   6    „
13.00    „   3rd   6    „
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Cotton bags, envelopes, overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum AVage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923, superseding Order of September 1st, 1919.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.40.    Hourly rate, 30 cents.
$11.00 for 1st 2 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. For work over 48 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day,
wages shall be not less than 30 cents an hour for experienced workers, and for work in excess of
10 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents an hour.
For work over 8 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day, wages shall be not less than 23 cents
an hour for inexperienced workers, and for work in excess of 10 hours the rate shall be not less than
35 cents an hour.
Order has been in force since November 2nd, 1926, superseding Order of February 28th, 1920.
Note.—A 10-per-cent. reduction in wages for experienced workers was effective from June 15th,
1932, to November 15th, 1932, under Emergency Order No. 17a, set out in full in the text, of this report.
The following Emergency Order covering the Fruit and Vegetable Industry was promulgated June
14th, 1933, and is included in this report for the information of all concerned:—
Order No. 17b (Emergency).
RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Effective June 15th, 1933, to December 31st, 1933.
Whereas on the 3rd day of September, 1926, an obligatory Order was issued by the Minimum
Wage Board relating to the fruit and vegetable industry under the provisions of the " Minimum Wage
Act," being chapter 173 of the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1924," by paragraphs 2 and 3 G 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
of which Order a minimum wage in respect of the said industry was fixed for experienced female
employees therein:
And whereas the said Order became effective in sixty days from the date thereof, and has since
been continuously in force, subject during the period from the 15th day of June, 1932, to the 15th day
of November, 1932, to the provisions of Emergency Order No. 17a, dated the 14th day of June, 1932:
And whereas the Board, under the provisions of section 6 of the said Act, has held public meetings
in Penticton on the 25th and 26th days of May, 1933; at Vancouver on the 27th day of May, 1933;
and at Victoria on the 12th day of June, 1933, at which employers and employees in the said fruit and
vegetable industry and the general public were heard:
And whereas, in the exercise of the discretion vested in it by the said Act, without reconvening or
calling any conference, the Board has reopened the question respecting the minimum wage so fixed by
the said Order, and has considered the question:
Now the Board doth order, in amendment of the said Order of the 3rd day of September, 1926,
that for the period from the 15th day of June, 1933, to the 31st day of December, 1933, both dates
inclusive, the minimum wage fixed by the said Order for experienced female employees in the fruit and
vegetable industry (including the respective rates per hour or per piece fixed in respect thereof) shall
be reduced by the deduction therefrom of ten per centum of the amount thereof; and that except to
the extent and for the period herein provided the said Order of the 3rd day of September, 1926, shall
continue in full force and effect as if this Order had not been made.
Dated the 14th day of June, 1933.
Adam Bell, Chairman,
Helen Gregory MacGill,
Herbert Geddes,
Members of the Minimum Wage Board.
Each employer shall post, and keep posted, a copy of this Order in each room in which employees
affected by the Order are employed.
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
The following list of organizations which have a direct connection with the employment of
labour has been compiled from the latest available information and does not include any which
has been established purely for social purposes.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, S.
M. Simpson, S. M. Simpson, Ltd., Kelowna;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, L. A. Manly ;
Vice-President, J. M. de Leon; Treasurer, J. B.
Wyard; Secretary, J. J. Walsh, 307-308 Lumbermen's Building, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver. The above are the officers of this
Association until the annual meeting and election of officers takes place next May.
B.C. Loggers' Association—Chairman of the
Board of Directors, Roger L. Cobb, Elk River
Timber Co., Ltd., 504 Yorkshire Building,
Vancouver; Vice-Chairman, Fred Brown, B. &
K. Logging Co., Ltd., 1004 Standard Bank
Building, Vancouver; Secretary-Manager, R.
V. Stuart, 921 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.    Officers elected annually on January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President (1933), J. D. McCormack,
Canadian AVestern Lumber Co.', Ltd., Fraser
Mills; Secretary, T. H. Wilkinson, 917 Metropolitan Building, Arancouver. Officers elected
annually on third Thursday in January.
Building & Construction Industries Exchange of
B.C.—President, Col. W. W. Foster; Vice-
President, W. N. O'Neil; Secretary, R. J.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section)—■
President, Prank McElroy ; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver—Chairman, J. G.
Robson, Timberland Lumber Co., Ltd., New
Westminster ; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria—
Chairman, E. AAr. Whittington, Moore-AVhitting-
ton Lumber Co., Ltd., Victoria ; Secretary, T. J.
Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transfermen's Association
(for year June, 1932, to June, 1933)—President, Elmer Johnston, Johnston National Storage, Ltd., C.N.R. Freight Offices, Main Street,
Vancouver. This Association has Board of
Directors in each Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, Al.
Hager, Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd., Arancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver; Assistant Secretary of Section, R. M. AVinslow, 705 B.C. Mining Building,
Vancouver.
Feed Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, A. C.
Foreman, Vancouver Milling & Grain Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Fertilizer Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, F. Smelts, B.C. Electric Railway Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 75
General Contractors' Association—President, W.
E. Jenkins ; Vice-President, Alex. Smith ; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Association, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C. D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing
Co., Ltd., Arancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
402 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver.
Meal, Oil & Salt Fish Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—R. Nelson, Nelson Bros.' Fisheries, Ltd. (Chairman) ;
Secretary, R. M. AVinslow, 705 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, D. A.
Mcintosh, Letson & Burpee, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. W.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary, T.
