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PART G ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1938

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Full Text

 PABT g
ANNUAL EEPOET
or the
MINISTEE OF MINES
OP the province op
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
Tear Ended 31st December
1937
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chables P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1938. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. J. Asselstine, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
D. E. Whittaker, Provincial Assayer and Analyst.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner. INSPECTION OF MINES. G 3
PART G.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—■
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in District.
Coast Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Yale, and
Nanaimo.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel, Cariboo,
Peace River, and those portions of the
Liard and Omineca east of the 123rd
degree of longitude.
Interior Similkameen,  Osoyoos,  Nicola,  Vernon,  and
Kamloops.
East Kootenay and Boundary„_Greenwood, Grand Forks, Trail Creek, Nelson,
Slocan City, Slocan, Arrow Lake, Ainsworth, Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort Steele,
Windermere, and Golden.
Northern Queen Charlotte Islands, Bella Coola, Stikine,
Portland Canal, Skeena, Atlin, and those
portions of Liard and Omineca west of
the 124th degree of longitude.
The  Inspectors  inspect  the  coal  mines,  metalliferous   mines,   and   quarries   in   their
respective districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for a
period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard Nichol Nanaimo Section.
James L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould Princeton Station.
JohnT. Puckey Fernie Station.
Geo. O'Brien, Inspector of Mines for the Nanaimo and Cumberland areas, died on
December 26th, 1937, after seven years' service in these districts. He was formerly mine
manager at several mines on Vancouver Island, and was previously Inspector of Mines and
Mine-rescue Instructor in the East Kootenay District.
H. E. Miard, Inspector of Mines, was transferred from the Nelson Inspection District
to the East Kootenay District, and John MacDonald, Inspector of Mines, was transferred
from the East Kootenay District to Nanaimo.
H. C. Hughes and E. R. Hughes were appointed Inspectors of Mines, with headquarters
at Nelson and Cumberland, respectively. G 4 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
During 1937 the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" was amended as follows:—■
AN ACT TO AMEND THE " COAL-MINES REGULATION ACT."
[Assented to 10th December, 1937.]
HIS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—■
1. This Act may be cited as the " Coal-mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1937."
2. Section 4 of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," being chapter 188 of the " Revised Statutes of
British Columbia, 1936," is repealed, and the following is substituted therefor:—
" 4. (1.) No boy under the age of sixteen years and no woman or girl of any age shall be employed
or be permitted to be in or about the surface workings of a colliery for the purpose of employment;
and every manager shall, on the request of an Inspector, produce a copy of the certificate of birth or
an affidavit or a statutory declaration setting forth the age of any boy employed in or about any mine
or surface workings: Provided that this prohibition shall not affect the employment of any person
engaged in the performance of clerical work, or in performing domestic duties in any hotel, boarding-
house, or residence in connection with any colliery.
"(2.) No woman or girl of any age shall be employed underground in any mine, and no boy under
the age of eighteen years shall be employed underground in any mine after the thirty-first day pi
December, 1937; but the provisions of this subsection shall not affect the employment of boys under
eighteen years of age who have been or are employed underground before the thirty-first day of
December, 1937."
3. Said chapter 188 is amended by inserting therein the following as section 77a:—
"77a. (1.) Where it is proposed to abandon a mine, or part of a mine, the owner, agent, or
manager shall give notice in writing of the proposed abandonment to the Inspector of Mines while
the workings of the mine or the part of the mine are still accessible, and shall see that all the workings
of the mine or the part of the mine to be abandoned are surveyed and shown on the mine-plan before
the abandonment occurs.
"(2.) Every person who fails to comply with this section shall be guilty of an offence against this
Act."
4. Section 88 of said chapter 188 is repealed, and the following is substituted therefor:—
" 88. (1.) Where the workings in any mine are approaching any abandoned workings, whether in
or belonging to that mine or any other mine, the owner, agent, or manager in charge of the present
workings shall report the circumstances in writing to the Inspector for the district in which the
workings are situate before the present workings reach within five hundred feet of the abandoned
workings; and no work shall be done within five hundred feet of the abandoned workings until a
definite method of proceeding with the work has been submitted to and approved by the Inspector.
"(2.) In no case shall the workings of any mine approach nearer than one hundred and fifty feet
to any abandoned workings until the abandoned workings have been definitely located by a bore-hole
or bore-holes from the live workings and all standing water in abandoned workings has been drained off.
"(3.) This section shall not apply where the abandoned workings can be readily examined, and a
knowledge obtained of the conditions prevailing therein.
"(4.) If the owner, agent, or manager fails to act in conformity with this section, he shall be
guilty of an offence against this Act."
5. Section 97 of said chapter 188 is amended by striking out subsection (2), and substituting
therefor the following:—
"(2.) The surveying of any mine and the preparation of the mine-plan from the surveys shall be
done only by a person holding a certificate of competency as a mine surveyor under this Act, and each
plan required to be kept in accordance with the provisions of this Act shall have inserted on it the
date on which the last survey was made and the signature of the person making the survey."
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended December,
1937, was 1,444,687 tons, being an increase of 98,216 tons or 7.27 per cent, over the production
of 1936.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton District, and the
Northern District, produced 985,551 tons, an increase of 109,686 tons or 12.52 per cent.
over 1936.
Vancouver Island Collieries produced 818,447 tons, an increase of 105,410 tons or 14.78
per cent, over 1936.
The Northern District produced 4,517 tons.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 162,587 tons, an increase of 5,025 tons over 1936.
The East Kootenay District produced 459,136 tons, a decrease of 11,470 tons or 2.49 per
cent, from 1936. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 5
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the year
of the various mines:—
Colliery and Mine.
0       ^
p a) ^
»h  O  3
T3
M
n
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is
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01  S  J
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OQjg
o o g
1? a oc
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee daily.
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee for Year.
Comox Colliery, No. 5 mine 	
269,547
19,925
129,983
225,706
150,471
6,351
494
3,659
57
10,913
400
678
81
182
94,136
25,276
6,009
4,692
12,697
18,873
326
81
479
4,313
204
111,265
347,871
249
272
273
258
257
261
90
220
76
259
127
95
31
39
229
166
81
81
278
283
51
96
199
54
174
226
589
164
343
576
232
22
9
9
4
58
5
3
4
2
200
100
45
50
25
62
5
2
2
11
3
156
472
1.82
0.44
1.38
1.50
2.52
1.09
0.62
1.84
0.18
0.72
0.63
2.37
0.64
2.33
2.05
1.52
1.64
1.14
1.82
1.07
1.27
2.49
1.96
1.26
4.09
3.26
455
121
379
391
648
288
56
406
14
188
80
226
20
91
470
252
133
93
508
304
65
40
239
392
68
713
737
463
147
302
305
188
17
5
8
4
37
3
2
4
2
126
67
29
35
20
42
4
2
2
8
2
121
341
2.29
0.50
1.57
2.86
3.11
1.42
1.10
2.08
0.18
1.13
1.00
3.58
0.64
2.33
3.26
2.27
2.55
1.65
2.28
1.58
1.58
2.49
2.71
1.88
5.28
4.51
582
430
Chambers' mine      _
457
133
339
20
Biggs' mine - __._ „_
Lewis' mine	
747
377
207
134
635
449
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co.
Yale Colliery	
Hat Creek Colliery.	
239
539
102
919
1,020
Collieries op Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island Collieries was 818,447 tons. Of this amount, 104,395
tons or 12.7 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 73,318 tons or 8.9 per cent, was
consumed by producing companies as fuel, 609,653 tons was sold in the competitive market,
31,081 tons was added to stock; thus 74.4 per cent, of the output was sold. Of this amount
sold in the competitive markets, 563,454 tons or 92.4 per cent, was sold in Canada and 46,199
tons or 7.6 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries of the Nicola-Princeton District.
Of the gross output of 162,587 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-Princeton
District, 18,858 tons or 11.0 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as fuel, 757
tons was lost in preparation for the market, and 143,022 tons or 88.0 per cent, was sold in the
competitive markets in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries in the East Kootenay District was 459,136 tons. Of this
amount, 17,205 tons or 3.7 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 11,947 tons or
2.6 per cent, was consumed as fuel by the producing companies, 67,634 tons or 14.7 per cent.
was used in making coke, and 362,336 tons was sold in the competitive market. Of this
amount 43,018 tons or 11.9 per cent, was sold in the United States and 319,318 tons or 88.1
per cent, was sold in Canada. G 6
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the past
five years.    Similar figures for the years prior to 1933 are shown in previous Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of
Employees
at Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Employee for
Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
1933 ■
1934 •
1935 ■
1936 -
1937 f
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province	
East Kootenay District-
Coast District	
Whole Province	
Coast District	
Whole Province	
477,677
787,069
,264,746
627,619
719,471
,347,090
407,110
780,858
,187,968
470,606
875,865
,346,741
985,551
,444,687
698
2,396
3,094
754
2,139
2,893
819
2,152
2,971
606
2,208
2,814
2,525
3,153
684
328
408
832
336
465
497
363
399
776
396
478
390
458
522
1,719
2,241
E51
1,499
2,050
614
1,531
2,145
459
1,556
2,015
1,824
2,286
915
457
564
1,139
480
657
663
510
554
1,025
563
668
540
632
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various collieries
and districts compiled from returns furnished by the owners:-— INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 7
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP MINES
, 1937.
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CQ<                    US INSPECTION OP MINES. G 9
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1937, 3,153 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the Province,
an increase of 10.8 per cent, compared with 1936.
Taking the average of all the mines in Vancouver Island District, about 30 per cent,
of the working-days was lost through lack of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton District the
different collieries worked on an average of about 70 per cent, of the working-days. In the
East Kootenay District the average for the year was about 66 per cent.
The table on page 8 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and about the
mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground and above
ground, compiled from the returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1937 imports of .crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled 205,680,478
gallons; in addition to which 18,669,902 gallons was imported for use in the Province and
24,368,477 gallons was brought in, duty free, for use in ships' bunkers.
From the refining of the above, 61,110,935 gallons of gasoline, 126,634 gallons of distillate, 29,909,012 gallons of light fuel-oil, and 162,079,133 gallons of heavy fuel-oil were
sold; of the total sales only 5,001,959 gallons, practically all gasoline, were shipped outside
British Columbia.
COMPETITION   OF   COAL   PRODUCED   OUTSIDE   BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
During 1937 the importation of coal into British Columbia from the United  States
consisted of 61 tons of anthracite, 2,540 tons of bituminous coal, and 1,217 tons of lignite;
there were no other importations of coal into British Columbia.
Alberta coal sold in British Columbia consisted of 78,124 tons of domestic coal, 46,475
tons of sub-bituminous coal, and 144,424 tons of bituminous coal.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia
during past years:—
Year. Short Tons. Year. Short Tons.
1925   117,037 1932   136,188
1926   127,868 1933   119,026
1927  •  187,028 1934   123,968
1928   262,198 1935   221,758
1929   247,060 1936   244,928
1930   227,385 1937   269,023
1931   193,060
Of the 1,119,531 tons of British Columbia coal marketed 170,726 tons was sold in the
Provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario, 89,220 tons was exported to
the United States, and 159,658 tons was sold for ships' bunkers, so that of the total sales
799,927 tons of British Columbia coal was used within the Province.
HYDRO-ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT.
At the end of 1937 the hydro-electric power installed in British Columbia totalled 728,000
horse-power, of which approximately 50 per cent, was actually in use.    The following table
shows the rate of increase of hydro-electric installations in the Province:—
Horse-power Horse-power
developed by developed by
Hydro-electric Hydro-electric
Year.                                                   Plants. Year.                                                    Plants.
1900    9,366 1927  :  473,142
1905   29,384 1928   523,902
1910   64,474 1929   559,792
1915   254,065 1930   630,792
1920   309,185 1931   655,992
1921   309,762 1932   713,792
1922   329,057 1933   717,602
1923   355,718 1934   726,000
1924   355,718 1935   728,000
1925   414,702 1936   728,000
1926  .  460,562      1937   728,000 G 10
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
For the purpose of comparison it may be stated that one developed horse-power per year
is equivalent to the power value of 6 tons of coal.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1937, 3,153 persons were employed in and around the coal mines. Ten fatal
accidents occurred during the year as compared with eight for 1936.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 3.17, as compared with 2.84
in 1936. In 1935 the ratio was 1.67; in 1934, 2.07; in 1933, 0.97; in 1932, 2.21; in 1931,
1.22; in 1930, 11.62; in 1929, 2.38; and in 1928, 2.64. The average for the ten-year period
being 3.32
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1937 was 6.92;   during
1936 the figure was 5.94; in 1935, 4.21; in 1934, 4.45; in 1933, 2.37; in 1932> 5.21; in 1931,
2.81; in 1930, 28.64; in 1929, 5.33; and in 1928, 5.54. The average for the ten-year period
being 8.06 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during
1937 and comparative figures for 1936:—■
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1937.
1936.
