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THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1938]

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 THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF THE   PROVINCE  OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1937, TO MARCH 31ST, 1938
PRINTED  BY
ADTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-fourth  Annual  Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1938.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Boyes, F. C, Principal. Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Gilley, Miss D. F., Secretary.
Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—During the past year more genuine interest has been displayed in regard to delinquency than ever before, and if this interest can be maintained and directed there can be
no doubt as to the good that will result.
Once more it has been borne in upon me that if we are to study the child under institutional care the compass of the activities of the institution must be kept narrow so that the
child may occupy the centre of the picture at all times. If the instructor loses sight of the
child owing to his interest in his subject, he is not giving of his best in correctional treatment.
True, he must be interested in the work in hand, but his major objective is the arousing of
interest in the child and in noting accurately the child's reactions to various situations which
arise from day to day. If we overload the instructor with work to be done he must perforce
side-track the boy in order to accomplish the various tasks which have been assigned to him.
By curtailing the size of our garden operations and stressing more and more the shop
programme, we feel that we have secured a better knowledge of the individual cases and have
been able to assist them in overcoming various weak points much more effectively than before.
The interest shown in the various shops has increased rapidly throughout the year. This
has been due to the improved technique of the various instructors and by the addition of some
good tools. The quality of the models turned out by the wood-shop and the metal-shop has
improved to the point where both boys and staff are proud of their product, while the work
of the tailor-shop and shoe-shop brought high praise from the members of the Prison Commission, who paid us a visit during the year. Statistics prepared by the various instructors
and included in their reports will complete the picture of the shop classes.
The problem of employing leisure time wisely is one of increasing importance to-day.
We have endeavoured to interest the boys in several lines. Games and swimming occupy first
place with lads of this age, and we have been able to interest most of them in one or more
games. We find very few able to play well when they come in. Some have played a bit of
this and a bit of that, but scarcely one has belonged to an organized team in a real league.
Boys who are fortunate enough to belong to such an organization seldom have time to get into
mischief, and, if we can discover and develop an interest in a good team game, the chance for
final readjustment in the community is improved immensely.
While we realize that music, art, and dramatics have a definite place in the lives of most
people, we sometimes despair over our efforts in these fields. The low mental rating of the
group as a whole, the poor cultural background of most of the members, and the time necessary to produce results worthy of notice, all combine to increase our feeling of futility. The
band instructor does interest many boys in band music but the short stay makes it impossible
to develop a real band. Moreover, much of the effort seems wasted, inasmuch as there is
little possibility of placing the boys when they leave with a band where their training may be
continued and completed. Perhaps something could be done to develop this field in various
communities.
As for singing, while the boys enjoy well-known songs, it is most difficult to teach them
new tunes and almost impossible to introduce harmony. We continue to experiment, but the
results are rather disappointing.
We have been fortunate in securing several fine concerts from various clubs in the city.
The Westminster Male Choir has been very generous in helping us, and the Junior G. Men,
under their leader, Constable Eveleigh, gave us a real evening of entertainment. It is
astonishing that groups will consider visiting us for this purpose since we are a small group
and the distance from town is a real handicap. Because they have been so willing to come,
and because it is good for the boys to see good acting and to hear good music, we never miss
an opportunity and are really grateful to those who have contributed to this side of our R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
programme. At times we have managed to build up a small concert troup of our own and in
the report of the instructor the activities of this group will be outlined.
The problem of restoring our lads to a place in the community is of major importance
and, during the past year, has given us many hours of thought and study.
For the older boys, a place in the various occupational fields is the best solution. However, under present conditions, it is difficult and at times impossible to find a place for a dull
normal boy when he must compete for such a place with many normal and bright boys who
have the advantage of a better educational background and a solid home. Our only hope for
these boys is to have them absorbed into some public work scheme such as the forestry camps
or the farm placement programme. We find that they are eager to accept such work and,
in practically every case, they have given a satisfactory account of themselves. The only
drawback to these schemes is their short duration. The boys are just settling into the work
nicely when their term is over and they must return to town to wait for another opening of
a similar nature. During their stay in town they may once more get into difficulties or they
may lose the incentive to work. If some permanent camps could be set up, not merely for
boys who have been in trouble but for boys who are unable to find a place for themselves
under a competitive system, the state would derive something real from their work and the
young men would be happy in their work.
