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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1938]

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 PROVINCE  OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT  OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1937
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letters of Transmittal 5, 6
Reports—
Game Commission      7
Game Wardens, " A " Division      9
Officer Commanding " B " Division    12
Officer Commanding " C " Division    16
Officer Commanding " D " Division    25
Game Wardens, " E " Division    29
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-37, inclusive    32
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer-tags    33
Revenue—Sale   of   Resident   Anglers',   Free   Farmers',   and   Prospectors'   Firearms
Licences    35
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' and Outfitters' Licences    36
Revenue—Sale of Resident and Non-resident Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences
and Royalties on Fur    38
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-37, inclusive    39
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been collected, 1921-37, inclusive    40
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected
during Year 1937    41
List of Confiscated Fur, 1937    42
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1937, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur and
Firearms    42
Bounties paid, 1937 :    43
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-37, inclusive    43
Revenue—Big Game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1937    44
Prosecutions, 1937    50
Statement—Migratory and Non-game Birds banded during 1937 by Representatives
of the Game Commission    51
Statement—Return from Holders of Special  (Trapping)  Firearms Licences, Season
1936-37    52
Statements—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1937    52
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1937    53
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1937    53
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1937    54
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1937, also showing Revenue from Sale of
Bird-bands    55
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1937    55
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1937    59
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1937    60  To His Honour E. W. HAMBER,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1937.
GORDON S. WISMER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1938. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1938.
Honourable Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December,
31st, 1937.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Members, Game Commission. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1937.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
No change has been made in the administrative set-up of the Department. The Province
is divided into five divisions, an Inspector in charge of each, with experienced Game Wardens
constantly patrolling the districts allotted to them in each division. The work of these latter
officers is closely supervised.
With the system of game laws administration in the Province it is felt that every possible
step, with the men and equipment available, is being taken to improve conditions generally in
respect to the conservation of our valuable game and sport fish.
Every possible assistance has been rendered the British Columbia Provincial Police and
other Government departments, who have, in a like manner, reciprocated to a marked degree.
As in the past year, many lectures, illustrated by moving pictures, have been given
throughout the Province to or before Game Associations, Schools, and other organizations.
We have, or are gradually taking and putting together, what we honestly believe to be game
and fish pictures that are not only interesting but very educational, which fact is attested
to by the many requests and letters of appreciation received during the year. In 1937 these
game and fish films were shown to forty-nine organizations and approximately 8,283 people.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
We are as much impressed with the usefulness of the system of trap-line registration
as in the past. Trappers everywhere are continuing their most excellent co-operation in
seeing that the true intent or purpose of this system is carried out. This has resulted in a
steady increase in the stand of fur-bearing animals in the Province, and there would seem
to be no cause for fear or concern of any serious depletion of any or all species of our valuable
fur-bearing animals. We feel quite safe in saying that our fur resources are most valuable,
as we conservatively estimate that the annual fur catch is approximately $1,000,000.
FUR-FARMING.
Mink-farming still appears to be a popular and profitable business. During the year,
additional fur-farm permits have been issued, while very few fur-farmers, operating previously, have discontinued their fur-farming projects.
We have endeavoured to assist in every possible way to further fur-farming in the
Province, and propose continuing this assistance in the future. Complaints of the theft of
farmed animals have been fully investigated and, although convictions have not been recorded
against the parties responsible, the animals stolen in most cases were returned to their lawful
owners.
BIRD-BANDING.
Our migratory bird-banding station at McGillivray Creek Game Reserve has again been
operated in co-operation with the Dominion National Parks Bureau. Weather conditions
and lateness in starting banding operations prevented our trapping and banding any large
number of birds.    Particulars of these operations are to be found on page 51 of this report.
Returns from previous years' banding operations have given us a better picture in regard
to the flight, habits, etc., of migratory game birds, and it is felt that this interesting and
helpful work should be continued and, if at all possible, on a much larger scale.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
On page 43 will be found particulars of bounties paid during the year, as will also a
statement showing vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, who have been particularly instructed
in this regard.
Shotgun ammunition has also been supplied to Game Associations for use in the destruction of noxious birds, this ammunition being given out on the basis of one shell for each
pair of feet of a noxious bird turned in. Under this arrangement many thousands of crows,
etc., have been destroyed in bird-nesting areas. Z 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
For the first time in the history of the Game Commission, advertisements have been
placed in a number of sporting and other magazines in the United States and locally, drawing
to the attention of big-game hunters and fishermen our wonderful game and fishing resources.
Five hundred and four hunters visited the Province during the year, being an increase of
129 over the preceding year. This increase undoubtedly is attributable in a large way to our
advertising programme. We conservatively estimate that each of the hunters referred to
spent $1,000 each in connection with their game hunt. An increase was also noticeable in
the number of non-resident anglers' licences issued.
There is no reason why we should not continue to encourage big-game hunters and
fishermen to visit the Province. By doing this our stand of game and fish will not be
depleted, but we will be bringing thousands of dollars to the people of the Province.
GAME PROPAGATION.
A decided increase has been noted in the number of game-bird farms in the Province,
notwithstanding the fact that we found it necessary to warn each farmer that we could
hold out no assurance that we would be financially able to purchase any or all of the birds
raised. During the year 12,306 pheasants were purchased and liberated in various sections
of the Province.
Details covering bird liberations are to be found on page 53 of this report.
We have again trapped beaver alive and uninjured on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve,
and these animals have been transported and planted in various districts where it is known
that they will have every opportunity to increase and will be afforded every protection.
Game reserves which have been and are being established in various sections of the
Province have been responsible to a marked degree in keeping up the stand of game in the
surrounding areas.
Wapiti (elk) liberated in the Adams Lake country are increasing, but the wapiti in the
Naramata District are still giving us considerable concern through their doing damage to
cultivated lands, although the open hunting season on these animals has resulted in a decided
decrease in the number of complaints received.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
Once again our usual hunting season has been curtailed by the Dominion authorities.
We still take the stand, and have what we believe reasonable and just grounds therefor, that
there is and has been no need for the shortening of the season in British Columbia, and we
propose to continue our demands for more reasonable seasons in the various districts of the
Province.
Migratory game birds are decidedly on the increase in British Columbia, and during the
year most encouraging reports on these birds were received from our Game Wardens, interested sportsmen, and residents.
REVENUE.
We are very pleased indeed to be able to report a very large increase in our revenue this
year.
Revenue increased $21,598.01 over the preceding year, and since the end of the calendar
year 1934 the increase has been $34,410.89.
GAME FISH CULTURE.
Dr. C. McC. Mottley, of the staff of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo, who has
been acting in an advisory capacity in connection with our fish-cultural work, accepted a
position with Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, and while regretting the loss of his
valuable advice and assistance, we were very pleased to hear of his advancement in the line
of work in which he has been so interested.
As a result of the advice received from Dr. Mottley, and also due to our acquiring further
experience in sport-fish work, our programme, so far as it could be proceeded with, has been
very successful.
Upon referring to pages 54-55 of this report, a statement showing liberations of trout
from the various hatcheries controlled or subsidized by the Game Department is to be found.   REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 9
We again experienced difficulty during the summer months with the water-supply to the
three hatcheries operated by the Department, but, fortunately, this condition was not as
pronounced as in previous years.
Financial assistance was rendered to certain Game Associations in the interior of the
Province, in the erection of traps for the purpose of taking coarse fish such as carp, squaw-
fish, etc. These Associations are to be complimented on the work undertaken, as they were
responsible for the destruction of many tons of coarse fish which are so detrimental to our
sport fish and the destruction of food for migratory game birds.
Steps have again been taken to reduce the cost of food for the trout in our hatcheries,
and we are very pleased to be able to advise that some reduction has taken place this year.
As in other years, the Dominion Fisheries Department has kindly, donated or supplied us
with Kamloops trout eggs for our hatcheries, and for this we are most grateful.
At the beginning of the year a committee was appointed by the Honourable the Minister
of Marine and Fisheries for the Dominion and the Honourable the Attorney-General for the
Province to delve, very carefully, into all phases of fish-cultural work carried on by the
Dominion Fisheries and the Provincial Game Departments. A report of the committee's
activities has been submitted, and it would seem that in the very near future there will be
more centralized control of our non-tidal fisheries.
Cut-throat trout-egg collections were made at Prospect Lake and adjacent lakes near
Victoria, resulting in the taking of 108,000 eggs, these being placed in our Veitch Creek
Hatchery for hatching and distribution in lakes on Vancouver Island.
The hatcheries, rearing-ponds, etc., operated by various Game Associations who were
granted subsidies for this work by the Game Commission, have been responsible for the
liberation of many thousands of Kamloops trout.
Certain scientific work has been carried on through the co-operation of the Pacific
Biological Station. The Forestry Department has also assisted materially in stream and trail
improvement work. Assistance or co-operation such as this cannot but help, reacting most
favourably in the interests of not only fishermen but other citizens as well.
We have complied with many requests for lectures or detailed information on our
sport-fisheries work, and are always only too pleased to furnish all particulars covering our
aims or objectives in improving game-fish conditions everywhere in the Province.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Game Associations, farmers, and others interested have rendered every assistance in
connection with the work of conserving our game and sport fish, and as a result of our
lectures the young people of the Province are also becoming conscious of the need for game
protection or conservation.
As in the past, the British Columbia Police Force has furnished splendid co-operation.
The friendly relationship between the two Departments has been very pronounced. Our
remarks also apply to the Provincial Forestry Branch under the capable supervision of
Mr. E. C. Manning, the Chief Forester.
We wish to express our appreciation to Major J. A. Motherwell, Chief Supervisor of
Dominion Fisheries, his officers and men; Dr. W. A. Clemens, Director of the Pacific Biological
Station at Nanaimo, and his assistants; Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird
Officer for British Columbia; and many others who have helped us so much in our work
during the past year.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1937.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Throughout the Division black bear are plentiful and, as in past years, complaints
of these animals doing damage to domestic stock have been received. Grizzly bear are fairly
numerous at the head of Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlets. At the head of Knight
Inlet one party, during the course of their trip, observed eight grizzlies. Z 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Deer.—In most areas of Vancouver Island deer suffered to some extent, owing to severe
weather conditions during the winter. Trappers, circularized in one district, bear out this
statement. Courtenay District reports deer on the increase in certain sections, while in the
Alberni area, especially along the west coast, deer are not noticeably increasing. A slight
improvement in the number of deer was to be noted throughout the northern sections of the
Division. More deer were taken during the past season in the Cowichan Lake area than
during the previous three or four seasons. This, however, has not been the case in the
Nanaimo District where, according to reports of the Game Warden, deer have slightly
decreased in number.
From the Victoria District comes the report that weather conditions were very poor at
the beginning of the hunting season, but with the cooler weather later in the season there
was a very noticeable improvement in hunting conditions, resulting in a number of deer
being taken.    The season for the hunting of deer, throughout the Division, was fairly good.
Mountain-goat.—There was no noticeable increase in the Phillips Arm and Loughboro
Inlet countries, and these remarks also apply to the districts lying north of these areas on
the Mainland.
A special patrol was made into the Shaw Creek (Lake Cowichan) District for the purpose
of reporting on condition of goat liberated by the Department some years ago. No definite
information was obtained, however, but indications pointed to the fact that these animals had
most likely migrated to the McKay Creek range where there are suitable grazing or feeding
grounds for them.    A further patrol into this district is contemplated.
Wapiti (Elk).—On the west coast fairly plentiful at several points. In the Oyster River
area elk are increasing and appear to be spreading towards the Quinsam River country. A
number of calves were observed in this section of the Division. Elk are also to be observed
in the vicinity of Beaver Lake below Upper Campbell Lake. In the Nimpkish country these
animals are fairly plentiful, but do not appear to be increasing to any great extent. From
the Game Warden at Lake Cowichan comes the report that elk are spreading out and can
now be found anywhere from the Nanaimo Lakes to Alberni and south on both sides of the
Nitinat River to Lake Cowichan.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—These animals are increasing, and although a close season is still in effect on
Vancouver Island certain registered trappers, who had conserved and protected their beaver,
were granted special permission to take a limited number. Permits to trap were also issued
in a number of cases owing to damage to agricultural lands and also public highways.
Beaver are, however, scarce in some sections of the Division and the policy of issuing permits,
such as outlined herein, would seem to insure against depletion in any section and is much
more easily controlled than by allowing a general open season.
Otter.—Land-otter are reported as generally being scarce, but in some sections are
increasing.
Marten.—Fairly plentiful and are not being trapped too heavily. Some portions of the
Division reports show slight increase in stand of these animals.
Mink.—In the northern portions of the Division mink are increasing, and in most other
sections favourable reports as to the stand of mink are being received.
Racoon.—These animals can be considered as being numerous and have been trapped
fairly consistently.
Muskrats.—Fairly heavy trapping, due to some extent of damage being done by these
animals, has reduced their numbers as they do not appear to be as plentiful as in past years.
Wolverine.—Scarce, only few animals trapped during the year.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Favourable reports as to numbers in areas on southern end of Vancouver Island. Birds were scarce along west coast but in fair numbers throughout Alberni
District. From Courtenay comes the report that blue grouse are holding their own and are
spreading over the logged-off areas. Lake Cowichan District hunters had one of the best
seasons in years and these remarks also apply to the Nanaimo District.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Scarce in Victoria and Lake Cowichan Districts but fairly plentiful
in Alberni, Courtenay, and Nanaimo territories, but care should be exercised in seeing that REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 11
too long an open season is not allowed in any given district for the hunting of these real
sporting game birds.
Quail.—Birds wintered well in southern sections and were plentiful. Alberni, Courtenay,
Lake Cowichan, and Nanaimo Districts report birds were scarce. In the Courtenay country
the winters probably are too severe for the successful propagation of quail.
■ Pheasants.—For particulars of pheasant liberations refer to statement contained in this
report. Victoria reports indicate pheasants have not been very numerous. Fair numbers
are to be observed in the Alberni, Cowichan, and Nanaimo areas. The Game Warden at
Courtenay reports the stand of pheasants has been very disappointing and that the birds
suffered during the winter months, although feed in suitable quantities and locations was
put out. Hard winters and poor weather during the breeding season have no doubt been
responsible for shortage of birds on the Coast during the past few years.
Migratory Game Birds.
A considerable improvement in the number of ducks and other species of migratory game
birds was to be observed during the past season. A fairly large increase in swans, which are
permanently protected, was observed in many sections of the Division.
Brant were to be found in increasing numbers in those sections of the Division to which
they are accustomed to visit each year.    Geese were also fairly plentiful.
Shore-birds were seen in increasing numbers.
Vermin.
Wolves have increased and cougar have been taken in good numbers. Bounty was paid
on 171 cougar and 13 wolves through the offices of various Government Agencies during the
past year, representing a bounty expenditure of $3,550. On comparison of these figures with
the bounties paid in 1936, there is or has been a decided decrease in cougar especially.
Predatory-animal Hunters J. Dewar and J. C. Smith have accounted for a number of
cougar and other predatory animals. Special hunters have also been employed from time
to time with beneficial results.
Game Wardens in " A " Division accounted for the following vermin during the year:—
Cats   281       •        Eagles      28
Cougar        3 Hawks      81
Dogs     68 Owls      31
Wolves    11 Ravens  137
Crows   704
Game Associations have also been responsible for the destruction of large numbers of
noxious birds, principally crows.
Game-protection.
As in past years, continuous patrol-work has been undertaken. Surprise or special
patrols have been greatly responsible for better observance of the game laws, such patrols
having been made into many sections of the Division. The districts to be covered by Game
Wardens are far too large, and probably as revenue increases extra appointments of experienced Game Wardens can be made in some sections of the Division where additional
patrol or protection service is required.
Pit-lamping has again been responsible for a number of arrests and convictions. The
unlawful taking of deer and fur-bearing animals at night is to be deplored, and every possible
step should be taken towards eliminating this unsportsmanlike and cruel practice of obtaining
game.
Game Propagation.
During the year 2,762 pheasants have been liberated on Vancouver Island. All birds
liberated have been in good healthy condition. A detailed statement of these liberations will
be found in another section of this report.
Fallow deer on James Island are continuing to be a problem. Trapping these animals
alive for liberation elsewhere has not been very successful, and in order to keep down
possible damage to property these deer were required to be reduced in numbers by permitting
shooting under permit. Z 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Reserves.
Game reserves throughout the Division have been responsible for improved stands of
game in surrounding districts. As far as possible close supervision has been kept over
these reserves, but, generally speaking, the public observes their boundaries, and while some
do or may infringe they are in the minority.
As in the past, permits have been granted to hunt predatory animals in a number of these
reserves with very beneficial results.
Fur Trade.
Vancouver is the principal fur centre for the Province, and most fur taken on Vancouver
Island or along the Coast is sent to this city or exported to outside fur markets.
Fur-farming.
Again it is necessary to mention an increase in the number of fur-farms, especially
those farmers having mink in captivity. Every assistance has been given these fur-farmers
and they appear to be making a success of their business. Farmed mink-pelts have been
bringing a good price on the fur market.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Trappers holding registered trap-lines seem to be carrying out the true intent of the
regulations and are farming their lines in a proper manner, as is evidenced from returns
received. In many sections of the Division the regulations, however, do not apply as the
areas being trapped are on private land or within the boundaries of a municipality.
Registration of Guides.
There are only a few registered guides in this Division. Particulars of all licensed
guides in this area can be found in a statement further on in this report.
Special Patrols.
As previously pointed out, a number of special and in some cases " surprise " patrols
have been undertaken into remote sections of the Division.
Hunting Accidents.
Very few accidents occurred in the Division compared to previous years. A statement
showing all hunting accidents is to be found later on in this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Throughout the year every assistance has been received from the British Columbia
Police Force, the Provincial Forestry Department, Game Associations, farmers, and others,
for which the Game Wardens in " A " Division express their sincere appreciation.
Game conditions generally are improving, and with milder winter and a good breeding
season a decided improvement in conditions no doubt will be noted.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1937.
Big Game.
Moose.—These continue to flourish in the Rockies and the previous reports of their
infiltration into the West Kootenay are substantiated from time to time as they continue to
be seen on the east side of Kootenay Lake. They are now quite plentiful on the Selkirk side
of the Columbia River, between Windermere and Donald.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals seem to parallel the range of the moose, including their
tendency to migrate across the Columbia into the Selkirks. There are still a few extant in
the Naramata area, where the open season has lessened their depredation in the orchards.
A number of these animals that were previously trapped and released in the vicinity of
Princeton are doing reasonably well. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 13
Caribou.—Caribou are sparsely distributed in the mountain ranges contiguous to Kootenay
and Arrow Lakes, and only a small number were taken during the open season. .
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are well distributed in the district and are numerous in
the Rocky Mountains.    They are not plentiful in the Boundary or Okanagan sections.
Mountain-sheep.—The Rocky Mountain big-horn are numerous in the Rocky Mountain
section of the East Kootenay. Small bands in the Ashnola and Okanagan District, as
previously reported, do not, on account of a limited range, show any appreciable increase in
spite of a consistent closed season.
Bear (Black and Brown).—The plentitude of black and brown bear during the past
summer and fall has been remarkable, particularly in the orchard districts around Kootenay
Lake. Apparently due to the scarcity of huckleberries in the mountains, the bears consistently raided orchards, and as a result were destroyed in great numbers by fruit-growers
and farmers, to such an extent that it is felt that these animals will not be numerous, in
the Kootenays at least, for several years to come. It was also noted that bears killed late in
the fall, when they should have normally hibernated, were in extremely poor condition. The
