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PART A ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1938

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 PAET A
ANNUAL REPORT
MINISTER OF MINES
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRUTISH COLUMBIA
Year Ended 31st December
1937
TUINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA. B.C. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. J. Asselstine, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
D. E. Whittaker, Chief Assayer and Analyst.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner. To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber, -
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1937 is herewith
respectfully submitted.
W. J. ASSELSTINE,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office,
April, 1938.   Gold nugget weighing 52 oz. 15 dwt., found on Vern Shea
claim on a tributary of Boulder Creek in the Turnagain
River area east of Dease Lake. Discovered by Vern Shea
in 1937, and now in the possession of the Department of
Mines, British Columbia. (Illustration one-half natural
size.)
Crystalline gold from the Zeballos area, presented to the
Department of Mines by the late Albert Bloom. (Illustration natural size.)
Gold nugget weighing 46 oz. 5 dwt. from Discovery claim
on Squaw Creek in the Atlin Mining Division. Found by
E. Peterson and Barney Turbitt in 1937. (Illustration
one-half natural size.)   PART A.
THE MINING INDUSTRY.
BY
John F. Walker.
The value of mine production in 1937 was $74,475,902, an increase of $20,393,935 over
1936. The increase is largely due to abnormally high base-metal prices prevailing throughout the greater part of the year. This is clearly shown in the case of lead, where the volume
increase amounted to 10.9 per cent, and the value increase 44.8 per cent. All phases of the
mining industry have shown increases in both volume and value.
Lead production has again stepped into the lead, with an all-time record in volume of
419,118,371 lb., valued at $21,416,949, this being the greatest value attained in the history
of mining in the Province for any one metal or material in. a single year.
Both lode and placer gold have again shown appreciable increases, and once again a new
record has been established with an output of 514,934 oz., valued at $17,680,972.
Zinc production, which in 1936 fell slightly below the 1935 volume record, has again shown
an appreciable increase, and established a new all-time record with a production of 291,192,278
lb., valued at $14,274,245. This shows an increase of 14.4 per cent, in volume and 69.1 per
cent, in value.
Coal, valued at $6,139,920, shows a smaller increase over 1936 than did the production
in 1936 over 1935.
Copper, which in 1936 had decreased both in volume and in value to the lowest point
since 1900, has, with the return of Britannia to full capacity and the reopening of Copper
Mountain, shown an even better recovery during 1937 than was anticipated. Volume production increased 121.4 per cent, and value production 205.5 per cent. The latter, however,
was due to abnormally high prices for copper.
Silver production in volume was the greatest in the history of the Province, with an
output of 11,308,685 oz., valued at $5,075,451. The value is considerably below that of the
peak year of 1926, when 10,748,556 oz. was valued at $6,675,606. The record volume production clearly shows that silver in British Columbia to-day is a by-product, and largely
dependent upon the production of base metals.
Non-metallic minerals and structural materials as groups show substantial increases in
value of 31 to 37 per cent., and only in a few individual items in each group has there been
any decrease.    The steady increase in the value of these materials is a healthy sign.
The total number of shipping-mines increased from 168 to 185, those shipping over 100
tons increasing from 70 to 113.
The number of men employed increased from 14,180 to 16,129, the greatest number
employed in any year; and wages and salaries increased from $17,917,221 to $21,349,690,
the greatest amount ever paid out in any year.
Dividends increased from $10,513,705 in 1936 to an all-time record of $15,085,293 in 1937.
These figures do not include dividends paid by Howe Sound Mining and Smelting Company,
parent company of the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company.
During the past four years new tables have been compiled, the first of which, Table No. I.,
appeared in the 1933 Annual Report.
For the 1934 Annual Report, Table No. VI. (now Table No. VII.), which formerly
tabulated the yield of placer gold only, was drawn up to show both placer- and lode-gold
values. This facilitates a rapid view of the total gold production of the Province. Another
table introduced in 1934, No. XXII., includes " Mining Companies employing an Average of
Ten or more Men." Incorporated in this table, additional data are presented showing the
number of operating days at mine and mill, and also tonnage mined and milled. A subsection
of the table shows operating days and average men employed at non-shipping mines employing
ten or more men.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA. B.C. A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Table No. II. was added to the Annual Report for 1936. It gives the average metal
prices used in compiling Provincial production for the years 1901 to date, for gold, silver,
copper, lead, and zinc.
Table No. IX. has been subdivided into three parts—IX.A, IX.B, and IX.C—to facilitate
reference, and IX.D, IX.E, IX.P have been added to show similar data for the period 1900-1937,
inclusive.
Table No. VIII. has been extended to cover a period of five years' production from mining
divisions and districts in place of the three-year period formerly given.
Table No. XVII., appearing for the first time in the 1936 Annual Report, has been
amended to show dividends paid from 1919 to date. The information in this table has been
obtained from departmental files, operators, and trade journals, and while in general accurate,
there may be slight differences in isolated instances.
Table No. XVIIL, also a new table introduced in 1936, sets forth capital employed,
salaries and wages, amount expended on fuel and electricity, and process supplies for the
year 1937, with comparative figures for 1936. The table shows details of such subjects by
districts, under the various classes of mining. The totals are those obtained from all returns
made to the Department on the subject, but there are some returns not received in time to be
included in the totals, nor does it take into account the amounts expended in the large number
of small operations conducted by one or two individuals or prospectors.
Table No. XIX. is a former table enlarged to show a period from 1901 to 1937, inclusive,
covering tonnage, number of mines, number of mines shipping over 100 tons, and net value to
shipper of lode-minerals. A new feature in the table also is the gross value of lode-minerals
produced. It will be observed that the " net value " is not given for the years previous to
1926;   such was not given on returns filed by operators.
Table No. XX. is a former table showing number of men employed in the mining industry.
Formerly the table gave the current year and one comparative year, but the present table
covers the period 1901 to 1937, inclusive.
GENERAL SITUATION.
It is as difficult to forecast the value of the mining industry for 1938 as it was for 1937.
At the time of writing the forecast for 1936 base-metal prices were skyrocketting, and far
above normal. At the present time base-metal prices are below what may be considered a
fair average, and it is very difficult to estimate the possibility of prices rising before the end
of the year to a level which will allow a fair average for the year.
It is anticipated that lode gold will again show an increase in volume. It appears reasonably certain that gold will again take first place in the mining industry during 1938, and will
exceed lead in value, though it is unlikely that the value of production will be equal to that
of lead for 1937.
Placer gold should show a further increase in volume and value production, and it is
interesting to note that more interest is being taken in placer-mining in British Columbia in
1938 than for many years.
Silver production may show a decrease, and it is impossible to predict what may happen
to the price for the metal before the year is out.
Copper should show a very large gain in volume, due to return to capacity production of
Britannia, and an anticipated full year's operation at the Copper Mountain property of
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company. While the average copper price
for 1938 is likely to be considerably below that for 1937, the volume increase is anticipated
to be large enough to show a value increase for the year, even at a lower metal price.
Lead production, due to a much lower price for the metal, may show a slight decrease
in volume, and it is reasonably certain that there will be an appreciable decrease in value, as
on the basis of 1937 volume productionl cent a pound means a difference in value of over
$4,000,000.
Zinc production may also show a slight decrease in volume, due to lower metal prices,
and it is almost certain that the decrease in value will be considerable, as the metal is at
present selling at almost 2 cents less per pound than the average price attained in 1937. A
1-cent variation in price based on last year's volume means a difference in value of close to
$3,000,000.
Coal may be expected to show a slight increase in volume and value. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 7
Structural materials should show a further increase in 1938.
In preparing the foregoing estimate, it is assumed that no major disaster will affect the
mining industry or any of the larger producers. If the industry functions smoothly throughout the year, it is anticipated that while the value of mine products will not be as great as
in 1937, the industry will have had a very good year.
During the past year the Whitewater property of Polaris-Taku Mining Company, Limited,
was brought into production in the far north-western part of the Province. The Big Missouri
mill, under construction during the past year, has been brought into production at the time
of writing. Placer-mining in the Atlin area has shown an improvement, and generally greater
interest is being shown in mining in the far north-west part of the Province.
The Manson section in the North-eastern Mineral Survey District was very active during
the past year, and it is anticipated that increased activity will take place in placer-mining in
that area during the coming season.
It is anticipated that development in respect to lode-gold properties in the Cariboo
district will reach greater proportions than during the boom period of a few years ago.
Placer-mining in the Cariboo area is again increasing in importance, and during the past
year more than 1,000,000 cubic yards of dirt was hydraulicked at the Bullion mine. It is
likely that several dredging possibilities will be investigated within the area during the
coming season.
In the Southern and Central Mineral Survey District, the Hedley Camp continues to
attract the greatest amount of attention. The reopening of the Copper Mountain property
of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, is creating an interest
in the Princeton area.
In the Eastern Mineral Survey District the drop in base-metal prices has affected the
interest that was being revived in the old Slocan area. However, there are sufficient mineral
showings throughout this district to attract attention at almost any time.
In the Western Mineral Survey District the most important event of the year was the
development in the Zeballos area of the west coast of Vancouver Island. During the coming
season a great deal of interest will be shown in lode-gold prospecting and development, not
only in the Zeballos area but in other places on the west coast of the Island.
The property of Pacific Nickel Mines, Limited, the old B.C. Nickel Mine, has not yet
been brought into production, but the prospects appear brighter than at this time last year.
GOLD PURCHASING.
Late in 1935 the Department of Finance, co-operating with the Department of Mines,
undertook to purchase small lots of placer gold under 2 oz. in weight from the individual
placer-miner. The Gold Commissioners throughout the Province have paid a cash price of
$28 per ounce for clean gold, and have purchased dirty gold and amalgam on a deferred-
payment basis. During 1936, 1,470 lots of gold were received by the Department through
the Gold Commissioners, of an aggregate value of some $50,000. In 1937 purchases increased
slightly to 1,657 lots, valued at approximately $52,250. The total price paid is almost exactly
the same as that received from the Royal Canadian Mint, except for the Mint's handling
charges of 1 per cent. Considering that the individual miner has received about $10,000
to $12,000 more per annum than had he sold through the ordinary channels, this service is
believed to be well justified.
DEPARTMENT LABORATORIES.
During 1936 the Assay Office was equipped with a new electric furnace and drying-oven
and other accessories to bring it thoroughly up to date. The laboratories of the Mineralogical
Branch were equipped for the first time in the history of the Department with the finest
microscopic equipment available. The work of the technical staff, Tjy reason of this new
equipment, has not only been increased in value, but the Department can offer a greater
service to the public in the examination of mill products, etc., than heretofore. The
laboratory in 1937 was equipped for research-work in respect to non-metallic and structural
materials, where preliminary investigations may be made preparatory to more intensive work
in the well-equipped laboratories of the Department of Mines in Ottawa. A 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
LECTURES TO PROSPECTORS.
A series of fourteen lectures on geology and mining, prepared by the Provincial Mineralogist in 1934, was again presented during the winter of 1937-38 by the Mining Engineers
and other instructors at the following centres throughout the Province:—
Bull River Bridge, Burnaby (2), Canyon, Creston, Grand Forks, Greenwood, Kitchener,
Nanaimo, Premier, Princeton, Revelstoke, Slocan, Vancouver (6), Victoria, Wynndel, and
Yahk.
The estimated total average attendance at the lectures prior to the completion of the
course was 660. This work was carried out in conjunction with the Department of Education.
This series of lectures has been presented for four consecutive seasons, and it is now time
that a new course be prepared. It is hoped that a new series of lectures can be prepared for
the 1938-39 season. The brochure, " Elementary Geology Applied to Prospecting," is now
in its second edition of 4,000 copies. It may be obtained from the Department at a nominal
charge of 35 cents.
The preparation of rock and mineral sets comprising about fifty minerals and rocks
commonly found in British Columbia has been going ahead for some time, and distribution
started about the end of 1936. A nominal charge of 50 cents a set is made. Distribution
has been confined to residents of British Columbia, as the Department has been unable to
cope with the demand from other places. However, it is hoped that in the near future this
restriction may be raised.
PLACER-MINING CAMPS.
The Provincial Government Department of Labour created in 1935 a plan whereby
unmarried, physically fit unemployed men between the ages of 21 and 25 years were given
an opportunity to learn placer-mining. In 1936 the age-limit was reduced, permitting
younger men to enrol. Instruction was carried out under the direction of the Chief Mining
Engineer.
In 1937 about 255 young men between the ages of 18 and 25 were given instruction
in placer-mining, woodcraft, camp cooking, building cabins, whipsawing lumber, etc., during
the summer months at the Nanaimo and Emory Creek camps.
After the first training period of six weeks, those who desired to prospect for gold were
given their fare, as well as a grub-stake and a special reduced cost on equipment, to certain
areas where, in the opinion of the Department, there was a chance of discovering gold.
A large number of trainees availed themselves of this opportunity, and in the Quesnel
area, where most of them went, the Department appointed an engineer-overseer familiar
with the area to assist them in locating ground, etc. This scheme worked well because the
results of the plan were reported to the Department by the engineer; whereas in former
years, the trainees were asked to report, and very few of them took the trouble to do this.
The thorough training in outdoor work fitted these young men to apply for jobs in the
mines, of any description, as well as forestry, so that the future holds considerable hope;
whereas beforehand the youths had no idea of any occupation outside of city limits.
Some of the larger mining companies kindly co-operated to the extent of giving some of
these young men jobs in the mines and smelters after training, which is one of the main
objects of the plan.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA.
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered Confederation, all geological investigations and mapping in the Province were to be carried on by the
Geological Survey of Canada; this agreement has been fully adhered to by the Dominion
Government and has proved of great benefit to the mining industry of the Province. Each
year several geological parties are kept in the field and in the aggregate a vast amount of
information is made available to the prospector and the mining engineer in the many excellent
reports and maps covering British Columbia which have been issued by the Geological Survey
of Canada.