Canadian Collieries (D-), Ltd	
Canadian Collieries (D-), Ltd	
Western Fuel Corporation, Ltd...
Western Fuel Corporation, Ltd...
Beban's Colliery  	
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd....
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd...
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co.,
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co..
Ltd...
Ltd..
Comox No. 5	
Northfield	
No. 1 mine _
Reserve mine	
Beban mine	
No. 4 mine —	
No. 2 mine	
Coal Creek	
Michel 	
1
1
4
2 1
4
1
1
1
1 1
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents and their percentage of
the whole with corresponding figures for 1936:—
Cause.
1937.
193G.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
4
2
3
1
40.00
20.00
30.00
10.00
2
4
1
1
25.00
60.00
12.50
12.50
10
100.00
8
100.00
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident in
their respective classes in the years 1937 and 1936:—
Cause.
No. of Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
1936.
No. of Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
By falls of roof and coal..
By mine-cars and haulage..
By inrush of water from old workings..
By electric shock  	
Miscellaneous  	
361,171
722,343
481,562
1,444,687
673,235
336,618
1,346,471
1,346,471
Totals..
10
144,468
168,309
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1937 was 144,468 tons, compared
with 168,309 tons for 1936.    The average for the ten-year period was 123,988 tons. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 11
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during the
year 1937 compared with 1936, according to Inspection Districts:—
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Total.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-cars
and
Haulage.
Inrush
of Water
from Old
Workings.
Electric
Shock.
Miscellaneous.
1937.
1936.
3
1
1
1
3
--
1
8
2
5
2
1
Northern  	
Province (1937)
4
2
3
1
10
Province (1936)
8
Accident Death-rate.
District.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons of
Coal mined.
1937.
1936.
1937.                1936.
Vancouver Island - ~   . -
Nicola-Princeton  _	
3.96
3.18
2.98
3.79
1.65
9.77
4.35
7.02
12.69
2.14
Totals (1937)  .	
3.17
2.84
6.92
Totals (1936) 	
5.94
The details regarding the occurrences of the fatal accidents in coal mines during 1937
are as follows:—■
The fatal accident which occurred to James A. Barbour, millwright at the Beban mine,
Extension, on April 27th was due to deceased being struck by a falling timber which he had
failed to fasten securely while engaged in constructing a small bunker at the mine; deceased
was not a mine employee.
The fatal accident which occurred to Paul Toth, miner's helper, No. 5 mine, Comox
Colliery, on May 30th was due to a fall of roof at his working-face; the place was well
timbered, but an unforeseen slip permitted the roof to break the laggings between the last
stringer and the face, and caused the stringer to swing out of its proper position and allow
a large cave of roof-rock.    Toth was instantly killed.
The fatal accident to George N. Shepherd, Joseph H. Shepherd, and Joseph Carr, miners,
Beban mine, Extension, on June 11th was due to an inrush of water from the abandoned
workings of the adjacent No. 1 mine, Wellington Extension Colliery; these abandoned and
flooded workings, abandoned in 1901, proved to have been advanced 350 feet further than
shown on the mine-plan.
The fatal accident to Samuel K. Mottishaw, fireboss, Reserve mine, on July 19th was
due to deceased being crushed between a loaded car and the roof timbers while riding up a
slope.    Deceased was riding in contravention of the regulations.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Bowness, miner, Reserve mine, on November
4th was due to a fall of rock at the working-face; the face was well timbered, but a large
rock broke from an unforeseen slip and swung out the timber at the face, killing deceased
instantly.
The fatal accident which occurred to William Cockburn, miner, No. 1 East mine, Coal
Creek Colliery, on December 8th was due to a " bump " which displaced three sets of timber
at the face and caused a cave of roof material which buried deceased; he was dead when
recovered.
The fatal accident which occurred to Ralph Gregory, rope-rider, No. 3 mine, Michel
Colliery, on December 9th was due to deceased riding down a steep incline with two uncontrolled timber cars and sustaining injuries to his head when the cars crashed at the foot of
the incline. Deceased was found unconscious and died shortly afterwards; there were no
witnesses of this accident. G 12
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
The fatal accident which occurred to Tudor Sainsbury, miner, Northfield mine, on
December 29th was due to a fall of roof at the working-face; the place was well timbered,
but an undetected slip at the immediate face permitted a fall of roof which displaced the last
set of timber; deceased was covered by the material which fell and died from suffocation
before being uncovered by his fellow-employees who had immediately started rescue-work.
Note.—Mike Zenovich, a miner who was injured in No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, on
August 21st, 1933, died on February 10th, 1937, as a result of his injuries.
INUNDATION AT THE BEBAN MINE, EXTENSION.
At the Beban mine, Extension, on June 11th the main slope broke into the abandoned
main slope of the old No. 1 mine, Wellington-Extension Colliery, and three men were drowned
by the water from the abandoned mine; this old No. 1 mine was abandoned in 1901 and the
plan of the workings showed the slope to be driven 160 feet below the adit-drainage level.
The Beban slope was started in 1935, converged on the line of the old No. 1 slope at an
angle of 60 degrees, and was designed to pass the shown termination of the old slope at a
distance of 250 feet.
When the Beban mine was dewatered after the partial flooding it was found that the
old No. 1 slope had been driven some 300 feet further than was shown on the mine-plan.
Levels were being driven from the Beban slope towards the line of the old No. 1 slope
for the purpose of dewatering, and as the possibility of the old slope having been driven
further than was indicated on the plan the upper of these levels was designed to intersect
the line of the old slope at a point below the shown termination of the slope; the two upper
levels were protected by 20 feet advance drill-holes but had not reached the line of the old
slope on June 11th.
About 60,000 gallons of water entered the Beban mine and this flooded the Beban slope
for a distance of 110 feet from the face and partly flooded a short level at this point.
One man was drowned near the face of the slope and three others were washed up the
slope and into the level by the rush of water; a fourth man was at work in this level and as
the water rose to the roof at the entrance to the level all four men were shut in.
There was a place driven a short distance up from this level and which the water did
not reach, but before the men located this place two of them drowned.
Emergency pumps were installed and the water lowered sufficiently to permit the
recovery of the two live men ten hours after the water broke in.
An inquiry into the above accident was held under the " Public Inquiries Act."
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during 1937,
together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of explosive used,
and the average pounds of explosive per shot fired  (these quantities include all explosives
used for breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines) :—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
used per
Shot fired.
Comox Colliery, No. 5 mine 	
Comox Colliery, No. 8 mine 	
Northfield Colliery  -	
Western Fuel Colliery, No. 1 mine	
Western Fuel Colliery, Reserve mine..
Lantzville Colliery  	
Ida Clara Colliery	
Chambers' mine	
Jingle Pot mine 	
Beban's mine	
Loudon's mine 	
Cassidy mine 	
Biggs' mine (Squaw Hill)	
Lewis' mine 	
Totals for district 	
73,284
14,890
90,350
66,743
61,600
6,050
150
1,800
50
9,680
175
440
50
269,547
19,925
129,983
225,706
150,471
6,351
494
3,659
57
10,913
400
678
81
182
86,700
29,500
95,291
105,254
91,930
7,250
200
3,500
120
17,542
300
700
100
3.67
1.33
1.43
3.38
2.44
1.05
3.29
2.03
1.14
1.12
2.28
1.54
1.62
0.84
0.50
0.94
0.63
0.67
0.83
0.75
0.31
0.41
0.55
0.58
0.62
0.50
325,262
818,447
438,387
0.74 INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 13
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
used per
Shot fired.
28,920
5,475
990
660
2,850
9,250
500
50
200
94,136
25,276
6,009
4,692
12,697
18,873
326
81
497
48,500
8,850
2,800
1,950
3,500
10,050
720
100
400
3.25
4.61
6.06
7.11
4.45
2.04
0.65
1.62
2.48
0.59
0.61
Blue Flame Colliery..   .
0.35
0.33
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co  	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co  	
0.81
0.92
0.69
0.50
Hat Creek Colliery      	
0.50
48,895
162,587
76,870
3.32
0.63
Northern District.
1,600
50
4,313
204
2,000
60
2.69
4.08
0.80
Aveling Colliery.—   	
0.83
1,650
4,517
2,060
2.73
0.80
East Kootenay District.
15
36,076
111,265
347,871
30
49,342
7417.66
9.64
0.50
0.73
36,091
459,136
49,372
12.72
0.73
411,896
1,444,687
566,689
3.50
0.72
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Monobel of different grades 	
Permissible rock-powder 	
Lb.
  298,216
  113,680
Total     411,896
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable
the Minister of Mines under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause (i), " Coalmines Regulation Act ":—
Polar Monobel No. 14
Polar CXL-ite No.    2
Polar Monobel No. 4
Polar Monobel No. 6
Polar Monobel No. 7
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1937 mining-machines produced approximately 810,865 tons or 56.1 per
cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type of
machine used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Mavor
and
Coulson.
Anderson
Boyes.
Hardy.
Siskol.
Ingersoll-
Rand.
Pneumatic
Pick.
....
38
24
62
4
2
14
3
6
27
14
11
13
30
Totals 	
—
124
6
17
33
25
13
30 G 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,560 safety-lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this number,
216 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,344 were electric lamps of various makes,
as follows:   Edison, 2,284;  Wolf electric, 60.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking, and
illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Method op Locking.
Illuminant used.
Colliery and Mine.
Magnetic
Lock.
Screw or
Automatic
Clip.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
38
11
22
25
12
2
2
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
450
156
297
266
201
20
18
14
56
4
4
6
38
11
22
25
12
2
2
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
450
156
Northfield Colliery  	
Western Fuel Colliery, No. 1  ~  	
297
266
201
20
18
14
Beban's mine     .	
56
4
4
6
12K          I        1.492
125
1,492
Nicola-Princeton District.
Coalmont Colliery	
Middlesboro Colliery-
Blue Flame Colliery ...
Pleasant Valley Colliery	
Princeton Tulameen Coal Co —
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co-
Yale Colliery 	
Black mine	
Hat Creek Colliery..
Totals for district .
119
65
42
48
34
52
10
119
65
42
48
34
52
10
Northern District.
Bulkley Valley Colliery..
Aveling Colliery 	
Totals for district-
18
18
18
18
East Kootenay District.
12
41
130
323
12
41
130
323
53
453
53
453
216
2,344
216
2,344 INSPECTION OF MINES. G 15
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the 1930
Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18, and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of Mines.
This model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp approval given
under Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol
BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company,
Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18h of the United States Bureau of Mines.
This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States Bureau of
Mines. The only bulb approved for used with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18H and is
manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This
lamp is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This
lamp is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the Department of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all persons underground in the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by the officials of the
mines in the carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at ten mines and underground
at six mines.
The purpose for which it was used, together with the amount of horse-power in each
instance, is shown in the following table:—
Above ground— Nature of its Use Aggregate H.P.
Winding or hoisting     2,253
Ventilation      1,380
Haulage        285
Coal-washing        424
Miscellaneous      4,044
Total horse-power      8,386
Underground—
Haulage   1,640
Pumping   1,180
Coal-cutting   1,093
Total horse-power      3,913
Total horse-power above and under ground  12,299
Of the above amount approximately 2,095 horse-power was operated as direct current
and 10,204 as alternating current. G 16 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the ventilation
in the main airways and splits of the different mines; in the Comox mines the gas outflow is
such that two machine-cut long-walls are the practical limit of one ventilation split and shot-
firing is prohibited until one hour after the completion of the cutting process.
Methane Detection.
During the year the Burrell Methane Detector was used to detect the presence of methane
in percentages less than could be detected by use of the flame safety-lamp.
The Ringrose Automatic Firedamp Alarm tested in 1936 while giving fairly satisfactory
results appears to be somewhat unreliable for constant use, but it is intended to secure some
of an improved design for further testing purposes.
Mine-air Samples.
Mine-air sampling was carried out in the various mines and 204 samples were taken
during the year; of this number, eleven were spoiled in transit. The air of the mines at
Comox Colliery and in the Crowsnest Pass District where the gass outflow is greatest is
sampled most frequently. In addition to samples of the normal ventilation, a number of
samples were taken in abandoned workings and from areas sealed off on account of fire.
The analyses of the above samples are filed in the office of the Chief Inspector of Mines.
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
At practically all the mines throughout the Province inspection committees appointed by
the workmen under  General  Rule 37,  section  101, " Coal-mines  Regulation  Act," were in
operation throughout the year. t->ttc<t
\j\) A.L-L) Uol.
Sampling of dust as per the Regulation for Precautions against Coal-dust was well maintained during the year and a total of 960 samples was taken and analysed at the different
mines, and where the analyses showed less than 50 per cent, incombustible matter immediate
steps were taken to see that the mine or part of the mine was rerock dusted.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
During the year the following dangerous occurrences, in addition to those causing
injuries, were reported:—
On January 2nd a fireboss in No. 4 mine, Coalmont Collieries, Limited, while making a
routine inspection on an idle day discovered spontaneous combustion in part of 10 West level;
the seat of this heating could not be reached and this occurrence necessitated the sealing-off
of the mine between No. 8 and No. 9 levels and the flooding of the affected area by water
from outside the mine.