J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Millwork Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. C. Chry-
stal, E. C. Chrystal & Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of B.C.—President, Charles
Booking, President and General Manager,
Granby Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.,
Vancouver; Secretary, H. Mortimer-Lamb, 905
Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, H. P. Ktinestiver, Lumberton;
Secretary-Treasurer, I. R. Poole, 204 Traders'
Building, Calgary, Alberta. Officers elected at
annual meeting held in January.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, S. Hogg,
AVilson Stationery Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary-Manager, A. W. Sparling, 706 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Printers' Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, H. M.
Diggon, Diggon-Hibben, Ltd., Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building,
Alctoria.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, J. M. Watson, Vancouver ; First Vice-President, H. Everett, Vancouver ; Second Vice-President, P. Trapp, New
AVestminster; Third Vice-President, J. Fred
Scott, Cranbrook; Treasurer, C. H. Moodie,
Vancouver; Dominion Councillor, R. T. AVilson,
Nanaimo; Secretary, Geo. R. Mathews, Vancouver ; ex officio, H. B. Burr, New AVestminster, and W. H. Anderson, Nanaimo. Head
Provincial Office at 420 Pacific Building, Vancouver. Branches are established at Cranbrook, Nanaimo, Revelstoke, and Vancouver.
At New Westminster there is a District Branch
serving the principal towns of the Lower Praser
Valley ; Secretary, D. Stuart, of this District
Branch has offices at 4 Hart Block, New AATest-
minster.
Shipping Federation of B.C., Ltd.—President, H.
A. Stevenson; Vice-President, R. L. Mason;
Treasurer, W. H. AValton; Manager and Secretary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Shipping
Federation Building, 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver ; Directors, D. M. Cameron, F. H. Clen-
denning, C. A. Cotterell, W. M. Crawford, B.
W. Greer, E. Aikman, K. A. McLennan, R. G.
Parkhurst, F. J. Pickett, R. D. AVilliams, and
A. AVood. Meets for election of officers in
January of each year.
Spruce Manufacturers' Association—President, J.
P. McMillan, Edmonton, Alberta; Secretary, I.
R. Poole, Calgary, Alberta. Membership includes mills in Northern B.C. and Prairie Provinces. General meetings usually held in Calgary or Edmonton. No set date for annual
meeting, but expect it to be held in May. Address of Secretary, 204 Traders' Building, Calgary.
Shipyards' Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, A. H.
Seaton, B.C. Marine Engineers & Shipbuilders,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
C. H. E. Williams, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Hon. Secretary, J. C. Reston, 579
Howe Street, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific
Building. Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver Electrical Association—President, R.
A. Graham, 929 Pender Street West, Arancouver ; Secretary, J. C. Reston, 579 Howe Street,
Vancouver. Offices, AVestern City Building,
542 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. Officers
elected annually in May. This Association has
sixty-four members and eight associate members.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, J. T. Taylor, c/o Rennie &
Taylor, Ltd., Victoria.
A'ictoria Builders' Exchange, Ltd.—Secretary, W.
J. Hamilton, 1712 Douglas Street, Victoria. G 76
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
UNION DIRECTORY.
We have endeavoured to give an up-to-date directory of trade organizations and their officials
covering the whole Province, and we desire to thank those union secretaries who were prompt
in returning our questionnaire.
It is regretted that many officials did not reply to our letters, and we have assumed that
their organization is no longer in existence and have struck them from the list.
The Department will be pleased at all times to receive any changes in the published list
which may be made from time to time, and would appreciate being advised of any new organizations desiring to be listed in the next publication.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS
OF CANADA.
President, Tom Moore, 172 McLaren Street,
Ottawa; Secretary-Treasurer, P. M. Draper,
172 McLaren Street, Ottawa.
THE ALL CANADIAN CONGRESS
OF LABOUR.
President, A. R. Mosher; Secretary-Treasurer,
AAr. T. Burford, 230 Laurier Avenue AVest,
Ottawa.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, P.O.
Box 268, Prince Rupert; Secretary, P. Derry,
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Prince Rupert on second Thursday in each month at
8 p.m.
Vancouver, New AVestminster and District—
President, Colin McDonald, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver; General Secretary-Treasurer,
P. R. Bengough, Room 200, Labour Headquarters, A'ancouver. Meets first and third Tuesdays of each month at Labour Headquarters at
8 p.m.
National Labour Council of Vancouver—President, P. E. Thompson, 1728 Yew Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Geo. B. Macaulay, Room 30,
163 Hastings Street West. Meets at 163 Hastings Street AVest on the first and third AVed-
days at 8 p.m.
National Labour Council of Prince Rupert—Secretary, N. AV. Appleyard, Box 679, Prince
Rupert.
Arancouver Building Trades Council—President,
E. H. Morrison, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, AAr. Page, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty Street on second
and fourth Tuesdays in each month at 8 p.m.
Victoria Trades and Labour Council—President,
J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto Street, Arictoria;
Secretary, J. AVilson, 1054 Balmoral Road,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on the first and
third Wednesdays in the month at Labour
Hall, Hamley Building, Broughton Street.
DISTRICT LODGES AND COUNCILS.
Allied  Printing Trades  Council.
Vancouver—President, W. Quigley, 2829 Broadway AVest, \rancouver; Secretary, AV. L. Mc-
Comb, 2211 AVaterloo Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 529-31 Beatty Street, Vancouver, on fourth
Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Arictoria—President, AV. AV. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, AVm. O. Clunk,
1624 Myrtle Street, Victoria. Meets at Jones
Building at 8 p.m. on last Thursday in month.
British Columbia Federation of Civic
and  Municipal Employees.