For some years a branch office of the Geological Survey has been maintained in Vancouver, where copies of maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained. The officer
in charge of the British Columbia office is W. E. Cockfield, and the address is 305 Federal
Building, Vancouver, B.C. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 9
In 1936 a reorganization of several departments in the Federal Government was effected,
and the Department of Mines and Resources created. One of the main branches of this
Department is that of Mines and Geology, with sub-branches known as the Bureau of Geology
and Topography and the Bureau of Mines. The Geological Survey of Canada and the
Topographical Survey are now a part of the Bureau of Geology and Topography. During
the season of 1937 the Bureau of Geology and Topography had the following officers employed
on field work in British Columbia:—
Geological Parties.
1. F. H. McLearn studied the stratigraphy and fauna of the Triassic in the foot-hills of
the Rocky Mountains along Peace River.
2. E. D. Kindle examined the mineral deposits north of Hazelton, in an area tributary
to the Prince Rupert branch of the Canadian National Railways.
3. J. E. Armstrong completed the mapping of the geology of the west half of the Fort
Fraser map-area (longs. 125°-126°, lats. 54°-55°).
4. J. G. Gray completed the mapping of the geology of the east half of the Fort Fraser
map-area (longs. 124°-125°, lats. 54°-55°).
5. A. H. Lang completed the mapping of the Keithley Creek area (longs. 121°-121° 30',
lats, 52° 45-53°) and of the Swift River area (longs. 121° 30-122°, lats 52° 45-53°).
6. C. E. Cairnes began detailed study and mapping of the Tyaughton area, Bridge River
district.
7. H. M. A. Rice continued the study and mapping of the east half Nelson map-area
(longs. 116°-117°, lats. 49°-50°).
8. D. A. McNaughton completed the study and mapping of the Hedley map-area (longs.
120°-120° 30', lats. 49° 15'-49° 30').
9. W. E. Cockfield assisted by W. E. Snow commenced study and mapping in the Hope
area (longs. 120°-122°, lats. 49°-50°).
Topographical Parties.
C. H. Smith and R. J. Parlee mapped an area of 132 square miles, including Hudson Bay
Mountain, for publication on a scale of 1 inch to 1 mile with 100-foot contours.
C. H. Smith and R. J. Parlee mapped, for publication on 1 inch to 4 miles with 500-foot
contours, 75 per cent, of the Tatlatui sheet (lats. 56°-57°, longs. 126°-128°).
H. A. S. West and K. G. Francis mapped 22 per cent, of the Nass River sheet (lats. 56°-
57°, longs. 128°-130°) for publication on 1 inch to 4 miles with 500-foot contours.
N. E. McConnell mapped 2,400 square miles included in the Big Bend area for publication
on 1 inch to 4 miles with 500-foot contours.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION.
The total mine output of the Province consists of the outputs of metalliferous minerals,
coal, structural materials, and miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials, valued at standard recognized prices in Canadian funds.
In the Annual Report for 1925 some changes were made in the methods used in previous
years in computing and valuing the products of the industry, but in order to facilitate comparisons with former years the same general style of tables was adhered to. The methods
used in the 1925 Annual Report have been followed in subsequent Annual Reports, with the
addition of new tables.
The following notes explain the methods used:—
(1.) From the certified returns of lode mines of ore and concentrate shipments made during the full calendar year by the producers the net recovered metal contents have been determined by deducting from the " assay value content " necessary corrections for smelting and
refining losses.
In making comparisons of production figures with previous years, it should be remembered that prior to 1925 in the Annual Reports the total metal production, with the exception
of copper, was determined by taking the assay value content of all ores shipped; „ deductions
for slag losses were made by taking varying percentages off the metal prices.
(2.) Gold-placer returns are received from operators giving production in crude ounces
recovered;   these are converted to fine-gold ounces by dividing the crude-ounce value by the A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
old standard price of gold. The fine-gold content is then valued at the yearly average price
of gold, which in 1936 was $35.03 per ounce. On this basis the average crude-gold value per
ounce was $28.80 on Provincial placer-gold production.
(3.) The prices used in valuing the different metals are: For gold, the average price for
the year; for silver, the average New York metal-market price for the year; for lead, the
average London metal-market price for the year; and for zinc, the average London metal-
market price for the year. As in 1936, copper in 1937 is valued at the average London metal-
market price. Prior to 1932 copper was valued at the average New York price. The change
was made because very little copper was being marketed in the United States on account of
high tariff charges against importations from foreign countries. The bulk of the lead and
zinc production of the Province is sold on the basis of the London prices of these metals and
they are therefore used. The New York, St. Louis, and Montreal lead- and zinc-market prices
differ materially from the London prices of these metals and are not properly applicable to
the valuing of the British Columbia production.
By agreement with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Provincial Statistical
Bureaus, the following procedure of taking care of the exchange fluctuations has been agreed
upon:—
(a.)   Silver to be valued at the average New York price, adjusted to Canadian funds
at the average exchange rate,
(fe.)   Lead, zinc, and copper to be valued at London prices, adjusted to  Canadian
funds at the average exchange rate.
(4.) In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in
former years had been to list coal and coke production (in part) as primary mineral production. Only the coke made in bee-hive ovens was so credited; that made in by-product ovens
was not listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was credited as coal production.
The result was that the coke-production figures were incomplete. Starting with the 1926
Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, has been adopted.
This consists of crediting all coal produced, including that used in making coke, as primary
mine production. Coke-making is considered a manufacturing industry. As it is, however,
of interest to the mining industry, a table included in the Report shows the total coke produced
in the Province, together with by-products, and the values given by the producers. This
valuation of coke is not, of course, included in the total gross mine production of the Province.
From 1918 to 1930 coal production was valued at $5 per long ton. In 1931 the price used
was $4.50, and from 1932 on the price used has been $4.25 per long ton. In making comparisons with former years the decline in dollar value is accentuated by this lowered price. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 11
INDEX TO TABLES.
Title. Page.
Table I.—Production;   all Metals, Structural, and Miscellaneous—-1937 and 1936 compared 12
Table II.—Metal   Prices;    Average   Prices   used   in   valuing   Production,   1901   to   1937,
inclusive  13
Table III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1937  13
Table IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1937, inclusive  14
Table V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1935, 1936, and 1937  14
Table VI.—Production of Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1887-1937, inclusive^.. 15
Table VIL—Value of Gold Production to Date—Lode Gold and Placer Gold  16
Table VIII.—Output of Mine Products by Districts and Divisions, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936,
and 1937  17
Tables IX.A, IX.b, and IX.c.—Production in Detail of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1936 and 1937, and IX.d, IX.e, and IX.f, production for 1900-1937,
inclusive  18-23
Table X.—Production in Detail of Structural Materials, 1937  24
Table XL—Production in Detail of Miscellaneous Metals, Minerals, and Materials, 1937  25
Table XII.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1895-1937, inclusive—Graph  26
Table XIII.—Production of Lode Mines in British Columbia, 1913-1937, inclusive—Graph.. 27
Table XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date  28
Table XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia from 1895 to 1925- 28
Table XVI.—Coke and By-products Production of British Columbia, 1936 and 1937  28
Table XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1937  29-31
Table XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and Process
Supplies, 1936 and 1937  32
Table XIX.—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals, 1901-
1937  33
Table XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-1937  34
Table XXI.—Metalliferous Mines shipping in 1937 and List of Mills operating  35-40
Table XXII.—Mining  Companies  employing  an  Average  of  Ten  or  more  Men  during
1937—Shipping and Non-shipping  41 42 A 12
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE I.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1936 and 1937.
Quantity,
1936.
Quantity,
1937.
Value,
1936.
Value,
1937.
Per Cent.
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease ( —).
Quantity.
Value.
Metal-lics.
a
357,007
468,170
1,971,848
14,168,654
1,249,940
14,790,029
930
4,296,548
8,439,373
49,971
$
— 100.0
+ 121.4
+ 13.9
+ 24.8
+ 10.9
— 4.4
+  18.7
+ 14.4
— 100.0
715,747
6,023,411
16,122,727
1,558,245
21,416,949
1,066
5,075,451
14,274,245
37,753
+ 52.9
+205.5
+ 13.8
+ 24.7
+ 44.8
+ 14.6
+ 18.1
+ 69.1
— 24.5
20,806,672
404,472
43,389
377,971,618
23
9,521,015
254,581,393
46,057,584
460,781
54,153
419,118,371
22
11,308,685
291,192,278
Gold, lode*   -  oz.
Gold, placer*    oz.
Lead lb.
Platinum  ___ -  ..oz.
Silver   —   oz.
Zinc -.    - -  lb.
45,792,470
65,225,594
+  42.4
Fuel.
Coal (2,240 lb.)- ......tons
1,346,471
1,444,687
5,722,502
6,139,920
-)-    7.3
+     7.3
NON-METALLICS.
350
14,555
124,425
4,000
2,809
15,389
608,790
1,346
18,032
151,175
1,280
2,790
17,030
820,398
+ 25.2
+284.6
Fluxes—limestone, quartz     ..tons
17,592
22,089
+ 23.9
+  21.5
— 68.0
Slate  and  green   rock  granules;
268
845
64,896
186
1,013
88,369
— 30.6
+ 19.9
+ 36.2
—  00.7
Sodium carbonate, magnesium sulphate    tons
Sulphurf   - —tons
+ 10.7
+ 34.8
770,318
1,012,051
+ 31.4
Clay Products and other
Structural Materials.
Clay Products.
Brick—
Common   - -No.
Face, paving, sewer brick —No.
3,327,061
564,788
5,291,044
995,600
46,437
19,613
115,121
7,657
33,444
54,179
2,875
1,961
75,334
35,147
126,115
9,986
23,497
68,707
9,578
2,932
+ 59.0
+  76.3
+ 62.2
+ 79.2
+     9.6
Fireclay  - - -    tons
567
694
+  22.4
+  10.7
+ 30.4
—  29.7
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe  No.
Pottery—glazed or unglazed   -
Bentonite ; other clay products	
712,745
784,491
+ 26.8
+233.1
+  49.5
281,287
351,296
+ 24.9
Other Structural Materials.
516,931
137,158
477,897
175.226
208,178
623,725
143,124
552,634
132,524
295,034
+  20.7
Lime and limestone — -tons
Sand and gravel  - -
Stone—building, pulp-stones tons
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock tons
72,591
71,293
—    1.8
+ 4.4
+ 15.6
5,890
333,348
6,079
343,587
+    3.2
+    3.7
— 24.7
+ 41.7
1,515,390
1,747,041
+ 15.3
Total value in Canadian
54,081,967
74,475,902
+ 37.7
* Canadian funds.
t Sulphur content of pyrites shipped, estimated sulphur contained in sulphuric acid made from waste smelter-
gases, and elemental sulphur. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A IS
TABLE II.—Average Metal Prices used in compiling Value op Provincial
Production op Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc.
Year.
Gold,
Fine Ounce.
Silver,
Fine Ounce.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
1901                              -	
$
20.67
Cents.
56.002 N.Y.
49.55      „
50.78
53.36      „
51.33      „
63.45
62.06
50.22
48.93
50.812    „
50.64 „
57.79
56.80
52.10
47.20
62.38      „
77.35
91.93
105.57      „
95.80
59.52
64.14
61.63
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.37
58.176    „
52.993     „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881     ,,
Cents.
16.11   N.Y.
11.70       „
13.24      „
12.82      „
15.59      „
19.28
20.00
13.20      „
12.98
12.738    „
12.38
16.341    „
15.27      „
13.60
17.28
27.202    „
27.18
24.33
18.70
17.45       „
12.50
13.38      „
14.42
13.02       „
14.042    „
13.795     „
12.92      „
14.570     „
18.107     „
12.982    „
8.116     „
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419     „
7.795     „
9.477    „
13.078    „
Cents.
2.577 N.Y.
3.66      „
3.81
3.88      „
4.24      „
4.81
4.80      „
3.78      „
3.85      „
4.00
3.98      „
4.024    „
3.93      „
3.50
4.17      „
6.172    „
7.91
6.67
5.19
7.16
4.09       „
5.16       „
6.54
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    „
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    „
2.710    „
2.113    „
2.391     „
2.436     „
3.133     „
3.913    „
5.110    „
Cents.
1902                             	
1903                                  	
1904                                    -	
1905                                 	
1906                               .
1907                	
1908                                 	
1909	
1910                                 	
4.60 E. St. L.
1911                                      	
4.90
1912                                 	
5.90
1913                                 	
4.80
1914                                  	
4 40
1916
1917                                 	
7.666    „
1918                                  _ - .
6.94
1919                  	
6.24
1920                                    -
6.52
1921
3.95
1922                                   	
4.86
1923                                	
5.62
1924                                     .--.
5.39
1925                                          .
1927
1928
1930                                 	
3 599    ,
1931
1932                                   	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
2.405    „
1933 -
1984	
1935 	
1936
3.210    „
3.044    „
3.099    „
3.315    „
1 937	
Average 1933-37 (inclusive) —   .
33.66
48.018    „
9.044    ,,
3.396    „
3.514    „
Note.—In making comparisons with average prices used prior to 1926, it should be remembered that deductions
were made from the average prices as a means of adjustment between the " assay value content " of ores shipped
instead of allowing percentage losses in smelting operations. The price of copper prior to 1926 was taken at " net " ;
silver, at 95 per cent. ; lead, at 90 per cent. ; and zinc, at 85 per cent. Subsequent to 1926 (inclusive) prices are
true averages, and adjustments are made on the metal content of ores for loss in smelting and refining.
