Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1937]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0307343.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0307343.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0307343-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0307343-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0307343-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0307343-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0307343-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0307343-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0307343-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0307343.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1936
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE" LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letters of Transmittal 3, 4
Reports—
Game Commission    7
Officer in charge of Game Fish Culture    9
Game Wardens, " A " Division  11
Officer Commanding " B " Division  14
Officer Commanding " C " Division  19
Officer Commanding " D " Division  27
Game Wardens—" E " Division.  30
Statistical Reports—
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences and Deer-tags  33
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences  35
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms, Anglers', and Outfitters' Licences  36
Revenue—Sale of Resident and Non-resident Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences
and Royalties on Fur  38
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1936, inclusive  38
Comparative Statement showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has
been collected, 1921 to 1936, inclusive  39
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty was collected
during Year 1936 .  40
List of Confiscated Fur, 1936  40
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1936  41
Statement of Bounties paid, 1936 :  41
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1936, inclusive  42
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters  42
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1936  44
Prosecutions, 1936    48'
Revenue—Export of Game Animals, etc., 1936  50
Revenue—Sale of Game-bird Bands, 1936  51
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1936  52
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1936  52
Statement—Returns of Fur-farmers, 1936  53
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1936  53
Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences, Season 1935-36  53
Statement—Migratory and1 Non-game Birds banded during 1936 by Representatives
of the B.C. Game Department  54
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, 1913 to 1936, inclusive  54
Hunting Accidents, 1936  55
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1936  56
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1936  56  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1936.
GORDON McG. SLOAN,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1937. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1937.
Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
31st, 1936.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Members, Game Commission. Ph
p
6
H
tn  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1936.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
The Province is divided into five game divisions for the purpose of administration and
in each division an Inspector or Sub-Inspector has been placed in charge. The Game Wardens
are very closely supervised and their work carefully followed.
As in past years, everything possible has been done to improve conditions in respect to
our valuable game and sport fish. Long and at times very difficult patrols have been undertaken, with beneficial results.
Every assistance has been given to the British Columbia Provincial Police Department
and other departments of the Government, and in turn we have received the best of co-operation
in our work.
Throughout the year many lectures, illustrated by moving pictures, have been given
throughout the Province before Game Associations, Schools, Boards of Trade, and other
organizations. It is estimated that during the year moving pictures of game in the live state
have been shown to approximately 15,000 people within as well as without the Province.
The co-operation of the National Parks Bureau, the Bureau of Provincial Information, and
Mr. Grover A. Youngs, of Barkerville, B.C., in loaning or donating suitable wild-life films is
greatly appreciated.
This Commission is endeavouring to gradually take suitable films of our wild life for use
for educational and advertising purposes. Time and patience are important factors in this
work, and we are doing our utmost to build up a series of films that will be a credit to the
Province.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
The system of trap-line registration, inaugurated in this Province in 1925, but not put
into actual operation until 1926, is proving more than ever each year to be an important
factor in the increase of fur-bearing animals. Trappers are in the majority of cases carefully
building up their trap-lines and only taking off a sufficient number of fur-bearing animals
each year to ensure a large annual supply. Trappers are to be commended for the manner
in which they are farming their fur-bearing animals.
Each year new maps are required to be secured in connection with the registration system,
but it is felt that any expense incurred in this connection is money well spent. It will no
doubt be of interest to mention that at the end of the year the following registrations were
in effect throughout the Province:—
White trappers  2,228
Indian trappers  (individual)    1,322
Indian trappers (partnership or group registrations)      214
In some of the group or band registrations of Indians it is not uncommon to find from
fifteen to fifty names of Indians appearing.
FUR-FARMING.
As during the past year, prices on the fur market for farmed pelts of fur-bearing animals,
especially mink, have been excellent, with the result that there has been a decided increase in
the number of fur-farms in operation.
This Commission, so far as finances would allow, has done everything possible to encourage
fur-farming, and is open to any suggestions that might be put forward at any time for improvements in respect to this industry.
BIRD-BANDING.
As in past years, the Department has operated its bird-banding station at McGillivray
Creek Game Reserve, Chilliwack, with very beneficial results. Severe weather conditions
during the first few months of the year, however, prevented the continuance of banding
operations.    In order to secure more definite information in regard to the migratory habits Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of our water-fowl, it is becoming more apparent each year that to do so we must continue
our bird-banding work on a much larger scale.
BOUNTY ON PREDATORY ANIMALS.
As in past years, Game Wardens have been very active in the destruction of noxious
birds and predatory animals. A large number of wolves, cougar, and coyotes have also been
accounted for during the year through the payment of bounties. A statement showing the
bounties paid and the animals destroyed will be found in another section of this report, as
well as particulars in regard to vermin accounted for by Game Wardens.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
A certain amount of advertising in respect to big-game hunting and fishing has been
undertaken by the Commission during the present year. More consideration has been given,
however, to the taking of moving pictures of game and fish, with the object in view of showing
the pictures to various organizations within as well as outside of the Province. The question
of inserting advertisements in many of the leading sporting magazines has been and is still
under consideration. During the year 375 non-residents, the largest number for some time,
hunted game in the Province. This in itself, considering that each of these hunters spent
on the average $1,000, indicates the value of our big-game resources. Fishermen also increased
in numbers from outside the Province, and with a more centralized control of our sport-
fisheries will result in an ever-increasing number of outsiders visiting the Province each year.
GAME PROPAGATION.
The policy of encouraging the breeding of pheasants, by farmers and others, for liberation in the Province has been continued. Licensed game-bird farmers in British Columbia
have, as a result, increased in number during the calendar year 1936, and 9,539 pheasants
were purchased, 6,282 of this number being secured in the Province. Indications point,
however, to the fact that next year it will only be necessary to purchase a small number of
birds from outside sources.
Details of liberations of game birds during the year will be found in a statement; contained
in another section of this report.
The policy of trapping surplus beaver on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve, near Barkerville, for liberation in other portions of the Province has been continued. A number of the
beaver so trapped have been liberated on Queen Charlotte Islands, where they have not been
known to exist before, and we are watching this experiment with considerable interest.
Indians and white trappers have been particularly requested to do their utmost to protect
these beaver.
Game reserves in the Province are proving very beneficial in restocking the surrounding
districts with game animals and birds. One of the most striking examples of this is in
connection with the Bowron Lake Game Reserve, where, from all accounts, big game as well
as fur-bearing animals are increasing.
As reported previously, mountain-sheep and wapiti liberated in certain sections of the
Province in the past have given us considerable trouble in connection with damage to private
property. This has been particularly the case in the vicinity of Spences Bridge in regard to
mountain-sheep liberated in that area, but steps have been taken to trap these animals and
to move them to other sections of the Province where damage is not likely to occur.
The situation in respect to wapiti liberated in the Naramata area some years ago has
improved in view of the fact that an open season for the hunting of these animals has been
permitted during the past few years.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS.
It was with a great deal of regret to find that the Dominion authorities curtailed our
seasons in connection with the hunting of migratory game birds. While drastic curtailment
of season was possibly necessary in the Prairie Provinces owing to continued drought, this
condition did not apply to British Columbia. We hope that next year our recommendations,
covering open seasons for the hunting of migratory game birds, will be given more favourable
consideration. *.
I
KAMLOOPS  (RAINBOW)  TROUT.  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 9
REVENUE.
We are more than pleased to be in a position to advise of a fairly large increase in our
revenue this year. With a carefully planned publicity programme, there is no reason why
our revenue from non-resident hunters and fishermen should not show a decided increase
annually.
Revenue increased $11,349.21 over the preceding year.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The assistance rendered and the keen interest shown by Game Associations, farmers, and
others in connection with our game-conservation problems has helped very greatly and is
much appreciated. There would appear to be an ever-increasing interest in game-conservation, due no doubt to some extent to more educational work being undertaken.
The co-operation of the British Columbia Provincial Police Force has again been an
important factor in our work, and the members of the Game Department have in turn assisted
the British Columbia Police at all times; the spirit of co-operation .between the two departments being most cordial.
We wish to thank Major J. A. Motherwell, Chief Supervisor of Dominion Fisheries; Dr.
W. A. Clemens, Director of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo; Dr. C. McC. Mottley;
Mr. J. A. Munro, Chief Federal Migratory Bird Officer for British Columbia; Major Allan
Brooks, of Okanagan Landing, the Forestry Department, and many others for the assistance
rendered during the past year.
REPORT OF THE OFFICER I/C GAME FISH CULTURE.
The annual report of the operations of the Game Fish Culture Branch for the year ended
December 31st, 1936, is hereby submitted.
The operations for the past year have consisted in the liberation of the fish held over
from 1935, the collection and hatching of the current year's supply of eggs, and the rearing
of a large proportion of the fry to the fingerling and yearling stages.
In July Mr. A. G. Bolton, who had been in charge of operations since 1932, retired from
the service on account of ill-health. In the absence of a trained man, Dr. C. McC. Mottley,
of the staff of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo, was appointed consultant in fish-
culture and he undertook the supervision of the work in an advisory capacity. This arrangement was to be a temporary one, with a twofold purpose: First, to incorporate into fish-
cultural practice a number of the recent discoveries in the scientific field; and, secondly, to
train a junior officer to take over the details of supervision by the end of the fiscal year.
The yearling's held over from 1935 and the fry and fingerlings of the current year were
planted as shown in the table in another section of this report. The hold-over for the present
year consists of 121,500 Kamloops at Qualicum Beach Hatchery, 40,000 steelheads and 18,000
Kamloops at Veitch Creek Hatchery, and 52,000 steelheads and 94,000 Kamloops at Stanley
Park Hatchery. In addition to these, a considerable number of Kamloops trout are being
reared under natural conditions in the Kelowna and Princeton Ponds. The hold-over for the
present year represents an increase of 130,000 fish over the previous year's operations.
In exchange for the steelhead-eggs received from the Cowichan Hatchery the Game
Department undertook the rearing of 2i3,000 spring salmon for a marking programme for
Campbell River. These fish were marked by the removal of the adipose and left ventral fins.
They averaged about 3% inches in length when released during the first week in August.
A fairly heavy loss occurred after planting, due to the high temperature of Campbell River
at the time of planting. Some experimental work on the tolerance of the various species of
game fish to changes in temperature should be undertaken. Such work is urgently needed
to find out the working limits of temperature for planting operations, especially those carried
on during the summer months.
Considerable difficulty was experienced this year with the water-supplies at the three
main hatcheries and losses resulted that were considered to be slightly higher than normal—
namely, 20 to 30 per cent. The losses among the Kamloops amounted to about 35 per cent.,
whereas the steelheads made a better showing. ' At Qualicum a swamp at the head of the
creek that supplies the hatchery was drained and the increased acidity was probably responsible
for the losses there.    At Veitch Creek there was an acute water-shortage in July and the fry Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
were crowded in the troughs; the situation was relieved somewhat by planting the Kamloops
as soon as they could be safely moved.
At Stanley Park the usual arrangement of supply was upset by the dry season and the
heavy demand for water by the City of Vancouver. A new supply-line was cut in from the
Capilano watershed, but it was too late to aid at the most critical period. Although the supply
of water available was sufficient for the hatchery, it could not be furnished steadily to the
reservoir, which reached a very low level, and as the surface water was drawn in the temperature rose to 68° F. This high temperature occurred just at the time when the Kamloops
fry were beginning to feed, and by making them listless they failed to take readily to the
artificial diet. The reservoir could only be filled during slack periods, and when the water was
poured in all at once the temperature would suddenly drop overnight to that of the city mains,
about 60° F. 'This sudden drop in temperature also affected the steelheads, resulting in
increased losses. Satisfactory arrangements with regard to the water-supplies were made
by the end of August and the losses have been below normal expectations since that time.
The co-operation of the Water Boards of Vancouver and Victoria, in making these arrangements is g-ratefully acknowledged.
Attention should be drawn to the necessity of obtaining only first-grade eggs for pond
cultural operations. Some difficulty was experienced again this year with eggs from the
Penask Lake stock, which are naturally small due to the overstocked condition of the lake.
A collection of Kamloops trout eggs was obtained from the end of the spawning run at
Beaver Lake. The operations were somewhat in the nature of a salvage, since they would
have ordinarily been wasted. A small temporary hatchery was constructed at the Kelowna
Rearing-ponds for the purpose of hatching these eggs. Part of them were shipped to the
Coast hatcheries.
No major construction was undertaken during the year. Certain rearrangements were
instituted at the Kelowna Ponds to facilitate the removal of the fish each year. Hatching-
troughs were installed at the Qualicum Beach Ponds, so that eyed eggs may now be shipped
there directly instead of stocking the ponds by the more cumbersome method of transporting
fry. A dam was constructed at the Veitch Creek Hatchery to direct the debris away from
the intake. Certain changes were made in the Stanley Park tanks; the sumps were boarded
over, new wooden outlets were installed to replace the old pipes, and the position of the
supply-pipes was altered to allow a better circulation of the water in the tanks. A new cement
tank with a fountain was built for holding larger fish for exhibition purposes.
