Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1938

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0307492.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0307492.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0307492-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0307492-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0307492-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0307492-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0307492-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0307492-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0307492-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0307492.ris

Full Text

 TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PEO VINCI AL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR CIRLS
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1937, TO MARCH 31ST, 1938
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1938.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1938.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls from April 1st,
1937, to March 31st, 1938.
The past year has been more difficult than the previous three or four, which may be due
to several causes. The general unrest is bound to have an influence; the girls, though not
older in years, are more experienced, and there is a feeling of " nothing to lose, so why not
be reckless." The majority of them have been members of families on relief with only the
bare necessities and little in way of pleasures, so any that were offered were taken, even if
questionable.    Too much idle time and no resources.
We have had more absentees, without leave, than usual, and valuable time that should
have been used for planning and training is wasted looking for them. We continue to search
for them until they are found because we fear what may happen to them, not that they are
liable to be involved in breaking the law.
One of our improvements this year has been enrolment of most of our new girls in the
Government Correspondence Course under the Department of Education at Victoria. This
has been so helpful and satisfactory. Formerly, when a girl came in late in the term she was
under a disadvantage, and in helping her the others were delayed. Now she can be enrolled
as soon as we receive her last school principal's report, and her progress depends on her application to work. She also has to do more delving for herself, although the teacher is always
there to direct and assist. We have seven in the regular Grade VIIL who will be writing
their examinations, and six of these are so well on with their work that they are practically
sure of high school entrance. More time has been given to academic training and keen
interest has been maintained throughout the entire year. Our school grades ranged from
Grade IV. to Grade XL, inclusive, also commercial course.
Our first aid and home-nursing classes are still of great interest and the girls prize their
certificates.
We have had many enjoyable programmes brought to us by the Women's Musical Society,
Philharmonic, Red Cross, and several private parties. The Child Welfare Association came
again this year and gave our girls a wonderful evening, an excellent programme, lavish
refreshments including candy, also gifts. The Social Workers' Club of Vancouver held their
annual meeting as usual in our building, approximately eighty being present. Their contribution to our library was very acceptable. Our sale of lavender provided a good collection of
new books for the library also, and many of the girls who had not been interested in reading
now look forward to library nights. The duties of librarian are assumed by a senior girl
under the supervision of Miss Peck, teacher.
Our " Open Day " in November brought many interested visitors who appeared to enjoy
the cantata, " King of the Seasons," put on by the girls.
There have been hikes and long rides in the truck kindly loaned from the Boys' School,
and all holidays have been celebrated appropriately.
Preparations for Christmas were on a larger scale because of our increased population.
The girls had made lavender novelties for mothers and calendars for fathers, and these were
attractively wrapped and sent out with their Christmas letters. We had our tree on Christmas Eve with gifts for all. The W.C.T.U., Salvation Army, Child Welfare Association as
usual sent in gifts wrapped and individually named. There were, also, remembrances from
other private parties. We are still receiving donations of current magazines which are
appreciated. U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We are made welcome at both Catholic and Protestant churches in our vicinity, and the
girls are always anxious to attend the services on Sunday morning. Sunday afternoon interesting teachers for both religions are arranged for, and an hour of song and Bible story is
enjoyed. Thursday evening an hour of instruction in religious education is provided by the
same group of young women who have been supplying for the past eight years. Seven
Catholic girls are preparing for first communion.
Twenty-eight girls completed their training and were released on probation. There is
no difficulty in placing our girls; in fact, there is a waiting list for our graduates. Their
wages run from $15 to $25 per month with room, board, and laundry, suitable living conditions, working-hours and recreation-time. There is a friendly supervision maintained, and
the girls know they can contact us day or night if in difficulty. Their employers also realize
that they are not dealing with friendless girls. Suitable clothing is provided, which is an
asset to the girls and approved of by her employer. Many of our girls marry young, and this
training has helped them to be better wives, mothers, and home managers.
In closing, I gratefully acknowledge the kindly thoughtfulness and co-operation of the
Government departments with whom I have been working.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
j Vegetables.
