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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1938

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPOKT
OP
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR  THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1937
printed by
authority op the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, rrinter to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.  To His Honour Eric W. Hamber.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1937 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1938. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twentieth Annual Report on the work of
the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1937.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.    .   ,
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C, July, 1938. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Statistics of Trades and Industries      7
Pay-roll       7
Comparison of Pay-rolls  .    8
Change in Wage-rates      9
Apprentices   10
Average Weekly Wage by Industries  10
Increased Employment   12
Variation of Employment   14
Nationalities of Employees    15
Firms with Large Pay-rolls   15
Statistical Tables   16
Summary of all Tables   29
Board of Industrial Relations    30
Change in Personnel  30
Statistics Covering Women and Girls  ,  31
Special Licences   37
Women Employees receiving more than Legal Minimum  37
Length of Service Table    38
Single, Married, and Widowed Employees    39
Collections and Inspections   40
Court Cases   40
Wage Comparisons   47
New Orders and Regulations 1  48
" Hours of Work Act "   49
Comparison with Previous Years   49
Average Weekly Hours   50
Summary of Existing Orders   52
Complete List of Orders   67
Labour Legislation  70
Amendments to Labour Statutes  70
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "   71
Labour Disputes and Conciliation   78
Summary of Labour Disputes     82
Inspection of Factories   84
Inspections, Accident-prevention  84
Prosecutions   85
Improved Factory Conditions   85
Employees' Welfare   85
Home-work  86
Elevators   87
Employment Service   88
Forestry and Placer-mining Training Camps   88
Employment Conditions  89
Handicap Section   89
Women's Section  90
Importation of Labour   90
Placement Tables   91
Unemployment Relief   92
Assistance to Settlers  92
Forestry Training   92
Placer-mining Training   92
Winter Work Projects  93
Statement of Relief  93 Page.
Apprenticeship Branch      99
Designated Trades   100
Trades not yet designated  100
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "   101 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1937.
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour for 1937 constitutes the twentieth
chronicle of the activities of the Department. The records of these twenty years present a
fluctuating scene.
Times of prosperity have been enjoyed, less prosperous times have had to be endured,
but the annals of two decades of British Columbia's industrial life portray a picture of indubitable progress.
Our comparative immunity from labour disturbances is a welcome aspect of our industrial life that cannot be too highly valued, for it bespeaks a spirit of moderation worthy of
the greatest encouragement wherever found.
It is again gratifying to report expanding pay-rolls and increased employment during the
year 1937, as disclosed in the pages that follow.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The statistical survey of labour conditions for the year 1937 discloses a marked improvement over 1936. The total pay-roll increased some $20,000,000, the number gainfully employed in industrial undertakings being the highest since 1929, which, together with higher
wages, has placed this Province in a very favourable position.
Unfortunately, an upward trend in prosperity in British Columbia has resulted in an
ever-increasing number in search of work coming here in the hope there would be employment
for all.
The inevitable result has been that there is a considerable number of unemployed in this
Province from other sections of Canada, which has made it more and more difficult for many
of our own residents to obtain work.
A study of the statistical section of this report will convince any one that but for this
influx of unemployed, our own British Columbia residents would have been in more desirable
circumstances. EMPLOYERS RETURNS TOTAL 4,711.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,711, as
compared with 4,357 in 1936, an increase of 354.
PAY-ROLL.
For the 4,711 firms reporting, a summary of the pay-rolls reveals a sum total of
$126,683,377. Inasmuch as this figure covers only the industrial pay-rolls, it should not be
considered as the total pay-roll of the Province, and must be further augmented by the following, yielding an accumulative total of $162,654,234, or an increase of $20,304,643 over 1936.
Pay-roll of 4,711 firms making returns to Department of Labour _  $126,683,377.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   1,003,125.00
Employees in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns
(estimated pay-roll)   ,  ■   _.   1,450,000.00
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)    - -    12,417,732.00
Dominion and Provincial Government workers   — _  5,500,000.00
Wholesale and retail firms  .'.   _   3,000,000.00
Delivery,   cartage  and  teaming,   warehousing,   butchers,   moving-picture   operators,
coal and wood yards, and auto transportation — _  3,600,000.00
Ocean services and express companies -    7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous   —   - - - - - -   1,500,000.00
Total   —- — -  - -   $162,654,234.00
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAY-ROLLS.
The total Provincial pay-rolls since 1927 are as follows:—
1927    $177,522,758.00      1933..    899,126,653.00
1928 - - —- 183,097,781.00      1934- _ _ 113,567,953.00
1929 -   192,092,249.00      1935   125,812,140.00
1930 - - -  167,133,813.00      1936    142,349,591.00
1931  - 131,941,008.00      1937 .._   162,654,234.00
1932      102,957,074.00 S 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The percentage of the total payable to wage-earners increased from 77.76 per cent, in
1936 to 78.67 per cent, in 1937, this together with an increase in the number employed and in
the average weekly wage paid is further evidence that the worker was in a better position
during 1937 than in any year since 1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
Per Cent.
12.08
13.62
74.30
Per Cent.
11.05
12.71
76.24
Per Cent.
11.06
12.65
76.29
Per Cent.
10.54
11.70
77.76
Per Cent.
11.33
78.67
Totals-   _	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Of the twenty-five tables, twenty-four show an increased pay-roll, one only revealing a
decrease. The lumber industry continued to lead with an increase of $6,046,674, followed by
metal-mining with $2,182,347 and contracting with $1,931,675; metal trades increased by
$1,306,593; smelting with an addition of $1,250,695, followed by pulp and paper mills with
$896,038; food products showed an additional $843,762; public utilities, $755,592; Coast
shipping, $584,334; wood (N.E.S.), $551,367; explosives and chemicals with $476,227;
miscellaneous trades, $441,727; garment-making, $341,150; coal-mining, $299,778; shipbuilding, $298,028; printing and publishing, $208,661; laundries, cleaning and dyeing,
$191,461; house-furnishings, $169,349; leather and fur goods, $156,786; building materials,
$111,274; breweries, $101,507; jewellery-manufacture, $22,027; oil-refining, $19,129; paint-
manufacture, $5,511.
One industry, cigar and tobacco manufacturing, showed a decrease of $391.
The pay-rolls covering the past three years can be conveniently compared in the following
table:—
Industry.
1935.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1937.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roH.
Breweries 	
Builders' materials..
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting— 	
Explosives and chemicals..
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods .
Lumber industries	
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous 	
Oil-refining. 	
Paint-manufacture.	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper mills.	
Ship-building 	
Smelting.. 	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S. )-
Totals.. _.. 	
37
76
6
24
110
705
13
562
61
49
9
87
46
656
683
353
262
24
10
130
17
43
4
96
90
$845
802;
23,
3,064,
7,736,
5,717,
985,
8,836,
613,
733,
177,
1,180,
454,
18,077,
6,134,
8,280,
3,450.
1,912,
251,
3,172,
4,294,
939,
4,300,
8,536,
1,548,
,643.30
,305.60
,532.50
399.10
267.50
448.50
511.00
143.70
258.10
428.80
148.50
647.20
269.10
,711.20
803.50
457.60
312.20
277.80
019.60
740.20
668.00
555.10
083.20
318.90
917.70
4,153   I  $92,068,867.90
74
5
27
116
787
16
551
59
56
10
91
50
747
698
311
269
31
14
135
14
43
3
108
106
951
6
3,416
9,058
7,097
1,250
9,908
664
905,
192
1,270,
467,
23,523,
7,012,
9,532,
3,653,
2,349,
323,
3,271,
4,695,
938,
4,702,
9,144,
2,208,
,176.00
,875.00
309.00
428.00
,328.00
,358.00
844.00
,726.00
,718.00
941.00
595.00
734.00
706.00
759.00
441.00
766.00
599.00
394.00
419.00
760.00
356.00
111.00
712.00
584.00
437.00
4,357 S$107,492,076.00
35
73
4
27
121
887
18
555
68
57
12
101
54
877
742
310
304
41
13
128
17
40
5
115
107
$1,045,
1,063,
5,
3,716,
9,642,
9,029,
1,727,
10.752,
1,005,
1,075,
214,
1,462,
624,
29,570,
8,319,
11,715,
4,095,
2,368,
328,
3,480,
5,591,
1,236,
5,953,
9,900,
2,759,
,683.00
,149.00
,918.00
,206.00
,662.00
,033.00
,071.00
,488.00
,868.00
290.00
,622.00
,195.00
492.00
433.00
034.00
113.00
326.00
523.00
930.00
421.00
394.00
139.00
407.00
176.00
804.00
4,711 |$126.683,377.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 9
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
Dealing with the segregation of the industrial activities of the Province into three
divisions—Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of Mainland—during the year 1937
owing to further increased activity in lumbering and mining the percentage representing the
Greater Vancouver area dropped from 33.97 per cent, to 32.96 per cent. Vancouver Island
continued to gain, increasing from 18.43 per cent, to 19.50 per cent. The Mainland percentage remained practically unchanged—a slight decrease of only 0.06 per cent, being noted.
The percentages quoted are based on the returns received, the figures contained in the
following table being obtained through their application to the total pay-roll.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
Greater Vancouver— 	
$41,831,447.67
37,965,508.24
19,329,697.37
$45,972,307.59
47,289,695.86
20,305,950.09
$49,142,221.94
56,728,693.99
19,941,224.22
$48,356,156.06
67,758,405.32
26,235,029.62
$53,610,835.53
■ 77,325,822.84
Vancouver Island 	
31,717,575.63
Totals   .._
$99,126,653.28
$113,567,953.54
$125,812,140.15
$142,349,591.00
$162,654,234.00
CHANGE IN WAGE-RATES.
Continued improvement is noted in the decreasing number of adult male workers shown
in the returns in receipt of less than $19 per week. While in 1936 a decrease of 2,201 was
evident in this group over the preceding year, the 1937 figure shows a further drop of 3,346.
Adult Male Workers employed at Low Rates of Wages.
Weekly Rate.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1
3
10
26
70
44
214
143
283
679
574
1,092
1,252
1
97
27
49
110
494
588
1,267
1,550
1,409
3
47
57
88
182
184
816
954
1,024
1,950
1,948
3
35
81
79
147
526
550
1,174
953
1,973
2,675
3,322
1,989
2,757
107 '
167
420
367
683
914
810
2,145
1,809
2,204
3.159
2.754
2.318
2.574
96
405
728
592
1,187
1,063
809
2,550
2,145
2,436
2,965
2,780
2,280
2,927
378
166
191
257
361
489
473
2,742
1,372
1,952
2,502
4,757
2,081
3,513
304
172
122
125
250
295
352
1,745
1,167
1,413
2,192
5,300
2,267
3,575
243
98
98
111
308
273
341
761
911
1,640
1,949
4,543
2,216
3,586
155
125
7 to 7.99    ..     	
245
8 to 8.99    ..	
172
9 to 9.99.  -   -	
10 to 1«99
164
257
11 to 11.99        -	
223
12 to 12.99 -	
951
13 to 13.99    	
482
14 to 14.99 	
1,199
15 to 15.99       	
1 826
16 to 16.99  	
2 989
17 to 17.99   	
2,153
18 to 18.99	
2,791
Totals    - -	
4,391
5,592
7,253
16,264
20,431
22,972
21,234
19,279
17,078
13,732
The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number, together with the percentages of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Industry.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..
Garment-making  _ _	
Paint manufacture — 	
Leather and fur goods.. 	
Builders'  materials  	
Wood   (N.E.S.) 	
Food products   —	
House-furnishing     	
Number
employed.
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-
Metal trades    	
Miscellaneous trades and industries .
Explosives and chemicals  	
Printing and publishing 	
Street-railways, etc.  .
Contracting   —
Oil-refining   —	
Coast shipping  	
Breweries   -	
195
146
297
1,108
2,241
10,058
641
586
4,564
2,832
1,100
1,101
4,971
11,805
1,076
6,194
582
Per
Cent.
75.00
40.51
34.25
33.67
31.86
30.43
28.64
28.39
27.47
27.19
25.25
19.09
15.62
14.76
14.04
12.73
11.59
10.65 S 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Industry.
Coal-mining
Smelting 	
Lumber  industries   	
Pulp and paper manufacture.
Jewellery-manufacture    	
Ship-building   	
Metal-mining  	
Number
employed.
... 2,782
... 3,433
... 27,906
... 4,001
57
...    1,295
Per
Cent.
10.50
9.58
8.99
7.07
5.26
2.56
1.62
Comparative study of the above figures with similar percentages for the year 1936
generally show favourable decreases in the number employed at less than $19 per week—a new
low of 1.62 per cent, being set in 1937—as compared with the 1936 low of 2.76 per cent.
APPRENTICES.
It may be noticed that 8 apprentices are reported in receipt of between $35 and $40 per
week—a" reference to the tables showing them employed in the following industries: Contracting, 3; pulp and paper mills, 1; street-railways, etc., 4. Ten are in receipt of from $30
to $35 per week, distributed as follows: Contracting, 1; printing and publishing, 1; street-
railways, etc., 8.
Industries showing an increasing source of opportunity for apprentices during the year
were: Breweries, increased 3; Coast shipping, 1; contracting, 51; food products, 16; jewellery
manufacture, 1; laundries, 23; leather and fur goods, 3; metal trades, 107; metal-mining,
18;  printing and publishing, 16;  pulp and paper, 22;   smelting, 12;  wood (N.E.S.),1.
Decreases are found in the following: Building materials, decrease, 4; coal-mining, 6;
explosives and chemicals, 5; garment-making, 1; house-furnishing, 44; lumber industries, 4;
miscellaneous trades, 7;   ship-building, 1;   street-railways, etc., 7.
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the average weekly wage for
adult male employees increased in twenty-two of the twenty-five tables. While considerable
difficulty is experienced with some industries in the matter of broken time, the figures have
been computed as in previous years—an endeavour being made to base calculations on a full
working week. Distribution of wage groups from $6 to $50 are used for this purpose, the
mid-point of the class limits generally being taken as the rate for each group.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
$27.40
27.38
25.06
29.03
31.36
30.34
26.66
27.79
28.34
25.54
37.85
27.16
28.31
25.69
29.96
33.31
25.88
29.78
25.85
39.34 "
27.39
30.35
30.05
30.02
26.03
$27.58
25.81
20.40
28.40
29.63
27.41
26.78
23.43
22.51
23.18
31.29
25.29
25.81
21.09
27.74
30.02
23.43
31.24
26.11
39.78
25.94
29.58
30.44
29.11
23.67
$25.65
21.95
14.28
28.04
26.50
■24.78
23.34
21.88
24.07
20.05
23.40
23.26
21.62
18.73
24.24
25.50
22.78
29.34
25.00
37.05
24.63
26.17
22.98
28.89
20.61
$25.70
20.54
14.67
26.80
27.62
23.37
20.66
21.12
25.29
18.91
30.55
21.78
20.73
18.00
22.70
25.62
22.13
23.78
22.53
32.82
21.21
25.25
23.83
24.51
18.05
$25.62
20.19
15.86
28.11
28.58
22.56
22.53
21.10
23.52
19.49
28.88
20.67
22.34
21.32
22.81
27.35
21.26
25.04
22.53
32.51
23.22
26.03
23.88
25.51
18.97
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
27.09
18.69
$25.00
22.28
17.75
28.75
31.61
24.13
23.76
23.16
22.74
21.29
34.39
22.25
20.48
24.83
24.41
29.10
22.07
26.21
21.44
32.72
24.24
26.38
24.54
27.50
20.32
Builders' materials 	
22.31
27 46
Contracting-   -	
Explosives and chemicals 	
25.61
24.58
23 85
Garment-making 	
22.97
Manufacturing leather and fur goods —
21.23
26 81
Miscellaneous trades and industries   . .
23.85
Paint-manufacturing  ,	
Printing and publishing 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
23.08
33.69
26.75
27 88
25 08
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones, etc,.. 	
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.) 	
27.20
21.97 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 11
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows :-
Breweries    	
Builders' materials
Coast shipping	
Contracting  	
Explosives and chemicals  	
Food products, manufacture of 	
Garment-making   _ 	
House-furnishing  	
Jewellery, manufacture of 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Increase.
$1.18
.03
.82
.69
.23
.96
.21
.64
.75
Lumber industries
Metal trades  	
Metal-mining  ___
$1.98
1.24
Miscellaneous trades and industries   1.78
Oil-refining         1.71
Paint-manufacturing       1.64
Printing and publishing     .97
Pulp and paper manufacturing  _  2.51
Ship-building       1.50
Smelting — _ „ - 54
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.)    1.65
Decrease.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing   $2.25
Coal-mining - -    1.29
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc. —        .30
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees was $26.64, an increase of $0.28
over 1936, and the following table shows the average for each year since the formation of
the Department:—
1918
$27.97
1928
$28.96
1919           	
 _     29.11
1929
29.20
1920   	
      31.51
     27.62
     27.29
     28.05
1930	
            28.64
1921	
1922 —	
1931....:	
1932   	
      26.17
 ,     23.62
1923          	
1933      .   .
22.30
1924  	
        28.39
1934—	
1935
          23.57
1925           	
     27.82
24.09
1926—  	
1927...	
      27.99
.— -      28.29
1936... 	
1937.	
         26.36
      26.64
The above weekly wage rates appear in the following chart, showing the trend of average
weekly wages for adult male workers from 1918 to 1937.
AVERAGE  WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT  MALE  EMPLOYEES
1918— 1937
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
V EAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
*
32.00
31.00
3O.00
29.OO
28. OO
27. OO
26.OO
25. OO
24.00
23.00
22.OO
A
/\
/
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\
|    /
\
/
	
V S 12
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
551
1934
1935
1936
1937
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INCREASED EMPLOYMENT.
Considerable satisfaction is to be found in the increased number of wage-earners during
1937 which, from May to the end of the year, reached the highest point since the peak-year
of 1929.
At the close of 1937 the number reported was only 1.493 below the number reported for
December, 1929.
From the above figures it is evident that considerable progress has been made by industry
in reaching out for new markets during 1937, and by so doing creating additional employment,
which brought the number employed at the close of the year to within reach of the 1929
figures, as will be seen by the following chart which depicts the employment curve for 1921
and from 1929 to 1937. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 13 S 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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'SC s SE £ ■& ,3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S  15
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
Of the total 120,416 employees reported under nationalities, 92,387, or 76.72 per cent.,
were natives of English-speaking countries, an increase of 1.30 per cent.; 18,548, or 15.40
per cent., were originally from Continental Europe, an increase of 0.57 per cent.; natives of
Asiatic countries employed showed a total of 8,217, or 6.83 per cent., decreasing 0.63 per cent.
Employees from other countries also decreased from 2.29 to 1.05 per cent.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
Per Cent.
75.26
14.57
8.40
1.77
Per Cent.
76.30
14.62
7.80
1.28
Per Cent.
72.83
15.25
8.28
3.64
Per Cent.
76.69
14.51
7.08
1.72
Per Cent.
75.42
14.83
7.46
2.29
Per Cent.
76.72
15.40
6.83
From other countries,  or nationality not
1.05
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
In line with the continued advancement of the recovery trend, the number of firms
showing a total pay-roll of over $100,000 further increased from 174 in 1936 to 222 in 1937.
As in previous years, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal)
are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels
engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry again headed the list with 73 firms, an increase of 10; followed by
metal-mining with 24, an increase of 7; food products, 23, up 1; general contracting, 13, up
7; Coast shipping, 11, up 1; pulp and paper, 8, up 3; public utilities, 8, up 1; coal-mining,
7, up 3; garages, oil-refining, and printing and publishing, 6 each, up 1 in each case; wood
(N.E.S.), 5, up 2; miscellaneous metal trades, 4; breweries, 3; house-furnishings, miscellaneous trades and industries, and ship-building, 3 each, up 1 in each case; builders' materials,
electrical contracting, laundries, and smelting, 2 each, all up 1; explosives, fertilizers and
chemicals, garment-manufacturing, jewellery-manufacturing, leather and fur goods, iron and
brass foundries, machine-shops, paint-manufacture, 1 each.
Of the 222 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $4,000,000, four between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and eight between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. S 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following-, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades inclu
ded under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here &re grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a:*d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-rail ways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—-This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.— Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-reftning.~Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.— Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, &nd supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 35 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $249,881.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    180,281.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    615,521.00
Total Sl,045,683.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
458
122
July .  	
519
75
February....
437
98
August	
521
71
474
96
September .
606
83
April	
468
104
491
91
May	
S01
98
November ..
496
94
June	
511
S5
December...
518
74
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00	
to   86.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to    9.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
to   20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
2
6
21
2
5
22
75
31
16
50
8
27
25
13
124
61
43
11
4
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
64
41
62
1
7
2
Under
18 Y'rs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
387
148
11
1
1
1
15
24
1
24
5
3
24
175
12 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 17
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 73 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $184,904.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc            83,775.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       794,470.00
Total $1,063,149.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January
February  ..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
493
4
519
4
705
4
794
4
816
4
849
4
July	
August	
September .
October	
November ..
December...
857
764
881
881
832
766
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to "
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
2*.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
27
4
8
1
5
10
11
8
16
126
66
60
122
90
78
49
28
94
53
44
20
21
17
64
23
40
7
5
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
572
294
19
1
2
6
31
18
22
52
3
7
112
2
12
Females.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering . Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,965.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  627.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,326.00
Total  $5,918.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
April	
May	
June	
6
6
6
6
7
6
2
2
2
2
2
2
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
5
6
6
7
7
8
2
2
2
2
2
4
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.
to 7.
to 8.
to 9.
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
to 15.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females. S 18
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 27 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $107,794.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       136,444.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,471,968.00
Total $3,716,206.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January..
February.
March....
April
May	
June	
2,598
2,550
2,619
2,665
2,709
2,641
July	
August...
September
October...
November.
December.
2,652
2,696
2,984
2,444
2,641
2,805
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
1.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
27 99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
and over. .
21 Yrs.
& over.
28
58
89
81
104
136
87
100
232
214
111
174
66
128
784
168
40
Under
21 Yrs.
27
16
4
37
12
10
20
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries    	
Males.       Females.
1,143
31
1
13
3
215
43
348
36
73
1
120
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 121 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $724,120.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       509,983.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    8,408,559.00
Total $9,642,662.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April ...
May	
June
5,441
5,624
5,656
5,769
5,946
44
47
60
54
57
72
Mouth.       Males.   Females
July	
August...
September
October...
November.
December
6,050
6,055
5,741
5,540
5,424
5,490
85
87
74
52
46
46
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
2
1
13
3
7
7
3
57
16
24
6
5
13
13
30
5
13
4
3
$6.00 to   $6.99..
2
1
12
12
11
14
62
49
60
64
178
111
152
131
197
141
255
301
257
451
81
62
158
45
665
259
2,149
159
165
1
1
8.00 to     8.99..
10 00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
1
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
1
3
10
1
1
30
16
1
2
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
1
20.00 to   20.99..
1
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99
6
4
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99
27 00 to   27 99.
28.00 to   28.99..
1
1
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99.
1
45.00 to   49.99.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
2,876
2,672
84
19
1
21
46
103
77
383
72
25
223
25
13
Females.
79
30
2 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 19
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 887 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,070,063.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       992,839.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,966,131.00
Total $9,029,033.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March..,
April....
May	
June
3,766
3,946
4,872
5,586
6,203
7,077
90
67
129
139
Month.       Males.    Females
July	
August....
September
October .. .
November.
December..
7,614
8,008
7,538
6,969
6,135
5,694
177
158
128
107
84
83
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99..
to 28 99..
to 29.99..
to 34.99..
to 39.99..
to 44.99.
to 49.99..
and over..
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18
30
9
11
17
20
16
60
59
105
116
407
535
254
1,680
623
664
1,156
460
991
380
307
392
339
138
1,332
689
590
266
141
Under
21 Yrs.
6
10
9
2
9
10
13
4
14
14
22
19
7
25
4
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
1
2
61
1
17
22
7
6
3
5
4
3
3
3
6
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
16
12
9
19
9
11
8
11
5
6
8
1
4
1
2
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France     	
Italy	
Germany and Austria.	
Central European and Balkan States
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
1,133
227
14
16
42
256
165
149
692
187
45
10
4
116
Females.
145
52
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 18 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $113,301.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  233,7S4.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,379,986.00
Total $1,727,071.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January  ...
February...
April	
696
691
761
952
1,035
1,065
20
19
25
27
28
26
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
1,071
1,085
1,041
871
859
552
27
25
26
23
23
24
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.
to $6
to 7
to 8
to 9
to
to
10.f
11.8
to   12.9
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
13.99.
14.99.
15.99
16.99.
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24 99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
4
2
1
1
1
2
2
13
13
31
24
18
98
28
88
54
131
60
59
105
26
50
94
31
91
38
17
7
11
2
1
1
1
5
1
5
4
1
o
1
ii'"
2
9
2
4
3
7
1
1
1
1
4
6
6
3
3
1
2
2
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium     	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
587
365
21
1
2
1
12
5
3
44
6
4
74
65
1
26
7
1 S 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 555 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,535,158.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,534,003.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,683,327.00
Total .    $10,752,488.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June
3,913
4,011
4,077
4,540
5,288
6,073
963
1,000
933
1,023
1,173
1,870
July	
August	
September .
October
November..
December ..
7,530
8,067
7,581
6,936
5,514
4,531
3,642
4,266
4,521
4,243
2,631
1,467
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
to
$6.99..
to
7.99..
to
8.99..
to
9.99..
to
10.99..
to
11.99..
to
12.99..
to
13.99..
to
14.99..
to
15.99..
to
16.99..
to
17.99..
to
18.99..
to
19.99..
to
20.99..
to
21.99...
to
22.99...
to
23.99...
to
24.99...
to
25.99...
to
26.99...
to
27.99...
to
28.99...
to
29.99...
to
34.99...
to
39.99...
to
44.99...
to
49.99...
and over ...