An important phase of the work during the past year has been the establishment of a
standard feeding technique and diet. With a view to obtaining a more balanced diet with
lower costs, several experiments were undertaken at Stanley Park and Qualicum Beach.
Some of the findings have already been incorporated into standard practice. The diet of
powdered skim-milk and fresh beef-liver in equal proportions, as used in the American
hatcheries for the fry, was adopted. The diet now in use at Stanley Park for the older fish
is as follows: Fresh beef liver, 15 per cent.; powdered skim-milk, 35 per cent.; frozen fish
roe and livers from the Fraser River commercial salmon-fishery, 50 per cent. A mineral
mixture, consisting of equal parts of common salt, edible bone-meal, and precipitated chalk,
together with 1 gram of potassium iodide per pound of the mineral mixture, is added to the
ration in the proportion of 3 per cent, of its total weight.
This diet costs about 7 cents per pound and its use has meant a considerable reduction in
the food costs. At Stanley Park the food costs have been reduced 30 to 40 per cent, from
those of previous years. Owing to the lack of cold-storage facilities at Veitch Creek and
Qualicum Beach the frozen roe and livers are not suitable. At the other plants the ration
has consisted of equal parts of beef-liver and powdered skim-milk, which has also reduced the
costs. Certain experiments now under way are intended to determine the efficiency of beef-
liver substitutes and it is expected that a considerable saving may be effected along that line.
In feeding the ration when the fish are small it is necessary to scatter the food in small
particles that slowly sink to the bottom. A certain amount of wastage is unavoidable in the
early stages, but the fish soon learn to pick up the pieces. The main difficulty with the small
fish is to get the particles fine enough. It was found that the ground-up or pulped fish-eggs
produced a thin, watery fluid rich in the yolk material which, if scattered in the trough on
the tips of the fingers, provided a source of food readily taken by small or weak fish.    The REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 11
fish-roe is in general not a satisfactory food for the young fish because of the large amount
of egg-shells that come through the grinder whole. These are prone to plug the screens in
the trough and cause a good deal of trouble. As the fish get larger the food may foe placed
in lumps on the bottom or on trays suspended in the water. The powdered milk acts as a
binder, holding the material together, but at the same time softening the surface as it dissolves
and allowing the fish to bite off pieces of it. It also seems to impart a flavour to the material
which was formerly lacking in beef-liver after it became water-soaked. The ingredients must
be thoroughly mixed in order to obtain the best results. It was found advisable to grind the
liver and fish-roe separately, then incorporate the powdered milk and stir them together, and
finally pass the crude mixture through the grinder again for final mixing. This gives a
fairly smooth paste of the proper consistency. In the case of the beef-liver-powdered-milk
ration a certain amount of water has to be included in order to get the proper combination;
the fish-roe when added, however, supplies enough moisture and would otherwise be wasted
without the binding properties of the milk. The diets now in use seem to have increased the
rate of growth with a greater efficiency of conversion.
In order to increase the efficiency of the ponds at Stanley Park, the steelheads were
graded in September and all the fish over 3 inches were placed in separate ponds. Some of
these now measure 6 inches. Standard grading methods will probably be incorporated in
next year's programme. Instead of thinning the fish out into spare ponds, which must necessarily remain idle until required, it will be possible to start with a greater number of fish,
thin out the ponds by grading out the large fish in September and planting them. Experiments
in grading the Kamloops at a much smaller size are also under way at Qualicum Beach Ponds.
Continuing in its policy of assisting in the survey of lakes before stocking, the Game
Commission made possible a study of Prospect and Thetis Lakes, near Victoria. Mr. G. C.
Carl, of the Biological Board, has submitted reports on these lakes. The Game Department
also fostered the improvement of the Goldstream by the building of low dams to provide pools
for cohoe-salmon fingerlings at the critical stage of low water in August. The Victoria Fish
and Game Association and the Saanich Inlet Anglers turned out and gave voluntary labour
for this project. The Dominion Department of Fisheries has planted cohoe-eggs in the Gold-
stream for a number of years, but it seems evident that the limiting factor to the production
of cohoes in this stream is not a lack of eggs, but the decrease in the range of water during
the critical summer period. This was pointed out last year by the Biological Board in connection with the survey of the Serpentine and Nicomekl Rivers. Owing to the great value of
the cohoe as a sporting-fish and to its importance in the blueback-fishery, it would seem to be
a desirable thing to adopt a comprehensive programme looking toward management of the
production of this particular species.
The Game Department has complied with the numerous requests by fish and game organizations for lectures on conservation;  eighteen such addresses have been given since August 1st.
" A " DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Game Animals.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are to be found in various sections of Vancouver Island.
In the Alberni, Cowichan Lake, and Alert Bay Districts they are fairly plentiful, and are in
scattered bands throughout the Courtenay and Upper Campbell Lake regions.
Bear.—Black bear are in fair numbers throughout Vancouver Island. They undoubtedly
do some damage to young deer during the early summer months. These black bear are not
hunted to any great extent and are becoming more or less a nuisance in the more settled areas.
Grizzly bear are to be found in the Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlet areas, as well as in
the vicinity of Thompson and McKenzie Sounds.
Deer.—In the Alberni District deer are fairly plentiful, but along the west coast of Vancouver Island they are not so numerous. Very few deer were killed by hunters in the North
and South Saanich and Highland Districts in the vicinity of Victoria, owing to the dry weather
during the hunting season in these districts, and as a matter of fact the condition in respect Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
to unfavourable weather during the hunting season applied to most districts on Vancouver
Island.    However, deer are quite plentiful in most sections of the Division.
During the year a number of fallow deer have been trapped on James Island and liberated
in the Alberni District and in the Sooke Lake watershed.
Unlike a few years ago, deer are reported to be fairly scarce in the Courtenay and
Campbell River regions, and while this is also the case in the Alert Bay area, signs indicate
a slight improvement in the stand of these animals in that district.
Mountain-goat.—During the fall, reports came to hand of these animals being seen between
the Cottonwood Valley and McKay Creek, and if this is the case, then these animals, liberated
in the Cowichan Lake area in 1925, have spread out from the high slopes east of Shaw Creek.
A patrol will be made into this area in the coming year for the purpose of definitely finding
out whether or not these imported animals have increased, and, if so, to what extent.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In the central and northern portions of Vancouver Island beaver are increasing,
and in a number of instances in the Courtenay and Nanaimo areas special permits have had
to be issued for the trapping of surplus stock owing to damage being done in the flooding of
highways and private property.
Otter.—Land-otter are reported as being scarce throughout Vancouver Island.
Marten.—Fairly plentiful, and from reports to hand they would appear to be standing up
very well in most portions of the Division. In the Cowichan Lake region trappers indicate
that there is every hope of obtaining a good catch during the next trapping season.
Mink.—Good catches have been made by trappers in various portions of the Division, but
mink are only holding their own and do not appear to be increasing in any particular area.
Racoon.—Fairly plentiful throughout the Division.
Muskrats.—In the area near Victoria these animals have not been taken in any great
numbers, but in the Cowichan and other sections of Vancouver Island they are reported as
being plentiful. It would seem that in the Courtenay region muskrats which were a few years
ago doing some damage have migrated farther north, as trappers report finding signs of theise
animals north of Campbell River. During the past trapping season muskrats have been taken
in fair numbers and the pelts thereof brought a good price on the fur market.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Along the west coast of Vancouver Island blue grouse have been scarce,
although they have been fairly plentiful in the Alberni District. A few good bags were
obtained in the vicinity of Victoria, but generally throughout the Division there has been no
noticeable increase or decrease in their numbers.
Grouse (Ruffed).—In the southern portions of Vancouver Island willow or ruffed grouse
are reported as being scarce, while in the Nanaimo District they are reported as holding their
own and are spreading over the district in fair numbers. In the northern portions of the island
ruffed grouse have shown an increase, and provided that these birds have a good hatching
season next spring a longer open season could be allowed.
Quail.—During the past hunting season in the vicinity of Victoria fairly good bags were
taken, but in most portions of Vancouver Island where they are to be found quail are not
very plentiful.
Partridge.—In the vicinity of Victoria and Sidney these birds are not very plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—To be found in the central portions of Vancouver Island.
Pheasants.—In the Victoria, Saanich, Cowichan, Nanaimo, Alberni, and Courtenay Districts pheasants have been fairly plentiful, but owing to unfavourable weather conditions
during the breeding season in the past few years they have not increased to any great extent,
though it is hoped that during the coming breeding season good weather will be encountered,
and if this is the case it is anticipated that pheasants will show a decided increase.
Migratory Game Birds.
Along the west coast of Vancouver Island ducks were fairly plentiful, but owing to weather
conditions prevailing during the hunting season very few ducks were taken in any portion of
the Division.    While ducks were generally scarce at the opening of the season, later they were
seen in increasing and most satisfactory numbers. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 13
Brant.—These birds were fairly plentiful along the west coast, especially during the spring
migration, and this condition also applied in the Qualicum and other districts.
Geese.—Reports indicate that these birds appeared in larger numbers than heretofore,
and this was especially the case on the west coast of Vancouver Island.
Swans.—As in past years, swans wintered in small numbers in various sections of Vancouver Island. Some of these birds were seen at Nanaimo Lake, Cowichan Lake, and in the
Campbell River District.
Shore-birds of all kinds appeared to have increased throughout the Division.
Vermin.
During the first part of the year cougar were to be found in fair numbers in the Alberni
District, but many of these animals were killed for bounty in this and other sections of the
Division. During the year bounty was paid covering the destruction of 386 cougar on Vancouver Island, compared with a total of 599 of these animals taken throughout the Province.
Wolves.—Reports from practically every section of Vancouver Island indicate that wolves
are increasing and are doing considerable damage to game and domestic animals. Predatory-
animal Hunters J. Cecil Smith and J. Dewar have accounted for a number of these wolves,
while bounty has been paid for the destruction of these animals in various sections of the
Division.
As in past years, Game Wardens report carrying out instructions issued in connection
with the destruction of all types of predatory animals and noxious birds. Game Associations
and others have been interested in conducting noxious-bird shoots in their respective districts,
with beneficial results.
Game-protection.
Patrols have been maintained throughout the Division as in the past, but with not such
pronounced results, as difficulty has been encountered in enforcing the Game and Fishery
Regulations owing to the fact that a certain percentage of the population is on relief. Pit-
lamping of deer and fur-bearing animals has again given enforcement officers a great deal
of trouble, and every step is being taken to eliminate this illegal practice.
Game Propagation.
As during the previous year, fallow deer have been trapped in as great numbers as
possible on James Island and released in the Alberni and Sooke Lake Districts.
An increased number of pheasants were liberated during the year throughout the Division,
and a statement will be found in another section of this report showing the total liberations
of game birds.
Game Reserves.
As close supervision as possible has been kept over the various game reserves in the
Division.    Reports indicate that as a result of the establishment of these reserves the game
therein is increasing and moving out in greater numbers each year to the surrounding districts.
Permits have been granted to a number of applicants, giving them permission to hunt predatory
animals in some of these reserves, and this has resulted in quite a number of cougar and
wolves being taken.
Fur Trade.
As the majority of the fur trade is centred around Vancouver, most of the trappers on
Vancouver Island send their furs to that city for sale.    There are, however, a few fur-traders
on Vancouver Island.
Fur-farming.
Mink-farming has steadily increased in many sections of the Division, due no doubt to the
fact that farmed mink-pelts are bringing a fair return on the fur market.    Game Wardens
report that they have done everything in their power to assist all fur-farmers in their respective
districts.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The benefits of the registration of trap-lines are showing up in the returns received from
registered trappers. In this Division, however, a great many trappers do not hold registered
trap-lines, but trap on privately owned land or within the boundaries of municipalities. Q 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few registered guides in the Division, in view of the fact that the majority
of the Division is not classed as a big-game district.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made from time to time in various portions of the
Division, and the policy of endeavouring to thoroughly cover each respective game district has
been carried out during the year.
Hunting Accidents.
During the year there were a few hunting accidents in the Division, as follows:—
William Holmes, of the H.M.C.S. " Skeena," while walking with his hands in his pockets
and carrying a rifle under his arm, slipped on a log, the rifle discharging and the bullet going
through the fleshy part of his left thigh, grazing the left side, and through the fleshy part of
the left upper arm, as well as grazing the left thumb. Mr. Holmes fortunately was not
seriously injured and has completely recovered.
On Sunday, September 19th, 1936, Percival Burgoyne, of Hilliers, accidentally shot himself while hunting in the Hilliers District. Mr. Burgoyne, who was 18 years of age, was
hunting birds, and when he did not return during the evening a search-party was sent out
and the following morning his body was found lying at the edge of a windfall. There was a
large wound in the right chest, and upon examination of same a large wad of a 12-gauge
shotgun shell was found embedded in the flesh. The gun was observed close by. It is presumed
that Mr. Burgoyne was walking along the windfall with his gun cocked and that he fell,
accidentally discharging the firearm.