On January 7th the guard of one of the cages in No. 1 shaft, Western Fuel Corporation
of Canada, Limited, was inadvertently left up by one of the shaft attendants and was torn
off by the head-frame. The guard fell down the shaft and damaged the other cage; no
person was injured.
On January 9th while six men were being lowered in No. 5 shaft, Comox Colliery, the cage
chairs fouled the cage and arrested it; approximately 25 feet of loose rope had been paid out
before the hoistman discovered that there was something wrong. He immediately stopped the
hoist, but before anything else was done the cage slipped from its position and fell until
arrested by the rope. One man suffered a fractured ankle and two others were slightly
injured; the cage weighs 2.5 tons; a new hoisting-rope was immediately installed. It is
probable that ice prevented the cage seats from being properly withdrawn in this instance.
On January 27th a small fire occurred on the floor of the main haulage tunnel and intake,
No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek Colliery, due to a rope-roller breaking and allowing the haulage-
rope to run on a tie; the consequent friction being sufficient to start a fire. The fire was
extinguished without injury to any person.
On February 12th a large snowslide came down from above the surface works at Coal
Creek Colliery and caused extensive damage to buildings and equipment and caused several
days' shut-down of the mine.    No person was injured. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 17
On June 4th the southerly extension of Northfield mine, Canadian Collieries (D.),
Limited, broke into some abandoned and flooded workings of the old East Wellington mine
at a point 350 feet distant from the nearest workings shown on the mine-plan of the abandoned mine; a considerable volume of water entered the Northfield mine but no person was
injured.
On July 20th a fire occurred in the fan-house at No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek Colliery;
this was apparently due to one of the drive ropes breaking and wedging around the drive-
shaft; the consequent friction causing the fire. The night-shift men were on their way out
of the mine when the fire occurred; after the fire was extinguished and the fan was restarted
no one was allowed in the mine until the fan had been running for several hours.
On July 22nd a small outbreak of fire occurred on 26 incline, No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek
Colliery, due to a broken haulage-roller causing sparks from the friction between the roller
and the haulage-rope;  this fire was discovered and extinguished without injury to any person.
On September 1st an outbreak of spontaneous combustion in the Heading district, Reserve
mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, occurred. This area was sealed off
with no injury to any person. PROSECUTIONS.
During 1937 there were six prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," as follows:—
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Jan. 26-
Canadian Collieries   (D.),
Ltd.,
Haulage-
Having matches in his possession in
Fined $10 and costs.
No. 5 mine, Comox
hand
the    mine;     in    contravention    of
General Rule 9
Feb. 3
Canadian Collieries   (D.),
No. 5 mine, Comox
Ltd.,
Miner
Having cigar in his possession in the
mine;   in contravention of General
Rule 9
Fined $10 and costs.
April 8_.
Canadian  Collieries   (D.),
No. 5 mine, Comox
Ltd.,
Fireboss...
Using compressed air to remove gas ;
in contravention of General Rule 1
Fined $10 and costs.
May 6_- -
Canadian  Collieries   (D.),
Ltd.,
Haulage-
Having matches and cigarettes in his
Fined   $50   and   costs
No. 5 mine, Comox
hand
possession ;    in     contravention     of
General  Rule  9
and   sixty   days   in
jail.
May 31-
Canadian  Collieries   (D.),
Ltd.,
Haulage-
Having   matches   in   his   possession;
Fined $25 and costs.
No. 5 mine, Comox
hand
in contravention of General Rule 9
July 12....
Canadian  Collieries   (D.),
No. 5 mine, Comox
Ltd.,
Fireboss.—
Firing    shots    where    gas-cap    was
found;    in   contravention   of   General  Rule  12
Fined $50 and costs.
INQUIRY UNDER SECTION 48, " COAL-MINES REGULATION ACT."
On August 16th an inquiry was held at Cumberland to inquire into the conduct of Mr.
Jasper Rutherford, fireboss, No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, in regard to his firing a shot in the
presence of gas in this mine on July 6th.
Mr. Robert Henderson, Nanaimo, was appointed to hold the inquiry, at which Mr.
Rutherford did not appear although he submitted a written statement.
After hearing the evidence submitted by the Chief Inspector of Mines and the District
Inspector of Mines, Mr. Henderson ordered that the Second-class Certificate of Competency
(No. B 219) and Third-class Certificate of Competency (No. C 644) held by Mr. Rutherford
be cancelled, and this was done.
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four mine-rescue stations in different parts of the Province
and centrally located in the mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo, Cumberland, Princeton,
and Fernie. During the year many requests were received from medical men for oxygen and
the inhalators for use in emergencies, and immediate service was rendered in every case. In
the larger coal-mining districts of Crowsnest, Cumberland, and Nanaimo experienced teams
maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the year and so keep ready for any
emergency calls. G 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual use of
oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere and instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-work. The training
itself is strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a special physical examination
before starting training and must be under 34 years of age.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, thirty-nine new men took
the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
943
944
945
946
947
948
949
950
951
952
953
954
955
956
957
958
959
960
961
962
John Reid Nichol	
Magnus Brown	
Mario Galeazzo	
Joseph Melville McHale
Leslie Webber _
John Kivela	
John Joseph Kelley —
Robert M. Alexander	
Earl A. Edwards	
Guy Guido  —
Howard Graham 	
William A. Gillespie	
Roscoe W. Hansen	
Henry W. Jackson	
Douglas Kirkpatrick	
Robert C. Kelley	
Donald Morrison	
John P. O'Rourke	
Richard Smith, Jr 	
Carl Ernest Adams	
I
Nanaimo.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Nanaimo.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Michel.
964
965
966
967
968
969
970
971
972
973
974
975
976
977
978
979
980
981
Romeo Jombatista Cimoline
Isaac Richard Hughes	
Robert Kitchener Taylor	
Reginald Thelbert Taylor—..
Edward R. Hughes	
William Hnatuk	
Isaac Plecash 	
Seiriol Llewellyn Williams —
Fred Hedley	
John Romain Dean	
James Robert MacFarlane.—
Alfred Leo Rivet _	
Edward Howcroft— 	
Eugene Warren Keer	
Clarence Charles Barr 	
Charles Thomas Gover	
William James McKim	
Halge Ragnar Pearson	
Robert Windsor Shannon   ...
Michel.
Michel.
Michel.
Michel.
Cumberland.
Princeton.
Princeton.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
MINE-RESCUE AND FIRST-AID WORK.
In all the coal-mining centres, first-aid classes and mine-rescue training was carried out,
and this was ably supported by the Vancouver Island and Coast Mine Safety Association, the
East Kootenay Mine Safety Association, and Princeton District Association, and by the
Inspectors of Mines in the various districts.
Competitions in first-aid and mine-rescue work were held during the year under the
auspices of these Safety Associations. These competitions are a great inducement to new
men to take up this work, and they demonstrate to all interested in mining the large number
of men who are fully qualified to give skilled attention to those who are injured in and
around the mines.
In Fernie and Princeton the men from both coal and metalliferous mines take part in the
first-aid and mine-rescue work and in this way great benefit accrues from an interchange
of ideas.
More teams took part in these competitions in the various centres of the Province this
year than in any previous year.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year twenty-two coal companies operated thirty-one mines, employing 2,286
men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there were fourteen
managers, fifteen overmen, ninety-eight firebosses and shotlighters, a total of 127, or one
official for every eighteen persons employed underground.
" COAL SALES ACT."
During the year a considerable number of inspections were made under the " Coal Sales
Act" and several complaints were investigated. The majority of the complaints were in the
Vancouver District and most of these were due to small dealers accused of substituting an
inferior grade of coal for a superior grade.   Valuable assistance was rendered in this district INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 19
by the Weights and Measures Inspector for the City of Vancouver, who keeps a close check
on the sale of coal in the city. Generally speaking, the regular coal-dealers try to conduct
their business in accordance with the " Coal Sales Act."
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief Inspector of
Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Colliery and District.
Producing Company.
Comox	
Old Wellington 	
Ladysmith-Wellington..
Ladysmith-Extension.—
Hi-Carbon—	
Nanaimo-Douglas-
Nanaimo _
Nanaimo Reserve	
Nanaimo-Wellington-
Mabury-Northfield-.
Wellington South, Ida Clara-
Cassidy-Wellington	
Lantzville Wellington-
Biggs-W ellington	
Fiddick-Douglas	
Little Ash-Wellington ~
Jingle Pot	
Old Adit, Wellington-
Chambers-Extension..
M iddlesbor o	
Nicola Sunshine	
Coalmont	
Princeton Blue Flame..
Tulameen Coal, Princeton	
Tulameen Valley Coal,
Princeton
Diamond, Princeton District
B.C.
Sunrise, Princeton District,
B.C.
Pleasant Valley, Princeton
District, B.C.
North Thompson Gem	
Yale Princeton Gem	
G ranby Tulameen	
Hat Creek	
Princeton-Black Diamond..
Bulkley Valley	
Aveling	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek-
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Corbin Washed	
Nos. 4 and 5 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland) -
No. 9 mine (Wellington). 	
No. 5 mine (South Wellington) 	
No. 8 mine (Extension)  	
Mixture   of   Canadian   Collieries'   coal   and   B.C.
Electric coke
No. 1 mine, Upper seam (Nanaimo)—-	
No. 1 mine. Lower seam (Nanaimo)..
Reserve mine (Nanaimo)	
Blend of No. 1 mine, Nanaimo, and No. 5 mine,
South Wellington
(Recovered from surface dump)  (Wellington)	
Ida Clara No. 1 (South Wellington)..
Cassidy Colliery (Cassidy)	
Lantzville (Lantzville) 	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington).
Little Ash mine (Wellington)-	
Jingle Pot (East Wellington)	
Old Adit (Wellington)	
Chambers (Extension)	
Middlesboro (Merritt)	
Sunshine (Merritt)	
Coalmont (Coalmont)	
Blue Flame (Princeton)	
Tulameen (Princeton).
Tulameen (Princeton).
Diamond (Princeton) —
Sunrise  (Princeton)	
Diamond and Sunrise blended (Princeton).
North Thompson (North Thompson).
Yale (Princeton)	
Granby (Princeton) „ _
Hat Creek (Lillooet)..
Black Diamond (Princeton).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa)	
Aveling (Telkwa)	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek).
Michel (Michel) 	
Corbin (Corbin)	
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd.
Ditto.
Mabury Engineering Corporation,
Ltd.
Richardson Bros., Ltd.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Lantzville Collieries, Ltd.
Biggs* mine.
Fiddick mine.
Little Ash mine.
Jingle Pot Colliery, Ltd.
Old Adit Colliery   (C.  Stronach).
R. H. Chambers.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Sunshine Coal Co., Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
W. R. Wilson Mining & Investment Co.
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd.
Tulameen Valley Coal Co.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co.,  Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
North Thompson Colliery, Ltd.
Yale Princeton Coal Co., Ltd.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co.,
Ltd.
Canada Coal & Development Co.,
Ltd.
Black Diamond Collieries, Ltd.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Corbin Collieries, Ltd. G 20 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of James
Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; Henry E. Miard, member; and James Strang,
member and Secretary of the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Department of Mines in Victoria.
Examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the Board of Examiners and
approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929. Two examinations were held
in 1937, the first on May 19th, 20th, and 21st, and the second on November 17th, 18th, and 19th.
The total number of candidates at the examinations were as follows: For First-class
Certificates, 2 (2 failed); for Second-class Certificates, 2 (2 failed); for Third-class Certificates, 17 (12 passed, 5 failed) ;  for Mine-surveyors' Certificates, 2 (2 passed).
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various classes:—
Third-class Certificate.—Thomas H. Robertson, Irving Morgan, Alfred M. Maxwell, James
Weir, John C. Mclnnis, Alexander Somerville, Thomas Taylor, Francis E. Wood, Leonard
Cooper, Peter Lancaster, John Robert Neen, and John M. Wilson.
Mine-surveyor's Certificate.—David L. Monroe and Cecil H. Brehaut.
EXAMINATIONS  FOR  CERTIFICATES  OF  COMPETENCY AS  COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examination and certificates already specified as coming under the
Board of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the holder of
a certificate of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed underground in
any coal mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, whether by hand or
machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all the coal-mining districts.
No certificate has been granted in any case where the candidate failed to satisfy the
Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working knowledge of the
English language.
The year 1937 showed a great increase of candidates compared with 1936. Compared
with fifty-seven candidates in 1936 there were 205 candidates in 1937 and of these 187 passed
and eighteen failed to qualify.
In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute certificates were granted to
miners who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for the
use of their premises for holding these examinations where necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines Regulation
Act " to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate as a coal-miner to
applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of a coal-miner for a period
not exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination before the Board. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. G 21
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
Richard Nichol.