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
48
157
49
51
103
65
478
75
287
546
361
271
330
693
590
420
586
349
683
699
400
284
360
194
835
412
185
56
432
Under
21 Yrs.
26
17
17
39
13
23
27
43
23
40
40
37
20
21
14
14
17
20
14
Females.
18 Yrs.
345
138
141
173
110
522
507
502
366
706
502
382
353
404
163
133
141
102
75
79
58
59
44
34
25
52
Under
18 Yrs.
10
48
17
37
29
37
22
23
27
7
9
58
6
2
3
3
Appren
tices.
2
3
10
7
13
5
10
2
4
7
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States ...
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries    	
5,103
2,606
139
9
10
29
91
154
134
633
87
50
1,257
25
773
34
4,695
921
83
2
4
31
80
209
81
99
71
10
5
432
131
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 68 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments,  1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $200,874.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        219,255.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       585,739.00
Total $1,005,868.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females
Januar}'..
February.
March....
April.  ...
May	
June	
185
201
208
215
206
206
512
570
635
649
627
579
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
196
200
209
211
204
198
548
549
582
589
661
516
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $9.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to     9.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
28
5
9
10
7
13
12
6
2
2
12
1
7
6
3
23
15
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
1
1
6
7
5
8
13
91
87
123
69
44
30
37
6
18
2
6
1
2
7
Under
18 Yrs.
4
2
21
4
1
Apprentices.
3
1
10
12
5
5
10
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium      	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.      Females..
107
65
2
15
7
10
380.
167
9
1
1
1
4
4
8
21
15
2
17
74 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 21
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 57 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $201,526.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   113,182.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   760,582.00
Total   $1,075,290.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June	
705
711
723
727
728
739
108
112
116
117
120
121
Month.       Males.   Females.
July 	
August...
September.
October   ..
November.
December..
767
845
811
828
806
780
125
131
134
135
131
128
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
18.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
2S.O0
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $6.
to 7.
to 8.
to 9.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
7
4
14
16
75
23
22
47
82
39
49
32
24
17
1
37
5
2
Under
21 Yrs.
3
2
5
24
17
7
IS
26
14
13
19
47
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
1
2
3
15
19
25
28
11
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia   	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan  	
Japan	
All other countries	
575
223
11
1
1
20
5
31
30
4
113
26
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING  OF.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $26,351.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   89,323.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   98,948.00
Total $214,622.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
May	
June	
65
66
66
65
64
65
6
6
5
5
4
4
July 	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December...
65
64
65
66
67
69
5
4
5
5
6
8
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
S6.00.
to $6.
to 7
to 8
to     9
to 10
to 11
to 12
to 13
to 14
to 15.9
to 16.9
to 17.9
to 18.9
to 19.9
to 20.9
to 21.9
to 22.9
to 23.9
to 24
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
«fc over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
48
26
10
1 S 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 101 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $138,034.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      231,429.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,092,732.00
Total     $1,462,195.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.        Males.   Females
January..
February.
March. ..
April..
May	
June
552
550
571
568
582
602
903
934
946
961
9S6
July	
August ...
September
October ...
November.
December .
601
597
597
588
575
568
1,003
1,025
981
955
948
954
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 29.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
4
1
5
4
4
7
12
7
34
21
21
37
37
50
18
59
14
31
52
37
31
15
5
48
17
7
18 Yrs.
& over.
8
6
3
14
26
21
38
82
401
137
93
40
27
16
Under
18 Yrs.
1
4
7
22
8
9
3
3
1
Apprentices.
1
2
2
17
15
14
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium .,	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Males.
296
242
18
11
8
26
2
624
325
28
1
3
12
22
12
9
23
21
4
1
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 54 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $116,391.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   114,899.00
Wage-earners (.including piece-workers)  393,202.00
Total $624,492.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June. ...
337
335
340
354
354
361
103
107
112
117
July..	
August	
September.
October
November.
December .
36S
367
362
371
362
119
128
133
138
133
129
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
9
6
19
8
8
9
3
11
8
2
4
3
1
1
4
3
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
4
3
2
5
3
9
12
23
18
15
10
8
6
9
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
4
3
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
4
2
9
4
9
23
17
15
19
35
26
12
20
8
29
22
9
10
4
5
10
6
1
2
1
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99
1
1
17.00 to   17 99  .
18.00 to   18.99
20.00 to   20.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99
24.00 to   24.99 .
25.00 to   25 99..
3
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34 99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France.
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
211
108
7
12
29
5
9
14
10
4
1
95
32
6
11
3 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 23
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 877 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,687,458.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       933,728.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 26,949,247.00
Total $29,570,433.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February-
March .. .
April....
May	
June
Males.    Females.
16,592
12,779
19,246
21,969
23,657
24,132
43
41
54
59
64
65
Month.
Males.
July	
24,176
August....
23,663
September.
23,935
October ...
23,129
November.
21,086
December..
18,354
67
65
62
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.60
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
29.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Y'rs.
Under
& over.
21 Yrs.
7
6
5
3
7
2
7
12
4
31
33
15
11
90
107
63
40
193
122
147
42
928
102
296
16
707
34
3,892
158
940
25
2,402
58
928
8
560
7
3,730
68
1,078
2
1,212
6
1,243
29
863
5
704
9
3,070
3
2,150
2
1,444
707
3
475
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
3
2
2
9
2
3
3
3
13
11
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy 	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan        	
AH other countries	
13,464
3,174
676
17
47
134
318
590
1,139
4,425
1,047
228
1,707
644
1,483
353
Appren.
tices.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 742 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,640,245.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,985,054.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,693,735.00
Total     $8,319,034.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January .,
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
3,775
3,896
4,144
4,316
4,432
4,564
143
152
153
147
164
171
Month.
July	
August....
September
October...
November .
December..
Males.
4,660
4,916
4,602
4,530
4,372
4,285
178
168
162
156
159
157
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners oitly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
5
5
11
11
19
22
69
36
69
377
163
229
236
294
269
137
218
123
252
256
140
116
178
108
780
245
114
36
68
Under
21 Yrs.
25
17
19
26
22
40
35
57
23
21
97
19
22
IS
13
2
18 Yrs.
& over.
5
9
5
4
66
6
10
14
13
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Apprentices.
42
50
27
49
26
20
23
25
13
9
13
12
3
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
3,528
1,404
111
14
13
16
62
54
19
92
28
10
4
2
17
20
200
37
4
Italy	
Central European and Balkan
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, F
States
inland, etc.
1
1
2
2
2 S 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 310 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,033,555.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        638,158.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  10,043,400.00
Total $11,715,113.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March.  .
April	
May	
June ....
5,253
5,227
5,583
6,060
6,569
6,811
34
34
37
41
52
55
July	
August....
September.
October ..
November..
December..
7,016
7,245
7,261
7,193
6,820
6,391
66
57
54
53
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering SOU Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $792,526.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      732,475.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,570,325.00
Total  $4,095,326.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Januarv....
1,796
306
July	
2,241
371
February...
1,772
321
August	
2,484
373
2,063
340
September..
2,551
403
2,212
333
October   ..
2,082
382
May	
2,114
337
November..
2,254
376
June	
2,145
356
December ..
2,175
365
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates
(Wage
-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&, over.
Under
18 Yrs.
7
1
5
3
3
2
4
4
3
25
14
24
42
37
97
180
228
54
626
784
238
556
699
904
2,720
1,163
331
81
86
1
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.99.
7.00 to     7.99.
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99  .
11.00 to   11.99.
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99  .
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99 .
18.00 to   18.99 .
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over ..
5
12
5
7
10
13
11
40
22
28
111
144
99
208
251
99
200
252
74
332
171
71
81
70
27
246
100
67
34
42
14
6
21
10
15
17
8
16
16
12
22
6
8
2
6
1
3
"l  "
1
1
2
2
7
7
9
2
27
54
138
41
35
19
14
16
9
9
2
2
3
4
3
1
6
$6.00 to   $6.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
1
1
8
2
1
4
2
12
2
9
30
1
1
8.00 to     8.99...
2
1
1
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
1
2
3
11.00 to   11.99.   .
5
1
1
2
5
2
5
3
2
9
4
7
2
4
1
20
1
4
1
3
8
6
8
10
5
is
2
2
2
4
1
1
13.00 to   13.99...
1
14.00 to   14.99...
3
3
1
19 00 to   19 99.
3
1
1
23 00 to   23 99  .
1
27.00 to   27.99...
1
6
Nationality of Er
nployees.
Nationality of Er
nployees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Canada and Newfou
Great Britain and Ir
United States of An
4,911
2,290
S45
21
15
36
234
239
482
1,402
132
63
94
62
18
3
Canada and Newfoundland
1,863
1,006
67
3
3
6
16
16
18
71
89
4
9
5
15
22
373
107
United States of A
7
2
Italv	
1
1
Italv	
2
Germany and Austr
Germany and Aust
1
tc.
etc.
1
2
Russia and Poland
Other European cou
Russia and Poland
Other European co
10
24
110
8
All other countries
All other countries REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 25
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering UI Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $251,528.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,033,403.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,083,592.00
Total    $2,368,523.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.    Females
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June
702
674
672
724
817
917
12
14
12
14
12
13
July  916
August  868
September.. 852
October  814
November .. 793
December... 752
19
13
16
17
12
11
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99..
29.99.,
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
to
to
to
to
to
to   49.99
and over
21 Yrs.
&over.
18
38
17
30
33
73
19
26
47
23
68
47
110
20
49
40
200
155
37
17
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
814
351
34
3
1
1
3
41
1
Italy           	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
8
62
2
7
6
2
Other European country	
4
5
1
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering IS Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $69,147.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    101,611.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   158,172.00
Total   $328,930.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March   	
April	
May	
June	
132
138
151
158
148
150
15
15
16
16
16
15
July	
September..
October.
November ..
December...
152
160
147
141
139
146
15
15
14
14
14
14
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
tfeover.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
7.00 to     7.99
"l"
3
5
1
11.00 to   11.99
1
1
3
16
6
6
11
6
6
10
6
6
3
19
12
4
1
2
1
12.00 to   12.99
5
3
2
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14 99..
6
7
1
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16 99
17.00 to   17.99
18.00 to   18.99..
1
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99.
23.00 to   23.99..
24 00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99.
29.00 to   26.99
28 00 to   28.99
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99
8
8
2
2
a
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China 	
Hindustan	
Japan ,    	
All other countries	
Males.
116
67
2
14
4
1 S 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 128 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $501,555.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,119,941.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,858,925.00
Total $3,480,421.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March. .
April....
May	
June	
1,082
1,111
1,135
1,166
1,163
1,164
152
162
162
162
178
187
July	
August...
September
October.. .
November
December.
1,165
1,160
1,160
1,203
1,195
1,204
1S3
188
185
211
186
180
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00	
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
11
4
9
4
13
8
12
9
22
23
23
12
18
23
30
13
28
15
15
51
23
26
26
7
88
95
217
187
85
18
4
8
4
4
5
3
1
1
Frmalks.
IS Yrs.
& over.
5
4
11
9
16
22
29
15
18
4
IS
1
2
4
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
5
10
4
8
14
18
10
8
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France.	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Males.      Females.
908
449
36
2
2
13
223
55
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 17 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $461,298.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      504,150.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  4,625,946.00
Total $5,591,394.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February
March ...
April
May	
June
3.312
3,339
3,411
3,422
3,611
3,534
72
80
83
81
July	
August	
September..
October
November ..
December...
Males.
Females.
3,393
79
3,515
83
3,505
81
3,396
81
3,332
75
3,268
69
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to   $6.99
7.9
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
2
18
12
7
10
13
34
49
137
516
82
130
117
110
752
304
378
159
91
117
326
415
96
58
67
18 Yrs.
tk over.
2
6
4
1
3
23
1
9
38
1
8
1
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
3
14
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia .	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
1,894
895
44
10
5
31
40
11
84
25
3
561
144
62
15 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 27
Tablb No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering UO Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $162,484.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  85,456.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       988,199.00
Total. $1,236,139.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
711
672
862
993
899
351
2
2
2
2
3
3
July	
September..
November ..
December...
812
746
994
803
836
711
2
2
2
2
June	
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over     21 Yrs.
1
1
1
6
2
7
1
3
5
5
10
15
9
436
9
67
14
14
75
23
153
242
149
26
18
2
26
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
10
4
4
1
4
1
6
5
4
2
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
716
510
70
i
3
2
8
1
35
4
1
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $241,908.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        757,094.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,954,405.00
Total $5,953,407.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March..
April	
June	
3,038
3,137
3,248
3,325
3,436
3,499
18
18
19
22
22
22
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
3,462
3,515
3,533
3,481
3,551
3,546
22
22
22
22
23
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7 99..
31
3
14
4
7
12
18
16
16
22
22
81
34
49
106
195
258
334
287
208
331
180
234
303
125
381
111
40
10
1
8
10
4
2
2
1
8.00 to     8.99
9 00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
IS
2
12
12.00 to   12.99  .
7
13.00 to   13.99..
6
2
14.00 to   14.99..
6
1
9
4
18.00 to   18.99  .
6
20.00 to   20 99
19
26
11
14
2
6
1
3
22.00 to '22 99
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24 99..
25 00 to   25 99..
27.00 to   27.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
3,615
1,062
108
4
403
56
79
162
40
10
3
40
1 S 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 115 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $750,291.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,849,741.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,300,144.00
Total $9,900,176.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
April	
May	
June	
3,677
3,649
3,717'
3,989
4,098
4,219
1,542
1,537
1,569
1,557
1,901
1,994
July	
August	
September..
. October ....
Novemljer ..
December...
4,194
4,150
4,104
4,050
3,942
3,992
1,986
1,699
1,717
1,615
1,588
1,669
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
to 25.99.
to   26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
43
18
11
7
20
44
220
59
96
82
127
498
196
138
114
145
317
159
184
259
271
273
784
373
388
84
54
18 Yrs.
& over.
46
163
53
6
493
140
16
41
47
518
117
38
12
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland '	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland    	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
2,584
2,282
185
16
4
16
82
76
51
165
43
14
Females.
1,566
465
54
1
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 107 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1937.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $403,500.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      169,391.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,186,913.00
Total   $2,759,804.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females,
January .
February
March. ..
April....
May	
June
1,722
1,764
2,063
2,208
2,365
2,454
68
61
73
98
137
136
July	
August... .
September
October ...
November.
December
2,484
2,594
2,498
2,325
2,253
2,104
115
95
92
87
76
73
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria.	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan	
All other countries 	
2,051
477
36
3
4
11
19
50
42
139
41
11
37
2
67
31
For Week of
Malrs.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Y'rs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00	
2
1
2
35
50
74
79
98
134
79
63
21
20
3
53
1
12
1
1
2
2
1
1
8
31
28
32
70
285
137
87
283
150
212
90
58
329
42
84
54
54
48
64
52
15
18
6
1
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
ll.OOto   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
8
5
19
8
48
21
7
5
4
3
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
18.00 to   18,99..
19.00 to   19.99 .
20 00 to   20.99..
1
1
22 00 to   22 99..
1
25.00 to   25.99..
27 00 to   27.99..
1
30.00 to   34.99
40 00 to   44.99..
Males.       F e rrales
105
24 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 29
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering U,711 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1937.
Officers,  Superintendents,  and Managers	
Clerks,  Stenographers,  and  Salesmen,  etc...
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)	
$12,665,857.00
14,350,026.00
99.667,494.00
$126,683,377.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary .  —
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's inquiry, and
from whom returns were not received     	
Transcontinental  Railways   -   -   	
Dominion and Provincial Government workers    —
Wholesale and Retail Firms—     	
Delivery,  Cartage  and  Teaming,   Warehousing,  Butchers,   Moving-picture   Operators,
Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation  	
Ocean Services and Express Companies    	
Miscellaneous     	
$1,003,125.00
1,450,000.00
12,417,732.00
6,500,000.00
3,000,000.00
3,600,000.00
7,500,000.00
1,600,000.00
35,970,857.00
Total..
$162,654,234.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.
024
611
341
138
440
568
966
981
864
342
495
573
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia ,	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries   	
52,386
25,982
2,288
146
143
351
1,868
1,687
2,600
8,573
1,960
513
3,802
679
3,165
1,124
5,246
5.360
5,511
5,653
6,986
6,800
8,607
9,233
9,491
9,053
7,189
6,104
Males.       Females.
9,090
2,319
204
5
8
47
121
239
102
190
135
21
23
648
140
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 .
155
103
374
104
Ill
$6.00 to   $6.99..
125
78
153
85
100
7.00 to     7.99  .
245
131
165
29
78
8.00 to     8.99..
172
182
213
89
130
9.00 to     9.99..
164
157
173
62
89
10.00 to   10.99..
257
283
60S
77
101
11.00 to   11.99..
223
211
638
43
92
12.00 to   12.99..
951
464
1,009
57
83
13.00 to   13.99..
482
320
1,105
60
43
14.00 to   14.99..
1,199
339
1,314
30
36
15.00 to   16.99..
1,826
435
1,498
39
65
16.00 to   16.99..
2,989
304
767
16
34
17.00 to   17.99..
2,153
133
529
9
20
18.00 to   18.99..
2,791
161
616
32
22
19.00 to   19.99..
8,955
319
295
7
15
20.00 to   20.99..
3,938
97
761
2
9
21.00 to   21.99..
6,285
147
292
4
7
22.00 to   22.99..
5,245
79
139
3
12
23.00 to   23.99..
2,873
75
125
2
24.00 to   24.99..
9,159
133
119
2
5
25.00 to   25.99..
5,308
48
90
3
9
26.00 to   29.99..
3,719
17
67
1
6
27.00 to   27.99..
3,889
34
49
2
5
28.00 to   28.99..
3,691
17
39
4
29.00 to   29.99..
3,197
12
26
2
30.00 to   34.99 .
12,872
46
63
10
35.00 to   39.99..
6,707
3
10
8
40.00 to   44.99..
5,831
1,795
1,681
3
1
2
2
45.00 to   49.99..
	
	
Totals	
97,877
4,332
11,241
756
1,097 S 30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell—  1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
S. Fraudena Eaton    1902 Blenheim Street, Vancouver.
4. James Thomson    789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. J. A. Ward Bell (replacing Dr. W. A. Carrothers, resigned) ..789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary.
Mabel A. Cameron      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head Office       Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office       789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
SIR,—We present herewith the Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
for the year ended December 31st, 1937.
CHANGE IN PERSONNEL.
Toward the end of the year Dr. W. A. Carrothers, who had been a valued member of the
Board since its inception, was compelled to resign, owing to pressure of other duties. At this
time we, as a Board, would like to pay tribute to the services rendered by Dr. Carrothers, and
while regretting the fact we no longer have the benefit of his help and advice, we are fortunate
in having J. A. Ward Bell to succeed him. Mr. Bell's close association with other branches
of the Department, particularly in the administration of the " Trade-schools Regulation Act,"
the " Apprenticeship Act," and his position on the Board of Examiners under the " Barbers
Act," enable him to give the Board invaluable assistance, as there is a close correlation among
these several branches of the Department of Labour.
GENERAL REMARKS.
Steady progress has been maintained during the year in improving conditions of employment for many classes of workers. This has been accomplished by amending existing Orders
and vigorously enforcing the provisions of labour laws and regulations.
The Inspection staff now numbers twenty-two, of whom eight are located in Victoria,
eleven in Vancouver, one with headquarters at Prince George, for the northern section, one
at Nelson (formerly at Trail) for the eastern area, and one at Kamloops for the central
section of the Province.
As occasion requires, these officials travel to other localities in their respective districts,
keeping up a systematic inspection and looking after special cases as they arise. In the
course of their work they give out information and distribute Orders and Regulations to
employers and employees, and it is gratifying to note that as a general rule co-operation is
given in enforcing the law, designed to benefit not only employees, but also the employers by
giving them protection against unfair competition. The public also shares in the beneficial
results, because employers who must conform with the Board's requirements are more careful
in selecting their staffs than they were before this type of legislation was in force, and the
public is thus served by more efficient employees.
Before making new Orders or changing those already in force, the Board has tried at all
times to gather as much information as possible relevant to the proposed Order.
This is accomplished either by public hearings, by presentation of material through
representative delegations of those who will be affected by the new rulings, or by investigation
and inquiry conducted by officials of the Board.
During 1937 the Board held sixty-three sessions, some of which convened in the evening
to enable certain groups of employees to attend and present their views without absenting
themselves from work. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 31
Delegations to the number of fifty-one appeared before the Board at different times and
places, representing a variety of trades and occupations.
When revisions are made, it is evident to those who have the welfare of the industries
and occupations at heart that very good reasons for the changes have existed.
The Board's aim and policy at all times has been to improve conditions of employment
without placing undue hardships on any groups.
It has been a source of gratification to those in charge of this type of legislation to have
some employers, who at first opposed certain phases of some particular Order, later admit
the wisdom of the Board's decisions. These individuals or firms have had to rearrange or
alter some of their previous methods of management, but in doing so have arrived at a more
efficient business system, and have been fair-minded enough to apprise the Board of their
changed opinion.
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Continuing its long-established policy of collecting data once a year, the Department
circularized employers of women throughout the Province towards the end of 1937.
Statistical forms were received from 3,749 employers of women and girls, an increase
of 184 over the 1936 figure. Returns covering 24,084 women workers were received in 1937,
as against 21,924, thus revealing 2,160 more women and girl employees on the pay-rolls than
appeared for the previous yearly period.
Coupled with this increase in reporting firms and reported employees is the noticeable
upward trend in wages, and, in some cases, a shortening of working hours.
Restoration of cuts in salaries has been effected in many instances, and actual increases
have been given to employees by other employers.
These satisfactory conditions are graphically revealed in the accompanying tables, compiled from material submitted to the Board, and tabulated by industries, corresponding to
various Orders made under the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
The information was requested for the week of greatest employment during 1937, and
as this peak occurs at different times in different occupations, while the figures are definitely
peak-employment records, they are not necessarily for one stated week in the year.
It must also be borne in mind by the reader that as the Act does not apply to fruit-pickers,
domestic servants, or farm-labourers, the total number of employees reported is not intended
to nor does it cover all women earning their own living within the Province.
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
1936.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years   — —
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years — 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years __	
Employees under 18 years.. -	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week 	
SGO
$4
507
5,010
4,540
470
373.35
638.65
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
40.47
479
4,723
4,326
397
1,086.46
1,523.49
$12.96
$8.88
8.40%
40.58
421
4,382
3,960
422
$51,158.70
$3,353.22
$12.92
$7.95
9.63%
40.38
390
4,239
3,870
$48,968.56
$2,750.77
$12.65
$7.45
8.70%
40.92
379
3,930
3,604
326
$46,074.00
$2,622.50
$12.78
$7.12
8.30%
41.03
The above table shows an all around increase for 1937 over 1936. From 28 additional
firms, 287 more employees were reported than in the previous year.
The average weekly wage for women 18 years of age or over rose from $12.96 to $13.30,
and for the younger employee the average weekly wage for the year under review stood at
S9.66, as against $8.88.
A slight decrease in average working hours is also noted.
There were 73 more girls under 18 reported than in 1936. S 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Laundry Industry.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
86
81
1,084
991
900
846
785
Over 18 years  _	
1,014
911
857
810
70
80
43
37
61
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years —  	
$13,083.49
$11,462.44
$10,517.50
$9,679.17
$8,964.00
Employees under 18 years — 	
$575.71
$658.04
$406.74
$309.74
$470.00
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years    	
$12.90
$12.58
$12.27
$11.95
$11.42
Employees under 18 years  	
$8.22
$8.23
$9.46
$8.37
$7.70
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
6.46%
8.07%
4.78%
4.37%
7.21%
Average hours worked per week.  	
41.90
41.94
41.12
39.91
37.92
More firms, more employees, a higher weekly average for women 18 years of age or over,
and a slight reduction in the average weekly hours, may be noted in the laundry, cleaning, and
dyeing industries.
For the sake of laundry employees the Board would like to see a trend towards less
broken employment. The employers claim the public is responsible largely for the rush of
work on certain days of the week. The operators have tried to spread the work more evenly,
but Monday still means the heavy collection-day, with Tuesday and Wednesday seeing the
peak loads. On Friday and Saturday the rush dies off, except in laundries that have a good
trade from hotels and restaurants.
In most plants marking and listing crews were busy on Mondays and slack by Wednesday.
An effort has been made to keep them steadily at work by transferring them to finishing
departments towards the end of the week.
In some parts of the United States efforts have been made to offer a lower price for
work collected at the end of the week, but it was found the trucks would not be carrying
capacity loads and the collection overhead would be unduly high.
Employees in the dyeing and cleaning branches of the industry do not experience such
fluctuating and broken time.
There has been a slight but not very insistent request for the setting of a higher rate for
part-time workers, to offset the effect of the low wages resulting from broken hours. This
Order now permits wages to be paid on a strictly pro rata basis if fewer hours than 48 are
worked during the week.
Hotel and Catering Industry.
1937.
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees.-
Over 18 years. _	
Under 18 years-
Total weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week	
532
3,424
3,302
122
1,840.82
,353.11
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
42.43
500
2,961
2,878
83
$40,265.89
$956.54
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
42.79
429
2,343
2,303
40
$30,189.28
$452.10
$13.11
$11.30
1.71%
41.31
433
2,256
2,209
47
$29,243.64
$499.15
$13.24
$10.62
2.08%
41.31
352
1,895
1,797
98
$24,763.00
$901.50
$13.78
$9.20
5.17%
42.30
For convenience, janitresses and women elevator-operators, although covered by special
Orders, were included in the figures with hotel and catering employees.
For the first time since 1932 the weekly average wage for adult women employees has
passed the $14 figure, standing at $14.19, as against the 1936 figure of $13.99.