TABLE III.—Total Production for all Years up to and including 1937.
Gold, placer
$84,260,944*
Gold, lode        207,936,443*
Silver   	
Copper 	
Lead 	
Zinc 	
Coal and coke 	
Structural materials 	
Miscellaneous minerals, etc.
Total	
129,026,600
292,103,616
237,689,431
142,124,138
372,513,077
74,965,889
13,200,373
- $1,553,820,511
* Canadian funds. A 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE IV.—Production for each Year from 1852 to 1937 (inclusive).
1852
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
to 1895 (inclusive)  $94,547,241
  7,507,956
  10,455,268
  10,906,861
  12,3 93,131
  16,344,751
  20,086,780
  17,486,550
  17,495,954
  18,977,359
  22,461,325
  24,980,546
  25,882,560
  23,851,277
  24,443,025
  26,377,066
  23,499,072
  32,440,800
  30,296,398
  26,388,825
  29,447,508
  42,290,462
  37,010,392
* Canadian funds.
  $41,782,474
    33,296,313
     35,543,084
     28,066,641
    35,162,843
     41,304,320
 ,_     48,704,604
     61,492,242
     67,188,842
     60,729,358
     65,372,583
     68,245,443
     55,391,993
    34,883,181
  *28,798,406
  *32,602,672
  *42,305,297
  *48,821,239
  *54,081,967
1937   *74,475,902
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934 .
19315
1936
Total $1,553,820,511
TABLE V.—Quantities and Value of Mine Products for 1935, 1936, and 1937.
1935.
1936.
1937.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
30,929
365,244
9,251,544
38,791,127
344,268,444
256,239,446
1,187,968
$895,058
12,852,936
5,994,075
3,023,768
10,785,930
7,940,860
5,048,864
1,238,717
1,041,031
43,389
404,472
9,521,015
20,806,672
377,971,618
254,581,393
1,346,471
$1,249,940
14,168,654
4,296,548
1,971,848
14,790,029
8,439,373
5,722,502
1,796,677
1,646,396
54,153
460,781
11,308,685
46,057,584
419,118,371
291,192,278
1,444,687
$1,558,245
Gold, lode*         	
16,122,727
5,075,451
  lb.
6,023,411
 lb.
21,416,949
 lb.
14,274,245
Coal    tons,
2,240 lb.
6,139,920
2,098,337
lerals
1,766,617
Totals     ...-     	
$48,821,239
$54,081,967
$74,475,902
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 15
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE VII.—Value of Gold Production to Date.
Year.
Placer.
Lode.
Total.
1858 1862             —-
$9,871,634
16,283,592
9,895,318
9,019,201
5,579,911
3,841,515
2,525,426
356,131
405,516
481,683
544,026
513,520
643,346
1,344,900
1,278,724
970,100
1,073,140
1,060,420
1,115,300
969,300
948,400
828,000
647,000
477,000
540,000
426,000
555,500
510,000
565,000
770,000
580.500
496,000
320,000
286,500
221,600
233,200
368,800
420,000
420,750
280,092
355,503
156,247
143,208
118,711
152,235
291,992
395,542
562,787
714,431
895,058
1,249,940
1,558,245
$9,871,634
1863-1867   -  -	
16,283,592
1868-1872   	
9,895,318
1873 1877             —
9,019,201
1878 1882 .      .	
5,579,911
1883 1887                  	
3,841,515
1888-1892  - -	
2,525,426
1893 .                            ...     	
1894     -    - -  -	
$23,404
125,014
785,271
1,244,180
2,122,820
2,201,217
2,857,573
3,453,381
4,348,603
4,888,269
4,812,616
4,589,608
4,933,102
4,630,639
4,055,020
5,282,880
4,924,090
5,533,380
4,725,513
5,322,442
5,627,490
5,109,004
.5,167,934
4,587,334
2,367,190
3,403,812
3,150,645
2,481,392
2,804,154
4,089,684
3,704,994
5,120,535
4,335,269
4,163,859
3,679,601
3,888,097
3,004,419
3,323,576
3,018,894
4,261,307
6,392,929
10,250,985
12,852,936
14,168,654
16,122,727
379,535
530,530
1895         -	
1,266,954
1896   ~~  - -   - 	
1897 - - -	
1898 -    	
1899         - - ..
1900   -	
1901     -   - - . -    -	
1,788,206
2,636,340
2,844,563
4,202,473
4,732,105
5,318,703
1902   -	
1903	
5,961,409
5,873,036
1904                    -	
5,704,908
1905    -	
1906  	
1907        -  	
5,902,402
5,579,039
4,883,020
1908
5,929,880
1909          -     - - - - •
5,401,090
1910  - -   	
1911 '    .
1912	
1913   	
1914         -	
6,073,380
5,151,513
5,877,942
6,137,490
5,674,004
1915 - -  - -	
1916       -  	
5,937,934
5,167,834
1917       	
1918   	
1919
2,863,190
3,723,812
3,437,145
2,702,992
3,037,354
4,458,484
4,124,994
1920   -	
1921 :   A.   	
1922    -  	
1923 - —      - —	
1924     - -   	
5,541,285
1925                  .    	
4,615,361
1926     	
4,519,362
1927                                    	
3,835,848
1928             —   -  	
4,031,305
1929                  -     -
3,123,130
1930      -	
3,475,811
1931          - ' 	
3,310,886
1932                -    ~    	
4,656,849*
1933          - - - 	
6,955,716*
1934     	
10,965,416*
1935               	
13,747,994*
1936                            	
15,418,594*
1937	
17,680,972*
$84,260,944
$207,936,443
$292,197,387
* Canadian funds. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 17
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REPORT OP THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1937.
TABLE IX.A.—Detail op Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver in 1936 and 1937.
Districts and Divisions.
Year.
Tons.
Gold—Placer.
GOLD-
—Lode.
Silver.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
North-western District ( No. 1):
Atlin	
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1930
1937
1036
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
193 6
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
193 0
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
0
18,423
21,683
530,720
623,925
2
70
934
421
228
6.56S
6,045
221
7,742
24,997
11 280
197,247
208,012
5,090
44,188
48,883
20
1,547,906
1,710,416
700
1,044,049
1,006,049
7
471,148
8
05
63
26
3
216
714
11,980
16,329
1,775
3,076
332
106
7,211
8,800
160
196
230
1,872
1,813
749
86
6 222
20.343
345,117
469.865
51.134
88.511
9.564
3,050
207.733
253,219
4.782
5,640
451,525
3
19.327
19,621
4.844
7,175
169,OSS
251,053
1,433
3,002
047
1,347
North-eastern District ( No. 2):
95,409
103,231
10
30
36,765
43,198
4
1,287,878
1,511,498
245
140
4,657
4,675
3,205
1,151
2,102
2,098
1,446
517
Quesnel	
Central District (No. 3):
18,343
13,408
18,889
10,430
41
2,871
494
1,601
22,957
41,000
115,190
188,259
8
444,552
766
59,623
7,021
4,787
1,086
617
48
1,198
1,061
933
5,905
3,286
39,555
55,214
4
2,102
1
64
245,946
167,497
38,043
21,589
1,681
41,918
■  37,107
32,646
206,852
114,977
1,385.612
1,931,938
140
73,549
35
2,239
19,405
1,322
28,411
13,234
361
2,011
18,361
3,207
728,047
665,953
28.981
57,761
58,436
21,056
83,234
8,757
593
12,821
2
110
170
9
10
135
152
o
57
3,169
4,892
259
288
3,889
4,374
58
5,940
163
Southern District (No. 4):
902
8,286
1,439
328,546
298,886
13,078
25,924
1
102
80
2
1
2
	
2.93S
2,302
58
29
58
Eastern District (No. 5):
26,227
9,502
37,356
1.901.477
2,219,755
657
836
4
9
29
1
160
282
79
97
1
18.927
24,056
115
259
835
29
4,609
8,114
2,276
2,791
29
7.068,195
8,267,901
3,189,664
65
2,274
3,710,717
102,872
3,182
209,927
275,241
102
114
11,677
54,716
37
4,933
15,823
25,000
	
2,749
285
81,014
111,710
6
96,208
9,972
2,858,938
3,908,733
210
1,416
32,937
121,111
198.609
6,742
4.469
226,061
523,537
509
18,998
10,627
149,821
639
14.782
54,654
Itevelstoke	
89,138
3,042
54
117
03
23
10,415
9,390
1,892
4,094
2,207
805
364,837
328,556
102.285
234.969
230
1
151
29
4,350
8,526
4,796
67,241
15
17
432
489
1
207
13
G
6
Western District (No. 6):
53
1,856
3
-
278
451
8,009
12,978
33
476
12.352
11,016
385,546
335,146
270
525
311
3,183
8,553
5,356
145,505
148,876
01
39
10,894
111,373
299,612
187,407
5,097,040
5,209,171
2,137
1,365
112
1,360
13,038
7,837
53,939
52,955
209
37
50
610
322
355
618
544
3
1
84
88
9,276
10,215
17,803
15,941
86
29
2,420
2,532
5.884
3,517
24,341
23,767
94
17
_                .
1,314.609
2,122,131
113
3,255
14.197
14,215
497,321
497,383
90,822
150,162
40.985
67,395
XT'   r       ia
37
3
54
65
1,066
86
1,556
1,871
Yale    	
1,161
370
163
61
5,710
2,134
3,722
14
1,680
6
1936
1937
4,456.521
6,145,254
43,389
54,153
tl, 249,940
t1,558,245
404,472
460,781
14,168,654
16,122,727
9,521,015
11,308,685
4,296,548
5,075,451
* Includes all shipments to Government sampling plant at Prince Rupert during 1937; individual shippers are listed in
List of Mines Shipping.
t Includes placer gold purchased by Gold Commissioners from " snipers " and others, and in many instances was not
nhtainfid in the minine division where sold, but disposed of at the most convenient place. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 19
TABLE IX.B.—Production in Detail of Copper,
Lead, and
Zinc in
1936 AND  1937.
Districts and Divisions.
Year.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds,
Value.
North-western District (No. 1):
1936
1937   |
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1930   |
1937   |
1936
1937   |
1936 t
1937 [
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
I 936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
193 6
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1930
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
193 6
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
1936
1937
8
1,139
45
$
450,615
42,705
2,751
107
873|
15,485|
82
2,025
864,074
943,871
33,811
48,232
7,354
62,576
697
8,184
North-eastern District (No. 2):
' 163
144
600
5,215
0
7
24
267
41
954
11,547
2
32
566
_.
r\           ^
Central District (No. 3):
31,803
27,925
24,908
183,410
3,014
3,652
2,301
23,986
34,330
6,835
353,813
183,410
431
384
1.078
1,470
567,444
498,023
15.407
31,854
1,343
349
13,845
9,372
17
20
42
75
22,204
25,449
003
1,628
25,475
738
100,177
4,823
228
844
36
3,520
237
8
Southern District (No. 4):
10,731
1,637
693,859
730,420
967
356
Greenwood 	
4,801
158,104
469,980
307,229
483,293
628
14,989
61,464
29,110
63,205
80
23,001
35,805
32
Similkameen	
7,692,756
1,006,059
Eastern District (No. 5):
814,475
2,289,536
31,870
116,995
7,005
2,085,383
234
102,225
360,362,803
405,373,908
14,100,999
20,714,607
232,818,066
266,176,726
7,717,919
13,047,983
_    ,
T        A
170,375
1,709,355
2,824,882
80,519
86,640
1,408,291
2,895,724
244
15,728
11,242,020
3,315,682
8,706
GO.887
144,351
3,386
4,427
55,100
147,972
10
804
439,900
169,431
112,600
1,043,278
1,490,845
5,520
Nelson
6,130
581
34.584
73,081
■n       l + L-
993,479
5,507,449
90
10,647
18,256,826
15,059,380
	
32,934
269,975
3
522
311,600
4,679,784
29,530
612,022
605,214
738,211
	
	
1,247
64
42
2
Western District (No. 6):
	
Ashcroft	
	
	
164
4,169
133
6
213
5
165
27,672
[           16,969
22
2,623
2,219
Lillooet	
26,105
19,302
1,022
986
961
1,229
91
161
Quatsino	
Vancouver	
19,479,303
32,419,185
1,846,059
4,239,781
472,233
449,972
18,478
22,994
624,198
20,692
7,986
313
26
3
    |
1936
1937
|   20,806,672
I   46,057,584
|
|     1,971,848
[     6,023,411
I
1377,971,618
1419,118,371
14,790,029
21,416,949
|254,58l,393
291,192,278
I
t     8,439,373
[   14,274,245
1
Includes zinc and lead recovered from slag and reclaimed slags which cannot be credited to individual mines. A 20
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE IX.c.—Production Value of Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead,
Zinc in 1936 and 1937.
Mining Division Total.
District Total.
1936.
1937.
1936.
1937.
$
$
$
2,833,1S6
S
3,119,381
•
20,545
1,905,281
2,329,740
1,983,470
90,001
3,050
253,219
9,564
207,733
Central District (No. 3)	
340,314
286,680
264,686
177,767
61,181
5,038
47,732
2,077.169
35,156
1,428,499
2,022,695
1,108,137
29,840,075
4,223,417
1,915,461
7,920,367
10,414,176
1.859
8,009
12,978
10,950
112,218
317,400
5,140,206
203,358
5,249,865
2,408
2,420
1,572
2,532
2,426,790
4,827,553
1,066
86
9,259
4,014
44,916,392
64,471,028
44,916,392
NOTE.—From   and  including   1937  the  Liard   Mining  Division  is  combined  with   Stikine  Mining   Division.     From   and THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 21
TABLE IX.d.—Production op Placer Gold, Lode Gold, and Silver, 1900-1937.
Districts and Divisions.