Of course, many of these older boys do find work in gainful occupations. Apprenticeships have been secured by some, delivery and messenger work by others. One boy is running
his own trap-line in the Far North, another has a contract for supplying hardwood to a mill.
Still another has earned a partnership in a flourishing business. These are highlights—outstanding personalities who enjoyed the struggle once they entered it with an aim in view.
We hope that more opportunities will present themselves during the coming year, but we still
feel that there are not enough places for them all even in the best of times.
With the younger boys the problem is a little different. Realizing that a long stay in
the unnatural surroundings of an institution may unfit a boy for normal living in a home, we
try to discover early whether or not his home has any possibility of being used by him again.
At times, a frank discussion with the parents may effect a readjustment which completely
changes the nature of the home and a return is successful. At times, a changed financial
condition results in a new atmosphere, in which family relationships are once more normal
and happy and the boy's return is a safe proceeding. In short, if the home can be repaired
to the point where it is usable, this should be done and is done. I do think, however, that the
machinery now in our hands for such repair-work is inadequate for the task confronting it
and that the future will see real strides along this path.
When it has been proven that the home is definitely inadequate and is beyond repair,
then we must consider foster-home care. There has been a great deal of timidity over this
step, in spite of the fact that it has been used and proven good in other lands. Thanks, however, to the efforts of the various Children's Aid Societies, to the Superintendent of Neglected
Children, and to many forward-looking and sympathetic citizens who have offered their homes
for the purpose, we have made a real beginning in this field. It is too early to make predictions, but certainly the picture is bright at the time of writing, and with care and study we
should be able to report amazing progress in the years that lie ahead.
Once more we would point out the difficulty encountered in returning boys to some of the
smaller centres. The boy may have been a bit of a nuisance there and is sent to the school
for a long term—say, three years. The object is to remove him from a setting which is
unfavourable to him and that may be good. However, that is a long time in the life of a
child, and he sees no reason why he should not return to his home when others from larger
centres, who have committed many more offences, and offences of a much more serious nature,
are allowed home in a year or less. I can understand the view of the local authorities, but
I can also see the boy's view-point and it is most difficult to teach a person who is harbouring
a sense of injustice. The change in the " Industrial School Act," which eliminated the length
of sentence, was an excellent step in the right direction. All sentences are now indeterminate.
Some judges, realizing that human nature being as it is, a fixed boundary has its value, are
suggesting maximum terms—i.e., " not more than six months," " not more than one year."
The boy knows how long he must stay if nothing can be arranged for him, yet permits those
in authority to accept an offer of employment, where the opportunity for the boy's advancement is good, at any time during that period. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1937-38.        R 7
It is well known that institutional cases reach saturation point in regards to improvement
at varying times. The arrangement outlined above permits us to take advantage of this and
to return a boy to the community when he has reached the crest of a wave of improvement.
When this is done the chance of a successful adjustment is enhanced.
Again we feel that we must bring up the old problem of the older incorrigible who can do
so much harm in this type of institution. This year, two such cases gave us endless trouble.
Clever enough to avoid detection, they were able to stir up the duller lads to acts of folly
which kept the staff on edge for several months. Neither boy had committed an offence sufficiently serious to warrant transfer to a senior institution, yet neither should have been sent
to join a young, impressionable group. Several other lads of seventeen made up a small
group which might better have been handled with real prison machinery. None were desperate or dangerous but should have been under pressure for a time, and machinery is essential
when pressure of that sort is to be applied. The most important angle is, of course, the
segregation of this older and more experienced type from the younger and more innocent lads.
Segregation is expensive, but the final results would seem to warrant the increase in cost.
Once more it is borne upon us that the average intelligence of delinquents is low. Moron,
border-line, dull normal, with an occasional normal and an occasional feeble-minded boy, are
added day by day to the list. Several transfers to mental institutions have been necessary
during the year, but with the more general use of the Clinic prior to conviction this should
soon become unnecessary.
We could not leave this part of our report without bringing to your attention the value
of the advice given to us by the Child Guidance Clinic during the year. We have presented
about twenty-four cases and in each case have been given very valuable information as to the
underlying cause of trouble and methods of building up the patient into a useful citizen. In
nearly every case the Clinic felt that long terms of institutional care were inadvisable and
that foster-home and job-placement were the real solutions. Whenever we have been able to
take advantage of these suggestions and secure such placements we have found that the
results were good. We are looking forward to the time when we shall be able to present
every case at Clinic. We realize that this is impossible at the moment because of limited staff
and quarters, but we know that in fairness to the boys all should make an appearance there.