natural result of bears denning up in this condition would be that they would not survive
the winter.
The prevalence of bears near settlements was noticeable in the East Kootenay as well as
in the Boundary District. They did not appear to be so much of a nuisance in the Similkameen, no doubt due to the fact that that district does not support as heavy a bear population
as the remainder of the Division.
Grizzly bears are fairly plentiful in the East and West Kootenays, but comparatively
scarce in the Boundary and Similkameen.
Deer.—The past open season on deer has resulted in a heavier kill of bucks than at any
time in recent years. For this two factors are suggested. One is that there was a fairly
heavy snowfall on the mountains during the early part of November, which brought the deer
down in great numbers. The other reason is the plain fact that there are a lot of deer
throughout the Division.
So easy was it to obtain the limit of two bucks that experienced hunters all the way
from the Similkameen to the East Kootenay have expressed their apprehension that the
kill has been too heavy, and that the time has come to curtail the season somewhat. It is
suggested that the present two weeks in the month of December could be eliminated without
any hardship to the hunters, and with a resultant curtailment of the too easy killing of deer.
The deer that are killed in December are almost, without an exception, in no condition
to afford the sport that these same animals furnish earlier. They are no longer alert, they
are usually thin, and their flesh is too strong to be palatable. The taking of bucks at this
time, so late in the fall, does not seem to be justified either from a sporting standpoint or the
replenishment of the larder.
The above resume also represents the individual opinions of all the Game Wardens in
the Division.
White-tail deer are plentiful in the East Kootenay, fairly well distributed in the West
Kootenay and Boundary Districts.    They are only occasional in the Similkameen area.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The annual catch of fur-bearing animals in the Division does not appear to vary greatly
from year to year, according to the statistics available. Mink, marten, lynx, and weasel are
the principal fur-bearers taken, with beaver and muskrats next. The fisher and wolverine,
as well as an occasional otter and fox, are trapped each season. The consistent amount of
fur caught each year is an indication that the trappers are handling their trap-lines in a
conservative manner, and are not depleting them by trapping too heavily in any season.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue and Franklin grouse are well distributed throughout the district. If anything,
blue grouse are more plentiful than in recent years.
Ruffed grouse, as previously anticipated, are at the bottom of the cycle, and may be
presumed to be climbing back up the numerical grade. They are generally reported more
scarce than in other years, but are still present in good numbers in some localities. Z 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Hungarian partridge are not particularly plentiful, with the exception of the Similkameen
District, in the Oliver-Osoyoos vicinity. They have not shown any particular increase in
Creston or Grand Forks. In all the above localities it is presumed the resident birds have
worked up from the adjacent States, as they have not been planted locally.
Ptarmigan are encountered in the high mountains, but as sporting birds are inconsiderable.
Pheasants continue to be plentiful in the Similkameen-Okanagan District, as well as
Creston and Grand Forks. They are also showing satisfactory increase at points on the
Arrow Lakes, where they have been planted, and appear to be holding their own in the
East Kootenay, where experimental plantings have been made the past two years.
It is thought that pheasants have sufficiently established themselves in the Similkameen-
Okanagan, and it is suggested that their numbers would remain fairly consistent without
introducing new blood. However, in considering the very fine sport offered by these birds, it
is felt that restocking annually will ensure consistent good hunting at a very low cost.
California quail suffered heavily last winter in the Similkameen District but made an
encouraging recovery during the summer, and it is hoped the present winter will not be so
hard on these interesting little upland birds.
The experiment of planting Bob-white quail in Creston in .the spring of 1936 does not
seem to have been successful, as it is feared none of them have survived the first winter
of 1936-37.
Migratory Game Birds.
The conditions for nesting ducks were generally good during the spring and early
summer, and from all observations large broods were successfully reared. The local ducks
were present in good numbers during the early part of the open season and the northern
flight was fair, possibly not as good as in earlier years, but a decided improvement over
last year. The fact that the heavy flight did not arrive until the season was practically
over no doubt resulted in considerable saving of birds, although the total number of birds
taken in this section of the Interior is not extensive in any normal year. The extremely
mild weather was responsible for the delayed flight from the north.
Locally reared geese were plentiful in the East Kootenay and around Creston, while a
fair flight of northern geese were coming in at the end of the season and continuing until
the freeze-up.
Wilson snipe, coots, and occasional shore-birds continue to hold their usual fair numbers,
but are little sought after by hunters.
Vermin.
There were 51 ownerless dogs, 77 wild domestic cats, 30 coyotes, 380 crows, 131 hawks,
and 136 magpies destroyed by Game Wardens on patrol. This is exclusive of bounties paid
on cougar and coyotes, and coyotes taken by trappers during the open season. Several Rod
and Gun Clubs also conducted crow and magpie shoots during the summer with great success.
Game-protection.
Seventy-four prosecutions during the year under the " Game  Act,"  Special  Fisheries
Regulations,   and   " Migratory   Birds   Act,"   resulted   in   sixty-eight   convictions   and   six
dismissals.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released for restocking in the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand Forks
Creston and Lower Arrow Lakes Districts, as well as in the East Kootenay Valley, north
and south of Cranbrook. So far these and previous experiments have been very satisfactory
although it is not yet conclusively proven if the pheasants can be successfully acclimatized
in the East Kootenay, as the increase is not as great as had been anticipated. The
assistance of sportsmen, principally resident farmers, is greatly appreciated for the care of
pheasants during the severe winter months. Their assistance in feeding these birds, as well
as their observations, are very helpful in determining the pheasants' stand in any particular
locality.    As usual, feed was supplied by the Game Department wherever necessary. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 15
Game Reserves.
There are three game reserves, four deer sanctuaries, and two game-bird sanctuaries in
the Division.
Fur Trade.
There are seven fur-traders in the Division, and the bulk of the fur goes to Vancouver;
a comparatively small proportion being exported directly to the Eastern fur market.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is on the increase, due to the satisfactory prices prevailing recently for
cultivated fur, principally mink, although the market for fox is also satisfactory. It is
presumed that in the near future the influence of ranch-raised pelts on the fur market will
be a greater factor than it is at present. Apparently scientific management of these animals
is producing a superior pelt to that of their wild brethren.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Approximately 500 registered trap-lines embrace the entire available territory in the
Division, and there is a waiting list of trappers for any lines that may become available.
The present system of handling trap-lines is apparently satisfactory to all trappers.
Registration of Guides.
There were twenty-seven licensed guides operating in the Division during the past
season. Most of the hunting expeditions were of short duration, and some guides had two
or more parties out during the fall. Big-game hunting in the East Kootenay is relatively
inexpensive compared to the northern part of the Province, or in Alaska, and for that reason
the East Kootenay is attractive to non-residents of moderate means. It is gratifying to
mention that the hunters, almost without exception, express themselves as being thoroughly
satisfied with the results obtained at a modest expenditure.
Special Patrols.
Patrols were consistently carried out during the year into the remote areas, principally
on horseback, snowshoes, rowboat, and on foot. While none of the above could be classed
as special patrols, the Wardens concerned were out for varying periods up to ten days.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 22nd, Rowland Summerell, of Penticton, while riding in a wagon with
Jack Watts, was slightly wounded in the thigh when jolting accidentally discharged a .22
rifle.    Watts was consequently charged for carrying loaded firearms in a vehicle.
On September 26th, Joseph Henry Porter, of Fauquier, was wounded when his rifle
slipped from where he had stood it against a tree while chopping wood. The bullet shattered
his arm, and he died in Nakusp Hospital on September 28th.
On November 14th, near Kimberley, Tony Blezina, of Kimberley, was accidentally
wounded in the rump by William MacDonald, also of Kimberley.    The wound was not serious.
On December 1st, Charles Taylor, of Kimberley, was separated from his hunting companions and was found the following day still alive, but died shortly after his rescuers
arrived, from exposure and exhaustion.
On December 13th, Ira Emette Brinson, of Trail, was separated from his hunting companions near Fruitvale, and was found dead on December 16th. It appeared he had worked
a double shift at Trail before going hunting and was not heavily clad. His death was
presumed due to fatigue and exhaustion.
Summary and General Remarks.
Some of the perennial problems were to the fore as usual during the year; namely, the
more satisfactory control of predators, adjustment of the water-fowl season, and the doe
deer argument.
It is felt, in the East Kootenay section particularly, that a year-round bounty on coyotes
should be established. This is on account of the presence of sarcoptic mange among the
coyotes, which renders their pelts valueless. Z 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The duck season is not satisfactory in the Kootenays, as it is felt it could be extended
to the end of November and shortened to commence on October 1st with advantage.
The doe season seems to crop up whenever the season is mild and the bucks are high
and hard to get. This is understandable, and many hunters will insist that the ratio of
bucks to does is disproportionate. But what does seem to be inconsistent is the argument
that too many bucks are being killed off and therefore the doe season should be opened.
While big game continues to be the chief attraction in the East Kootenay for non-residents—both for hunters with a gun and with a camera—the total kill is light. Comparatively few moose, elk, sheep, goat, or caribou are killed by residents. Mainly because they
require a little more time to obtain than mule or white-tail deer, and also because the
weather is usually mild with a consequent difficulty of bringing out meat in good shape.
For that reason the actual big-game hunting is mostly done by non-residents, who are
interested primarily in the trophies or the pleasure they obtain from camping in the wilds.
Weather conditions during 1937 have been good, and the forest fire damage was small.
Only one specific instance of a diseased deer was reported, Penticton Detachment, and it is
thought that, notwithstanding many adverse factors affecting them, our stand of sporting
ruminants are in a favourable position. That is, they are plentiful, but not yet at the
state of over-population, where they are liable to be readily infected with disease.
Barring some unforeseen malignant caprice of nature, this favourable condition may be
expected to continue.
The usual cordial co-operation from the Provincial and also the Mounted Police during
the year is greatly appreciated. Also the many instances of material assistance rendered
by members of the various Game Associations, as well as their moral support, has been of
inestimable value.
"C" DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Game
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1937.
Big Game.
Moose.—Mining development around Barkerville is partly responsible for the decrease or
partial disappearance of moose. In the Quesnel area the increase in numbers is again
noticeable.
There is some report of an alleged variation in build and coloration of moose west of
Quesnel. However, there is no authentic or scientific information which would lead us to
believe in the possibility of any two distinct species existing in that area. Further inquiries
will be made shortly in regard to this report. Moose remained on the higher ranges until
late in the year, as a number were observed at the 4,000-foot level in the middle of December.
Feed, such as peavine, remained quite green in the northern area up to the middle of
October. To the best of our knowledge, at least forty moose were taken out by non-resident
hunters from the Quesnel area. All but ten came from the west side of the Fraser River.
A conservative estimate of 120 moose were killed by residents, Indians, and settlers in the
above district last fall.
Moose were first seen in the Bowron (Bear) Lake District in 1901, according to old-
timers, and west of the Fraser in the Nazko District in 1912-13. In the Williams Lake area
these animals were first observed in the spring of 1924, according to reports. In the Likely
area reports state that moose were first seen around Beaver Lake in 1912-13. East of
Lac la Hache they were seen in 1920-21. Clinton reports their first appearance in 1921-22,
although they were seen around North Bonaparte in 1910. At Tranquille they were observed
in 1924. In their southward migration moose have taken approximately twenty years to
travel 160 miles. This, however, is only a rough calculation. The appearance of an occasional
specimen should not be taken as applying to their general appearance in any locality. I am
of the opinion that there will be no large-scale migration still farther south, except in areas
more suitable to their propagation. The Williams Lake Detachment reports a large increase
in moose.    It is stated that more of these animals were killed this last season than in any REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 17
previous open season. The general opinion in the Cariboo area is that moose have multiplied
their numbers to a very noticeable extent. There is a report of moose having been seen in
the Cariboo in the eighties, but this cannot be verified at present.
Caribou.—A pronounced scarcity of caribou is reported over most of this Division, which
would imply a closed season or drastic curtailment of the open season. The hunting of this
species in the Kamloops Detachment was unusually heavy during 1935-36. Repetition of
these invasions by hunters added to the kill by predators will soon deplete their numbers.
Special attention should be paid to this section of the report where a scarcity is reported
almost everywhere.
A few small bands may be seen at the headwaters of Quesnel and Horsefly Lakes. In
the Clinton Detachment few caribou were taken. They are quite numerous on the mountains
on both sides of the Willow River and in the Aitcha Mountain locality, which is in the extreme
west portion of the Quesnel Detachment.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are increasing at Deer Park Ranch, near Fraser:
River, in the Williams Lake Detachment. Marble Range, in the Clinton Detachment, has a
few sheep but they are not increasing. Very few have been seen during the recent open
season. The sheep at Squilax were released there in 1926. Thirty of these were transferred
to Squam Bay a few years later. These continue to increase. A short open season on the
sheep at Spences Bridge, Squilax, and Squam Bay would not be out of the way.
To the passer-by they are not much of a tourist attraction as they are seldom seen,
except where they have damaged crops and irrigation flumes in the Spences Bridge District.
In a public park big-game animals are a tourist attraction, but adjacent to and on private
property and Indian reserves they are more of a nuisance and have no more fear of civilization than the proverbial house-cat.
During the last two years ways and means have been found of preventing further damage
to private property. To-day these sheep have, to a large extent, left the area where they were
first liberated and have now scattered. Some have been seen near Ashcroft and at Blue Earth
Lake. Latest advices from the Indians are that only a few can be seen from time to time
around Spences Bridge. A patrol will be made in the early spring to ascertain the extent
of their range.
Mountain-goat.—In the Upper Clearwater and Murtle Lake areas a few mountain-goat
exist. On the Momich River there are still many on the mountain-slopes. Michell Lake
and the headwaters of Horsefly also have their numbers still unimpaired. South and east
of the Bowron Lake Game Reserve mountain-goat can be observed very high up on the ranges.
Bear.—In the southern part of this Division the berry-crop was frozen and little or no
supply was in evidence. As a result of this failure, bears, mostly black, invaded the sheep
flocks of the wool-growers and did extensive damage. Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttle-
worth killed twenty-two black bears which were actually molesting and killing sheep. One
wool-grower alone lost ninety sheep in one raid by two large black bears. The sheep ran
into the bottom of a gully, where they piled up against a large tree across their path. Most
of these animals were suffocated. The herder killed one bear and Predatory-animal Hunter
Shuttleworth killed the other.
It was the busiest year this Department hunter has had, and while it was impossible to
attend to all complaints of this nature on time good work was accomplished and a great
many head of stock were saved from destruction.
As grizzlies were scarce they seldom troubled domestic sheep. In the Aitcha Mountains
they are in fair numbers. A few were taken in the northern portion of the Clinton and
Williams Lake Detachments during the year. At the head of Mission Creek grizzlies have
been thinned out during the last few years because of damage to the stock of wool-growers.
Mule-deer.—An exceptionally large number of deer were taken this year. A very early
snowfall drove them down all over this Division. It is estimated that 700 deer were killed
in the Kelowna District. A very large proportion of these were young bucks. Under these
conditions, which fortunately do not arise every winter, the deer population will possibly
suffer.
In the Kamloops area the kill of deer was unusually heavy; practically every hunter
bagged from one to two deer. If we limit the season and cut two weeks off the latter end,
or even one week, it would effect a saving.    There are cases where, in the Okanagan, this Z 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
would work a hardship; but it seems that some hunters appear to regard even the killing
of bucks in poor condition better than losing the opportunity of getting any through pressure
of business in the field of seasonal vocation. The deer population may suffer a temporary
set-back such as the 1937 season, but it should also be remembered that in some seasons the
kill is unusually limited because of unsuitable climatic conditions. The present buck law
has stood the test of time and even after the season is over there are still large numbers of
bucks left.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Marten are reported in increasing numbers along the Nazko Mountain. While we have
no definite figures for the Division, the winter conditions were against a heavy catch.
Unusually deep snow prevailed throughout and travelling was difficult.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue grouse are exceptionally scarce in the Quesnel area. This also applies to some
extent to Vernon and Salmon Arm and Clinton. At Williams Lake the blue grouse keep a
steady low average in numbers. Kelowna reports an increase of blue grouse. The heavy
winter of 1936-37 took a heavy toll of game birds everywhere, especially quail, Hungarian
partridges, and, in some cases, pheasants.
In the Kelowna District quail have almost disappeared. The California quail liberated
at Tranquille about two years ago have increased rapidly. About twelve quail were released
and they have now increased to approximately 100 birds. The locality is splendid, fully
sheltered, and has ample food-supply. Their worst enemy is the house-cat, but many of these
have been trapped and destroyed this winter.
There is no word of the appearance of the Hungarian partridge liberated in the Cariboo
a few years ago. I am in receipt of a report from Forestry Officers of the Kamloops District
of an unusual species of bird observed in the Brookmere area on October 14th, 1937. Its
description is as follows: Colour, mottled grey and black—grey dominant; size, much like
barred rock hen, but with finer neck and head; body, quite square; weight, 5 to 6 lb. Two
birds were noticed from a distance of 40 feet, one on the ground and one on a windfall. The
possibility of these birds being capercailzie, which is very doubtful, will be investigated during
the coming spring and a report will be submitted. If possible, a more accurate description
will be obtained.
Migratory Game Birds.
Local ducks in the Quesnel Detachment remained about the same numerically as in
previous years. At Williams Lake they are not increasing. It happens practically every
year, and it is again borne out by observation over most of this Division, that the local duck
population, on the whole, provides the first and most satisfactory shooting of the season.
After two weeks of steady firing, and that means little or no rest to feed, ducks begin to
gradually disappear—not to the small lakes on the mountain-tops, but apparently south,
across the International Boundary-line. This is noticeable even to the casual observer.
There follows a lull in the shooting in this Division and, if climatic conditions in the north
are not conducive to the existence of food-supply for water-fowl, the northern ducks commence
their flight south, passing over vast stretches of country in this Division which, time and
time again, is frozen over, and so on across the 49th parallel.
In the majority of cases the sportsmen of the Central and Southern Interior obtain
fairly good shooting at local ducks, but in any case, even if the season is extended or pushed
ahead, it depends almost exclusively on the date of freeze-up. If the freeze-up is early, then
we have to grin and bear it and content ourselves with the local ducks. In many cases,
depending on the breeding conditions, ducks are very small on September 15th, and when
this is evident October 1st would be a more suitable opening date. At least, this condition
could be observed over a period of years. A few sportsmen object to delaying the season in
the Kamloops District until October 1st. However, uniform opening dates are desirable. In
the Yale Electoral District the Nicola cattle-raisers complain that a heavy influx of hunters
from the Okanagan two weeks before their own season opened worked a hardship on the
cattle, where the continued shooting kept them on the move with a consequent loss of weight
and value to the cattle-raisers.    If we begin the season on September 15th in the Kamloops   REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 19
Electoral District, then it means a heavier influx of hunters from outlying districts and a
heavier toll taken of the local duck population, which this district cannot very well afford.
Nicola cattle-raisers are entitled to some consideration, and it would appear that the later
season to conform with the majority of the other districts would be a protection for their
interests.
A heavy migration of northern ducks was observed in the Quesnel District about
November 9th with the first snow and cold weather.
In the Merritt area the freeze-up came about the end of October, and with the exception
of the water-fowl in the Chaperon Lake District the heaviest flight south took place around
October 30th. Actually then, the northern flight of ducks passed over the Southern Interior
almost without stopping. In other words, where the season opened on September 15th,
sportsmen on the Cariboo-Nicola flight-line only had about three weeks of actual shooting of
local ducks.
While the morning and evening flights are, in many places, negligible compared with the
Coast flights, I have never yet been able to understand why shooting of ducks should be
allowed for a period of one hour after sunset, which, in the Interior and mountainous country,
amounts to total darkness.
We have gone to the trouble of providing a nesting and feeding period for pheasants,
but we have not yet considered water-fowl in the same category. This, in my opinion, is
responsible, to a very large extent, for the disappearance of the local ducks after about two
or three weeks of steady shooting. Some of the officers in the field also support this view.
True, on some of the larger lakes a great many water-fowl seek protection. At Kelowna,
on the Okanagan Lake, there were thousands of mallards wintering there, as most of the
lake contained open water this year.
In the Vernon District the absence of predators and the presence of additional cover is
reflected by an increase in water-fowl. On the Commonage, where a large number of small
lakes and pot-holes exist, this is very noticeable, and a variety of bird-life abounds there in
a beauty-spot difficult to surpass in any other part of this Division. It is a spot well worth
visiting at any time during the spring months.
The areas protected by private property in the Douglas Lake and Nicola Districts in the
protection of water-fowl have their virtues. Large numbers of birds find a haven of rest
from the battering of numerous guns.
Vermin.
There are two districts in this Division where the crow and magpie are definitely under
control, where pheasants are raised and in certain areas where water-fowl and- other birds
exist in unusual numbers. I refer to Vernon and Kelowna. On the range-lands of the
Kamloops and Nicola Districts the inclusion of the crow is welcomed by the cattle-raiser and
also many farmers, and they feel that anything that will combat the grasshopper menace
should be encouraged. In certain districts the crow is more of a help than a detriment and in
others he is an unmitigated nuisance. Localized control is therefore necessary, but no fear