Gold—Placer.
Gold—Lode.
Silver.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
Ounces.
Value.
North-western District (No. 1):
502,926
5
14,356
175
8
1,410
2,092
8,096
$
10,946,957
104
285,770
3,500
230
31,274
42,950
188,994
17,791
8
370,019
52,453
$
32,290
124,395
1,479,005
1,953
348,529
2,765,210
33,546,515
41,174
7,534,156
8,175,079
30,966,701
20.413
190,846
5,004,918
20,047,800
16,916
147,688
Skeena	
District totals	
529,668
11,499,779
1,971,673
44,257,080
45,415,092
25,849,612
North-eastern District (No. 2):
1,860,487
25,511
3,394
588,460
37,442,822
570,190
73,072
11,915,539
135,330
8,254
4,088,808
182,792
16,083
2,239,S97
8,117
1,411,386
District totals	
2,477,852
50,007,023
143,584
4.871,000
2,255,980
1,419,503
Central District (No. 3):
2,354
228
1,114
53,408
4,592
24,096
30,560
7,932
3,491
1,003,667
212,100
111,677
277,711
233,155
5,024
105,794
112,935
2,096
3,690
82,096
41,983
1,327,444
515.890
281,425
Southern District (No. 4):
624
2,777
161
5,640
12,871
03,444
3,274
116,230
103,807
895,829
734,485
25,940
3,525,880
18,903,842
10,985,506
566,548
1,937,123
14,078,175
384,068
821,693
853,504
7,994,148
271,007
439,872
9,202
195,819
1,820,007
39,981,770
17,821,659
9,558,591
Eastern District (No. 5):
169
107
14,275
187
863
2,236
3,523
1
14
377
861
215
4,404
2,362
310,215
4,131
.   19,784
51,268
71,761
29
375
10,340
17,137
5,102
1,841
161
2,313
6
18,400
708,273
12
3,801
1,402
2,565,212
5,502
G4
37,355
3,383
48,991
124
502,432
18,920,208
335
82,776
35,080
54,115,050
113,725
1,823
6,456,728
13,600
87,098,275
388,762
137,002
3,461,549
50,097
35,220,036
3,345,052
3,151,404
1,920,701
705.682
3,902,504
10,487
44,587,703
197,445'
77,726
1,954,290
31,309
21,647,881
1,960,050
1,776,478
1,030,840
503,498
22.S28
490.908
3,307.047
73,860,782
141,949.554
77,080,211
Western District (No. 6):
266
9,011
1,308
7,101
88,191
.   215
1,013
233
113
419
7,300
5,503
192,964
26,436
150,519
1,783,270
4,414
25,499
4.902
3,255
9,153
148,970
386
8,476
4,977
15,533
830,022
66,657
12,783
289,680
158,095
543,325
20,288,824
1,380,412
1,553
16,804
26,886
23,180
225,458
512,533
268
4,245
2,703,966
734,273
6,463
911
9,513
18,475
10,731
108,750
295,643
107
2,157
1,568,989
399,092
3,240
59
186.005
35,348
3,379
1,219
4,775,869
730.044
75,508
Yale	
115,170
2,354,885
1,150,842
34,257,259
4,255.629
2,417,668
3,158,416
64,637,710
8,435,196
198,555,941
212,213,804
117,207,010
Note.—Prom and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division. From
and including 1937 the Nass Eiver Mining Division is combined with Portland Canal Mining Division. From and
including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division.
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.
t Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
t Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ Lillooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1874. A 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE IX.e.—Production of Copper, Lead, and Zinc, 1900-1937.
Districts and Divisions.
Copper.
Lead.
Zinc.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
Pounds.
Value.
North-western District ( No. 1):
83,161
$
11,949
109,945
7,036
$
645,243,514
3,896,535
1,457,541
5,519,374
96,155,780
579,889
276,471
869,084
50,148
19,715,958
2,621
883,S84
1,867,664
110,254
666,200,125
07,893,773
19,870,051
893,541
1,867,664
110,254
North-eastern District (No. 2):
05 6
5,851,278
30
332,835
492
3,789,588
16
6,050,228
1,338,025
242,884
0,050,228
1,338.025
5,851,934
332,865
3,790,080
242,900
Central District (No. 3):
5,501,399
536,304
614
994,990
103,443
89
367,164
2,093,087
5,451
20,087
84,420
262
406,758
227.001
2,442
25,981
7,358
137
G,038.317
1,098,528
2,465.702
105,375
636,201
Southern District (No. 4):
47,130,210
393,260,838
825,307
106,569,002
7,320,228
03,089,104
99,570
15,534,520
413.585
5,718,024
198,692
235,461
13,311
247,655
5,711
8,907
550,050
4,166,798
4,516
63,720
143,471
547,791,357
86,049,431
6,507.702
275.5S4
4.785,090
Eastern District (No. 5):
10,175
216,034
28,592
10,822
155
5,685,261
683
3,284
1,201
41,651
6,193
1,949
12
889,008
124
636
120,777,767
24,734
4,650,203,605
54,189,305
725,410
42,812,416
939,741
284.700.594
5,678,061
14,631,700
8.502,337
13,798,509
5,955,091
1,564
205,462.502
1,717.514
30.518
1,983,422
55.885
13,704,430
235,155
612,235
334,396
829,410
33,642,519
140
2,779,224,585
53,392,821
154.380
17,034,071
8.093
158,309,695
558,889
78,021,008
62,705
592,765
1,000,110
1,750,033
10,809,993
109,928,451
5,439
4G,556
10,035.038
773
8,641
2,824,815
4,233
33,011
115,935,452
17,585.226
5.202.984,188
230.928.122
3,121,602,337
140,013.350
Western District (No. 6):
309.284
633,775
1,099,828
54,298
50,894
155,721
200,304
5,580
263
99
4,333
193
00.22S
8
4
219
7
2,470
20,041.150
21,712
174,642
537.581,822
20,505,022
26
3,173,243
5,897
27,693
78,760.667
3,049,770
3
6,750,424
236,510
17,981,772
563,988
12,088
541
5S0.421.559
85,429,772
6,827,628
239,759
17,981,772
563,988
1,912,437,038
289,394,755
5,244,573,205
232,775,246
3,150,663,204
141,124,133
Note.—From and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division. From
and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with Portland Canal Mining Division. From and
including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division. THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 23
TABLE IX.f.—Production Value op Placer Gold, Lode Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and
Zinc, by Mining Divisions and Districts, 1900-1937.
Districts and Divisions.
Mining Division Total.
District Total.
$
$
180 504,039
Atlin*	
11,368,251
104
285,770
104,532,035
55,108,572
365,835
8,594,478
188,994
Liard	
58,212,516
42,139,793
4,084,112
73,072
11,915,539
2,928.944
2,264,533
524,854
139,557
136,221,366
11,745,750
90,441,604
17,365,270
16,668,082
Osoyoos	
540,564,599
10,900,605
59,451
372,725,040
3,671,190
644,957
25,030,234
159,883
40,245,745
2.205,383
75,973,956
1,501,104
1,380,985
Fort Steele -	
125,263,331
70,099
647,882
404,429
710,162
28,183.314
4,853,712
31,563
35,971
85,909,278
4,188,059
228,202
Lillooet§	
1,043,094,795
1,043,694,795
Note.—From and including 1937 the Liard Mining Division is combined with Stikine Mining Division. From
and including 1937 the Nass River Mining Division is combined with Portland Canal Mining Division. From and
including 1931 the Trout Lake Mining Division was combined with Lardeau Mining Division.
* Atlin totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1898.
t Cariboo totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
t Quesnel totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1858.
§ Lillooet totals include estimated placer gold production from and including 1874. A 24
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
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Is A 26
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1937.
TABLE XII.-
—British Columbia Mine Production, 189J
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A 27
TABLE XIII.—Production of Lode Mines in British Columbia, 1913-1937.
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n»tiniai^cocno    —    cucn^inior-cDcno           cum^-mio^
oi           ai                                 o)                                 cn                                 cn                                 cn A 28
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES, 1937.
TABLE XIV.—Coal Production per Year to Date.*
1836-1885..
1886	
1887'.	
1888	
1889'-	
1890	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894 	
1895	
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900 	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904 	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909 	
1910 	
1911	
Tons.
(2,240 lb.)
3,029,011
326,636
413,360
489,301
579,830
678,140
1,029,097
826,335
978,294
1,012,953
939,654
896,222
882,854
1,135,865
1,306,324
1,439,595
1,460,331
1,397,394
1,168,194
1,253,628
1,384,312
1,517,303
1,800,067
1,677,849
2,006,476
2,800,046
2,193,062
Value.
$9,468,557
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,818,962
2,688,666
2,648,562
3,407,595
3,918,972
4,318,785
4,380,993
4,192,182
3,504,582
3,760,884
4,152,936
4,651,909
6,300,235
5,872,472
7,022,666
9,800,161
7,675,717
Tons.
(2,240 1b.)
  2,628,804
_ _ 2,137,483
  1,810,967
  1,611,129
  2,084,093
  2,149,975
  2,302,245
  2,267,541
  2,595,125
  2,483,995
  2,511,843
  2,453,223
  1,939,526
  2,328,522
  2,330,036
  2,453,827
  2,526,702
  2,251,252
  1,887,130
 _ 1,707,590
  1,534,975
  1,264,746
  1,347.090
  1,187.968
  1,346,471
  1,444,687
_ __ 87,209,078
* For all year3 to 1925   (inclusive)   figures are net coal production and do not include coal made
sequent figures are entire coal production, including coal made into coke.
1912..
1913..
1914..
1915 ..
1916-.
1917-
1918-
1919.
1920-
1921-
1922...
1923..
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927-
1928..
1929...
1930-
1931-
1932..
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937..
Totals-
Value.
$9,200,814
7,481,190
6,338,385
6,638,952
7,294,325
7,524,913
11,511,225
11,337,705
12,975,625
12,419,975
12,559,215
12,266,115
9,697,630
11,642,610
11,650,180
12,269,135
12,633,510
11,256.260
9,435,650
7,684,155
6,523,644
5,375,171
5,725,133
5,048.864
5.722,502
6,139,920
$346,839,477
into coke;  sub-
TABLE XV.—Coke Production from Bee-hive Ovens in British Columbia
from 1895 to 1925.
1895-97	
1898 (estimated).
1899	
1900	
1901	
1902 	
1903	
1904	
1905   	
1906	
1907 	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911-	
1912	
Tons.
Value.
(2.240 lb.)
19,396
$96,980
35,000
175,000
34,251
171,255
85,149
425,745
127,081
635,405
128,015
640,075
165,543
827,715
238,428
1,192,140
271,785
1,358,925
199,227
996,135
222,913
1,337,478
247,399
1,484,394
258,703
1,552,218
218,029
1.308,174
66,005
396,030
264,333
1,585,998
1913.
1914-
1915-
1916-
1917-
1918-
1919-
1920-
1921-
1922-
1923-
1924..
1925-
Totals.
Tons.
Value.
(2,240 lb.)
286,045
$1,716,270
234,577
1,407,462
245,871
1,475,226
267,725
1,606,350
159,905
959,430
188,967
1,322,769
91,188
637.966
67,792
474,544
59,434
416,038
45,835
320,845
68,919
412,433
30,615
214,305
75,185
626,295
4,393,255
$25,673,600
TABLE XVI.—Coke and By-products
Production of
British Columbia, 1936 and 1937.
Description.
1936.
1937.
Quantity.
Value.
Quantity.
Value.
112,348
$436,595
148,348
$570,250
30,370
$191,843
43,215
$277,726
43,632
138,787
52,813
330,821
74,002
$330,630
1,422,783
38,872
96,028
$608,547
1,746,047
46,698
$1,792,285
$2,401,292 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 29
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1937.
Lode-gold Mines.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
Gold -..- 	
Gold  	
Gold :	
Gold	
$43,958
25,000
Bralorne  - -         -      -   -
Bridge River  	
Princess Royal Island-	
Wells   -	
Camp  McKinney	
Nelson
Rossland-	
Oliver	
Nelson -  	
Ymir	
Wells  -
Rossland  	
Greenwood 	
Rossland 	
Rossland 	
Bridge River- 	
Hedley   	
Bridge  River — 	
Nelson  -
2,421,400
1,437,500
Cariboo Gold Quartz  -  -	
Cariboo-McKinney — - - -	
Canadian Pacific Exploration  	
Gold-	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
266,661
565,588
37,500
472,255
Gold      ...
2,668
Gold -
Gold	
Gold	
15,000
13,931
157,608
I.X.L.                                .-   -  - 	
Gold	
131,633
Gold —	
Gold  -	
Gold - -	
Gold -	
Gold	
11 751
1,475,000
Le Roi No. 2    - —	
1,574,640
20,450
Nickel Plate    -  	
3.423,191
Gold -	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold. - 	
Gold   ...
Gold  —
Gold	
Gold
6,006,068
25,000
19,658,075
85,000
Sheep Creek	
Erie	
Relief            	
5,000
700,440
300,000
Sunset No. 2 —-	
Rossland   —
Rossland  	
Sheep Creek  	
115,007
1,245,250
Gold
162,500
Ymir Gold   —            	
Gold
300,000
Gold
133,501
Gold 	
23,530
$40,855,105
The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines.
Antoine ——   -  	
Rambler _  _
Beaverdell 	
Beaverdell	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc—	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc _
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc	
$10,000
97,200
Bell                                                              -   -               	
476,297
27,500
New Denver 	
Trail..  -
Field    	
5,500
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.
71,624,514
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
132,464
67,437
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213,109
Smithers..    .
Goodenough 	
Cody -  	
Hall Creek	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc —	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc _
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc __
Silver-lead-zinc	
Highland Lass, Ltd.                                                               .