President, W. J. Scribbens, 3208 Pender Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. R. Simmers,
211, 1298 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at call of Chair.
Electrical Communication Workers of
Canada.
British Columbia District Council No. 1—District Chairman, E. T. Redford, P.O. Box 837,
Vancouver; Secretary, Joseph Haegert, P.O.
Box 837, Vancouver. Meets at call of Committee.
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Box 222, Kamloops; Secretary, R. Halliday,
3481 Georgia Street East, \Tancouver. Meets
at Ashcroft at 8 p.m. on third Saturday of
March, June, September, and December.
Corbin.
Corbin Miners' Association, Local No. 3, Sub.
Dist. No. 1—President, E. James, Corbin; Secretary, J. Press, Corbin. Meets in Burke &
Booth Hall every second Sunday at 7 p.m.
Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brock, Cranbrook;
Secretary, G. A. Hennessy, Drawer 878, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays in Maple Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President,
W. Henderson, Box 827, Cranbrook; Secretary,
R. J. Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook. Meets at
AAr. J. Flower's residence on third Sunday in
each month at 3 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, Albin Eliason, Baker; Secretary, G. C. Brown, P.O. Box 739, Cranbrook.
No set date.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, R. H. Harrison, Cranbrook ; Secretary, Geo. Kirwan, P.O. Box 451,
Cranbrook. Meets at Maple Hall, Cranbrook,
on second Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, James Sims, Cranbrook ; Secretary, J. F. Lynn, Cranbrook.
Meets at 8 p.m. at Cranbrook on first Wednesday in month. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 77
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Express & Station
Employees, Mount Baker Lodge, No. 1292—
President, A. H. Laurie, Cranbrook; Secretary, E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook. Meets
at Cranbrook on second Sunday at 3 p.m. each
month.
Fernie.
Miners' Association, British Columbia—President, John Rigg, Fernie; Secretary, AV. A.
Harrison, Box 568, Fernie. Meets at Canadian Legion Hall, Fernie, every first AArednes-
day at 11.30 a.m.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Canyon
Lodge, Local No. 165—President, L. AVider-
man, McMurdo; Secretary, AAr. Rande, Box
164, Field. Meets at Golden on first Sunday
of each quarter at 1 p.m.
Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Div. No.
821—President, Chas. Spencer, Kamloops;
Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall on first and third Sundays in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Div.
No. 611—President, J. A. Miller, General Delivery, Kamloops; Secretary, H. B. Battison,
Box 377, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall,
Kamloops, on second and fourth Sundays in
month at 2.30 p.m.
Natal.
B.C. Miners' Association—President, J. C. Smith,
Michel; Secretary, Simeon AA7eaver, Natal.
Meets every second Friday at 7 p.m. in the
Mission Hall, Natal.
Nanaimo.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada—President,
J. E. Foster, 438 Milton Street, Nanaimo;
Secretary, John Kerr, 123 Craig Street. Meets
at Occidental Hotel on second and fourth Tuesdays at 7 p.m.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No. 196—President, Eli Sut-
cliffe, Nelson; Secretary, R. M. Burgess, Box
657, Nelson. Meets at Cramage Barber Shop,
Nelson, at 7.30 p.m. on third Thursday in
month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, E. J.
Hoskey Division, No. 579—President, L. AAT.
Humphrey, Box 117, Nelson; Secretary, E. Jeff-
cott, Box 214, Nelson. Meets at Canadian
Legion Building on Sundays at 10.30 a.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, United Brotherhood of, Nelson Lodge, Local No. 1S1—President, C. Holm, Eholt; Secretary, J. Eliason,
Box 682, Nelson. Meets on last Sunday in each
quarter at 10.30 a.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, J. E. McKenzie, Nelson ; Secretary, G. B. Abbott, Box 722, Nelson.
Meets at K. of P. Hall, Baker Street, Nelson,
on fourth Tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Ko-
kanee Division, No. 460—Chief Conductor,
G. AAr. Allan, Box 476, Nelson; Secretary,
A. B. Hall, Box 986, Nelson. Meets in Canadian Legion Building at 1.30 p.m. on second
Sunday in month.
New Westminster.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada, New AVest-
minster Branch—President, A. J. Manzer, 1406
Edinburgh Street, New AATestminster; Secretary, AV. Taylor, 3030 Miller Avenue, New
AArestminster. Meets at 28 Lome Street, New
AArestminster, on second and fourth AVednesdays
at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, A. M. Ford,
740 Colbourne Street, New AVestminster;
Recording Secretary, AAr. A. Robertson, 224
Eleventh Street, New AVestminster. Meets at
Labour Temple on first Thursday in month at
8 p.m.
Civic Employees of New AArestminster, Union of—
President, Dave McAATaters, 711 Fifth Avenue,
New AArestminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan,
314 Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in
month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President, R. A. Cheale, 1710 Edinburgh Street,
New AArestminster; Secretary, G. H. Jameson,
1814 Eighth Avenue, New AATestminster. Meets
at 25 Hart Block, New AVestminster, on third
Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
256—President, Chas. Peeney, 906 Fifth Avenue, New AVestminster; Secretary, C. J. High-
sted, 1230 Ewen Avenue, New AVestminster.
Meets at No. 1 Fire Hall once every month at
8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C., Local
No. 14—President, Leonard Peterson, R.R. No.
1, New AArestminster; Secretary, Wm. E.
Maiden, Box 427, New AArestminster. Meets at
Canadian Legion Hall, New AArestminster, on
first Saturday of each month at 3.30 p.m.