Potatoes, 15,158 lb  $250.85
Peas, 554 lb  27.70
Beans, 440 lb  21.00
Beets, 1,200 lb  21.00
Vegetable marrow, 1,090 lb 1  21.90
Tomatoes, ripe, 820 lb.   50.00
Cucumbers, 98   6.00
Cabbage, 515 heads  51.50
Onions, green, 67 bunches  2.90
Onions, 560 lb  14.65
Lettuce, 310 heads  20.60
Radish, 24 bunches   .60
Corn, 3,072 ears   38.30
Turnips, 3,000 lb.   38.70
Cauliflower, 135 heads  17.70
Carrots, 3,827 lb  47.85
Parsnips, 3,450 lb  51.00
Brussels sprouts, 120 lb.   15.00
Spinach, 44 lb  1.35
Manure, 12 loads  36.00
Lavender, 10 lb .... 10.00
$744.60
Fruit.
Apples, 196 lb .  $5.60
Cherries, 59 lb  5.90
Raspberries, 68 lb.  10.40
Rhubarb, 300 lb  15.00
Loganberries, 13 lb.  1.30
$38.20 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1937-38. U 7
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1938.
On roll April 1, 1937  41
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938  38
79
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  20
Released on becoming 21 years of age     1
Recidivist—cancelled     1
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital     1
Transferred to Children's Aid Society     1
Cancelled     4
— 28
Total in School, March 31st, 1938  51
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1938.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1937, to March 31st, 1938  16,663
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year    $599.2205
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  1.6417
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year      546.5145
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day         1.4973
Operating expenditure by voucher—■
Salaries      14,338.88
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies   $290.76
Telephone and telegraph     145.63
  436.39
Travelling expenses  512.33
Farm operations   880.32
Household equipment (other than furniture)  :  335.58
Clothing—■
Clothing   $662.03
Boots and shoes  .     235.46
  897.49
Janitors' supplies   302.23
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel  .  $2,120.72
Water         353.30
Light and power         516.12
       2,990.14
Provisions—
Groceries   $4,276.69
Meat      1,126.28
Fish         138.51
Medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical supplies   $193.70
Surgery  :  280.00
Dental cost  308.00
5,541.48
781.70
Good Conduct Fund          101.95
Incidentals and contingencies   242.20
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $27,360.69
Carried forward   $27,360.69 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1938—Continued.
Brought forward  $27,360.69
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)       1,805.93
Inventory, March 31st, 1937       1,013.18
$30,179.80
Less board and rent  $2,463.62
Less other receipts  47.34
Less inventory, March 31st, 1938        311.94
       2,822.90
$27,356.90
Less Revenue Account (maintenance of inmates)  .      2,406.90
Net cost of inmates' maintenance to Government  $24,950.00 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1937-38.
U 9
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1937, TO MARCH 31st, 1938.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Length of Term.
441
452
486
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
Vancouver, B.C.Edmonton, Alta..
Arran, Sask..	
Scotch	
Unknown .
Russian —
Vernon, B.C. 	
Vancouver, B.C  	
Vancouver, B.C.- 	
Vancouver, B.C.—  	
Canim Lake, B.C 	
Fort William, Ont 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C  	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Yahk, B.C  	
Edmonton, Alta 	
Vancouver, B.C  	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Edmonton, Alta  	
Vernon, B.C	
Edmonton, Alta 	
Morden, Man 	
Winnipeg, Man..	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C..-	
Vancouver, B.C	
Armstrong, B.C 	
Victoria, B.C  	
Brentwood, B.C. (Indian Re.
serve)	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Calgary, Alta—	
Winnipeg, Man	
Moose Jaw, Sask._. 	
United States 	
Regina, Sask..	
Samos, Jugo-Slavia..
Atida, Sask 	
Scotch 	
English 	
English-Irish	
American	
Swedish-French..
Polish 	
Canadian-Negro	
Swedish-Canadian	
Scotch-Canadian,
Canadian
Swedish  ___
Russian-English	
English 	
Chilean-Half-breed
English	
Canadian  	
Canadian-English	
Dutch-Canadian	
English :	
English-Irish	
Japanese	
American	
French-Indian	
Canadian-Half-breed
English-Canadian	
Victoria, B.C 	
North Battleford, Sask..
Indian - _	
English 	
English-Scotch	
English-Canadian-
Ukrainian	
German 	
Irish-Canadian,
Polish
Serbian-Slav	
Canadian-English-
English  	
American 	
Years.
16V2
10
12
16%
16%
16
15
15
14
16
15
16%
15%
12
16
13
14
17
5/12
8/12
2
17
15 y2
17%
17
13
14
16
14l/2
14
13
17
8
17%
15
11
Years.'
i6y2
15
i5y2
16%
16%
16
15
15
17%
16
15
16%
15%
16
16
13
17
17
14
16
13
17
15%
17y2
17
13
16%
16
14%
14%
161/2
17i/o
15
17%
11
14%
15
12
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
2   years   or   until   otherwise   discharged.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Undefined;   not less than 2 years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
See. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Not less than 2 years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 16, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Undefined;   not less than 2 years.