Highland Bell, Ltd.- -  -	
Beaverdell-         	
Beaverdell.  	
Similkameen "	
Salmo 	
Three Forks	
Lone Batchelor 	
Sandon  	
Three Forks               	
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
Mercury ,   —  	
Sandon  	
$73,391,446 A 30
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1937—Continued.
Silver-lead-zinc Mines—Continued.
Company or Mine.
Locality.
Class.
Amount
paid.
$73,391,446
Three Forks
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc . 	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc - _
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc —
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc 	
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-lead-zinc
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc	
Silver-lead-zinc -	
Cody      .
40,894
72,859
496,901
6,754
Cody  	
North Star                -
No. One  _ 	
Sandon   .„.
1,438,000
33,810
25,000
575,000
Greenwood
Rambler       -
Cody                                 	
Ruth Mines, Ltd.- - —- .	
St. Eugene      	
Sandon 	
Moyie -	
Sandon      	
165,000
566,000
725,000
11,600
567,500
Sandon _ _ —
Ainsworth     	
Spokane-Trinket
9,564
2,700.000
88,000
64,000
Wallace Mines, Ltd.  (Sally).  ...
135,000
38,000
592,515
70,237
$82,352,387
Copper Mines.
Copper	
Copper	
Copper.	
Copper	
Copper _	
$6,552,578
G r een wood	
Texada Island	
615,399
8,500
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.f
8,025,471
Marble Bay.   ___	
Texada Island.
175,000
160,000
Copper	
260,770
$15,797,718
* The Howe Sound Company is the holding company for the Britannia mine in British Columbia and other mines
in Mexico and the State of Washington. Dividends paid by the Howe Sound Company are therefore derived from all
operations, and in the foregoing table the dividends credited to the Britannia mine have been paid by the Britannia
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, none being credited subsequent to 1930. In making comparison with yearly
totals the amounts credited to the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so the total in the
annual report concerned will show the higher figure.
t The amount shown to the credit of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited,
does not include the sum of $6,749,996 paid by the company during 1935 and 1936 as a distribution or repayment of
capital, subsequent to the closing-down of its operations at Anyox and the company going into voluntary liquidation.
Operations ceased at Anyox in August, 1935. The company since that date has revived its business charter and is
conducting operations at Allenby, B.C.
The term " Miscellaneous " noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together with
payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance
given by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 31
TABLE XVII.—Dividends paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1937—Continued.
Coal.
Wellington Collieries, Ltd., Nanaimo  $16,000,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., Fernie     12,012,807
Total v$28,012,807
Miscellaneous and Structural.
Various       $1,455,229
Aggregate of all Classes.
Lode-gold mining   $40,855,105
Silver-lead-zinc mining   82,352,387
Copper-mining   15,797,718
Coal-mining   28,012,807
Miscellaneous and structural   1,455,229
Total  $168,473,246
Dividends paid Yearly, 1919 to 1937, inclusive.
Year.                                              Amount paid.                    Year. Amount paid.
1919        $2,494,283                1930   $10,543,500
1920          1,870,296                1931   4,650,857
1921      736,629      1932   2,786,958
1922     3,174,756      1933   2,471,735
1923     2,983,570      1934   4,745,905
1924     2,977,276      1935   7,386,070
1925     5,853,419      1936   10,513,705
1926      8,011,137      1937   15,085,293
1927     8,816,681 	
1928          9,572,536 Total  $115,937,724
1929        11,263,118
Dividends paid during 1936 and 1937.
1936. 1937.
Beaverdell-Wellington   $18,000 $18,000
Bell Mines, Ltd  25,403 	
Bralorne Mines, Ltd.   561,150 935,250
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mines, Ltd.   133,331 133,330
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of
Canada, Ltd.  :  6,515,943 11,413,189
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd  434,826 279,351
Fairview Amalgamated Gold Mines    2,668
Highland Bell, Ltd.   14,803 52,634
Island Mountain Mines, Ltd.   105,072 52,536
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C., Ltd  1,401,400 875,875
Premier Gold Mining Co., Ltd  800,000 800,000
Reno Gold Mines, Ltd.   219,157 225,600
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Ltd.   112,500 187,500
Ymir Yankee Girl Mines, Ltd  111,250 22,251
Others    60,870 87,109
Totals  $10,513,705 $15,085,293 A 32
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE XVIII.—Capital employed, Salaries and Wages, Fuel and Electricity, and
Process Supplies, 1937.
Mineral Survey District and Class.
Capital
employed.
Salaries
and Wages.
Fuel and
Electricity.
Process
Supplies.
No. 1, North-western—
$
5,852,347
92,156
$
930,958
179,823
$
116,230
15,781
$
405,314
30,991
356,356
19,695
22,049
2,002
Totals	
6,300,859
1,130,476
154,060
438,307
No. 2, North-eastern—
3,177,131
4,269,000
3,000
640,769
510,471
27,784
67,292
37,240
1,537
140,804
34,679
1,303
Placer-mining  -  	
7,449,131
1,179,024
106,069
176,786
No. 3, Central—
436,520
100,216
369,872
24,056
90,893
25,891
141,889
5,202
13,393
104
17,105
851
21,252
1,307
48,499
25
Placer-mining — - -  	
Structural  —
Totals       	
930,664
263,875
31,453
71,083
No. 4, Southern—
Lode-mining   	
Placer-mining                                         	
Coal-mining   .
10,104,574
64,440
1,271,196
1,506,582
10,853
372,806
8,610
700
213,411
361
46,955
7,781
847
544,446
85
57,943
40
Totals  	
11,440,210
1,899,551
269,355
602,514
No. 5, Eastern—■
61.384,608
44,375
6,047,973
506,280
21,150
8,975,921
28,291
824,290
71,737
3.914
1,824,703
927
27,832
1,807
686
2,742,965
5,537
275,000
4,703
Coal-mining ..
MiRppllnneoilR
Totals     —-	
68,004,386
9,904,153
1,855,955
3,028,455
No. 6, Western—
Lode-mining
19,444,588
34,864
17,552,157
12,465,171
1,898,611
3,479,995
3,608
2,614,303
422,740
451,965
298,866
164
221,831
42,936
85,622
1,703,171
Coal-mining -      	
Miscellaneous    	
780,748
9,419
34,842
Totals    _ _	
51,395,391
6,972,611
649,419
2,528,185
Grand totals, 1937	
Grand totals, 1936     -	
Grand totals, 1935
145,520,641
142,663,065
143,239,953
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
6,845,330
4,434,501
4,552,730
Note.—The above figures, compiled from returns on the subject made by companies and individuals, illustrate
the amount of capital employed in the mining industry in 1937, the amount of money distributed in salaries and
wages, fuel and electricity, and process supplies  (explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc.).
Capital employed includes: Present cash value of the land (excluding minerals) ; present value of buildings,
fixtures, machinery, tools, and other equipment; inventory value of materials on hand, ore in process, fuel and
miscellaneous supplies on hand; inventory value of finished products on hand; operating capital (cash, bills and
accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, etc.). THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 33
A special survey was made covering the mining industry for 1937 and the following data
were compiled from all returns received, and is additional to the statistics set forth in Table
XVIII. It should also be kept in mind that in the aggregate a substantial amount can be
credited to individuals who do not make a return to the Department.
Origin.
Machinery.
Building
Materials.
Food Supplies.
Totals.
$
2,090,647
526,399
172,456
19,072
$
616,930
31,359
$
1,491,095
$
4,198,672
557,758
172,456
19,072
Totals   .  	
2,808,574
648,289
1,491,095
4,947,958
TABLE XIX.—Tonnage, Number op Mines, Net and Gross Value of Lode Minerals,
1901-1937.
District.
Year.
Tonnage.
No. of Shipping-mines.
No. of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons.
Net Value
to Shipper of
Lode Minerals
produced.
Gross Value
of Lode
Minerals
produced.
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1937
1937
1937
1937
1937
920,416
998,999
1,286,176
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,804,114
2,083,606
2.057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,690,110
3,188,865
2,761,579
2,892,849
2,112,975
2,178,187
1,562,645
1,573,186
2,421,839
3,397,105
3,849,269
4,775,073
5,416,021
6,241,310
6,977,681
6,803,846
5,549,103
4,340,158
4,030,778
5,087,334
4,916.149
4,456,521
227,643
103,261
26,709
675,412
2,642,565
2,469,664
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
175
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
13
5
7
35
108
17
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
7
2
5
25
62
12
$14,100,282
11,581,153
12,103,237
12,909,035
15,980,164
18,484,102
17,316,847
15,847,411
15,451,141
14,728,731
11,454,063
17.662,766
17,190,838
15,225,061
19,992,149
31,483,014
26,788,474
27,590,278
19,750,498
19,444,365
12,920,398
19,227,857
25,347,092
35,538,247
46,200,135
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
9,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,368
20,243,278
25,407,914
29,975,608
1,979,099
1,513,485
192,074
2,965,557
29,104,366
9,008,279
51,508,031
44,977,082
48,281.825
51,174,859
40,915,395
22,535,573
19,700,235
25,007,137
33,895,930
40,597,569
43,666,452
2,472,782
1,515,095
276,091
No. 4 District	
3,699,979
No. 5 District	
44,578,312
No. 6 District	
10,370,524
Totals	
1937
1901-1937
6,145,254
119,166,522
185
113
$44,762,860
$62,912,783
979,490,209
	 A 34
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE XX.—Men employed in the Mining Industry of British Columbia, 1901-1937.
District.
Lode-mining.
c
P
a
COAL-MININO.
•a
a
P
<
3,041
931
3,101
910
3,137
1,127
3,278
1,175
3,127
1,280
3,415
1,390
2,862
907
4,432
1,641
4,713
1,705
5,903
1,855
5,212
1,661
5,275
1,855
4,950
1,721
4,267
1,465
3,708
1,283
3,694
1,366
3,760
1,410
3,658
1,769
4,145
1,821
4,191
2,158
4,722
2,163
4,712
1,932
4,342
1,807
3,894
1,524
3,828
1,615
3,757
1,565
3,646
1,579
3,814
1,520
3,675
1,353
3,389
1,256
2,957
1,125
2,628
980
2,241
853
2,050
843
2,145
826
2,015
799
Stbuc-
TURAl,
Materials.
si
No. 1 District
No. 2 District
No. 3 District.
No. 4 District.
No. 5 District
No. 6 District.
Totals....
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1937
1937
1937
1937
1937
299
415
355
341
425
688
874
1,134
1,122
1,291
1,124
736
219
662
143
470
680
704
567
184
472
435
472
773
741
709
357
290
626
513
074
355
510
102
353
298
606
671
707
926
310
463
355
786
796
740
959
284 287
910 254
28 ! 49
32
57
60
426
1,361
1,226
1,212
1,126
1,088
1,163
1,240
1,303
1,239
1,127
1,070
1.237
1,159
1,364
1,505
1,433
1,435
2,036
2,198
1,764
1,746
1,605
975
1,239
1,516
1,680
2,840
1,735
1,916
2,469
2,052
1,260
834
900
1,335
1,729
1,497
1,840
270
119
42
271
652
464
3,948
3,345
2,750
3,306
3,710
3,983
3,943
3,694
3,254
3,709
3,594
3,837
4,278
4,174
4,144
5,393
5,488
4,390
4,259
3,679
2,330
2,749
3,618
4,033
5,138
4,341
4,587
5,176
4,978
3,576
2,297
2,255
3,121
4,525
4,237
4,799
557
373
91
697
2,013
1,690
808
854
911
966
832
581
542
531
631
907
720
61
304 j
453 |
318 I
2,461
2,842
2,748
2,948
3,197
3,157
2,036
2,436
2,890
2,771
2,678
1937 | 1,371  | 3,603
1,818
5,421
1,168 I 3,027
3,974
4,011
4,264
4,453
4,407
4,805
3,769
6,073
6,418
7,758
6,873
7,130
6,671
5,732
4,991
5,060
5,170
5,247
5,966
6,349
6,885
6,644
6,149
5,418
5,443
5,322
5,225
5,334
5,028
4,645
4,082
3,608
3,094
2,893
2,971
I 2,814
10
67
258
462
1,489
2,286
4
33
131
166
533
867
14
100
389
628
2,022
493
647
412
492
843
460
536
376
377
536
931
66
57
90
49
133
324
138
368
544
344
526
329
269
187
270
288
4
1
4
124
122
120
268
170
380
344
408
360
754
7,922
7,356
7,014
7,759
8,117
8,788
7,712
9,767
9,672
11,467
10,467
10,967
10,949
9,906
9,135
10,453
10,658
9,637
10,225
10,028
9,215
9,393
9,767
9,451
10,581
14,172
14,830
15,424
15,565
14,032
12,171
10,524
11,369
12,985
13,737
14,179
974
1,380
322
1   |     1.472
687 I    7.000
246      4,981
3,153
938 I 16,129 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
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REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
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< H M THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 41
TABLE XXII.—Mining Companies employing an Average of Ten
or more Men during 1937.
Shipping
Mines.
Days Operating.
Average Number
op Men.
Tonnage.
Mine.
Mill.
Mine.
Mill.
Mined.
Milled.