On October 4th, 1936, Cecil Smith, of Victoria, was wounded by the accidental discharge
of a 30/30 Savage rifle belonging to Mr. Art Beadle, also of Victoria. Loaded rifles of these
hunters were lying against a plank logging-road while Messrs. Smith and Beadle were assisting
a motorist who was in difficulty, and for some unaccountable reason one of the rifles discharged,
striking Mr. Smith.
Thomas Ralph, of Victoria, accidentally shot himself through the arm with a .22 rifle
on October 25th, 1936.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Throughout the year every assistance and co-operation has been received from members
of the British Columbia Provincial Police Force, and Game Wardens throughout the Division
express their appreciation of this spirit of co-operation and advise that they in turn have
endeavoured to co-operate with the British Columbia Police to the fullest possible extent.
Game conditions generally are improving, although in some districts deer have decreased.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Big Game.
Moose.—Moose continue to extend their range westward over the Selkirks, presumably
through the passes and down the valley of the Columbia. As has been noted in other years,
they are being reported more frequently in the Revelstoke area, the Upper Kootenay Lakes,
and in the vicinity of Creston, near the Idaho boundary. As this westward infiltration has
been continuing steadily for a number of years, there is reason to believe they will be established eventually in the Kootenay and Arrow Lakes section.
It is of interest to note that within the lifetime of many residents the moose have spread
from the central interior of the Province to the south and eastward. It is not so long ago that
moose were unknown on Kootenay Lake and very much a rarity in the south-eastern section
of the Province, where now they are plentiful.
Wapiti (Elk) .—Wapiti are reported spreading from their regular range in the Rocky
Mountains eastward to the Selkirks, but due to the heavy snowfall in that section it is not
felt that any such migration will be permanent or successful.    There is no decline in the stand ■   *l
• ■':''■:
•-,  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 15
of wapiti south of the borders of Banff and Kootenay National Parks and there is a definite
report of their increase in the area south of Fernie. In some localities, such as the valley of
the Palliser River, the stand of elk is approaching a limit of suitable concentration. However,
there is little danger of over-population for some time yet, but it is a possibility.
The open season on the elk near Penticton, which had been plentiful there some years
ago, has had the effect of scattering these animals, so they are not so bothersome to the
orchardists as formerly.
Mountain-sheep.—Big-horned sheep are plentiful in the East Kootenay from Banff and
Kootenay National Parks to the Crowsnest Pass. South of Crowsnest Pass they are not
plentiful, although they are not scarce. There are two small bands in the Okanagan, one on
the Ashnola Range and the other in the vicinity of Okanagan Falls. These animals appear
to hold their own, and there is little anticipation that they will increase to any extent on
account of the scarcity of the range, which they are obliged to share with domestic stock.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are well distributed throughout the Division, being thickest
in the Rockies and getting less plentiful in the mountains to the west. In the Grand Forks-
Greenwood, South Okanagan, and Similkameen they are scarce.
Caribou.—Caribou are confined to the Selkirks, and there have not been any reports of
their being seen in the mountains on the east side of Okanagan Lake, where thirty years or
more ago they were found occasionally. Their main range seems to be the high country on
either side of the Kootenay and Arrow Lakes, where they are reported in fair numbers,
although they do not consistently remain in the same area for any length of time. There has
been no apparent depreciation over a number of years, although, considering the migratory
character of the animals, they are not scarce. Short open seasons during the past three years
have met with general approval, but not many of them have been killed. This is on account
of the arduous nature of the country they travel in, which is practically inaccessible except to
well-organized hunting parties who have plenty of time at their disposal.
Bear.—Black or brown bear are found throughout the Division, but are not so plentiful
in the Grand Forks-South Okanagan Districts. Grizzly bear have approximately the same
range as the blacks, but are not so numerous. The Selkirk Range seems to be the most populous
area for bear of all species, closely followed by the Rocky Mountains.
Deer.—White-tail deer are plentiful in the eastern part of the Division and become scarcer
to the west. They are reported as increasing slightly in the Greenwood area, where there is
no open season, nor is it felt that same is warranted yet. They are only occasional in the
South Okanagan and Similkameen.
Mule-deer.—This is the prime game animal of the Division, being first in numbers, distribution, accessibility, and favour. In the East Kootenay, the Grand Forks-Greenwood area, the
South Okanagan and Similkameen, mule-deer are abundant. They are plentiful but harder to
obtain in the heavily wooded Kootenay Lake-Arrow Lakes section.
«
Fur-bearing Animals.
Marten, lynx, mink, and weasel, followed by muskrats and beaver, are the principal
fur-bearing animals in the order named. Otter, fox, fisher, and wolverine are taken occasionally in this part of the Province. All furs from the Division are of good quality and lynx and
marten, particularly in the Kootenay Lake-Arrow Lakes section, are not excelled anywhere in
Canada.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue grouse, ruffed grouse, and Franklin's grouse are well distributed throughout the
Division.
Sharp-tailed grouse are increasing in the East Kootenay District, but have practically
disappeared from the Grand Forks-South Okanagan-Similkameen District. Hungarian partridge are not as plentiful as formerly and are confined to the Creston and South Okanagan-
Similkameen Districts. A few flocks are reported occasionally along the boundary, but these
appear to be only migrations.
California quail are plentiful in the South Okanagan-Similkameen, which is the only part
of the Division where they have successfully propagated.
Pheasants are doing very well. They are plentiful in the South Okanagan-Similkameen,
where a month's open season does not seem to affect the stand.    Short open seasons at Grand Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Forks and Creston also met with general approval.    Recent experiments in planting these
birds at Robson, Deer Park, Renata, Nakusp, and Edgewood, on the Arrow Lakes, appear to
be successful, as well as similar experiments carried out in the East Kootenay from Cranbrook .
to Windermere.
Migratory Game. Birds.
The past season was a beneficial one for both ducks and geese. The short open season
resulted in the shooting being practically confined to locally reared birds, which after the first
day or two became very wild and difficult to secure. A small flight of northern ducks appeared
in the early part of November, but did not persist as the weather moderated.
Around Creston and the watershed of the Columbia River from Canal Flats to Golden,
the nesting conditions were good during the summer and an increase was noted in the Canada-
goose population, while the ducks were plentiful. This section constitutes the main breeding
area of the Division, although sundry duck colonies are found practically everywhere.
Ducks were fed grain last winter in the Canal Flats, Creston, and Nelson localities.
Apparently these water-fowl will not migrate if there is any open water to feed in. A small
amount of open water during the freeze-up remaining in the above-mentioned places was fully
occupied by wild ducks, principally mallards, with a scattering of pintails and golden-eyes.
Wherever possible they were fed, and even though the freeze-up was almost complete they
were observed resting on the ice and coming back to the feed. It is estimated that between
700 and 1,000 ducks remained throughout the winter.
Vermin.
Vermin accounted by Game Wardens in the Division: 15 coyotes, 25 ownerless dogs, 105
cats, 121 magpies, 18 owls, 70 hawks, and 365 crows. Game Warden Sinclair reports that
twenty-seven cougars have been killed in his detachment by Indian bounty-hunters. These
men were encouraged by the Game Warden, who gave them information where he had noticed
cougar signs during his patrols and also transported them by means of his car and saddle-
horses. In addition, ten cougar bounties were paid at the Nelson Government Agency and
320 coyotes taken by trappers.
Dogs running loose in the bird-nesting season are the usual source of complaint wherever
pheasants have been established, and it is a difficult matter to overcome, especially where the
dogs are usually the property of the farmer on whose land the birds are hatched.
Dogs of the German shepherd or police-dog type are a nuisance, especially in vicinity of
the towns, as they have a tendency to collect in packs and hunt far afield. Apparently they
revert readily to the wild state, as they are frequently taken by trappers and others in remote
places where deer are found.
Identification of individual dogs of this type is difficult as they are too wary to be captured.
Much unofficial assistance has been rendered by sportsmen, who have accounted for many of
these wandering dogs in a summary manner.
Game-protection.
There were eighty convictions and three dismissals under the " Game Act " in this Division
during the year.
Game Propagation.
The usual Upland bird-stocking programme was augmented during the past year and more
pheasants than formerly were released. So far the results have been most encouraging and
should continue as long as the plantings are confined to suitable localities. The pheasant seems
to be a very adaptable bird, but cannot cope with those sections of the Division where the winter
snowfall is excessive. The generous assistance of sportsmen in the various communities where
the birds have been released has been a great factor in the successful results obtained.
Game Reserves.
There are six game reserves in the Division at present, two of which are water-fowl
sanctuaries. In addition, Banff and Kootenay Parks as well as Waterton and Glacier National
Parks also contribute to the welfare of game animals in the Rocky Mountain area. Fur Trade.
Most of the raw furs are sold by trappers direct to resident local fur-traders or are shipped
to fur-traders at Vancouver. Practically all the catch is disposed of eventually at Vancouver
and very little fur is exported from the Province, as the trappers have learned by experience
that the British Columbia market is the most satisfactory one.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farmers are much encouraged by the steady rising price of all furs. The mink-
ranchers are particularly jubilant now that the quality of their pen-raised mink is recognized
as being of a higher standard than the wild fur. This is due, no doubt, to the systematic
selection of breeding stock as well as supervised diet and timely pelting.
Registration op Trap-lines.
Every trap-line available is taken up and there is a waiting-list at all the game offices.
This is an indication of the popularity of British Columbia's system of handling commercial
trapping, as very few trappers give up their lines unless for some serious reason.
Registration of Guides.
The system of licensing guides for big-game hunting is not entirely satisfactory. There
are many men who are excellent woodsmen, but do not meet with the approval of the nonresident who hires them for big-game hunts. At the same time there are other men who are
not so well qualified that seem to get on better with their patrons. Also the wide range of
prices quoted by the guides has tended to puzzle the inquiring outsider. It has been suggested
that licences be graded into guides and assistant guides, and that a guide's licence be only
issued to.a man who owns his own outfit and who is capable, if necessary, of employing an
assistant guide in a secondary capacity. This might relieve us from the present system of
giving inquiring outsiders a list of all our guides and suggesting that they make their own
arrangements with them. Sportsmen who write to the individual Game Wardens or to the
Game Commission expect that certain men will be specifically recommended. This has not
been our custom and the wisdom of such action is open to argument. However, if we discriminated somewhat in our licences, then the holder of a chief guide's licence should be
entitled to an official recommendation.
Special Patrols.
There were no outstanding patrols made during the year, as the usual routine patrols were
carried on consistently. These embraced trips of ten days and two weeks by Game Wardens,
either in pairs or singly, on horseback, snow-shoes, or by canoes.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 27th Joseph Yezovitch was shot in the left arm and side by his hunting-
partner, Nick Gredzuk, both of Fernie. The men had separated and Gredzuk observed what
he thought was a bear and fired. His explanation was that Yezovitch had on a black mackinaw
coat and looked like a bear, as he was sitting down at the time. He had whistled prior to
shooting, but apparently Yezovitch did not hear.
On October 2nd Arthur Cozzetto, of Rossland, was accidentally shot and killed by Allan
Dixon, aged 19, who was walking behind him along a trail. This accident occurred as a result
of Dixon getting his gun entangled in the low bushes across the trail.
On October 4th Joel R. Sutton, of Hedley, went hunting in the Ashnola District and did not
return. His body was found by search-parties on October 6th, and an inquest the following
day brought in a verdict that Mr. Sutton had come to his death from heart-failure while
hunting.
The hunting licences of the two above men concerned in accidents were cancelled by the
Game Commission.
General Remarks.
The vermin question is always a contentious subject. It is pointed out that coyotes and
cougar particularly do an immense amount of damage to big game, and none will deny the
2 truth of this assertion. But the picture is not as black as it is painted, otherwise we would
not have the gratifying number of wild game within our borders that we have to date.
Much emphasis is laid by conservationists on the so-called balance of nature and man is
credited with being a disrupting factor. That argument may or may not apply in other parts
of North America, but it is not fair to charge it against game administration in British
Columbia. We have always had noxious animals in this Province and will continue to have
them as long as we have our game.
If the indictment against the hunter of upsetting nature's balance is true, then the
responsibility rests with those States or Provinces which permit the killing of female game
animals. The buck-law policy in effect in British Columbia has demonstrated its value beyond
any reasonable argument. If we continue to restrict our hunting to adult males only, we can
still endure a sizeable coyote and cougar population without fear that our game stands will
unduly depreciate.
On January 1st, 1937, coyote-pelts were bringing $10 or $12, or better, from the fur-buyers.
If this inducement is not sufficient to curtail their numbers, then it would be out of the question
to ever pay a large enough bounty to achieve the desired result. The coyote with his pelt at
a premium during the winter and a small bounty payable during the summer, as well as the
cougar with the year-round bounty on him, are in little danger of becoming too numerous.