The equipment maintained at this station consists of six sets of the Gibbs two-hour
oxygen apparatus; six sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the
Burrell all-service masks; forty-two self-rescuers; two H.H. inhalators; 1 Sparklet resusci-
tator, with sufficient supplies to maintain the above in service.
One Ford panel truck is kept fully equipped, ready for any emergency. Four men took
a full course of training and received their certificates, one of the men taking the full course
was Dr. Seiriol Llewelyn Williams, of Nanaimo.
There were no emergency calls for the rescue apparatus during the year, but the
inhalator was called for several times. There were also nineteen calls for oxygen from the
Nanaimo and Ladysmith Hospitals and from local medical practitioners. These calls were
responded to at once.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
The equipment of this station consists of eleven sets of McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service masks, with speaking diaphragm; one H.H.
inhalator with dual face-mask; one Sparklet resuscitator; and twenty-five self-rescuers,
with adequate supplies to maintain same in service.
During the year 650 cubic feet of oxygen was supplied to Cumberland Hospital for
emergency purposes. Four fully trained teams from Comox Colliery carried out regular
practice-work at this station; five new men took the full training course and received
certificates of competency in this work. The trained teams are paid by the Canadian
Collieries (D.), Ltd., for the time spent in rescue-training.
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; eleven Burrell all-service masks; seventeen M.S.A. self-rescuers; one M.S.A. high-
pressure pump to recharge cylinders; one H.H. inhalator, and an adequate supply of all
necessary parts and materials for the maintenance of the machines.
There were no calls for rescue apparatus during the year. Four calls for oxygen
administration were received from the Princeton Hospital, and were promptly responded to.
The Instructor from this station paid a series of visits to the Nickel Plate mine, Hedley,
during April, May, and June, taking with him six sets of McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus,
six Burrell all-service gas-masks, and an H.H. inhalator. Instructions were given in mine-
rescue work and first-aid work. The training in rescue-work was carried out mainly in the
abandoned workings of the mine. Eleven men completed the course of training, were
examined and granted certificates of proficiency. Two men were trained at the station, and
were granted certificates. Several men attended the station periodically during the year,
and received a short refresher course in rescue work.
The annual field day of the Princeton and District Ambulance and Mine Safety Association was held on June 26th. The mine-rescue event was held on vacant lots adjoining the
station, on which an artificial mine had been erected;  five teams competed in this event. G 22 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
FERNIE.
BY
John T. Puckey.
The equipment at this station consists of one high-pressure pump; one H.H. inhalator;
1 pulmotor; six sets of Gibbs apparatus; 11 sets of McCaa apparatus; twelve Burrell all-
service masks; ten electric safety-lamps; thirty-five self-rescuers, together with adequate
supplies to maintain above in service.
Two regular mine-rescue teams from Coal Creek Colliery continued their monthly training
during the year and several other teams renewed practices in June. Fifteen new men in all
took the full course of mine-rescue work, five of these were from Michel Colliery and the
other ten were from the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, at
Kimberley; all of them were granted certificates, and are a welcome addition to those already
trained.
The local medical practitioners made two calls for the inhalator during the year, and in
addition for service in pneumonia cases called for several hundred cubic feet of oxygen; this
was supplied at once. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 23
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald.
Western Fuel J. A. Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.; Lieut.-Col. C. W. Villiers, Vice-
Corporation of President, Nanaimo, B.C.; P. S. Fagan, Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo,
Canada, Ltd. B.C.; John Hunt, General Manager, Nanaimo, B.C. This company operated
the No. 1 and Reserve mines, Nanaimo.
No. 1 Mine, Nanaimo.—W. Frew, Manager; T. Wood and G. Frater, Overmen. This
mine is situated on the southerly end of the Esplanade in the City of Nanaimo and adjacent
to the shore-line of the Strait of Georgia. It is the oldest operating coal mine in British
Columbia and has four shaft openings, as follows: No. 1 and No. 2 shafts on the Esplanade;
Protection shaft on Protection Island;   and Newcastle shaft on Newcastle Island.
A full description of the surface plant, method of working, and system of haulage in
and around the mine has been given in previous annual reports. The only change to be
reported in connection with the surface equipment is the removal of two boilers from the
plant on Protection Island;  these were installed at the Reserve mine.
No. 1 mine worked 258 days during the year with an average production of 875 tons
per day. This shows a decrease of 300 tons per day as compared with the 1936 output, and
is accounted for by the fact that several of the active producing districts are gradually
decreasing in area as the extraction of pillars continues. Both the Douglas and Newcastle
seams were operated until June when all the long-wall faces in the latter seam were abandoned and the material taken out. Since then the whole of the output has come from the
Douglas seam, where all operations are confined to the extraction of pillars.
The ventilation is provided by two fans; one located at Protection shaft and operating
as a " blower" fan, and one at No. 2 shaft on the Esplanade which is operating as an
" exhaust" fan, the distance between these two units being approximately 1 % miles. The
ventilation has been generally good throughout the mine, samples of air having been taken
regularly in all splits and return airways, the resultant analysis of same being generally
satisfactory.
Approximately 50 per cent, of the men are taken by ferry across the bay from Nanaimo
to Protection Island, a distance of 1% miles, where they descend Protection shaft; the
remainder enter the workings by way of the No. 1 shaft. Considering the prevailing difficulties in this mine due to roof movements, the roadways and working-places have been kept in
good condition. All precautions were taken to guard against the coal-dust hazard by frequent applications of inert dust and cleaning up of roadways. Samples of the dust were
taken each month where required in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust
Regulations, all of these being well above the minimum standard set by the above regulation.
The miners' " gas committee " made frequent inspections of the workings and kindly furnished copies of their reports. All report-books required to be kept at the mine were examined
regularly and found in good order.
There were no fatalities in this mine during the year, but five serious accidents occurred
which were specially investigated. Of these, two were caused by falls of rock; two by mine-
cars and haulage; and one by a fall from a railway-car in the repair-shops on the surface.
In addition to the above, there were a number of minor accidents involving a loss of time
varying from a few days to several weeks.
Reserve Mine, Nanaimo.—W. Roper, Manager; A. W. Courtney, Overman; R. Houston,
Shiftboss. This mine is situated in the Cranberry District, about 5 miles south of Nanaimo.
The Douglas seam is the only one in operation at present and this is reached by means of two
shafts at a depth of 1,000 feet.
This mine operated 257 days during the year with an average output of 585 tons per day,
a large proportion of this production coming from the extraction of pillars. New development-work consisted of driving a main slope and counter through the solid rock for a distance G 24 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
of 2,500 feet from the No. 2 West heading to tap the seam; from this point the main slope
and diagonal slope were driven for a distance of 300 feet and 600 feet, respectively, by the
end of the year, all indications pointing to a good section of coal in this area. However,
several small faults and rolls were encountered necessitating a considerable amount of
rock-work being done to get suitable grades for haulage.
The ventilation has been generally good at all inspections and the workings kept clear
of noxious gases. Due to an outbreak of spontaneous combustion in the 10 East Heading
district, it was found necessary to isolate this section from the rest of the mine by the erection
of fire seals at the intake and return for this district. Samples of the mine-air have been
taken every month in the returns from each split, the resultant analysis of same being found
generally satisfactory. All roadways, where required, are treated with inert dust to reduce
the danger of coal-dust and samples of the dust have been taken each month on the roadways,
all of which were in keeping with the standard set by the Coal-dust Regulations.
Regular inspections of the workings were made by the miners' " gas committee," and
this committee kindly furnished copies of all their reports of inspection. The report-books
required to be kept at the mine were examined frequently and found in good order.
There were two fatalities and six serious accidents in this mine during the year. The
fatal accidents were the result of one man being caught by a stringer while riding on a
loaded car, while the other was caused by a fall of rock. Of the six serious accidents, three
were caused by falls of rock; one caused by blasting; one by mine-cars and haulage; and
the other when a mine mechanic put his hand forward to examine a bolt at a hoist just as
the machinery was set in motion and his hand was jammed between the eccentric and the
frame of the hoist. In addition to the above, a number of minor accidents occurred which
caused a loss of time from a few days to several weeks.
J.  A. Boyd,  President,  Montreal,  Que.;    Lieut.-Col.  C.  W.  Villiers, Vice-
Canadian Col-    President, Nanaimo, B.C.;   P. S. Fagan, Secretary, Nanaimo, B.C.;   John
Iieries (Duns-    Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.;   Robt. Laird, District Super-
muir),Ltd.      intendent, Cumberland, B.C.    The mines operated by this company during
the year were Nos. 5 and 8, Comox Colliery, Cumberland;   Northfield mine
at Northfield, and the No. 10 mine at South Wellington.    Comox Colliery is situated near
Cumberland and is connected to Union Bay by the colliery railway, 12 miles in length, over
which the whole of the output is transported.    The Northfield Colliery is situated about 4
miles north of Nanaimo and has railway connections over the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway
and the Western  Fuel  Corporation's private lines with the loading-wharves  at  Nanaimo
where all coal is shipped.    No. 10 mine is situated at South Wellington, which is approximately 7 miles south of Nanaimo.    This latter property has not yet been developed to the
producing stage.
No. 5 Mine, Comox Colliery.—J. S. Williams, Manager; S. Jones and H. Devlin, Overmen.
This mine operates the No. 2 seam which is reached by a shaft 280 feet in depth. All the
workings lie to the dip of the shaft and are accessible by four slopes which were driven from
the level of the No. 1 seam. Practically all of the output was produced from the various
long-wall faces with the exception of the development places in the Main slope district
where steady progress is being made in the preparation of new walls. These are laid out
with an average length of 300 feet and equipped with Meco-type conveyors which carry the
coal from the faces to the loading-points on the levels. All mining is done in the rock-bands,
either in the centre of the seam or underneath, by means of Anderson-Boyes coal-cutting
machines which mine the coal to a depth of 6 feet. In the development places, the coal is
undercut by means of Hardiax post type punching machines, compressed air being used to
operate the coal-cutters and conveyors.
A new 500-horse-power electric hoist was installed during the year at the top of the
main slope. This unit is equipped with a 6-foot-diameter drum carrying 5,300 feet of
1%-inch rope and is giving satisfactory service on this long haul. A considerable portion
of the slope has been relaid with heavy steel as a precaution against derailing of the trips
which of necessity must travel at a high rate of speed on such a long slope. Each trip is
made up of eighteen cars with a safety-car behind as a safeguard against accident to the
hoisting equipment. The main travelling-way and main slope have been cleaned up and
enlarged where necessary to provide a larger intake area and reduce the resistance on the INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 25
air. A new diagonal slope has been driven from the half-way hoist to reach a large area of
coal which lies to the left of the No. 1 West section. The seam in this area varies from
2% to 3 feet in thickness with a fairly strong roof and will be worked by the regular long-
wall system and conveyors.
An additional Canadian Ingersoll-Rand, Class P.R.B.-2, cross-compound duplex belt-
driven air compressor was installed early in the year. This machine has a displacement of
936 cubic feet of air a minute at 300 r.p.m., and is driven by a 150-horse-power Westinghouse
synchronous motor, 25 cycle, 3-phase, 2,200 volts, 750 r.p.m. This makes a total of six
compressors located underground at a distance of 6,000 feet from the shaft.
The heavy outflow of methane from the workings in this mine demands a continual
improving and enlarging of existing airways, coupled with the driving of new and more direct
roadways to carry the large volumes of air necessary to dilute and render harmless the gases
given off. In this connection, the management is to be congratulated on the fact that a
number of the main returns from the various splits have been greatly enlarged and a new
main return airway, 1,600 feet in length, 7 feet in height, and 14 feet in width, was completed
and incorporated in the ventilating system on the East side of the mine in the latter part of
the year. Work was also begun on a new air-drift, 8 by 16 feet, which is being driven
through the rock on a pitch of 65 degrees from the Main slope section for a distance of 850
feet, where it will make connection with a new 10-by-12-foot air-shaft now being sunk from
the surface to an ultimate depth of approximately 300 feet. When completed, this new
opening will be used as a main intake airway for a considerable period of time and when
the workings have advanced to the point where further changes are imperative, it will be
eauipped with a large fan and used as a main return. When the above connection is made,
a big improvement should result in the general ventilating conditions as the main body of the
intake air will be available at the most strategic point for distribution to the different
districts. All the development-work in the Main slope area has been done by the pillar-and-
stall method with a view to providing every precaution against movements in the strata in
the vicinity of the air-drift.
Rock-dusting is carried on continuously in this mine, a total amount of 364,200 lb. of
rock-dust were used during the year and distributed over approximately 4,000,000 square feet
of surface. The dust is applied on all main roadways by means of special dust-cars built
for this purpose while small boxes or troughs in conjunction with air nozzles are used in all
other places. Water-sprays are constantly in use at the discharge end of all conveyors and
all main partings are equipped with water-sprinklers which are used to thoroughly wet down
all loaded cars before they are taken out on the main haulage. Samples of dust were collected
each month from the different roadways as required and the analysis showed these to be
in keeping with the standard set by the Coal-dust Regulations. Samples of air were taken
regularly in the returns from all splits and main return airways, the resultant analyses
providing a fund of useful information in checking on the quantities of methane given off
from the faces and passing along the various returns.