■WollrliiTi
233
117
365
254
299
364
283
282
299
156
Nil
313
163
286
298
340
120
334
327
250
300
241
241
314
300
365
365
120
350
296
289
335
344
365
365
341
360
240
358
365
142
38
307
335
365
345
311
270
360
303
187
110
365
299
338
283
282
299
213
339
334
103
352
365
196
341
243
73
45
365
289
365
118
365
365
358
353
180
244
365
132
30
64
304
365
348
365
268
353
4
9
174
15
26
25
161
80
28
15
11
7
11
12
31
22
34
40
36
117
20
265
654
8
17
91
12
25
15
35
16
12
31
14
21
87
10
82
95
64
61
8
24
78
15
14
15
86
346
35
215
12
695
15
7
6
32
11
6
13
13
6
2
8
6
8
10
32
65
7
171
260
2
2
16
10
2
10
2
10
3
19
23
9
16
2
3
16
24
5
25
6
18
8
27
7
289
2,311
2,220
201,206
100
17,043
14,383
69,324
33,903
13,180
10,430
2,742
2,226
2,220
201,206
EdyePass    	
Surf Point              	
7,140
Surf Inlet.	
12,432
69,324
33,903
Windpass   	
13,180
10,430
17,727
15,376
114
3,411
956
34,885
6,500
61,025
77,858
7,240
452,352
2,227,123
56,180
12,100
25,008
3,861
3,249
375
15,934
998
63
650
104
2,487
41,600
974
37,851
45,978
54,243
34,633
2,440
9,302
39,356
7,948
2,059
1,486
422
11,074
170,686
32,556
147,876
6,056
2,116,075
15,376
Highland Bell   	
3,411
970
34,885
6,500
59,115
77,887
Osoyoos    .	
7,240
444,552
2,219,576
Whitewater   	
56,180
12,100
Mammoth  — —  -	
34,705
3,249
375
15,934
2,403
39,935
974
Relief Arlington ._ __. ■
26,822
45,984
54,243
34,633
2,440
8,702
39,356
Velvet.
7,948
1,604
1,486
Vidette- _   -    	
11,016
Bralorne .— —   —  	
170,686
32,556
130,864
6,056
2,116,075
B.C. Nickel Mines, Ltd  	 A 42
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
TABLE XXII.—Mining Companies employing an Average op Ten
or more Men during 1937—Continued.
Non-shipping Mines
Name of Mine or Company.
Days Operating.
Average Number
op Men.
Tonnage.
Mine.
Mill.
Mine.
Mill.
Mined.
Milled.
364
61
365
220
365
306
365
365
162
265
199
255
350
300
311
210
61
102
216
312
350
173
92
61
94
40
55
12
25
19
16
10
12
10
14
25
39
22
10
11
25
15
15
20
19
33
28
7
8,831
8,831
Cons. M. & S. Co. (Anyox)   	
Big Missouri.—  	
Cariboo Hudson Gold Mines, Ltd—  	
Cons. M. & S. Co. (Aiken Lake).   	
Golden Zone, Osoyoos  	
Utica Mines (1937), Ltd   _
Gold Belt Mining Co., Ltd   	
Reeves MacDonald Mines, Ltd   	
	
Spud Valley Gold Mines, Ltd   	
	
Zeballos Gold Peak Mines, Ltd  	
Taylor Windfall Gold Mining Co  	
B.R.X. (1935) Cons. Mines, Ltd..  	
* No shipments made until 1938. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 43
SYNOPSIS OF MINING LAWS OF B.C.
Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
The mining laws of British Columbia are very liberal in their nature and compare
favourably with those of any other part of the world. The terms under which both lode and
placer claims and placer leaseholds are held are such that a prospector is greatly encouraged
in his work, and the titles, especially for mineral claims and placer-mining leaseholds, are
perfect. The fees required to be paid are as small as possible, consistent with a proper
administration of the mining industry, and are generally lower than those commonly imposed
elsewhere. Provision is also made for the formation of mining partnerships practically
without expense, and a party of miners is enabled to take advantage of these sections of the
Acts so that such miners may work their claims jointly.
Placer-mining leases are granted for a period of twenty years and are approximately 80
acres in size. On a lode claim of 51 acres the expenditure of $500 in work, which may be
spread over five years, is required to obtain a Crown grant, and surface rights are obtainable
at a small figure, in no case exceeding $5 per acre.
The following synopsis of the mining laws will be found sufficient to enable the miner
or intending investor to obtain a general knowledge of their scope and requirements; for
particulars, however, the reader is referred to the Acts relating to mining, which may be
obtained from any Mining Recorder, or from the Department of Mines or the King's Printer,
Victoria, B.C.
Free Miners' Certificates.
Any person over the age of 18, and any joint-stock company, may obtain a free miner's
certificate on payment of the required fee.
The fee to an individual for a free miner's certificate is $5 for one year. To a joint-stock
company having a capital of $100,000, or less, the fee for a year is $50; if capitalized beyond
this, the fee is $100.
The free miners' certificates run from date of issue and expire on the 31st day of May
next after its date, or some subsequent 31st day of May (that is to say, a certificate may be
taken out a year or more in advance if desired). Certificates may be obtained for any part
of a year, terminating on May 31st, for a proportionately less fee.
The possession of this certificate entitles the holder to enter upon all lands of the Crown,
and upon any other lands on which the right to so enter is not specially reserved, for the
purpose of prospecting for minerals, locating claims, and mining.
A free miner can only hold, by location, one mineral claim on the same vein or lode, but
may acquire others by purchase. Under the " Placer-mining Act," a free miner may locate
one placer claim or leasehold in his own name and one placer claim or leasehold for each of
two free miners for whom he acts as agent, on any separate creek, river-bed, bar or dry
diggings.    Other placer claims or leaseholds may be acquired by purchase.
In the event of a free miner allowing his certificate to lapse, his mining property (if not
Crown-granted) reverts to the Crown (subject to the conditions set out in the next succeeding
paragraph), but where other free miners are interested as partners or co-owners the interest
of the defaulter becomes vested in the continuing co-owners or partners pro rata, according to
their interests.
Six months' extension of time within which to revive title in mining property which has
been forfeited through the lapse of a free miner's certificate is allowed. This privilege is
given only if the holder of the property obtains a special free miner's certificate within six
months after the 31st of May on which his ordinary certificate lapsed. The fee for this
special certificate in the case of a person is $15 and in that of a company $300.
It is not necessary for a shareholder, as such, in an incorporated mining company to be
the holder of a free miner's certificate. A 44 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Mineral Claims.
Mineral claims are located and held under the provisions of the " Mineral Act."
A mineral claim is a piece of land not exceeding in area fifty-one and sixty-five one-
hundredths acres. The angles must be right angles unless the boundaries, or one of them,
are the same as those of a previously recorded claim.
No special privileges are allowed for the discovery of new mineral claims or districts.
A mineral claim is located by erecting three " legal posts," which are stakes having a
height of not less than 4 feet above ground and squared 4 inches at least on each face for not
less than a foot from the top. A tree-stump so cut and squared also constitutes a legal post.
A cairn of stones not less than 4 feet in height and not less than 1 foot in diameter 4 feet
above the ground may also be used as a legal post.
The " discovery post" is placed at the point where the mineral in place is discovered.
Nos. 1 and 2 posts are placed as near as possible on the line of the ledge or vein, shown
by the discovery post, and mark the boundaries of the claim. Upon each of these three posts
must be written the name of the claim, the name of the locator, and the date of location. On
No. 1 post, in addition, the following must be written:   " Initial post.    Direction of Post No.
2 {giving approximate compass bearing]  feet of this claim lie on the right and ■—■	
feet on the left of the line from No. 1 to No. 2 posts."
The location-line between Nos. 1 and 2 posts must be distinctly marked—in a timbered
locality by blazing trees and cutting underbrush, and in bare country by monuments of earth
or rock not less than 2 feet in diameter at the base, and at least 2 feet high—so that the line
can be distinctly seen.
Mineral claims must be recorded in the Mining Recorder's office for the mining division
in which they are situate within fifteen days from the date of location, one day extra being
allowed for each 10 miles of distance from the recording office after the first 10 miles. If a
claim is not recorded in time it is deemed abandoned and open for relocation, but if the
original locator wishes to relocate he can only do so by permission of the Gold Commissioner
of the district and upon the payment of a fee of $10. This applies also to a claim abandoned
for any reason whatever.
Mineral claims are, until the Crown grant is issued, held practically on a yearly lease,
a condition of which is that during such year assessment-work be performed on the same to
the value of at least $100, or a payment of such sum be made to the Mining Recorder. Such
assessments must be recorded before the expiration of the year, or the claim is deemed abandoned. If, however, the required assessment-work has been performed within the year, but
not recorded within that time, a free miner may, within thirty days thereafter, record such
assessment-work upon payment of an additional fee of $10. The actual cost of the survey of
a mineral claim, to an amount not exceeding $100, may also be recorded as assessment-work.
If, during any year, work is done to a greater extent than the required $100, any further sum
of $100—but not less—may be recorded and counted as further assessments; such excess
work must be recorded during the year in which it is performed. All work done on a mineral
claim between the time of its location and recording may be counted as work done during the
first period of one year from the recording. As soon as assessment-work to the extent of $500
is recorded and a survey made of the claim, the owner of a mineral claim is entitled to a
Crown grant on payment of a fee of $25, and giving the necessary notices required by the Act.
Liberal provisions are also made in the Act for obtaining mill-sites and other facilities in the
way of workings and drains for the better working of claims.
Placer Claims.
Placer-mining is governed by the " Placer-mining Act," and by the interpretation clause
its scope is defined as " the mining of any natural stratum or bed of earth, gravel, or cement
mined for gold or other precious minerals or stones." Placer claims are of four classes, as
follows:—
"' Creek diggings ':  any mine in the bed of any stream or ravine:
" ' Bar diggings,': any mine between high- and low-water marks on a river, lake, or other
large body of water:
" ' Dry diggings ':   any mine over which water never extends: THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 45
" ' Precious-stone diggings ': any deposit of precious stones, whether in veins, beds, or
gravel deposits."
The following provisions as to extent of the various classes of claims are made by the
Act:—
" In ' creek diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet long, measured in the
direction of the general course of the stream, and shall extend in. width one thousand
feet, measured from the general course of the stream five hundred feet on either side
of the centre thereof:
" In ' bar diggings ' a claim shall be :■—•
"(a.)  A piece of land not exceeding two hundred and fifty feet square on any bar
which is covered at high water;  or
"(b.)  A strip of land two hundred and fifty feet long at high-water mark, and in
width extending from high-water mark to extreme low-water mark:
" In ' dry diggings ' a claim shall be two hundred and fifty feet square."
The following provision is made for new discoveries of placer-mining ground:—
" If any free miner, or party of free miners, discovers a new locality for the prosecution
of placer-mining and such discovery be established to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner, placer claims of the following sizes shall be allowed to such discoverers, namely:—
" To one discoverer, one claim    600 feet in length;
" To a party of two discoverers, two claims amounting together to 1,000 feet in length;
" And to each member of a party beyond two in number, a claim of the ordinary size only.
" The width of such claims shall be the same as ordinary placer claims of the same class:
Provided that where a discovery claim has been established in any locality no further discovery shall be allowed within five miles therefrom, measured along the watercourses."
Every placer claim shall be as nearly as possible rectangular in form, and marked by
four legal posts at the corners thereof, firmly fixed in the ground. On each of such posts
shall be written the name of the locator, the number and date of issue of his free miner's
certificate, the date of the location, and the name given to the claim. In timbered localities
boundary-lines of a placer claim shall be blazed so that the posts can be distinctly seen, underbrush cut, and the locator shall also erect legal posts not more than 125 feet apart on all
boundary-lines. In localities where there is no timber or underbrush, monuments of earth
and rock, not less than 2 feet high and 2 feet in diameter at base, may be erected in lieu of the
last-mentioned legal posts, but not in the case of the four legal posts marking the corners of
the claim.
A placer claim must be recorded in the office of the Mining Recorder for the mining
division within which the same is situate, within fifteen days after the location thereof, if
located within 10 miles of the office of the Mining Recorder by the most direct means of travel.
One additional day shall be allowed for every 10 miles additional or fraction thereof. The
number of days shall be counted inclusive of the days upon which such location was made, but
exclusive of the day of application for record. The application for such record shall be under
oath and in the form set out in the Schedule to the Act. A claim which shall not have been
recorded within the prescribed period shall be deemed to have been abandoned.
To hold a placer claim for more than one year it must be rerecorded before the expiration
of the record or rerecord.
A placer claim must be worked by the owner, or some one on his behalf, continuously, as
far as practicable, during working-hours. If work is discontinued for a period of seven days,
except during the close season, lay-over, leave of absence, sickness, or for some other reason
to the satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner, the claim is deemed abandoned.
Lay-overs are declared by the Gold Commissioner upon proof being given to him that the
supply of water is insufficient to work the claim. Under similar circumstances he has also the
power to declare a close season, by notice in writing and published in the Gazette, for all or
any claims in his district. Tunnel and drain licences are also granted by him on the person
applying giving security for any damage that may arise. Grants of right-of-way for the
construction of tunnels or drains across other claims are also granted on payment of a fee
of $25, the owner of the claims crossed having the right for tolls, etc., on the tunnel or drain
which may be constructed.. These tolls, however, are, so far as the amount goes, under the
discretion of the Gold Commissioner.
5 A 46 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Co-owners and Partnerships.
In both the " Mineral " and " Placer-mining " Acts provision is made for the formation of
mining partnerships, both of a general and limited liability character. These are extensively
taken advantage of and have proved very satisfactory in their working. Should a co-owner
fail or refuse to contribute his proportion of the expenditure required as assessment-work on
a claim he may be " advertised out," and his interest in the claim shall become vested in his
co-owners who have made the required expenditure, pro rata according to their former
interests.
It should not be forgotten that if any co-owner permits his free miner's certificate to lapse,
the title of his associates is not prejudiced, but his interest reverts to the remaining co-owners;
provided that said co-owner has not taken advantage of the six months' period of grace allowed
for the taking-out of a special free miner's certificate, thus reviving the title to his interest.
Placer-mining Leases.