The work of the follow-up officer has been exceedingly heavy. As more and more boys
are placed on parole or are released the demands on the time of this official have assumed
alarming proportions. Boys and girls from the two schools, their families and relatives, are
constantly in need of advice and assistance. Much valuable work has been accomplished, but
additional workers must be secured if we are to keep up with the demands. Without this
branch much of the work of the Courts and the schools would be wasted.
Throughout the year we have enjoyed an increasing measure of co-operation from Courts,
police, Welfare organizations, and private groups. As their interest and understanding-
grows, so the results will be noted in the various communities. We would like them to know
that we appreciate fully their efforts to assist us with our problems.
To the members of your Department, the Department of Public Works, the Attorney-
General's Department, and the Department of Labour, we would extend our sincere thanks
for the many services rendered throughout the year.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1937, TO MARCH 31st, 1938.
On roll, March 31st, 1937  43
Number on parole, March 31st, 1937  60
Number away without leave       2
Number of new commitments during year  74
Number committed for second term  11
Number committed for third term       1
Number transferred from Oakalla Prison Farm       1
Carried forward  192 R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION-
Brought forward	
Number of boys released	
Number at present on parole	
Number placed in foster-homes	
Number transferred to Mental Hospital	
Number escaped and not returned	
-Continued.
192
90
38
5
2
1
136
Total in school, March 31st, 1938..
56
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1937, TO MARCH 31st, 1938.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1560
1551
1552
1553
1554
1565
1556
1557
1558
1559
1560
1561
1562
1563
1564
1565
1566
1567
1568
1569
1570
1571
1572
1573
1574
1575
1576
1577
1578
1579
1580
1581
1582
1583
1584
1585
1586
1587
1588
1589
1590
1591
1592
1593
1594
1595
1596
1597
1598
Victoria, B.C	
Ranfurly, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C.-
Biggar, Sask	
Montreal, Que	
Vancouver, B.C.Vancouver, B.C...
Spokane, Wash.—
Regina, Sask	
Winnipeg, Man	
Nelson, B.C..	
Larkhall, Scotland ...
Fort William, Ont. -
Sidney, B.C  	
Port Moody, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
Grand Forks, B.C.-.
Vancouver, B.C —
Holland 	
Prince Albert, Sask..
Trail, B.C  	
Prince Rupert, B.C..
Vancouver, B.C	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Camsack, Sask	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Edmonton, Alta	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Shoal Lake, Man	
Prince Rupert, B.C...
Prince Rupert, B.C.-.
Poland  	
Edmonton, Alta	
Sheffield, England-
Toronto, Ont	
Lillooet, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Holdfast, Sask	
Winnipeg, Man	
Vancouver, B.C	
Ocean Falls, B.C	
Powell River, B.C.	
Prince Rupert, B.C...
Prince Rupert, B.C.-
Prince Rupert, B.C...
Toledo, Oregon	
English-Scotch	
English-American-
English-Scotch	
Irish-English	
English-Canadian...
Austrian _.
English-Canadian...
English-Canadian...
Roumanian	
Polish  	
English 	
English-Scotch .
English 	
Indian	
English-Canadian ..
Scotch 	
English-Russian-
English	
Dutch _
English-Scotch	
Irish-Norwegian.
English 	
English-Canadian-
Scotch	
Russian. 	
Canadian	
English	
Ukrainian-French.
Canadian 	
Indian 	
English	
Scotch  	
Indian 	
Polish	
Ukrainian-Polish	
English-German	
Canadian-French	
Canadian-American.
Chinese	
German-Russian..
Scotch 	
French-Indian	
Scotch-Canadian-
Indian  —	
Indian 	
Williams Lake, B.C.
English-American..
Norwegian-Indian .
Canadian	
Indian .... 	
Years.
Life.
14
Life.
2
4
Life.
8
1
11
14
Life.
8
3
Life.
Life.
2 mos.
12
Life.
1
12
10
Life.
Life.
5
13
11
Life.
1 mo.
11
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
10
7
2 mos.
5 mos.
Life.
Life.
8
7 mos.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
' Life.
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
8
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
Life.