Frequent inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee," and copies of all these
reports of inspection were received through the courtesy of the committee members. All
report-books required to be kept at the mine were examined regularly and found in good order.
One fatal accident and seven serious accidents occurred in this mine during the year. The
fatal accident was caused by a fall of ro"k, while the others occurred as follows: One due
to the cage falling from the pit-head to the ground level before it was brought to a halt;
three were caused by falls of coal and rock; and three by mine-cars and haulage. There were
also a large number of minor accidents which caused a loss of time varying from a few days
to several weeks.
No. 8 Mine, Comox Colliery.—Jas. Quinn, Manager; A. Watson, Overman. This mine
is situated in the vicinity of the Lake Trail road and 2 miles east of the mine camp at Bevan.
The seams are reached by two shafts each 1,000 feet in depth; these were dewatered and
repaired to the 700-foot level in the latter part of 1936 after having been closed down for over
twenty years. Prospecting-work only had been done when the shafts originally tapped the
coal-measures and it was necessary to make new roadways and sidings to facilitate the new
development in the No. 1 Seam area. A shaft-pillar 1,000 feet in diameter was marked off
and narrow openings driven beyond this limit before opening out on the long-wall method
3 of work. Up to the present time, operations have been confined principally to the south side
of the mine where the Main level has been rapidly driven ahead and No. 1 Incline turned off
to the right and No. 1 Diagonal slope set off to the left. The area around the shafts for a
distance of 1,200 feet is badly faulted, but the face-lines are being opened out in more
regular ground; this has greatly facilitated the winning-out of the three walls in operation
with another one approaching the producing stage. The No. 1 seam is approximately 30
inches thick with a band of bone and shale in the centre which varies from 6 to 26
inches in thickness; the cutting is done in this centre band by means of Anderson-Boyes
overhead long-wall machines. Meco-type conveyors are used on the walls and all machinery
is operated by compressed air. The roof conditions are none of the best and require close
attention on account of the numerous slips encountered together with cap-rock or false roof
from 4 to 6 inches thick which usually comes down with the coal.
The ventilation is produced by a Keith fan which is capable of passing 100,000 cubic
feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 2.5 inches. Duplicate intake and return airways
are projected for each side of the mine and these will simplify the ventilating problems as
the workings increase in extent. The mine drainage is taken care of by two single-stage
electric pumps, one situated in each shaft at the 80-foot level, each unit delivering 150 gallons
of water per minute. A new rock-drift has been driven to connect both shafts below the
present pumping-station and, when this is completed, all the water will be collected at this
point and then pumped up the downcast shaft by a 4-stage electric pump; all the water that
accumulates below the 700-foot level is hoisted with a 600-gallon-capacity bucket up the
No. 2 shaft, the water-level being kept down to a point 200 feet below the present shaft-
bottom.
During the year, 74,300 lb. of rock-dust were used in treating approximately 350,000
square feet of surface. Regular sampling of the mine-air and dust was attended to in all
returns and haulage roadways. The workings were inspected frequently by the miners'
" gas committee " who kindly furnished copies of all reports of inspection. All report-books
were examined periodically and found in accordance with the regulations.
Compressed air is supplied to the mine by a large Ingersoll-Rand compressor located
on the surface. This machine is driven by a 750-horse-power motor and has a displacement
of 2,100 cubic feet of air a minute. Additional buildings erected during the year were the
large compressor-house, blacksmith- and machine-shop, lamp cabin, office, and store-room.
Twenty-five dwelling-houses at No. 8 mine were reconditioned, and forty houses, hotel, store,
and club-rooms at Bevan Camp were repaired and occupied by the employees of this mine. A
number of the miners live at Cumberland and these are taken to the mine by train, which
also picks up the men at Bevan when passing through the camp. At the end of December,
the output had been raised to 340 tons per day with 142 men employed underground and
seventeen men on the surface.
Northfield Mine.—A. Newbury, Manager; J. Sutherland, Overman. This mine operates
the Wellington seam and was reopened in the latter part of 1936 after having been closed
for over forty years. During the present year an enormous amount of repair-work has been
carried on retimbering and enlarging roadways. The main haulage roadways on both sides
of the mine have been straightened out and improved, and this programme has entailed the
driving of portions of these roadways through a total distance of 3,200 feet of solid rock.
No. 5 Incline is being driven in the roof-rock above the old Wellington No. 5 mine abandoned
workings to develop a large area of the upper Wellington seam, which averages from 24 to
30 inches in thickness. It is anticipated this roadway will also provide a means of access
to some pillars that were left in the early days of mining in this district in the vicinity of
old No. 5 mine shaft. All main roads are being laid with heavy steel and are projected with
a view to handling a large output.
This mine is operated on the long-wall system, the coal being cut by Anderson-Boyes
machines while Meco-type conveyors are used on the walls to transfer the coal to the loading-
stations on the main levels;  all of the above machinery is driven by compressed air.
The surface plant is all operated by electricity, the power being supplied by the Nanaimo-
Duncan Utilities, Power, and Light Company. The main hoist at No. 1 shaft is an Ingersoll-
Rand, bicylindro-conical drum, 60- and 90-inch diameters, driven by a C.G.E. 350-horse-power,
2,200-volt, 3-phase, 60-cycle a.c. motor.    The ventilation is produced by a Sirocco-type fan, INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 27
driven by a 35-horse-power, 440-volt, 3-phase, 60-cycle a.c. motor, and is operating on the
exhausting principle at No. 2 shaft. Two Ingersoll-Rand 29 by 18 by 14% angle-type compressors, driven by 500-horse-power synchronous motors, 300 r.p.m., 2,200 volts, 3-phase,
60 cycle, each machine having a capacity of 3,300 cubic feet of air a minute, supply the
power to operate all machinery underground. The tipple is a 3-car gravity plant, equipped
with all necessary picking-tables, loading-booms, and shaking-screens, the latter being fitted
with a Hendrick patented lip-screen. A large centrifugal pump having a capacity of 800
gallons per minute, driven by a 60-horse-power 2,200-volt motor, has been installed as an
emergency fire unit.
While the method of operation in this mine causes a certain amount of crushing and
squeezing on the roadways, working conditions have generally been found satisfactory at all
inspections. The miners' " gas committee " have made regular inspections of the workings
and furnished copies of all their reports. The necessary report-books required to be kept at
the mine have been examined during all visits of inspection and found in good order.
One fatal accident and one serious accident occurred in this mine during the year, both
of which were the result of falls of coal and rock. In addition to the above, a large number
of minor accidents occurred involving a loss of time varying from a few days to a few weeks.
No. 10 Mine, South Wellington.—W. Wilson, Manager. This new opening is situated in
Section 9, Range 6, Cranberry District, at a point located half a mile to the south of the old
Wellington-Extension No. 5 mine. Work was commenced in May when a slope was driven
from the surface for a distance of 650 feet where it was stopped in faulted ground. It was
then decided to drive the counter-slope ahead to prove the ground and then drive back uphill
to connect with the main slope on a permanent grade suitable for the main haulage. The
ventilation is provided by a small Sturtevant fan which is driven by a 10-horse-power motor;
this unit is capable of producing 25,000 cubic feet of air a minute. Two small Canadian
Ingersoll-Rand compressors, with a combined capacity of 450 cubic feet of air a minute,
provide the power in the meantime to operate the drilling-machines, pumps, and a small airhoist. The water used to cool the compressors is pumped from an adjacent lake by an
electrically driven Canadian Allis-Chalmers turbine-pump.
This mine is still in the prospecting stage, and while some coal has been found in the
slopes it is estimated that these roadways will have to be driven a considerable distance before
they are clear of the troubled area and into the regular seam. Working conditions in general
have usually been found satisfactory at all inspections. This mine was free from serious
accident during the year.
No. 1 Mine, Lantzville.—A. Challoner, Overman. This mine is situated
Lantzville on the shore-line of the Strait of Georgia, 9 miles north of Nanaimo. The
Colliery. workings are reached by a slope from the surface;   this roadway is 270 feet
in length and dips at an angle of 30 degrees. The Wellington seam is
operated in this area, the coal averaging 30 inches in thickness which is mined by hand on a
modified long-wall method of working. This mine was in operation 261 days during the year
with an average production of 24.3 tons per day. This property is operated on a co-operative
system with seventeen men employed underground and five on the surface. The ventilation
is provided by a small fan which is capable of passing 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute;
working conditions were found to be generally satisfactory at all inspections and no serious
accidents were reported.
J. Biggs, Operator and Fireboss. This mine is situated in the Wellington
Biggs' Mine,     area and all operations were confined to the extraction of some small surface
pillars which had been left from previous operations. This property was
operated only for a period of thirty-one days with a production of 81 tons of coal. Ventilation was provided by natural means and was sufficient for all requirements. Working conditions were found to be fairly good, and the mine being naturally damp was generally free
from coal-dust.
A. McLaughlin, Operator. This mine is situated in the vicinity of the old
Jingle Pot Mine, original Jingle Pot site and was opened up to recover some small surface
pillars which were left in the first working. It operated for a period of
seventy-six days during the first four months of the year and produced 57 tons of coal. The
ventilation was provided by natural means, this being ample for the needs of the mine.    As G 28 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
this area is naturally damp, the workings generally were free from coal-dust.    No accidents
were reported.
Richardson Bros., Operators. This mine is situated on the site of the
Richardson former operations of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at South Wellington,
Bros.' Mine,     and all activities were chiefly confined to the extraction of some surface
pillars in the Douglas seam which were left in the first working in this
area. This mine was operated ninety days during the first four months of the year, and
produced 664 tons of coal. These workings were ventilated by natural means and, being
naturally damp, were free from coal-dust.    No accidents were reported from this mine.
R. H. Chambers, Operator; Chas. Webber, Fireboss. This mine is situated
Chambers' Mine, in the Extension area in the vicinity of the old Extension No. 1 mine and
was developed to recover some surface pillars that were left in bygone
years. It was in actual operation for a period of 220 days during the year and produced
4,097 tons of coal. The workings are ventilated by natural means and were found clear of
noxious gases at all inspections; being naturally damp, all roadways were generally free
from coal-dust.    No accidents were reported during the year.
F. Beban, Operator;   J. Wilson, Overman.    This mine is also located in the
Beban's Mine    vicinity of the old Extension No. 1 mine and was opened in 1936 to develop
a solid area that was left intact in former operations in this field. The
main slope was driven down on the full pitch of the seam and levels turned off to the left;
one of these, No. 2 Left, was driven 8 feet wide with advance drill-holes 20 feet in length,
kept ahead of the face as a precautionary measure against contacting the abandoned workings
of old No. 1 mine. In the meantime, the main slope was being driven ahead into what was
generally considered to be solid ground, but on June 11th this place tapped a flooded area in
the old No. 1 mine, resulting in a large body of water breaking through and causing the
death of three men. After this water had been pumped out, an examination of the abandoned
area showed that the old No. 1 slope had been driven a considerable distance ahead of the
point marked on the old plans as being the actual limit of drivage for this place. Following
this regrettable occurrence, a restricted area was outlined on the plan ahead of the Beban
workings and precautionary drilling of long diamond-drill holes ahead with the necessary
flank holes on each side was ordered as a safety measure in all roadways in this area which
were approaching in the general direction of the old abandoned mines. The old workings
were successfully tapped in No. 1 Left level by a drill-hole 135 feet in length which permitted
the water to be drained off to this level. A roadway was then driven through to the old
Diagonal slope and this area dewatered. This made it possible to get a connection put
through from the Diagonal to the old Extension No. 3 workings for drainage purposes.
When this work was completed, active development was resumed in the main slope workings.
An Ingersoll-Rand compressor having a capacity of 350 cubic feet of air a minute was
added to the surface plant in June, while another return-tubular boiler, 126-horse-power, was
installed in October. A new air-shaft, 6 by 6 feet, was sunk to connect with the old water
level and the fan moved to this new location. The ventilation is produced by a steam-driven
28-inch-diameter Keith fan capable of passing 20,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a
water-gauge of 0.5 inch. The ventilation was good throughout the mine at all inspections,
while all parts examined were found to be generally free from coal-dust.
This mine operated on 259 days during the year and produced 9,316 tons of coal;
punching-machines of the Post type are used to cut the coal which is then loosened and
brought down by the use of explosives. The fatal accidents caused by the inrush of water
mentioned above were specially investigated and full reports submitted covering same.