need be expressed at the disappearance of the crow. If the crows are cleaned up locally they
become very much in evidence during the fall in their sojourn to lower lands from the
mountain-tops in a clean-up of what is left over from crops not garnered.
The members of the Lillooet Rod and Gun Club have destroyed approximately:—
Crows   350 Hawks        9
Magpies  120 Cats      30
Eagles        1
A number of the following predators were destroyed by Game Wardens in this Division
during the year: Dogs, cats, crows, eagles, wolves, wild cats, black bear, coyotes, owls, hawks,
magpies, and cougars. Three hundred and fifty-two crows were destroyed by Game Warden
MacMartin alone. About 450 magpies were destroyed by the same officer. Twenty-four
coyotes were killed by Game Warden Maxson and twenty-three by Game Warden Jobin.
Predatory Animal-hunter Charles Shuttleworth killed twenty-two black bears in the act of
destroying sheep.
Reports of timber-wolves are increasing in this Division and also of their rapid southward migration. They seem to be following or driving the moose still farther south. They
are a most difficult animal to trap as they are continually on the move and becoming bolder. Z 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Two cases of wolves taking cattle are reported from Quesnel. Cattle-raisers on the headwaters of the Euchiniko River report an increase from one band of eight to two bands of
twenty. They are now increasing in the southern portion of the Cariboo. The latest advice
is being sought in regard to the most successful method of destroying these animals. They
have been seen in the Clinton Detachment at Bridge Lake. The hide of one black wolf
trapped on the west side of the Fraser River near Clinton measured 7 feet.
Game-protection.
A total of 147 prosecutions with eight dismissals were registered in this Division during
the year. Of this number, three were executed by Provincial Police. Game Wardens Still,
Maxson, MacMartin, and Jobin were unusually active in this connection.
An Indian Game-protection Club has been organized at Fountain Valley, in the Lillooet
District. It is, no doubt, the first of its kind in British Columbia. The showing of moving
pictures of wild life and the absolutely obvious necessity for protection among the Indian
bands would have a very pronounced effect in time. Propaganda of this type, especially in
the Chilcotin, is necessary.
Very little feed for pheasants has been used up to the end of the present year on account
of the very mild winter and lack of snow on the lower levels. If this keeps up, wild life
generally will pass through the winter in good shape.
The Game Associations in this Division still show a lively interest in all matters pertaining to the protection of wild life. The exhibition of wild-life pictures by members of the
Game Commission in numerous centres of British Columbia is having a marked effect,
especially on the youth of our Province. The use of coloured films is a greater relief for the
eyes and the inclusion of talking pictures should follow in time, with effective slogans. I
would suggest the slogans as an important feature at the beginning and ending of every
picture.
Game Propagation.
Thirty-six pheasants were trapped at Tranquille during the winter of 1936-37, twenty-
three cocks and thirteen hens. Because of the severe weather and deep snow these birds had
to be held for several weeks and a larger number would have been trapped if more accommodation had been provided.    As usual they were scattered throughout the Kamloops District.
Another trap has been constructed and put into use during the present winter, but the
lack of snow and abundance of feed around the Tranquille Sanatorium is making the trapping
difficult and less successful. It would seem that in no other portion of British Columbia can
such a sm'all area show such a large number of pheasants. In a few years we expect to say
the same of the California quail. Eight hundred and fifty-seven pheasants were purchased
by the Department and liberated in this Division during 1937.
There is some difference of opinion in the Kamloops District on the success of the
pheasant shooting last fall. As usual a great many birds took to the slopes and draws during
the day and came down again after shooting hours. In the British Columbia Fruitland area
they showed up well after the season expired. In my opinion it was a good average season,
except in one or two places where no cultivation took place as in former years. Although the
Vernon District has a larger number of birds compared with other districts the shooting there
was not as good as in former years, despite the care and feeding of the previous winter. The
dispatch of pheasants for liberation after the breeding season is over is probably not conducive to good results. However, as it is impossible to obtain them from the pheasant-breeders
on time, little can be done about the matter.
Beaver liberated at Wells and Kersley Creek are doing splendidly. A few were also
released at Lilypad Lake. Ten pairs of Bob-white quail and twelve pairs of California quail,
liberated in the Lillooet District, are doing well.
Game Reserves.
Tranquille, Bowron Lake, and Yalakom are the only game reserves in this Division.
Tranquille Game Reserve is really only a pheasant sanctuary. A deer sanctuary has been
established in the Upper Bridge River Valley.
Moose in the Bowron Lake Sanctuary are decreasing every year, but deer and mountain-
goat show some increase.    Ever since the year 1901 moose in the Bowron Lake area have REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 21
steadily increased up to around seven years ago, according to reports. In the very early
days, lily-pads and other feed grew in great quantities around Bowron Lake and adjacent
bodies of water. It was often difficult to take a boat through them. To-day the moose have
cleared them all out and there is scarcely any lake feed left. From 1901 to 1916 these animals
increased rapidly. It was not uncommon to see as high as thirty-five moose in one day, and
on one occasion in the early days thirteen were seen at one time.
Fur Trade.
A few years ago an attempt was made at Divisional Headquarters to ascertain the extent
of fur-catch for this Division. This fur is sent mainly to Vancouver. This record was discontinued because of pressure of other duties. Practically all revenue from furs, big-game
trophies, and non-resident licences is now collected either at the International Boundary-line
or at Vancouver. May I suggest, for statistical purposes, that the catch returns be compiled
and sent to each Division in an effort to ascertain the why and wherefore of reduced or
increased fur-catches? I am informed that the 1937 fur-catch did not exceed the 1936 catch,
but this is purely a local opinion.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is gradually increasing in volume and in many cases producing good returns.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Section 39 of the " Game Act" should be amended to give more protection to the registered trapper. The lands within a registered block of territory, except private property,
should be included as trapping territory in so far as molesting or setting traps within 1 mile
is concerned. This is as described in the " Game Act" at present and which appears to apply
to single trap-lines. The system is 100 per cent, effective if we can also locate the poacher at
the other end, who sells and has his name registered with various fur-buyers.
The leasing of a trap-line to others is having a detrimental effect on the fur-catch. The
majority of those leasing trap-lines feel that they may not be able to lease the line again and
therefore fur takes the rap. A minimum of two active trappers should be made compulsory
on all lines of a certain mileage and supply of fur. One of these would be the registered
holder.
If a graph of each trap-line were-kept and the fluctuations of the fur-catch shown, I am
of the opinion that a few of the trap-line holders would have their lines immediately cancelled.
The system of graphs could be followed with ease and greater and quicker control exercised.
A steady drop in a graph would immediately indicate something wrong. If the fur-catch
drops steadily over a period of years, then the cause can be found in the individual trapper.
The marten as a rule lives where the food-supply is most abundant. It will wander from
one line to another, staying for brief periods in one locality and then passing on. The trapper
knows this and his argument is: " Well, if I don't take them, the other fellow will." There
are some lines which are mainly marten lines and others which are not. Some remedy should
be found to conserve the marten, even if we had to classify lines and limit the catch.
Practically no disputes over trap-line matters exist in this Division, and where any arise
most trappers are reasonable and mutual understanding solves many difficulties. Any disputes arising over trap-line matters are invariably due to maps showing ground not fully
surveyed and lacking in the necessary details. This is solved by both parties in the dispute
supplying the necessary details lacking, together with other evidence necessary for final
solution of their difficulties.
A total of 90 per cent, renewals of trapping licences was received up to the end of
December with three and one-half months of the season still to go.
Registration of Guides.
There is still a great deal to be done in establishing a thoroughly sound big-game guide
policy. For many years there has been dissatisfaction with the present conditions. The
writer met four non-resident hunters last fall who made the mistake of hiring guides without
proper inquiry. All of these hunters were dissatisfied with the ability of the guides and the
scarcity of game, due, perhaps, to lack of knowledge on the part of the guides. Z 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Special Patrols.
Several special patrols were executed by Game Warden Atwood as follows:—
Along west side of Fraser River to Twan Creek. Several Indians were checked. This
patrol took place in February. Saddle-horse, 147 miles. In March a patrol was made to
Swan Lake area investigating trap-line conditions. Saddle-horse, 150 miles. Two patrols
were made in April and the first part of May to the head of Ramsey Creek, Trout Lake,
Blackwater, and Nazko to investigate a complaint by the Indian Agent at Vanderhoof. By
horse, 414 miles.
During November and December another patrol was executed by Game Warden Atwood
to the Upper Nazko, through the Nazko Valley, and up the Batnuni. This was to investigate
trap-line complaints.    By saddle-horse, 363 miles;   foot, 35 miles.
A special patrol was made by Game Warden Jobin, of Williams Lake, and Constable
Broughton, of Alexis Creek, to the headwaters of Gaspard Creek and Big Creek. Two
Indians were arrested and convicted for having moose-meat in their possession during the
month of April; also for hunting land fur-bearing animals during the close season. Three
hundred and eighty-two miles were covered by car, horse, and foot. This patrol was instigated at the request of the Officer Commanding this Division.
Two special patrols were made by Game Warden Mottishaw to Spruce Lake area in
connection with checking up Indians.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 13th, 1937, Rod McKenzie, guide, from Barkerville, B.C., was accidentally
shot in the left leg by Mr. G. P. Maggard, of San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.
Mr. Fullingham, Mr. Maggard, and guide were coming down from Hanging Valley after
looking at bait left for grizzly. The guide, Mr. McKenzie, was ahead, with Mr. Maggard and
Mr. Fullingham about 30 feet behind. Mr. Maggard stepped over a pile of windfall and
brush and in doing so his rifle discharged. The bullet struck McKenzie in the back of the
left thigh. First aid was administered and the injured man conveyed by boat by Messrs.
Becker and Hansen.    Ready assistance was also given by Mr. Maggard and Mr. Fullingham.
It has been suggested that the guide should have taken the necessary precautions to
see that his client's firearm was in good order and quite safe. The rifle carried by Mr.
Maggard was a well-known American make and a new model with a type of safety-catch not
wholly dependable in rough country.
On October 23rd, 1937, Roy Longley lost his leg by a gun accidentally discharging in the
hands of Charles Petman. Mr. Longley was out hunting in the Kelowna District. The gun
parts were badly worn and the sudden jar discharged the weapon.
On September 26th, 1937, Napoleon Bellieu, of Alkali Lake Indian Reserve, accidentally
shot and killed Joe Dan, another Indian, while hunting moose near Eagle Lake. Bellieu
mistook J. Dan for a moose.    The coroner's jury returned a verdict of accidental death.
Summary and General Remarks.
The early frosts appear to be the deciding factor in the water-fowl situation in this
Division. In the Okanagan far better shooting is to be had during the latter part of the
season, but in the Cariboo-Kamloops-Nicola flight the chances are about six to one that the
freeze-up completely terminates the presence of water-fowl, except occasionally along the
Thompson River. When this takes place the Okanagan route is still the Mecca of large
numbers of water-fowl, more so than the higher country of the Kamloops area where shooting
becomes a thing of the past early in November. Around Kelowna a heavy population of
' mallards was in evidence during the winter of 1937-38. If an earlier season on water-fowl
is requested around Kamloops it is bound to draw an influx of hunters from districts where
the season is closed. This should also include the Cariboo. This would react to the benefit of
lodges and merchants; but would this influx of hunters be a detriment to the water-fowl
situation? In my opinion it is bound to be. Last fall the Nicola area was an illustration of
this. The season opened on September 15th, fully two weeks ahead of the Okanagan. This
brought a full contingent of Okanagan sportsmen to the Nicola. These, added to the local
residents, gave the water-fowl ho respite. In the spring of each year there is always a heavy
migration of water-fowl passing along the Nicola, Kamloops, and Cariboo flight-line.    On account of the heavy frosts and early freeze-up in the fall of the year, only very small percentages of this number ever appear on the same feeding-grounds on their way south across
the International Boundary-line.
A slight extension of the season for British Columbia sportsmen would be a fair and
equitable settlement.
Very careful inquiries made throughout this Division reveal the duck and goose population as quite numerous for local water-fowl and has been so for two or three years, but
otherwise very disappointing in the supply of northern water-fowl.
In regard to big game, the open season just concluded was largely beyond previous years
in the matter of bag-limits. Heavy and early snow brought big game down, especially the
mule-deer. Most hunters took their bag-limit in their wintering-grounds with little hunting.
In the northern part of this Division the heavy undergrowth served as a protection to mule-
deer. This undergrowth makes hunting difficult and sometimes impossible. In the Quesnel
Detachment fresh wapiti tracks were reported at the head of Tuatri Creek.
The western portion of this Detachment has never been thoroughly covered in a survey of
game conditions.
During the hunting season more big-game hunters called at Williams Lake to inquire and
hunt than in any previous year. Inquiries were received from as far as Honolulu, and in
many cases the hunting for next year is already booked up.
In the Merritt Detachment during the summer months of 1936 and 1937 a check has been
kept by the local Game Officer on the number of American cars coming in to investigate and
enjoy the sport-fishing in this part of the Division. In 1936 about ninety cars were checked
and in 1937 over 390 cars were checked. Most of them were American. A great many of
those tourists were brought in as a result of the advertising programme initiated by the
Game Department and all were satisfied with the sport-fishing in the Interior.
There is still considerable room for ingenuity in advertising and I would suggest that new
schemes be devised to bring in the tourist, provided it would not jeopardize our game and
fishery resources to any serious extent.
The trapping season 1936-37 had all the earmarks of a poor season. The eternal snow
and its depth imposed a severe strain on fur-bearers.
An albino beaver has been seen in the Savona District during last summer and fall.
A large mountain-goat, the only one of its kind remaining on the summer range near
Savona, was killed by a kick from a horse when it became too familiar with the stock on the
ranch of Harry Ferguson.
Reports of damage to fruit-trees by deer at Peachland came to hand. The use of wire
netting has been suggested around each individual tree or where the greatest amount of
damage is being done. These orchards were planted in the midst of a deer yarding-ground
and this complaint of damage has been made for many years. In one case high fencing has
been tried with success, but the expense involved is too great to protect all properties in that
area. The determining factor in a solution to this problem will be a possible reduction in the
number of does. Various scarecrows have been put up in other places. The use of cougar
gall has also been tried with limited success, as the aroma does not last long enough to keep
deer away from haysta"ks or garden-patches for any more than a few days. The most
effective solution to the problem of protecting haystacks is to wind around the stack a 6-foot
width of chicken wire placed about 1% feet from the ground and held to the stack by means
of long iron wire staples driven in. The usual fence to keep cattle out is necessary but is
useless for deer, and to fence this with chicken wire some distance around the stack would
involve additional expenditure.
In the yarding-grounds of the mule-deer during the winter of 1937-38 there remained
for any one to see an impressive sight in the large numbers of animals enjoying a very mild
winter.
Predators have been and are still roaming and killing. According to Predatory-animal
Hunter Shuttleworth, a cougar will frequently take the healthiest and biggest animal it
happens to run across. While it is true that the weaker animals are more easily killed, it is
largely a matter of opportunity in the case of the cougar and no exception is made in their
choice of kill. I am at a loss to understand why more trapping of cougar is not carried out.
These animals travel up and along mountain ridges and have well-known trails or beats where Z 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
game animals exist. As they are comparatively easy to trap, I suggest that trappers should
be instructed in the habits of those animals in order to facilitate the proper location of sets.
The amount of destruction carried on by predatory-animal hunters and by others taking
advantage of the bounty is a drop in the bucket compared to the menace that exists and
roams our mountain ranges. In other words, we are indulging in localized control. Even the
most ardent nature lover who favours leaving wild life and predator alike to nature's course
should not object to this. If a predator is doing damage locally to game, then it should be
destroyed if, in addition, it is of no benefit to agricultural interests. I would not, however,
condemn it to everlasting destruction all over the Province simply because it causes damage
locally.
As all wild life has thrived and retained its natural equilibrium through the ages in the
midst of predators, it is hardly in keeping with the law of nature that we should interfere in
an effort to straighten out something that nature has decreed should exist. There is nothing
beautiful or glorious in the natural scheme of biological growth if that form of life is deprived
of its natural enemies. An animal fully alert to every sound, with all faculties unimpaired
and in full use for its own protection, is what every hunter and nature lover desires to see.
In the course of my travels over this Division I have frequently obtained the impression from
observation that game animals raised in proximity to civilization, protected and free from
predators, are not the animals one usually admires when he goes farther afield.
The Junior Game Association movement is likely to spread. I am informed that it is the
first of its kind in the Dominion of Canada, if not in the American Continent. Since its
inception at Kamloops last year, several clubs are in the process of formation. As all conservation relates to the preservation of the forest, the inclusion of Ranger Bands in these
junior organizations would be most important.
The Forestry Department, under the capable guidance of Chief Forester E. C. Manning,
is mainly responsible for the inauguration of the Forest Ranger Bands in the northern portion
of our Province.    A correlation of the aims of the above units would be desirable.
A log of the highways and side-roads is being made in this Division showing mileage
from one lodge to another. This includes mileage between ranches, creeks, lodges, towns,
roads, lakes, etc., for the benefit of the tourist.
A compendium of information has also been compiled on various fishing lakes, lodges,
boating accommodation, fishing gear best adapted to each lake, etc. Information has also
been gathered on hunting, guides, equipment, species of game, charges, etc., for the benefit
of the big-game hunter, angler, and tourist.
Some change should be made in the revision of Game Districts. This difficulty has been
outstanding for many years. At present we have the electoral district boundaries which are
geographically wrong as pertaining to the enforcement and open seasons under the Game
Regulations. Visitors to this Province and from one district to another find it next to
impossible to locate boundaries, many of which do not exist on public highways.
The idea of using longitude and latitude lines is, in my opinion, an improvement on the
present electoral district boundaries, which are geographically described and jut in and out
all over the country. If we take the populous centres or each town of any size in this
Province and use the longitude and latitude lines, so many miles north, south, east, and west,
we would at least know how far from each town we would have to travel before going into
another Game District. A revised large-scale map on the backs of the regulations would have
to be utilized and made, perhaps in two sections—one for the northern and one for the
southern portion of the Province. Certain difficulties may arise in working out this plan of
revision, but I do not consider it impossible to solve.
I might also recommend the inclusion of smaller regulation sheets, if this is not too
costly, to take in certain districts only, such as Dewdney, Yale, Lillooet, and Cariboo. This
would give the regulations for a trip from Vancouver through the Cariboo. Another sheet
could be prepared for Dewdney, Yale, Lillooet, Kamloops, Salmon Arm, North and South
Okanagan, and Similkameen. This would include a trip from Vancouver to the Okanagan
via Kamloops, Vernon, and on to the International Boundary-line. There would be less
difficulty in interpretation, and districts over which we have no interest would be eliminated
from the regulations.    The vast majority of hunters do not move out of two or three electoral REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 25
districts in the course of a season. This could apply to the electoral districts, or revised
districts if the former idea were adopted. A limited number of the present regulation sheets
could still be utilized.
I am greatly indebted to various Civil Servants for assistance rendered to this Department during the year just concluded. I wish to especially thank the officers of the Forestry
Department for their services. Their capable assistance, so readily rendered, has been a
pleasure to us at all times. To Inspector Shirras, Staff-Sergeant Service, Sergeant King,
Sergeant Mansell, and various other officers, I again wish to extend my thanks for their advice
and assistance in the past.
The many Game Associations have loyally co-operated and have shown a spirit of willingness to help at all times.
The task of running the affairs of this Division has been pleasantly aided by the esprit
de corps of the Game Commission and officers of this Division, so essential to its success and
smooth functioning.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE
RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1937.
Big-game Animals.
Moose and Caribou.—Reported in fair numbers throughout the northern and eastern
portion of the Division.
Deer.—From all reports received it appears that these animals are the greatest sufferers
from the depredation of the timber-wolves and coyotes, and if the losses continue the matter
of a close season will have to be considered.
This does not apply to the Queen Charlotte Islands, where the deer, owing to the total
absence of coyotes, timber-wolves, and cougars, are very numerous, and in lieu of a possible
close season, as suggested above, the open season could safely be extended and the bag-limit
increased.
Wapiti (Elk).—Scarce throughout the Division, with the exception of the Musqua-Toad
Rivers area, where a band of about 150 animals is reported. Owing to the depredation of
the wolves, the prevailing close season on these animals should be maintained.
The elk literated on the Queen Charlotte Islands show a fair increase, but a close season
should be maintained until their numbers have increased considerably.
Bear (Black).—These animals are very numerous throughout the Division. It has been
suggested that the close season during July and August be removed and that they be considered as predatory animals.
Bear (Grizzly).—In fair numbers throughout the Division, and as they are quite an
asset as a trophy for visiting big-game hunters, the close season on these animals should be
maintained.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain).—These animals are to be found in fair numbers in the Sheep
Creek Pass area north of McBride. A band is also reported in the Caribou Mountains
between the headwaters of the Raush-Shuswap, the Clearwater and Castle Rivers, in latitude
53, longitude 120.10. One of the Prince George guides is planning an expedition, by plane,
into the area, take a Game Warden to accompany said expedition, when more information
will be obtained regarding the location and numbers of these animals.
Sheep (Stonei and Fanini).—Good reports as to the number of these animals have been
received from the Cassiar, Musqua River, and Finlay River Districts. The prevailing close
season has been found satisfactory and should be maintained.
Sheep (Dahl).—Further reports confirming previous information as to the location of
this species in the north-west corner (Dahlton Post) of the Province have been received, and
this species of sheep can now safely be enclosed in the nomenclature of wild animals of the
Province.
Goat.—These animals are not hunted extensively and therefore are in no danger of