Nine months.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Undefined;   not less than 2 years.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
J.D.A.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
Not more than 3 years. U 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY
English (both)      6
OF PARENTS.
Norwegian-English
1
Scotch (both)     2
English-Irish
2
American (both)                   3
Swedish-French
1
Indian (both)      1
Swedish-Canadian
1
Polish (both)        .._    1
Russian-English	
Chilean-Indian
1
German (both)      1
1
Negro (both)      1
Canadian-Indian	
     1
Swedish (both)      1
French-Indian
1
Dutch-Canadian (both)      1
English-Scotch
1
Japanese (both)     ....    1
Irish-Canadian, Polish
Serbian-Slav
1
Ukrainian (both)      1
1
Russian (both)       1
Unknown
1
Scotch-Canadian  ...    1
Total 	
WERE BORN.
United States
English-Canadian                ..2
38
Canadian-English   .     ..    2
WHERE GIRLS
British Columbia  23
1
Alberta        5
Jugo-Slavia    ..
1
Saskatchewan     5
Manitoba      3
Total  ...
  38
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigibility   24
Sexual immorality   4
Assault   2
Unsatisfactory ward  2
Obstructing police   1
Theft   1
Vagrancy   1
Selling intoxicating liquor   1
Robbery with violence  1
Transferred from Protestant
Children's Aid Society as incorrigible   1
Total   38
Castlegar   1
Creston  1
Lumby   1
Mission  1
Murrayville   1
North Vancouver   1
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
     1 Nelson	
Vancouver __
Victoria 	
Total
1
26
5
38
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Juvenile Delinquents' Act     1
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 16, J.D.A. _
Two years	
Undefined;   not
years 	
Two  years  or
discharged ...
1929
26
1
1
less than two
until  otherwise
1
Not more than three years     1
Nine months—transferred from
Oakalla	
Industrial Home for Girls Act-
Total
1
2
38
13 years
14 years
15 years.
    3
    4
    8
16 years  13
AGES OF GIRLS.
17 years
10
Total   38 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1937-38. U 11
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Apostolic     1 Pentecostal      1
Baptist   1 Presbyterian      3
Church of England  6 Roman Catholic   11
Doukhobor   1 United Church   11
Greek Orthodox   1 —
Lutheran   2 Total   38
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  .  27
Number who have father living, mother dead      6
Number who have mother living, father dead     2
Number who have foster-parents      3
Total  38
Of the above, the parents of 8 girls are separated;   of 1 are divorced;   1 remarried;
stepfathers, 3;   stepmothers, 2.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
Teacher and Supervisor Miss Ayra E. Peck.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Linen-keeper  Miss Katherine M. Smith.
Attendant'(Sewing Supervisor)  Miss M. E. Murray.
Dietitian Miss Myrtle Moar.
Junior Supervisor  Miss Margaret Patterson.
Daily Supervisor Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener Henry Philip.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent. U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1937,
to March 31st, 1938:—
Calls made by physician   53
Patients seen by physician, including treatments  382
Complete physical examination  -.  45
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection  11
Smears taken for Neisser infection  _■_  120
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman   72
Treatment for syphilis intravenously   82
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously   2
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection   261
Argyrol and silver nitrate treatments for Neisser infection   334
Urine tests   69
X-rays     2
Chest Clinic   2
Vaccination     23
Basal metabolism   2
Tonsillectomy     5
Sexual sterilization   1
Maternity cases (2 boys, 1 girl)  ,  3
Examination by eye specialist   3
Glasses provided   3
Abscesses opened and drained   3
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a
complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School for Girls
during the year ending March 31st, 1938:—
Visits to dentist   17
Number of girls seen   51
Amalgam fillings  1  65
Cement fillings   73
Extractions     32
Cleanings   .     4
Novacaine administrations   43
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Dr. Stanley McQueen. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1937-38. U 13
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following report applies to the period between April 1st, 1937, and
March 31st, 1938:—
Morning Class (9 a.m. to 12 noon).—The average monthly attendance was twelve and the
total time 5,539 hours.
The girls who are capable of doing the work of Grades I. to VII. are enrolled in this
group.