W. D. Loudon, Operator; G. Stewart, Fireboss. This mine is located at a
Loudon's Mine, distance of 1 mile from the town of Wellington and was opened solely for
the purpose of extracting some small surface pillars that had been left
intact by former operators. Work was commenced at this property in July and continued
steadily until the end of the year; during this period, a total of 127 days were worked and
655 tons of coal produced. The ventilation was provided by natural means and was quite
sufficient for the mine requirements; working conditions in general were found to be satisfactory at all visits of inspection.    No accidents were reported. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 29
J. McKellar and Associates, Operators;   T. Bullen, Fireboss.    This mine
Cassidy Mine,   was opened in the latter part of the year on the old Granby property at
Cassidy for the purpose of recovering some surface pillars that were left
when the Granby mine was abandoned. A short slope was put down from the surface to tap
the seam and a level turned off to follow the strike, crosscuts being broken away from this
level at suitable points to explore the area, but usually these holed through into the old gobs
a short distance from the level. The owners of this small mine have displayed commendable
initiative and have erected a small tipple and screening plant on the surface which enables a
better product being shipped to their customers. Power to operate the hoist is supplied by a
gasoline-engine. This mine was in operation ninety-five days and produced 674 tons of coal.
The ventilation is produced by natural means and is quite sufficient for the mine requirements.    General working conditions were found satisfactory at all inspections.
T. Lewis and Son, Operators;   A. McLaughlin, Fireboss.    Operations at
Lewis' Mine,     this property were commenced in May, when approximately 200 feet of the
Jingle Pot slope at East Wellington was cleaned out and repaired to the
No. 2 level. A skip was then started along the high-side of this level with a view to developing a small area of solid coal that was left by the old operators. Active production was begun
in the latter part of the year when a total of 125 tons of coal was produced in thirty-nine
days of operation. A small centrifugal pump was installed on the slope a short distance
below the No. 2 level; this is driven by a 5-horse-power motor, the power being supplied by
the Nanaimo-Duncan Utilities, Power,' and Light Company. Ventilation is provided by
natural means and working conditions were found generally satisfactory.
Somenos Prospect, Cowichan Municipality.—Kovich and Associates, Operators. This
prospect is situated on Section 12, Range 4, in the Somenos District near Duncan. A 6- by
7-foot slope was being driven on a grade of 25 per cent, through the shales, but definite
information is lacking at the time of writing as to the exact amount of work that has been
accomplished during the year or whether the slope has actually reached the coal-seam.
H. McLean Davidson and Associates.    This property is located in the old
Berkley Creek   Extension area in the vicinity of Berkley Creek and consists of a short drift
Prospect.        which was being driven through the gravels.    Owing to the proximity of
this opening to the abandoned workings of the old Extension Colliery, all
further advance in this roadway was prohibited during November and an order issued
limiting future operations to precautionary advance drilling with a view to locating the above
old workings. Upon receipt of this order, it would appear that all operations were indefinitely
suspended.
At all mines operating in this district, the Edison electric cap safety-lamp is used exclusively by the workmen, while Wolf safety-lamps are carried by the officials for testing
purposes. All fatal and serious accidents were immediately investigated and reported on in
detail; in all cases of fatal accident the inquests were attended, and the courtesy of the
Coroner is acknowledged on behalf of the Department for the privilege of examining the witnesses present on such occasions with a view to ascertaining any information which might
prove to be of value in the future in averting serious accident. It should be unnecessary to
again remind all officials and workmen that a strict adherence to the regulations and the
application of sound common sense in the exercise of their various duties would eliminate
many of these so-called accidents, with their consequent physical suffering and financial loss.
In this connection a heavy responsibility rests on the shoulders of the firebosses and shot-
lighters, as these officials are in more frequent touch with the workmen while travelling
around their respective districts, and are therefore afforded more opportunities to correct
loose practices amongst the men and point out the proper method attending to their various
duties. Much valuable information along these lines may be obtained from a study of the
accidents that occur during the course of each month, and the writer is quite certain that
many officials would be genuinely surprised to see how many of these can actually be classed
as avoidable occurrences. G 30 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John G. Biggs.
The following coal companies operated in this district during 1937: The Coalmont
Collieries, Limited; Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; the Wilson Mining and Investment
Company, Limited (Blue Flame mine); Pleasant Valley Mining Company, Limited (Pleasant
Valley coal mine); the Tulameen Valley Coal Mining Company, Limited; Princeton Tulameen Coal Company, Limited; Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company,
Limited; Golden Glow Mining Company, Limited; Yale Coal Mining Company, and the
Francis Glover Trust Company.
The Coalmont Collieries, Limited, Middlesboro Collieries, Limited, and the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, continued to operate during the
whole of the year, while the Wilson Mining and Investment Company, Limited, and the
Pleasant Valley Mining Company, Limited, ceased operations at the Blue Flame and the
Pleasant Valley mines in Princeton during the month of April, when the material was withdrawn from the mines and the mines closed. The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and
Power Company, Limited, leased the Bromley Vale coal-mining property from the Princeton
Properties, Limited, as operated during 1936 by the Black Diamond Coal Company, Limited.
The Princeton Tulameen Coal Company, Limited, took over the coal-mining interests of the
Tulameen Valley Coal Company (generally known as the Lind mine), while the Golden Glow
Coal Mining Company, Limited, took over the Robert Haigh and Partners coal-mining
developments, situated on Lot 406 in the Bromley Creek district at Princeton, with a view of
bringing this mining development into production.
Blake M. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   General J. W. Stewart, Vice-
Coalmont President, Vancouver, B.C.; A. H. Douglas, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
Collieries, Ltd. D. McLeod, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.; George Murray, Superintendent,
Blakeburn, B.C. This is the largest coal operation in the district and consists of Nos. 4 and 5 mines, at present employing about 200 men. The mining operations are
conducted at Blakeburn, situated on the North Fork of Granite Creek, at an elevation of
1,600 feet above, and 4 miles by road from, the town of Coalmont, where the mine-tipple,
screening plant, and power plant are located on a spur off the main line of the Kettle Valley
Railway. The coal is transported over the mountain to the mine-tipple below at Coalmont
by means of an aerial tramway 2% miles long; the buckets on the tramway constitute the
body of the mine-cars and have a capacity of 1 ton. (Plant and tipple described in previous
reports.)
No. U Mine.—James Littler, Overman; Robert Murray, Frank Bond, Thomas Bryden,
Robert Barrass, Firebosses. This mine has been described in previous reports. In January
spontaneous combustion was discovered in 10 West level and caused the sealing-off of the mine
below this point, the sealed-off area being flooded with water pumped into the mine.
Pillar-extraction from the Nos. 8 and 9 levels has maintained the production since that
time, and preparations are now being made to extract the pillars between the main haulage
level and the outcrop. Ventilation is maintained by a double-inlet fan driven by a 75-horse-
power motor, and at the last inspection there was 13,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing
down the main slope for the use of thirty men. The brattice and stoppings were in fairly
good order and the mine well timbered; no methane was discovered during the year and
analyses of dust samples show same to be in accordance with the " Coal-mines Regulation
Act."
No. 5 Mine.—William G. Brown, Overman; Wilfred Valentine and Frederick Millar,
Firebosses. This mine is situated 2,800 feet north of No. 4 mine and 250 feet higher in
elevation, and is connected to No. 4 mine yard by a surface incline; Nos. 4 and 5 mines
operate in the same seam. This is a slope mine with the main slope dipping 20 degrees to
a point 2,000 feet from the portal, at which point inferior coal was met; production is from
pillar extraction in Nos. 4 and 5 levels.
During the year a larger fan was installed, which at the last inspection was passing
13,000 cubic feet of air per minute into the mine for the use of twenty-five men. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 31
At this somewhat isolated community there is a resident doctor and a well-equipped first-
aid room in charge of a trained first-aid man. There was no change in the general equipment
at this colliery during the year.
His Honour E. W. Hamber, President;   E. McDonald, Secretary;   Robert
Middlesboro     Fairfoull, Manager.    This colliery is situated on a branch of the Kettle
Collieries, Ltd.   Valley Railway about 1 mile from Merritt and consists of Nos. 2 South and
3 North mines.    The plant and equipment have been described in previous
reports and there were no changes during the year;   ninety men are employed.
No. 3 North Mine.—A. E. Allen, Overman; Garnet S. Corbett, Fireboss. This is a slope
operation on the seam for a distance of 450 feet, at which point the seam flattens for a distance of 400 feet. The seam is 6 feet thick. Seven men are employed; headings are driven
up the pitch to the surface outcrop for ventilation purposes; no methane gas was found at
the different inspections during the year.
No. 2 South Mine.—James Fairfoull, Overman; Wm. Ewart, Thomas Rowbottom, and
Leslie Dickie, Firebosses. The seam is from 6 to 8 feet thick, is steeply inclined, and occupies
a small basin to the extent that the main adit-level, driven into the hillside, after following
the strike of the seam for 4,500 feet, again reaches the surface close to the portal; headings
are driven to the surface outcrop above the main level and provide efficient natural ventilation; 115,000 cubic feet of air was passing through this mine at the last inspection for the
use of forty-two men.
Compressed air is the only power used underground and all the coal is mined by Post-
type puncher-machines. No methane was found during the year, and analyses of dust
samples show that the precautions of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" regarding coal-dust
are observed.
Granby Colliery No. 1, Princeton.—N. L. Amster, President, New York;
Granby Consoli- A. S. Baillie, Vice-President, Copper Mountain, B.C.; B. E. Perks, Secretary-
dated Mining,    Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;   W. R. Lindsay, Superintendent, Allenby, B.C.;
Smelting & PowerThos. M. Wilson, Manager, Princeton, B.C.    This mine was formerly known
Company, Ltd.   as the Bromley Vale Colliery and is situated in the Bromley Creek area
about 6 miles west of Princeton.    The seam is 12 feet thick, but only the
best part comprising the lower 6 feet is mined.
The mine was developed by an adit-drift which follows the strike of the seam for 600 feet,
at which point a slope was driven down the pitch with levels projected on both sides; the coal
is mined with the Post puncher-machine and requires very little blasting.
The power installation consists of three small compressor units having a total of 1,000
feet free air capacity; the compressors are Diesel driven. The coal is transported by
motor-truck to bunkers on the north bank of the Similkameen River, a distance of 4 miles, at
which point it is conveyed across the river to the steam power plant of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited; this power plant supplies the
electrical power required at the Copper Mountain mine and the Allenby concentrator of this
company.
Guy F. Atkinson, President, San Francisco, California;   Geo. H. Atkinson,
Princeton        Vice-President,   San   Francisco,   California;    W.   D.   Seaman,   Secretary-
Tulameen Coal   Treasurer, Princeton, B.C.;   James Taylor, Princeton, B.C.    This mine was
Co., Ltd.        formerly known as the Lind mine, and consists of a slope from the surface
on a pitch of 16 degrees for a distance of 350 feet, with three levels developed
on each side;   several openings have been driven through to the surface for ventilation
purposes and there is practically no dust, as the workings are wet.
During the year a modern small tipple and screening plant was constructed and an
electric-driven slope-hoist installed. The coal is hauled by motor-trucks to a spur on the
Kettle Valley Railway at the old Princeton Colliery, a distance of IV2 miles; thirty men
were employed at this mine.
The Princeton Yale Company, the Golden Glow Mining Company, and the Black Coal
Company each did some development-work at their respective properties, but the total production of coal was small. G 32 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
L. D. Leonard, Manager, Ashcroft, B.C.;   Harry Hopkins, Fireboss.    Some
Hat Creek       400 tons of coal was produced from this mine during the last three months
Colliery.*        of the year.    It was sufficiently marketable to be in demand at Lillooet,
Ashcroft, and Kamloops.    Two men were employed on the surface and two
underground.    No indications of gas were found at the different inspections during the year
and the ventilation was fairly satisfactory;   however, further development will require the
use of a fan or a ventilation raise to the surface.    Pillar-extraction gives the required tonnage
at present.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
F. M. Dockrill, Lessee and Operator.    This mine is located on Goat Creek,
Bulkley Valley   a tributary of Telkwa River, about 7 miles from Telkwa, to which point coal
Colliery. is hauled by motor-truck and shipped via Canadian National Railway;   the
market is chiefly domestic and limited to the line of the Canadian National
Railway between Prince George and Prince Rupert.
The Main slope was extended during the year and additional levels turned off. These
levels all ran into a squeezed area and have been temporarily abandoned. A new slope has
been turned off the present slope about 100 feet from the portal and is being driven down on
the full dip.    Pillar-extraction is being carried on in No. 1 level.
No inflammable gas has been detected on any visit. The mine roadways are damp and
dust treatment is applied at intervals. Electric lamps are used. Conditions generally in the
mine are good.
Thos.  Campbell,  Superintendent;   Wm. Dinsdale, Fireboss.    The property
Northwest       is  situated in  Glacier  Gulch,  on  Hudson  Bay  Mountain,  near   Smithers.
Anthracite       Several  seams  of  anthracite  coal  outcrop  on  the mountain.    A  crosscut
Syndicate.       adit is being driven from near the valley floor to intersect these seams.
This working still lacks considerable distance from reaching its objective.
Work has been carried on in a small scale and there have been frequent stoppages during the
year.    No sign of inflammable gas has been detected.
Skeena Development Syndicate.—J. M. Wilson, Fireboss. Some blacksmith coal and a
few tons of domestic coal have been mined along the outcrop of the Betty seam and brought
across the river by cable.    Only two men have been employed.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald.