extermination.    Open season and bag-limit to remain as established in past years. Z 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Land Animals.—The fur-catch will not be up to average. Numerous reports as to the
cause of the reduced catch have been received. Certain districts report an increase in rabbits,
others were favoured with mild weather, the fur-bearers being able to find their natural food
—mice, rabbits, etc.—did not have to hunt, resulting in a medium catch of fur.
As a whole the fur-catch will be below average, but this does not indicate that the fur-
bearers are not in the country. Reports have been received of numerous fur signs throughout
the Division, and if fair weather prevails a healthy increase is expected.
Water Animals.—Beaver and rats are to be found on most white trappers registered
trap-lines. A few Indians are conserving their beaver, but in most instances the Indian
kills all beaver on his line and relies on the overflow of his neighbours to obtain two or three
beaver each year.
A campaign of education by moving-pictures, lectures, etc., in the various Indian schools
and some Indian villages would, perhaps, create an interest in conservation among the
younger people, eventually resulting in conservation-work by the Indians themselves.
To be effective the idea of conservation cannot be forced on the Indians, but must be
slowly brought to their attention as being very desirable. The initiative must, in all events,
be left with the Indians in order for same to be lasting and effective.
The matter of lectures in this Northern Division should receive your very kind consideration.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—A noticeable increase in the number of grouse has been reported throughout
the Division, but in order to fully re-establish these birds in their previous great numbers,
the small bag and short season established these last two years should be maintained.
Ptarmigan.—These birds, owing to the remoteness of their habitat, are reported in great
numbers in every district.
Hungarian Partridge.—The birds liberated at McBride and Vanderhoof are reported on
the increase. If at all possible a greater number of these birds should be introduced in the
northern part of the Province.
Pheasants.—Numerous.trials have been made to introduce the bird in the northern areas,
and in future experiments should be discouraged.
These birds were introduced on Graham Island, where they are established and remain
close to the cultivated area in the vicinity of Tlell. No great increase is anticipated until
agricultural lands are extended over a much greater area.
It would be advisable to introduce new birds in order to prevent inbreeding and ultimate
deterioration of the species. The introduction of a dozen male birds each year over a period
of three years would be very desirable.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—A great number of ducks and geese nest in the northern portion of
the Division, congregate at various points in the Northern Interior during the autumn,
forming a flight which travels through the Chilcotin District and eventually reaches the
Coast.
The northern flights from the Yukon and North-west Territories do not come through
the interior parts of this Division, but some flights follow the coast and some pass to the
east of the Rockies through the Peace River District.
Greater attention should be paid to the flight or flights originating in the northern
section of the Province. Such flights have been observed by numerous trappers and hunters
and have been very uniform over a period of years.
There is no danger of the British Columbia ducks and geese being depleted by the
shooting carried out in this Division. The season of eight weeks could safely be extended
to nine weeks, from September 1st to November 8th, as the cold weather around November 1st
generally causes the birds to migrate about that time. But the extension of the season to
November 8th would afford our sportsmen an extra eight days' hunting should the season
be late, as prevailed during the last two years, when no birds were to be seen during the
first two weeks in September and a great number during the two first weeks in November. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 27
Vermin.
Coyotes.—The coyotes are reported as decreasing, owing to mange. No proof of the
above has been produced, but the absence of coyotes is quite noticeable.
Timber-wolves.—These predatory animals are still to be found in great numbers. A few
cases of mange have been reported and a reduction in their numbers through this disease
is anticipated.
Cougar.—These are steadily increasing in the southern half of the Division. Quite a
few have been killed this season, but their increase far exceeds the number killed. An
increased bounty is suggested.
Game-protection.
Continued patrolling of the various districts by the Game Wardens and by members of
the British Columbia Provincial Police Force is a feature of our game-protection work.
The formation of new Game Clubs at Vanderhoof and the co-operation of all Game
Clubs with the officers of this Department has been of great assistance to the members of
this Department in their enforcement and game-protection work.
In order to create greater public interest in our Game Department work, lectures,
especially to school-children, with the aid of lantern-slides or moving pictures, should be
given at regular intervals, and would be of great value from a game conservation point of
view.
This matter was brought to your attention in last year's annual report, and I respectfully
suggest that this phase of game conservation work be kindly considered by the Commission.
Numerous patrols, ordinary and special, were undertaken by the Game Wardens in the
Division, covering the following mileage:—
Miles. Miles.
Train   14,129 Horse   (including sleigh)       3,815
Autos   58,880                Plane        7,138
Foot (including dog-team) 8,248                                                            	
Boat   12,228                                Total   104,438
Game Propagation.
Very encouraging reports have been received regarding the six beaver liberated on
Graham Island. A further supply of these animals, from three to five pairs, should be
liberated on Graham Island and these fur-bearers will then be well established. Further
reports on these animals will be obtained and submitted at a later date.
The promises made to the McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, and Smithers Rod and
Gun Clubs to liberate a certain number of Hungarian partridges in their respective districts,
should, if at all possible, be carried out during the year 1938.
Game Reserves.
Game reserves at Prince George, Lake Kathlyn (near Smithers), and Prince Rupert
have been regularly patrolled and are fulfilling the purpose for which they were established.
Kunghit Island Game Reserve, a refuge for deer, has never been patrolled and conditions,
etc., on this reserve are unknown. A patrol will be made during the coming summer and
report obtained.
Fur Trade.
Fur-traders are complaining of a poor season, prices being low and fur-catches below
the average. A number of trappers ceased trapping of land animals at an early date, which
would account for the small amount of fur offered to the trade.
A greater catch of beaver and rats is expected as compared with previous years, as
prices are on the increase and the trappers will naturally wish to increase their catch of
fur, which is at present below normal.
An average catch of fur, however, is expected for the whole of the season 1937-38.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farmers received fair prices for their pelts. The industry is growing rapidly and
should receive all consideration from the Department. Z 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In view of the importance of this new industry, the creation of a fur-farming department,
under the direction of an animal pathologist, will soon become a necessity, and I respectfully
suggest that the Game Commission give this matter every consideration.
Registration of Trap-lines.
In view of the large area covered by " D " Division, it is very difficult to give all trap-lines
close supervision.
In order to give the trap-line holder better protection and closer supervision, it will be
necessary to increase the staff in this Northern Division or resort to the use of a Department
plane. The latter method would be the most economical. Will you be so kind as to give
this matter your kind consideration?
Registration of Guides.
Guides were exceptionally busy last year and an even better year is expected during the
season 1938-39.
But all our guides are by no means as efficient and capable as expected. Quite a number
of big-game hunters left the Province without trophies and, as suggested in previous reports,
it is of the most importance that the regulations covering guides be altered and the guides
classified, according to examinations, in three different classes: " Resident Guides and Outfitters," " Guides," and " Apprentices."
To carry this out in an efficient manner it would be advisable to hold meetings at various
points in the Province and have the guides present, so the proper regulations, etc., might be
drafted.    I would be pleased if some such action could be started during the coming year.
Special Patrols.
Numerous special patrols were undertaken by all Game Wardens in the Division. It is
impossible to mention every patrol made;  but special mention is made of the following:—
By Game Warden S. G. Copeland, Finlay Forks.—Patrol to investigate the shooting of
Hugo Stalberg, trapper, of the Upper Finlay River. Mileage, 1,009, made up as follows:
On foot, 257 miles; by boat, 162 miles; by plane, 370 miles; by auto, 220 miles. Cost of
patrol, nil, all expenses being paid by the British Columbia Provincial Police.
By Game Warden W. L. Forrester, Prince George.—Accompanied the Indian Agent on
annual visit to Bear Lake, Takla Lake, Whitewater, and Fort Grahame. By car, 228 miles;
by plane, 1,040 miles; total miles, 1,268, at a cost of $11.50 for meals and rooms, the cost of
plane paid by Indian Department.
By Game Warden (Corporal) J. S. Clark, Fort Nelson.—Patrol of the Interprovincial
Boundary between the Yukon-North-west Territories and British Columbia, checking fur-
traders and trappers. Miles, by boat 400, on foot 220, a total of 660 miles. Over $1,000
in revenue was collected during this trip.
By Commissioner J. G. Cunningham.—A comprehensive patrol of the northern section of
the Province was undertaken by the above mentioned, a member of the Game Commission,
who, accompanied by the undersigned, left Prince Rupert on July 12th for Wrangell, Alaska,
and Telegraph Creek, Dease Lake, the Lower Post, Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Pouce Coupe,
and Dawson Creek, covering 205 miles by steamer from Prince Rupert to Wrangell, Alaska;
120 miles by river-boat to Telegraph Creek; 75 miles by car to Dease Lake; thence using
Department launch, from Dease Lake to McDame Creek and Lower Post, on the Liard River,
175 miles. The Yukon mail plane was used between the Lower Post, Fort Nelson, Fort
St. John, and Swan Lake, near Pouce Coupe, covering about 500 miles by plane, in a
little less than five hours' flying.
From the above it is obvious that the use of a plane by the Department would greatly
assist in the administration and enforcement of the " Game Act " and regulations, and I
again respectfully suggest that the matter of purchasing a plane be given serious consideration.
Hunting Accidents.
I am very sorry to report an increase in the number of hunting accidents, as compared
with previous years. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 29
On September 15th, 1937, Portage Pious, Indian, of Fort St. James, whilst hunting
moose, was attacked by a moose he had shot the previous evening, thrown in the air two or
three times, was badly gored and died of his wounds on September 20th.
On September 9th, 1937, Tommy Napoleon, Indian, of Moberly Lake, B.C., whilst hunting
moose, and carrying his rifle by holding the muzzle with his right hand, passing through
dense willow-bush, the hammer caught and the rifle was discharged, the bullet passing
through third and fourth fingers of right hand.    Said fingers were later amputated.
On October 11th, Thomas James Bailey, of Prince George, B.C., whilst hunting ducks
under Resident Ordinary Firearms Licence No. 52457, and in entering his car, was accidentally
shot by his hunting companion, Robert Lloyd George Jackson, Resident Ordinary Firearms
Licence No. 52474, who, whilst unloading his shotgun prior to entering the car, caused the
gun to discharge, striking both heels of Bailey. The amputation of both heels was found to
be necessary.    Mr. Bailey recovered from the accident.
On September 9th, 1937, Alexander E. Millar, of Smithers, B.C., whilst hunting ducks
at Covert Lake, in the vicinity of Telkwa, using an old punt, found same to be leaky and
sank before being able to return to shore; being handicapped with heavy clothes and hip-boots,
was unable to swim ashore and drowned.
On November 28th, 1937, Fred Cook, of Smithers, B.C., whilst hunting deer, crossed the
trail of a wounded moose, followed said moose with the intention of killing same, thereby
putting an end to its suffering. William Frank Duff, of Smithers, found the same moose-
tracks and followed same with the same intentions as Cook. On hearing some noise in
the woods and seeing some bushes move, thinking it was the wounded moose, fired and killed
Fred Cook. No prosecution was launched in this case, but the Resident Ordinary Firearms
Licence of W. F. Duff was cancelled.
On December 1st, 1937, Melvin Charles Wilcox, of Terrace, B.C., whilst taking a walk
along the Canadian National Railway tracks in the vicinity of Terrace, was mistaken for a
coyote and shot by Arthur Wagner, who was hunting rabbits with a .22-calibre rifle. The
shot entered the back between the shoulder blades and came out above the left hip-bone.
Mr. Wilcox recovered and Mr. Wagner was prosecuted for carrying firearms without a licence,
and has been deprived of the privilege of obtaining a firearms licence for a period left in the
discretion of the Game Commission.
On December 1st, George Cole, of Prince George, B.C., whilst hunting rabbits, the above
mentioned, who is a juvenile, dragging his .22 rifle by the muzzle, discharged the rifle in his
right buttock. Medical attention was obtained and he has since recovered. A prosecution is
pending against the young man for carrying firearms without a licence.
Summary and Remarks.
Conditions have been favourable throughout the year and a healthy increase in all game
is anticipated. The wolves took a great toll of the young moose, caribou, and deer, especially
the latter, but with the return of the rabbits, which is reported from various parts in the
Division, the predatory animals will soon find an easier prey and it is expected that animals
of the deer family will have an opportunity to rear their young in peace, resulting in a
normal increase in their numbers.
The mange in wolves and coyotes, reported to this office from various districts, will
greatly help in reducing their numbers with the greatest benefit to all other game animals.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to all Game Wardens and Provincial
Police Officers stationed in " D " Division for the fine spirit of co-operation existing between
the two Departments, and for the efficient manner in which they carried out their numerous
duties during the past year.
I also wish to thank the members of the various Rod and Gun Clubs for their very kind
co-operation and good-will extended during the past year to all members of this Department.
" E " DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1937. Z 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Animals.
Deer.—In this Division sportsmen had a fairly good season for the hunting of deer.
Deer were in good numbers and many large and healthy animals were taken. During the
first part of the season hunting was poor in most sections, owing to dry weather conditions
making it extremely difficult to successfully hunt deer.
Pitt Lake, Powell River, and through the Gulf Islands deer were in good numbers, while
the fallow deer released on Pender and Saltspring Islands are increasing.
Mountain-goat.—Fairly plentiful in the Upper Stave River country and are to be found
in lesser numbers at the headwaters of Alouette, Pitt, and Coquitlam Lakes. In the Powell
River District mountain-goat are holding their own, but in the vicinity of Powell Lake they
are scarce, and in order to secure one of these animals a hunter has to go farther afield as
goat have moved out to areas which are not hunted so extensively. In the Upper Skagit
River country mountain-goat are increasing in numbers.
Bear.—As in past years, black bear are in good numbers and have caused some concern
in respect to damage done to domestic stock in the more settled areas. Grizzly bear are to
be found in fair numbers at the heads of the various inlets along the Coast.
Moose.—Good reports are to hand in regard to the increase in moose in the Pemberton
District where no open season is or has been in effect. Residents of the district referred to
are continuing their fine spirit of co-operation by assisting in the protection of these animals.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In or near settlements beaver are scarce, but in areas covered by registered
trap-lines they are to be found in fair numbers.
Muskrats.—During the past season fair catches were made and it would seem, from
returns to hand, these animals have slightly increased.
Red Fox.—These animals have either been trapped or shot throughout the Lower Mainland in greater numbers than in previous years. Near farming country red foxes have done
some damage to domestic as well as game birds. These animals are definitely on the decrease
throughout the area mentioned.    Other fur-bearing animals are, generally speaking, holding
their own.
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Owing to the increased numbers of pheasants being liberated each year the
hunting possibilities of the Lower Mainland areas have been greatly improved. The Sumas-
Prairie section provided good hunting, as did most of the other districts. With a few good
breeding seasons there would seem to be no reason not to expect a decided increase in
pheasants. During the past few years the breeding season has been a very important factor
in preventing sportsmen not having the best of pheasant-hunting.
The new law prohibiting the hunting of pheasants prior to 12 o'clock noon on the first
three days of the open season undoubtedly provided better shooting and gave pheasants a
better chance to take care of themselves. This law has been in effect in certain sections of
the Interior for a number of years, and has been greatly responsible for improved hunting
conditions.
After the season had expired a good crop of breeding birds were to be observed in most
districts.
Blue Grouse—Taken in fair numbers throughout the Division, but owing to excessive
hunting on the islands in Howe Sound it no doubt would be good policy to close the season on
these birds in this section next year in order to give them a fair chance to increase. In other
sections blue grouse are in some instances increasing and in other areas holding their own
in numbers.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—These birds are to be found in fair numbers throughout the
Division, but should not be provided with any long or extended open season at any time.
California Quail.—Found in fair numbers in the Delta or Ladner District and these
remarks also apply to European partridge.
Migratory Game Birds.
During the past year, owing to a later opening of the season, migratory game birds of
all kinds were very plentiful.    Conditions in most sections were ideal for hunting and good
sport was secured. 4
...
'■:
rV  Black brant were very plentiful and towards the end of the open season daily bag-limits
were not uncommon, especially was this the case in the Boundary and Mud Bay areas in the
Delta District.
Swans, which are protected throughout the year, were to be observed in different sections
of the Division.
Shore-birds were plentiful and seem to be slightly increasing, although in some sections
of the Division they were not observed in any great numbers.
Geese were fairly plentiful in the Pitt Lake and some of the Coastal Inlets.
Vermin.
Reports covering presence of cougar have been, if possible, immediately investigated.
Cougar have, in some sections, been observed in greater numbers than heretofore. Wolves
have also been reported especially in the Squamish District.
Domestic cats have again given us concern and an extensive campaign has been conducted against this class of vermin, which does such untold damage not only to game birds
but beneficial insectivorous birds as well.
Game Associations and others still continue to co-operate in the usual annual crusade
against predatory animals and noxious birds. The Chilliwack Fish and Game Protective
Association was again responsible for the destruction of a large number of crows.
Game Wardens were very active, also, as will be noted in a statement to be found on
another page of this report.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols have been undertaken as usual, with special patrols being made into
outlying sections of the Division. The officers and men of the British Columbia Police have
rendered valuable assistance in our efforts towards the conservation of game, and these
remarks also apply to Game Associations and interested sportsmen.
Game Propagation.
A larger number of pheasants were purchased and liberated, resulting in improved
hunting conditions.    The elk liberated at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, are slightly increasing.
Game Reserves.
All game reserves in the Division have been continually patrolled, resulting in a very
noticeable increase of game in the surrounding areas. This condition has probably been more
pronounced in North Vancouver.
Fur Trade.
Undoubtedly there has been a larger turnover in the fur trade as will be noticed from
the increased amount collected from fur royalties.
Fur-farming.
There has been an increase in the number of fur-farming permits, especially for mink-
farming.    Generally all fur-farmers are, or appear to be, making a success of their business.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system of trap-line registration is working very smoothly, and no doubt has been
greatly responsible in our present favourable stand of fur-bearing animals.
Registration of Guides.
There are only a few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
A number of extended patrols have been made during the year into outlying sections of
the Division, with very excellent results. Z 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Hunting Accidents.
There were very few hunting accidents. See statement under this heading later on in
this report for further detailed particulars.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The officers and men of " E " Division of the British Columbia Provincial Police, members
of the Game Associations, farmers, and others interested in the conservation of game and
fish have rendered every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout
the Division, and the Game Wardens have in turn endeavoured to assist the police and others
wherever and whenever possible. Game conditions throughout the Division have been fair,
and with proper weather for breeding birds during the coming spring there undoubtedly
will be a decided increase in the stand of upland game birds of all kinds.
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS.
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences and
Fees.
Calendar
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913    	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
618
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
562
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
61
41
24
23
16
15
33
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
$4,417.60
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,674.30
177,771.33
1914   _   ..     	
1915	
1916
1917
1918     _	
1919         	
1920	
1921               	
$5,291.39
24,695.80
1922                  	
51,093.89
1923         	
60,594.18
1924              	
56,356.68
1925     -	
1926 -    	
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927	
1928	
1929.. 	
1930    -
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
1931	
1932	
1933	
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
1934  	
1935	
47,102.81
49,831.95
1936	
1937  	
52,196.50
53,697.48
Totals
9,762
9,060
674
654
5143,209.57
$3,097,131.87
$872,844.97 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 33
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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& REPORT OP PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 35
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
639
108
136
1,151
683
532
649
138
147
163
103
1,118
168
934
365
298
921
1,658
98
2,662
125
864
584
2
2
445
310
1,066
246
4,963
873
1,260
59
254
$639.00
108.00
1
33
9
7
16
12
4
6
3
29
22
22
2
1
2
10
6
15
18
1
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39
54
113
157
30
50
40
39
44
4
253
18
155
1
40
51
75
535
27
64
111
7
119
13
17
102
74
3
193
50
102
279
275
72
9
11
15
32
24
33
1
1
4
25
11
21
32
32
56
30
18
86
11
4
84
1
36
4
28
19
4
84
32
86
126
54
6
14
25
26
192
41
29
67
6
$639.00
Ashcroft.	
$5.00
$2.00
115.00
136.00
1,151.00
683.00
532.00
649.00
165.00
45.00
301.00
Cranbrook    —	
4.00
1,200.00
683.00
532.00
Fernie 	
35.00
80.00
60.00
2.00
684.00
82.00
138.00
147.00
163.00
103.00
1,118.00
168.00
934.00
365.00
298.00
921.00
1,658.00
98.00
2,662.00
125.00
864.00
198.00
1.00
1.00
3.00
7.00
148.00
20.00
184.00
106.00
Kamloops   -.
30.00
1,155.00
168.00
7.00
4.00
941.00
15.00
384.00
298.00
1.00
7.00
922.00
1,665.00
98.00
15.00
2,677.00
125.00
1.00
16.00
1.00
34.00
3.00
7.00
38.00
2.00
865.00
145.00
161.00
584.00
2.00
2.00
445.00
585.00
110.00
146.00
5.00
452.00
110.00
10.00
148.00
Revelstoke...   	
310.00
1,066.00
246.00
322.00
1,066.00
5.00
10.00
50.00
30.00
3.00
254.00
10.00
50.00
4,963.00
873.00
1,260.00
59.00
254.00
72.00
5.00
8.00
8.00
4.00
5,065.00
878.00
1,268.00
75.00
90.00
142.00
348.00
Totals	
23,724
$23,724.00
218
$1,090.00
3,232
1,411
256.00
$25,070.00 Z 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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Z 37
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250.00
325.00
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Government
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-trader.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Tanners'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt.
No.
Amt,
No.
Amt.
2
3
3
1
22
2
1
5
3
1
36
11
13
12
7
9
69
3
3
19
$50.00
2
1
1
14
2
9
1
22
4
30
7
113
34
1
15
5
1
11
10
19
27
9
178
1
116
57
8
9
1
1
10
24
6
659
4
70
5
14
$30.35
6.00
191.67
.65
208.40
22.10
123.00
62.04
1,286.38
302.94
.75
1
1
1
4
2
2
2
$80.35
6.00
75.00
75.00
25.00
266.67
75.65
$5.00
238.40
22.10
	