In this industry it is often convenient and practical for employees to be furnished with
board and lodging, or partial board. The Order prescribes definite rates in such circumstances and prohibits deductions for greater amounts than specified. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 33
While tabulating the figures in this occupation allowance was made where meals and
accommodation were provided, so the $14.19 average does not mean an actual cash average
in all cases, but would include living allowance when same was furnished and used by the
employees.
The Order covering this type of work has always given the Board considerable trouble.
If disputes arise between employer and employee and the intervention of our officials is
needed; the question of meals is usually the crux of the problem, and much diplomacy is
needed to straighten out the contentious phases of the disagreement.
Some people have advocated eliminating from the Order any reference to the charges
that may be made for meals, making it obligatory on the employers to pay a straight cash
wage and allowing the employees to make their own arrangements for food.
Much as it would like to be free from the meal problem, the Board has taken the stand
that if no maximum price for meals was fixed by law the unscrupulous employers might
make meal charges so high that they would have a disastrous effect on the actual cash
earnings of employees, and thus offset the Board's efforts to provide a reasonable living wage
for women and girls in this type of employment.
Office Occupation.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees..
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years..   	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years.	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years — 	
Employees under 18 years... 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week 	
1,891
5,911
5,802
109
$106,395.64
$1,306.60
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
40.79
1,848
5,344
5,280
64
$94,789.14
$645.41
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
40,88
1,727
4,827
4,809
18
14,596.16
$195.20
$17.59
$10.84
0.37%
40.79
1,716
4,818
4,783
35
12,745.51
$347.80
$17.30
$9.94
0.73%
40.59
1,810
4,708
4,660
48
$80,947.00
$484.50
$1.7.37
$10.09
1.02%
38.95
This classification continues to employ the greatest number of women employees, and
returns received for the year under review increased from 1,848 to 1,891, and showed 567
more employees.
The weekly average for the experiencd workers has mounted gradually over the past
four years, now standing at $18.34, being $3.34 per week in advance of the legal minimum.
For the younger girls in offices this year's average reached $11.99 per week.
A slight increase in the percentage of the younger workers is noted.
It may be of interest to set out some of the numbers receiving the more worth while
salaries. A $65 monthly rate is the legal minimum for experienced employees 18 years of age
or over.
There were
1,452 employed at $65.00 per month.
y)
259            ,
70.00
,)
330            ,
75.00
j,
234           ,
80.00
>>
203
85.00
?>
213
90.00
>>
68
95.00
jj
182
,            100.00
j)
25
,            105.00
it
55
110.00
i)
16           ,
,            120.00
„
52
,           125.00         „
„
33
130.00
?)
20
135.00
>J
14
140.00
n
26
150.00
ti
89
,            more than $150.00 per month. S 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The above figures show those actually receiving the quoted monthly rates, and do not
include, for instance, those getting between $65 and $70, or between $70 and $75, and so on
down the list. _ „
Personal Service Occupation.
1937.
1936.
1935.
■ 1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees   	
157
481
472
9
$6,283.69
$45.09
$13.31
$5.01
1.87%
37.85
138
427
417
10
$5,486.48
$66.05
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
38.07
108
376
374
2
$4,873.84
$18.00
$13.03
$9.00
0.53%
36.81
110
384
378
6
$4,932.31
$10,25
$13.05
$1.71
1.56%
37.95
90
305
298
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
7
$4,319.00
Employees under 18 years ■ — 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years
$48.00
$14.49
$6.86
2.30%
Average hours worked per week	
38.93
Included in the above figures are employees of beauty-parlours and theatre ushers. It is
the irregular hours of the latter employees that bring the average weekly hours down to the
low figure of 37.85 per week.
Nineteen more firms sent in returns this year and accounted for 54 more employees.
The weekly average for the experienced workers rose to $13.31 from $13.16 in 1936.
Part-time workers in beauty-parlours and similar establishments have to be paid a higher
hourly rate than full-time workers, and a daily guarantee is required by law.
Fishing Industry.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees-
Experienced	
Inexperienced..
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees.—
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week. 	
5
37
26 |
11
$330.84
$90.67
$12.72
$8.24
29.73%
37.02
6
32
24
$234.20
$26.73
$9.76
$3.34
25%
26.24
4
11
10
1
$101.35
$4.00
$10.13
$4.00
9.09%
25.33
2
11
11
$96.85
$8.80
26.50
6
15
10
6
$164.00
$50.60
$16.40
$10.10
33.33%
51.60
As the Order of the Board does not cover women workers in fish-canneries, this group
comprises a rather negligible number. The work itself is not attractive enough to induce
many women to go in for it.    However, there were 5 more employees than in 1936.
The weekly average wage increased to $12.72, with a corresponding rise in weekly hours.
Being a purely seasonal occupation, comparisons with other industries are difficult.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees..
Experienced	
Inexperienced-
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week _ 	
142
1,934
1,720
214
$31,284.95
$2,497.70
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
40.59
124
1,791
1,571
220
$28,717.26
$2,462.93
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%
40.46
120
1,689
1,630
59
$27,776.16
$673.00
$17.04
$11.41
3.49%
39.53
109
1,589
1,583
6
$26,909.12
$52.50
$17.00
$8.75
0.38%
39.75
104
1,601
1,536
65
$22,622.00
$606.50
$14.73
$9.33
4.06%
38.42 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 35
This is one of the two occupations showing a slight decrease in weekly average wages for
the experienced operator, although this average is $3.19 above the legal rate. The inexperienced average rose from $11.20 to $11.67 per week.
Included with regular telephone and telegraph company employees are those who operate
switch-boards in offices and other establishments, such as hotels, hospitals, etc.
It will be seen that there were 143 more employees reported in 1937 than in the previous
year.
A very slight increase in weekly hours is revealed, the figure being 40.59 against 40.46.
Manufacturing Industry.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
358
2,652
2,297
355
$32,469.11
$3,247.59
$14.14
$9.15
13.39%
41.65
314
2,500
2,167
333
$30,694.89
$3,015.36
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
42.92
311
2,310
2,111
199
$29,869.50
$1,734.50
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
43.28
284
2,249
1,955
294
$26,975.51
$2,504.27
$13.80
$8.52
13.07%
42.34
284
2,123
1,745
378
Total weekly wages—
$25,627.50
$3,145.00
$14.68
Inexperienced employees - - 	
Average weekly wages—
$8.32
17.80'%
41.92
There were 44 more firms sending in returns, with 152 more employees than in 1936.
A decrease in hours from 42.92 to 41.65 is noted.
For the experienced employees a 2-cent drop in their weekly average wage was recorded,
but it must be borne in mind that with this negligible drop in wages the employees worked
IVi hours less than in the previous year.
The wages for the unskilled workers showed an advance over the 1936 figures.
This grouping takes in a great variety of factories, where many articles and commodities are made or prepared for use and sale.
Unskilled, semi-skilled, and skilled employees ply their trades, and in addition to the
usual branches of manufacturing, fur-work, millinery, dressmaking, and allied trades are
covered under this one heading. Three different schedules of wages for the learners are
provided in the Order.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1937.
1936.
1935
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees —	
Experienced —- - 	
Inexperienced   — -
Total weekly wages—■
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees.—S	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees 	
Inexperienced employees 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week 	
71
3,551
3,298
253
$54,279.51
$2,650.17
$16.46
$10.48
7.12%
47.78
75
3,155
2,803
352
$41,831.03
$3,082.70
$14.92
$8.76
11.16%
46.02
71
3,096
2,681
415
$41,167.84
$4,032.30
$15.36
$9.72
13.40%
46.68
76
2,986
2,680
30«
$40,681.77
$2,824.65
$15.18
$9.23
10.25%
47.17
62
2,472
2,009
463
$31,116.00
$4,635.50
$15.49
$10.01
18.73%
48.33
The general increase in number of employees recorded in other occupations is reflected
also in this seasonal industry, there being 396 more women and girls required to cope with
the fruit and vegetable crops in 1937 than in the previous year. Fruit-pickers are not
covered by the Orders.
Average wages mounted for both experienced and inexperienced workers, the $16.46
weekly figure for the skilled employee being the highest since 1931. S 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This increase was due largely to the new Order of the Board, which raised the hourly
rate from 27 cents to 30 cents for experienced workers.
It was in reality a restoration of a former 10 per cent, cut that had been in effect for
some years.
The inexperienced average also showed a marked rise for 1937, increasing to $10.48
from $8.76 the previous year.
Average hours were higher than in 1936, but the percentage of inexperienced workers
dropped from 11.16 per cent, to 7.12 per cent.
Cherry-processing is expanding. This work comes in at the early part of the soft-fruit
season, and is now a recognized branch of the industry in certain localities.
At the beginning of the fruit season there has always been a tendency on the part of
most employers to have a larger staff than seemed necessary, but with the uncertainty of
delivery of fruit at the plants the operators wanted to be sure of sufficient help when a rush
occurred. The practice of keeping on so many girls at the start of the season resulted in
short hours and correspondingly low wages, but as the Order now stands a daily guarantee
is required, and there are fewer complaints about broken time at the beginning of the
seasonal work.   .
Summary of all Occupations.
1937.
1936.
1935.
1933.
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of employees..
Over 18 years, or experienced-
Under 18 years, or inexperienced... 	
Total weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years, or experienced —
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced ....
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced-
Average hours worked per week..
3,749
24,084
22.471
1,613
$351,341.40
$16,405.29
$15.64
$10.17
6.70%
42.05
3,565
21,924
20,377
1,547
$309,567.79
$14,437.25
$15.19
7.06%
41.98
3,272
19,934
18,735
1,199
$280,250.33
$10,869.06
$14.96
$9.07
6.01%
41.79
$270,
3,192
19,379
18,279
1,100
232.44
1,299.13
$14.78
$8.45
5.68%
41.81
3,152
17,895
16,444
1,451
$244,596.50
$12,964.00
$14.87
$8.93
8.11%
41.33
The steady expansion of the Board's work is reflected in the above table.
Actual figures concerning 24,084 women and girl employees prove the importance of
their place in the industrial and commercial world.
These workers were on the staffs of 3,749 firms or individual employers and their wages
and salaries for one week totalled $367,746.69, or $43,741.65 more than last year's aggregate.
The experienced employees averaged $15.64 per week and the unskilled $10.17, both
being definite increases over 1936. The $15.64 figure is the highest average for the past
six years.
The lowest legal wage for women 18 or over in the various classifications covered by
Orders of the Board is $12.75 in the mercantile industry, ranging up to $15.50 in the fishing
group. It will be seen, therefore, that taking all classes of employment together the general
average is still above the highest minimum set by law.
While the Orders permit of a 48-hour week, the average week for 24,084 gainfully employed women and girls was only 42.05 hours.
So neither the rates required by law nor the maximum hours prescribed in the Orders
appear to work any hardship on employers in the Province.
The allowance of inexperienced employees working under licence, or at lower rates set
in the various Orders for the younger workers, is much more generous than the employers
as a whole appear to require. Only 6.70 per cent, were listed as being under 18 or inexperienced, while the Act itself allows one in seven to be working under special licence,
and these licencees together with employees under 18 years of age could total 35 per cent,
of the employer's female staff. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 37
Special Licences.
During 1937 special licences were granted under the " Female Minimum Wage Act " to
590 inexperienced employees, permitting them to work at the lower rates prescribed in the
respective Orders for learners.
Each application was investigated before the licence was issued, and when circumstances
appeared to justify the employee being taken on for training, the original licence was sent
to her and a duplicate to her employer, the Board having first satisfied itself that facilities
for teaching the licencee were available and that the employer really intended to keep her
on the staff after her training period expired.
For the Christmas rush the Board refused to issue licences to inexperienced employees,
as their positions lasted only a few weeks. They received the rate for experienced workers
during their short time on the staff.
The following figures show the number of licences issued in the various occupations:-—■
Mercantile   103        Telephone and telegraph        1
Laundry      64       Manufacturing  127
Hotel and catering     44
Office   241
Personal service     20
Total
590
Under Order No. 38 promulgated under the " Male Minimum Wage Act," 156 licences
were granted in 1937 to young men, between the ages of 18 and 24, who had just begun to
work in the industry or were recommencing.
In many cases the wages their employers agreed to pay them were in excess of those
set out in the Order. Their permits, however, did not lower these rates, as it is the affirmed
policy of the Board to see that no reduction in the present rate of pay of any employee takes
place when granting permits under its Orders.
Industry or Occupation.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time
Experienced
Employees.
Receiving Actual
Minimum Wage
set for Experienced Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage set for
Experienced
Workers.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
Total.
Mercantile— 	
Laundry...: 	
Hotel and catering	
Office 	
Personal  service	
Fishing. 	
Telephone  and  telegraph
Manufacturing 	
Fruit and vegetable	
Totals, 1937	
Totals, 1936	
$12.75*
13.50f
14.00*
15.001
14.25*
15.50t
15.00t
14.00f
14.40t
2,099
110
1.019
1,452
139
1
201
361
57
41.90
10.15
29.76
24.56
28.90
2.70
10.39
13.61
1.61
1,852
337
1,580
3,842
250
7
1,360
1,101
2,131
36.96
31.09
46.15
65.00
51.97
18.92
70.32
41.52
60.01
1,059
637
825
617
92
29
373
1,190
1,363
21.14
58.76
24.09
10.44
19.13
78.38
19.29
44.87
5,010
1,084
3,424
5,911
481
37
1,934
2,652
3,551
5,439
5,185
22.58
23.65
12,460
10,559
51.74
48.16
6,185
6,180
25.68
28.19
24,084
21,924
* 40 to 48 hours per week. t 48 hours per week. t 37% to 48 hours per week.
The foregoing table is worthy of careful study. It most emphatically refutes the contention that minimum wages become the maximum. Actually 51.74 per cent, of the 24,084
women and girl employees included in our returns were receiving wages in excess of those
prescribed by law, while only 22.58 per cent, were getting less than the rates for experienced
employees. This group comprises those younger and less skilled girls for whom lower rates
are fixed, and those who are working part time and are thus unable to earn a sum equal to
the weekly rate set for full-time employees.
The 1937 percentage of women receiving more than the legal rate is much higher than
in 1936, while the figures for those whose wages stand at the actual legal minimum, or are
lower for the above-mentioned reasons, are correspondingly less than in the previous year.
The mercantile industry, with 41.9 per cent, receiving $12.75 per week, holds most closely
to the rates fixed in the Orders. S 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Credit must be given to the telephone and telegraph occupation, which pays 70.32 per
cent, of its operators more than the law requires. Office workers rank next, with 65 per cent,
having pay-cheques above the legal standard. In the fruit and vegetable industry 60.01 per
cent, are able to earn more than the rates fixed by the Orders, and most of these are girls
working in the packing-houses, where skill and deftness enable them to run up good wages
on their piece-work. Of course, their work is seasonal only and even with high earnings
these must be spread over the balance of the year, as in the districts where the bulk of this
work is done there are not enough other kinds of employment to absorb all those who are out
of work when the packing-houses and canneries are closed down.
The personal service occupation records 51.97 per cent, of its employees getting more than
the actual minimum wage.
The hotel and catering industry shows 46.15 per cent, of its employees receiving more
than $14 per week, but as explained in a previous section of this report, value for board and
accommodation is included with the cash wage.
Manufacturing employees to the extent of 41.52 per cent, earned more than the $14
weekly minimum.
Individual high wages in each occupation were recorded while the statistics were being
compiled.
In the mercantile group, one employee is receiving $65 per week. The laundry, cleaning
and dyeing top wage is $75.60. The hotel and catering group reveals a top wage of $56.50
per week. The most remunerative position amongst office workers nets $75 per week to the
fortunate employee. With a top salary of $60 per week in the personal service occupation,
$50 in the manufacturing, and $18.70 in the fishing industry, and the very worth while $88.80
per week for an employee in the telephone and telegraph occupation, the list of peak wages
is complete.
It also shows that there are a few positions in British Columbia open to women where the
salary rating is somewhat on a par with that of men. Unfortunately these openings are
very few.
We are a long way from the goal of " Equal Pay for Equal Work," here as elsewhere.
Table showing Years of Service of Employees with Employers
reporting for 1937.
Name of Industry.
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1,796
793
428
293
221
116
106
102
126
117
388
5,010
507
Laundry -
57
219
219
154
78
35
37
29
38
46
47
125
1,084
86
184
1,031
814
405
232
128
100
96
91
81
60
202
3,424
532
Office                                  	
144
821
969
631
433
330
216
233
238
345
280
1,272
5,911
481
1,891
157
Personal   service -
47
93
115
67
43
26
15
21
9
12
10
23
Fishing- - 	
3
21
3
6
4
37
5
Telephone and telegraph	
3
289
397
183
110
53
16
26
71
155
163
468
1,934
142
Manufacturing  __	
255
670
468
274
176
130
92
89
96
88
75
239
2,652
353
Fruit and vegetable  — __.
604
1,557
540
227
201
107
100
47
39
29
25
75
3,551
71
Totals   -
1,821
6,497
4,315
2,369
1,569
1,036
695
647
684
882
777
2,792
24,084
3,749
The accompanying table indicates the length of time each woman employee had been on
the staff of the employer who sent in the return, set out according to occupation.
It will be noted that 6,497 of them were working less than 1 year when the pay-rolls
were sent in.
This figure, of course, includes extras in the shops working during the Christmas season,
and it would also cover many seasonal workers in the fruit and vegetable industry. Perhaps
some who return year after year to the same employer to help with the canning and packing
of perishable products might be entered on his current form as serving less than 12 months.
Many, however, have been recorded as working several seasons. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 39
This " Under 1 Year" period would take in beginners in each line of work. If any
failed to measure up to the standards required by their employers they would be let out before
a year had elapsed. So under all these circumstances one naturally expects to find the total
comparatively high in this section.
The " 1 to 2 Year " group also contains a fairly high percentage, but it is interesting to
note that the third highest total occurs in the group where employees had served 10 years or
more with the same individual or firm.
The office occupation stands out well above the others, in that 1,272 out of 5,911 were
continuously employed for 10 years or more. Telephone operators, too, as a class show a
large number in the long-term group.
A careful study of the figures seems to disprove the oft-repeated statement that girls as a
rule enter business for a very short time.
The totals in the longer-service columns are fairly high.
Just by way of interest, the employee in each occupation with the greatest number of
years to her credit was noted as the figures were being compiled.
With a record for 34 years' unbroken service, a woman in the mercantile industry outdistanced her colleagues.
The laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry had in its ranks one who had 32 years to her
credit with one firm.
In the hotel and catering group, the longest service reported by any employer was
29 years.
When it comes to office work, a faithful employee with an unbroken record of 40 years
with one firm leads all others.
This makes a mere 28 years seem rather fleeting in the personal service occupation.
The record in the telephone and telegraph occupation is held by a woman who has given
35 years to her present firm.
The manufacturing industry has within its ranks one employee who has devoted 36 years
to the same employer.
It is somewhat surprising to realize that in the seasonal fruit and vegetable industry
there should be an employee who has worked 21 consecutive years with the same firm.
The fact that a 5-year service period is the longest in the fishing industry goes further
to prove that this work is rather distasteful to the average woman.
Since the depression women, in every line of work, as well as men, have shown less
tendency to move from position to position, for reasons that are obvious to everyone.
Table showing Number of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees
and Their Earnings for Week reported.
Industry or Occupation.
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings.
Widowed.
Total
Earnings
for Week
reported.
Mercantile  _
Laundry	
Hotel and catering-
Office 	
Personal service .
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph .
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable.—	
Totals _
1937 per cent...
1936 per cent...
4,111
725
2,277
5,140
374
18
1,716
1,951
1,855
18,167
75.43%
75.45%
$52,190.71
8,771.57
32,177.70
93,092.24
4,775.26
172.00
29,908.84
25,485.89
27,811.87
I
$274,386.08
723
315
902
619
92
18
186
618
1,6
$10,156.41
4,279.64
12,478.92
11,571.98
1,305.69
234,73
3,266.72
8,938.33
27,752.17
176
44
245
152
15
1
32
83
$2,664.88
607.99
3,537.31
3,038.02
247.83
14.78
607.09
1,292.48
1,365.64
5,081
1,984.59
$13,376.02
$65,012.00
13,659.20
48,193.93
107,702.24
6,328.78
421.51
33,782.65
35,716.70
56,929.68
$367,746.69
21.10%
20.81%
3.47%
3.74%
The foregoing table sets out the numbers of single, married, and widowed employees, in
each of the nine groups, together with their actual earnings.
Very little change in the proportions of these three classes has been recorded since
figures have been kept, and less resentment should be levelled at the married worker and
her employer by critics who do not inquire carefully into the reasons for her being gainfully employed. S 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs recently conducted
a survey and, based on its findings, issued a pamphlet entitled " Why Women Work."
Replies to its questionnaire were received from 12,043 women from the forty-eight States
of the Union, Hawaii, and Alaska. It was found that half of these women have individuals
solely or partially dependent on their earnings, and one out of every six has the entire responsibility for a household of from two to eight persons.
This would seem to attack with convincing figures the statement that " Women work for
pin money." This belief is often used to justify a lower rate of pay for women than for
men doing the same work. The " pin money " women disclosed in the survey accounted for
only 3.4 per cent, of the total number. They are the ones who work, not because they must
but because they choose.
Another important finding of the survey was that the number of dependents per woman
has increased since 1930, while the average earnings have fallen. It may be that the same
is true of men, although no comparable study has been made.
Thus it turns out that the vast majority of women with jobs work primarily because
they have to, to support either themselves or others. The " pin money " residue is very
small indeed, and constitutes no serious threat to the well-being of their employed sisters.
What has developed from the survey in the United States would be true to a similar
degree in Canada, and most likely also in British Columbia. Similar reasons also exist for
the employment of married persons here. Little criticism is levelled against a widow in a
job, but a married woman having urgent and justifiable necessity for holding a job is often
subjected to undeserved comment from many quarters.
Before being too vocal on this point, it behooves us to make searching inquiry into the
background of the married worker.
COLLECTIONS AND INSPECTIONS.
For the year under review the Inspection staff made personal investigations of 13,212
establishments in all parts of the Province. This meant 2,967 more places were visited than
in 1936.
If the employing firm had a large pay-roll involving hundreds of employees it might mean
the departmental official would have to spend some days making a complete check and
obtaining all the necessary information for a comprehensive report. Even under such
circumstances, this would be registered on the Board's records as one inspection only.
The thoroughness of administration may be gauged by the fact that adjustments totalling
$57,028.50 were effected for employees during the 12-month period.
Under the " Male Minimum Wage Act " 517 firms were required to pay to 1,313 men or
boys $40,794.68, and 386 employers paid to 609 women and girls the sum of $13,895.33 in the
way of adjustments.
Employers were ordered to pay arrears of wages in the sum of $2,338.49 following
decisions in various Court cases.
The above-mentioned figures refer only to amounts paid to wage-earners who had the
help of the Board's officials in receiving the amounts to which they were entitled, being the
difference between what they had been paid and the minimum wage to which they were
entitled under various Orders of the Board.
The Department naturally has no record of the cases started in the Civil Courts and
carried through by the employees themselves, without the aid of our officials, but which cases
were made possible by the powers given to individuals in the Male and Female Minimum
Wage Acts.
COURT CASES.
It has been the policy of the Board to strive for enforcement of its Labour laws, Orders,
and Regulations, with as few Court cases as possible. Every effort is made to induce
employers and employees to avoid infractions, but as Orders are extended to cover new
occupations, as more extensive provisions for improved conditions of labour are put into effect,
as some cases of violations arise which cannot be adjusted by amicable arrangement between
employer and employee, it becomes necessary, when every other effort has failed, to resort to
the Courts. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 41
The following is a summary of Court cases segregated by Statutes under which prosecutions were initiated.    The nature of the charge and the result of each case are briefly noted:—
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
' Female Minimum Wage Act ".....	
'Male Minimum Wage Act" -	
' Hours of Work Act "  - -
' Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act'
' Factories Act "— — 	
Totals   -	
52
47
70
12
7
40
36
54
11
7
148
D 6 W6
D8 W3
D8 W8
  W 1
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Failure  to  keep   true   and
correct  records
Fined $15.
D.    Kinnon,    149    Hastings    Street
West,
Paying     less     than     the
Dismissed.
Vancouver
minimum   wage
Maple Leaf Bakery, Kamloops	
Failure   to
keep   true  and
Fined  $12.
correct   records
Nu-Way  Cafe,   Kamloops _.	
Failure to
keep  true and
Fined $15.
correct   records
Paying     less     than     the
minimum   wage
Fined $25;   costs, $2.50 ;   and pay arre
of   wages,   $30.
The   Arden,   2975   Granville   Street,
Van-
Failure  to
post   notices	
Suspended sentence; costs,  $2.50.
couver
Cottage    Coffee    Shop,    1617    Commercial
Failure to produce records
Fined  $10  and  costs,   $2.50.
Drive,   Vancouver
Cottage    Coffee    Shop,    1617    Commercial
Failure   to
pay   minimum
Suspended   sentence;   ordered   to   pay
ar-
Drive,   Vancouver
wage
rears,   80c.
M. Furuya Co., Ltd., Mission—	
Failure  to
wage
pay   minimum
Withdrawn.
New   Moon   Cafe,   1   Pender   Street
East,
Failure  to
pay   minimum
Fined  $25  and ordered to pay arrears
of
Vancouver
wage
$65.
New   Moon   Cafe,   1   Pender   Street
East,
Failure  to
pay   minimum
Fined   $25   and   ordered  to  pay   arrears
of
Vancouver
wage
$52.67.
New   Moon   Cafe,   1   Pender   Street
East,
Excessive
hours       (two
Withdrawn.
Vancouver
charges)
New    Paramount     Cafe,     1068     Granville
Paying     less     than     the
Fined   $25   and   ordered  to  pay   arrears
of
Street,  Vancouver
minimurr
wage
$29.