If our ruminant game animals are to continue to be the fleet, alert, beautiful trophies of
the wild that they are, it will be because their senses are continually attuned to the menace of
their hereditary enemies, the coyote and the cougar or—outside of this Division—the wolf.
Game-conservation records in America support the issue that wild animals reared in the
comparative safety of a cow-pasture degenerate to the approximate sporting-level of the
domestic cow.
Grouse.—The cycles of plenty come and go with the grouse. Scientific researches in the
Eastern States have not appreciably added to our knowledge of grouse conditions. We have
known for many years that they are subject to periodic fluctuations, but we do not know
definitely the cause. We suspect the wood-tick and diseases emanating from barnyard fowls
and we blame the pheasant, none of which may be true, yet the cold fact remains that the
grouse wax and wane every seven or eight years as they have always done—in spite of short
or long seasons, or no seasons at all.
Regarding the water-fowl, a large and successful reclamation scheme at Creston is another
example of the curtailment of duck-breeding areas. Thousands of acres of shallow swamps
have been reclaimed and are now flourishing wheat-fields. The work is not quite finished, but
in another year or two there will be a comparatively small area at Kootenay Flats for nesting
ducks. The local sportsmen are cheered somewhat by the prospect that upland-bird shooting,
pheasants and Hungarian partridge, will be appreciably increased.
The winter of 1935-36 was an easy one on big game, particularly deer, as the snowfall
was not up to average and the present winter has a tendency in the same direction. One
adverse feature, however, was the number of destructive forest fires during the past summer,
especially in the area north and south of Fernie. The famous Elk Valley was burned almost
its entire length, and the same thing happened in the Flathead District from just north of
the International border to the summit of the watershed at Corbin. This range carried moose,
elk, sheep, and deer as well as goats. While it is not anticipated that many of them perished,
it will inevitably result in large numbers of these animals transferring their allegiance to the
Alberta side of the Rockies, at least temporarily.
A deer shot near Summerland was found, on pathological examination, to be infected with
tuberculosis. Reports of disease in deer are infrequent and few opportunities are afforded for
the examination of specimens, the information usually coming to hand too late.
The absence of snow until after the close of the deer season resulted in somewhat smaller
bags than in previous years, the bucks remaining high.
The usual generous and cordial co-operation was received from all ranks of the Provincial
Police during the year.
The encouragement and assistance freely given to the Game Wardens by sportsmen's
associations throughout the Division is sincerely appreciated. The moral support of these
bodies lightens in no small degree many of the irksome phases of game-law enforcement.   REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 19
"C" DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Sub-Inspector, " C " Game Division.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C " Game
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Big Game.
Moose.—These animals wintered well in the north and, with the possible exception of the
Barkerville area, showed a numerical increase. Owing to the open fall, moose stayed well
back in the hills. Few of these animals were taken by settlers in the north, but many resident
and non-resident hunters obtained splendid heads, many of which measured over 50 inches.
Two reports of moose shedding their antlers before the end of November came to the notice
of Game Warden Atwood at Quesnel.
Williams Lake reports an increase in moose. Reports of their presence in the Upper Hat
Creek District north-west of Ashcroft, also south-east of the Thompson River, have been
received. The appearance of moose within easy reach of Kamloops and Salmon Arm is
common knowledge;   they are taken mostly by residents.
In the Cariboo many outside residents made a rush visit to obtain a moose-head and many
came back with specimen heads of which they were justly proud. This type of hunting is not
generally satisfactory, as it is unfair to the guide with the party because of the limited time
at his disposal.
Caribou.—Guides and trappers report a scarcity of caribou in the Bowron Lake area.
They are, however, doing well in the Willow River District. Very few were taken by hunters
this season.
In the Clearwater area caribou calves were scarce, which was mainly attributed to the
presence of cougar, twelve of which were destroyed during the latter part of the year and
since the bounty was raised.
Williams Lake Detachment mentions a limited number of caribou as being present in the
Quesnel Lake area.
In the northern portion of the Clinton Detachment very few caribou were bagged, although
many were seen.
Wapiti.—The animals liberated a few years ago at the head of Adams Lake are doing
splendidly, but no reports have been received since the heavy snow. One bull was seen in the
vicinity of Knouff Lake, about 15 miles due west of the south end of Adams Lake. Roughly,
100 wapiti are located at the north of this lake, but the majority are extended along the west
side of Adams Lake as far south as Squam Bay. A few are reported some considerable
distance north of the north end of this lake.
Mountain-sheep.—Many carcasses of mountain-sheep were found under a bluff by Indians
on Marble Mountain in the spring of 1935.    These were reported caught by a snowslide.
At Spences Bridge sheep can be seen daily. A band of twenty-five is reported north-west
of Ashcroft.
At Squilax they are spreading out in all directions, but their proximity to an Indian
reserve is the unfortunate feature, as no great increase can be expected.
Grizzly Bear.—Grizzly bear are present in the Azure Lake area and Blue River District.
Few of these animals were taken out. Clearwater Lake and Quesnel Lakes are famous
grizzly hunting-grounds.
A little more advertising of the game resources of British Columbia would bring in mora
hunters. This could take the form of a sticker attached to the wind-shield of every non-resident
car carrying big game from the Province, with the inscription: " This game was taken from
British Columbia." The Department could supply the stickers to all Government Agents and
Game Wardens for issue when trophy fees are collected. There must be thousands of people
across the International Boundary who must ask the question when a big-game head is seen
on one of their cars:  " I wonder where he got that head."    The need for advertising is obvious.
Deer.—Toward the end of the season only a limited number of deer were taken, due mainly
to mild weather. The same condition applied to the Clinton Detachment. Hunters in some
cases were misled into believing that deer had left the country.    As a rule, from 2,000 to 3,000 Q 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
deer yard up every winter in the Peachland, Trepanier, and North Summerland areas, but up
to the end of the year there was a lack of deep snow to drive them down.
Mountain-goat.—These animals have increased in the following districts: Isaac and Long
Lakes, in the Bowron Lake area;   Lillooet, headwaters of Niagara Creek, and Horsefly River.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The only detachment reporting a scarcity of beaver is Williams Lake. All other detachments report an increase from observations made during the year. The Williams Lake
District provides as much fur as any other detachment, but the scarcity of beaver reported,
which appears to be of long standing, would leave one to interpret that either poaching, over-
trapping, or lack of appreciation on the part of the trapper might explain matters. Census
returns of beaver left on registered trap-lines would, however, appear to contradict this rough
observation, unless the " scarcity " is based on the potential beaver population an area such
as this should have. From the returns of seventy-two trappers in this district, a total catch
of 239 beaver is recorded for the season 1935-36. From an estimate made foy the same
trappers, 1,139 beaver are still left on their lines, or approximately 15.8 beaver per trap-line.
I submit comparative statistics on the estimate of beaver left on registered trap-lines in
this Division exclusive of Indian trap-lines:—
No. of Trappers
Season. sending Returns. Estimate of Beaver.
1934-35   275 4,789;   17.41 per trapper.
1935-36   343 6,392;   18.6 per trap-line.
From the return of catch of 356 trappers, 1,019 beaver were taken in this Division. There
are many potential beaver-grounds still available for restocking. From a perusal of the beaver
return of catch and the estimate of beaver left on trap-lines, there are no complaints to make
as practically all trappers are conserving this fur-bearing animal. Beaver have established
themselves on Cayoosh and Seton Creeks.
Marten are apparently increasing again after the slump of a few years ago.
Other fur-bearers are reported increasing in localities favourable to their propagation.
There is some agitation in favour of fall trapping. While it is not generally recognized, the
fur-bearing animal and its welfare is the very foundation of our vast game resources.
Upland Game Birds.
Willow-grouse have apparently made a substantial increase at Salmon Arm. Blue grouse
are fair and Hungarian partridges are scarce. In the Merritt Detachment a slight increase is
reported in all species. There is a scarcity of prairie-chicken in the Lillooet Detachment;
in fact, this might apply to the Division as a whole, with the possible exception of the Vernon
District.
The season on pheasants eclipsed all previous seasons for good hunting. Roughly, 800
birds were shipped out by express companies during the first week of the season by sportsmen
at Salmon Arm, Vernon, and Kelowna. About 150 were shipped out by stages from the Vernon
District in addition to the above.
Between 5,000 and 6,000 pheasants are being fed this winter at Vernon, with a corresponding number at Kelowna. It is expected that feeding expenses will be considerably heavier
than in any previous year.
Hungarian partridges are reported at Bridge Lake and Ashcroft. Blue grouse around
Quesnel are scarce. Franklin's grouse, especially on the Nazko Mountain in the Quesnel
Detachment, are quite prolific.    Willow-grouse are also reported increasing.
In the Kelowna District, Hungarian partridges are slowly increasing. Quail are about the
same as last year.    Blue grouse are increasing, but at Vernon they are far from numerous.
Hungarian partridges appear to be semi-migratory. I would suggest in any further shipments of Hungarian partridges that the birds be banded in order to prove or disprove this
theory.
Migratory Game Birds.
Quesnel.—Ducks showed no increase. Local ducks are about the same. Heavy frosts on
September 7th and 8th caused ducks to leave.    The main northern flight appeared to filter REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 21
through at Quesnel all fall instead of migrating in large flights.    Geese were observed in the
Nazko and Blackwater in the middle of November, when all lakes were frozen over.
Williams Lake.—Migratory bird were about the same as last year.
Clinton.—Ducks and geese observed in considerable numbers and were reported to have
stayed longer than usual.
Lillooet.—Nesting seasons of migratory game birds was hampered by high water during
May and June.
Kamloops.—The local duck season was fairly good. The northern migration was late.
Early frosts speeded the flight south in many localities.
Merritt.—There is an increase in local ducks. The season was generally considered good.
A great scarcity of canvas-back ducks is reported at Merritt.
Salmon Arm.—Last season was a good breeding season. There was an increase in ducks,
for which the shorter season was only partly responsible.
Vernon.—An increase of migratory game birds is reported.
Kelowna.—Geese are reported scarce, ducks numerous, but mostly local.
The water conditions in this Division, which showed improvement in 1935, continued to
improve during 1936. Actually, these improved areas meant additional food and cover for
water-fowl, which resulted in an increase of local populations. In districts such as Okanagan,
Kamloops, and Nicola, which are mainly semi-arid, the size of the duck populations is largely
controlled by the amount of food and cover available, which in turn is governed by water conditions.
Throughout the Division mallards have shown an increase over the previous year. Other
species of ducks have maintained their numbers, with the possible exception of canvas-backs at
Nicola. There appears to have been an increase of red-heads, especially in certain sections of
the Cariboo. A flock of, roughly, 500 red-heads was reported from Okanagan Lake. No previous report of so large a number as a winter record has been received for many years. It is
reliably reported that 5,000 or more red-heads used to winter on Okanagan Lake some twenty
years ago.
Vermin.
The following predators were killed by Game Wardens in " C " Game Division during
1936:—
Crows   840 Cougar   13
Magpies  531 Coyotes  77
Horned owls  . 81 Hawks   77
Dogs gone wild  21 Eagles doing damage.— 16
House-cats gone wild— 71 Bear doing damage  5
Bobcats doing damage._ 3
Game Wardens Maxson and Still were outstanding in the destruction of predators. Good
work was also done by Game Wardens MacMartin and Jobin. Game Warden Still was instrumental in assisting trappers and coyote-hunters by showing them improved methods of killing
coyotes, resulting in about 170 of these animals being destroyed.
Game Warden Maxson alone killed twenty-two coyotes, mainly through the use of rifle
and telescopic sight. In regard to the use of the latter equipment and speaking from considerable experience, there is no finer and more accurate equipment made to-day for the destruction
of predators than a small-calibre rifle with good-quality scope and accurately made mount, of
which the latter is an important feature.
Considerable advances have been made in recent years in the ballistics of modern firearms,
and it can be safely said that the telescopic sight attached scientifically to the present-day rifle,
with the use of super-accurate ammunition, is a long step ahead of the old type of firearms
with even the gold-bead front-sight and open or peep back-sight. The coyote begins to move at
dusk and at dawn, moving out of its hide-out at dusk and coming back again at dawn. The fifteen minutes to one-half hour period in the use of the telescope sight in the morning and evening
over the old iron sight means quite a lot in the destruction of coyotes. A cheap rifle with scope
is a gamble.    Up-to-date equipment is an investment.
During 1935-36 a drive was made against coyotes by a number of trappers and hunters
in the Lillooet District.    Approximately 310 of these animals were destroyed. Q 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A universal system of marking cougar-pelts in British Columbia, Washington, Alberta,
and surrounding territory, after collection of bounty, should be undertaken.
In regard to the possibility of trapping cougar by means of catnip-oil, the use of this scent
has possibilities, but the cost of distillation from the plant is, on the face of things, somewhat
high. The synthetic material (catnip-oil) has not so far displayed its qualities in the field.