Leases of unoccupied Crown lands approximately 80 acres in extent may be granted
by the Gold Commissioner of the district after location has been made by staking along a
" location-line " not more than one-half a mile (2,640 feet) in length. In this line one bend,
or change of direction, is permitted. Where a straight line is followed two posts only are
necessary—namely, an " initial post " and a " final post." Where there is a change of direction
a legal post must be placed to mark the point of the said change. The leasehold is allowed
a width not in excess of one-quarter mile (1,320 feet), and the locator, both on his "initial
post" and in his notice of intention to apply, which is posted at the office of the Mining
Recorder, is required to state how many feet are included in the location to the right and
how many feet to the left of the location-line.
That section of the Act dealing with the staking of placer-mining leases follows :■—
" 105. (1.) For the purpose of locating a placer leasehold, a line to be known as the
' location-line ' shall be marked on the ground by placing a legal post at each end, one post
to be known as the ' Initial Post' and the other as the ' Final Post.' The direction of the
location-line may change at not more than one point throughout its length, and an intermediate
legal post shall be placed at the point at which the direction changes. The total length of the
location-line, following its change of direction (if any), shall not exceed two thousand six
hundred and forty feet.
"(2.) Upon the initial post and the final post shall be written the words 'Initial Post'
and ' Final Post' respectively, together with the name of the locator and the date of the
location. On the initial post shall also be written the approximate compass-bearing of the
final post, and a statement of the number of feet of the leasehold lying on the right and on the
left of the location-line, as viewed from the initial post, not exceeding in the aggregate a width
of thirteen hundred and twenty feet, thus:   ' Direction of Final Post, . feet of
this claim lie on the right and feet on the left of the location-line.'    In addition to the
foregoing, where there is a change of direction in the location-line as marked on the ground,
the number ' 1 ' shall be written on the initial post; the number ' 2 ' shall be written on the
intermediate post; and the number ' 3 ' shall be written on the final post. There also shall be
affixed to the initial post a notice to the following effect, namely: ' Application will be made
under the " Placer Mining Act" for a lease of the ground within this location.'
"(3.) The location-line shall at the time of location be marked between the legal posts
throughout its length so that it can be distinctly seen; in a timbered locality, by blazing trees
and cutting underbrush, and in a locality where there is neither timber nor underbrush, by
placing legal posts or monuments of earth or stones not less than two feet high and not less
than two feet in diameter at the base, so that the location-line can be distinctly seen.
"(4.) Where, from the nature or shape of the surface of the ground, it is impracticable
to mark the location-line of a leasehold as provided by this section, the leasehold may be located
by placing legal posts as witness-posts, as near as possible to the location-line, and writing on
each witness-post the distance and compass-bearing of some designated point on the location-
line from the witness-post; and the distances and compass-bearing so written on the witness-
posts shall be set out in the application for the lease and in any lease granted thereon.
"(5.) The locator shall, within thirty days after the date of the location, post a notice in
Form I in the office of the Mining Recorder, which notice shall set out:— THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 47
"(a.)
"(b.)
"(c)
The name of the intending applicant or each applicant if more than one, and
the numbers of their free miners' certificates:
The date of the location:
The number of feet lying to the right and left of the location-line, and the
approximate area or size of the ground.
The words written on the initial post and final post shall be set out in full in the notice;  and
as accurate a description as possible of the ground to be acquired shall be given, having
special reference to any prior locations it may join, and the general locality of the ground to
be acquired."
Examples of Various Methods op laying out Placer Leaseholds.
Showing Areas secured with Location-lines of Various Lengths.
Final Post
Initial Post
Initial  Post-'
Initial PostNo
inal Post A 48 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Another provision is that there must be affixed to the " initial post" and to the " final
post" a numbered metal identification tag furnished by the Mining Recorder with each free
miner's certificate issued. These tags may be attached to the posts, or placed in a container
within a cairn, either at the time of location or some time during the succeeding year, but
must be so placed before the Mining Recorder will grant the first certificate of work in respect
of the leasehold.
The annual rental on a placer-mining lease is $30, and the amount to be expended
annually on development-work is $250.
Authority also has been given for the granting of special placer-mining leases in locations
other than has been defined.
For more detailed information the reader is referred to the complete " Placer-mining
Act," which may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.
Table of Fees, Mineral Act and Placer-mining Act.
Individual free miner's certificate, annual fee   $5.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital $100,000 or less), annual fee  50.00
Company free miner's certificate (capital over $100,000), annual fee  100.00
Recording mineral or placer claim   2.50
Recording certificate of work, mineral claim  2.50
Rerecord of placer claim   2.50
Recording lay-over  2.50
Recording abandonment, mineral claim   10.00
Recording abandonment, placer claim  2.50
Recording any affidavit under three folios  2.50
Per folio over three, in addition   .30
Records in " Records of Conveyances," same as affidavits.
Filing documents, " Mineral Act " .1  .25
Filing documents, " Placer-mining Act "   1.00
Recording certificate of work, placer-mining lease   2.50
For Crown grant of mineral rights under " Mineral Act "   25.00
For Crown grant of surface rights of mineral claim under " Mineral Act"  10.00
For every lease under " Placer-mining Act "   5.00
Provisional Free Miners' Certificates (Placer) Act.
This Act provides for the issuance of " provisional free miners' certificates " for the
locating, recording, representing, and working of placer claims of a size, and according to
the terms, and in the manner set out in Parts II. and III. of the " Placer-mining Act." Any
person over 18 years of age who has resided in the Province continuously for a period of
not less than six months prior to date of his application may, on application accompanied by
a statutory declaration or other satisfactory evidence as to his age and period of residence
in the Province, obtain from any Gold Commissioner or Mining Recorder a provisional free
miner's certificate. No fees are payable in respect of such certificate, and it abolishes the
fees payable in respect of the recording or rerecording of placer claims, but no record or
rerecord of a claim shall be granted for a longer period than one year without the payment
of fees. It should be pointed out that the provisional free miner's certificate does not carry
the privileges of an ordinary free miner's certificate as to the staking and working of placer-
mining leases or mineral claims.
The Act also gives the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, as a means of unemployment
relief, power to make provision for the establishment, equipment, maintenance, and operation
of one or more placer training camps at suitable locations, at which unemployed persons who
hold provisional free miners' certificates and are British subjects may acquire knowledge and
training in the art of placer-mining and may be afforded gainful work in the recovery of
minerals by placer-mining. Reserves for the location of such camps shall not exceed one
mile in length by one-half mile in width, and the right is given to enter into agreements with
private holders under the Act for the development of their ground by means of unemployment
relief camps. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 49
Department of Mines Act, 1937.
The " Department of Mines Act" empowers the Minister of Mines to organize the Department or to reorganize it from time to time to meet changing conditions in the mining industry.
It provides for examination and certification of assayers; for the conducting of short courses
of lectures in practical geology and mineralogy; and for the purchase of ore from the Provincial sampling plants. The said Act also provides for the expenditure of public moneys
for the construction, reconstruction, or repair of trails, roads, and bridges to facilitate the
exploration of the mineral resources of any mining district, or in the operation and development of any mining property.
Iron and Steel Bounties Act, 1929.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may enter into an agreement with any person
whereby the Crown will pay to that person, out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, bounties
on pig-iron and steel shapes when manufactured within the Province, as follows:—
(a.)  In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced from
ore mined in the Province, a bounty not to exceed three dollars per ton of two
thousand pounds:
(6.)  In respect of pig-iron manufactured from ore, on the proportion produced from
ore mined outside the Province, a bounty not to exceed one dollar and fifty
cents per ton of two thousand pounds:
(c.)  In respect of steel shapes of commercial utility manufactured in the Province,
a bounty not to exceed one dollar per ton of two thousand pounds.
Bounty, as on pig-iron under this Act, may be paid upon the molten iron from ore which
in the electric furnace, Bessemer or other furnace, enters into the manufacture of steel by
the process employed in such furnace;   the weight of such iron to be ascertained from the
weight of the steel so manufactured.
Bounty on steel shapes under this Act shall be paid only upon such steel shapes as are
manufactured in a rolling-mill having a rated productive capacity per annum of at least
twenty thousand tons of two thousand pounds per ton.
Phosphate-mining Act, 1925.
This Act takes the mineral tricalcium phosphate out of the " Mineral Act" for the purpose of administration. This is done to make possible the staking of phosphate claims one
mile square in area.
Any person desirous of securing a licence to prospect for phosphate is required to stake
the land he may wish to acquire and work; and after such staking shall post in the office of
the Gold Commissioner for the mining division in which the land is situated a notice of his
intention to apply for a licence. Then the applicant is required to make application in
writing to such Gold Commissioner for a prospecting licence over the land for any term not
exceeding one year. The Gold Commissioner shall forward this application to the Hon. the
Minister of Mines, who may grant to the applicant a prospecting licence. Application shall
be accompanied by a licence fee of $100. The land to be acquired shall be of a rectangular
shape and shall not exceed 640 acres for each licence, measuring 80 chains by 80 chains, and
boundary-lines shall be run true north and south and true east and west. A renewal of the
licence may be obtained for a second period of one year upon payment of further licence fee
of $100, and furnishing proof that he has explored for phosphate and has expended not less
than $50 in such exploration-work. An extension of the term for a third period of one year
may be granted upon like conditions and terms. Provision is made for the payment of $150
in cash in lieu of exploration-work. The cost of the survey of the land, not being less than
$150, can be counted as exploration-work. If during any one year work is done to a greater
extent than the required $50—but not less—same may be applied as work for any subsequent
year that the licence remains in force.
The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may grant a lease of the land covered by a prospecting licence to any licensee who during the existence of his licence, or within thirty days
following the expiry of same, gives satisfactory evidence that he has discovered phosphate on
such lands. He shall at the same time pay a sum sufficient to cover the first annual rental
and also shall have expended not less than $50 per licence in exploration-work during the A 50 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
term of the last renewal licence or tender in lieu thereof the sum of $50 per licence. Such
lease shall be granted for a term of five years, renewable for three years, and for a further
three years after the expiry of the first renewal. A lease shall not be issued until the land
has been surveyed by an authorized land surveyor. An annual rental rate of 15 cents per
acre shall be payable under said lease.
The lease provides for the expenditure of not less than $100 per annum in the development of a mine, or the payment of $100 in lieu of such development-work. Excess work done
in any one year may be applied as work to subsequent years. Provision is also made for the
purchase of phosphate-mining rights.
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act.
At the 1935 session of the Provincial Legislature " An Act to amend and consolidate the
Enactments regulating the Working of Metalliferous Mines, Quarries, and Metallurgical
Works " was passed. This Act is known as the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," and,
in its general tone, its clear purpose is to maintain the highest standard in respect of safety
and of healthy conditions, both on the surface and underground in mining operations. The
idea is to not only assure, as far as practicable, the protection of workmen against injury,
but to establish those conditions best calculated to safeguard the health of the men employed.
The Act also provides for the drafting of regulations, if such are found necessary, for the
protection of men who are working under conditions which may lead to pulmonary disability.
This Act may be divided into six parts, as follows:—
(1.)   Administration:
(2.)   Duties of owners, managers, and others:
(3.)   Special Rules for protection of miners:
(4.) General Rules, having reference to: (a) Employees; (6) Ventilation; (c) Explosives and blasting; (d) Fire-protection; (e) Connection between mines; (/)
Mine signals; (g) Aid to injured; (h) Prevention of dust; (i) Handling of
water; (j) Sanitation; (fc) Protection of working-places, shafts, winzes, raises,
etc.; (I) Ladder-ways; (m) Shaft equipment and operation; (n) Testing of
brakes; (o) Haulage; (p) Protection from machinery; (q) Electrical installations :
(5.) General Rules for quarries:
(6.)  Supplemental. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 51
SUMMARY OF ACTS SPECIALLY RELATING TO MINING.
(The complete Acts may be obtained from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C.)
Mining Licences under the Coal and Petroleum Act.
Any person desiring to prospect for coal, petroleum, or natural gas upon any unsurveyed
unreserved lands in which these resources are held by the Crown may acquire a licence to do
so over a rectangular block of land not exceeding 640 acres, of which the boundaries shall
run due north and south and east and west, and no side shall exceed 80 chains (1 mile) in
length. Before entering into possession of the said lands he shall place at the corner of such
block a legal stake, or initial post, and shall inscribe thereon his name and the angle represented by such post, thus: " A. B.'s N.E. corner," or as the case may be, and shall post in a
conspicuous place upon the said land, and also in the Government office of the land recording
district, notice of his intention to apply, as well as publishing the same in the B.C. Gazette
and local newspaper once each week for four consecutive weeks. If the area applied for is
surveyed no staking is required, but the same procedure with regard to advertising notice
of intention to apply is necessary.
The application for said licence shall be in writing, in duplicate, and shall contain the
best written description possible, with a diagram of the land sought to be acquired, and shall
be accompanied with a fee of $100. The application shall be made to the Commissioner of
Lands for the district, and by him forwarded to the Minister of Lands, who will grant such
licence—provided no reasons arise to the contrary—for a period not to exceed one year, and
at the expiration of the first year an extension of such licence may be granted for a second
or third year at a fee of $100.
Where coal is discovered during the existence of licence or within thirty days after
expiration, the land held under licence, having been surveyed and licence conditions fulfilled,
may be leased for five years at rental of 15 cents an acre, subject to renewals for five successive periods of three years each, renewal fee being $100 for each lease, in addition to
annual rental.
Lessees, on showing continuous work has been done and reasonable expenditure made for
development, may, after carrying out the provisions of the lease, purchase at $20 per acre
where surface is available, or $15 per acre for under-surface rights where surface is not
available. Lands under the sea may be purchased at $15 per acre. Provided also that, in
addition to the rental or purchase price, there shall be paid to the Government as a royalty
2% cents a barrel (35 imperial gallons) of crude petroleum raised or gotten from such land.