Fraser River Longshoremen's Association—Secretary, AV. Scott, 49 Eighth Street, New Westminster.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of Canada, National Union, Local No. 4—Secretary,
AV. Young, 428 Elmer Street, New Westminster.
Meets second Tuesday at Hart Block, New
AVestminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 280—President, J. H. Garrod, 312
Eighth Street, New Westminster; Secretary,
AV. E. Bradley, 3020 AVilson Avenue, New
AArestminster. Meets at Canadian Legion Hall,
Begbie Street, New AArestminster, on third Friday in month at 6 p.m.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division No. 226—General Chairman, A.
Peplow, 333 Twelfth Street, New AVestminster.
Meets in Canadian Legion Hall, New AVestminster.
Railway Engineers, Conductors, Trainmen, Yardmen, Telegraphers, and Dispatchers, Canadian
Association of, New Westminster Lodge—Secretary, A. Potter, 812 Fourth Street, New
AATestminster. G 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, No. 134—President, S. I. Hearst, 1412 Seventh Avenue, New
Westminster; Secretary, A. J. Bond, 531 Fourteenth Street, New AATestminster. Meets in
Labour Temple at 7.30 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
.632—Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New
AArestminster. Meets in Labour Temple at
10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in each month.
Afancouver and District AVaterfront AVorkers' Association, New Westminster—Secretary, S.
Blake, 735 Columbia Street, New AVestminster.
Westminster AVaterfront Workers' Association—
Secretary, James Shaw, Begbie and Front
Streets, New AVestminster.
Penticton.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426—President,    AAr.    McQuistin,    Penticton ;
Secretary,   T.   Bradley,   Penticton.    Meets   on
first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railroad  Trainmen,  Brotherhood  of,  Local  No.
914—President,   Herbert  Nicolson,  Penticton ;
Secretary, AV. B. McCallum, Penticton.    Meets
at Odd Fellows' Hall, Penticton, on first and
third Mondays of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Prince George.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
202—President, F. P. Donavan, Hansard; Secretary, C. H. AVeaver, Hulton via Sinclair Mills.
Meets at MeBride and Prince George about end
of each quarter.
Railroad Employees, Nechako Division, Local No.
28—President, J. Roberts, Prince George; Secretary, A. G. Campbell, Box 138, Prince George.
Meets at Third Avenue, Prince George, on first
Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 620—Chief Conductor, R. J. Thompson,
Prince George; Secretary, J. E. Paschal, Prince
George. Meets in Prince George on second and
fourth Sundays in month at 8 p.m.
Prince  Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, Geo. Dun-
gate, 1239 Water Street, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert.
Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first
and third Wednesdays of each month.
Conductors, Trainmen, Farthest North Lodge, No.
869—President, AV. D. Moxley, Prince Rupert;
Secretary, J. H. Rife, P.O. Box 168, Smithers.
Meets in. Municipal Hall, Smithers, first and
third Wednesdays of each month at 8.30 p.m.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific—
Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, 86 Seneca
Street, Seattle. Meets in Seattle at 86 Seneca
Street on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m. and at Ketchikan, Alaska.
Electrical AVorkers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, T. B. Black, Graham
Avenue, Prince Rupert; Recording Secretary,
F. AV. Stamp-Vincent, Eighth Avenue, Prince
Rupert; Financial Secretary, J. N. Forman,
1742 Atlin Avenue, Prince Rupert.    Meets in
Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first Monday in
month.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 2, Canadian
Federation of Labour—President, Sydney V.
Cox, Box 531, Prince Rupert; Secretary, Wm.
A. Pilfold, Box 531, Prince Rupert. Meets in
Longshoremen's Hall on first Monday in month
at 8 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, F. Derry, Box 498,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, E. W. Tucker, Box
527, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall, Fraser Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m.
on second Monday of each month.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Div. No. 154—President, N. W. Appleyard,
Box 679, Prince Rupert; Secretary, H. R. Hill,
Box 679, Prince Rupert. Meets on third Monday at 7.30 p.m.;   no set place.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—
President, James Black, Prince Rupert; Secretary, Ben G. Rice, Prince Rupert. Meets at
326 Sixth Avenue East at 8 p.m. on first Friday
of each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. MacDonald, Box 268,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. N. Campbell, Box
689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 7.30 p.m. on last Friday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—President, Antonio Corrente, Revelstoke; Secretary,
Jas. M. Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke. Meets in
Selkirk Hall on the fourth Saturday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Div. 657
—President, H. Carpenter, Box 5, Revelstoke;
Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27, Revelstoke;
Meets in Selkirk Hall on first and third Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, S. J. Spurgeon,
Revelstoke; Secretary, A. McKenzie, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke, on
second and fourth AVednesdays of each month
at 2 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, C. E. Holten, Revelstoke;
Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 497, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 2 p.m. on first Monday of each month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, R. Wyman, Revelstoke; Secretary, T. Bysoutt, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's
Hall at 1.30 p.m. on first Sunday after 15th of
every quarter.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, A. N. Watt, Box
111, Revelstoke; Secretary, Chas. Lundell, Box
213, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8
p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Mount
Stephen Division, No. 487—President, J. M.
McDonald, Box 513, Revelstoke; Secretary, J.
Knox, Box 212, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk
Hall on second Sunday of each month at 2.30
p.m. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 79
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
Ill—President, F. V. Foster, Smithers; Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers. Meets at Smithers on first and third Tuesdays in month at
3 p.m. at City Hall.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415 (Bulkley)—President, J. S. Cathroe,
Smithers; Secretary, G. W. Smith, Smithers.