123.00
$400.00
462.04
550.00
1,836.38
302.94
.75
50.00
41.31
5.00
96.31
77.75
.50
86.25
11.00
110.75
77.75
■ 25.00
125.00
25.50
211.25
11.00
75.00
185.75
79.41
79.41
25.00
900.00
19.00
6,548.79
2.00
1,646.57
1,597.21
2,885.00
7B.66
.40
2.00
14.55
947.15
13.14
30,555.35
61.85
152.01
7.80
87.75
200.00
7,648.73
275.00
325.00
5.00
1,926.57
1,922.21
2,885.00
Prince Rupert	
300.00
125.00
225.00
1,725.00
75.00
75.00
475.00
1,072.15
238 14
Telegraph Creek-
Vancouver -
200.00
20.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
32,510.35
146.85
87 75
Totals
225
$5,575.00
4
$800.00
1,497
$47,257.48
11
$55.00
2  j  $10.00
$53,697.48 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 39
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1937, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921   _	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
$30,790.80
1922              	
57,458.89
1923   	
67,524.18
1924                                                                              	
62,446.68
1925 -    	
56,287.78
1926     ..
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928                                                 	
58,823.07
1929                                                    	
47,329.89
1930                                      	
45,161.11
1931                                                         -
45,981.08
1932                                                                                                       	
40,363.79
1933	
1934                                         - —           	
44,167.48
47,102.81
1935	
49,831.95
1936                                  	
52,196.50
1937                _	
53,697.48
$789,848.58
$103,175.00
$893,023.58 Z 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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C
OS REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 41
Particulars of Various Pelts of Pur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid,
January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Particulars of Various Pelts op Fur-bearing Animals
on which Royalty has been paid.
Government
Agents.
IH
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Alberni 	
6
8
2
75
1
6
57
2
1
63
6
28
186
35
4
52
96
Atlin  _  „
3
Clinton  	
13
Cranbrook    .
56
150
1
7
98
32
32
14
65
Cumberland 	
5
	