Coal Creek and Michel were the only collieries producing during the year—these are
owned and operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, with head office in
Fernie. Corbin Colliery is still closed and likely to remain so for some time to come. Except
in a few isolated cases, working conditions in general have been found very satisfactory at
all inspections in regard to the state of the ventilation, treatment of coal-dust, and general
maintenance of working-places and roadways. Where it was found necessary to bring any
matter to the attention of the various managers or other officials, they proved themselves
at all times to be ready and willing to co-operate in effecting the proper remedies with the
least possible delay. Crushed limestone-dust is the medium used to combat the coal-dust
hazard on all roadways, gob-lines, and entrances leading to extracted areas. Nine hundred
and thirty-two samples of dust were taken in the district, ten of which were found to be
* By Thomas R. Jackson. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 33
under the minimum standard set by Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations. It is
still necessary to use explosives at Michel Colliery to bring down the mined coal, and the
regulations governing their use have been faithfully adhered to by the officials in charge of
such blasting operations.
One hundred and twenty-six accidents were investigated; two of these were fatal,
thirteen classed as serious, while the remainder caused a loss of working-time ranging from a
few days to several weeks in extent. The investigations again brought out the fact that the
exercise of reasonable care and a closer observance of the regulations on the part of the men
directly involved would have prevented a large percentage of these accidents, with their
subsequent suffering and financial loss.
The Edison electric cap safety-lamp is used exclusively at all mines by the workmen,
while Wolf safety-lamps are carried by all officials and bratticemen for testing purposes. In
addition, Burrell gas-detectors are provided at all mines and readings taken regularly to
check the methane content in the various return airways. Copies of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " and special rules are posted up at each mine and all report-books required by
the regulations have been examined regularly and found in good order.
Coal Creek Colliery.—C. Stubbs, Manager. No. 1 East mine only has been operated
during the year, production being still confined to the districts situated to the west of the
main haulage-tunnel. The programme of cleaning up and repairing the roadways in the
old 16 East district has been successfully completed, and it is now possible to gain access
to all strategic points for inspection purposes so that a quick check can be made if any
untoward conditions should develop. This operation has been carried on under very trying
conditions, and the fact that it has been brought to a successful conclusion with entire freedom
from accident reflects great credit on the skill and care constantly exercised by the men
entrusted with this work.
A large snowslide came down the ravine opposite the tipple on the north side of the
valley on February 12th and caused extensive damage to many of the surface buildings,
timber-yards, and steam-lines; this caused a temporary suspension of underground operations, but emergency repairs were completed and work resumed on February 15th. Three
outbreaks of fire were discovered and promptly dealt with. Two of these resulted from the
friction set up by the rope running over damaged rollers on the main haulage-tunnel and!
26 West incline, while the other occurred in the fan-housing on the surface. The latter fire
was the result of one of the driving-ropes breaking and coiling around the driving-shaft
where the excessive friction caused it to heat and go on fire. It was very fortunate for the
future prospects of this colliery, especially in the case of the underground outbreaks, that
these fires were discovered before gaining much headway in roadways passing large quantities
of air.
The method of work as planned in 1936 has been continued along the same lines during
1937 and, up to the time of writing, has fulfilled all expectations regarding the anticipated
behaviour of the strata. The small sacrifice pillars that were left in are apparently serving
the purpose of steadying the heavy conglomerate roof and causing the floor to heave, as in
many parts of the extracted areas the floor and roof have practically come into contact with
each other. When the peculiar conditions governing this field are taken into consideration,
the management is to be congratulated on the care and close attention given to the planning
and operation of this system, inasmuch as it involved a radical departure from that formerly
adopted as being the only method applicable to local conditions.
No. 1 East Mine.—J. Caufield, Overman. This mine is ventilated by an electrically
driven 11- by 7%-foot Sirocco fan, which, running at a speed of 150 r.p.m., produced an
average quantity of 122,200 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 3 inches. The
ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantity passing in each at the last inspection
measured as follows:—
No. 1 split: 27,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-five men and four
horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 1.6 per cent, methane.
No. 2 split: 30,100 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and three
horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 1 per cent, methane.
Main return: 134,000 cubic feet of air a minute. Safety-lamp indicated 0.6 to 0.7 per
cent, methane. G 34 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
Roadways and timbering have been kept in good shape and well treated for dust, all
roadways and working-places where such treatment is necessary being given frequent applications of limestone-dust. Three hundred and twenty-seven samples of dust were taken in
accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all but seven of these being
above the minimum standard set by the above regulation. Fifteen samples of air were taken
during the year, mostly in and around the 16 East old workings, where an extensive programme of repairing and cleaning up of key roadways has been steadily carried on for the
purpose of facilitating inspections of these abandoned areas, thus making it possible to
examine and check on any incipient heatings that might occur in this section.
Michel Colliery.—B. Caufield, Manager. In the early morning hours of October 25th,
the tipple, wet washer, slack-bins, and dry-cleaning plant at this colliery were completely
destroyed by fire, which apparently originated in the boiler plant situated at the upper end
of the coke-ovens. This small unit was erected for the express purpose of providing heated
air to dry the washed coal and was connected to the tipple by an air-duct through which the
hot air was carried to the washer. During the comparatively brief interval that elapsed
from the time of turning in the alarm and getting the fire-fighting forces organized, the fire,
assisted by the draft created by its own heat in the air-passage and also by the presence of a
certain amount of coal-dust, had travelled through this airway with lightning rapidity and
attacked the main tipple and washery at various points, eventually enveloping the slack-bins
and dry-cleaning plant. It was early apparent to those in charge that the tipple with its
adjacent buildings were doomed, so all efforts were concentrated in preventing the flames
from destroying the snow-sheds leading to the mines. Almost immediately plans were drawn
up to erect a temporary wooden structure, which was completed and put into operation on
December 9th, with a capacity of 1,000 tons in eight hours. This tipple was erected and
operating in the short space of seven weeks from the time construction was begun, and was
equipped to deliver all the different sizes and grades of coal to supply the market requirements.
At the end of December, practically all of the men who had been deprived of their
employment due to the fire were back to work, except for a few who were waiting to be
placed in No. 1 seam as soon as haulage arrangements were suitable. While the temporary
tipple was in process of erection, the engineering department of the company was busy with
plans and specifications for a new steel structure which will be erected in 1938, construction
to begin as soon as the weather permits.
No. 3 Mine.—Robt. McFegan, Overman. This mine operates the upper No. 3 seam and
is ventilated by an electrically driven 12- by 6-foot Sullivan fan, which, running at a speed
of 240 r.p.m., produces an average quantity of 140,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a
water-gauge of 3.1 inches. Ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantities passing in
each measured as follows:—
No. 1 split: 8,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-six men and six horses.
Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
No. 2 split: 12,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-four men and five
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
Main return: 26,400 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighty men and eleven
horses. Safety-lamp, 0.4 to 0.5 per cent, methane. Roadways and timbering have been kept
in good repair and usually well treated for coal-dust. One hundred and thirty-two samples
of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all
of which were above the minimum standard set by the above regulation.
No. 1 Mine.—W. McKay and R. B. Bonar, Overmen. This mine is reached by a crosscut
tunnel from the upper No. 3 seam of No. 3 mine, which intersects Nos. 2, 1, " A," and " B "
seams; Nos. 1, " A," and " B " ony being operated at present. This mine is also ventilated
by No. 3 mine fan. The ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantities passing measured as follows:—
No. 1 seam, return: 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of six men and two
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
" B " seam, return: 18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and four
horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 0.7 per cent, methane. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 35
Main return (all mines): 145,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of 116 men
and fifteen horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.4 to 0.5 per cent, methane.
No. 1 mine, main return: 77,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-six men
and six horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.5 to 0.6 per cent, methane.
Roadways and timbering have been kept in good shape and generally well attended to
regarding treatment for coal-dust. A total of 273 samples of dust were taken in accordance
with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all except three of which were above
the minimum standard set by the above regulation.
No. 3 East Mine.—J. Henney, Shiftboss. All operations in this area were again confined
to necessary repairs to main roadways and patrolling the fire area adjacent to the main
return airway.
Corbin Colliery.—W. Almond, Acting-Accountant, in charge. The mines at this colliery
still remain closed, with no signs apparent of a resumption of operations. Some slack coal
was gathered off the dumps at the tipple and distributed to the school, colliery office, and a
few of the residences. During the year, a decision was reached by the company to dispose
of all their equipment; some material has already been sold to other operators in the district,
but the main tipple plant remained practically intact at the end of the year. The services
of the two watchmen were dispensed with toward the latter part of the year and this change
now leaves Mr. W. Almond as the only remaining official representative of the company in
the Corbin area. G 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
During 1937 the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act " was amended as follows:—
AN ACT TO AMEND THE " METALLIFEROUS MINES REGULATION ACT."
[.Assented to 10th December, 1937.1
HIS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1937."
2- Section 24 of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," being chapter 189 of the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1936," is amended by striking out the words " the last preceding section "
in the second line of subsection  (1), and substituting therefor the word and figures "section 21."
3. Section 27 of said chapter 189 is amended by sriking out the figures " 41 " in the first line of
subsection  (5), and substituting therefor the figures "42."
4. Section 39 of said chapter 189 is amended as follows:—
(a.)   By striking out the figures " 42 " in the third line, and substituting therefor the figures " 43."
(6.)  By inserting after the word "period," in the first line of clause  (a) of General Rule  (7), the
word " not."
(c.) By striking out the word " block-holding " in the first line of General Rule (26), and substituting therefor the word " block-holing."
(d.)   By adding to General Rule  (28) the following clause:—
"(ff.)  Where shafts or winzes are being sunk or raises are being driven, or where any places
are abnormally wet or other emergent conditions are present, the Inspector may order
that all blasting in such shafts, winzes, raises, or other places shall be done by means
of an electric current;   and may rescind such order according to the conditions obtaining."
(e.)   By striking out General Rule  (74), and substituting therefor the following:—
"(74.)  Before drilling is commenced in any working-face, the driller or miner shall make a careful
examination of the exposed surface for holes or sockets in which any explosive may have  remained
from previous blasting;   and where power-driven drills are in use this examination shall include the
washing  of all the  exposed  surface  and  the  washing-out  of  all  holes  and  sockets  by  water  under
pressure, so that all such holes and sockets may be closely examined for the presence of any remaining
explosive."
PRODUCTION.
The output from the metalliferous mines for 1937 was 6,145,254 tons, an increase of
1,688,733 tons from the tonnage of 1936. This tonnage was produced from 185 mines, of
which 113 produced 100 tons or more.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES   (INCLUDING UNDERGROUND
PLACER-MINING).
There were twenty-three fatal accidents in and around the metalliferous mines and concentrators in 1937, being an increase of nine from the figures of 1936. There were no fatal
accidents in the quarries of the Province.
There were 5,421 persons under and above ground in the metalliferous mines and 1,168
persons in the concentrators in 1937. The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed
was 3.79.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1937 was 256,052 tons, compared with
318,322 tons during 1936. The tonnage mined per fatal accident for the last ten-year period
was 366,479. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
G 37
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1937 and
comparative figures for 1936:—
Mine.
No. of Accidents.
Mining Division.
1937.
1936.
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
Lillooet     - -
Bralorne    	
1
1   •
1
1
Nickel Plate       	
1
Windermere  	
Trail Creek- __	
Thunderbird   	
Velvet Gold (mill)  	
1
1
Fort Steele                                 	
Fort Steele.                         -
Sullivan (concentrator)   	
Sullivan  	
1
Fort Steele   	
1
Totals-.  	
23
14
The following table shows the cause, the percentage to the whole of the fatal accidents,
with comparative figures for 1936:—
Causes.
1937.
1936.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
3
5
1
9
2
3
13.05
21.70
4.35
39.15
8.70
13.05
4
2
5
._.
1
2
28.57
14.29
35.71
By carbon-monoxide poisoning. _ 	
Miscellaneous   _	
7.29
Totals  -	
23
100.00
14
100.00
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alexander MacKenzie, miner, Minto Gold Mines,
Limited, on January 18th was due to his being struck on the head by a small piece of rock
which fell some 15 feet and killed him instantly. He was wearing a defective hat; it is
probable that a safety-hat in good condition would have prevented his death.
The fatal accident which occurred to A. E. Taylor, labourer, in the concentrator of the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, at Chapman Camp, on
April 2nd was due to deceased being caught and crushed by the screw of a coal conveyor
which distributes coal to the boilers. He had apparently attempted to step across the
conveyor in contravention of orders and had no need to do so.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Hardy Sproule, trammer, Pioneer Gold
Mines of B.C., Limited, was due to deceased stepping or falling from an ore train into an
uncovered raise down which he fell a distance of 74 feet; a cover was provided for this
raise, but there was no evidence available regarding the person or persons who had left it
uncovered. G 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
The fatal accident which occurred to T. Gazzola, miner, Britannia Mining and Smelting
Company, Limited, on May 9th was due to deceased being struck on the left foot by a rock
which came down a transfer-raise; he died of bronchial pneumonia in Vancouver General
Hospital on May 24th, this arising as a result of the accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to William Gibbon, part owner, Harrison Creek
Ventures, Limited, on June 4th was due to deceased being crushed between two clay boulders
on the floor of this hydraulic operation; deceased was assisting in driving a bar into one of
the boulders when a slab broke off and squeezed him against the other boulder.