14
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1937-38.
R 9
LIST OF BOYS COMMITTED—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
Admission
previous to
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1599
Years.
8
Life.
Life.
16
Life.
9
6
7
Life.
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
8
14
10
16
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
9
Life.
10
11
Life.
Years.
8
1600
Life.
1601
Grand Forks, B.C.
Life.
1602
Kisbey, Sask.  	
Harrison Mills, B.C. _ 	
Life.
1603
Life.
1604
Life.
1605
6
1606
Life.
1607
Victoria, B.C.
Life.
1608
Port Douglas, B.C.
Life.
1609
Life.
1610
12
1611
Life.
1612
Life.
1613
Life.
1614
Life.
1615
New Westminster, B.C  	
Life.
1616
French.  	
Life.
1617
14
1618
Kitwanga, B.C.  	
Life.
1619
Life.
1620
Indian    	
Life.
1621
Life.
1622
Dutch   ■        ' ____	
Life.
1623
Life.
1624
1625
Spalding, Sask.   	
Halifax, N.S.
Swedish-Norwegian    -
Life.
Life.
1626
1627
Creston, B.C   __._
Quesnel, B.C   	
Indian    -
Canadian _ _   —
Indian    	
Life.
Life.
1628
Life.
1629
Victoria, B.C.
Life.
1630
Smithers, B.C                	
Life.
1631
Enderby, B.C.	
Life.
1632
1633
1634
1635
Manitoba -   	
North Vancouver, B.C. 	
Moose Jaw, Sask. _ ___      _	
Ypres, Belgium 	
English    -
American-Bulgarian  	
Scoteh    __._„
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
1636
Life.
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Burnaby     3
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Campbell River
Chilliwack 	
Enderby 	
     1
     1
     1
     1
     1
Grand Forks     2
Harrison Hot Springs	
Harrison Mills 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops 	
Lillooet	
Mission 	
Nelson 	
North Vancouver
Port Alberni 	
New Westminster
     1
     1
Port Simpson      1
Powell River      2
Prince George     3
     1
  10
     1
     1
    3
  28
Port Moody __
Prince Rupert
Richmond 	
Saanich 	
Trail 	
Vancouver 	
Victoria 	
Vernon 	
Williams Lake
Total  87 R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Canadian  (both)      7
English (both)   10
Scotch (both)      9
English-Irish 	
Scotch-Canadian
  1
  1
  2
  1
  2
  1
  1
  11
  1
  1
English-Scotch       7
English-American   2
English-Canadian   6
English-Russian  1
English-Belgian   1
English-Welsh   1
English-German   1
Austrian (both) 	
Roumanian (both) _
Polish  (both)  	
French  (both)  	
Dutch  (both)  	
Russian  (both) 	
Doukhobour (both)
Indian (both) 	
Irish (both) 	
Chinese (both) 	
Scotch-American   1
Irish-American   1
Irish-Canadian   1
Irish-Norwegian   1
Ukrainian-French   1
Ukrainian-Polish   1
French-Canadian   1
Canadian-American   2
German-Russian   1
French-Indian   1
Norwegian-Indian   1
Doukhobour-Polish   1
Swedish-Canadian   1
Swedish-Norwegian   1
Portuguese-American   1
American-Bulgarian   1
Total ..
87
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta   5
British Columbia   50
Belgium   1
England   1
Holland   1
Ireland   1
Manitoba   7
Nova Scotia   1
Oregon   1
Ontario   2
Poland    1
Quebec    1
Saskatchewan   11
Scotland   3
Washington   1
Total
87
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft   46
B.E. & S.      6
B. & E  10
Incorrigible      5
Retaining stolen property      2
Assault      4
Vagrancy     3
Hold-up       1
Sexual immorality      2
Carrying concealed weapons ._    1
Obstructing railway tracks __
Intoxication  	
Indecent act 	
Wilful destruction of property
Attempted rape 	
Total  87
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Indefinite   43 1 year	
3 months      3 2 years .—
4 months      1 3 years __
6 months      2
9 months      1
3
31
3
Total  87
AGES OF BOYS.