Its effect on a house-cat, when a diluted amount was placed before it, showed that it had some
virtue. The cat continually rolled over on its back. This scent has some effect on the sexual
organs. The cold weather affects the volatility of the oil in British- Columbia and reduces its
strength in the trapping of cougar. The effect on a house-cat which had been operated on
showed only very mild results when the synthetic oil was placed before it. The cat paid little
attention to the material. In the use of the oil distilled by the U.S. Biological Survey on a cat
in possession of its organs, the effect was magical and in some cases violent. Experiments with
synthetic catnip-oil are continuing.
I am of the opinion that even the placing of half a pound of natural oil on well-known
haunts of cougar would be a very economical investment considering the damage these animals
do. Real catnip-oil at $23 per pound would not be expensive if, after using a liberal quantity,
results were definitely conclusive. The drawback in the past, after considerable experimenting,
was its cost and the limited amount on hand. Sets have been visited months after by cougar
when the real catnip-oil was used, but it would be considerably more effective if liberal quantities were used consistently at selected places. Wolves are increasing to the extent where they
are a serious menace to game in the north. A number of old kills, mostly moose, in the western
portion of the Quesnel Detachment have been observed. One band, estimated around thirty in
number, is at present ranging between Strathnaver and Ahbau Lake.
Game-protection.
The co-operation of the various Game Associations in the work of game-protection in
Kelowna, Vernon, Kamloops, Salmon Arm, Ashcroft, Blue River, Williams Lake, and Lillooet,
and also the Bridge River Association, has been very gratifying over a period of years. The
conservation of an asset in this Province with the whole-hearted support of so many sportsmen
is appreciated.    There is no better advertisement than an abundance of game and fish.
Greater use of good-quality cameras, not so much to photograph the kill as to show others
what our forests contain, should be part of the itinerary of the up-to-date hunter.
A total of 120 prosecutions, nine of which were executed by the Provincial Police, were
recorded this year.    The Vernon and Williams Lake Detachments were unusually active.
The feeding of pheasants is being carried on by Game Wardens, farmers, sportsmen, and
residents during the winter months. The severe weather of February last was unusually hard
on game-birds. Care is being exercised to ensure economy in the distribution of grain with
maximum results.
The subject of game-protection is an extensive one, requiring careful attention and the
creation of means to stop more effectively the various leaks or weak features in what might,
if allowed to continue, eventually become a dwindling asset. If a situation arises demanding
action as a result of experience in the field, some means should be found to cope with that
situation.    Some of the points requiring attention are enumerated as follows:—
(1.) The indiscriminate use of poison by some wool-growers, farmers, and the suspected
use of same by trappers goes on apace year after year. The " Pharmacy Act " allows its use
with certain precautionary measures in the destruction of animals or predators; so does the
" Game Act," on a farmer's own property for the protection of his own stock. The ease with
which poison is bought, both in this Province and in the United States, without any form of
control, is leaving an ugly mark on the face of game-conservation. This clause also applies to
Indians, as the use of poison has been taught them by white residents. This would involve
amendment of the " Pharmacy Act" and the " Game Act." Roughly, seventy applications for
poison for the destruction of predators have been made in three towns in the Division during
1936, amounting to over 60 oz. This will kill more than predators if this sort of thing is allowed
to continue.
(2.) Poached fur and the purchase of same by fur-buyers without the demand to show the
necessary licence or give its number.    It is an offence under the Criminal Code to purchase or   REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 23
have in possession stolen property. The same should apply to fur stolen from other registered
trap-lines.
(3.) The obvious need for a leg-band system on species of birds shot during the open
season in order to control bag limits. This would apply to species demanding greater protection, such as ducks or prairie-chickens, etc. A suitable fool-proof tag at a low price, if such a
tag can be secured, could be used.
(4.) Attention to the need for destruction of horned owls and certain hawks on mountain
ranges. I would suggest that the bounty system be inaugurated for trappers only, from
November 1st to April 30th, or that a number of hawks and horned owls in various parts of the
Province be banded with an invisible band and liberated by the Inspector of each Division.
Money prizes totalling a few thousand dollars would be used, when the bands are turned in by
hunters or trappers. A time-limit would be set for the return of bands. This would be much
cheaper than the bounty system and would be an added attraction. Some information on flight
and movement of raptores might be obtained from this plan if carried out.
(5.) The distribution of literature for the instruction of young trappers in the proper
method of stretching skins for the market. The loss to the trappers is considerable through
poor pelting.
(6.) The sending-in of returns of game killed in order to assist the Department in ascertaining how heavily each species is being thinned out. This would be a more accurate method
than the rough observation and estimate of game likely to be left in the field. There would be
a delay of a year in getting returns, but these estimates, even a year late, would at least form
a basis on which to work.
Some attention should be paid to the ever-increasing number of complaints by registered
trappers inside whose block of territory, over which he has trapping rights, to the encroaching
by non-registered trappers, who have obtained the trapping rights over private property and
even Government departmental lands inside the territorial blocks in question. The registered
trapper contends that he is protecting the fur inside his boundary and the trapper over private
property comes in without any regard to fur-conservation and takes the fur. It seems that the
Department should insist that the registered trapper should be given first consideration, or,
failing that, where a disagreement occurs between the registered trapper and the farmer,
especially where the latter is not a trapper, the Department should choose a reliable man to
work on a share basis with the farmer. This form of complaint is becoming increasingly
prevalent every year.
The Chilcotin area has been the subject of some discussion during the past year, since two
or three complaints have reached this office in regard to the slaughter of game and the taking
of fur by Indians contrary to the provisions of the " Game Act." Patrols have been made by
Game Wardens and the Indian Department has been appealed to in the past with some success.
It is a difficult country to reach, especially in the winter, and to give it the protection it requires
would mean placing a qualified Game Warden around the Dog Creek District.
Game Propagation.
Eight hundred and sixteen pheasants were liberated in this Division. The year just ended
provided the best pheasant season in the experience of this Department, due mainly to the
policy of the Game Commission and a favourable breeding season. There is no demand in the
Interior for an open season on hen pheasants, especially since the last open season. Most
hunters got their bag-limit without difficulty; in fact, many got their daily bag-limit in the
first half-hour of shooting.
Any elimination of old birds could be done more effectively by trapping during the winter
months, but this would be an elaborate job and would leave the Warden little or no time to
attend to his manifold duties.    The birds are big and in splendid condition.
Twenty-five pheasants were trapped at Tranquille for liberation in other parts of the Kamloops District.    There are too many in the Tranquille Sanctuary;   hence the yearly trapping.
Thirteen California quail are being held at Kamloops for the stocking of the Kamloops
District. These quail were trapped at Kelowna. There are now, roughly, sixty of these birds
at Tranquille.
The results so far obtained in the capture of mountain-sheep at Spences Bridge have been
disappointing.    Six sheep were feeding inside the trap toward the end of December, but left Q 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
and have not been seen since. About fifteen sheep have died as a result of suspected poisoning
by milk-vetch (Astragulus campestris). In the Spences Bridge District Zydadenus venendsus
or death-camas and larkspur (Delphinium minzius) have been unusually prolific, in addition
to the poison milk-vetch. One wool-grower at Spences Bridge had to go out of the business on
account of this poison. While it is not definitely certain that this is the cause, the symptoms
are nevertheless the same as from poison milk-vetch. Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth
is proceeding shortly both to hunt cougar reported there and to obtain a sheep carcass, if
possible, for stomach-analysis.
One cougar was killed feeding on the carcass of a sheep and another one was killed by
Predatory-animal Hunter Shuttleworth in the vicinity of the Basque Ranch, 15 miles north of
Spences Bridge. Both animals were ranging from Spences Bridge north. As there are two
or three more reported in the district, it is expected that they .will be cleaned out shortly.
The sheep trap has been set for some time, but so far they have not returned to stay.
One timber-wolf has been seen near Spences Bridge according to reports.
Twenty-four beaver were trapped at Bowron Lake Sanctuary for distribution, nine of
which were sent to Queen Charlotte Islands and the balance to other parts of the Province to
conserve water-supply. Live beaver are exhibited every year at the Kamloops Fair and were
also exhibited at Vancouver while en route for liberation. Beaver stocked at Kersley and
Savona Districts, also Sullivan Valley, are all doing exceptionally well.
Game Reserves.
The existence of the Yalakom Game Reserve is, no doubt, responsible for the increase of
game on the west side of the Fraser River.
In the Bowron Lake sector moose seem to be gradually decreasing every year. The fur-
bearers have increased greatly in the sanctuary, with the possible exception of mink. Beaver
have been trapped regularly on this sanctuary for a number of years for distribution at the
headwaters of various streams and irrigation projects.
Fur Trade.
Prices were a great incentive toward the end of last season and at the beginning of the
present season. A quantity of fur is sold in the Interior, but the bulk, as usual, is disposed of
at Vancouver. The transient fur-trader is still doing business. The term " established place
of business," as embodied in the " Game Act " and applying to fur-traders, does not discourage
the transient fur-buyer, who in the past has been a source of complaint, from doing business,
contrary in many cases to the provisions of the " Game Act." The term " established place of
business " has too wide a meaning. More stringent regulations are necessary in order to cope
with this source of complaint. The transient buyer starts out in the usual way, with the same
licence, from his home, which in many cases he describes as his place of business, and buys at
random furs in season and out of season.
The Indian is his easiest victim and the fur of the Province is reg-arded as a bottomless
gold-mine. In fairness to fur-buyers as a whole, who are frequently on the road and whose
desire it is to assist rather than hinder in the conservation of fur, I have no complaint, but
there are. a few doing business who are out of the realm of fair dealing, and I wish to stress
that it is against this element that action should be taken by having the " Game Act " amended
in order to eliminate this unfair and unscrupulous dealing.
Fur-farming.
Many mink-farms have started up in the Interior. This animal is easily domesticated and
the price on this fur is very attractive. On the whole, this business during the next few years
should make great strides.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system is still working successfully. There is an ever-increasing demand for trap-
lines, which cannot be filled. The only possible chance of any one getting a trap-line in this
Division is to wait until some one wishes to part with and sell his equipment through ill-health
or old age. There is not a single trap-line of any value in this 51,000 square miles available
for registration, and yet we have an ever-increasing number waiting for a chance to obtain a REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1936. Q 25
trap-line. We have had 90 per cent, renewals of registered trap-lines up to the end of the year.
It is expected that 97 per cent, will have renewed before the end of the season.
The complaint comes from Quesnel that Indian company registered blocks of territory are
not being trapped in accordance with the regulations. It appears that when the block system
was formed for a band of Indians, inside of which were a number of registered Indian lines
prior to the company reg-istration, the individual rights among the Indians in respect to their
individual lines were lost sight of, the result being that Indians of the band ran foot-loose over
the registered block and trapped wherever they pleased. This meant that no individual lines
existed in some of these blocks. Attention is also drawn to the fact that when these blocks are
trapped out the Indians are likely to start poaching on adjacent territory.
It seems that this is a matter that could well be taken care of by the Department of Indian
Affairs. There are certain individual Indian trap-lines in the southern portion of the Province
that have not been trapped for years.
In the Okanagan Valley the block system for Indians works very well and my attention
has been drawn to this by the local Game Warden as working out successfully. A great deal
depends on the band and how much they respect each other's rights. There is nothing to stop
individual Indians inside a company block of territory properly registered from still retaining
their individual rights to their respective trap-lines. This is a matter which, once drawn to the
attention of the Department of Indian Affairs, could well be handled by the Indian Agent in
whose district these company registrations exist.    This matter is being investigated.
There are a few non-active trappers holding registered trap-lines, whose applications will
be investigated in the near future.
A difficult problem to handle is the poacher on registered trap-lines. There are certain
transients around the country who den up for the winter in old cabins and on farms adjacent
to trap-lines and who are a continual source of annoyance to this Department. When the
snow goes they start travelling from beaver-dam to beaver-dam, shooting beaver when they
come to the surface. The simplicity of selling stolen pelts to an avaricious market without
question is well known. Surely the Department can suggest a remedy to overcome a glaring
leak of this type. The problem of selling stolen pelts should be made a serious offence and
any registered trapper selling pelts for a poacher should have his line cancelled. It is
only by tightening-up on the points that are weak that we can ever expect to have a highly
efficient system of trap-line fur-farming.
Registration of Guides.
Registered guides are available in this Division—some with first-class equipment.
The inclusion of the word " resident" in that section of the " Game Act" in which it
allows a non-resident hunter to take a resident in lieu of a guide is being taken full advantage
of by non-resident hunters. The result is, registered guides are sometimes out of employment
and the business of guiding by those paying for licences is being slowly dropped. Guides are
now saying, " Why buy a licence when residents are allowed to accompany non-resident
hunters as ' guests '? "
For all big-game hunting I would recommend the elimination of the word " resident"
as described above, but for the shooting of deer, birds, and black bear by non-resident hunters
the accompanying of same by a resident in lieu of a guide might be allowed. I would also
recommend that no resident alien be issued with a guide's licence.