12
20
Duncan  ___..
73
7
1
411
Ffirnie        	
9
4
1
7
42
6
6
	
58
1
2
1
683
90
24
124
43
2
47
1
40
27
94
118
945
45
2,232
933
10
1
1
962
362
1
Golden	
1
Grand Forks 	
....
Greenwood      .
3
Hope _ .__ __ _
Kamloops  ....
1
9
2
8
16
87
6
32
1
	
311
Kelowna .___	
Lillooet 	
	
2
Merritt __
331
2
2
....
Nanaimo 	
44
5
72
8
1
3
5
17
364
12
130
New Denver
New Westminster
1
34
2
665
34
1
Oliver ... _       .
Penticton _ _	
12
2
7
12
1
80
Pouce Coupe .. .„
28
2,531
68
38
427
664
842
1,511
318
3,070
9
1
26
6,061
106
17
Powell River __ „
2
....,
-
Prince George ___
9
735
35
54
85
90
37
73
246
420
2,005
10
8
3,671
100
12
Prince Rupert _...
3
697
15
4
28
20
58
355
1,292
968
76
7
772
26
20
Princeton  _
134
Quesnel   , 	
18
3
3
5
9
14
3
10
56
167
6
Revelstoke 	
1
Rossland     ,	
1
2
4
Salmon Arm	
1
1
2
1
1
3
20
48
45
10
Smithers 	
7
255
31
22
56
48
14
257
189
934
6
4
1,731
2
Telegraph Creek
2
1
1
2
3
13
1
3
Vancouver   ,	
389
10,696
496
1,877
965
931
66
1,594
6,596
13,061
59,405
704
2,946
324
33,825
217
Vernon 	
1
8
1
78
2
26
12
1
45
1
Victoria  	
23
2
260
3
3
1
17
446
8
4
12
12
Williams Lake ___
1
3
1
10
Windermere
1
112
2
45
95
17
25
Totals	
472jl5,932
1
676
3,693
1,626
1,827
530
2,751
9,489
18,030
70,166
824
2,972
391
48,043
345
279 Z 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
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1
8
6
2
1
-
1
1
3
3
6
2
4
3
1
30
2
25
32
27
9
2
4
2
1
3
41
5
2
12
2
68
49
March 12
3G
Mawer, Fred —- -  	
Call, Ray...-  -     .
Callison, E. 0 —  	
Nelson.— __ _	
30
Fort Nelson  	
Kamloops _ _ _.
April     2	
August, Thomas (Indian)	
~
16
King, Albert __ _ . _	
Coe, John C. — — -	
Roberts, Melvin  _	
27
Vanderhoof  _	
5
1
Burns Lake - ,  	
1
7
McDougall, Roy ,    ,„  ...
9,
8
10
Wolf man, Norman ...   	
10
Armstrong  	
15
Sumner, Thomas   .. 	
Dowling, Stanley  _ 	
Ulm, Ray... - 	
Radu, George  	
Graham, Ronald  __ , .
26
July    27..
Nov.    22
22
23
Prince George  -	
Chilliwack   _
Ganges  __ 	
1
24
Dec.       2
2
Mack, Andrew  	
Abbott, J  — — -	
Erickson, Alphonse (Indian)-.
Mitchell, John. ,   _	
11
31
Totals..— 	
17|    1|    1|    1|    6
8
133|    9
175|    9
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind op Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
March   1  	
10.  	
Hardie, Eddie	
Cloverdale .—  	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
April  17       	
26  -...
May    29 ..	
29 	
29      - 	
Mathews, Ray	
Fraser, James	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwack __	
July     15
Oct.     12 	
Nanaimo	
19  	
Millen, George - 	
Mnirhead,   Ralph 	
Shinygu, T  - 	
20	
26 _	
26
Vernon  	
Victoria	
Enderby 	
Cloverdale	
Nov.    17	
20	
26	
29  	
Fry, George 	
Potrie, Emile ,  	
Jarvis, Jack   	
Johnson, Willie (Indian)....	
29	
Agassiz - -    . . .
30 	
Milam, M. L   	
Dec.     15 _.
Nichols, Floyd  	
Totals   	
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and firearms during the calendar year
1937 amounted to $420.53. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 43
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1937.
Government Agents.'
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
3
84
166
11
130
4
11
130
2
56
20
40
66
24
	
89
9
6
65
2
32
56
19
6
93
215
49
5
2
67
1
3
15
3
5
1
142
96
84
3
17
226
140
18
SI
8
6
61
35
2
2
2
22
2
8
33
6
24
2
4
4
1
1
5
2
18
9
3
31
36
30
20
25
$670.00
20.00
Atlin                	
676.00
338.00
Cranbrook        -  	
452.00
1,050.00
700.00
62.00
450.00
8.00
62.00
730.00
44.00
272.00
700.00
200.00
Nanaimo     ....    	
530.00
88.00
80.00
212.00
1,488 00
20.00
1,238 00
844 00
52 00
520 00
2,298.00
2,032.00
1,010.00
598.00
Totals                  	
1,400
828
423
$19,540.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1937.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922 	
1923      -   -
303
132
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
828
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
1,092
1,687
6,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,644
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
20,398.40
24,397.00
41,077.00
65,377.95
50,709.25
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,033.15
1924...	
172
1925      ■
1926 -   -~
5,770
10,046
1927	
2,487
1928    	
1,025
1,389
403
1
1929  ...	
1930       -	
1931 — 	
3,427
1932... - - ...
1933	
	
6,285.00
6,825.00
12,374.00
20,350.00
19,540.00
1934	
1935  ..._	
1,877
1,950
1,400
1936  -	
1937  -,---	
Totals  	
5,564
6,258
64,680
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$462,996.80 Z 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
9
tt
M
o   .
ri fl
n|
rZ    *
tt o
d
o
X
e$
a
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9 js
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o
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£
a
el
a .
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6
o
0
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B d
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0 Si
a-g
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Amount.
Ashcroft—
Steen, A. J., Seattle, Wash ___ _ , _ *	
i  ....
$25.00
Barkerville—
De Mishaegen, Mrs. E. G., Antwerp, Belgium. _ _	
1
i
50.00
Jordan, H., Pawpaw, Mich     __ 	
1
i
40.00
Watson, V. C, San Francisco, Cal.   ,	
. 1
1
1
i
80.00
Clinton—
Holton, Dr. S. W., Sedro Wooley, Wash- ,    .
	
i I -
25.00
Kroff, 0. D., Halsey,  Ore.                                      	
i
25.00
?,
30.00
1
25.00
1
25.00
Wilken, G. C., San Diego, Cal.. __„_	
1
i
50.00
Woodson, F., Seattle, Wash._ _ _	
1
15.00
Cranbrook—■
1
i
40.00
Barton, Dr. J., Longview, Wash....   _	
1
1
40.00
i
25.00
1
1
40.00
Cheney, B. B., Tacoma, Wash.  	
	
1
25.00
2
i
i
1
105.00
9,
30.00
Eroddy, E. H., Denver, Colo    	
1
1
i
55.00
?.
i
1
80.00
i
25.00
Kelsey, A. L., Indianapolis, Ind. ... .	
	
...-
	
1
25.00
1
1
i
55.00
1
25.00
?,
?,
i
85.00
Fernie—
Bower, Ted, Wapato, Wash , ,	
1
15.00
1
25.00
Dunn, W. W. Jr., St. Paul, Minn... _. ,.	
1
25.00
2
i
1
80.00
i
25.00
Fox, R., Port Gibson, Miss..    ,. -	
...
1
15.00
1
15.00
i
25.00
Fort Fraser—
Garhart, Dr. M. M., Seattle, Wash._„. __ ,	
_.
i
	
25.00
Johnson, L., San Mateo, Cal—    _	
1
15.00
Koch, F. C, Wichita, Kansas ..	
1
	
	
15.00
Lewis, H. M., Wallingford, Conn...  	
1
15.00
1
25.00
Monteverde, G., Cincinnati, Ohio  _ —	
__
i
25.00
Romaine, W., San Francisco, Cal  	
2
30.00
i
25.00
i
25.00
1
25.00
i
25.00
Thompson, G. W., Klendive, Mont.. „	
i
....
25.00
1
1
1
i
90.00
Wilson, G. B., Los Angeles, Cal. _  .,	
	