(See chapter 162, R.S.B.C. 1924.)
Taxation Act.
A preliminary note is essential to the understanding of this Act. As the law has stood,
a Crown-granted mineral claim on which taxes were in arrears for a number of years was
offered for sale by the Government at a tax sale, with arrears of taxes plus interest and
charges and Crown-grant fees as an upset price. If no sale was made the property remained
in the hands of the Assessor until desired by some one, when it could only be purchased by
tender. It was not open to location under the " Mineral Act " and a prospector had no
protection, and to relieve the situation an amending Act was passed.
Under the amended Act such reverted Crown-granted mineral claim may be obtained by
any person under a lease for one year upon payment of $25, and a renewal of such lease
may be granted upon payment of further $25 for a further period of one year, but no longer.
During the period of such lease the lessee has the right to enter, prospect, and mine on such
mineral claim, save for coal, petroleum, and natural gas, and during such time the lessee
has the option to purchase such Crown-granted mineral claim upon payment of all taxes,
costs, and interest which remained due and unpaid on such claim on the date of its forfeiture
to the Crown, together with an amount equal to all taxes and interest which, except for its
forfeiture to the Crown, would have been payable in respect thereof from the date of the
lease to the date of application for a Crown grant. If, however, the lessee establishes to the
satisfaction of the Gold Commissioner that he has expended upon the claim in mining-
development work a sum of not less than $200 a year during the continuance of the lease, A 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
then the payment of the sum in respect of taxes and penalties from the date of the lease to
the date of application for a Crown grant shall not be required. Provision also is made for
the grouping of adjoining claims, not exceeding eight in number, and the performing on one
of such claims mining-development work for all of the claims.
A person may obtain a lease, or interest in a lease, of eight such claims in the same
mining division.
Such leases are not transferable and are subject to the rights any person may already
hold to any portion of the surface of such Crown-granted mineral claim.
Taxation of Mines.
Crown-granted mineral claims are subject to a tax of 25 cents per acre. The tax becomes
due on April 1st in each year, and if unpaid on the following June 30th is deemed to be
delinquent.
All mines, other than coal, are subject to an output tax (payable quarterly) of 2 per
cent, on gross value of mineral, less cost of transportation from mine to reduction-works and
the cost of treating same at reduction-works or on the mining premises.
Any such mine, not realizing on ore shipments a market value of $5,000 in any one year,
is entitled to a refund of the output tax paid.
All mines are subject to a tax upon income, subject to the exemptions and allowances
given in the " Income Tax Act"; provided, in the case of those mines paying an output tax,
that an income tax is only collected if such tax prove greater than the output tax, and the
output tax is then regarded as part payment of the income tax.
In addition to the ordinary working expenses, mines are allowed to deduct from their
income a charge for:—■
(1.)   Development—being such proportion of this capital expenditure as is ascertained to be" chargeable to the year's operation:
(2.)  Depreciation of buildings and plant:
(3.)  Depletion—being such proportion of the capital cost of the mine as, being a
wasting asset, is ascertained to be chargeable to the year's operation.
The above-mentioned charges are allowable at the discretion of the Minister of Finance,
subject, however, to an appeal to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The rate of income tax varies from 1 per cent, up to a maximum of 10 per cent, on
incomes of $19,000 and over.
Coal is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except coal shipped to coke-ovens
within the Province.    Tax payable monthly.
Coke is subject to a tax of 10 cents per ton of 2,240 lb., except in respect of coke produced from coal upon which this tax has already been paid.    Tax payable monthly.
Coal land from which coal is being mined (Class A) is taxed at 1 per cent, upon the
assessed value, in addition to any other tax.
Unworked coal land, known as " Coal Land, Class B," is subject to a tax of 2 per cent,
upon the assessed value.
For further particulars see the " Taxation Act," also the " Public Schools Act," which
are obtainable from the King's Printer, Victoria, B.C. THE MINING INDUSTRY. A 53
ASSAY OFFICE.
BY
D. E. Whittaker.
During the year 1937 there were made by the staff in the Government Assay Office, 6,410
assays or quantitative determinations and 361 analyses;   of these the majority were for the
Department of Mines or for the other departments, for which no fees were received.
The fees collected by the office were as follows:—
Fees for analyses       $77.00
Fees for assaying         74.50
Fees for assayers' examinations       150.00
Total cash receipts     $301.50
Determinations and examinations made for other Government departments, for which no fees were collected:—
Attorney-General's Department   $1,158.00
Agricultural Department   2,513.00
Board of Health   680.00
Other Departments   185.00
Treasury   1,654.00
Forest Branch  405.00
$6,595.00
Value of work done outside of Mines Department work  $6,896.50
One thousand six hundred and fifty-four lots of gold were received from the Gold Commissioners, who are purchasing amounts up to 2 oz. to aid the prospector in disposing of his
gold.
FREE DETERMINATIONS.
In addition to the above quantitative work, 476 qualitative determinations, or tests, were
made in connection with the identification and classification of rocks or minerals sent to the
Assay Office for a report; for these no fees were charged, as it is the established custom of
the Department to examine and test qualitatively, without charge, samples of minerals sent in
from any part of the Province, and to give a report on the same. This has been done for the
purpose of encouraging the search for new or rare minerals and ores, and to assist prospectors and others in the discovery of new mining districts, by enabling them to have determined, free of cost, the nature and probable value of any rock they may find. In making
these free determinations, the Department asks that the locality from which the sample was
obtained be given by the sender.
EXAMINATIONS FOR ASSAYERS.
The writer has the honour, as Secretary, to submit the Annual Report for the year 1937
of the Board of Examiners for Certificates of Competency and Licence to practise Assaying
in British Columbia, as established under the " Department of Mines Act, 1934."
A meeting of the Board was held on April 17th and December 6th. Three candidates
applied for examination on April 17th and two passed the examination. Three candidates
applied for examination on December 6th and two passed the examination. The Board
recommended that certificates be issued to the above-mentioned four candidates. A 54
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.
The following list shows the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders of the Province:
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining: Recorder.
Deputy Recorder.
Atlin                  _
Atlin             .   ...
H. F. Glassey  	
H. F. Glassey	
G. H. Hallett.
T. S. Dalby.
Haines (U.S.)	
(Com. for taking Affidavits)
(Com. for taking Affidavits)
T. S. Dalby..    ..     -
B. A. Barnett.
Squaw Creek via Atlin	
Tulsequah
Juneau (U.S.)	
Telegraph Creek	
Boundary via Telegraph
Creek
H. L. Fraser.
T. S. Dalby       	
F. E. Trousdell.
R. J. Meek.
F. W. Beatton.
Dease Lake Townsite	
Prince Rupert	
L. S. McBride.
Skeena	
N. A. Watt...	
N. A. Watt  ...
A. J. Lancaster.
Copper River	
Terrace  —
Stewart (Portland
Canal)
Rosswood  	
H. W. Dodd.
Stewart  	
N. A. Watt (at Prince
Rupert)
H. W. Dodd	
W. Eve.
Bella Coola
Prince Rupert.	
N. A. Watt    -    -
NT A. Watt	
Geo. H. Hill.
Kimsquit     -
Queen Charlotte	
Jedway  	
Massett - .
Queen Charlotte
N. A. Watt	
D. T. R. McColI, M.D.
W. T. Reavley.
J. C. Frizzell.
Sub-office	
Smithera ,_	
H. B. Campbell	
H. B. Campbell	
Fort St. James 	
	
Sub-office _ . -
W. B. Steele.
Telkwa	
T. J. Thorp.
Kimsquit -
Fort St. John	
Whitewater (Finlay
River) via Fort
Grahame
Cedarvale
F. W. Beatton.
0. T. Sundal.
Vanderhoof	
T. H. McCubbin.
Hazel ton	
F. E. Trousdell.
Usk - 	
Takla Landing ,.—
•
Aiken.
Fort St. John	
H. B. Campbell (at
Smithers)
F. W. Beatton _
J. S Clark.
	 THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 55
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office. Gold Commissioner.        Mining Recorder. Deputy Recorder,
Peace River—Con.
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Su b-offi ce	
Cariboo	
S u b-offi ce	
Sub-office 	
Sub-office	
Sub-office 	
Quesnel	
Sub-office	
Sub-offic e	
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-office.	
Sub-office	
Clinton	
Sub-office	
Sub-office	
Sub-offi ce	
Sub-office-	
Sub-office	
Kami oop s	
Sub-office...	
Sub-office	
Sub-office 	
Ashcroft. 	
Sub-office-
Nicola-	
Yale,
Sub-office...
Similkameen..
Sub-office...
Vernon _—
Sub-office....
Greenwood	
Sub-office...
Sub-office....
Sub-office...
Grand Forks...
Osoyoos —
Sub-office....
Sub-office.._
Sub-office....
Golden	
Windermere-
Fort Steele...
Sub-office..
Ainsworth	
Sub-office..
Sub-office..
Slocan	
Sub-office....
Slocan City	
Nelson	
Sub-office...
Sub-office...
Sub-office...
Arrow Lake..
Revelstoke.	
Finlay Forks	
Hudson Hope..
Pouce Coupe....
Barkerville	
Quesnel	
Prince George...
McBride 	
Fort McLeod.	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Likely	
Barkerville	
Horsefly	
Keithley Creek..
Hanceville 	
Tatla Lake	
Clinton _ 	
Taseko River	
Williams Lake _ _
Haylmore via Gold Bridge
Tatla Lake _
H an c eville __ 	
Kamloop s  	
Chu Chua  	
Vavenby 	
Salmon Arm.. 	
Ashcroft - 	
Lytton „
Merritt.
Hope	
Lytton .	
Princeton _
Hedley	
Vernon	
Kelowna 	
Greenwood	
Kettle Valley..
Beaverdell	
Oliver...	
Grand Forks...
P en tic ton	
Keremeos	
Hedley	
Oliver..... ...
Golden	
Windermere..
C ran brook	
Fernie.	
Kaslo 	
Trout Lake.....
Poplar Creek .
New Denver...
Sandon ...
Slocan....
Nelson...
Creston .
Ymir	
Salmo	
J. P. Scarlett-
L. C. Maclure-
R. J. A. DorrelL.
P. H. McCurrach _
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloop s)
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
P. H. McCurrach (at
Kamloops)
Chas
Nichols 	
R.
M
McGusty	
T,
A
Dodd
B. Harrison	
W. R. Dewdney..
A. W. Anderson	
A. W. Anderson (at
Golden)
J. E. Kennedy... _.
Claude MacDonald..
Claude MacDonald
(at Kaslo)
Claude MacDonald
J. Cartmel	
J. P. Scarlett...
L. C. Maclure.
p.
H.
McCurrach
w
F
A.
H
G. Freeze -	
Beech- „	
Chas
Nichols	
R
M
McGusty	
L.
A.
Dodd   ...
Nakusp _	
Revelstoke -
J. Cartmel (at Nelson)
Wynfleld Maxwell..:	
E. Harrison	
W. R. Dewdney...
A. W. Anderson ..
A. M. Chisholm ....
J. E. Kennedy	
W. M. H. Dunn-
Frank Broughton
T. McNeish	
J. Cartmel.. _
N. A. Herridge	
W. Maxwell 	
A. MacKinnon.
F. F. Monteith.
M. S. Morrell.
Miss L. D. Boyd.
E. C. Lunn.
Geo. Milburn.
R. McKinlay.
J. E. Mclntyre.
E. C. Lunn.
A. Morrison.
J. P. Scarlett.
A. B. Campbell.
Wm. Lowden.
E. R. Hance.
David Lloyd.
Leslie MacAdams.
L. C. Maclure.
W. Haylmore.
David Lloyd.
E. R. Hance.
D. G. Dalgleish.
George M. Fennell.
H. Finley.
A. P. Suckling.
H. Elgie.
H. Elgie.
John Love.
F. H. C. Wilson.
C. W. Dickson.
G, B. Gane.
T. W. Clarke.
W. H. Laird.
L. S. Coleman.
John Love.
W. H. Laird.
C. J. Dainard.
A. A. Robertson.
J. R. Nolan.
R. Mcpherson.
A. Robb.
H. Bradbury.
W. E. Graham.
J. A. Stewart.
R. H. Hassard.
Wm. Clark.
M. C. Donaldson.
W. G. Fleming. A 56
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders—Continued.
Mining Division.
Location of Office.
Gold Commissioner.
Mining Recorder.
Deputy Recorder.
Beaton    	
Wynfield Maxwell (at
Revelstoke)
W. H. Reid 	
C. L. Monroe	
Rossland 	
Nanaimo - —	
Ladysmith
W. H. Reid	
C. L. Monroe
J. A. Knight.
Vananda 	
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O.
H. J. Bull.
Cumberland-	
Zeballos  	
S. B. Hamilton.
W. H. Boothroyd.
Alberni 	
Tofino _	
Zeballos 	
Alberni 	
Nanaimo  —
W. H. Boothroyd
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
W. H. Boothroyd
C. W. Sharp	
G. C. Rolf.
W. H. Boothroyd.
W. H. Boothroyd (at
Alberni)
R. J. Steenson	
A. P. Grant  	
Ed. Evenson	
P. J. Mulcahy. -	
A. B. Gray __ __ »
Victoria-
New Westminster	
Victoria 	
New Westminster	
C. N. Tingle.
A. S. Tyrer  ...
Alert Bay	
Sub-office	
A. C. Sutton.
Shoal Bay, Thurlow P.O..
L. J. Price
L. J. Price	
T. B. Williams.
Haylmore via Gold Bridge- THE MINING INDUSTRY.
A 57
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o VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938.
3,675-438-3627  

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