P.   W.   Willis,   Kimberley*.    .
Failure   to   keep   true   and
correct records
Fined   $10   and   costs,   $5.
P.  W.   Willis,  Kimberley	
Failure  to
wage
pay  minimum
Withdrawn.
Failure  to
Failure  to
keep  records.—
pay   minimum
Fined $10 and costs, $4.25.
Defendant  left the  city;  whereabouts
Cosy   Corner   Confectionery,   S.W-   Marine
un-
Drive, Vancouver
wage
known.
Little White  Cafe,  304 Main  Street,
Van-
Failure  to
pay   minimum
Suspended   sentence;   ordered   to   pay
ar-
couver
wage
rears  of  $65.25.
Woodworth    &    Woodworth,    Ltd.
535
Failure    to
keep    proper
Fined   $10.
Georgia Street West, Vancouver
records
Afton   Hotel,   249    Hastings    Street
East,
Failure to
keep  records __..
Fined $10 and costs, $2.50.
Vancouver
Cosy    Corner    Confectionery,    1359
S.W.
Failure to
keep  records „
Fined  $10.
Marine Drive,  Vancouver
Cosy    Corner    Confectionery,    1359
S.W.
Failure   to
pay   minimum
Fined  $25  and  ordered to pay  arrears
of
Marine Drive,  Vancouver
wage
$89.50.
Norman     Lee    Glozer,     836     Thirteenth
Failure   to
pay   minimum
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
Avenue West, Vancouver
wage
arrears of $104.40.
Robson   Dressmakers,   521   Robson   Street,
Failure  to
pay   minimum
Fined  $25  and  ordered to pay  arrears
of
Vancouver
wage
$10.
P.   Barsato,  Nelson  ,	
Failure   to
wage
pay   minimum
Fined  $25  and  ordered to pay  arrears
$5.70.
of
P.  Barsato,  Nelson. ,..	
Failure  to
wage
pay   minimum
Fined  $25   and  ordered to pay  arrears
$6.15.
of
* This case appealed and decision of magistrate reversed. S 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—-Continued.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Jenks   Bros.,   822   Seymour   Street
Van-
Failure   to  pay   minimum
Guilty ;   suspended sentence ;   costs,  $2.50 ;
couver
wage
and ordered to pay arrears of $40.54.
Fairview   Cleaners,   706   Broadway
West,
Failure to produce records
Withdrawn.
Vancouver
Queens  Hotel,   Nelson _  	
Failure   to  pay   minimum
wage
Dismissed.
Home   Assurance    Co.    of    Canada,
Van-
Failure  to  pay  minimum
Fined  ?25  and ordered to pay arrears  of
couver
wage
$10.
Home   Assurance    Co.    of    Canada,
Van-
Failure to keep  records....
Fined $5.
couver
John Shean,  Creston __ 	
Failure   to  pay   minimum
wage
Fined  $25;    costs,   $2.50;    and  ordered  to
pay arrears of $10.50.
John Shean,  Creston 	
Failure  to  keep  true and
correct   records
Guilty;    suspended  sentence.
Mother's Chilli Parlour, 250 Union
Street,
Failure to produce records
Fined  $10.
Vancouver
Bell-Irving   Travel   Bureau,   738   Hastings
Failure   to   pay   minimum
Fined  $25  and ordered to pay arrears  of
Street, Vancouver
wage
$90.84.
Broadwav   Cafe.   Vernon       __  ___
Failure to produce records
Failure to keep   records __
Failure   to   pay   minimum
Suspended   sentence;    costs,   $1.75.
Dismissed.
Broadwav   Cafe.   Vernon 	
Rivers   Limited,   728   Robson   Street
Van-
Dismissed.
couver
wage
Bridge Service Station, 405  Cassiar
Street
Failure to produce records
Suspended   sentence;    costs,   $2.50.
North,   Vancouver
E.    Y.    Hammer,    1037    Granville
Street,
Failure   to   post   schedule
Fined $25.
Vancouver
of  hours
E.    Y.    Hammer,    1037    Granville
Street,
Failure   to  pay   minimum
Dismissed.
Vancouver
wage
Oka  Dressmaker,   221   Gore Avenue
Van-
Failure    to    keep    proper
Fined  $10;    costs,  $2.50;   or  five  days   in
couver    -
records
jail.
Rowcliffe Tannine Co..  Ltd..  Kelowna _ __ .
Failure to produce records
Failure to produce records
Fined   $10.
H.    C.    Berchten-Breiter,    Elysium
Hotel,
Dismissed.
Vancouver
H.     C.     Berchtesn-Breiter,     Elysium
Hotel.
Failure   to   keep   records....
Costs, $2.50.
Vancouver
Canadian   Cafe,   Smithers —-	
Failure to keep  records...
Fined $10;   costs, $2.50;   in default, fourteen days.
Canadian   Cafe,   Smithers 	
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Fined   $25;    costs,   $2.50;    in  default,  one
month   in   jail;    ordered   to   pay   arrears
of  $24.
O.K. Cafe  (Lee Yet Fat), Smithers
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Fined  $25;    costs,   $2.50;    ordered  to pay
arrears of $47.50.
O.K. Cafe  (Lee Yet Fat), Smithers
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Ordered to pay arrears of $80.25.
O.K. Cafe (Lee Yet Fat), Smithers
Failure  to  keep   records.—
Failure   to   pay   minimum
Guilty;    costs,   $2.50.
Pacific  Candy  Co.   (N.   E.   Oldoker
,    652
Fined $25 or two months ;   ordered to pay
Broadway West,  Vancouver*
wage
$46 arrears.
* Failed to pay fine and was ordered to serve two months in gaol.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
D.    Kinnon,    149    Hastings    Street   West,
Vancouver
Routledge Motors,   Mission	
Union Dyers  & Cleaners  Ltd.,  1098
Street, Vancouver
Louis Zagin,  Trail. 	
Fuller   Brush   Co.,   Ltd.,   Dominion   Bank
Building, Vancouver
Paying     less     than     the
minimum  wage
Failure to produce records
Failure   to  pay   minimum
wage
Failure  to keep  true and
correct   records
Appeal from dismissal of
original charge
Dismissed.
Fined $10 and costs, $2.50.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence;   costs,  $2.50.
Dismissed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 43
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
The Arden, 2975 Granville Street, Vancouver
Fred Chernenkoff,  Blewett P.O., Nelson....
Dollar Lumber & Fuel Co., North Vancouver
Ian Ferguson (Roy Hatch), 666 Seventeenth Avenue West, Vancouver
Roy Hatch, 666 Seventeenth Avenue West,
Vancouver
Alex.  Cheveldave, Slocan Park 	
Alex.  Cheveldave, Slocan Park  	
Carlyle    Le   Blanc,    151    Broadway    East,
Vancouver
Fred Chernenkoff, Nelson   	
Sam Verigin, Ymir..
Hollywood   Barber    Shop,    1114    Granville
Street, Vancouver
Lake   Side   Sawmills,   Ltd.,   Harrison   Hot
Springs
Sardis  Lumber Co.,  Agassiz  	
Kilgard   Firebrick   Co.,   Ltd.,    1601   Fifth
Avenue, New Westminster
J.     B.     Hoy     Produce,     2171     Forty-first
Avenue West, Vancouver
Kelowna Sanitary Dairy, Ltd., Kelowna	
J. C. Mclnroy, Mt. Lehman.
Royal Blue & Commercial Taxi, 640 Helm-
cken Street, Vancouver
Pacific Drug Co., Ltd., 1003 Robson Street,
Vancouver
George Roadnight,   St.   George  Apartments,
1045 Haro Street, Vancouver
Sooke Dry Wood Co., 430 Burnside Road,
Victoria
Sooke Dry Wood Co., 430 Burnside Road,
Victoria
Harvey Turnbull,  White Rock 	
Fred R. Brason, Rio Vista Auto Camp,
Burnaby
Moonlight Cafe (Jean Jung), 251 Hastings Street East, Vancouver
Norman Lum (Vancouver Trading Co.),
211 Georgia Street East, Vancouver
Pacific Coast Distillers, Ltd., 1654 Franklin  Street,  Vancouver
Nick  Dershousoff,   Castlegar.	
J. C. Mclnroy, Peardonville  	
J.  C. Mclnroy,  Peardonville..
Quality    Meat    Market    (Carl    Peterson),
Abbotsford
J.  T.  Suderman,  c/o  Willowmoor Garage,
Chilliwack
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Failure to produce records
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage   (four charges)
Failure   to   pay  minimum
wage   (three charges)
Failure to return true and
correct     statement     of
hours worked
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure   to  pay   minimum
wage
Paying     less     than     the
minimum  wage
Failure  to  pay   minimum
wage
Failure   to    keep    proper
records
Failure to produce records
Failure to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure to   pay   minimum
wage (five  charges)
Failure to produce records
Failure  to  keep  true and
correct  records
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Discharging       employee
about to give evidence
Failure to produce records
Failure to give a rest
period of twenty-four
consecutive hours to
janitor
Failure to pay minimum
wage
Failure to pay minimum
wage   (two  charges)
Failure to produce records
Failure to produce records
Failure to produce records
Failure to produce records
Failure to produce records
Failure  to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure  to   pay  minimum
wage
Failure  to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure   to   pay   minimum
wage
Failure to keep  records—
Dismissed.
Fined $10 and costs, $3.75.
Fined   $50;    costs,   $10;    ordered   to   pay
$747.08  arrears  to  four   employees.
Fined  $50  and  ordered to  pay arrears  of
$29.07.
Dismissed.
Withdrawn;   arrears  of  $59.40  paid.
Fined   $50;    costs,   $7;    and paid  arrears,
$12.40.
Fined  $50 and  ordered to  pay arrears  of
$64.19.
Fined   $50  and  ordered to  pay arrears  of
$21.90;   or,  in default,  three months in
jail.
Dismissed.
Guilty;    costs,   $2.50.
Withdrawn ;   paid  $18 arrears and costs.
Guilty;   ordered to pay arrears  $165, and
costs,  $4.75.
Suspended sentence;   ordered to pay $125
arrears and $12  costs.
Fined  $10.
Fined  $10.
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
arrears of $135.40, and costs,  $11.30.
Dismissed.
Fined $10.
Suspended   sentence   and   $2.50   costs.
Withdrawn.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Withdrawn.
Fined $10.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Fined $50 and ordered to pay arrears of
$22 ;   in default, two months.
Convicted;    suspended   sentence;    ordered
to pay arrears of $21.50.
Convicted;    suspended   sentence;    ordered
to pay arrears of $21.50.
Fined   $50   and   costs,   $2.50;    ordered   to
pay arrears of $24.80.
Fined $10 and costs, $6.35. S 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Mainland Fuel Co., 405 Industrial Avenue,
Vancouver
John Quin, Port Renfrew.— 	
Routledge Motors,  Mission 	
Union Dyers & Cleaners, Ltd., 1098 Davie
Street, Vancouver
Welch's, Limited, 814 Robson Street, Vancouver
False Creek Lumber Co., Ltd., Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver
False Creek Lumber Co., Ltd., Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver
False Creek Lumber Co., Ltd., Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver
M. Furuya Co., Ltd., Mission 	
M. B. King Lumber Co., Ltd., North Vancouver
Ritchie Bros. & Co., Ltd., 840 Granville
Street,   Vancouver
U.K. Sawmills, Ltd., Vancouver	
General Construction Co., Ltd., Cranbrook
General Construction Co., Ltd., Cranbrook
New     Paramount    Cafe,     1068     Granville
Street,  Vancouver
Kerrisdale      Theatre,      2138      Forty-first
Avenue West,  Vancouver
La   France   Beauty   Shop,   Yates    Street,
Victoria
Lehannon  Nursing  Home,  Victoria „
Little White Cafe, 304 Main Street, Vancouver
Sterling Food Markets, Ltd., 736 Granville
Street,  Vancouver
I. Kawai,  2410  Main  Street,   Vancouver	
Safeway  Stores,   Ltd.,   840   Cambie  Street,
Vancouver
Safeway   Stores,   Ltd.,   840   Cambie   Street,
Vancouver
Hollywood   Barber    Shop,    1114    Granville
Street, Vancouver
Roslyn  Rooms,   631   Seymour  Street,   Vancouver
Fairview   Cleaners,   706   Broadway   West,
Vancouver
Mrs. M. I. Stephenson, North Bend	
A.    E.    Burnett,    281   Eighteenth   Avenue
West,   Vancouver
Fraser Valley Milk Producers,  425 Eighth
Avenue West, Vancouver
J. B. Hoy Produce, 2171 Forty-first Avenue
W est,  Vancouver
R.   E.   Small,   2057   Third   Avenue   West,
Vancouver
J.   E.   Binnie,   3967  Beatrice   Street,   Vancouver
W.   McCarthy,   1381   Twenty-ninth  Avenue
East, Vancouver
Failure to  keep  true and
correct records
Failure to keep  records....
Excessive hours —	
Failure to  keep  true and
correct records
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Excessive hours	
Excessive hours	
Excessive hours.  _
Failure to post notice	
Excessive     hours      (three
charges)
Failure   to   post   schedule
of  hours
Excessive     hours      (three
charges)
Excessive hours 	
Excessive hours  	
Failure   to   post   schedule
of   hours
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Failure    to    post    proper
notice
Failure   to   post   schedule
of   hours
Excessive hours 	
Excessive hours	
Failure   to   post   notice   of
hours of work
Failure to keep  records...
Failure to post notices-
Failure to keep records ...
Failure to keep records-
Excessive hours	
Failure to post notice	
Being an employee, worked
in    excess   of   limit   of
hours
Being an employee, worked
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Being an employee, worked
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Fined $10 and costs, $2.50.
Fined $10 and costs, $2.50.
Suspended sentence ;   costs, $2.J
Fined  $10 and costs,  $2.50.
Fined $15.
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined  $25  and costs,  $3.50.
Withdrawn.
Fined $10 and costs, $2.50.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25 and costs, $3.50.
Fined $25 and costs, $3.50.
Dismissed.
Fined  $10 and costs.
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
Fined $10.
Withdrawn.
Guilty;    pay  costs,   $2.50.
Fined  $25.
Dismissed.
Dismissed.
Fined $25.
Suspended   sentence.
Suspended   sentence.
Fined $10 and costs, $6.
Fined $10.
Withdrawn.
Fined $25.
Suspended  sentence.
Suspended   sentence.
Suspended sentence. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 45
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Houes of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
G.   A.   Gillis,    31    Royal   Mansions,   Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
H.   W.   Cranna,   970   Fourteenth   Avenue
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
East, Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
N.    Stewart,    3304    Sixth    Avenue    West,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess   of    limit   of
hours
R. Nelson, 250 Twenty-third Avenue East,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess    of   limit   of
hours
F.   McEwan,   1431   Thurlow   Street,   Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in    excess    of    limit    of
hours
C. Wooding, 1541 Thirteenth Avenue East,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended  sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
J. McQuat, 1852 Fifth Avenue West, Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in    excess   of    limit   of
hours
J.   Sutherland,   2347  Tenth  Avenue  West,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in    excess   of   limit   of
hours
A.   Courtney,   2735   Twenty-second  Avenue
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
West,   Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Geo.    Hegler,    2476    Sixth   Avenue   West,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended  sentence.
Vancouver
in    excess   of   limit   of
hours
W.   C.   Thompson,   2230   Granville   Street,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess    of   limit   of
hours
W. Wood, 4424 Dunbar Street, Vancouver
Being an employee, worked
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Suspended sentence.
A.    Chedd,    2268    Waverley    Street,    Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Wm.   Moffat,   2265   Tenth   Avenue   West,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Garnet    Cocker,    3480    Cambridge    Street,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Roy Henry, 2045 Maple Street, Vancouver
Being an employee, worked
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Suspended sentence.
H.  Holmes, Vancouver.	
Being an employee, worked
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Suspended sentence.
W.   Heath,   4799   Gladstone   Street,   Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
J.    Hamilton,    4487    John    Street,    Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
L.   L.  Rossiter,   1023   St.   Andrews   Street,
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
Vancouver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
W.    D.    Dunn,    1800    Haro   Street,    Van
Being an employee, worked
Suspended sentence.
couver
in   excess   of   limit   of
hours
Sooke Dry Wood  Co., 430  Burnside  Road,
Failure to post notice.	
Fined $25.
Victoria S 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Peter   Purkow,   West  View,   Powell  River
F. R. Rotter, Salmo	
Moonlight   Cafe   (Jean   Jung),    251   Hastings Street East, Vancouver
Pacific Meat Co., Ltd., Shaughnessy Street,
Vancouver
Stave Lake Cedar Co., Ltd., Ruskin	
Stave Lake Cedar Co., Ltd., Ruskin	
Durieu Lumber Co., Ltd., Durieu	
Failure  to  post notice  of
hours
Failure    to    keep    proper
records  (five charges)
Failure to post notice -	
Failure to post notice..
Excessive hours 	
Failure to post notice	
Failure    to    keep    proper
records
Fined  $25.
Dismissed.
Fined $25.
Guilty;   suspended  sentence;   costs,  $2.50.
Fined   $10   and   costs,   $2.
Fined  $25   and  costs,   $2.75.
Fined  $10  and  costs,   $2.50-
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Cheam  View  Hardwood  Co.,   Ltd.,   Cheam
View
Oscar Peterson, Kitchener 	
Walter Edlund, Mission .
Lake   Side   Sawmills,   Ltd.,   Harrison   Hot
Springs
Douglas  M.  Colquhoun,  Roberts  Creek	
A.   G.  Grayson,   1125  Vernon Drive,   Vancouver
Nels Olsen, Stave Falls	
Nels Olsen, Stave Falls..
Clarence Sinclair, Kamloops _
E. Thomas, Mile 34, P.G.E.*..
R. T. Burdett, Port Mellon...
R.   f.   Burdett,  Port  Mellon...
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
Failure to
monthly
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages semi-
pay wages s
pay wages s
pay wages s>
pay wages s<
Fined  $100 and costs,  $4.50.
Guilty;   suspended  sentence.
Fined $100 and costs, $1.75;   or sixty days
in gaol.
Suspended  sentence  and   costs.
Fined $100.
Fined $100 or fifteen days in gaol.
Fined   $100   and   costs,   or   sixty   days   in
gaol.
Suspended   sentence.
Suspended  sentence;    ordered   to  pay  arrears  of  $75.
Fined   $100   and   costs.
Suspended sentence.
Withdrawn.
* This case was appealed.    Conviction sustained.
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Twin  Sisters Dressmaking  Shop,  504 Cor
Employing   home - workers
Fined  $10
and  costs.
dova Street, Vancouver
without a permit
Toshino Mimura, 566 Cordova Street East,
Working at home without
Suspended
sentence.
Vancouver
a home-worker's permit
Nouko   Sawada,   Room   113,   World   Hotel,
Working at home without
Suspended
sentence.
396 Powell Street, Vancouver
a  home-worker's permit
M.    Shinkoda,    216    Powell    Street,    Van
Employing a home-worker
Fined   $15
and  costs.
couver
without a permit
M.    Shinkoda,    216    Powell    Street,    Van
Employing a home-worker
Fined  $15
and  costs.
couver
without a permit
Tsuru Yokoyama, 235 Powell Street, Van
Working without a home-
Suspended
sentence.
couver
worker's permit
Keefer  Laundry,   238  Keefer  Street,  Van
Excessive    hours     (" Fac
Fined $50
and costs.
couver
tories Act") REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 47
WAGE COMPARISONS, 1918, 1935, 1936, 1937.
From the accompanying tables a convenient comparison may be made as to wage trends
for women and girls during the past three years, lined against the averages of 1918, the year
that marked the introduction of minimum-wage legislation in British Columbia.
If the wage advances continue as they have done in the past three years, the beneficial
results of this legislation will be even more marked than they are at present.
While the Board does not take credit for all the increases, it is absolutely certain that
had there been no minimum wage basis upheld by law the prevailing standards would be
much lower than they now appear.
A minimum set in an occupation forms the foundation wage, and employees in the more
skilled branches are able to build up from that base. Employers recognize, in most cases,
that the wages fixed in the Orders, are minimum wages only, and a grading-up from that
level is prevalent in the better establishments and firms.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.
1935.
1936.
1937.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years—	
Employees under 18 years...- _	
Percentage of employees under 18 years _
$12.71
$12.92
$7.70
$7.95
15.49%      1
9.63%
$12.96
$8.88
8.40%
$13.30
$9.66
9.38%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$12.58
$8.23
8.07%
$12.90
$8.22
6.46%
Hotel and Catering Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years ..
Employees under 18 years.
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
$14.19
$11.09
3.56%
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$17.59
$10.84
0.37%
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
$18.34
$11.99
1.84%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years..	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
$13.83
$6.96
15.38%
$13.03
$9.00
0.53%
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
$13.31
$5.01
1.87% S 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees
Inexperienced employees-
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
$18.19
$11.67
11.06%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
$14.14
Inexperienced employees    	
$9.15
13.39%
NEW ORDERS AND REGULATIONS.
For a period from the 15th of June, 1937, to the 15th of September, 1937, a special Order
was made relating to resort hotels in unorganized territory. This Order amended Order No.
30, which was in effect throughout the Province for hotels and restaurants. The amending
Order gave some leeway to resort hotels, in so far as their hours were concerned.
Although this report nominally covers the year 1937, certain time must elapse before it
can be printed and during this interval Orders Nos. 52, 52a, and 52b, covering the hotel and
catering industry, have been put into effect. A summarized version of these and other Orders
of the Board will be found in the Appendix to the report.
Order No. 42 raised the wages in the barbering industry from $15 to $18 per week, and
increased the hourly rate for part-time workers from 40 cents to 45 cents per hour.
Order No. 43 for janitors, and Order No. 44 for janitresses, replaced the former Orders
which had been promulgated in 1935. The new Orders set out definite wages for these
employees in apartment-houses, according to the number of residential suites in the buildings.
An increase from 35 cents to 37% cents per hour went into effect for janitors and
janitresses in apartment-buildings of four suites and under, and in other types of buildings.
A very definite improvement in working conditions for these employees was effected by
requiring those working in apartments with twenty or more suites to have a rest period of
twenty-four consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
For those whose work was done in buildings containing from twelve to nineteen suites,
a rest period of eight hours per week was made obligatory.
These provisions have given days off to janitors and janitresses who had never had any
time off over a period of years.
A restoration of a cut in wages for women and an increase for men, with improved conditions of employment in the fruit and vegetable industry as a whole, were brought into
force by Orders Nos. 46 and 47, which replaced Orders Nos. 21 and 22, which had been in
effect since 1935. The hourly rate for women employees was restored to 30 cents after the
27-cent rate had been in effect since 1933, and for the men an increase from 35 cents to
38 cents per hour was made.
Certain temporary emergent Orders were passed to deal with unforeseen conditions in the
fruit and vegetable industry during the year.
In the wood-working industry, Order No. 49 raised the rates for adult males from 35
cents to 40 cents per hour; for males from 18 to 21 years, from 25 cents to 30 cents per hour;
and for boys under 18, from 20 cents to 25 cents per hour. It also limited the employment
of those receiving less than 40 cents per hour to 33% per cent, of the whole number of male
employees in any plant or establishment.
Order No. 50 raised sawmill wages from 35 cents per hour to 40 cents per hour, and took
the place of former Order No. 36. Wages for boys under 21 were increased from 25 cents
per hour to 30 cents. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 49
An allowance of 10 per cent, of male employees receiving less than 40 cents was made,
but this class had to be paid at least 30 cents per hour instead of at least 25 cents per hour,
as permitted under the former Order.
Taxicab-drivers' daily wages were increased from $2.50 to $2.75 per day. The Order
applies only to the City of Vancouver and to the City of Victoria and its surrounding
municipalities.
A completely new Order relating to the household furniture manufacturing industry was
made, setting rates for adult males at 40 cents an hour, and providing a sliding scale for
younger persons ranging from 20 cents to 35 cents per hour.
A limitation of 40 per cent, of male employees in any plant receiving less than 40 cents
an hour was embodied in the Order.
The seasonal Regulations and Orders for Christmas trade were dealt with along somewhat similar lines as in former years.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Enforcement of the " Hours of Work Act" can best be judged by the number of overtime permits granted during the year.
The fact that the Act makes it obligatory for employers to apply for permits when
overtime work is necessary has been of great value to the employees.
During 1937, 1,671 such permits were granted and, while the number exceeds those issued
in 1936, the increase is due to more rigid inspections by officials of the Board. The reasons
for overtime are varied, the majority of requests being for taking periodic inventories.
Since the " Hours of Work Act" became effective we have shown the average hours by
industries, and the accompanying table sets out comparative figures for the years 1933 to
1937, inclusive.
It will be noted that with thirty industries covered, fifteen reveal fractional increases in
the average weekly hours worked, fourteen register decreases, and one remains as in 1936.
In the cases where 1937 average hours were higher than previously, they are still below
the limit allowed under the Act and Regulations of the Board.
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
4,704
4,088
3,529
3,530
3,956
4,153
4,357
4,711
87.821
Per Cent.
77.60
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
4.57
Per Cent.
9.04
1931
84,791                 83.77
68,468                80.36
71,185                77.95
75,435                 85.18
81,329                 88.78
90,871                 87.12
102.235       I         89.31
9.44
1932                                         	
11.92
1933	
11.12
1934                                 .   ..              ._ 	
9.06
1935           ... 	
5.96
1936 ~.~	
1937 -  	
6.46
6.12
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being :-
1937
1936
1935
19S34
1933
1932
1931
1930
47.25
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
The 4,711 industrial firms submitting forms to the Department of Labour gave information regarding hours covering 102,235 male and female employees. A segregation shows
89.31 per cent, working less than 48 hours per week, 4.57 per cent, working from 48 to 54
hours per week, and 6.12 per cent, working in excess of 54 hours per week. S 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
A comparison with previous years may be seen in the following table:—
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries.