10 years
11 years
12 years
13 years
14 years
1 15 years   20
1 16 years  20
6 17 years   22
8 18 years     1
8 —
Total  87 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1937-38. R 11
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Church of England   10 Mission      1
Roman Catholic   22 Christian Reform     1
Presbyterian   14 Evangelist     2
United   21 Gospel      1
Baptist      4 Christian Science     1
Lutheran     1 Free Methodist    1
Doukhobour    2 All Saints'    1
Pentecostal      2 Seventh Day Adventist      2
Plymouth Brethren      1 —
Total  87
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  66
Number who have both parents dead     3
Number who have father living and mother dead     3
Number who have mother living and father dead     8
Number who have stepmothers      2
Number who have stepfathers      5
Total  87
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1938, the mouths of all the boys entering the
institution were carefully examined and record charts made.
" Of the seventy-two boys examined it was necessary to extract 21 hopelessly diseased
teeth, and local anaesthetic was used 29 times for relief of pain. During the year 144
amalgam fillings, 9 enamel fillings, and 117 cement fillings were inserted. Prophylactic treatments were completed for 18 boys, and 4 boys had to be treated for pyorrhoea, complicated
with severe systemic lesions. As a result of accidents, two boys had three teeth devitalized
and roots filled and treated.
" All patients were taught proper methods of brushing and caring for the teeth, and I
believe the services rendered will be of great future benefit in assisting these boys to become
useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
MEDICAL REPORT.
The medical staff has given cheerful and untiring service throughout the year, coming
promptly when called for emergencies and attending to routine visits carefully. The services
of Mr. Spence, trained in this type of work, have been very much appreciated by the staff
and boys, and he has been of considerable assistance to the attending doctors.
Once more we are pleased to note that the results of the Kahn tests have shown negative
in all but one case. In this case, a positive reaction was secured, and when followed by a
spinal fluid test congenital syphilis was discovered. The boy was promptly transferred to a
hospital equipped to handle such cases.    In every other case a clear sheet was given.
Four boys were referred to the  chest  clinic for  examination  on  the  advice  of  the
doctor attending, but here again we are pleased to report that no active cases were discovered.
The following is a list of cases which required hospital attention or special services:—
Tonsil operations   9
Circumcision   2
Impetigo  1
Abrasions resulting from accident   1
Eye test and glasses  3
Beyond a few common colds and minor accidents, to which all healthy boys are subject,
we have nothing to report and feel that, on the whole, we had what might be described as a
" healthy year." For this we must thank the doctors and, of course, the nourishing and
well-balanced meals provided by our cooks. R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—The boys attending school were divided into two groups as in previous years, the
upper grades attending the morning session and the lower grades the afternoon. The number
fluctuated a great deal, the highest number on the roll being thirty-three and the lowest
seventeen. Thirteen of the total were found to be of a definitely low mental age, but of this
number a fair percentage were good, steady workers, and by the end of the term had accomplished more than some of the boys rated normal, thus indicating that native intelligence is
no final value of the individual's worth.
" Some of the boys, although still under fifteen, had left school before coming here.
Others had attended spasmodically. These and other factors made it very difficult to place
them in their proper grade and much individual work had to be done. We had the picture
of a boy doing Grade VI. arithmetic, Grade V. reading, Grade IV. language, etc., yet being
rated Grade VI. Giving the latter grading was found to restore self-confidence and a desire
to continue school-work.
" Intelligence tests were given to every boy entering the institution. The average
Intelligence Quotient for the year was 89;   somewhat higher than the preceding year.
" School-boys of the upper grades were required to read at least two library books a
month and then make a report. At first, some did not like the idea, as they had been in the
habit of doing no reading, or, at the most, stories relating to crime. They were surprised
to find that books of a higher calibre could be just as interesting. Not a few have become
regular readers of good books.
" Eric W. Blagburn."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Again we have found a number of boys interested in this department, and have done our
best to train them so that they might be able to fill junior positions after leaving us.
Unfortunately, the employment situation has been most discouraging, and we have boys
who would have made excellent junior cooks who have had to take routine-work in various
fields in order to keep afloat.
One or two of the boys could secure nothing in any line of work, and were forced to
accept the temporary expedient of a forestry camp. While these are excellent in their way,
the fact that they are non-permanent and that the same old struggle must be entered into
with each break of the season mitigates against the success of young people trying to make
a place for themselves in the world. We do hope that the next year will see a brighter
horizon and that we will feel justified in definitely training boys for positions which may be
available for them when they are trained.