It is recommended that the fee for guides' licences be reduced and that all members of
the guide's party, such as packers, cooks, etc., be required to take out a guide's licence. The
fee for the head guide's licence would be higher. This would prevent abuse of the regulations.
Mention has been made that guides be also held responsible for infractions of the " Game Act."
Special Patrols.
Two special patrols were made by Game Wardens Stewart and Mottishaw to the Spruce
Lake area in connection with the alleged poaching activities of Chilcotin Indians, also one
from Minto, Bridge River to Big Creek, 'Chilcotin. These patrols were undertaken with satisfactory results. Q 26 . BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A special patrol was made into the Mission Creek watershed by Game Warden Maxson
to bring out the body of a trapper. Twenty-two miles were covered on snow-shoes and a
toboggan was used to bring out the body.
On June 1st Game Warden Atwood accompanied Constable Bradley, of the British Columbia Police, on a fifteen-day patrol to Algatcho. Four hundred miles by horse were covered
on this patrol. Another patrol was made by Game Warden Atwood in the Nazko country and
as far west as Kluskus, settling trap-line boundaries and checking up trapping operations.
Mileage covered on this patrol was 357 miles on horseback.
Hunting Accidents.
One hunting accident took place in the vicinity of the Flying U Guest Ranch at Green
Lake on September 24th. H. R. McConachie, of the Railway Men's Club of Vancouver, while
taking his shotgun out of his car, dragged a loaded .22 rifle out with it. The .22 rifle discharged. The bullet struck him in the thigh according to reports. Mr. McConachie left
immediately for Vancouver to receive treatment.
Summary and General Remarks.
The year just passed has been quite satisfactory from the view-point of the hunter, with
the possible exception of the water-fowl situation, where opinions lean to the side of a request
for readjustment.
In the Quesnel area there is a recommendation for the open season to take place on
September 1st owing to the early frosts causing the majority of local ducks to leave. During
1936 the early frosts in the north caused the local ducks to leave before the season opened,
according to reports, and in 1934 the migration of local ducks took place on September 22nd
around Quesnel due to the same climatic changes. When one comes farther south he finds
the Clinton Detachment, which incidentally takes in from Canim Lake to Ashcroft, reported
the best hunting season for some time owing to the longer stay of ducks and geese.
In the Kamloops District the season on ducks was considered quite good, but frosts ruined
the hunting of the northern flights and the shorter season did not improve matters.
In the Vernon District there appeared to be general dissatisfaction on the duck situation,
although in many cases in this Division the feeling existed that the curtailment of the season
was a good one, except that, with the possible exception of the northern districts, the season
should be curtailed at the beginning and not the end. It is difficult to please all factions and
yet have uniform regulations. However, there is some virtue in the suggestion from some
sportsmen in the southern portion of the Province that, while a curtailed season may be in
order, a more convenient tim'a adjustment could be made on perhaps a zone basis.
The hunting of big game in this Division did not appear to show the volume of the
previous year. There were too many rapid-fire and rapid-departure hunters in the Cariboo.
The extent of some hunting expeditions lasted for three or four days only. One moose-head
appeared to be the limit of their ambition, while others again were after the meat only.
The business of guiding is only a side-line, but could be made lucrative if it were properly
organized.
The pheasant-hunting was the main bright spot in the hunters' horizon. The birds were
literally under one's feet in the Interior.
There are vast stretches of this country as yet untouched by the hunter. All it requires
is the woodman's axe to blaze a trail into virgin territory that would gladden the heart of any
sportsman.
To the Game Commission, Provincial Police, Inspector Shirras, Staff-Sergeant Service,
and the Forestry Branch, also the members of various Game Associations and Game Wardens
in this Division, I wish to extend my hearty appreciation and thanks for their assistance and
loyal co-operation extended gratefully in the course of our duties throughout the year. •
o
c  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 27
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE
RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Big-game Animals.
Moose, Caribou, and Deer.—The adverse conditions prevailing last year, 1935, occurred
again during the year under review, 1936. Deep snow at calving-time, an abundance of timber-
wolves, coyotes, and cougars, all contributed to depletion of our big-game animals.
The sale of tanned moose-hides to and by fur-traders, prohibited during the last ten years
under the provisions of the " Game Act," is again in full swing and is another very serious
destructive element to be added to those above mentioned.
The Department should very carefully inquire into the matter of the sale of these tanned
hides or the killing of members of the deer family for their hides alone, and to take or provide
for whatever corrective measures that are necessary to put into effect.
Elk.—These animals are scarce in this Division. The band liberated on the Queen Charlotte Islands are reported on the increase. The Musqua River country north of Hudson Hope
supports another band, which is subject to depletion by the extraordinary number of wolves.
The close season on these species should be maintained.
Bear (Black).—Very numerous.
Bear (Grizzly).—To be found in every district, except the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Sheep (Rocky Mountain).—In fair numbers in the Sheep Creek Pass area, north of
McBride.
Sheep (Stonei and Fanini).—In fair numbers in the Musqua River, Cassiar, and Atlin
Districts.
Sheep (Dahl).—Very reliable information has come to hand to the effect that white sheep
are in fair numbers in the Squaw Creek-Dahlton Post areas, situate in the north-east corner
of the Province.    This specie is also reported north of the Liard River.
Goat.—Numerous in all mountain districts.
Fur-bearing Animals.
A very good catch of fur is again reported throughout the Division. I am afraid that
owing to the high prices received for pelts there will be an inclination to overtrap. Stricter
supervision of the trap-lines will be necessary. The necessity of appointing more Game
Wardens in the northern area is again brought to your attention.
Upland Game Birds.
A fair number of grouse of all species were noticed after the close season. In order to
give these birds an opportunity to re-establish themselves fully, the small bag-limit and short
season established last year should be maintained.
Migratory Game Birds.
The season on ducks in the whole of the Division, owing to the late fall, was very unsatisfactory from the hunter's point of view.
It has been advanced that in the northern portion of the Province (Eastern District) the
season should be open from 15th day of September until two weeks after freeze-up. This would
allow the sportsmen from three to four weeks' hunting at the most.
The general opinion throughout this Division, as expressed by numerous hunters, favours
a close season from December 1st to September 15th in each year, and I am of the opinion
that such a season would be fair in the Northern portion of the Eastern District—say that
portion of the district situate north of the 54th parallel of north latitude.
All migratory game birds were quite as numerous as in the past, but migrated after the
close of the season and very small bags were obtained. Hence the demand to open the season
as stated above. Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vermin.
Wolf! Wolf! is the general cry throughout the Division, and there is no doubt that this
predatory animal is increasing very rapidly and will soon be out of control. The increase in
bounty appears to be a primary necessity.
Game-protection.
Constant patrolling by all members of the Force and very creditable assistance renderad
by members of the Provincial Police Force throughout the Division has created a greater
respect for our game laws. The co-operation of the Rod and Gun Clubs with the members
of the Department is improving steadily, but, in order to create an even better understanding
of our work, I respectfully suggest that lectures, with photographic slides or moving pictures,
should be given in the biggest centres of the Division. Such a campaign of education would
create a better understanding between the public and the Department and promote the spirit
of co-operation so greatly required in the proper administration of game matters. I sincerely
hope that the above suggestion will be given serious consideration.
During the course of their ordinary and special patrols the game officers in this Division
covered the following mileage:—
Miles. Miles.
By train  12,251 By   horse    (including
By car   51,103 sleighs)      3,376
On   foot    (including   dog- By plane      6,387
team)   10,045 	
By boat  14,222 Total  97,384
Game Propagation.
Especially good results have been obtained in the Graham Island with deer, elk, and
pheasants, although the latter are to be found only in the Tlell area. They are increasing
and are established permanently. As a further experiment, six beaver have been released
on the Queen Charlotte Islands and owing to very favourable conditions these animals should
do extremely well. Another shipment of these animals should be made during the coming
season in order to ensure their propagation.
Pheasants liberated from time to time at Telkwa, Smithers, Vanderhoof, Prince George,
and McBride did not live throughout the severe winters, and it would not be advisable to
ship more birds into the northern area. On the other hand, reports on the Hungarian partridges released at Vanderhoof and McBride would indicate that these birds are more suitable
for the northern climate, and I would suggest that the requests submitted by the various Rod
and Gun Clubs foe complied with, if at all possible, and a number of birds released in this
Division. McBride, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Telkwa, and Smithers should be given consideration in this matter.
Game Reserves.
Game reserves established at Prince George, Lake Kathlyn, and Kaien Island (Prince
Rupert) as safety-zones are fulfilling the purpose for which they were established. Kunghit
Game Reserve, established on the most southerly island of the Queen Charlotte Group, cannot
be accepted as a game reserve in the general meaning of the term, but is merely a refuge
for deer.
The creation of game reserves in the vicinity of Ootsa Lake and the Musqua River has
been suggested at various times and should be given serious consideration.
Fur Trade.
By all appearances the fur trade is improving. Prices paid for all pelts are higher than
last year and a greater number of traders are operating in the Division, but owing to the
greatest percentage of all furs being shipped to Vancouver, no accurate estimate of trade
condition is obtainable.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farmers in general received very high prices for the pelts shipped and an increase
in the number of mink-farmers is anticipated. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 29
The services of an Animal Pathologist is becoming rapidly a necessity, and such an
appointment within the Game Department should receive serious consideration.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines is receiving our constant attention and is progressing very
favourably. As suggested in last year's report, the revision of the regulations is rapidly
becoming a necessity, in order to put an end to the commercialization of trap-lines to the
great detriment of conservation.
The registered trap-line holder should, by regulation, be prevented from hiring too many
trappers to operate on his line. The owner should be on his trap-line during the trapping
season. Here are only a few suggestions for your consideration. Better supervision and
protection of the trap-lines is again suggested. This can only be accomplished by increasing
the staff of Game Wardens.
Registration of Guides.
Recommendations submitted last year are again submitted. Licensing of head guides or
outfitters. Licensing of hired guides at the recommendation of head guides. Strict examination of all applicants for guides' licences.
All bona-fide guides are in favour of the above suggestions, and I would suggest that all
guides be approached on the matter with a view to draughting stricter regulations.
Special Patrols.
Numerous special patrols were made by various Game Wardens. Planes were used
extensively. Patrols of special interest were made by Corporal J. S. Clark and Special Game
Warden B. Villeneuve.
From November 25th, 1935, to January 26th, 1986, visiting by dog-team the Liard River,
the whole of the Black River, Hay Lakes, the Interprovincial Boundary, returning to Fort
Nelson by way of the Fontas and Fort Nelson Rivers. Time, sixty-three days, covering 934
miles.
From March 18th to March 24th, patrol by dog-team to Fort Liard and return. Mileage,
230 miles.
A patrol to Fort St. James, Fort McLeod, Fort Grahame, and Whitewater by plane was
undertaken by Game Warden W. L. Forrester, covering between January 16th and 21st, 934
miles, 700 miles of which were by plane and 234 by car.
A fifteen-day patrol of Bain Lake by Game Warden C. D. Muirhead is also brought to
your attention. Mileage, 150 miles by car, 15 miles by team, and 356 miles by outboard
motor-boat.    Total, 521 miles.
The fur-robbery at Fort Nelson was the occasion of numerous special patrols by both
Police Officers and Game Wardens. Game Warden Forrester and the writer took part in
this investigation, using plane from Prince George to Fort Nelson and return, covering
approximately 2,400 miles by plane.
Following an unprecedented fall of snow in the Rocky Mountains, which endangered the
lives of numerous big-game hunters, a special patrol of the Musqua River area was undertaken
by the undersigned, using a plane for the purpose, and covering 2,046 miles, 220 of which
were foy car, the remainder by plane.
Although not contacting the big-game hunters, the search-party had the satisfaction of
discovering the hunting-parties in their various camps on the Halfway River, out of the snow
and therefore safe and sound.
Hunting Accidents.
Ekotle, Charlie (Indian), of Fort Nelson, B.C., accidentally killed, while hunting moose,
foy Alphonse Franceways on June 7th, 1936. Coroner's inquest held—shooting was held to
be accidental.
Johnny, Alec Seymour (Indian), of Vanderhoof, B.C., accidentally shot himself in the right
foot whilst hunting squirrels.    Recovered from injuries.
Cassie, Fred (trapper), of Hudson Hope, B.C., presumed drowned, crossing the Graham
River, whilst taking in supplies to his trap-line in the month of October. Body has not been
recovered. Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Summary and Remarks.
The exceptional work carried out by the McBride Rod and Gun Club is again brought to
your attention. Destruction of predatory animals, conservation and propagation of migratory
and upland game birds, operation of a trout hatchery, and liberation of some 100,000 trout-fry
in the district are a few of the activities undertaken by the members of the club. I respectfully
suggest that the Department recognize the good work carried out by this club in giving them
all possible assistance in their endeavours.