1
i
50.00
Golden—
3
1
70.00
Cohn, Julia, New York, N.Y..   j
1
3
70.00
1
15.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 45
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937-
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
n S
41H
as
P a
P  QJ
o a)
Amount.
Golden—Continued.
Eidson, F., Dawson Springs, Ky._
Gerl, Dr., Hendelund, Germany..
Johnson, R. A. F., England —
Rownd, C. M., Hopkins, Minn	
Thomas, J. M., Banff, Alta	
Von Opel, George, Russilcheim, Germany..
Phelps, Eric, Putney, London, England —
Von Opel, Miss I., Falkenstein, Germany.
Ward, G. R., Columbus, Ohio	
Ward, F. D„ Columbus, Ohio   	
Wilkinson, E. M., Calgary, Alta.. .—
Grand Forks—
May, Archie, Kendrick, Idaho .. 	
Greenwood—
Berry,  F., Yakima, Wash.  	
Bull, L. L., Seattle, Wash 	
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash.  	
Coffin, H. L., Yakima, Wash 	
Bfner, Dean,  Seattle, Wash 	
Gurrin, A., Seattle, Wash. 	
Krebs, A. M., Anacortes, Wash. _. —	
Manley, J. J.,  Seattle, Wash _	
Miller, R. L., Seattle, Wash.....	
Morton, C, Yakima, Wash.....	
Paulson, E. M., Seattle, Wash. 	
Reid, D. C, Seattle, Wash. 	
Schaw, Omar, Seattle, Wash 	
Simley, E. S., Yakima, Wash 	
Smith, G. E., Jr., Seattle, Wash	
Stender, Bruce, Seattle, Wash. — —	
Kamloops—
Timken, H. H., Canton, Ohio 	
Kelowna—
Cummins, W. T., Mandan, N.D. .— —
Lillooet—
Simpson, O. H.,  Texas 	
Merritt—
Churchill, N. D., Centralia, Wash  „
Conn, A. C, Everett, Wash 	
Day, W. E., Seattle, Wash... „
Dick, J. T., Bremerton, Wash	
Hughbanks, C. F., Seattle, Wash..
Hustead, Bill, Caldwell, Idaho	
Kerr, S. W., Seattle, Wash.	
Knudson, T., Los Angeles, Cal	
Martin, R. M., Kent, Wash.	
Morse,  C.  L.,  Bremerton,  Wash....
Oliver, C. T., Kent, Wash.. 	
Spates, S., Seattle, Wash-	
Strain, A., Kent, Wash	
Taylor, Dr. 0., Kent, Wash...
(No record)..—	
Nanaimo—
Green, Sidney, Seattle, Wash.
Kern, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
Peterson, John, Seattle, Wash...
$55.00
85.00
15.00
15.00
70.00
230.00
140.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.C0
30.00
30.00
65.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
5.CO
25.00
25.00
35.00
10.00
10.00
5.00 Z 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
JSj
6
M
y  .
rt A
„ o
U     r'
rttt
<U   .
o
rt
O
r-i
fl
rt
® X
rH^f
>- 35
Sr=
0
O
u
OJ
OJ
O
h
B   ■
o
o
0
Jj
B ft
3 QJ
o <u
3
5
'p.
is
Amount.
New Westminster-—
Brill   T. W-, Seattle, Wash. ___ '
1
—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
$40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
Crites, A. S., Bakersfield, Cal ______ ..... _. _  -
50.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
Deppman, L., Seattle, Wash.— — 	
Feek, R. J., Seattle, Wash .... ,, 	
Gilbert, W. J., Mt. Vernon, Wash.
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Gray, H. E., Seattle, Wash.                    	
25.00
Green,   S.,   Seattle,  Wash....  	
25.00
Griffin, J. H., Bellingham, Wash   	
Hall, A. D., Stanwood, Wash..—  	
Henry, W. K., Blanchard, Wash. ,     __	
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Kern, E. A., Seattle, Wash _.	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Morris, P. R., Los Angeles, Cal  	
Mylroie, R. O-, Seattle, Wash  _ „__
McFadden,  S.  P.,  Seattle,  Wash-   _ _ _	
25.00
25.00
15.00
McPhee, D. J., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
25.00
Newman, F. H., Junction City, Ore  	
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
Power, J.  W-, Seattle, Wash 	
25.00
Rogers, M. S., Seattle, Wash... _.__ _ __
Rouse, K., Seattle, Wash 	
50.00
25.00
Sandoni, T., Cle-Elum, Wash.   ■ _	
25.00
25.00
Savidge, S. L., Seattle, Wash  _   	
25.00
25.00
Stead, C. B., Seattle, Wash  _.    „
25.00
40.00
Steen, W. H., Seattle, Wash	
55.00
Sund, Alfred, Conway, Wash   __ _	
Todd, W. 0., Los Angeles, Cal.   -
25.00
55.00
25.00
Utterstrom,  J., Seattle, Wash _ ____ __ ___
Vnn Waters, G., Seattle, Wash __ _____ __ 	
Woodcock, M., Yakima, Wash—    ' __	
Y eager, Ira, Bellingham, Wash   _ ___	
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
55.00
Penticton—
Antler, J., Okanogan, Wash.   __	
30.00
40.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 47
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937-
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
tH
a
<$
0)
tt
-id
o   .
£ a
S £
. ?
««
X u
M a
3
O
O
T3
B
rt
QJ^
, i
9 XI
qfc
-p
in
rt
O
O
^T
CJ
0
B
'^
h
OJ
m
Q
o
B
'rt
B ft
fl   QJ
0 QJ
3
S
'S
rt
Amount.
Penticton—Continued.
Bull, Mrs. L. L., Seattle, Wash 	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
_
1
....
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
$25.00
Call, A. H., Santa Paulo, Cal _   	
:!:::
25.00
Carsten   W   H-, Seattle, Wash.                                  	
15.00
Coffin, H. L., Yakima, Wash.      .. _ '    	
15.00
Coffin A. S., Yakima, Wash.           -
15.00
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
30.00
30.00
--
....
....
-
-
z
30.00
25.00
Henderson, P. A., Seattle, Wash  __ ___ __	
Henderson, W. S., Seattle, Wash.. _„ ___ 	
55.00
30.00
40.00
Ketchen   E., Seattle, Wash ■ ... _ 	
30.00
30.00
McKinney, L. J., Yakima, Wash.__ __ 	
Power, J. W., Seattle, Wash   _	
Van Thiel, Ted, Seattle, Wash     ___	
30.00
30.00
15.00
Pouce Coupe—
55.00
Bohn, Harvey, Richland, Pa _   —
145.00
55.00
65.00
Colt, Mrs. S    Tuxedo Park, N.Y.                              .
65.00
115.00
115.00
65.00
40.00
50.00
65.00
50.00
130.00
Glock  H. E., Fort Wayne, Ind _ _ _ 	
90.00
80.00
Hall, H. N., Preston, Idaho  ___. ___  	
Hammatt   J.   New York, N.Y.               	
105.00
120.00
130.00
15.00
Rilgerman, W- N., Fort Wayne, Ind...-   	
Jones, Dr. F., Greenville, Penn._   __	
Keith, E., North Forks, Idaho .._.    ,  _. __	
40.00
80.00
75.00
50.00
Krech   S   K    New York, N.Y.                	
90.00
50.00
50.00
Norton,   F.   T.,  Omaha,  Neb  __-_ __ _	
40.00
25.00
15.00
Reich   S   K., New York, N.Y    	
90.00
Shillingbury, T. E., Noslini Ganado, Arizona.- —	
90.00
65.00
115.00
Van Sandt, G. B., Wewoka, Okla. - _ — 	
15.00
Woods, General R. E., Chicago, 111 _ _____ _	
Powell River—
Attree, M., Bellingham, Wash     ~_ —
Hook, Arthur, Bellingham, Wash.. ...... __— ____	
50.00
10.00
10.00 Z 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
O
Q     .
rt C
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Amount.
Prince George—
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
2
1
.___
l
l
l
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
.._.
2
1
1
2
	
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
~
$25.00
50.00
Bean,  M.  L.,  Portland, Ore  __   _ __
80.00
50.00
Burrell   H   R   Grafton, W. Va _ — _
50.00
Frazier, A. S,   Glen Falls, N.Y.   .          	
25.00
95.00
Holland, C. D.   Beverley Hills, Cal.    __ _ _	
25.00
15.00
40.00
Mowry, Dr. H. S., Cleveland, Ohio... __ __ _ _     .
McBride   K  R.   Glen Falls, N.Y. 	
25.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
25.00
40.00
50 00
Quesnel—
Campbell, W. V. B., Reno, Nevada   	
Fullingion, G. R-, Amarillo, Texas    ...
25.00
55.00
15.00
Hite   W   M., Pond Creek, Okla.  -
25 00
55 00
25.00
Sacks, W. T., Downey, Cal .._ __ __ _ __	
Taylor, E. E., San Diego, Cal. _ ___ _ 	
40.00
55.00
Telegraph Creek—
50 00
115 00
Hollender, F. W., Lynbrook, N.Y	
25 00
Lawrence, A. A., Tonsfield, Mass  _ __	
50.00
Mudge, Mr. and Mrs. E. W., Gainsville, Texas ___ _
Murdock, Mr. and Mrs. H. A., Nestville, Conn.. ___ _
Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. R., Nashua, N.H _ ______
Peterson, W. R., Jr., Nashua, N.H	
155.00
15.00
115.00
Vancouver—
Bowers, Dr. J. W., et a.., Fort Wayne,, Ind 	
80 00
Cadman, M. V., Tyler, Texas  	
Carp, B., Amsterdam, Holland _ _	
85.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 49
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1937—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
'in
O
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Amount.
Vancouver—Continued.
Crites, A. S-, Bakersfield, Cal.   _ _ _ __.
1
1
1
1
I
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
I
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1    1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
• 1
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$25.00
40.00
Fisher, W. R., Frankenmuth, Mich    __	
25.00
McLeod, M.. Potter Valley, Cal.  ... j
Goldston, R. 0-, Tyler, Texas    	
160.00
80.00
Heister, Geo., Seattle, Wash __  	
Howard, C. Jr., San Francisco, Cal.—_ — -  _	
10.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
Marshall, G. W-, Seattle, Wash.—  	
Mills, J. H., Portland, Ore. _ _	
25.00
25.00
Patterson, W. W., Saginaw, Mich. 	
Philipps,  J., London,  England   - —
25.00
55.00
75.00
Von Gontard, Paul, San Francisco, Cal..   — -
40.00
40.00
Wood   W   R., Seattle, Wash	
25.00
Wright, L., Beverley Hills, Cal    __ __ _	
15.00
Victoria—
55.00
40.00
Williams Lake—
Drippett, Oscar, Los Angeles, Cal._   _ _
Fairfield, H. T., Dixon, Cal.  	
90.00
40.00
80.00
Fishburn, Mrs. F. V., Los Angeles, Cal..— ___   —
65.00
45.00
60.00
70.00
30.00
Hamilton, A., St. Joseph, Mo.__ __ _   —
45.00
70.00
25.00
Loepp, A., Vancouver, Wash. —   _— —
McGimsey, Chas., Dixon, Cal. .   , , ..„	
Ratsell, B. M., Belvedere, Texas _ ;,  	
Sweet, B., Oakland, Cal __ __,     _	
Windermere—
Baugh, H. M., Garden City, Kansas.  	
Clavel,  Dr.  R.,  Basle,  Switzerland—  	
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
115.00
25.00
Cummings, N. B-, Tell City, Ind _	
Humphries, W.  E., Lubbock, Texas	
40.00
110.00
15.00
Luthi, Dr. A., Thun, Switzerland ___  	
Midgley, Mrs. D., Pond Creek, Okla _  	
McMillan, W. G., Lubbock, Texas	
80.00
15.00
105.00
15.00
Scaulman, F., Garden City, Kansas  _ _ _	
Waterman, L. S., Reno, Nevada .     _.   _
Watts,  E.,  Landover,  Md.__ _ 	
1   ....
30.00
80.00
15.00
Totals _    	
52
65
57
Sfi   1  15   1188
151   1  64  1  24
| $13,110.00
1
1
1
1
1 Z 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1937.
See Foot-
NOTE
B2
09
Ti
in
in
s
a
m
B
O
V
'>
B
o
O
o m
. B
0 o
«e
It1 <h
Description of Offence.
p
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B
o
«3
!   0
ri
o
: n
ri
o
.    in
-. 0
ri
o
:   to
H'j>
: Q
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Exceeding bag-limit on game animals — — — -   —
1
1
1
$10.00
Game on premises of a logging camp, etc— __   _ -
i
1
1
25.00
Hunting game between one hour after sunset and one hour before
i
1
Killing or having in possession game animals of female sex 	
8
l
1
i
10
11
235.00
Killing,  hunting,   or  having  in  possession  game  animals  during
2
5
18
2
1
5
28
33
340.00
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age —  _	
i
3
4
1
9
9
145.00
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season 	
3
6
6
5
20
20
190.00
a
4
1
7
7
60.00
Running deer with dogs  __ _  _ -  	
i
1
2
2
20.00
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during prohibited period _	
i
2
1
4
8
8
70.00
i
1
1
Hunting or in possession of migratory birds during close season __
7
1
3
7
2
18
20
145.00
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
3
1
12
6
1
22
'3
360.00
Hunting  certain  game  birds  with  a  rifle  contrary  to  the  game
2
1
1
4
4
30.00
Hunting pheasants when surface of ground covered with snow	
1
1
1
10.00
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours __	
...
....
—
59
1
59
60
525.00
3
1
4
4
40.00
4
4
8
8
82.50
Trapping game birds—  .  _.      — 	
1
1
1
2
10.00
Using live decoys in the hunting of migratory game birds _	
1
1
1
25.00
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line . '  ___ _  	
2
3
6
6
11
17
720.00
Submitting false trapping returns .____ __   __ 	
1
1
2
2
20.00
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence  —   __ —
5
11
r,
2
2
23
25
165.00
1
?,
6
2
1
11
12
Trapping without first securing registration of trap-line   __.
1
1
1
10.00
Licences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals without a licence
1
3
4
4
100.00
12
13
19
13
16
5
73
78
485.00
1
1
1
10.00
Guiding big-game hunters without a licence —   ..
1
2
3
3
20.00
Minor carrying firearms without a licence or without being accom-
3
1
5
9
q
.21.00
1
2
2
1
6
6
210.00
1
1
l
1
1
l
10.00
Resident angling without a licence  _   .,-	
17
9
12
	