The following sample menus illustrate the type of meal served to the boys:—
Breakfast.—Cream of wheat, toast and butter, jam, coffee, milk.
Dinner.—Roast beef and gravy, potatoes, turnips, rice and raisin pudding, bread and
butter, tea, milk.
Supper.—Spaghetti and tomatoes, bread and butter, stewed peaches, cookies, tea, milk.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
(1.)   Office and school supplies  $977.85
(2.)  Travelling expenses   2,085.63
Gas, oil, and repairs  333.75
(3.)   Purchase of clothing   991.83
Shoe-shop supplies   450.69
Tailor-shop supplies   185.71
(4.)  Janitor supplies and maintenance of grounds   403.10
(5.)  Light  822.00
Heat  2,400.00
Water   439.65
(6.)   Provisions   8,506.35
(7.)   Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and operation expenses  1,435.87
Dental—Dentist's salary and supplies   600.00
Carried forward   $19,632.43 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1937-38. R 13
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST—Continued.
Brought forward   $19,632.43
(8.)   Laundry   999.65
(9.)   Feed for stock   330.65
(10.)   Purchase of live stock   Nil
(11.)  Vocational supplies for various departments   353.74
(12.)   Incidentals and contingencies        1,256.08
'      Salaries     27,621.84
Total expenditure, Vote 151   $50,194.39
Expenditure, Public Works        3,166.28
Depreciation of stock   129.16
Total expenditure for year  $53,489.83
Total amount of revenue for year—
Board and room   $1,539.19
Municipality receipts      3,888.80
       5,427.99
$48,061.84
Per capita cost for the year 1937-38, $2.86.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—I submit the annual report of the tailor-shop for the year 1937-38.
" Considering the inexperience of the boys who attended the tailor-shop classes they have
done very well, having grasped the fundamentals of sewing, cleaning, pressing, and the use
of a sewing-machine.    Three boys worked steadily in the shop and forty-one attended the
classes.
" The year's work consisted of the making of 101 pairs of overalls, 44 pairs of tweed
pants, 179 pairs of shorts, 13 pairs of football shorts, 67 sheets, 113 pillow-covers, 56 tea-
towels, 78 aprons, 11 lacrosse protectors, 4 hoover aprons, and 50 mattress-covers. In
addition, 24 suits and 73 pairs of pants were cleaned and pressed, and various articles of
clothing and linen were brought to the tailor-shop for repairs.
" J. Henderson,
Tailor."
Shoemaking Department.
" Sir,—I submit my annual report for the fiscal year 1937-38. The result of the year's
work and training has been very encouraging, much interest being shown in the work by
the boys attending the classes.
" An average of three boys have worked full time during the year for periods of two,
three, and four months. Seventy-two boys have attended classes and were given a course
in theory and practical shoemaking and repairing with good results.
" During the year 96 pairs of shoes and 91 pairs of slippers were made and 445 pairs
of shoes were repaired. Another duty of the shoe-shop boys was to keep the harness and
sports equipment well repaired.
" J. Osborne,
Shoemaker."
Blacksmith and Sheet-metal Department.
" SIR,—In submitting my annual report for the year 1937-38, I should like to remark on
the interest shown by the boys in the blacksmith and sheet-metal classes.
" The quality of the products, which varied from ash-trays and pokers to sieves and
cookie cutters, was very encouraging, and it has been a pleasure to note the pride which each
boy has taken in the articles of his own manufacture.
"W. J. Scott,
Instructor." R 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Greenhouse and Gardens.
" Sir,—Keen interest in the various methods of cultivation of flowers and vegetables has
been shown by the boys who have worked with me this year, and the results of their labours
have been very satisfactory. In addition, I believe the information which they have gathered
will prove very useful to them in the future.
" An increase in farm produce over last year, in spite of decreased area under cultivation, can be explained by the fact that fertilizer was used quite lavishly and hoeing and
weeding kept pace with growth.
"Produce from Garden.—Potatoes, 3 tons; carrots, 1% tons; onions, 1,000 lb.; beets,
540 lb.; green beans, 600 lb.; broad beans, 320 lb.; green peas, 25 lb.; turnips, 100 lb.;
cabbage, 300 lb.; spinach, 50 lb.; rhubarb, 200 lb.; lettuce, 1,500 heads; celery-sticks, 600;
parsley, 25 lb.;   pumpkins, 180 lb.;   cucumber, 75 lb.;   marrow, 500 lb.