The fine spirit of co-operation existing between all departments has been maintained
during the past year, and I beg to extend my sincere thanks to all who assisted in bringing
this co-operation spirit to such a high level.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to all Game Wardens and Provincial
Police Officers in " D " Division. The former for the manner in which they performed their
duties, the latter for the very useful assistance at all times willingly extended to the members
5f the Game Department.
" E " DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Owing to dry weather conditions throughout the hunting season in this Division,
not as many deer as in past years were killed, although these animals are to be found in good
numbers. The Game Warden at Powell River again draws attention to alleged disease principally affecting the doe deer on Texada Island, and suggests that steps be taken with a view
to finding out why this should be the case and if any steps can be taken to remedy this condition.    This matter is being investigated.
As in past years, a number of deer were taken in the Squamish area, and the Game
Warden at Port Coquitlam points out that deer in his district were taken in fair numbers.
Fallow deer were released on various Gulf Islands during the past few years, but do not
appear to have increased to any extent except on South Pender Island.
Mountain-goat.—These animals appear to be increasing in the Upper Skagit, Chilliwack,
and Harrison Districts. In the area bordering Powell Lake, however, mountain-goat appear
'o be scarce, although they are holding their own generally throughout the Powell River
district. These animals are plentiful, especially in the Upper Stave River area, and would
-?em to be increasing in the Upper Allouette, Pitt, and Coquitlam Lake Districts.
Bear.—Black bear are plentiful throughout the Division and are causing some damage
to domestic stock in the more settled areas. Reports would indicate that grizzly bear are not
plentiful, but are to be found in fair numbers at the head of the various inlets on the Coast.
Moose.—Reports to hand indicate that moose, which put in their appearance a few years
ago in the Pemberton Valley, are increasing, and every step is being taken to give them full
protection.    Residents of the district are co-operating with the Department in this connection.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Muskrat.—This is the chief fur-bearing animal taken throughout the Fraser Valley
portion of the Lower Mainland, and they would appear to be holding their own, although in
some sections this is not the case owing to heavy trapping due to a good market.
Beaver.—Are to be found in many portions of the Division and there does not appear to
be any sign of a decrease in the stand of these animals.
Other fur-bearing animals in the Division have been taken in good numbers and are
holding their own.
Red fox and coyotes have been trapped in the Fraser Valley region during the year.
Upland Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Throughout the Sumas District these birds appear to be increasing after the
severe set-back occasioned through ice-storms and floods in 1935. Heavy restocking measures
have been undertaken not only in the Sumas area, but in other portions of the Division suitable   REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936. Q 31
for the propagation of pheasants, with beneficial results. The breeding season during the
past two years has been very poor owing to cold and wet weather, but if good weather for
breeding is encountered next year, then the present stand of birds would indicate that there
would be a decided general increase in the number of pheasants.
As in past years, a large number of pheasants were taken during the hunting season in
the Delta, Pitt Meadows, and Surrey Districts.
On the Gulf Islands pheasants appear to be increasing, and the Game Warden at Powell
River reports that the birds liberated in that district are not plentiful, but that there has
been enough to provide plenty of sport for local hunters and at the same time leave a sufficient
number for breeding purposes.
Grouse (Blue and Ruffed).—In some portions of the Division these birds are increasing,
whereas in other sections this is not the case. Blue grouse in the Coquitlam area were taken
in good numbers during the hunting season, and the Game Warden in that district reports
that ruffed grouse are increasing.
California Quail.—These birds are increasing in the area in the vicinity of Ladner, but
the European Partridge in that district are not very plentiful. This also applies in the Surrey
and Sumas Districts.
Migratory Game Birds.
Reports indicate that the past hunting season, which closed on December 15th, has been
the worst on record, but this has not been due to the scarcity of birds, but through the absence
of water in the fields and weather conditions generally. Throughout that area at the mouth
of the Fraser River, ducks were fairly plentiful when the season opened, but migration from
the north did not take place until the season had closed. More ducks were observed after the
season had expired than were seen in the same district for a number of years.
Black brant appeared in fair numbers in the vicinity of Boundary Bay, and this also
applies to snow-geese. A fair number of Canada geese were observed in various portions of
the Division during the year.
Swans are reported to have been seen in fair numbers in various sections of the Division.
Shore-birds of all kinds seem to be increasing, but this cannot be said in regard to band-
tailed pigeons, as they would appear to be in smaller numbers than heretofore.
Vermin.
Whenever possible, immediate action has been taken regarding reports of cougar and other
predatory animals being seen, and as a result several of these animals have been destroyed by
Game Wardens, either hunting them with dogs or by trapping. A large number of house-cats
gone wild, and which are always a serious menace to game birds, have been accounted for
during the year by Game Wardens, who have carried on an extensive campaign in ridding
their respective districts of these cats. Domestic cats have been trapped in areas far removed
from any settlement and where it was necessary for them to live entirely on game in order
to survive.
Game Associations and others have been co-operating to the fullest possible extent in the
destruction of vermin in their respective districts, and the Game Wardens have endeavoured
to assist these Game Associations in their efforts to control vermin.
Game-protection.
As in past years, regular patrols have been undertaken in every portion of the Division,
and while difficulty has been encountered in enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act ". and
Fishery Regulations, due to the unemployment situation, still this has not been so pronounced
as in past years.    Special patrols have been made throughout the year.
The officers of the British Columbia Provincial Police Force have rendered valuable
assistance, as in past, in connection with the enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Acts, and
the Game Wardens have in turn endeavoured to assist the British Columbia Police Department in its work.
Game Propagation.
In the vicinity of Mission, floods caused considerable damage to pheasants, with the result
that steps were taken to release a larger number of birds in this district, and as a result
hunting conditions improved.    Steps were also taken to replenish the supply of pheasants so Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
seriously affected in the Sumas region during the past winter. A statement showing the
pheasants liberated in the various portions of the Division will be found on another page of
this report.
The wapiti released at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, are reported to be increasing.
Game Reserves.
Every step has been taken to see that the existing game reserves were properly patrolled
and protected. Complaints have come to hand, however, especially in the North Vancouver
District, of black bear and deer doing damage, and every possible step has been taken to
eliminate any further cause for complaints of this nature.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade in general is improving, and this is noted through an increase in the amount
of fur royalties collected in Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
During the past year farmed mink-pelts have brought a good price on the fur market,
with the result that in this Division mink-farms especially have increased and everything
points to the fact that mink-farmers are making a good profit on the sale of their farmed pelts.
Registration of Trap-lines.
As in past years, the system of trap-line registration is working very smoothly, and
trappers generally are endeavouring to conserve or " farm " the fur-bearing animals on their
respective trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
There are only a few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
The Division has been regularly patrolled, and a number of extended patrols have been
made in outlying sections, with beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
On October 18th, 1936, George Follis, of Aldergrove, lost an eye while hunting pheasants
with his brother.
Three hunting accidents occurred in the Port Coquitlam District. On November 1st
Margaret Bach, of Pitt Meadows, was accidentally shot by John Brown, of Haney, who was
hunting pheasants; on November 21st Gilbert Clitheroe accidentally shot himself in the hand
while hunting in the Pitt Meadows area; and two hunters by the names of Peter S. Henderson,
of Mission, and Loth Sward, of Matsqui, were accidentally drowned in Slave Lake, where their
boat capsized on November 28th, 1936.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The officers and men of " E " Division of the British Columbia Provincial Police, members
of the Game Associations, farmers, and others interested in the conservation of game and fish
have rendered every possible assistance in the work of the Game Wardens throughout the
Division, and the Game Wardens have in turn endeavoured to assist the police and others
wherever and whenever possible. Game conditions throughout the Division have been fair,
and with proper weather for breeding birds during the coming spring there undoubtedly will
be a decided increase in the stand of upland game birds of all kinds. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 33
to
CO
OJ
rH
m
ai
r-t
CO
BS
W
CQ
X
M
U
W
Q
o
H
H
<
ra
r-H
iH
JH
<
SB
a
<
j
z
1-7
<
u
l-H
Wl
H
O
01
r-t
<1
H
«
«i
W
rfl
H
m
Q
p
Q
g
£
<
<
ra
in
b
IS
H
2;
W
w
►J
s
ra
H
a
H
<!
H
Ul
R
z
W
p
r/;
Ifl
Ph
fc
o
H
£
M
a
W
H
<
P
Ul
o
m
gjj
In
ojrl
Bra
S
-<
55 fi
« £
ra
o
IC t- OO © t- t- ■^iraOOt—ClCOM
©10©©©eO©OOeOCO-tfeOin-tf
tO -mrHUirHtOtOeO-rfrHUitr-
CM H   M   IO   N   M   N   H
t-U50)00110MN"!llt-OOt-ONC003lOCOH'#M
itxitoiJ-3C<ioit^cntM-rttoeocococouitoco
—   ©t-<NQOiocoioeo©eoo©
N M H K ^" H M M N H rt
OO O t-i ©
O O CO    Cj ■
OOOO
tO CO OJ to O CO
t- CO -tf 00 © CS
rH     CM     rH
IN O f CO pq
o o o in cm
w cm eo CM
to co oi  io c- co
N Ol H (C t- t- |
IO O O CM
tO    rH    -tf CO
T-H      T-H      r-t     00
01NHOt-<OtOOJtO        |OMCMrH©t-COcOt^COlO©©-tfCO©rH-tf-tf«tf
(OtijKicncp'C^'HO     icom^-itDoai'-i^-tcD'^as Hroroi-wwcoo
(D   H    (O   W t-1    t-H    CM        |    CO WCOHffltO ^HIO <M IO    CM    >-H    t-H   -tf    CM
-V   rH   eo
tr-    CM   ->*.    CO   ©
.J
HO
rJ
fc
O
fc
6
CD
o
©
S3
o
o
o
r-i
o
o
es
o
©
o
©
O
©
o
<—,
o
©
CO
o
o
o
o
o
o
-rH
o
o
o
o
o
O
o
o
o
o
O
CJ!
00
o
©
o
<->
O
O
o
©
CO
o
o
0)
©
r-
on
o
o
o
o
-tf
o
©
o
m
Tf
TO
o
00
o
CB
Ol
eo
■*
Tf*
eo
00
CO
OJ
IO
-tf
IO
Ol
OJ
CN
<M
CM
rM
1?-
CO
co
eo
O
r-
to
ua
cy.'
w
rt
"
rn
*<
CO
CM
OJ
i
CM
:  co
CM   CM   CM   "*
!   ©
©
©
OJ
!   00
!   -tf
00
oot-^'Tr'eoeOeD-tf
eOi-icoeoor-it-eo
CO CM   CM
-tf    t**    *ef    Tjr    rH    rH
CO
©
O
o
§
©
o
25
Q
o
o
©
o
o
©
o
©
o
o
o
©
o
g
©
o
&
s
o
o
g
©
©
©
©
o
o
©
o
©
©
©
©
©
o
©
©
©
o
©
o
©
©
©
©
o
©
©
©
©
CM
-tf
OJ
OI
©
CM
-tf
CM
OJ
IO
o
en
CO
CO
OJ
00
OJ
to
CM
CO
IO
IO
o
CO
to
t-
co
OC
>—1
00
T-H
-tf
OJ
o
op
eo
Ol
-tf
o
CM
Cl
Ci
to
o
-tf
CO
IO
IO
CO
to
CO
©
CM
CM
©
IO
eo
CO
fc-
CM
IO
Ol
TO
N  rt'CO  IO  ■*   H  CO  "#  O.H  -Si  M t"  cS  «*  t*  C?  CD
Ol H   M CO CO <-t    rH Oi   *A
©   ©   ©   to   o   ©   o
o  o  o  o  ©  o  o
WinOH00l-OWHT|ifflmW^M00lOC0M^HOMHNC000WNtDKlOM<C
^Tft-OlHt-^MMMCOMOltDOIOOOblOHtD'irlQOOMOObOiSlHd't
CO OJt-COCiCMCOOJCOCO HNffiMIOHOHCOMlCNOOt-OlOl'Jfflt-ISM
CO   i-H    i-H
cimioot-tooiON
.-HrHCSClOlOCOt-H
,-( IO    rH    ©    -tf    i—I
01TO©COlO©-W00lr-CM'-Ht--tfCO©-tf-rji(<vlT-H©-
C0G6W000)M00M*C0O<Bt-iKMINCOiHtit-'
t- IO    CM    i-H    ©    © CM 1ft iJlNtOMHNlOHi
H     rt
^ ^; ^3
s §
'5 *j
u ri
orjKOti
—• (y OJ ry
rj » O 2 °
S   is .5 .3 ■
SB«Sa88 3»<33!S5!»1S«J2j5Sr355i!t'i;3»o
< < < < o O o p h fe O »« W M M M J S S! !<5 » a O fn fri'fiH p< ft fc'aw.pi
s
C   ry
If Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ra
S
a
SB
rfl
03
a
w
o
K
Q
o
Eh
P>
z
-t
<
Eh
SB
W
w
p
a
Z
<
ra
a
o
25
H
o
a
IB
<!