Meets at Smithers on Thursday at 7.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, AV. D. Mox-
ley, Prince Rupert; Secretary, G. H. Rife, Box
168, Smithers. Meets at Town Hall, Smithers,
on first and third Mondays of each month at
8.30 p.m.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Mount Garibaldi Lodge, No. 1419—President,
T. Smith, Squamish; Secretary, W. A. Mahood,
Squamish. Meets on second Tuesday at 8 p.m.
in the Elks' Rooms, Squamish.
Steveston.
Steveston Fishermen's Benevolent Society—President, Tamigoro Koshiba, Steveston; Secretary,
G. Takahiski, Steveston. Meets at Steveston
on second Saturday of each month at 2 p.m.
Three  Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173—President, Joe Mikus, Alamo; Secretary, T. H. Horner, Kaslo. Meets at Three
Forks on the first Sunday of each month at
1 p.m.
Vancouver.
Amalgamated Building Workers of Canada, Vancouver Division—J. McKinlay, Room 34, 163
Hastings Street West. Meets second and third
Tuesdays at 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Bakery & Confectionery Workers, Local No. 468
—President, R. P. Davis, Arancouver; Secretary, J. D. Inkster, 1124 Burrard Street, Vancouver. Meets in Labour Headquarters on first
Saturday of month at 7 p.m.
Bakery Salesmen, Local No. 189—President, R.
P. Hornal, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street on
second Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—President, Sam Grant, 320 Cambie
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, C. E. Herrett,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street on fourth Tuesday in month at
8 p.m.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President,
C. R. Lear, 1251 AAroodland Drive, Vancouver;
Secretary, T. J. Hanafin, 2376 Sixth Avenue
AVest, Vancouver. Meets at 402 Homer Street
on last Sunday of month at 8 p.m.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, AV. J. Bartlett, 1156 Howe Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048 Second
Avenue West, Arancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters when necessary; no set date or
time.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders' Union of
Canada, Local No. 1—President, L. C. Campbell, 349 Fifth Avenue East, North Vancouver;
Secretary, R. Woodbridge, 5407 Cecil Street,
Arancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West
on the second and fourth Fridays of each month
at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—President, Chas. McMillan, 1419 Nelson Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross
Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Hall,
Beatty Street, at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, Mrs. Anna Harvey, 4487
Quebec Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Miss
Gertrude Grossman, 2038 Columbia Street,
Vancouver; Financial Secretary, G. Mowatt,
Alcazar Hotel, 337 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver. Meets at Business Women's Section, Empire Building, Seymour and Hastings Streets,
Vancouver, on second Tuesday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Bricklayers, Masons' International Union of
America, Local No. 1, B.C.—President, Lawrence Padgett, 2066 Eighth Avenue, Vancouver ; Secretary, Wm. S. Dagnall, 1442
Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at
Labour Headquarters on second Wednesday in
month at 8 p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron AVorkers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—President, Robert
McDonald, 5059 Chester Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Paul Lauret, 531 Beatty Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty Street at 8
p.m. on second and last AVednesdays in month.
Bridge, Structural, Ornamental, Reinforced Ironworkers, Pile Drivers & Riggers, Local No. 1-—-
President, A. Andrew, 2066 York Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, W. S. MacKenzie, 647 AVin-
dermere Street, Vancouver. Meets at 8 p.m.
every first and third Thursday in Room 30, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Camp and Millworkers, No. 31—President, Taneji
Sada, 981 Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver ; Secretary, Takaichi Umezuki, 544
Powell Street, Vancouver. Meets every second
AArednesday at 542 Powell Street, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m.
Canadian Association of Seamen—Secretary, P.
O'Donovan, Davis Chambers, Hastings Street,
Arancouver. Meets in Association's Quarters;
no set date.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 15—President, H. C. Haines,
1919 Kingsway, New Westminster; Secretary,
E. Hill, 2352 Sixty-first Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets on first Tuesday of each month at
8 p.m. at Victory Hall.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
1—President, M. J. Teskey, 8 Twenty-first Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. McKinley,
817 Fiftieth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 163 Hastings Street AVest at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays of each month.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated (Shipyard),
Branch No. 2—President, Albert E. Arnold,
209 Twenty-fifth Street West, North Vancouver ; Secretary, Wm. Bray, 116 Sixteenth
Avenue   East,    Vancouver.    Meets   at   Flack G 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Building, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
on the first and third Tuesdays of month at 8
p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, R. J. Thompson, 531
Beatty Street, A'ancouver ; Secretary, AV. Page,
531 Beatty Street, A'ancouver. Meets at 531
Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays in month.
Cement Finishers' Union of Canada, Local No. 1
—Secretary, A. MacKenzie, 2641 Venables
Street, ATancouver. Meets on second and fourth
Tuesdays at 163 Hastings Street AVest, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59—President, D. Squair, 3728 Thirtieth Avenue AVest,
Arancouver; Secretary, J. Tarbuek, 3517
Twenty-fifth Avenue West, ATancouver. Meets
at 195 Pender Street East, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Union, Local No. 28—President,
Phil Floyd, 195 Pender Street East, Vancouver ; Secretary-Treasurer, George Harrison,
3427 Triumph Street, Vancouver. Meets on
first and third Fridays in the month at 195
Pender Street East at 8 p.m.
Electrical Trades Union, Canadian—President,
Robert S. Milne, 163 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver; Secretary, AATm. Shepherd, 163
Hastings Street AVest, Vancouver. Meets at
163 Hastings Street AVest on second and fourth
Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Electrical AArorkers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—President, D. AV. MacDougall,
1345 Renfrew Street, Arancouver; Secretary
and Business Agent, E. H. Morrison, 2642 York
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 202, 531 Beatty
Street on first and third Mondays at 8 p.m.