Industry.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
45.81
42.19
42.71
47.93
51.82
43.42
42.00
47.83
43.68
43.33
42.00
44.40
41.33
48.41
50.36
45.28
48.26
49.15
45.50
45.85
52.11
44.96
46.29
43.68
44.09
48.30
43.53
46.47
44.87
45.33
46.41
44.97
44.13
48.00
50.04
43.68
47.76
50.60
44.89
43.91
43.47
44.05
46.17
48.33
49.69
45.93
48.00
48.37
46.69
45.39
51.51
45.82
44.82
44.01
44.37
47.93
44.06
41.39
44.67
44.19
45.15
44.55
44.38
47.99
49.72
43.81
48.36
48.85
42.60
45.50
43.54
44.49
46.18
48.46
52.46
47.30
49.16
48.35
47.46
45.02
50.05
48.93
42.76
43.81
44.10
47.99
43.97
44.27
44.87
46.09
44.98
44.44
43.45
48.03
48.58
44.57
43.83
50.54
44.79
44.92
44.43
44.74
45.61
48.66
50.70
45.07
48.45
48.50
47.28
45.36
49.89
46.17
47.29
43.87
44.54
47.85
43.75
47.90
45.29
46.05
44.60
Builders' materials, etc  	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
45.15
42.73
47.91
46.93
44.11
Explosives, chemicals, etc.— -	
46.70
49.05
44.39
45.61
44.30
45.20
45.33
Lumber industries—
48.49
50.91
45.77
48 45
48 23
45.46
50.25
46.20
Oil-refining   	
Paint-manufacturing 	
Printing and publishing —- 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing— 	
46.70
44.16
44.37
47.95
43.85
47.92
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified)
45.36
46.72
STAFF CONFERENCE.
With closer co-operation from employers, employees, and the general public, and with
requests from more groups of workers not already covered by any Orders or regulations to
bring them within the scope of the " Minimum Wage Acts " and " Hours of Work Act," the
Board is convinced that its efforts and activities are becoming more appreciated as the years
go by.
The Inspection staff in educating the worker, the employer, and the " man on the street"
to the value of this type of legislation is doing an excellent work in addition to its administrative duties.
At the beginning of the year a staff conference was held, at which all members and
officials of the Board, together with heads of other branches of the Department of Labour,
were present.
While the meetings were arranged primarily for the benefit of Inspectors of the Board,
the general exchange of ideas and problems brought home graphically to every one in
attendance the importance of the work of the Department as a whole and the inter-relation
of its various branches.
The Minister of Labour addressed the conference, outlining his ideas as to policy and
efficiency, his succinct talk being one of the highlights of the meetings. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 51
CONCLUSION AND APPRECIATION.
Before concluding this report, we are glad to record our appreciation to all those, who in
any way have helped us in our endeavours to carry out the spirit of the Province's labour
legislation in as fair a manner as is humanly possible. Our problems are many and varied,
but with co-operation from employers, employees, and public-minded persons, we are encouraged in our duty to carry on the work with which we have been entrusted.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson.
J. A. Ward Bell. S 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO " MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT, 1934," AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT, 1934."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over	
18 years and under 19 years.
19 years and under 20 years..
20 years and under 21 years -
Delivery salesmen	
40c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
48
48
48
48
54
BARBERING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8, Effective August 3rd, 19SU.)
Barbering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation,
Rate.
Hours per Week.
$18.00 week
45c. per hour
Daily minimum, $1.80
40 to 48 hours.
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
BOX-MANUFACTURING  (MALE).
Order No. 55, Effective April 4th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 37 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 7 of August 3rd, 193U-)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel
staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate
Hours per Week.
Adult males, 90% of total 	
Adult males, 10% of total, not less than.-
Males, 18 to 21 years of age  	
Males, under 18 years of age 	
40c.
30c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates apply only to those not included in any other Order of the Board,
(o.)   Wages to be paid semi-monthly.
BUS-DRIVERS  (MALE).
Order No. 31, Effective October 28th, 1935.
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich    • _	
45c.
40 to 50.
50c.
Less than 40.
67^c.
In  excess  of  9  hours
in   any  one  day  or
50 hours in any one
week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 53
CARPENTRY TRADE   (MALE).
Order No. 40, Effective February 1st, 1937.
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and of the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metcho-
sin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew - _ - — 	
70c.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY  (MALE).*
Order No. 12, Effective October 19th, 1934.
Order No. 12a, Effective February 28th, 1938.
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Pate,
21 Years and
Hourly Rate,
18 to 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo,
New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt, Saanich, Burnaby,
Oak Bay     	
Rest of Province- -  	
45c.
40c.
35c.
30c.
48
48
* Consolidated for convenience only.
Note.—Above rates do not apply to indentured apprentices under " Apprenticeship Act."
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS  (MALE.)
Order No. 54, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 32, Effective November 28, 1935.)
Includes every male elevator operator and starter.
37V2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37 %c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week,
(b.)   Individual meals, twenty cents   (20c.)   each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven   (7)  days, $2.00 per week,
(e.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(/.)   Uniforms  or special wearing-apparel,  required  by the employer, must be supplied  and laundered without
cost to the employee.
(g.)   The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(h.)   Employees must be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(£.)   Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND  STARTERS   (FEMALE.)
Order No. 53, Effective March 3rd, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30, October 3rd, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 2U, 193U.)
Includes every female operator and starter.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
Daily minimum, $1.50.
Notes.—As for males. S 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM   (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of
a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while
under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer" means holder of a special or temporary
certificate.    (See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (l).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Engineer 	
Engineer, special..
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act " 48 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(6.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(c.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents per
hour (Order 18b).
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS   (MALE).
Order No. 39, Effective August 1st, 1936.
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
First-aid attendant—.— - 	
Assistant first-aid attendant	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work-
$4.00
4.00
Note.— (a.) "Hours of Work Act" regulates the daily hours in the industry, but should overtime be necessary,
attendant must be paid overtime rate.
(6.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
32%4C. per hour.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences  required for inexperienced  employees
18 years of age or over. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 55
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 15th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22, Effective April 18th, 1935.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for
sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
Under 21 years-..      	
(Not to exceed 15 per cent, of male employees in plant.)
57c.
76c.
28c.
42c.
56c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21, Effective April 16th, 1935.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting
for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
30c.
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
Inexperienced rate   .  -   	
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
45c.
60c.
25c.
37y2c.
50c.
Note.— (1.) In cases where employees' regular rates of pay are in excess of the rate for work up to 10 hours
per day, no deduction shall be made from such regular rate to be applied to wages due for working overtime in
excess of 10 hours in any one day, and in no case shall the rates of pay for overtime in excess of 10 hours be less
than the rates prescribed for such time in excess of 10 hours and in excess of 12 hours respectively.
(2.)  Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. S 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52, Effective February 14th, 1938.
(Superseding Order No. 30 of December 3, 1935, and Order No. 5 of May 25, 1931.)
Includes the work of females in:—
(a.) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which a
charge is made.
(6.) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet halls,
cafeterias, tea-rooms, lunch-rooms, lunch-counters, ice-cream parlours, soda fountains, hospitals, nursing-homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any other place where food is cooked, prepared, and served, for which
a charge is made; whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently
or in connection with any other business.
This Order does not apply to females employed as graduate or undergraduate nurses in hospitals,
nursing-homes, or other similar establishments.
Experienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37%e. per hour.
Daily guarantee, $1.50.
Inexperienced Employees.
(Any age.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00 per week, 1st 2 months.
10.50 per week, 2nd 2 months.
12.00 per week, 3rd 2 months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
Licences required for all inexperienced employees
working at above rates.
25c. per hour, 1st 2 months.
30c per hour 2nd 2 months.
35c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
37%e. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of four (4) hours pay per day.
Note.— (a.)   Full week's board  (21 meals), $4.00 per week.
(6.)   Individual meals, twenty cents   (20c.)   each.
(c.)   Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(d.)   Full week's lodging of seven   (7)   days, $2.00 per week.
(e.)   Emergency  overtime  up   to   ten   (10)    hours   per  day,   but  not   to   exceed   fifty-two   (52)    hours   in   any   one
(1)  week.
(/.) Time and one-half shall be paid for all hours in excess of eight (8) in the day, or forty-eight (48) in
the week.
(g.) Split shifts shall be confined within fourteen (14) hours from commencement of such split shift. (See
Order 52b).
(h.)   Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(i.) Uniform or special wearing apparel required by the employer must be supplied and laundered free of
cost to the employee.
(j.)   Accidental breakages shall not be charged to employees.
(k.)   Employees must be given twenty-four   (24)   consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(I.)   See Order 52A for " Resort Hotels."
I;
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY (FEMALE).
Order No. 52b, Effective May 19th, 1938.
Allows a split-shift to be spread over 14 hours immediately following commencement of work,
thereby cancelling section 8 of Order No. 52. Every employee whose split-shift extends over 12 hours
shall be paid at the rate of one and one-half times her regular rate of pay for such portion of the
split-shift as is not confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of her work.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 52a  (Resort Hotels), Effective June 15th to September 15th, 1938.
Covers   the  work  of  females  in  any  establishment  in   unorganized  territory   wherein   meals   or
lodging are furnished to the general public, for which a charge is made.
Allowing:—
Hours not to exceed ten (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four  (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight  (48) in any one week shall be paid not less than time and one-half
(1%) of the legal rate fixed in Order No. 52.
Provides for a rest period of twenty-four  (24)  consecutive hours in each calendar week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 57
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 51, Effective November 22nd, 1937.
Includes the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room furniture, bedroom furniture, living-
room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household furniture, customarily manufactured in
a furniture factory.
Males.
Rate per Hour.
Hours per Week.
21 years of age or over.-
Under 17 years of age—.
17 years and under 18 years of age..
18 years and under 19 years of age_.
19 years and under 20 years of age-
20 years and under 21 years of age..
40c.
20c.
25c.
27%c
30c.
35c.
48
48
48
48
43
Note.— (a.)   60 per cent, of all male employees must be paid not less than 40c. per hour.
<b.)   This Order does not apply to apprentices duly indentured under the " Apprenticeship Act.*'
JANITORS   (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th, 1935, and Order No. 23A, in Effect from
October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-fireman.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37V2C.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24)  consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order. S 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
JANITRESSES   (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 29, in Effect from October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (ct.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month
29 residential suites,
30 residential suites,
31 residential suites,
32 residential suites,
33 residential suites,
7.00 per month;
3.00 per month;
1.00 per month;
3.00 per month;
S.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.
Experienced Employee—Weekly rate, $13.50.    Hours per week.
Inexperienced employee .
Under 18 years of age.
Weekly rate.
$8.00 for 1st 4 months.
$8.50 for 2nd 4 months.
$9.00 for 3rd 4 months.
$10.00 for 4th 4 months.
$11.00 for 5th 4 months.
$12.00 for 6th 4 months.
18 years of age and over.
Weekly rate.
$9.00 for 1st 4 months.
$10.50 for 2nd 4 months.
$12.00 for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required in this
class.
Hours per week, 48
Note.— (a.)   Above rates are based on a 48-hour "week.
(6.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 59
LOGGING  (MALE).
Order No. 1, Effective April 27th, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, mining-prop, and
pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties,
mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Male employees-
Trackmen	
Cook- and bunk-house employees -
40c. per hour
STV2C. per hour
$2.75 per day
48
48
Unlimited.
Note.—Certain exemptions regarding working-hours.     (See "Hours of Work" Reflations.)
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 1923.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing; altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity,
exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees-
$14.00
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 1.
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut hutter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes and
wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks, pails,
wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions, gas-
mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers,
maps,   saw-teeth   and   holders,   mats,   tiles,   ropes,   and   shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first two months of
employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 2.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations, worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toys and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48. S 60
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 3.
Includes  bookbinding,   embossing,  engraving,   printing,   dress-making,
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
basis.
ready-to-wear   suits,   jewellery,   furs,   leather   goods,   hand-made
Not less than—
cigars, and hand-made millinery
$7.00 a week for the first six months of
employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 38, Effective July 20th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 10, dated August 10th, 19SU-)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Eate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over..
(3.) 21 years of age and over..
Minimum rate per day	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day.
37 % to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours.
Males under Twenty-one  (21)  Years op Age.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Eighteen (18) Years of Age.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
(4.) (1.)
$6.00 per week..
7.50 per week..
9.00 per week..
11.00 per week..
13.00 per week .
15.00 per week..
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
16c.
20c.
24c.
29c.
35c.
40c.
65c.
80c.
96c.
$1.15
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing, Eighteen (18) Years and under Twenty-one (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
(4.) (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months	
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months	
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months _	
Thereafter rates as shown in (2) or (3).
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
21c.
27c.
35c.
85c.
$1.10
1.40 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 61
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persons 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-pour (24).
Beginners and those recommencing, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
24c.
29c.
35c.
95c.
$1.15
1.40
Thereafter the rates as shown in (2) or (3).
Note.—Bicycle-riders and foot messengers, employed in wholesale and   (or)  retail establishments, shall be paid
at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No, 26.
MERCANTILE   (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over. „ _  	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
20c.
per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c.
per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c.
per hour during 3rd 3 months.
9.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c.
per hour during 4th 3 months.
9.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c.
per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c.
per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c.
per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c.
per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum, $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or Over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00  a week  1st 3  months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week  4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)   Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(b.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week. S 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 4 of May 25th, 19St.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years op Age and over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st three months.
12,00 a week for 2nd three months.
13.00 a week for 3rd three months.
14.00 a week for 4th three months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st three months.
32 %c. per hour for 2nd three months.
35c. per hour for 3rd three months.
37%c. per hour for 4th three months,
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Ace.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st six months.
12.00 a week for 2nd six months.
13.00 a week for 3rd six months.
14.00 a week for 4th six months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st six months.
32%c. per hour for 2nd six months.
35c. per hour for 3rd six months.
37%c. per hour for 4th six months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours* pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order Effective since September 15th, 1919.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring;   hairdressing;   barbering;   massaging;
giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments;   removal of superfluous hair;   chiropody;   or other
work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over  _ _ 	
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over - - _ -	
$74.25
37%c.   per  hour
$1.50  per day
40 to 48
Less than 40 hours
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months,
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months.
or until employee reaches
or until employee reaches age
age of 18 years.
of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum,   $1.25  per  day. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 63
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or Over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.—Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Effective since September 15th, 1919.
This includes the work of females employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries,
and other public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service-stations, or as drivers of motor-cars
and other vehicles.
(Other classes of work originally in this Order now covered by Order No. 27.)
Wage Rate.
Weekly Hours.
$14.25 per week.
2911/iec per hour.
48 hours.
Note.— (a.) Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, and the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum payment of
75 cents.
(6.) Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less than
$10.80  a   week.     (Ushers  in   this  category  may  be  employed  only   between   1.30   p.m.   and   11   p.m.)
(c.)   Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
(d.) No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered necessary for ushers.
SAWMILLS  (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 2 of April 27th, 193k, Order No. 1U of October 19th, 193U, and
Order No. 36, Effective April 1st, 1936.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult males— - _ - -	
Not more than 10 per cent, of all employees at not less than—
Males under 21 years of age— - - _ 	
40c.
30c.
30c.
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."     (See regulations.)
(o.)  For engineers see Engineer Order,
(c.)  For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.)   90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour.
SHINGLE-BOLTS   (MALE).
Order No. 1b, Effective January 4th, 1935.
Includes employees engaged in felling, bucking, and splitting shingle-bolts.   *
Rate, $1.30 per cord.
Hours, 48 per week. S 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE-MILLS  (MALE.)
Order No. 16, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
48
Note.— (a.)   For engineers see Engineer Order.
(6.)   For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20, Effective June 14th, 1935.
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder or wood-caulker -	
All other employees - _ — — -   -
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees
in plant may be employed at not less than __   ___ .„	
671/2 c.
50c.
25e.
48
48
TAXICAB DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 33, Effective January 30th, 1936, and Order No. 33a, September 13th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 6, Effective June 29th, 19S4.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Kate.
Working-hours.
V -ncouver, Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich..
All ages.
$2.75
Unlimited.
Note.—If uniform or special article of wearing apparel is demanded by employer, it must be without cost to the
employee.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
31*4c. per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences  required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)  Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(b.)  Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.                                     S 65
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 26, Effective July 4th, 1935.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.)   Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40  and  not more
than BO
40c.
40  and  not more
than 50
35c.
40 and not more
than 48
25c.
40   and   not  more
than 48
17c.
40  and  not more
than 50
35c.
40   and   snot   more
than 50
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52%c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of E0 and
not more than 54
60c.
(2.)   Operators   of  motor-vehicles   of  less  than
2,000  lb.   net weight,  as  specified  on  the
motor-vehicle   licence,   exclusive . of   those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
(3.)  Operators of motor-cycles    _
(4.)   Bicycle-riders    and     foot-messengers    employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work
(6.)   Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
those covered by section 7 hereof
(7.)   Drivers of vehicles employed  in  the  retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery
of milk
Hourly rate, 40c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(6.)  Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee.
(c.)  Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours is worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven  (7)  weeks.
(c.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 38.
WATCHMEN—LOGGING CAMPS   (MALE).
Order No. Ia, Effective November 29th, 1934.
Wages.
Hours.
No minimum wage fixed.
Not fixed.
5 S 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Superseding Order No. 35 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 11 of August 24th, 1934.
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products, and
general mill-work products.
Class.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
25c.
48
48
48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33}
cent, of all male employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
G7
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE  ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders made by the Board of Industrial Relations,
compiled as at June 1st, 1938:—
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
17
8
42
7
37
55
31
40
12
12a
45
45a
48
19
32
53
54
18
18a
18b
18c
3a
21
21A
21b
21c
22
22A
22B
22c
46
46a
Baking  - 	
Barbering	
Barbering	
Box-manufacture .„.	
Box-manufacture -	
Box-manufacture	
Bus-drivers (Victoria and Dii
trict) -	
Carpentry 	
Construction 	
Construction 	
Construction  _      ..
Construction (Cancelling 45)
Construction  _
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators 	
Elevator Operators ..	
Engineers, Stationary Steam
Engineers, Stationary Steam .
Engineers, Stationary Steam .
Engineers, Stationary Steam _
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing  -	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency)  _
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable ...
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency) .„. __
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
46b   I Fruit and Vegetable .
46c    Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)	
I
47     [ Fruit and Vegetable  	
47A    Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable_
47c [ Fruit and Vegetable (Temporary Emergency)	
51 I Household-Furniture.
52 [ Hotel and Catering ....
52a I Hotel   and   Catering   (Resort
|     Hotels)  	
Nov. 1/34   ...
July 12/34 ....
April 5'37   . .
July 12/34
March 23/36
March 10/38
Oct. 15/35 ....
Dec. 1/36	
Sept. 28/34 ...
Feb. 28/38	
June 14/37	
July 2/37 .......
July 29/37	
Feb. 8/35   .....
Nov. 26/35 ...
Feb. 28/38 ...
Feb. 28/38 ....
Feb. 8/35 .......
April 17/35-.
June 26/36 ....
May 14/37	
June 26/36 ...
May 2/34	
June 12/34 ...
April 16/35 ...
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36...
Aug. 26/36 ...
April 16/35 ...
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36 ...
Aug. 26/36 ...
July 2/37	
Sept. 1/37 .....
Sept. 15/37....
March 4/3S
July 2/37  .
Sept. 1/37..
Nov. 8/34 .....
July 19/34 ...
April 8/37 ...
July 19/34 ...
March 26/36
March 17/38
Oct. 17/35 ...
Dec. 3/36
Oct. 4/34 .....
March 3/38....
June 17/37 ...
July 8/37 .....
July 29/37	
Feb. 14/35 .....
Nov. 28/35 ....
March 3/38...
March 3/38....
Feb. 14/35	
April 18/35 ...
July 2/36	
May 20/37	
July 2/36
Jan. 15/20 ....
May 3/34    ....
June 14/34 ..
April 18/35 ...
Dec. 5/35   ...
July 23/36 .
Sept. 3/36
April 18/35
52b    Hotel and Catering-
Sept. 15/37
March 4/38 .
Nov. 17/37 ...
Feb. 8/38 .....
April 6/38....
May 18/38 ....
Nov. 23/34 .
Aug. 3/34
June 14/37 .
Aug. 3/34 -
April 1/36
April 4/38 ...
Oct. 28/35 -
Feb. 1/37 ...
Oct. 19/34 ...
March 3/38
July 5/37 -----
July 8/37 --
July 29/37 ...
March 1/35 .
Nov. 28/35 .
March 3/38.
March 3/38.
March 1/35 ..
April 18/35 .
July 2/36 -.
June 1/37 -
Aug. 1/36 -
Feb.28/20 -
May 18/34 ..
June 29/34 .
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35 _
July 23/36 .
Sept. 3/36 .
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35   .
July 23/36
Sept. 3/36 .
July 8/37 ..
Sept. 2/37...
Sept. 16/37
March 10/38
July 8/37
Sept. 2/37...-.
Sept. 16/37..
March 10/38
Nov. 18/37...
Feb. 10/38 ...
April 7/38 -
May 19/38 ...
Dec. 5/35
July 23/36    ...
Sept. 3/36   —
July 12/37
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37.
March 10/38 to
May 7/38 ....
July 12/37   .
Sept. 2/37 to
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 16/37 to
Sept. 30/37
March 10/38 to
May 7/38	
Nov. 22/37 ....
Feb. 14/38 .—
June 15/38 to
Sept. 15/38 .
May 19/38	
Male....
Male....
Male....
Male ...
Male ...
Male ....
Male ...
Male —.
Male -
Male ....
Male —
Male ...
Male
Male ...
Male .
Female
Male ..
Male
Male
Male ..
Male ...
Male ...
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Male   -
Male ...
Male —-
Male
Female
Female-
Female
Female-
Male
Male	
Male
Male
Male   ...
Female
Female
Female
June 14/37
April 1/36
April 4/38
July 8/37
Nov. 26/35
March 3/38
April 18/35
April 18/35
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38
Sept. 15/37
Sept. 30/37
May 7/38 S 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
23 Janitor..
23A | Janitor.
43
5a
29
44
IA
lc
13      l
13A I
I
15    |
28    ]
56    |
25 !
10 [
10    j
10   I
10a
24
24
24
24
Janitor  	
Janitresses (Public Housekeeping)   	
Janitresses (Public Housekeeping ) 	
Janitresses    	
Janitresses	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Logging (West of Cascade
Mountains) 	
Logging (Watchman)	
Logging (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers)  -	
Logging and Sawmills 	
Logging    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains) 	
Logging  (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers) — 	
Cancelling No. 9 	
Logging and Sawmills   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area) —
Logging —	
Manufacturing .
Mercantile	
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1934)  _	
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1935)  	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935) . - 	
| Mercantile — —	
Mercantile     (Supplementary,
1935) 	
| Mercantile      (Supplementary,
J     1936)  	
j Mercantile     (Supplementary,
I     1937) 	
I
24a
24b
[ Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)  	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1936)  	
38      Mercantile—	
38    I Mercantile    ( Supplementary,
1936)   	
38      Mercantile    (Supplementary,
I   1937)   —
38a I Mercantile (Christmas  Cards,
I     1936) —	
38b  I Mercantile- — 	
4
34
| Office Occupation -
Office Occupation -
     | Personal Service- 	
27    | Personal Service  —
27a j Personal     Service     (Temporary)    —
April 17/35.
Sept. 25/35...
May 14/37...
Nov. 9/34 .
April 17/35..
Sept. 26/35-
May 14/37—
April 7/34 ...
Nov. 9/34	
Jan. 24/36..
July 12/34..
Sept. 28/34-
Jan. 24/36....
Sept. 28/34 .
Sept. 25/35—
March 23/38-
March 29/35 _
July 24/34—
Nov. 9/34....
Nov. 26/35 .
Oct. 16/86 _
May 29/35...
Nov. 26/35 .
Dec. 1/36.....
Nov. 17/37...
Oct. 15/35.-
Aug. 26/36..
June 26/36.
Dec. 1/36	
Nov. 17/37...
Aug. 31/36..
Aug. 26/36..
May 2/34 ....
Jan.24/36„
Aug. 29/35 .
Dec. 17/35 ..
I
April 18/35-
Oct. 3/35 —.
May 20/37 —
Nov. 15/34 -
April 18/35-
Oct. 3/35 —
May 20/37—
Feb. 27/19.
April 12/34 .
Nov. 15/3 4...
Jan. 30/36 ...
July 19/34 ...
Oct. 4/34 .
Jan. 30/36.
Oct. 4/34 ...
Sept. 26/35 ..
March 24/38..
June 6/35 _
July 26/34-
Nov. 15/34..
Nov. 28/35 .
Oct. 17/36-
June 6/35—.
Nov. 28/35 .
Dec. 3/36	
Nov. 25/37-
Oct. 17/35 -
Sept. 3/36...
July 2/36...
Dec. 3/36 ...
Nov. 25/37..
Sept. 3/36 -
Sept. 3/36—
May 10/34..
Jan.30/36.
Aug. 14/19 -
Sept. 5/35-
Dec. 19/35
April 18/35..
Oct. 3/35	
June 1/37.....
Nov. 30/34 ..
April 18/35 .
Oct. 3/35 ....
June 1/37	
March 31/19 .
April 27/34...
Nov. 30/34...
Jan.30/36.
Aug. 3/34
Oct. 19/34.
Jan.30/36.
Oct. 19/34 ..
Sept. 26/35 ..
March 24/38..
July 1/35 ....
Aug. 10/34.
Dec. 1/34	
Nov. 28/35-
Oct. 17/35 ..
July 1/35	
Nov. 28/35 .
Dec. 3/36....
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37-
Oct. 17/35—
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36...