21
59
59
480.00
?,
1
3
3
50.00
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in  or discharging same from  an  auto-
?,
3
1
5
11
11
85.00
Carrying   or   in   possession   of   unplugged   pump,   repeating,   or
1
1
1
1
1
4
5
11.00
Carrying  firearms  in launch,  etc.,   during  close  season  on  game
1
1
1
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
7
1
7
8
60.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 51
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1937-
Continued.
See Foot-note.
in
to
to
1
3
DQ
c
O
u
B
O
1=3
w 01
tH-*
O to
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rH    &
n s
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rHi-i
Description of Offence.
p
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: 0
ri
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:    in
!   P
ri
0
t   in
o'.>
: 0
ri
0
-    in
: Q
ri
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-    tn
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= a
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Exporting   pelts   of   fur-bearing   animals   without   a   permit   or
2
2
1
7
1
5
2
1
1
5
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
6
4
1
2
6
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
7
2
1
2
3
i
3
1
5
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
2
1
1
2
1
1
9
1
10
1
3
5
7
11
7
6
1
1
5
14
11
1
2
3
3
1
2
2
3
1
i
2
2
1
1
10
1
11
1
3
5
7
11
7
8
1
1
5
14
11
1
2
3
3
1
2
2
3
1
$15.00
50.00
Fur-trader unlawfully in possession of deer hides  _	
10.00
Obstructing or furnishing false information to a  Game  Warden
65.00
Trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals taken during close season
50.00
85.00
B.C. Special  Fishery Regulations.
1.00
15.00
9.00
53.00
52.00
17.00
26.00
Gaol Sentences.
$5,332.50
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or birds during
Totals _ _ - -	
84
1
70
1
147
71
178
33
552   |
585
Note.—" A " Division:   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    " B " Division:   Kootenay and Boundary
areas.    " C " Division:   Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas.    " D "  Division:   Atlin,  Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas.    " E "
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one week to three months.
Division:   Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by Members of the Game
Department during the Year 1937.
Baldpate     10 Pintail   20
Great blue heron       1 Wilson snipe   2
Green-wing teal  785 Wood-duck  84
Mallard   707 Z 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Returns from 2,327 Holders of Special  (Trapping)  Firearms Licences, showing Big
Game, Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1936-37.
Big Game.
Bear	
  413
Caribou	
     89
Deer 	
  755
Moose	
  545
Mountain-goat   124
Mountain-sheep      16
Wapiti (elk)       2
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver     6,576 Otter       246
Fox     1,804 Racoon     1,743
Fisher         392 Skunk   88
Lynx      1,217 Squirrels   23,361
Marten      5,874 Weasel   31,238
Mink      5,755 Wildcat        174
Muskrats   42,260 Wolverine         186
Cougar .
Coyotes
Predatory Animals.
48 Wolves
2,171
136
Fur-farm Returns, 1937 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1937.
7,683
17
9,578
601
545
3,950
20
6,915
360
91
14
1,155
3,097
60
6,804
2,177
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 36;   nil returns, 7;   no returns
received, 13.    Eight Fur-farmers reported farming muskrats hut number on hand unknown.
Fur-farm Returns, 1937 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1937.
3
16
43
2
20
4
3
1
3
8
12
2
68
48
Fitch                                 	
77
13
Note.—Figures  in  respect to beaver  only  approximate.    Cancelled  permits,   6 ;    nil  returns,   5 ;
received, 2.    Five Fur-farmers reported farming beaver but number on hand unknown.
no  returns REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 53
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during Year 1937.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
Total.
" A."
"B."
" C."
"D."
"E."
Animals.
Bear            	
281
3
68
11
704
28
81
77
31
137
2
77
28
48
1
376
10
109
117
38
1
24
1
130
8
76
63
19
2
1,164
21
147
578
88
4
6
396
15
33
16
2
3
587
2
7
16
42
5.
1,808
15
145
66
1
26
4
Cats             .            .                  ...
1,079
13
117
Cougar    -  	
Foxes            	
16
63
177
6
13
Birds.
4,448
89
515
695
77
Owls	
239
Ravens —~ - 	
141
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1937.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
252
621
215
359
50
50
1,215
Agassiz-Mission  	
Burnaby     	
Chilliwack   	
Delta ....  ...
Langley-Surrey  	
985
64
1.228
892
1,075
1,108
300
124
1,263
50
1,206
Ashcroft  	
£ranbrcok-Car.al Flats 	
Creston  	
Edgewood   -	
Grand Forks —.	
189
Cowichan..	
81
76
Nanaimo 	
Saltspring Island  	
12
98
108
Victoria   -
Matsqui  ....
North Vancouver-Squamish...
Pitt Meadows  	
Kelowna —    	
Lumby   —	
100
48
150
Merritt  ....    ...
Nakusp   ... ...  	
Penticton   — 	
Robson   ...   	
Salmon Arm  	
Vernon   	
48
Sumas Prairie  	
8
93
26
112
100
Totals   	
2,762
8,295
1,249
Note.—Thirty California quail in Pitt Meadows District;  20 California quail in Lillooet District;   20 bob-white
quail in Lillooet District.
Summary.
District.
Vancouver Island ._
Lower Mainland
Interior    	
Totals-
Quail.
30
40
12,306 Z 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Fish Culture Branch—Summary of Trout Plantings for the Year 1937.
Plantings, River or Lake.
Kamloops.
Steel-
head.
Cutthroat.
Total.
District and Area.
Yearlings.
Yearlings.
Finger-
lings.
Vancouver Island.
8,000
4,000
7,000
■ 14,000
4,000
30,000
2,000
248
4,000
5,000
1,000
2,000
1,500
500
2,400
3,000
3,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
7,000
10,000
8,000
4,000
Sproat Lake  __    	
7,000
14,000
Englishman's River   	
Comox Lake    	
Rogers Lake   .     , —
Little Qualicum River  	
4,000
Courtenay  - 	
30,000
2,000
248
4,000
5,000
1,000
2,000
Creek connecting Off and Round Lakes
Off Lake                             	
1,500
500
2,400
Paul Lake    ,.   -   _  .
Blind Lake (Extension) __   	
3,000
3,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
—
2,000
2,000
7,000
10,000
5,000
10,174
25,527
5,000
10,174
Cowichan River ____  	
Big Thetis Lake       _  	
5,000
10,000
2,128
1,000
25,527
5,000
35,000
45,000
Wolf Lake 	
2,128
1,000
40,500
1,500
40,500
Fork Lake  ...
Long Lake —   _	
Capilano River    	
1,500
2,000
2,000
Lower Mainland.
5,000
20,000
5,000
20,000
300
2,000
300
Cowans Lake (Bowen Island)   ,	
4,000
12,340
10,000
2,000
Surrey  _   _	
4,000
12,340
5,000
20,000
10,000
10,000
9,070
10,000
10,000
19,100
3,000
10,000
5,000
20,000
10,000
Lake of the Woods __ 	
Deer Lake. _ _	
Mill Lake   	
Davis Lake .  _   _ 	
10,000
9,070
10,000
10,000
19,100
3,000
Totals  _ _	
237,246
92,041
77,000
406.287 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 55
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized in
connection with their Game Fish Culture operations; subsidies being granted by the British
Columbia Game Department, and a summary of the plantings made by these clubs or associations in lakes and streams in their respective districts is given hereunder:—
Powell River District Board of Trade:   70,000 Kamloops trout flngerlings.
Revelstoke District Rod and Gun Club:   107,000 Kamloops trout flngerlings.
Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club. Inc.:   828,372 cut-throat trout eggs and fry;   220,353
hybrid trout, eggs, fry, and flngerlings;   454,540 Kamloops trout, eggs, fry, and
flngerlings.
15,290 cut-throat trout were sent to the Cowichan Lake Hatchery, operated by the
Fisheries Research Board of Canada, for liberation in the spring of 1938.
The following trout are being held in our hatcheries for liberation during the spring of
1938:—
Qualicum Rearing-ponds, Qualicum Beach, V.I.—
Kamloops trout  168,088
Stanley Park Hatchery, Vancouver—
Kamloops trout   400,095
Veitch Creek Hatchery, Sooke, V.I.—
Kamloops trout      59,136
Cut-throat trout  354
Total  627,673
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1937.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1937.
Pheasants   3,018 Ducks   9
Quail   4 Partridge   1
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1937.
Pheasants   13,630 Ducks	
26
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1937.
Pheasants   842
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1937.
Pheasants   12,624 Ducks  18
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1937.
Pheasants   4,169 Ducks  11
Quail   4
Note.—During the year 1937 there were 197 licenced game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year twenty-eight of these farmers discontinued operations.
Nineteen licenced game-bird farmers have not submitted their returns.
Game-bird bands sold to licenced game-bird farmers during the year 1937, 593 bands at
10 cents, $59.30.
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1937.
Barkerville and Quesnel Districts.
Becker, Fred W Barkerville.
Byrne, Edward Barkerville.
Cochran, J. D. Barkerville.
Colebank, G. A Hixon.
Colebank, G. F Hixon.
Cornwall, C. C Barkerville.
Grevatt, Walter.-. Quesnel.
Hodges, N. F Barkerville.
Houser, W. L Barkerville.
Jarrach, C. H Barkerville.
Johnson, G Quesnel.
Ludditt, B. C Barkerville.
Olson, A Quesnel.
MacKenzie, R. A Barkerville.
Quanstrom, Wm Quesnel.
Shea, E. M Barkerville.
Tibbies, F Quesnel.
Tibbies, Jack Quesnel.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Youngs, Grover A. Barkerville.
Evans, Charles Quesnel. Z 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Haskell, Gordon Westbridge.
Lutner, E. C Beaverdell.
Archie, Geo Canim Lake.
Archie, Thomas Canim Lake.
Baptiste, J. J Castle Rock.
Bell, Darwin 70-Mile House.
Bidstrup, H Likely.
Birdstone, A. Baker.
Bradford, W. J. Bridge Lake.
Burgess, T. R Roe Lake.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Coldwell, H. W Jesmond.
Colin, A. A Dog Creek.
Collier, E Riske Creek.
Daniels, G. A Canim Lake.
Davies, W. J Lone Butte.
Dewees, Pete Likely.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Dougherty, R. C. Clinton.
Gott, Joe _, Clinton.
Haines, J. F 70-Mile House.
Hansen, John F Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Hansen, W. B Bridge Lake.
House, S. V Ochiltree.
Boundary District.
Peterson, S. G .Westbridge.
Saunier, E. ..Beaverdell.
Cariboo District.
Hutcheson, D. B 70-Mile House.
Johnson, C 70-Mile House.
Johnson, 0. M Fawn.
Lackie, C Likely.
Larson, Karl Roe Lake.
Larson, Ole Roe Lake.
McKort, C Alexandria.
McNeil, B. S Canim Lake.
McNeil, H. M Canim Lake.
Monkman, F. G Narcosli Creek.
Nicol, Alex Horsefly.
Park, J. P 70-Mile House.
Patenaude, G. B 150-Mile House.
Peters, Machel Clinton.
Pollard, J Clinton.
Rioux, Ed Roe Lake.
Scheepbower, J. A 70-Mile House.
Sellers, A. Soda Creek.
Thursteinson, C 100-Mile House.
Tompkins, E 70-Mile House.
Vadan, A Clinton.
Young, H. W. Lac la Hache.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Butler, L. H.
..Tatla Lake.
Church, R. H Big Creek,
Dester, Batiste Kleena Kleene
Chilcotin District.
Mackill, J..
Ross, C	
Kleena Kleene.
Kleena Kleene.
Cassiar District.
Adsit, Geo. E.___. Telegraph Creek.
Ball, Geo. B Telegraph Creek.
Carlick, Lou D Telegraph Creek.
Creyke, John Telegraph Creek.
Dunstan, Tom Telegraph Creek.
Etzerza, B Telegraph Creek.
Fann, Billy Telegraph Creek.
McClusky, Pat Telegraph Creek.
Pete, Jack Telegraph Creek.
Williams, Mike Telegraph Creek.
Coast Distr-iit.
Fisher, Tony Harrison Hot Springs. Skuce, H Kimsquit.
Morigeau, M Harrison Hot Springs. Stanton, J. R Glendale Cove.
Service, John Kimsquit.
Fort George District.
Blackman, Charles Tete Jaune Cache.
Blackman, William Valemont.
Carr, Stanley J Tete Jaune.
Caton, Harold McBride.
Chesser, C. A Mt. Robson.
Coe, J. C .Mapes.
Corless, R. F., Jr T>rince George.
Dennison, G. M Mt. Robson.
Hargreaves, R. F Mt. Robson.
Hooker, J. B Bend.
L'Heureux, J. E -Mt. Robson.
Lonsdale, F. E Snowshoe.
Mapes, Harvey Mapes.
Munroe, A. R Engen.
Mustard, W. M..
Shovar, D	
Smith, J. M	
..McBride.
_McBride.
-Red Pass.
Swanson, 0 Valemont.
Woods, L. N. W Prince George.
Reimer, Abe Tete Jaune. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 57
Hazelton District.
Clark, J. E., Jr....
Fox, James W	
Harrison, Alford..
-Ootsa Lake.
..Telkwa.
-Wistaria.
Harrison, O. A Wistaria.
Harrison, R. B Wistaria.
Holland, Julian Telkwa.
..Kamloops.
Knowles, G. F Ootsa Lake.
Knox, Jack Ootsa Lake.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Moore, R. S Wistaria.
Morgan, J. E...." Wistaria.
Van Tine, E Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Hoover, Max	
Marsden, G Savona.
Mobley, C. W Tappen.
Mobley,  H. Salmon Arm.
Ray, John B Clearwater Station.
Renshaw, J.  H Blue River.
Riley, E. P Celista.
Sheaves, T Chinook Cove.
Shook, F. A Clearwater.
Shopshire, V. H Aspen Grove.
Kootenay Districts.
ley, A. J Windermere.
Baher, M. C Natal.
Barbour, Geo Wilmer.
Bergenham, Peter..
Boiven, Wm	
.Beavermouth.
-Natal.
Boker, Ernest Edgewater.
Buckman, Richard Fort Steele.
Cameron, D. C Skookumchuck.
Capilo, Louis Athalmer.
Christon, L. F Natal.
Couilard, Harry Natal.
Cretney, E. F Fort Steele.
Fletcher, J. R Nelson.
Gilbert, F. P Field.
Gorrie, Meth Grasmere.
Harley, Martin..
Harrison, Wm...
Jaeggi, John	
Jimmie, Joe	
Jones, R. K	
—Invermere.
—Edgewater.
—Edgewater.
—Windermere.
—Golden.
Lawrence, C. G Golden.
McDonald,  Sam Grasmere.
McKay, G. G. J Athalmer.
Moore, J. S Canal Flats.
Munro, J. H Vancouver.
Neas, Jimmie Windermere.
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Nixon, J. H Invermere.
Nixon, W. J   Invermere.
Nixon, W Parson.
Nordstrom,  C Elk Valley.
Philipps, F. A North Vancouver.
Richter, Frank Radium Hot Springs.
Rutledge, H. E Fernie.
Sale, Jack Yahk.
Sheek, W. P Castledale.
Staples, E. L Skookumchuck.
Stewart, C. W Spillimacheen.
Tegart, R Windermere.
Tegart, H. W Brisco.
Terrion, J Michel.
Thomas, G. A Parson.
Thompson, J. E Fort Steele.
Turnor, Miss M Skookumchuck.
Webber, S Golden.
White, J Fort Steele.
Wiedenman, O. W Leanchoil.
Lillooet District.
Cameron, A. L...
Campbell, Pete_
.Ashcroft.
-Big Bar.
Colins, E. M Cache Creek.
Grinder, John Big Bar.
Hewetson, J. S Shalalth.
Land, B Shalalth.
Manson, W Lillooet.
Michel, T Lillooet.
Peace River District.
Anderson, Stewart-— Arras.
Artemenko, Wm Fort St. John.
Calliou, Pat Little Prairie.
Calliou, Peter Little Prairie.
Calliou, Sam Moberley Lake.
Cameron, Patrick Little Prairie.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla.
Cranmer, John Hudson Hope.
Durney, L East Pine.
McCusker, K. F Fort St. John.
MacDougall, Donald—-Hudson Hope.
MacDougall, John Hudson Hope.
Millar, Wm Fort St. John.
Minaker, Glen Taylor.
Napolian, F.  Moberley Lake.
Napolian, T Moberley Lake.
Noskey, N Kelly Lake, via  Good-
fare P.O., Alberta. Z 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Durney, Milo East Pine.
Esswein, P. B.
Garbitt, T	
Gerlinsky, A.	
Gibson, H. B._
Gladu, I	
-Little Prairie.
Golata, F. W.
Prince,  Alec Fort. St. James.
Savard, Wm Kelly Lake, via  Good-
..Hudson Hope. fare P.O., Alberta.
.Fort St. John. Sheffield, B Fort St. John.
.Dawson Creek. Sheffield, C Fort St. John.
-Kelly Lake, via Good- Thomas, J. N Arras.
fare P.O., Alberta.    Wanyandi, St. Paul Kelly  Lake,  via  Good-
-Rolla. fare P.O., Alberta.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Hargreaves, Jack A Jasper, Alberta.
..Banff, Alberta. Sunderman, Sidney Hythe, Alberta.
Brewster, Pat         Banff, Alberta. Thomas, J. L Banff, Alberta.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alberta.
Brewster Transport
Co., Ltd	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937.
Z 59
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fc   § Z 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1937.
Attorney-General (Minister) Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Jas. G. Cunningham   Vancouver.
F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Headquarters.
C .-rporal  R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Clerk -  J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk  G. E. Marshall    Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss I. Pettigrew.—.    Vancouver.
Game Fish Culture Branch.
Fishery Officer C. O. Mellor Vancouver.
Junior Fishery Officer H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity   .Sooke.
Fishery Officer , A. Higgs Qualicum.
" A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden  A. Monks        -Alberni.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield   ._   Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey    Courtenay.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash     Victoria.
Game Warden F. P. Weir  Lake Cowichan.
Game Warden W. N. Massey    Alert Bay.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes    Duncan.
Game Warden J. W. Jones  Royal Oak, V.I.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Sub-Inspector  C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Stenographer Miss M. Marapodi Nelson.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Invermere.
Game Warden N. Cameron  Golden.
Game Warden L. F. Washburn  Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch    Cranbrook.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart   Nelson.
Game Warden  W. H. Cartwright  Creston.
Game Warden M. J. Wilscn     Penticton.
Game Warden   W. H. McLean        Greenwood.
Game Warden  H. V. Morgan        Princeton.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Sub-Inspector R. M. Robertson . Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling   Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron ._.  Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson  .'_ Kelowna.
Game Warden  C. F. Still   _..  Vernon.
Game Warden  J. W. Stewart Clinton.
Game Warden R. W. MacMartin  —..Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game Warden E. H. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Lillooet.
Game Warden  L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1937. Z 61
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W..L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Smithers.
Game Warden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Stenographer Miss H. Walker Prince Rupert.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Corporal J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve - Fort Nelson.
Game Warden -•- .' .V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden  S. G. Copeland Finlay Forks.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden  G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden  W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden . R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden 1 G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden F. Urquhart  Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden A. J. Butler _■___ Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Jones _■_    Ganges.
Corporal R. E. Allan  .    Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
J. C. Smith Comox. C. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
J. Dewar Extension.
X'lCTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majes'y.
1938.
925-1038-6237   

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