Engineers, National Union, Local No. 2—Secretary, G. Lamont, 223 Carrall Street, Vancouver. Meets at 223 Carrall Street on first
Saturday in month at 2 p.m.
Engineers Operator, National Union, Local No. 3
—President, C. Gaunt, 6607 Vine Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, J. E. Brown, 3435 McGill
Street, Arancouver. Meets on second Monday
in each month at 8 p.m., Room 36, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, No. 18, International Association
of—President, P. Trerise, 3416 Eighth Avenue
AArest, Vancouver; Financial Secretary, C. A.
Watson, 1624 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at 195 Pender Street East alternate first
or third Thursday monthly at 10 a.m. and 8
p.m.
Fire Fighters, Local No. 296—Secretary, Wm.
Thompson, 225 Fifteenth Street AVest, North
Arancouver. Meets in Fire Hall, Thirteenth
Street East, on first Monday of month at 7.30
p.m.
Firemen & Oilers, Local No. 289—President, O.
L. AArark, 2162 Forty-seventh Avenue East,
Arancouver; Secretary, A. Sutherland, 2049
Turner Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Temple on fourth day every month at 8 p.m.
General AVorkers' Union of Canada, No. 6—
Secretary, F. Johnston, 4750 Carlton Street,
Vancouver. Meets on first Monday in each
month at 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
General AVorkers' Union of Canada, Unit No. 9—
Secretary,    H.    Froggart,    North    Vancouver.
Meets on third Monday in each month at North
Vancouver.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, Robert C. Smart, 2684
Trinity Street, Arancouver; Secretary, Wm.
Morrice, 2228 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Meets on third Friday of month at O'Brien
Hall, Hastings Street, at 7.30 p.m.
Hod Carriers' National Union, No. 12—Secretary,
H. Gordon, Room 30, 163 Hastings Street
AVest, Arancouver. Meets on second and fourth
Tuesdays at 163 Hastings Street AVest, Vancouver.
Hotel & Restaurant Employees & International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 28 (Cooks and AVaiters) —
President, Flo Allen, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver ; Secretary and Business Agent, Colin
McDonald, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street on second and last
Mondays of each month at 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees & M.P.M.O. of United States and
Canada, Local 118—President, Bernard Mc-
Glone, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver; Secretary,
Rod Martin, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver. Meets
at Trades and Labour Temple on second Tuesday in month at 9.30 a.m.
Jewellery AVorkers' International Union, Local
No. 42—President, AV. T. Cran, 5568 Bruce
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, E. G. Howells,
3107 Thirty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street on first Thursday
in month at 8 p.m.
Lathers, National Union, Local No. 1—Secretary,
P. Thompson, 1728 Yew Street, Arancouver.
Meets on first and third Fridays at 163 Hastings Street AArest, Vancouver.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops
Division, No. 320—President, G. P. Boston,
1763 Third Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H. Stingley, 661 Twentieth Avenue
AArest, Arancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on
second and fourth Tuesdays in month at 2 p.m.
and 8 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No. 656
—President, Thos. McEwan, 350 Fourteenth
Avenue East, ATancouver; Secretary, S. H.
Waterhouse, 3438 Pandora Street. Meets at
I.O.O.F. Hall on first Thursday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Lumber Handlers' Association (Independent) —
President, M. McGrath, 696 Powell Street,
Arancouver; Business Agent, Jas. Greer, 696
Powell Street, Arancouver. Meets on Thursdays of the month at 8 p.m. at 696 Powell
Street, Arancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 182—President, George Lyle, 2240 Parker
Street; Secretary, Jas. H. AVallace, 2170 Trutch
Street, ATancouver. Meets on second Friday at
8 p.m. in Labour Hall, Arancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—President, H. R. Colquhoun, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Percy R.
Bengough, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays.
Mailers' Union, No. 70—President, A. R. C.
Holmes, 6439 Cypress Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, H. E. E. Fader, 2725 Eton Street, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 81
Vancouver.    Meets in Labour Headquarters on
first Monday of each month at 5.30 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 31—President, J. Firkins, Spences Bridge ; Secretary, R.
McClure, 4269 Victoria Drive, Arancouver.
Meets at Vancouver and Kamloops alternately.
Day of meeting first Sunday in every second
month at 1 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, E. S. Collins, 815 Kent Street,
Sapperton ; Secretary, John Roscow, 14 Fourteenth Avenue AVest, Arancouver. Meets at
Eagle Hall at 10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in
month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No. 7
—President, George D. Moody, 319 Pender
Street West, Vancouver; Secretary, E. Read,
319 Pender Street West, Arancouver. Meets at
319 Pender Street West on second and fourth
Fridays at 8 p.m.
Milk AAragon Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local
No. 464—President, J. Paterson, 529 Beatty
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, B. Showier, 529
Beatty Street, Arancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty
Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays
in month.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—President, John Browne,
638 Broadway West, Vancouver ; Secretary, D.
B. McCormack, 677 Sixteenth Avenue, New
AVestminster. Meets at Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in' month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Union), Local No. 145—
President, J. Bowyer, 2704 Fourth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, E. A. Jamieson,
319 Pender Street AArest, Vancouver. Meets at
G.AA'.V.A. Auditorium, 856 Seymour Street,
Arancouver, on second Sunday in month, except
during months of May, June, and July.
Musicians, National Union, Local No. 2—Secretary, AV. Turner, 322 AVoodland Drive, Vancouver. Meets on first Sunday in each month
at 322 Woodland Drive at 11 a.m.