July 20/36    -
Dec. 3/36	
Dec. 1/37 to
Dec. 31/37—
Sept. 3/36 to
Dec. 31/36—
Sept. 3/36	
May 25/34 _
Jan. 30/36-
Sept. 15/19 .
Sept. 5/35—
Dec. 19/35 .
Male.
Male
Male-
Female .
Female.
Female.
Female -
Female.-
Male -
Male-
Male .
Male .
Male .
Male.
Male .
Male.
Male-
Female .
Male	
Male-
Male .
Male	
Female..
Female-
Female—
Female-
Female .
Female..
Male	
Male.
Male..
Male..
Male.
Female-
Female-
Female..
Female .
Female
May 31/37
May 31/37
April 18/35.
Oct. 3/35
May 31/37
March 24/38
Oct. 19/34
March 24/38
March 24/38
Oct. 4/34
July 20/36
Dec. 31/34
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Jam 3/37
Dec. 31/37
Dec. 31/35
Dee. 31/36
Jan. 3/37
Dec. 31/37
Dec. 31/36
Jan. 30/36
Dec. 31/35 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 60
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wace Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
5
May 2/34
Sept. 26/35.	
April 2/37
April 7/34
Sept. 28/34 _
Sept. 25/35
March 23/36 ..
Aug. 3/37
Dec. 14/34
Nov. 1/34
May 28/35
June 13/34...
Jan. 24/36
Sept. 1/37
May 10/34
Oct. 3/35
April 8/37
April 12/34
Oct. 4/34
Sept. 26/35
March 26/36...
Aug. 5/37
Dec. 20/34
Nov. 8/34
May 30/35
June 14/34
Jan.30/36
Sept. 2/37
March 4/20
May 3/34
June 20/35
July 2/36
Aug. 9/34
March 26/36 -
Aug. 5/37
May 25/34 ... .
Oct. 3/35
June 15/37 to
Sept. 15/37...
April 27/34....
Oct. 19/34
Sept. 26/35
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37   -
Jan.4/35
Nov. 23/34 ....
June 14/35 ...
June 29/34
Jan.30/36
Sept. 13/37
April 5/20
May 18/34
July 4/35	
Female	
Female	
Female	
Male..... -
Male	
Oct. 3/35
30
Feb. 14/38
30A
2
Sept. 15/37
April 1/36
14
28
Sawmills    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains)  	
Sawmill  and  Logging   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area)
April 1/36
36
Male —.. 	
Male 	
Aug. 16/37
50
IB
16
20
6
Sawmills   	
Shingle-bolts  ,.,.
Shingle-mills 	
Male — 	
Male	
Male -	
Male  —
Male 	
Female... 	
Male 	
33
33a
Taxicab-drivers    (Vancouver,
Victoria, and District)	
Taxicab-drivers    (Vancouver,
Sept. 13/37
2a
May 2/34 .
June 19/35
June 26/36
Aug. 1/34
March 23/36...
Aug. 3/37
Sept. 30/34
26
Transportation 	
26a
11
35
49
July 20/36 .     .
Aug. 24/34......
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37
Male. 	
Wood-working —	
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37 S 70 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
LABOUR LEGISLATION.
" COAL-MINES REGULATION ACT."
This Act was amended prohibiting the employment of any boy under the age of sixteen
years or any woman or girl of any age in or about the surface-workings of a colliery, except
while engaged in clerical work, or performing domestic duties in any hotel, boarding-house,
or residence in connection with any colliery.
This Act also prohibits the employment of any woman or girl of any age, or boy under
the age of eighteen years, underground in any mine after December 31st, 1937, with the
exception of boys under the age of eighteen years, who have been or are employed underground before December 31st, 1937.
It compels the mine-owner, agent, or manager to give notice of proposed abandonment
to the Inspector while the workings are still accessible, and also to ensure the surveying of
all workings before actual abandonment; also provides no workings shall approach an
abandoned working nearer than 500 feet, without approval of the Inspector.
"FACTORIES ACT."
Amended to define as a factory, every laundry, cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or dressmaking
establishment run for profit, by a person who holds a trades licence issued by a municipality,
whether operated by manual, muscular, or meshanical power, or partly by manual, muscular,
or mechanical power, and whether or not any person is employed therein.
This Act now prohibits any person to be employed in or work in any laundry, cleaning,
dyeing, pressing, or dressmaking establishment on any day except between the hours of seven
o'clock in the forenoon and seven o'clock in the afternoon, also requires an unobstructed view
of the interior of tne work-room of any such laundry, cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or dressmaking establishment from the exterior of the establishment between the hours of seven
o'clock in the afternoon and seven o'clock in the forenoon of the following day.
The amendment also gives the Inspectors the power to close any elevator  (passenger or
freight),  when  considered  unsafe.    Previously,  only  passenger-elevators  could  be  ordered
closed.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Amended to read that " Every employee who is found performing any work or service
in connection with the work of any employer shall be deemed to be employed by that employer
to do the said work or to perform the said services."
Confines the working-hours of employees working on a split-shift in any industrial undertaking to within twelve hours immediately following commencement of work.
"HAIRDRESSERS ACT."
Amended to provide that regulations may be made subject to the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
(<x.)   Prescribing the minimum prices which may be asked, charged, or received from the
public for various acts of hairdressing.
(6.)   Prescribing what may and what may not be stated in or on any signs, notices, or
advertisements and may require the discontinuance of any specified advertisement
or means of advertising.
" APPRENTICESHIP ACT."
Amended to provide that any municipality may as an employer enter into any contract
of apprenticeship pursuant to the provisions of the Act.
" MECHANICS' LIEN ACT."
This Act was amended to deal with the registration of liens, and provides, in addition to
filing in the County Court and in the appropriate Land Registry Office, where the lien is
claimed in respect of mining property held under the " Mineral Act " or the " Placer-mining
Act " other than a Crown-granted mineral claim, for a duplicate or copy certified by the
Registrar of the County Court to be filed in the office of the Mining Recorder in which the
mining property is situate.
Printed forms of affidavits may be procured from the County Court Registrar. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 71
"INDUSTRIAL CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION ACT."
CHAPTER 31.
An Act respecting the Right of Employees to organize and providing
for Conciliation and Arbitration of Industrial Disputes.
[Assented to 10th December, 1937.1
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitra-Short title,
tion Act."
2. (1.) In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:— interpretation
" Application " means an application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner under the provisions of this Act:
" Board " means a Board of Arbitration appointed under the provisions of this Act:
" Conciliation Commissioner " means a Conciliation Commissioner
appointed under the provisions of this Act:
" Dispute " means any dispute or difference between an employer
and a majority of all his employees or a majority of his employees in any separate plant or department of his operation
as to matters or things affecting or relating to work done or
to be done by him or them, or as to the privileges, rights, and
duties of employers or employees, and, without limiting the
general nature of the above definition, includes all matters
relating to:—
(a.) The wages, allowance, or other remuneration of employees or the price paid or to be paid in respect of employment:
(6.) The hours of employment, sex, age, qualifications,
or status of employees and the mode, terms, and conditions of
employment:
(c.) The employment of children or any person or persons
or class of persons, or the dismissal or refusal to employ any
particular person or persons or class of persons:
(d.) Claims on the part of an employer or an employee
as to whether and, if so, under what circumstances preference
of employment should or should not be given to one class over
another class of persons being or not being members of labour
or other organizations, British subjects, or aliens:
(e.) Materials supplied and alleged to be bad, unfit, or
unsuitable or damage alleged to have been done to work:
(/.) Any established custom or usage, either generally or
in the particular district affected:
{g.)  The   interpretation   of   an   agreement   cr   a   clause
thereof:
" Employer " means any person employing one or more persons or
any  number  of  employers   acting  together,  or  who   in  the
opinion of the Minister have interests in common:
" Employee " means any person employed by an employer to do any
work for hire or reward in an employment to which this Act
applies, but does not include employees in domestic service or
in agriculture:
" Lockout " includes the closing of a place of employment or the
suspension of work or the refusal of an employer to continue
to employ a number of his employees in consequence of a dispute done with a view to compelling his employees or to aid S 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
another employer in compelling his employees to accept terms
of employment:
" Minister " means the Minister of Labour:
" Strike " or " to go on strike " includes the cessation of work by
a body of employees acting in combination or the concerted
refusal or the refusal under a common understanding of a
number of employees to work for an employer in consequence
of a dispute done as a means of compelling their employer or
to aid other employees in compelling their employer to accept
terms of employment:
" Organization," when used in relation to employees, means any
organization or association of employees formed for the purpose of regulating relations between employers and employees,
and includes a trade-union; and when used in relation to employers means any organization or association of employers
formed for the purpose of regulating relations between employers and employees.
(2.) No employee or employer shall cease to be such within the meaning
and for the purposes of this Act:—
(a.)  In the case of a lockout or strike;   or
(fi.) In the case of a dismissal where an application is made within
fifteen day's after the dismissal.
Application of Act.
Right to organize
recognized.
3. This Act shall apply only to matters within the legislative jurisdiction of the Province.
4. The right of employers and employees to organize for any lawful
purpose is hereby recognized.
Collective bargaining 5. It shall be lawful for employees to bargain collectively with their
legalized. employers and to conduct such bargaining through representatives of em
ployees duly elected by a majority vote of the employees affected, and any
employer or employees refusing so to bargain shall be liable to a fine not
exceeding' five hundred dollars for each offence.
Certain restrictions
and conditions
unlawful.
Preventing employee
from joining
association.
6. It shall be unlawful for any employer hereafter to insert any clause
in any written contract of employment, or to impose any condition in any
verbal contract of employment, or to continue such clause or condition
heretofore in effect where such clause or condition seeks to restrain any
employee from exercising his rights under this Act, and any such clause or
condition shall be of no effect.
7. (1.) Any person who by intimidation, threat of loss of position or
employment, or by actual loss of position or employment, or by any other
threat, seeks to compel any person to join or refrain from joining any
organization or to refrain from becoming an officer of any association shall
be guilty of an offence, and liable to a fine of not more than five hundred
dollars.
(2.) Nothing contained in subsection (1) shall prevent an organization
of employees from maintaining an existing agreement or entering into a
new agreement with an employer or organization of employers, whereby all
the employees of the employer or organization of employers are required to
be members of a specified organization of employees.
Rights preserved. 8. Nothing in this Act shall detract from or interfere with the right of
an employer to suspend, transfer, lay off, or discharge employees for proper
and sufficient cause.
Returns by
associations.
9.  (1.)  Every organization, whether of employers or employees, shall
file with the Minister:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 73
(a.)  A copy, duly certified by its proper officers to be true and
correct, of its constitution, rules, and by-laws containing a
full and complete statement of its objects and purposes, and
all amendments when made shall be likewise certified and filed
with the Minister:
(6.)   An annual list of the names and addresses of its president,
secretary, and other officers as at the thirty-first day of December in each year.
(2.)  The list mentioned in clause (6) shall be filed before the thirty-
first day of January in each year.
(3.) The information required to be filed under this section shall be
used only for the purposes of this Act and shall not be open to inspection
hy the public.
10. Whenever any dispute exists and the parties thereto are unable to Application for
adjust it, either of the parties to the dispute may make application to the commissioner.
Minister for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.
11. On application made pursuant to section 10, the Minister may, if he Appointment of
is satisfied that the dispute is a proper one for reference to a Conciliation Conciliation
r r      r Commissioner.
Commissioner, appoint a Conciliation Commissioner, and may at the same
time or subsequently refer to him any other dispute of a similar kind between any other employer and his employees. The decision of the Minister
on the application shall be made within three days after the receipt of the
application.
12. Whenever any dispute exists or is apprehended, the Minister may Appointment of
on his own initiative, if he thinks it expedient so to do, appoint a Concilia- commissioner
tion Commissioner, and may at the same time or subsequently refer to him without application.
any other dispute of a similar kind between any other employers and his
employees.
13. Upon the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, the Minister Notice of appoint-
shall forthwith give notice of the appointment to the representatives of allmen   ° a  par ,es'
parties to the dispute, and shall from time to time give notice of the appointment to the representatives of all parties who may become interested by
reason of any dispute of a similar kind being referred to the same Conciliation Commissioner.
14. (1.)  A   Conciliation   Commissioner   shall,   in   such   manner   as   he inquiry by
thinks fit, expeditiously and carefully inquire into the dispute and all mat- commissioner,
ters affecting the merits and right settlement thereof.
(2.)   In the course of the inquiry the Conciliation  Commissioner may Mediation by
make all such suggestions and do all such things as he deems right and commissioner,
proper for inducing the parties to come to a fair and amicable settlement of
the dispute.   The Conciliation Commissioner shall hear such representations
as may be made on behalf of the parties to the dispute, and shall diligently
seek to mediate between the employer and employees.
15. It shall be the duty of the Conciliation Commissioner to promote Duty to encourage
conditions favourable to a settlement by endeavouring to allay distrust, to settlement6
remove causes of friction, to promote good feeling, to restore confidence, and
to encourage the parties to come together and themselves effect a settlement.
16. The  Conciliation  Commissioner shall,  within the time limited  by Commissioner to
,-, rt- • i/. , • i     report within
the terms of his appointment, not to exceed fourteen days, transmit to the time limited.
Minister a report setting forth the result of the reference: Provided that
with the unanimous consent of all parties the time for transmission of the
report may be extended beyond fourteen days. The Minister shall forthwith
transmit a copy of the report to the representatives of all parties to the
dispute, and may publish the report in such manner as he sees fit. S 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Failing conciliation,
dispute referred
to arbitration.
Notice to be
served on parties.
Power to determine
representatives.
Power of Minister
to appoint
arbitrators.
Designation of
Board of
Arbitration.
Members of Board
to make oath.
Minister may provide secretary, etc.
Vacancies.
Board to proceed
to hear.
17. In case the report of the Conciliation Commissioner is to the effect
that he has failed to bring about any settlement or adjustment of the
dispute, the Minister shall, where the Conciliation Commissioner was appointed pursuant to the provisions of section 11, forthwith refer the dispute
to arbitration, and shall notify the representatives of all parties to the dispute that he has so referred it. The arbitration shall be before a Board of
three arbitrators.
18. The Minister shall forthwith serve notice on the representative of
the employer, requiring the employer within the time limited by the notice,
which time shall not exceed seven days, to appoint a person to act as arbitrator on behalf of the employer, and shall forthwith serve notice on the
representative of the employees requiring the employees within the time
limited by the notice, which time shall not exceed seven days, to appoint a
person to act as arbitrator on behalf of the employees, and such two arbitrators shall appoint a person to act as third arbitrator, and the third arbitrator shall be Chairman of the Board.
19. Where any of the parties to a dispute is an organization having a
president and secretary, notification shall be made to and service shall be
made upon the president and secretary, and in every other case the Minister
shall have power to determine the persons to be notified and served as representatives for the purpose of this Act, and his determination shall be final.
20. (1.) If the employer fails to appoint an arbitrator within the time
limited by the notice, the Minister shall appoint a person to act as arbitrator
on behalf of the employer.
(2.) If the employees fail to appoint an arbitrator within the time
limited by the notice, the Minister shall appoint a person to act as arbitrator
on behalf of the employees.
(3.) If the two arbitrators fail to appoint a third arbitrator within five
days after the day on which the last of the two arbitrators is appointed, the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall appoint a third arbitrator, who shall
be Chairman of the Board.
21. (1.) As soon as the names of the three arbitrators are determined
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council shall designate them a Board of Arbitration for the purposes of this Act, and shall deliver to them a statement
of the dispute to be inquired into by them.
(2.) No person shall be appointed an arbitrator unless he is a British
subject.
22. Before entering upon the exercise of the functions of their office,
the members of a Board shall respectively make oath or affirmation before
a Justice of the Peace or other person authorized to administer an oath or
affirmation, that they will faithfully and impartially perform the duties of
their office, and also that, except in the discharge of their duties, they will
not disclose to any person any of the evidence or other matter brought
before the Board. The oath or affirmation shall be forthwith filed with
the Minister.
23. The Minister may provide the Board with a secretary, stenographer, and such other clerical assistance as to the Minister appears necessary for the efficient carrying-out of the provisions of this Act.
24. Every vacancy in the membership of a Board shall be supplied in
the same manner as in the case of the original appointment of the arbitrator
whose ceasing to act caused the vacancy.
25. As soon as possible after the Board is designated it shall, after serving sufficient notice on all parties, proceed to hear and determine the dispute. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 75
26. The Board shall have power to determine its own procedure, but Board to determine
shall give full opportunity to all parties to present evidence and to be heard.own Procetmre-
27. It shall be lawful for the members of the Board, by a summons Power to summon
under their hands or under the hand of any one of them, to require the
attendance of any person as a witness before them at a place and time to be
mentioned in the summons, which time shall be a reasonable time from the
date of the summons, and in like manner by summons to require any person
to bring and produce before them all documents, writings, books, deeds, and
papers in his possession, custody, or power touching or in anywise relating
to or concerning the dispute; and every person named in and served with
any such summons shall attend before the Board and answer upon oath,
unless the Board otherwise directs, all questions relating to the dispute
and produce all documents, writings, books, deeds, and papers as aforesaid,
according to the tenor of the summons.
28. If any person on whom any summons has been served by the de- Power to compel
livery thereof to him or by the leaving thereof at his usual place of abode witnesses and to
fails to appear before the Board at the time and place specified in the sum- Punlsh for contempt,
mons, or, having appeared before the Board, refuses to be sworn or to make
answer to such questions as are put to him by the Board, or to produce and
show to the Board all documents, writings, books, deeds, and papers in his
possession, custody, or power touching or in anywise relating to or concerning the dispute, or if any person is guilty of any contempt of the Board,
the Board shall have the same powers to be exercised in the same way as
any Judge of the Supreme Court in the like behalf; and all goalers, sheriffs,
constables, bailiffs, and all other police officers shall give their aid and assistance to the Board in the execution of its office.
29. For the purpose of its inquiry the Board shall have the power of Power to
administering oaths.    Any member of the Board may administer an oath.a mmls er oa   s-
30. The Board may accept, admit,  and call for such evidence as  in Power to accept
equity and good conscience it thinks fit, whether strictly legal evidence or not. atrict?y1s^Sether
evidence or not.
31. The Board, or any member thereof, and, on being authorized in powers of entry
writing by the Board, any other person, may, without any other warrant byBoard60*1011
than this Act, at any time enter any building, mine, mine-workings, ship,
vessel, factory, workshop, place, or premises of any kind wherein or in
respect of which any industry is carried on, or any work is being or has
been done or commenced, or any matter or thing is taking place or has taken
place, which has been made the subject of a reference to the Board, and
inspect and view any work, material, machinery, appliance, or article
therein, and interrogate any persons in or upon any such building, mine,
mine-workings, ship, vessel, factory, workshop, place, or premises as aforesaid, in respect of or in relation to any matter or thing hereinbefore mentioned; and any person who hinders or obstructs the Board, or any such
person authorized as aforesaid, in the exercise of any power conferred by
this section, or refuses to answer any interrogation made as aforesaid, shall
be guilty of an offence, and be liable to a penalty not exceeding one hundred
dollars.
32. Any party to a reference may be represented before the Board by How parties may
three or fewer than three persons designated by the parties respectively for be represented
that purpose. ' '
33. Every party appearing by a representative shall be bound by the Parties to be
acts of such representative. re^ntatta^
34. If, without good cause shown, any party to proceedings before the Presence of parties.
Board fails to attend or to be represented, the Board may proceed as if the
party had duly attended or had been represented. S 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Time and place of
sittings of Board.
Majority of Board.
Quorum.
All members of
Board to be
present.
Award.
Award not to
conflict with
certain Acts.
Award of Board to
be transmitted to
the Minister.
Copy of award to
be sent to parties.
Parties may accept
or reject award.
Acceptance or
rejection to be
by vote.
Lockout or strike
prohibited pending
conciliation or
arbitration.
35. The sittings of the Board shall be held at such time and place as are
from time to time fixed by the Chairman after consultation with the other
members of the Board, and the parties shall be notified by the Chairman as
to the time and place at which sittings are to be held: Provided that, so
far as practicable, the Board shall sit in the locality within which the dispute arose.
36. The decision of a majority of the members present at a sitting of
the Board shall be the decision of the Board, and the findings and recommendations of the majority of its members shall be those of the Board.
37. The presence of the Chairman and at least one other member of the
Board shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for a sitting of the Board.
38. In case of the absence of any one member from a meeting of the
Board, the other two members shall not proceed, unless it is shown that the
third member has been notified of the meeting in ample time to admit of his
attendance.
39. (1.) After making full inquiry and without undue delay, and in any
event not more than fourteen days after the Board is designated pursuant
to section 21, the Board shall make its award, and in its award the Board
shall so far as practicable deal with each item of the dispute, and shall state
in plain terms and avoiding as far as possible all technicalities what in the
Board's opinion ought or ought not to be done by the respective parties concerned: Provided that with the unanimous consent of all parties the time
within which the Board shall make its award may be extended for such time
as may be agreed upon by the parties.
(2.) The award shall in all cases be retroactive to the date of the application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner, and whenever it
appears to the Board expedient so to do its recommendations shall state the
period during which the proposed settlement should continue in force.
40. The Board in its award shall not make any direction or recommendation which conflicts with the provisions of the " Apprenticeship Act,"
" Factories Act," " Hours of Work Act," " Female Minimum Wage Act," or
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
41. (1.) The Board's award shall be signed by such of the members as
concur therein, and shall be transmitted by the Chairman to the Minister as
soon as practicable after the submission of the dispute to the Board.
(2.) Where any question arises as to the meaning or application of or
as to anything relating to or connected with the award, the Minister may, if
he deems it expedient, request from the Chairman of the Board an expression of the Board's opinion upon such question, and the Chairman shall upon
receipt of such request reconvene the Board, and the Board shall as soon as
practicable report to the Minister its opinion upon such question.
42. Upon receipt of the Board's award, the Minister shall forthwith
cause a copy thereof to be sent to the respective parties to the dispute, and
the Minister may publish the award in such manner as he thinks fit.
43. The parties may, subject to section 44, accept or reject the award.
44. The question of acceptance or rejection of the award shall be submitted to a separate vote by the employees and employers (if more than one
employer is involved) respectively. The vote shall be by secret ballot, and
both in the case of the employees and of the employers the Minister may
supervise the taking of the vote.
45. (1.) During the period of time intervening between an application
for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner under section 11 and
fourteen days after the date fixed for the taking of a vote under section 44, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 77
no employer who is a party to the dispute shall declare or cause a lockout,
nor shall any employees who are parties to the dispute go on strike.
(2.) Subsection (1) shall not apply in any case where an application
under section 11 is refused.
(3.) Nothing in this Act shall prohibit the suspension or discontinuance
of any industry or of the working of any persons therein for any cause not
constituting a lockout or strike.
46. (1.)  Where any dispute arises, no employer shall make effective a Changes in wages,
proposed change in wages or hours without the consent of the employees,
nor shall the employer declare or cause a lockout, nor shall employees go
on strike prior to an application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner.
(2.) The application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner shall be made by the employer or employees proposing the change in
wages or in hours. None of the parties shall alter the conditions of employment with respect to wages or hours, or on account of the dispute do or be
concerned in doing, directly or indirectly, anything in the nature of a lockout
or strike or a suspension or discontinuance of employment or work, but the
relationship of employer and employee shall continue uninterrupted by the
dispute or anything arising out of the dispute until the application for the
appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner has been made.
(3.) Where an application for the appointment of a Conciliation Commissioner has been made pursuant to this section, all the provisions of this
Act shall be applicable to the same extent as if the application had been
made under section 10.
47. Where there is between an employer and an organization of em- Exemption in case
i -I* ■  • ,       ,,       Tttr-   .   , .. -t i,01 agreement
ployees an agreement, approved in writing by the Minister, for the arbi- between employers.
tration of disputes, the employer and organization  shall, so long as  the       employees,
agreement remains in force, be exempt from the provisions of sections 10
to 46 of this Act.
48. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this Act for which Penalty.
a penalty has not been provided shall be guilty of an offence, and shall be
liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not more than five hundred dollars.
49. No Court shall have power or jurisdiction to enforce any awardNo Court to
-, .       .. .      .   , enforce award.
made under this Act.
50. No proceeding under this Act shall be deemed invalid by reason of Technicalities not
any defect of form or any technical irregularity. procedings.6
51. Any moneys  required for the administration of  this  Act or for Moneys required
carrying out any of the provisions of this Act shall, in the absence of any °ra mmlstratlon-
vote of the Legislative Assembly available therefor, be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
52. The  Lieutenant-Governor  in   Council  may  make   regulations   not Regulations,
inconsistent with the spirit of this Act as to any matter or thing which
appears to him necessary or advisable to the effectual carrying-out of the
provisions of this Act.
53. The "Industrial Disputes Investigation   (British Columbia)   Act "Repeal,
is repealed. S 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
The year 1937 was one of peace in labour circles; sixteen disputes were reported affecting
1,188 employees, resulting in 30,022 working-days being lost.
The above figures are particularly gratifying when friction between employers and employees is so prevalent in other parts of the country.
Of the 30,022 working days lost, 22,745 were lost by miners in the Cariboo District, leaving only 7,277 working days for the other fifteen disputes.
Future reports in connection with labour disputes will appear under the heading of
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," the text of which will be found on page 71.
The following table shows the record for the past seven years:—
Year.
No. of Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1937	
16
16
23
17
14
11
11
1,188
5,741
7,321
4,427
2,397
4,136
2,322
30,022
75,311
140,706
73,977
25,760
37,740
79 310
1936                  ....               	
1935..      _ .	
1934	
1933             	
1932...             	
1931             	
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On February 12th, a group of waitresses in one cafe in Vancouver ceased work, demanding Union wages and additional help taken on to perform the work.
After three days, an agreement was drawn up with the Union, the prevailing wages to
be raised and a check to be made on the books of the firm to ascertain whether the increased
overhead was justified.