The fatal accident which occurred to Bagnor Benson, miner, and G. B. Shaw, mucker,
in the Melvin mine of the Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C., Limited, on June 14th was
due to deceased being caught near the face by a round of eighteen shots. As the place was
dry, fuse was being used and all the shots had been spit and deceased had apparently
retreated some little distance from the face before the first shots went off; there was no
available evidence to show why the deceased had not left the face in ample time.
The fatal accident which occurred to Finley McArthur, miner, Ymir Consolidated Gold
Mines, Limited, on June 17th was due to deceased falling down a raise after being overcome
by carbon monoxide from blasting in the raise. Blasting during the previous shift had
deranged the ladders and timbering at the face of the raise and deceased and others were
engaged in repairing this damage. Four individual shots had been fired to dislodge some
of the damaged timbers, and McArthur then went up the raise to investigate conditions but
was overcome. The compressed-air supply in the raise was used during the firing of the
shots and afterwards, but proved to be insufficient to dilute the carbon monoxide to a safe
minimum.
The fatal accident which occurred to Nick Priza, chuteman, Copper Mountain mine,
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, on June 18th was due
to suffocation caused by deceased being caught and covered by a run of wet muck from a
glory-hole chute. Apparently a large body of frozen muck had thawed out on the floor
of the chute and came down with sufficient force to cause deceased and his partner to loose
control of the chute-gate and cover deceased;   his partner had a narrow escape.
The fatal accident which occurred to Walter Markgren, miner, Pioneer Gold Mines of
B.C., Limited, on June 25th was due to deceased being squeezed by a slab from the foot-wall
which fell out and caught him against the hanging-wall and also injured Vincent Joseph, his
nipper. There had been two sprags set against this slab on the previous day but both were
found displaced when the accident was discovered; deceased and nipper had been dragging
their drill and equipment past this point and may have disturbed the sprags.
The fatal accident which occurred to Joseph Edward Sherwood, shaft miner, Bralorne
Mines, Limited, on June 24th was due to deceased being struck on the head by a rock which
presumably fell from the bucket which was being hoisted at this time; he died on June 28th
from his injuries.
The fatal accident which occurred to Matt Jarvenpaa, miner, Wesko Mines, Limited, on
July 13th was due to deceased being struck on the head by a 1-inch diameter pipe which fell
down a raise; deceased had fastened the pipe to the %-inch tugger rope in the raise by means
of half-hitches which failed when the pipe had been hoisted some 70 feet; 6 feet of the pipe
went through his safety hat and head.
The fatal accident which occurred to H. J. R. Bremner, mucker, Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited, on August 4th was due to deceased being struck by a train of
empty cars which was being switched into side-track near where he was loading a car; the
train became derailed at the switch and the cars went in where deceased was at work and
before he could get clear.
The fatal accident which occurred to G. L. Laribee, prospector, and G. Hansen, 17 years
of age, on August 14th in the Golden Eagle prospect, owned by the former, was due to carbon-
monoxide gas from blasting; three shots had been fired at the end of the previous day in a
prospect-shaft of small area and some 20 feet deep. Deceased had gone down this prospect-
hole on the 14th and had apparently been overcome by gas and died; they were not discovered
until the following day. From evidence given at the inquest it was found that very old
dynamite of a type prohibited for mining had been used, and that the men had previously INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 39
been affected by carbon monoxide in this small prospect.    Beyond relatives no one knew of
this prospecting operation.
The fatal accident which occurred to Hugh S. Cameron, timberman, Sanderson mine,
Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C., Limited, on August 16th was due to a cave-in of gravel
and boulders when retimbering at a point where a new place was being started; a new bridge
timber had been placed and a post withdrawn when the cave-in occurred, which completely
covered deceased.
The fatal accident which occurred to Steve Bandish, miner, Copper Mountain mine,
Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, on August 27th was
due to deceased falling from a manway ladder in a stope on to the muck pile some 12 feet
below.    He died from his injuries on August 31st.
The fatal accident which occurred to William Condon, jaw-crusher operator, Copper
Mountain crushing plant, Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, on September 14th was due to deceased being struck on the head by the crusher fly-wheel
when he apparently got under or leaned over the safety-fence to examine the crusher-bearings;   the crusher should have been stopped if an examination was necessary.
The fatal accident which occurred to Valentino Vogrig, timberman, Copper Mountain
mine, Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, on August 4th
was due to injuries received when the cage in which he, with sixteen other men, were riding
struck the shaft-bottom with sufficient violence to injure all of the men; Vogrig died on
September 26th from a blood-clot due to above accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Robert Alphonse Mahon, leading miner, St. Eugene
Extension Mines, Limited, on November 8th was due to deceased being thrown down the main
shaft from a staging about 40 feet below the collar when a shaft guide which was being
lowered to that point slipped from the lowering rope and broke the staging, causing deceased
to fall 370 feet to the water in the shaft-bottom. The body was not recovered until November
19th. The guide timber was secured by a timber hitch with a half-hitch further up and
under a lag screw through the guide, but the timber hitch apparently fouled some of the shaft
timbers when the guide was being lowered and had been loosened thereby. Such timbers
should be lowered by means of a bridle with a pin through the timber.
The fatal accident which occurred to Theodore Swanson, head timberman, Kootenay Belle
Gold Mines, Limited, on December 8th was due to a cave-in at the face of a working which
was being driven through unconsolidated ground. The working was timbered to the face and
bulkheaded above, but a sudden release of the overhead material caused the timbering to
collapse and instantly kill Swanson who was engaged in examining*the timbering at this time.
The fatal accident which occurred to John F. Gillis, mucker, Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining
Company, Limited, on December 23rd was due to a fall of ground in a stope; the miner in
charge of the place had barred down all visible loose ground and was engaged, with the
assistance of deceased, in setting up his drill at this time; the rock that fell weighed approximately 1 ton.
The fatal accident which occurred to Allan Bruce Ritchie, general superintendent,
Sullivan mine, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, on December
27th was due to deceased being struck by a flying rock from a shot in a stope. Deceased had
entered the stope by means of a manway that was not in use, but which was not fenced off,
after the men who had spit the shot had gone to guard the approaches of the regular man-
ways into the stope.
Falls of ground was again the largest individual cause of fatal accidents in spite of
intensive efforts to keep this potential danger before both officials and employees at the
different mines.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On March 27th while three men were being lowered in the 3,927 incline skip, Sullivan
mine, the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, the brakes failed
to act efficiently when approaching the bottom of the incline and caused the skip to strike the
bottom with sufficient force to slightly injure the three men. Riding of men in this raise was
immediately suspended to permit changes and adjustments in the braking system.
On August 4th at the No. 1 Shaft, Copper Mountain mine, the Granby Consolidated
Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, the main tie-bolt of the friction-drive of the G 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1937.
hoist broke while a cage containing seventeen men was being hoisted, and caused the cage to
get out of control to the extent that it went to the bottom of the shaft, where it struck with
sufficient violence to injure all of the men, one of whom died on September 26th from his injuries.
This shaft is 800 feet deep with stations at 200-foot intervals and is equipped with a single
cage and a counterbalance; the hoist was a double-drum, friction-strap drive, driven by compressed air, and is equipped with a Lilly control for the automatic application of the brake
in a case of overwinding or overspeeding.
The cage was about midway up the shaft when the friction-bolt broke and the cage
immediately stopped and began to descend the shaft; the automatic control came into action
as soon as the descending cage reached the speed at which the control was set to operate, and
the brake then retarded the cage but failed to bring it to rest and the cage descended to the
bottom of the shaft a distance of 400 feet from its position when the friction-strap failed.
The hoist brake had been adjusted two days prior to this accident and was apparently in
good working order. The surface of the brake-blocks were in good condition but showed
indications of foreign material which may have been due to grease and dust projected on to
the brake-race by the broken friction-strap. While the automatic brake did not prevent the
cage from reaching the bottom of the shaft it retarded the cage sufficiently to avert a major
disaster. The free drums on this hoist did not serve any purpose in this installation and
immediately following the above accident the friction-drive was removed and the drums were
secured rigidly to the main shaft of the hoist.
On October 6th in No. 2 Shaft, Pioneer mine, the West side skip stuck in the dump while
being backed out and several hundred feet of the hoisting-rope was paid out before the hoist-
man discovered there was something wrong. The hoisting-rope was damaged and a new one
was immediately installed.
On December 3rd the miners in the 3,927 drift, Sullivan mine, had finished loading a
round of shots and were preparing to couple up the lead wires to the permanent blasting-line
at a point 85 feet back from the face of the drift when the round went off prematurely; it is
presumed that one of the men had inadvertently allowed one of the lead wires to contact the
live trolley-wire at this point. Following this occurrence additional cut-out switches were
installed on both the firing-line and trolley-line and orders given that all power must be cut
off the trolley-line before starting to load shots;  no person was injured.
PROSECUTIONS.
During the year 1937 there were four prosecutions made for infractions of the
liferous Mines Regulation Act " and special rules, as follows:—
Metal-
Date.
Mine.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Jan. 7
Colpe Mining Company, Ltd.,
Manager-
Failure to comply with the orders
Fined $300 and costs, plus
Atlin
of the Inspector as per section
7,   " Metalliferous  Mines  Regulation Act," to provide a suitable  ladder-way  in   a   shaft  to
maintain   a   second   exit   from
the mine
$5 per day for 97 days;
the latter part of the
penalty was disallowed
by an appeal to the Supreme Court due to a
technicality in the information.
March 5-
Livingstone Mining Co., Ltd.,
Manager...
Failure to report an accident as
Charge    dismissed    on     a
Blewitt
per  section   14,   " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act "
technicality.
March 5-
Livingstone Mining Co., Ltd.,
Manager __.
Failure   to   keep   a   plan   of   the
Charge   dismissed   due   to
Blewitt
mine as required by section 21
(1),   "Metalliferous Mines Regulation  Act "
relating sections 21 and
24 of the " Metalliferous
Mines Regulation Act"
being separated ; this is
now amended.
March 5-
Livingstone Mining Co., Ltd.,
Blewitt
Manager...
Failure   to   provide   a   properly-
constructed    stretcher    as    required by General Rule 55, section   38,   " Metalliferous   Mines
Regulation Act"
Fined $100 and costs. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 41
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1937 the explosives used in metalliferous mines in British Columbia consisted of
10,118,000 lb. of high explosives, 4,410,000 fuse detonators, 1,219,000 electric detonators,
168,200 delay-action electric detonators, and 25,652,000 feet of safety fuse.
It is noted that blasting by electrical means is increasing each year.
AIR-SAMPLING.
Most of the air-samples taken in the metalliferous mines were taken at the faces of long
single drifts after blasting to determine whether carbon monoxide was present, and the
sampling done throughout the year shows a reduction in the number of instances where traces
of this gas was found.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
The ventilation of the average metalliferous mine is improving yearly, due to the better
understanding of the value of ventilation beyond merely supplying air for breathing purposes.
The increased use of larger-capacity fans for general ventilation and booster fans for the
ventilation of single drifts is not only supplying augmented ventilation, but is the best means
of quickly removing from the mine the dust that is unavoidably produced.
In all mines it is standard practice to have all the rounds blasted either at the end of the
shift or by blasters on the graveyard shift, and only incidental bulldozing in chutes or bulldoze chambers is done during the working shift; where there may be constant blasting in
bulldoze chambers the smoke and dust is dealt with by local fans.
There is an increased application of water-sprays at dust-producing operations such as
transfer-chutes and at the crushers in mills, and at the latter there is a growing use of
exhaust fans to control and remove dust.
MINE-LIGHTING.
There are now approximately 2,500 electric safety-lamps in use in the metalliferous mines
and it is expected that more will be in use each year; in no case where the electric safety-
lamp has been used has there been a return to the carbide-lamp.
FIRST-AID AND SAFETY WORK.
First-aid work is being well maintained in all the mining areas and during 1937 competitions were held in this work at Stewart and in Bridge River, as well as in the older
established districts.
Practically all the larger mines have organized safety committees which inspect the
mines both for the purpose of studying safety conditions and interesting their fellow-
employees in working safely. These local safety committees have the advantage of knowing
their own mines intimately and have a personal knowledge of the details that may easily be
overlooked by an Inspector who can visit the mines only at intervals; the work of these safety
committees is worthy of considerable expansion.
QUARRIES.
Quarries in the Province were fairly active throughout the year, although the number of
men employed was only 724, as compared with 931 in 1936; the number of men employed in
processing plants increased to 327 in 1937, as compared with 288 men in 1936.
There were no fatal accidents in quarries or processing plants during 1937. 

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