" W. J. Scott,
Gardener."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—This department has showed marked improvement in many ways during the past
year. The enrolment per month has increased to such an extent that it has been necessary
to break the class up into two groups. The school is now providing four classes per week
instead of two as previously.
" Our shop has been renovated to make it possible for the actual work to be done on
automobiles, which previously was carried out in the form of theory.
" Although we are hoping for improvement in the near future in the way of equipment,
it is very gratifying to see the attitude being displayed by the classes at the present time.
Every day is opening up new avenues of progress in the minds of the boys under instruction
and very few dull moments are experienced.
" At the time of writing this report a piece of work is under way requiring the fitting
of rings, honing out of cylinders, fitting wrist-pins, taking up main and connecting-rod
bearings, grinding valves, replacing a broken spring, installation of shock absorbers, and
adjustment of brakes. Now what young man with the slightest spark of enthusiasm would
not be delighted to see completed each part of this job and hear how smoothly the car will
run when put back together and tuned up?
" Several days ago a generator problem came up for attention. The ammeter showed
a heavy charging rate and, according to information given by the owner, it had no previous
work done on it. Now why should this generator behave this way? A few minutes disclosed
a very dirty set of brushes and the commutator-bars needed to be dressed up.
" So many of these problems come up during the month that numerous questions relating
to future work are on the way before the ones in hand are completed.
" From our experiences so far in giving these instructions to boys of this age, we feel
that we are laying the foundation for future employment in a varied field, which includes
Diesel engineering, aeronautics, and electrical engineering.
" D. W. Munro,
Instructor."
Wood-working Department.
" Sir,—The end of this year finds the woodwork department swinging along in good
routine fashion. With a new supply of excellent tools at the beginning of the year and a
pleasant shop, the classes in woodwork have attained a fair standard of accomplishment. A
similar statement can be made for the classes in draughting. Classes in this subject were
regular for the best part of the year, but lately have fallen off due to small enrolment and
the fact that my hours for class-work in the shop are restricted. However, if the need
becomes great, some means will undoubtedly be found to give this instruction.
" One indication of accomplishment is the group of projects turned out—a variety of
models such as in any manual training course, a standard sized lacrosse box which was
built in two months last summer, several general carpenter jobs about the school itself, and
the odd appurtenance for the shop.
" The interest which the boys have shown in their class-work has been a great reward
for the effort that I have made to instruct them. Their enthusiasm has been truly gratifying.
Their work, of course, being entirely of an objective nature, has attracted them to the degree REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1937-38.       R 15
that I have had perfect attendance. Under the monthly trade optional system, my classes
have enjoyed such popularity that groups of boys have repeated their attendance in woodwork
and draughting month after month.
" My endeavour has been to fulfil each and every need. Each class, containing boys
at varied stages of learning and of various degrees of mental ability, required a great deal
of individual instruction. For the older boys the spirit of the work has been pre-vocational,
while to the younger boys I have tried to convey the fundamentals of manual training. From
the results so far achieved, it would appear that this department is fulfilling a real need in
the essential purpose of the school.
" W. Catherall,
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—In summing up the year's work I find that it has been a year full to the brim
of athletic and social activities.
" With the coming of summer in 1937, the outdoors beckoned us all and full advantage
was taken of the fine weather and long cool evenings. Lacrosse, baseball, and soft-ball all
proved popular, and the river was a popular spot for cooling off after a hard game and one
and all paid it visits on every possible occasion.
" In all the games organized—' away,' ' home,' and ' inter-school' matches—the boys gave
of their best and deserve a great deal of credit for the exceptional showing they made. In
many of the games played they were handicapped by inexperience, but this was quickly overcome by encouragement and constant practice.
" Arrangements for games were made with a number of outside teams, Coquitlam, New
Westminster, and Vancouver being well represented. The results were always close and our
boys took a fair share of the honours.
" Days to look forward to were those when trips were arranged for the boys to visit
various places of interest. The occasional trip to the beach for a swim and a basket-lunch
proved to be very popular.
" As the fall season crept in the gymnasium and auditorium came into their own and
once more rang with excited voices as indoor games were organized. Once again, games
were arranged with visiting teams and each game was a battle from start to finish.