Subsequent to this agreement, following a trial period, the Union was advised that
Union wages could not be paid, the establishment operating at a loss. An investigation by
Union officials showed a possibility of these records being falsified in order to show an
apparent loss.
Should the rates be found to be too high in view of the incoming revenue, a special
provision was to be made for this house, whereby employees might work for a rate lower
than that contained in the agreement, but not lower than the minimum wage.
Work was resumed on February 16th, the employees returning at increased wages and
under Union conditions.
MILLING COMPANY EMPLOYEES, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On April 5th, some twenty-seven employees of one milling firm at New Westminster
went out on strike following dismissal of three employees for Union activities. The workers
affected were engaged as truck drivers, mill-workers, warehousemen, etc. Following negotiations between the employers and workers concerned, the men dismissed were reinstated, the
firm agreeing to recognize the Union, no change being effected with regard to hours or wages.
Work was resumed on April 6th.    Favourable to workers.
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On April 22nd, three members of a staff of twenty-seven restaurant employees went out
on strike in protest to the refusal of the management to sign an agreement with a local
Union, and the dismissal of one employee for Union activities. The strikers demanded
recognition of the Union and a subsequent increase in wages to the Union scale. The remainder of the staff not affected continued work, and on May 5th, following negotiations
between the parties concerned, a conciliation was effected, the three strikers being reinstated
and the staff given the right to belong to a Trade Union of their own choice, no discrimination
being made for same. At the termination of the dispute no change in wage rates was effected,
the workers returning at their previous scale of wages. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 79
GOLD-MINERS, CARIBOO DISTRICT, WELLS.
Strikes occurred at two mines in the Cariboo district on May 25th, 1937, involving approximately 385 miners, members of Local No. 253, Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers' International Union, an affiliate of the Committee for Industrial Organization.
The conciliation services of the Federal Department of Labour were at once offered to
both the employers and the strikers, and the attention of the latter was directed to a provision
of the "Industrial Disputes Investigation Act," (since repealed), which made it unlawful
for mine employees to go on strike on account of any dispute prior to or during a reference
of such dispute to a Board of Conciliation and Investigation, established under the Act.
After considerable delay, the conciliation offer was accepted by the strikers, a representative conferring with the strikers' committees in Wells on May 31st. Efforts to bring about
a resumption of work pending the establishment of a Board of Conciliation and Investigation
were not successful.
This strike was largely precipitated by a dispute arising over demands of the miners
that seniority rather than merit be the basis for promotion, although later demands were
submitted for recognition of the Union, no discrimination to be shown to strikers, reinstatement of all employees, a forty-eight-hour week where possible, and an upward adjustment in
wages.
Proposals for reference of the dispute to a Board under the " Industrial Disputes In-.
vestigation Act " not being accepted, the strike continued until July 15th, 1937, when one of
the mines was reopened with a partial staff, which amounted to 175 by July 31st, as compared
with   a  normal   staff   of  260   workers.    An   employees'   co-operative   association   had   been
organized.
On July 30th, the Union voted to call off the strike, the workers in this case voluntarily
returning to work at the scale of wages previously in effect; the dispute terminating in
favour of the employers.
LOGGERS, COWICHAN LAKE, V.I.
Following the discharge of one employee of a logging company at Cowichan Lake, V.I.,
on June 11th, some 180 employees walked out, claiming discrimination. A strike-ballot being
taken, a majority were shown in favour of resuming work, but as several key-men had
already left the district, a return with a complete crew was impossible at that time.
Following a duration of one day, work was resumed with the partial crew carrying on
under previous conditions.    No change.
HOTEL EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
On July 1st, some twenty-six employees of one hotel at Vancouver ceased work, demanding
recognition of the Union and Union rates of pay. The workers affected included bus-boys,
waiters, and waitresses.
Following a six-day period, during which negotiations were carried on between both
parties, an agreement was drawn up, the strikers returning to work on July 7th.
Slight increases were effected in the case of waiters covering special functions, but in
general the rates remained the same, with recognition of the same Union as previous to strike.
LOGGERS, PARKHURST.
Thirty employees in one logging camp at Parkhurst went out on strike on July 2nd,
following dismissal of three workers. While no previous demands had been made with the
company, an increase of 25 cents per day was asked for all employees in the lower ratings at
the time of striking.
Negotiations proceeded, resulting in an agreement being reached granting the increase
asked, the workers returning to work on July 6th, with the exception of the three employees
dismissed, who were not reinstated.    Favourable to workers.
LATHERS, VANCOUVER.
On July 5th, a strike occurred at Vancouver, involving some ninety workers engaged in
lathing operations. The firms affected included all lathing contractors and the association
of Master Plasterers of Vancouver and District. S 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The cause of the dispute centred chiefly on the desire of the men to change from a
piece-work basis to a more stable system of " day-work." The prevailing rates in effect at
the time of the dispute were $4 per thousand lath, with a forty-hour week.
Requesting a change to a day basis, the workers proposed two classes of labour, $6 per
day and $7.50 per day.
Following negotiations covering a period of five days, an agreement was signed with the
Union, employers agreeing to respect all resolutions of the Union designed to change from
the " piece-work " system of employment to day-work, with two classes of labour, at 75 cents
per hour and 93% cents per hour, effective August 1st, 1937.
RESTAURANT WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
A group of waitresses of one cafe at Vancouver went out on strike on July 17th, demanding recognition of the Union, with Union wages and conditions.
At the time of the dispute, the workers were already under agreement with a Canadian
Union, but this Union was not recognized and was not in affiliation with the Trade Union
movement.
The demands of the strikers included an increase of $2.50 per week, and repudiation of
the prevailing Union agreement, in favour of an American Union policy.
Following negotiations, the dispute terminated on August 31st, the strikers being reinstated at Union wages, and under Union conditions.    Favourable to workers.
LIME WORKERS, BLUBBER BAY.
On July 23rd, 1937, a dispute arose at a lime and lumber plant at Blubber Bay, Texada
Island, some 133 employees ceasing work in favour of an increase in general wage rates and
Union recognition. The basic rates prevailing at the time of the strike were approximately
37 cents and 38 cents per hour, the workers demanding a blanket increase of IVz cents per
hour. While the employees offered to negotiate with a workers' committee, they refused to
deal with the Union.
Following lengthy negotiations, an agreement was signed between the company and the
employees, granting a blanket increase of 3% cents per hour, with special concession regarding overtime, ship-loading, etc.
While the company refused to recognize any outside Union, the agreement specified no
discrimination would be shown to workers by reason of the existing strike and agreed to
recognize the right to collective bargaining, through a shop committee of its own employees.
Work was resumed on September 8th under the new agreement.
SASH AND DOOR WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
On August 9th a strike occurred in two sash and door plants at Vancouver, involving
some 133 workers, the men demanding an increase in wages. The prevailing rates of wages
were from 20 cents to 63 cents per hour, the workers asking that this be increased to from
30 cents to 75 cents per hour.
The employers refused to negotiate with the Union representatives, and a move toward
conciliation proved unsuccessful.
The minimum wage rates in the industry were about to be increased, and the workers
in skilled occupations demanded increases also.
Following negotiations, a settlement was finally reached, the employer in one case agreeing to increase wages 7 per cent, immediately, with a 5-per-cent. increase after two months,
and in the other, applying a 3-cents-per-hour immediate general increase, with an additional
2 cents per hour, effective September 16th.
The agreements also specified overtime rates, and the recognition of shop committees in
the matter of collective bargaining. Work was resumed August 16th, the dispute terminating
in favour of the workers.
FRUIT-PICKERS, VERNON.
On September 6th the employees of one fruit-growing firm at Vernon went out on strike
demanding an increase in wages. The workers were engaged in fruit-picking, and the
prevailing rate of wages at time of strike being 8 cents per box, the pickers demanding that
this be increased to 10 cents per box. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 81
While some thirty-eight workers were involved, seventeen of these were allowed to return
to work, having previously walked out to avoid trouble with the strikers. The company
refusing to increase the wage rates, the strikers were replaced by other workers and work
was resumed September 7th.    In favour of the employer.
MOVING-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS, VANCOUVER AND OTHER
LOCALITIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A dispute involving projectionists in certain theatres in Vancouver and other localities in
British Columbia occurred on October 5th and 6th, affecting employees in some thirty-seven
motion-picture houses.
While the operators asked an increase in wages of 10 per cent., the dispute was largely
precipitated by reason of an impending change in the Provincial regulations, demanding that
the employers agree to employ two projectionists during the period of the new agreement,
which in most cases was a two-year period.
Following conciliation measures on the part of officials, of the Department of Labour, a
new agreement was drawn up granting the above demand, and successive 5-per-cent. increases,
one to be applied immediately, with an additional one to follow after a period of one year.
The scale previously in effect was $1.17 to $1.45 per hour.
Following a period of some forty-eight hours, work was generally resumed on October 7th.
ENGINEERS, VANCOUVER.
On October 25th engineers in four theatres in Vancouver went out on strike, demanding
a definite form of agreement and wage increases. The scale prevailing at the time of the
dispute was chief engineer, $40 per week, and assistant engineer, $32.50 per week.
The hours prevailing were in some cases a straight eight-hour day and some with eight
hours spread over a fifteen-hour period. The company threatened a lay-off during the
summer months.
The men demanded the scale be increased to Union scale: 10 per cent, for first year with
full scale thereafter, being $38.40 for assistant engineer, and $42 for engineer in charge, with
eight consecutive hours six days per week.
Following a period of five days during which negotiations continued, an agreement was
drawn up granting increases and a closed-shop with stipulations covering hours and extra
engineers in some cases during heating season. The increases amounted to $1.50 per week
granted to assistant engineers, with engineers in charge and seasonal employed engineers
unchanged. A forty-eight-hour week was stipulated with an eight consecutive-hour day;
maximum weekly limit fifty-six hours, with time and one-half for overtime.
Work was resumed November 1st, the strike having been successful.
CARPENTERS, VANCOUVER.
On October 27th some fourteen employees of one building firm in Vancouver ceased work
for one-half day, protesting that the project on which they were employed was not a 100-
per-cent. Union job. The workers affected included carpenters, electricians, and reinforcing
steelworkers—members of the Amalgamated Building Workers of Canada—and as other
Unions were also involved the dispute was largely due to the inability of the Unions to work
together.
Returning to work the following day, the men again ceased operations on November 2nd,
in this case being out for one and one-half days. Following negotiations, the workers returned to work at their previous rates of wages, some strikers being replaced by other
workers, but the employer agreeing in all cases to hire only Union workmen, irrespective
of affiliation.
WAITRESSES, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On November 5th a group of waitresses at one cafe in New Westminster went out on
strike requesting an increase of 5 cents per hour and Union recognition. The rate prevailing at the time of the dispute was 20 cents per hour, this to be increased to 25 cents per
hour, with Union recognition.
The employer refused to negotiate and refused to- rehire one discharged employee, this
being considered discrimination by the remainder of the staff and followed by the walk-out. S 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
After an interval of seven days, a settlement was effected on November 12th, the discharged employee being reinstated and the workers returning to work under previous conditions, with no change in wage-rates and no Union agreement signed. Favourable to the
employer.
MINOR DISPUTES  (NOT LISTED AS REGULAR STRIKES).
Bakery Employees, Vancouver.
On March 8th some sixteen employees of one bakery in Vancouver ceased work, demanding Union recognition and an increase in wage-rates. On presentation of an agreement by
the Union officials, the employer refused to sign.
Following negotiations, during which three workers were dismissed, the agreement was
accepted, the employees returning to work under Union scale and conditions on March 8th,
the same day.
Bakery Employees, Vancouver.
On July 16th, following the expiration of an existing agreement between a group of
bakers and helpers of one bakery in Vancouver, a dispute arose over a new agreement and
proposed increase in wage-rates.
Following the refusal of the employers to accept the terms of a new agreement, some
eight workers went on strike, and picketing was put into effect to prevent the hiring of nonunion workers. As a result of negotiations, it was decided to lay the matter before a Board
of Arbitration, and an agreement was signed pending decision of the Board, said decision
to be binding on both parties. On July 16th at 5 p.m. the workers returned to work at the
increased rates.
Loggers, Harrison Lake.
On September 21st a group of loggers at one camp at Harrison Lake went out on strike
in sympathy with one employee who was discharged for incompetency.
Following meetings between a committee of the men and the employers, no settlement
was arrived at satisfactory to the strikers, who went to work in other camps, a new crew
being taken on by the camp in which the dispute occurred, work being resumed on September
24th, 1937.
SUMMARY OF LABOUR DISPUTES, 1937.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in Man
Working-
days.
Waitresses, Vancouver-
Flour and cereal-milling workers.
New Westminster
Restaurant employees, Vancouver,.
Gold   miners,   Cariboo   District
(Wells)
Loggers, Cowichan Lakc~
Commenced February 12th, for increased wages with
improved conditions. Terminated February 15th,
in favour of workers.
Commenced April 6th, against discharge of workers
due to Union activity. Following negotiations,
workers reinstated and Union recognized. No
change re wages or hours. Terminated April 6th.
Favourable to workers.
Commenced April 22nd, in protest of the dismissal of
one employee for Union activity and refusal of
employer to sign a Union agreement. Terminated
on May 5th by negotiations. Workers reinstated
at previous wage-rates and allowed free association.
In favour of employees.
Commenced May 25th for Union recognition and
wage increases. Voluntary return of workers under original conditions at old wage-scale. Partially terminated July 30th. All work resumed
August 16th.    In favour of employer.
Commenced June 11th, against dismissal of one
worker, allegedly for Union activity. Terminated
June 12th, with return of workers. No change in
conditions.    Unsuccessful.
Carried forward  	
370
180
21
34
36
22,745
180
23,016 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 83
Summary of Labour Disputes, 1937—Continued.
No. of
Time lost
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
Employees
affected.
Working-
days.
586
23,016
Hotel employees, Vancouver	
Commenced July  1st,  for recognition  of Union  and
Union   rates   of   pay.    Negotiations.    Recognition
of the same Union  as prior to strike,  with  some
increases    in   wage-scales.    Terminated    July    7th.
Compromise.
26
130
Loggers, Parkhurst 	
Commenced   July  2nd,   against  discharge  of   certain
workers and for increased wages.   Negotiations.   Increase   in   wages   granted,   but   strikers   not   reinstated.    Terminated July 5th.    Partially favourable
to  workers.
30
45
Lathers/Vancouver- 	
Commenced   July   5th,   for  hourly   wage   instead   of
piece-work.    Terminated   July   10th,   following   negotiations  in  which  a  closed-shop   agreement  was
signed   with   change   in   wage-system   from   piecework to day-rate.    In favour of workers.
90
190
Waitresses   (restaurant),  Van
Commenced July 17th, for recognition of the Union
6
264
couver
with    Union    wages    and    conditions.    Return    of
workers.    Negotiations   followed   by   signed   agreement   with   rates   increased   to   Union   scale,   and
strikers   reinstated   September   1st.    Favourable   to
workers.
Lime workers. Blubber Bay	
Commenced  July 23rd,  in  favour of an  increase in
general wage-rates and Union recognition.    Negotiations.    New agreement signed granting increased-
wages and right to collective bargaining, but Union
not recognized.    Terminated September 8th.    Compromise.
133
5,254
Sash and door workers,Vancouver___-
Commenced   August   9th,   for  increased   wages.    Ne
133
798
gotiations.    Increases granted, recognition of shop
committees   re   collective   bargaining.    Terminated
August 16th.    In favour of the workers.
Fruit-pickers, Vernon 	
Commenced September 6th, for an increase in piecework   rates.    Increase  refused   and   work   resumed
with replacement of strikers.    No change in rates.
Favourable to employer.    Work resumed September
7th.
Commenced   October   5th,   for   increased   wages   and
38
38
Motion-picture projectionists, Van
120
180
couver   and   other - British   Co
renewal   of   agreement   for   two   workers   on   each
lumbia localities
shift.     Conciliation  effected by  Provincial officials.
Terminated October 7th.    In favour of workers.
5
30
cuts   and   recognition   of   Union   jurisdiction.    Ne
gotiations successful.    Closed-shop agreement signed,
with wage increases granted in some cases.    Union
jurisdiction and regulation of hours, overtime, etc.
Terminated   November    1st,    1937.    Partially   suc
cessful.
Building-trade workers, Vancouver
Commenced October 27th, in protest against violation
of Union  policy and inability of  Unions  to work
together.    Negotiations   and   replacement   of   some
strikers.   Wages unchanged.   Terminated November
2nd.    In favour of employer.
14
28
Waitresses, New Westminster.	
7
49
charged employee.    Negotiations effected in favour
of   worker,   the   discharged   employee   being   rein
stated.    No   change   in   wage   rates.    Terminated
November 12th,    In favour of employees.
Totals 	
1,188
|      30,022
I S 84 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 28th, 1938.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for the
year 1937.
The year under review witnessed continued industrial activity in all parts of the Province. Considerable expansion to plants took place since our previous visit of inspection, and
many modern structures were built to house new industries. The working conditions prevailing in the new factories and in additions to older plants showed a decided improvement.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1937, 1,860 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
Previous to the advent of factory inspection, the worker took working conditions as he
found them, sanitary or unsanitary, safe or unsafe, and if he were unfortunate enough to be
injured in the course of his employment, regardless of the employer's responsibility, the
accident was generally attributed to carelessness on the part of the employee. Pioneer efforts
in connection with the enforcement of those sections of the " Factories Act" relating to employees' safety in industrial occupations, would at times reveal a most callous type of employer who did not seem to be at all concerned. A well-remembered instance occurred while
making an inspection of a shingle-mill. Upon drawing the attention of the manager to the
very dangerous conditions existing, he admitted that his employees were being subjected to
hazardous working-conditions, but exclaimed " Why should I be concerned; I am covered by
liability-insurance? " The growth of the safety-movement and the establishment of Workmen's Compensation Boards, together with a financial incentive to prevent accidents, have
virtually eliminated this type of employer.
The early work of this Deparatment was concentrated largely on the provision of adequate mechanical safeguards. As the proportion of accidents due to poor working-methods
and carelessness or thoughtlessness increased in proportion to those due to lack of mechanical
safeguards, our inspection work has grown to include more education in safe practices at
work. For many years industrial accidents of serious consequence have been investigated;
in these investigations an effort has been made to discover underlying or contributory causes
to determine, if possible, the best means of avoiding a repetition of the accident.
Close investigation of the frequency of accidents to young persons, employed mainly in
sash and door and furniture factories, was made during the year. While practically all
accidents reported were not what might be termed of a very serious nature and the time loss
was of short duration, we are of the opinion that the speedup and mass-production system is
a contributing factor. Interviews with a number of the injured persons would also indicate
that the education of the younger workers in the risks attached to their work is not receiving
the attention it deserves. Tuition consisting only of a warning to be careful, without any
further explanation of the risks involved, is by no means sufficient.
More accidents are created in wood-working industries by lack of proper instruction than
by the lack of mechanical safeguards. When a workman is properly instructed in the method
of operation, it must of necessity, include safety, for there is only one proper method of
operation, and that is operation with " safety." The responsibility for conveying this instruction rests with the foreman of the plant, and he must act in duel capacity of foreman-
teacher. The outstanding qualities in this respect are patience, painstaking effort, fairness,
and good-will.
The safety of employees while operating machinery is obviously a matter which rules
and regulations or legislation alone can never wholly achieve. I do believe, however, that
we could receive very helpful suggestions from employees' trade organizations, if they would
have included in their regular order of business, a heading entitled " Injuries to members to
be reported."   A report would then be received and discussions of same take place, and practi- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 85
cal suggestions offered for their prevention. The suggestions could be submitted to the
manager, superintendent, safety engineer, or safety committee for approval, and if found
practical, adopted, if not, convincing reasons should be given as to why it would be impractical
to have such suggestions put into effect.
PROSECUTIONS.
Two proprietors of dressmaking factories were, upon conviction, fined for an infraction
of section 81, Part II., of the " Factories Act." Three persons were convicted and given suspended sentence, for failure to comply with the regulations respecting home-worker's permits.
The proprietor of an Oriental laundry was fined $50 for an infraction of subsection (2)
of section 4 of the "Factories Act."
HOLIDAY PERMITS.
During the year 140 permits authorizing the operation of factories on statutory holidays
were issued; these permits were issued in cases of extreme emergency only, and to industries,
the nature of which require continuous operation.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
Eighty-four overtime permits were issued, extending the working-hours for female
factory-employees up to fifty-four per week.
IMPROVED FACTORY CONDITIONS.
Special attention was given during the year to improving working-conditions in factories
where, during the processing of fruit, solutions are used, which while not particularly harmful, prove discomforting to the employees. For the purpose of removing fumes which are
generated in the processing of this fruit, fans have been installed in the work-rooms and the
fruit thoroughly washed for the purpose of removing the solution before being handled by the
employees. The mixing and application of the solution is now segregated from the factories
proper, and the persons in charge of same are supplied with an efficient respirator.
Periodically, we receive complaints from workmen employed in industries in which considerable wood-dust is generated. • The density of this dust depends largely upon the moisture
content in the wood being sawn and also on the location and design of the refuse-conveyer.
While this dust can be partially removed by means of suction fans with the necessary piping
(and the large majority of plants has provided this equipment) there are, however, still a
number of factories being operated by a class of employer that is not interested enough in
his employees' welfare to install this equipment, unless forced to do so.
AMENDMENTS.
For the purpose of bringing all cleaning, dyeing, pressing, and dressmaking establishments operated for profit (regardless of the type of ownership under which they are operated)
within the provisions of the " Factories Act," section 3 was repealed and clauses 2 and 3 of
section 4 were amended at the 1937 Session of the Legislature. This legislation, condensed,
prohibits with certain specified exemptions, any work being performed on the premises on
any day except between the hours of 7 o'clock in the forenoon and 7 o'clock in the afternoon.
Previous to this legislation being enacted, numerous Oriental and other nationalities, usually
husband and wife and other members of the family whose living quarters are at the rear of
their establishments, were working unlimited hours in direct competition with our own
nationals.
EMPLOYEES' WELFARE.
It is not possible to describe adequately in a report of this nature the various schemes or
provisions provided by employers for the comfort and welfare of their workers. While some
of our large industrial establishments have hot meals prepared and served in dining-rooms
in or adjacent to the plant, for which a nominal charge is made, others provide dining-rooms
with facilities for making tea and coffee for the benefit of those who for various reasons bring
their lunch. There are, however, a great many factories in which male employees predominate where no provision is made in this respect. As it is optional on the part of the employer
in so far as male employees are concerned whether or not dining-rooms are provided, we can S 86 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
only request that consideration be given to the suggestion that some room other than the
factory proper be placed at the disposal of the employees for luncheon purposes, and so far
the results obtained by this procedure have not been all that we would desire.
It is, however, with a great deal of satisfaction that we are able to report that we have
in this Province a type of employer who is interested in the welfare of the employees to such
an extent that good conditions are voluntarily being made even better. At the close of the
year, while making an inspection of a plant, we noted extensive structural alterations being
made to a building adjacent to the factory. Upon entering the building accompanied by an
official of the company,.he justly pointed out with pride the measures being taken by his
company for the welfare of the employees. Individual lockers of the latest type were being
installed, and the most modern sanitary conveniences, showers, and washing facilities were
also being installed, all located in an enclosure with the entire floor and a section of the
walls in tile.
HOME-WORK.
Persons who question the necessity of and criticize the trend of social legislation would,
I feel sure, change their point of view to some extent if they had been privileged to observe
conditions under which industrial home-work was being performed in this Province previous
to legislation being enacted, having for its purpose some measure of control over this system.
Prior to this legislation becoming operative, garments were being manufactured in homes
where little or no regard was paid to sanitation. Work was being performed by individuals
whose appearance in some instances would justify the opinion that they were the victims of
a communicable disease. The manufacturing of wearing-apparel under such conditions constituted a menace to the public making purchases of same and, if it had been permitted to
continue and expand, the continuity of employment of female factory-employees because of
the extremely low remuneration home-workers were receiving for performing skilled work
would have been seriously jeopardized. We will cite one of many such cases investigated.
Mrs. " X," an expert at her work, whose premises were located in an old tenement house,
was engaged making children's exquisitely smocked dresses, for which she would receive from
20 cents to 40 cents each. As far as could be ascertained, her maximum earnings at the
piece-work rate set would average 80 cents for an eight-hour day, working at top speed.
Further proof of the justification for our refusal to grant employer's and home-worker's
permits to Japanese applicants was forthcoming during the year, as the following will show:
A Japanese employer shortly after receiving an adverse reply to his application for an employer's permit authorizing him to give out work to be performed in the home, requested us
to inspect vacant premises in order to determine their suitability for factory operations.
After approving of two locations, we waited a reasonable length of time for some sign of
occupancy, and, as this was not forthcoming, we decided that the request to view premises
was intended as a ruse to defeat the regulations. After considerable investigation, this was
verified by the fact that we were able to obtain sufficient evidence to warrant Police Court
proceedings being taken. Immediately following the conviction of the employer and home-
workers involved, one of the locations referred to was occupied by this employer, power-driven
machinery installed, and a staff of twenty female operators employed.
Assuming that strict enforcement of Part II. of the " Factories Act" has in a large
measure been a contributing factor towards industrial home-work being no longer a problem
in this Province, it has not been accomplished without being subjected to a certain amount of
criticism from our own nationals who would have us believe that for philanthropic reasons
only did they wish to be permitted to give out work to be performed in the home. Our records
show that to-day denial of a request for an employer's permit to such an individual has
resulted in the establishment of a factory giving employment to fourteen female employees.
While industrial home-work is no longer an industrial and social evil in this Province,
we view with much concern the increasing domination by Japanese manufacturers of machine-
made ladies' wearing-apparel. Although we have been successful in having this work performed under close supervision in factories, the proprietors of these plants still have a decided
advantage over other competitors because, in addition to factory space, living-quarters are
provided for their families. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 87
ELEVATORS.