During the latter part of the year six girls commenced the Elementary Correspondence
Course for Grade VII.
Afternoon Class (1 p.m. to 4 p.m.).—The average monthly attendance was eleven and the
total time 5,424 hours.
This group follows the Grade VIIL curriculum. Three girls have recently been enrolled
in the Elementary Correspondence Course for Grade VIIL
The girls have been very interested in their work, and six will be recommended to high
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following are movements of high-school pupils from April 1st, 1937,
to March 31st, 1938:—
Number enrolled   19
Grade IX.   15
Grade X.      3
Grade XI.  '.      1
19
Girls leaving during term      9
Girls in class at present   10
Four girls received certificates of partial standing.
Subjects taken in all grades include social studies, English literature, English grammar
and composition, hygiene.    Of these girls twelve also enrolled in Home Economics, one in
Art, and nine in Commerce.    This is the third year that the girls have taken the High School
Correspondence Course. _   _
Ayra E. Peck,
School-teacher and Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—On main floor the girls receive training in the proper care of walls,
windows, floors, furniture, etc., in library, assembly-room, smaller sitting-rooms and dining-
room, adjoining which is the serving-room where meals are served cafeteria under supervision.
Very soon after commitment the girls are taught to knit, as few of them have mastered
this art. They commence on their blue coat-sweaters, and when finished to my satisfaction,
they then proceed to select colour and design for a three-piece knitted suit with cap or hat
and purse to match.
During the past year they have completed twenty-nine sweaters, thirty-one suits, and
two knitted rugs.    This work is carefully inspected, and these suits are the pride of the girls
and often the envy of their visitors.
Agnes Craig Oxley,
First Assistant. U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dear Madam,—The entire laundry for the School during the year has been done by
fifty-four girls, under supervision. The number working in the laundry at one time averages
eight and the number of hours worked 4,995 hours.
The work is progressive, the newcomers taking charge of their own clothes and working
up to Superintendent and staff uniforms.
The number of articles which pass through their hands weekly averages 4,732, making a
total for the year of 56,795.
This training fits the girls for work in a commercial laundry, or entire charge of laundry
in a private home.
Katherine M. Smith,
Linen-keeper.
Dear Madam,—The annual musical event was held on November 24th, when a group of
eighteen girls took part in the cantata, " The King of the Seasons," in costume. This was a
very pretty and tuneful work, illustrating" spring, summer, autumn, and winter with solos,
duets, and choruses. The costumes were very effective, being designed and made by Miss
Murray and Miss Peck, with the help of some of the girls who were to wear them.
The girls learnt the music and dialogue in short periods of half an hour before 8 a.m.
and at the weekly singing-class on Wednesdays, starting in May, so the whole atmosphere of
" The Seasons " was absorbed gradually, and in consequence there was nothing strenuous in
the rehearsals.
Hymns for the Sunday afternoon services are learnt during the daily singing period
from 7.30 a.m. to 7.45, and on Wednesdays from 7.30 p.m. till 8.30 p.m. A small group of
girls who are interested learn to sing in two and three parts, entirely by ear. This class is
not compulsory, so attendance varies considerably.
Katherine M. Smith,
Director of Music.
Dear Madam,—During the past year nineteen girls received a full training in the
sewing-room.
They accomplished all the sewing for the School, which included the making of 762
personal garments, 384 articles for dormitory floor, 146 articles for the dining-room, 24 pairs
of curtains, and 1,038 miscellaneous articles, the latter being distributed chiefly on medical
floor and in the kitchen.
Every girl is responsible for keeping her own garments in good repair. Many of them
are taught to darn their first stockings here.
Each in turn is taught to make simple garments and, if interested, is carried on into
more advanced work.    They all take great pride in the making of their going-home frocks.
Also the girls are trained to hemstitch, embroider, and crochet. This is carried on more
extensively during the winter months when outside interests do not demand so much of
their time.
Mabel E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—During the year twenty-five girls received their kitchen training. This
included the preparation and serving of meals, menu planning, and the general kitchen
routine work. In addition, 600 quarts of fruit were preserved, and 50 quarts of marmalade
and 400 quarts of pickles made. The School bakery produced an average of 170 loaves of
bread per week.
The poultry department provided 2,003 dozen eggs, 39 hens weighing 230 lb., 84 cockerels
weighing 503 lb., and 6 turkeys weighing 93 lb.
Myrtle M. Moar,
Dietitian. VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.
425-838-5350     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0307492/manifest

Comment

Related Items