" As always, community singing proved very popular and voices of every range were
raised with gusto on many an evening. Our concert party was gathered together and the
members of it coached on every possible occasion, three nights a week being set aside for
practice. They were called upon to do their bit at the Christmas tree concert held at the
Western Sports Centre in Vancouver. In spite of the fact that there were more experienced
artists on the same programme, their performance gained them a radio audition, which was
sponsored by the Junior G. Men, and they were placed on several broadcasts from a Vancouver
station.
" Recalling our Christmas activities, I find we are deeply indebted to a number of friends
who so ably entertained the boys and a number of guests. Our appreciation for their kind
interest and fine performance goes to the members of the Westminster Male Choir and the
Junior G. Men's concert party, under the direction of Constable Eveleigh. Christmas Day
itself proved to be a very merry one which was enjoyed by the staff as well as the boys.
" As a finishing touch to our winter athletic season, we have arranged a series of football
and basket-ball games and swimming meets. Competition is keen and each team is battling
to reach the finals.
" In conclusion, I wish to say that the boys deserve a great deal of credit for the
sportsmanship they have shown in their games and the co-operation they have displayed in
the various activities planned for them. It has been a pleasure to help and advise them
throughout the year.
" W. R. Jones,
Instructor." R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BAND NOTES.
" Sir,—Although we have been unable to develop a band during the past year, a great
deal of interest has been displayed in the band practices.    Approximately eighty-three boys
have attended, and of these we hope a goodly number have received sufficient instruction to
encourage them to continue with band music when they leave the school.
" J. W. Rushton,
Bandmaster."
REPORT OF FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" Sie,—Another year with its scores of problems has passed, and in summarizing the work
of the year certain facts stand out in relief and should be commented on.
" The placing of girls has always been relatively easy. The school turns out well-trained
house workers and the demand exceeds the supply. Only one flaw appears in the picture,
and that flaw is the front page publicity which is given to all those who leave the school
without permission. As a result of one such advertisement the demand for graduates ceased
for several weeks, and four or five girls who had been successfully placed were " let out "
because they had once belonged to the group which gained the front page headlines.
" Placing of boys has been most difficult for the past year. People still prefer a " bright "
boy even for dull routine jobs and most of our boys are not in that class. What we are to
do with the mediocre and poor group is a problem, if industry cannot or will not absorb them,
and in a competitive state one can scarcely expect this. The forestry and mining camps of
the Department of Labour have again come to the rescue but, unfortunately, these are
seasonal, and the younger folk need steady employment if they are to become solid citizens.
" The group between sixteen and eighteen present a real problem. They are eligible for
apprenticeship it is true, but what employer would choose a dull normal boy with Grade VI.
or VII. standing as an apprentice when he can secure a lad with a technical or a matriculation
certificate for the same wage? They do secure delivery jobs until they are eighteen and then
the old round starts once more. It is well enough to say that they should remain in school.
Some of them hate school so violently that to keep them there is a rank injustice to teachers
and other pupils. Yet a place must be found for them unless we are to raise the compulsory
school-age to eighteen. It is a problem to all countries, but no satisfactory solution has yet
been reached.
" The spread of the physical education classes, the growing number of clubs and community houses, and the increasing interest in team games all tend to help in the process of
rehabilitation, but work has no genuine substitute.
" The following outline of activities will help complete a picture of the year's work:—
Visits to homes  1,128
Visits to office      713
Business calls and interviews       699
Telephone calls       885
" While follow-up work is our major duty, prevention is ever in our minds and much
time is spent each year in helping parents with behaviour problems before they reach the
commitment stage. This branch of the work should increase very rapidly and would have
reached huge proportions by now had we had the staff and the time to comply with the
requests that have reached us.
" Once more I should point out that the work is beyond the power of one person. With
no clerical assistance, regular written reports are impossible if the calls for help are to be
answered.    It is unfortunate that the records have to suffer but the human side conies first.
" Again I would like to express my gratitude to the social workers of the public and
private agencies who have co-operated so readily with me during the year. To the many
members of the Department of the Provincial Secretary, with whom it has been my privilege
to work during the year, I wish to extend my most sincere thanks. Thanks are also due
to the Minister of Labour and to many of the members of his staff who have assisted in the
work of placement cheerfully and effectively.
" Realizing that I have not been able to do all that I would like to have done, I can
look back on some genuinely happy results and shall look forward to bigger and better things
in the new year.
"K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
425-738-5015

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