As the safety of an elevator, wherever located, is seldom questioned by the persons using
it, it is of paramount importance that the confidence placed in this form of transportation be
retained. I do not think the passengers, generally, realize the precautionary measures that
are at the moment being taken to further safeguard the lives and limbs of all persons who
use passenger and freight elevators in this Province. In compliance with the Regulations
governing installation, operation, and maintenance of freight and passenger elevators, issued
under Order in Council February 4th, 1935, a large staff of skilled mechanics has been, and
is still busily engaged, installing interlocking equipment on the hoistway doors and car-gates
of passenger-elevators and hoistway gates and doors of freight-elevators not previously provided with same.
Failure on the part of a large number of owners of buildings in which elevators are
located to award contracts for this equipment until just previous to the expiry date, together
with a shortage of mechanics to install same, give strong indications that complete compliance
with the Regulations will not he attained for some considerable time. Applying these safety
devices, more particularly to some of the older freight-elevator installations, without sacrificing safety and at a reasonable expenditure, has been somewhat of a problem and required
frequent visits of inspection for a satisfactory solution to all concerned.
We are pleased to report that during the year under review no fatal accident occurred to
any person while being transported on passenger or freight elevators. Major injuries were
received by two persons who fell from the main floor to the elevator-pit in office buildings, a
distance of approximately 10 feet. In both instances the injured persons, by using the blade
of a knife or similar article, unlocked the hoistway door, and assuming the car was at the
main floor landing, fell the distance as stated.
The only injuries to be reported occurring to a passenger after boarding the car were
received by a person while under the influence of liquor about to be transported to his room
in a hotel. The operator reported that after this passenger had boarded the car he was about
to close the door and then start the car; while in the act of doing so, the passenger, because
of his condition, stumbled against the operator whose hand was on the car-control switch,
causing the car to ascend. The passenger fell from the ear platform through the open hoistway door on to a tile floor, causing him to receive a broken hip. In all instances, the injuries
as related were received on elevator equipment, the hoistway doors of which had not yet been
provided with interlocking devices.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1937, 821 operators' licences were renewed, and 277 temporary and 254 permanent
licences issued.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
The following number of plans and specifications relating to installation of modern elevator equipment were approved: Fifteen freight-elevators, seven passenger-elevators, one
power dumb-waiter.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1937, 1,134 passenger and freight elevators were inspected.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected with
industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. DOUGLAS,
Factories Inspector. S 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent -    Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer and
Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets... .—  )
Vancouver (Women's Branch), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets  j Jas- Mitchell, Superintendent.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets _ _    )
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets  j W. G. Stone, Superintendent.
New Westminster  _ _ Robt. MacDonald, Superintendent.
Nanaimo     .J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops J. H. How, Superintendent.
Penticton      A. Coy, Superintendent.
Nelson —   J.  M.  Dronsfield, Superintendent.
Prince George  E. Victor Whiting, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert —- _  J. M.  Campbell, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
\ G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets     \ R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets    W.  A.  Turner,  Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the Nineteenth Annual Report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1937.
The period under review saw a continuation of serious unemployment which was intensified by the influx of large numbers of men and women from other Provinces, with the result
that the Service was confronted with difficulties usually met with when the number seeking
employment is much greater than the number of jobs available.
Reference has been made to the establishment of camps by the Forestry Branch of the
Department of Lands and the Public Works Department for the purpose of providing employment for single men during the winter months. In order to prevent the immediate expenditure of the wages earned and a consequent application for relief, a system was devised
whereby the men received part of their wages in cash during their period of employment
and on their discharge and the balance in orders payable by the Post-office Department at
weekly intervals. Although strongly opposed in some quarters, the system undoubtedly contributed to the fact that there was less agitation and disturbances in the larger centres than
during any period since 1930.
The camp system was continued and the camps reopened during the closing months of
the year, their popularity being clearly shown by the large number of applications for
admission.
FORESTRY AND PLACER-MINING TRAINING CAMPS.
Opportunities for young men to secure training in forestry and placer-mining were again
made available, and proved highly popular and beneficial to those accepted, as many of the
young men secured work in the basic industries as a result of their training.
Arrangements for the shipment of men to and from all relief and training camps were
in charge of the Employment Service, which was able to secure material reductions in transportation costs.
WORK SCHEME IN VANCOUVER.
During the year and for the first time during the depression, the City of Vancouver, with
the assistance of the Provincial Government, required relief recipients to work for their relief,
thus following the practice followed in the balance of the Province. This resulted in the
failure of a large number of men to report for work, with a corresponding reduction in the
relief rolls of the city. The selection and distribution of the 4,000 men covered by this programme was the responsibility of the Service. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 89
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS.
Employment in the primary and secondary industries continued at a higher level throughout the year, although hostilities in China had some effect on the export market for logs and
paper products, and coal-mining continued to be affected by the use of oil and sawmill byproducts.
Despite the general improvement in conditions and the increase in the volume of employment, it was found necessary to grant relief to a larger number of families and to reopen
relief camps for single men during the winter months. The Coast area of the Province, owing
to climatic conditions, is normally a Mecca for unemployed persons, particularly during the
winter months. Drought conditions in Alberta and Saskatchewan have greatly accentuated
the situation and large numbers have come from those Provinces, many of them destitute, and
unable to secure relief here they endanger the whole wage structure in their search for
employment. The normal expectancy that employers would give preference to British
Columbia citizens is not being fulfilled, at least in so far as relief recipients are concerned, due
largely to the impression created by the disturbances caused by transients that all persons in
receipt of relief are unreliable and reluctant to accept and remain in employment. Efforts by
the Minister of Labour and officials to change this point of view have been partially successful, although it has been pointed out that a continuance of the policy must inevitably result
in increased taxation to pay the costs of relief.
While the tables showing work by offices and months gives an indication of the Service's
operations so far as applicants, reapplicants, employers' orders, placements, and transfers are
concerned, it is impossible to portray by figures the many activities and assignments it is
called upon to assume and the many demands made upon the staff by the public.
The returns show a slight decrease in the number of applicants and reapplicants, which
during the year amounted to 198,775 as against 202,264 for the year 1936. There was a very
considerable increase in employers' orders and placements over the preceding year, which is
accounted for to some extent by the relief-work undertaken by the City of Vancouver, the
figures being, employers' orders, 52,523, as against 32,162 for 1936, while placements were
52,365, as against 32,012 in the preceding year.
HANDICAP SECTION.
In a further effort to assist ex-service men to secure steady and gainful employment, the
Dominion Government through the Veterans' Assistance Commission inaugurated a scheme
whereby selected unemployed ex-service men, who served in a theatre of war, were given an
opportunity to take a course of training to fit them to enter into industrial employment and
thereby become self-supporting. Although the proposals were freely advertised and employers
secured against financial loss so far as wages were concerned, the results had little or no
influence on the situation as it affects unemployed ex-service men.
The problem concerning partially disabled veterans continues to increase with the passing
of the years, and although many have disappeared from the ranks, their places are taken by
men who, through advancing age and war-service disabilities, find their difficulties steadily
increasing. These factors, together with the application of and speeding-up of machinery,
make it almost impossible for these men to successfully compete in the labour market, with
the result they are practically limited to short casual employment.
As has been previously pointed out, the number of men injured and permanently handicapped in the primary industries continues to increase. These industries—logging, mining,
fishing, and agriculture—require strong physically-fit men, and except for mechanics employed in maintenance-work, no training which cannot be secured on the work is required.
The employment is hazardous and many of the injuries result in major disabilities which
prevent their re-employment in the industries in which they were previously employed.
Compensation payments only partially meet the problem, as the payments cease or are materially reduced when the workmen are able to resume employment, even though the type of work
they are able to perform is not available. The secondary industries are the only outlet for
handicapped men and in an overstocked labour market of physically-fit workers the prospects
of absorbing thousands of handicapped persons is remote.
7 S 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WOMEN'S SECTION.
Special sections for women are maintained in Vancouver and Victoria, where the volume
of employment warrants this policy, but in the other towns the women are dealt with in the
general offices. A wide variety of employment is handled, but personal-service occupations
form the bulk of the business. As in the men's sections, there was a large influx of women
from Alberta and Saskatchewan, resulting in an increase in competition for local women for
the available employment.
In an effort to improve the working-conditions of women employed in domestic service
and to assist women seeking employment for the first time, a position was created in the
Vancouver Office which may be properly described as a Women's and Girls' Counsellor. Not
only does she interview young women who are making their first advance towards self-sustaining employment, but encourages them to return and describe the working-conditions they find
in the employment to which they are sent. The quarters in which these interviews take place
are furnished more in keeping with home than office style, and the arrangements have been
the subject of favourable comment from officials of other Provinces and the United States.
The extremely delicate task of interviewing women employers regarding working-conditions in homes has been undertaken with considerable success, and the educational value of
such interviews has spread rapidly with very beneficial effects.
Special attention is also given in the Vancouver office to problem cases, of which there is
a large number. Women meet responsibilities more courageously than men, but once their
morale is weakened by sickness or long periods of unemployment and State assistance, the
road to recovery is long and difficult and considerable stimulation is necessary to persuade
them to again become self-sustaining by employment.
IMPORTATION OF LABOUR.
Despite the surplus of labour in practically all fields of employment, the Service is called
upon to pass on the merits of many applications received by the Department of Immigration
for the admission of labour from the United States and other foreign countries. These cover
a wide range of occupations and are from periods of a few days to permanent admissions.
The guiding principle is to discourage all applications, except for those to be used for a limited
time to train Canadians in special operations or processes or where new industries require
key-men with knowledge not easily acquired in Canada. The arrangement between the departments has worked out to their mutual advantage and to the benefit of Canadian workmen.
CONCLUSION.
The Service continues to be recognized as necessary to the industrial activities of the
Province. The surplus of labour has, however, provided an ample supply of workers to
employers without the necessity of securing the assistance of any outside agency.
Considerable time and effort is devoted to occupational guidance work. Many parents
and young men and women consult members of the staff regarding the best line of endeavour
to follow and expert advice in this field requires a wide knowledge of industries and occupations. The offices also function as information bureaus and assist in tracing lost relatives.
Many organizations refer all enquiries regarding employment to the Service for reply and,
generally speaking, the officers of the Branch fulfil a vast range of duties but slightly connected with employment work, but all of assistance to community life of the Province. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 91
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1937.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
Kamloops..
Nanaimo—
Nelson	
New Westminster..
Penticton—	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert 	
Vancouver (Men)	
Vancouver (Women).
Victoria (Men) 	
Victoria (Women)	
Totals	
3,558
4,126
2,990
4,147
3,629
615
3,963
131,433
22,760
15,772
5.782
198,775
872
3,368
2,563
1,633
767
462
752
27,359
5,179
7,827
1,741
52,523
837
3,329
2,562
1,630
741
430
751
27,335
5,185
7,824
1,741
52,365
14
6
5
4
1
148
32
18
231
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1937.
Month.
Applications
and
Reapplications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
20,537
17,387
15.009
19,360
14,330
12,839
17,132
12,156
12,590
18,274
17,930
21,231
4,199
4,276
3,501
3,853
4,398
3,071
5,258
3,829
3,702
4,109
4,535
7,792
4,168
4,276
3,490
3,827
4,389
3,057
5,245
3,825
3,673
4,102
4,533
7,780
9
5
20
41
18
30
41
18
24
14
9
2
February.. 	
1
April.. _	
May      	
June    _	
July  	
September 	
October 	
November   .
December	
	
Totals 	
198,775
52,523
52,365
231
1 REPORT OF ADMINISTRATOR OF UNEMPLOYMENT
RELIEF, 1937.
There was a great improvement in the relief situation during the calendar year 1937.
The decrease in the average monthly numbers receiving relief in the Province was nearly 24
per cent, as compared with the previous year's average. The lowest number receiving assistance since the peak of 128,858 in March, 1933, was in the month of September, 1937, when
43,110 individuals were assisted. This is about one-third less than the low for the previous
year of 64,996 in October, 1936.
The Province continued to pay 80 per cent, of the cost of relief afforded to municipal
residents and the whole cost of assistance granted to Provincial and transient cases residing
within municipal limits. The Federal Government assisted by means of monthly grants-in-
aid amounting to $200,812.50 for the months of January, February, and March; $150,000
for the months of April, May, and June; $120,000 for the months of July, August, and
September;   and $115,000 for the months of October, November, and December.
Registration.—Since 1st August, 1934, when a reregistration took place, a total of 85,234
applications for assistance have been received. This is made up of the following categories:
Standard, 66,013; farmer, 6,099; transient, 13,122; each application representing either a
head of family or single person.
Grub-stakes.—We continued the policy of affording grub-stakes to enable men to follow
placer-mining or lode prospecting.
Garden Seeds.—A total of 6,000 collections was distributed to relief recipients in unorganized territory.
Assistance to Settlers Plan.—The agreement with the Federal Department of Labour
referred to in the previous year's report expired on 31st March, 1937, but, as no provision was
made by that Department for a continuation of this type of assistance, a new agreement along
similar lines was negotiated with the Federal Department of Agriculture. A total of 259
families were assisted through the provision of stumping-powder, farm implements, farm
animals, harness, etc. By the end of the year about forty families had become re-established
and did not require any further relief assistance. It is anticipated that by the end of the
crop year in 1938 at least 75 per cent, of the farmers assisted in 1937 will have become reestablished, assuming that weather and market conditions are comparable with those of the
current year.
Forestry Training Plan.—In previous years forestry training camps were operated entirely by the Province, but during the current year an agreement was entered into with the
Federal Government on a joint-cost basis. The age-limit and general conditions remained
the same as in previous years, the work being carried out by the Forestry Branch. The total
number of men enrolled was 585. Of those who were notified that their applications had been,
approved, 161 did not report for placement. The total number of applications was 1,009.
Of the men enrolled 23 secured employment through Government endeavours, 58 secured
employment through their own efforts, 69 left camp to return to school or because of illness,
25 quit, and 9 were discharged as unsatisfactory, the balance being laid off on termination of
the projects. The young men were afforded training principally on trail crews, a small proportion in Forestry Experimental Stations, and 110 as Forest Ranger Assistants. If the
training plan is continued next year it will be necessary to refuse applications from youths
who intend to resume their studies, as we have found that those leaving in the latter part of
August to return to school seriously disrupt the work of the trail crews and, as we have-
many more applications than we have vacancies, those who intend to complete the full term
of training will be given preference. In addition to this, the original policy was to train.
young men who were ready to seek employment in the basic industries of the Province, not to
afford work during the summer holidays to youths who would not normally be seeking employment for two or three years.
Placer-mining Training Plan.—This form of training was continued during the current
year under the Dominion-Provincial agreement, camps being operated at Nanaimo River and
Emory Creek. The procedure was similar to that in previous years. The total number of
men enrolled was 262.    One hundred and eighty-two were unabsorbed or failed to report. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 93
The total number of applications dealt with was 484. Those who completed the course were
given the opportunity to undertake placer-mining or prospecting in small parties and 61
enrollees took advantage of the grub-stakes made available for this purpose. Consideration
is now being given to the question of extending the scheme to include lode prospecting courses
if similar training is afforded next year.
Winter Work Projects.—Under the agreement entered into with the Federal Department
of Labour to provide work for single homeless men during the winter months of 1936-37, a
total of approximately 5,400 were given employment on Forestry and Public Works Projects,
a total of twenty-one Forestry and twelve Public Works Camps being operated for this
purpose. The rate of pay was 30 cents per hour for an eight-hour day with 75 cents per day
board and shelter deduction. The men were required to purchase their own clothing. Part
of their earnings were withheld for payment at the rate of $4 per week on termination of
their period of employment. The agreement terminated on May 31st, 1937. Of the total
number of men placed approximately 1,200 were transients from other Provinces. Much
useful work was performed on these projects.
A similar agreement was entered into with the Federal Government on November 16th,
1937, to take care of a similar number of men. With the exception of one Public Works
Camp, accommodating 300 men, all the work will be confined to Forestry Development.
The details of all expenditures made in connection with unemployment relief appear in
the Annual Report of the Department of Public Works and the Annual Public Accounts
Statement of the Department of Finance.
E. W. Griffith,
Administrator.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of British Columbia, 1937.
(As from Returns received from the Field.)
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
January.
Organized Territory—
10,687
1,146
821
28,560
3,025
2,196
39,247
4,171
3,017
10,501
890
10,501
Single women 	
Unorganized Territory—
3.853
207
890
12,040
839
15,893
1,046
2,500
160
213
196
2,139
2,500
	
160
Farm Improvement and Employment Plan
Camps—
	
213
196
2,139
16,714
46,660
16,599
79,973 S 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1937—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
February.
Organized Territory—
11,187
1,207
865
30,106
3,164
2,678
41,293
4,371
3,543
9,750
898
9,750
4,105
217
898
Unorganized Territory—
13,288
892
17,393
1,109
2,604
159
230
187
2,683
2,604
	
159
230
Camps—
	
187
Forest Development Projects..  |
Public Works Projects      j
2,683
Totals   -_-	
17,581
50,128
16,511
84,220
March.
Organized Territory—
11,089
1,188
851
29,817
3,15-0
2,265
40,906
4,338
3,116
7,185
970
7,185
4,229
222
970
Unorganized Territory—
13,575
893
17,804
1,115
2,650
161
213
194
4,120
2,650
161
213
Camps—
	
194
Forest Development Projects  „  ]
Public "Works Projects      f
4,120
Totals 	
17,579
49,700
15,493
82,772
April.
Organized Territory—
10,356
1,093
769
27,632
2,941
2,044
37,988
4,034
2,813
5,470
881
5,470
881
Unorganized Territory—
3,963
221
12,633
873
16,596
2,446
169
147
222
3,089
1,094
2,446
	
169
Farm Improvement and Employment Plan ....
Camps—
147
222
Forest Development Projects.  }
3,089
16,402
46,123
12,424
74,949 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 95
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1937—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
May.
Organized Territory—
9,443
964
685
24,922
2,575
1,851
34,365
3,539
5,054
849
105
2,536
5,054
849
105
Unorganized Territory—
3,418
197
10,873
779
14,291
976
2,152
164
91
217
3,191
2,152
164
Emergency cases (heads and singles) — —
Camps—
91
217
3,191
Public Works Projects —   f
14,707
41,000
11,823
67,530
June.
Organized Territory—
8,641
851
611
22,556
2,268
1,637
31,197
3,119
2,248
4,696
806
78
4,696
806
78
Unorganized Territory—
2,716
151
8,509
628
11,225
779
1,680
156
113
200
128
76
2,409
1,680
156
113
Camps—
128
	
	
76
2,409
Totals     	
12,970
35,598
10,342
58,910 S 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1937—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
July.
Organized Territory—
7,852
818
489
20,288
2,125
1,340
28,140
2,943
1,829
4,639
764
52
4,639
764
6,865
523
52
Unorganized Territory—
2,248
131
9,113
654
1,348
140
71
1,348
62
140
71
Assistance to settlers (subsistence) 	
Camps—
17
79
183
474
153
331
183
474
Placer-mining Training..  	
Forest Development Projects   |
153
331
Totals     -	
11,555
31,203
8,155
50,913
August.
Organizsed Territory—
7,349
764
458
18,775
1,951
1,223
26,124
4,608
749
21
2,715
1,681
4,608
749
6,315
524
21
Unorganized Territory—
2,088
130
8,403
654
1,209
144
38
154
500
246
1.209
60
144
38
200
260
Camps—
154
500
Placer-mining Training  _	
246
Totals -.- -	
10,849
28,988
7,669
47,506 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937.
S 97
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1937—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
TotaL
September.    ^
Organized Territory—
6,792
609
341
17,176
1,521
895
23,968
2,130
1,236
4,176
736
35
4,176
736
35
Unorganized Territory—
1,931
110
5,866
423
7,797
.                 533
1,198
138
32
132
500
106
1,198
	
138
32
Assistance to settlers (subsistence)	
Camps—
92
301
393
132
500
106
Totals
9,875
26,182
7,053
43,110
October.
Organized Territory—
6,959
686
374
17,587
1,757
988
24,546
2,443
1,362
4,972
750
93
4,972
750
93
Unorganized Territory—
1,954
103
5,934
389
7,888
492
1,243
144
56
1,243
144
56
97
322
419
Camps—
146
420
8
420
8
Totals
10,173
26,977
7,832
44,982 S 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1937—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
November.
Organized Territory—
Resident families	
Provincial families	
Transient families	
Single men  _ —
Single women..
Emergency cases (heads and singles).
Unorganized Territory—
Resident families  	
Transient families .
Single men	
Single women	
Emergency cases (heads and singles).
Farm Improvement and Employment Plan..
Assistance to settlers (subsistence)—	
Camps—
Hospital..— 	
Forest Development Projects-
Public Works Projects 	
Totals.
December.
Organized Territory—
Resident families.—  -	
Provincial families  	
Transient families 	
Single men	
Single women	
Emergency cases (heads and singles) 	
Unorganized Territory—
Resident families  	
Transient families  	
Single men	
Single women .	
Emergency cases (heads and singles)	
Farm Improvement and Employment Plan-
Assistance to settlers (subsistence)	
Camps—
Hospital  	
Forest Development Projects	
Public Works Projects  _ 	
Totals	
7,838
787
416
19,987
2,086
1,142
2,254
127
7,056
479
122
387
6,342
781
136
1,387
147
65
85
153
1,629
11,544
31,137
10,725
8,723
743
641
2.792
151
140
22,849
2,054
1,661
S.920
612
428
6,437
819
245
1,623
154
64
177
148
2,350
13,190
36,524
27,825
2,873
1,558
6,342
781
136
9,310
606
.1,387
147
65
85
509
153
1,629
31,572
2,797
2,302
6,437
819
245
11,712
763
1,623
154
64
177
568
148
2.350
61,731 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 99
REPORT OF APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee.
J. A. Ward Bell, Chairman. J. F. Keen.
Adam Bell. James Thomson.
Officials of the Branch.
Director of Apprenticeship      _ Hamilton Crisford.
Assistant Director of Apprenticeship     Thomas V. Berto.
The fiscal year 1937-38 shows a considerable advance in the establishments of apprenticeship in this Province.
The year commenced with the Branch supervising 261 apprentices, 196 in Group A, trades
designated under the provisions of the " Apprenticeship Act," and sixty-five in Group B,
trades not yet designated.
During the year the following five additional trades were designated, namely:—
Lithography.
Machinists.
Patternmaking.
Boilermaking.
Aviation mechanics.
At   March   31st,   1938,   the   number   of  firms   or   employers   training   apprentices  had
increased to 375 and apprenticeship contracts in force had increased to 602, of these 491 were
in Group A and 111 in Group B.    The distribution of these apprentices is made up as per the
attached charts.
During the period twenty-nine apprentices satisfactorily completed the period of apprenticeship set out in their contracts, and of these sixteen were in designated trades and received
their certificates.
There were twenty-four contracts cancelled for one cause or another, in every case by
mutual consent.
Considerable progress has been made in the matter of periodic inspections and these have
revealed that, generally speaking, the apprentices consist of boys, young men, and women of
a high standard who are making satisfactory advancement and frequently receiving wages in
excess of that set by our regulations.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship.
' S 100
DEPARTMENT OF
LABOUR.
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fr- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1937. S 101
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT."
J. A. Ward Bell, Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Hamilton Crisford, Secretary.
The " Trade-schools Regulation Act," which came into force on January 1st, 1937,
was actively enforced during the fiscal year 1937-38 with very satisfactory results.
The regulations governing the registration and operation of the various types of schools
remained unchanged, excepting in the case of the special regulations governing the one barber-
school operating in the Province, which was given a concession in the hours during which the
public might act as models. This concession was granted owing to altered conditions in the
school itself, which justified some readjustment.
During the year a total of sixty-nine schools were registered and, of these, sixty-seven
remain in active operation, one registration having been cancelled by the Minister of Labour
for non-compliance with the regulations, and one correspondence school having voluntarily
withdrawn their registration owing to lack of business.
Of the sixty-seven operating schools, fifty-two are practical schools situated throughout
the Province, and fifteen are correspondence or home-study schools. Of the correspondence
schools, four are Canadian schools and eleven are American schools.
An additional sixteen schools applied for registration under the Act, half this number
being refused registration after a thorough investigation, the other half withdrawing their
applications owing to their inability to comply with our regulations.
Owing to the volume of complaints that had been received regarding the past operations
of some correspondence and home-study schools, special regulations governing their activities
in this Province were brought into force on September 14th, 1937. Briefly, these regulations require a school:—
(1.) To post a $1,000 Government bond with the Minister of Labour as security for the
due completion of contracts entered into with students.
(2.) To return to a student all moneys collected in the case of enrolments obtained
through false and misleading statements.
(3.) To recognize the right of any student to discontinue any course of study without
further liability, on giving notice in writing and making a payment for that portion
of such course he has already received, plus 10 per cent, of the balance due under
his contract.
(4.) To refrain from all advertising that might tend to mislead.
(5.) To give full particulars and location when asserting that a specific demand for services exists and to refrain from assurances of a position upon completion of a course.
The enforcement of the Act and these regulations has in a few short months brought
about a satisfactory change in the attitude of these schools towards their students.
Enrolment methods have distinctly improved and the right of a student to discontinue
any course of study under reasonable conditions has practically eliminated the objectionable
tactics adopted by the collection departments of some schools in an effort to enforce one-sided
and unreasonable contracts.
Comparatively few complaints have been received from students enrolling in registered
schools since the regulations became effective, and a considerable number of adjustments have
been made in regard to contracts that were entered into before the regulations became effective.
The Act has received the whole-hearted support of the general public and, as a result,
similar legislation has already been enacted in the Provinces of Ontario and Manitoba and is
under consideration in other Provinces.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chaei.es F. Banfield, Printer to tue King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.
1,525-738-4959   

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