National Union of Plasterers, Local No. 2—
Secretary, E. Williams, 1719 Yew Street, Arancouver. Meets at Flack Building, 163 Hastings
Street West, on third Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Painters. Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 138—President, H. O. McDonald,
845 Twentieth Avenue AVest, ATancouver;
Secretary, Ed Smith, 5216 St. Catherines Street,
South Vancouver. Meets at 8 p.m. on second
Thursday in each month at 529 Beatty Street.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of Canada, National Union, Local No. 3—Secretary,
A. McGillivary, 163 Hastings Street AVest.
Meets on second and fourth Tuesdays at 163
Hastings Street AArest, Vancouver.
I'attern Makers' Union of British Columbia—
President, Nelson Atkinson, Thirty-ninth Avenue and Eraser, Vancouver; Secretary, Albert
Hooper, General Delivery, Ocean Falls.
Photo Engravers' Union of North America, Local
No. 54—President, AVade Swearinger, 46 Fifty-
second Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, AAr.
Pumfrey, 2860 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first
Wednesday in month.
6
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, James McGuffie,
P.O. Box 320, Vancouver; Secretary, AV. G.
Russell, Box 320, Vancouver. Meets at 122
Hastings Street West at 8 p.m. each Friday.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International
Association of the United States and Canada,
Local No. 89—President, Harry AArest, 3419
Twenty-third Avenue AA7est, Vancouver; Secretary, Alfred Hurry, 1115 Thirty-third Avenue
East, Arancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street
at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday in month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, Val Person, 787 Fifty-second
Avenue East, Arancouver ; Secretary and Business Agent, Wm. Watt, 3346 Tenth Avenue
East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Union, Local No. 12—President,
Andrew Campbell, 2248 Triumph Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. AV. Macdonald, 2696
Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street at 7.30 p.m. every fourth Wednesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, AV. W. Quigley, 2829 Broadway AVest,
Arancouver; Secretary, Thos. S. Ezart, 1807
Thirty-eighth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Projectionists' Society, B.C., Local No. 348—
Secretary and Business Agent, John C. Richards, Box 345, Vancouver. Meets in Labour
Headquarters at 10 a.m. on the first Thursday
in every month.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local No. 59—Secretary, H. Strange, 3616 Victory Street, New Westminster. Meets on third
Fridays at Victory Hall, Homer Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division, No. 82—President, J. Hulme,
1937 Forty-fourth Avenue AVest, Vancouver;
Secretary, T. M. Sullivan, 2715 Dundas Street,
Vancouver. Meets at Flack Building, 163
Hastings Street AVest, ATancouver; no set date.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division, No. 206—Secretary, A. Mac-
Donald, 103 Hastings Street AVest, Vancouver.
Meets at 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
on second Sunday at 11 a.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, H. M. AValker, 6168
Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. B. Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at 2
p.m.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President, F.
W. Hitchcock, 2551 Thirty-seventh Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, S. C. Bate, 3025
Second Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets in
Post Office Building, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m.
on last Tuesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie, 1434 Eighth
Avenue East, Arancouver; Secretary, W. J.
Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 535 Homer Street oh second
Monday in month at 8 p.m. G 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—President, Victor Lund, 5634
Bruce Street, Vancouver; Secretary, F. H. Fallows, 1504 St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, Vancouver, on
fourth Friday at 8 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 280—President,
Thomas E. Burke, 3557 Dundas Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Daniel Macpherson, No. 308,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Thursdays.
Sheet Metal Workers (Railroad), No. 314—President, H. H. Swinden, 2265 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Arancouver; Secretary, Geo. AVatson,
1909 Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
■ Meets on second Friday of each month at Labour Headquarters, 529 Beatty Stret, at 8 p.m.
Sign & Pictorial Painters, Local Union 726—
Arancouver and Vicinity—President, Alymer
Pratt, 2732 Sussex Avenue, Burnaby; Secretary, Wm. O. Clarkson, 1823 Kitchener Street,
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Temple, Vancouver, on first and third Thursdays of each
month at 8 p.m.
Shingle AVeavers, Local No. 17813—President,
Fred Stevenson, 426 Tenth Avenue East, North
A'ancouver; Secretary, E. Lockhart, 8631 Montcalm Street, Vancouver. Meets on first and
third Sundays in Labour Temple at 8 p.m.
Steam Engineers, International, Local No. 963—
President, Hugh Alexander, 2030 First Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, Wm. R. Crawford, 1539 Parker Street, Arancouver. Meets
at Labour Temple on first Tuesday in each
month at 8 p.m.
Stone-cutters, Association of North America—
President, John Marshall, 4708 Beatrice Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. W. Tonge, 4119
Grace Avenue, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on second Monday in month at
8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, F. E. Griffin, 447 Sixth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary and Business
Agent, H. W. Speed, 2837 St. George Street,
Vancouver. Meets at K. of P. Hall, Eighth
Avenue and Scotia Street, Vancouver, on first
and third Mondays at 10.15 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Submarine Divers & Tenders' Union of Canada,
Western Division—President, H. E. Ryan, 433
Second Street East, North Vancouver; Secretary, L. T. Shorter, 2861 Trinity Street, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street on the
first Friday at 8 p.m.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—President, AV. J. Ingles, 2048 Eighth Avenue AVest, Vancouver; Secretary, A. S. Crosson,
3925 Fourteenth Avenue AVest, Vancouver.
Meets at 3925 Fourteenth Avenue AA7est on first
and third Sundays at 2 p.m.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local No.
178—President, Colin McDonald, 2834 St.
George Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. W.
Hocken, 1582 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Taxi, Stage & Bus Drivers, Local No. 151—
President, T. Robertson, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver;     Secretary,    Birt    Showier,    529
Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty
Street, Arancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Monday
and 10.30 a.m. on second Tuesday.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
466, International Brotherhood of—President,
F. Goodrich, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, Room 308, Labour
Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on first and third Mondays at
8 p.m.
Teamsters, Joint Council No. 36—President, H.
A. Smith, 3820 Quebec Street, Arancouver; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street on call of
Chair.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
226—President, C. S. Campbell, 529 Beatty
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
AAraterfront Freight Handlers' Association—President, C. Maigne, 233 Alain Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. T. Moore, 233 Main Street, Vancouver. Meets in rear of 233 Main Street,
Vancouver, on first and third AVednesdays in
month at 8 p.m.
AAraterfront Workers' Association, Vancouver and
Harbour—President, Joseph Boyes, 4758 Carlton Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Allan L.
Walker, 1902 Sixth Avenue AVest, Vancouver.
Meets at 45 Dunlevy Avenue on second Friday
of every month at 8 p.m.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, H. G.
Bartholomew, Box 446, Vernon; Secretary,
W. B. Hilliard, R.R. No. 1, Enderby. Meets
in Vernon at call of Chair.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, G. A. Turner, 616
Avalon Road, Victoria; Secretary, Jas. A.
Green, 1319 Douglas Street, Victoria. Meets
at Labour Hall on fourth Monday in month at
8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—President, L. Basso, 635 John Street,
Victoria ; Secretary, W. S. Duncan, 1409 May
Street, Victoria: Meets on first Tuesday of
each month at 8 p.m.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. AV. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. A. Wiley, 141
Clarence Street, Victoria. Meets at Burns
Building,. 1402 Douglas Street, at 8 p.m. on
fourth Friday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America, International Union of, Local No. 2—President,
E. W. Mertton, 1039 Hillside Avenue, Victoria ; Secretary, J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto
Street, Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on second
Monday in month at Labour Hall, Broughton
Street.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20—President, T. C. Johns, 112
South    Turner    Street,    Victoria;    Secretary,
F. E. Dutot, 1540 Bank Street, Victoria. Meets
at Canadian Pacific Railway Building, 1104
Government Street; no set date. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1932.
G 83
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1598—President, J. F. Mildon, 1640
Earle Street, Arictoria; Recording Secretary,
J. Townsend, Box 26, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall, Government Street, at 7.30 p.m. on
first and third Mondays in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, S.
Osborne, 2549 Graham Street, Victoria; Secretary, R. Betts, 2S58 Shakespeare Street, Victoria. Meets at Main Fire Hall, Cormorant
Street, at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday in month
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, R. D. Lemmax, 915
Kings Road, Victoria; Secretary, AV. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour
Hall, Government Street and Broughton, on
first and third Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Firefighters, City Union, No. 258—President, J.
F. Abbott, No. 8 Fire Hall, Victoria; Secretary, H. Medley, 48 San Juan Avenue, Victoria.
Meets at Headquarters Fire Hall, Cormorant
Street, at 8 p.m. on or about the first of each
month.
Machinists, International Association, Local No.
456—President, A. Wallace, 44 Lewis Street,
Victoria; Secretary, C. H. Lester, 3326 Oak
Street, Saanich. Meets at Eagles' Hall, 1319
Government Street, on fourth Thursday in
month at 8 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
2824—President, J. H. Davis, Cowichan Lake
P.O., Arancouver Island; Secretary, Arthur
Cann, Lake Cowichan P.O., Vancouver Island.
Meets at Labour Hall, Arictoria. Day of meetings, no set day.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, H. Ball, 1178 Fort Street, Arictoria ; Secretary, F. V. Homan, 418 Helmcken
Street, Arictoria. Meets at Labour Hall on
second Sunday in each month at 2 p.m. in winter and 10.30 a.m. in summer.
Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 119—President, J. AV. Whit-
taker, 716 Market Street, Victoria;   Secretary,
P. W. Smith, 1444 Mitchell Street, Oak Bay.
Meets at Labour Hall, Broughton Street, on
second AArednesday in month at 8 p.m.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, AVharf & Dock Builders, No.
2415—President, J. D. Murray, 318 Irving
Road, Victoria; Secretary, P. Packford, P.O.
Box 1027, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays of each
month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKen-
zie Street, Victoria. Meets at third floor of
the Jones Building at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Railway Carmen of America, Victoria Lodge, No.
50—President, J. Stephenson, 1617 Burton
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Oak Bay.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, Local No. 604—Victoria and District—
President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank Street, Victoria ; Secretary, H. H. Hollins, 1112 Government Street, Victoria. Meets at 1112 Government Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, James P. Torrance, 2510 Blackwood Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, AV. Turner,
2169 Fair Street, Victoria. Meets at corner of
Broad and Yates Streets at 10 a.m. and 7.30
p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, Jas. D. Davidson, 384 Burnside
Road, Victoria; Secretary, James Petrie, Box
1183, Victoria. Meets in Maccabees' Hall, 724
Fort Street, Victoria, at 2 p.m. on last Sunday
in month.
Wood, Wire & Metal Lathers, No. 332, Vancouver Island—President, L. McKay, 3074 Earl
Gray Road, Saanich; Secretary, James AArilson,
1054 Balmoral Road, Victoria. Meets at
Labour Hall on fourth Friday of each month
at 8 p.m.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1933.
2075-533-3007 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0308201/manifest

Comment

Related Items