6!
IB
j—i
rM
m
Z
H
a
rn
ra
H
ft
o
H
a
H
<:
ta
IO
ta
©
co
o
CM   OJ    CJ    O    O
IO
-u
o
©   to   CO    CM    CO
©
CO  -tf  ©  o  -^
Oi
-tf   00   CO    IO   -*tf
©
H
©   CO   ©   CM    (-H
ee-
OOOO
O
o
o o © o
o
i
O   -fl'   ©   CM
co
CO
c» cn  t- t- io
00
<n
■«#    ©   ttf    t-H
c-
pet    •
SO
30
fc
;
"tf "~~~
LO   t-   IO   ©   00
o
*tf   ©   CO   00   CM
Cl
Z
CM   -tf   CM
00
-tf*
i   r
o
1
©
OJlJ
s
<
1
| j
id
©
*<*
Hra
t»
6
to   '
©
Z
© io  io  ©  ©
IO     ~~
LO   fc-   CM   Ui   ©
CM
oi
1
lO    Ol    Tf   ■*    CO
t-
u
O   GO   DO   lfl   CO
©
<
<
lO    rH    CO
tt
60-
-tf
S
»3-
©
cm cn t> oo -#
-<
6
Z
CM   IO    CO    rH    ©
CM
O
©   t-    IO    CM    CM
■itf
CM"            rH
eo
lO   O    ©   O   ©
IO
-+-J
C-   IO   ©   IO   ©
CM
tn 3
ra 2
s
CM   as   rt-   CM   t-H
IO
«!
CM
o
Vi-
OJ
©   ©   -tf   IO   CM
©    CM    rH
-tf
0 H
d
CM
01
£
OO   O  O   O
©
©  to   ©  ©   ©
o
+J
©   rH    CM    CM    ©
Ui
g'
<
Oi   tr-   -tf    t-   rH
IO
ii
lO    "rtf     CO    CO    IO
CM
t-"
ft
©■S-
CM
ra
W-
rl   00   IO   ffl   ■*
00
d
CO   ^    CO   CO    IO
Ui
^
rH                      rH
fc-
CM
©
©  o   ©
©
© © ©
©
g
ed
cm -^  ed
id
3h
HO
t-
t-   CM   CO
©
<
CM
&9-
CO
co     :  © cm co
rtf
d
CM       |
£
■"*
© ©  © o  ©
© ©  © o  ©
©
O
g
ep  cm   Oi   cm   oo
A
lO   t-H    CO   CM    i-H
CM
<!
©   rH             CO    CO
CO
Pt
6
CO
66-
w
tO   Ci    t-    tO    CO
00
d
00    rH             IO    IO
CO
rH
-#_
O   ©   O    ©    ©
©
©OOOO
©
.jj
-tf ©   ©  »o  to
t~
g
<
CO    tr-   -tf    >0    lO
00
lO   ©   ©   iO   -tf
>o
P
CM   CM   Ui
©"
ft
6
 _
se
eo
©
co o co io cm
t-    Ol    CO   OD   IO
©
d
l-H   ©   eS   t-H   rH
£
t*             rH
©"
CM
+■
p
a
b
t
<
s
rl
£
P
*
a
S>
c
C
a
A
(
OJ
[
a
*H          O
i H
E
§.
B
s <
£
ru
set
G
a
>
a
>
>
I
a
il
3 a
$ s
E    0)
H    on
ll REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 35
Statement of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors' Firearms
Licences issued, January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Anglers.
Guides.
Free
Farmers.
Prospectors.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
No.
Amount.
542
101
110
1,227
754
561
606
84
146
161
30
1,008
238
821
349
304
820
1,575
33
2,120
77
766
613
159
413
305
909
231
4,168
1,317
831
43
222
$542.00
1
26
2
1
1
6
8
1
8
3
1
19
17
3
12
1
11
4
24
10
	
2
1
13
48
49
166
199
33
101
26
35
43
8
296
24
171
6
37
63
98
681
30
47
124
18
135
16
27
107
86
2
144
65
141
234
327
69
13
10
19
38
30
48
2
4
22
3
18
25
35
88
27
23
42
23
4
122
1
38
8
44
25
2
96
38
77'
109
44
11
20
47
22
222
42
40
82
18
$4.00
$546.00
Ashcroft  	
Atlin
101.00
$5.00
2.00
1.00
3.00
9.00.
108.00
1.00
Clinton	
110.00
1,227.00
754.00
561.00
606.00
130.00
10.00
243.00
1,246.00
754.00
5.00
5.00
30.00
40.00
566.00
611.00
9.00
2.00
2.00
4.00
23.00
1.00
12.00
12.00
3.00
2.00
16.00
25.00
39.00
84.00
146.00
161.00
30.00
1,008.00
238.00
821.00
349.00
304.00
820.00
1,575.00
33.00
2.120.00
77.00
766.00
124.00
148.00
5.00
168.00
34.00
Kamloops..	
40.00
1,071.00
239.00
833.00
15.00
376.00
307.00
822.00
5.00
1,596.00
33.00
2,145.00
77.00
95.00
3.00
18.00
769.00
113.00
613.00
613.00
85.00
15.00
53.00
12.00
13.00
47.00
2.00
138.00
159.00
413.00
186.00
426.00
60.00
107.00
306.00
909.00
231.00
308.00
909.00
5.00
6.00
6.00
8.00
109.00
16.00
10.00
17.00
2.00
242.00
6.00
55.00
20.00
63.00
Vancouver.	
4,168.00
1,317.00
831.00
43.00
222.00
4,297.00
1,333.00
841.00
120.00
50.00
180.00
Windermere	
274.00
Totals.	
21,645
$21,645.00
159
$795.00
3,675
1,569
$452.00
$22,892.00 Q 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
H
5
Z
m
03
a
m
m
HH
ft
m
o
o
Q
z
ta   .
cc vi
b B
ii
g3
o
o
LO
t-r
O
o
IO
IO
o
O
o
CO
o
o
©
©
CO
©
©
to
o
o
©
o
o
t-
to
o
o
Ol
o
c
IO
o
Ci
o
©
CM
CO
o
©
o
©
tO'
©
IO
LO
©
t-
o
IO
o
o
Ol
CJ1
o
IO
CM
IO
©
lO
ui
to
©
IO
o
IO
C0
t-
o
o
©
CO
o
o
■«tf
o
IO
©
CO
©
IO
CO
OJ
o
IO
t-
©
©
©
VO
CM
o
o
eo
o
to
CM
rH
CO
o
IO
©
to
o
-tf
S 2
Z ^
a |
£    CO
«<    OS
m 1
11
a ra
o
ra
tr til ii
O b W
-53
a ^1*3
b S 3 &5
g a u b a
ft
OOOO
OOOO
iijiovJoourjjrJJQOiaoirjirjoo
OI ro ^irjs^n rrj-rJirrjTj'rjrMrrjn'
CO   rn CC   rH   CT]
ra
fe o
H Eh
I* Eh
a rH
r"
fa
O
ra
g
Q
IB
fa
a
P
ra
&
Z
ra
>
ra
Q ^
ksSIh
b<^Sb
fa      5
!
©
O
1
©
o
i    i
i    i
j
ta
CM
j
©
IO
i    j
1    j
* 5 £2 H
i©        ©©©©©©o
>   © ©   ©   ©   ©   ©   ©   ©
• io        iooio©©idid
>t- t-   ©   CM   IO   ©   CM   CM
I   -* CM   CM   CM   CM   CM   ©
CM*"
00   ©   O   00   IO   rH
u H _. w
» s -S s
£5 to -*-> "3
<! < < o
* 5
O   rrj
c   jr;   ru   S
.2 fa
&
c
=  oj
rr)   Qj
ru ^3
a S
O      >      0
*>      S *    li
OJ    QJ
B >  5  C
o 5 « O M  o    I
a oj qj € 8
°    fe    C    (3    C    ro    Qj
OOQfafaOOOWMMWt-lSZZZZOfaPHfarHfHPHaK
IS
K  03 ttl REPORT ,OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 37
©   fc-  ©   ©  iO   ©
W   H   Tf   CO   CC    H
CM   -«J< ©   CM   CO
©   00    i-H   fc-   i
IO © ©
t> © IO
CM   CM   CM
'"     O     O '- " Oj
OO   5    fl O .2 T3
nj    a    Ci -rt TT lT"
H >> > P P
=3.2
H
Ci
1
o
H
H
60
55 a Q 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and Royalties on
Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Government Agents.
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences.
Agent for
Non-resident
Fur-trader.
Royalty or
Tax on Fur.
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
3
3
1
27
2
4
1
1
3
29
13
20
15
9
8
67
2
4
15
2
$75.00
1
6
1
10
28
19
6
94
13
1
11
5
19
3
2
17
1
210
91
70
6
12
9
19
12
690
12
63
8
9
$16.35
6.50
148.93
1
1
1
1
8
2
3
$91.35
6.50
Atlin	
148.93
75.00
25.00
75.00
83.20
79.75
37.19
1,178.54
74.00
13.25
22.12
65.75
$5.00
79.75
37.19
675.00
50.00
1,853.54
Golden 	
124.00
5.00
13.25
100.00
25.00
25.00
127.12
	
65.75
25.00
163.93
2.95
1.70
25.00
4.00
11,159.98
724.12
2,171.79
17.80
113.03
21.38
980.81
262.65
28,487.95
124.53
129.10
22.81
47.39
188.93
2.95
75.00
76.70
25.00
4.00
725.00
325.00
500.00
5.00
5.00
11,889.98
1,054.12
2,671.79
17.80
375.00
488.03
21.38
225.00
200.00
1,675.00
50.00
100.00
375.00
50.00
1,205.81
462.65
Vancouver  ..
$200.00
40.00
10.00
15.00
30,402.95
184.53
244.10
397.81
97.39
Totals	
229  1    SR.72R.no
1
$200.00
1,347
$46,186.50
17
$85.00
$52 196.50
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1936, inclusive.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-traders'
and
Taxidermists'
Licences.
Total.
1921	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
66,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,663.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
$30,790.80
1922-      	
57,458.89
67,524.18
62,446.68
56,287.78
'      62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
45,981.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
1923	
1924	
1925 _.     ...    ..
1926	
1927 	
1928  	
1929
1930 _	
1931 '	
1932	
1933   . -	
1934
1935   	
1936                     .
Totals
$742,591.10
$96,735.00
$839,326.10 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 39
«
ra
Ph
P
X
m
o
z
tn
a
5
a
Eh
o
ra
p
pi
o
o
Z
h
w
M
to
<
K
><
5
<
in
©
Pi
a
p  ra
7**   rfi
z
<
O
a
H
z
r-\
fM
IB
Oi
<
H
D3
IB
5
ta
a
Ph
CS
52
P
o
a
z
w
£
w
Eh
■<
Eh
02
W
>
Oh
s
o
o
Ol
no
'on
cr
eo
ro
t-
en
on
a
on
,_,
OC
rx;
rH    ©
©
CC
r-
e
t-
Tf     OC
Oi  U.
•pa:paijoo
co
Tf
CO
r-
IO   Oi
eo
rn
rH
CO
CO
CM    t-
tH
^ibAoh
©
©
©
IO
CO
fc-
© to
tr-
Tf
IO
©
IO
CM
>»    ©
00   00
Oi
jo ^unouiv
tr
w
©    r-
O
CO
©    CV
1(7
tf
IR
Tj
lO   to
ic
Tf
Tj
■*l
w
CO     Tf
«»
«.
f
N
Oi     -*
^
-H.
H
en
on
t-H    ©
CO   CN
'JIOA4.
~
CM
rH   Tf
Oi     Tf
CO*
©
CO
CO   00
ta
IN
•^PUAY
CO
CM
OC
CM
rH
CM   CM
to
us
IO
©
CO
es
H
on
IO   CM
r-
CO
Tf
tr,
'0
CO   t-
CO
o.
CM
CM
CM
CO    IO
Tf
CO
CO
CM
CM
CM    CM
CM   CM
Tf
rr
on
©
CM   t>
IN
CA
CO
t-
TH     ("J
cz
e
IO   CC
f)C
c.
rr
CM   tf
•josea^
CM
to
Tf
©   CC
tr-
co
00
CO
CO   ©
©   Cf,
©
■*t
r-
rr.
IO
©   OC
tf
r-
e;
CV
no
co eo
CM
CM
CO
CO    CO
Tf
io
Tf
-f
Tf     Tf
CO    CO
CM
to
rH
Ifll
CO
_,
CM
00   CM
Tf
IO
r~-
ec
r->
eo cm
t-
Oi   CC
Tt
■^im^g
CO
c-
p-
-
00
IO
to
IO   Ui
CO    Tf
©
©
tH
o.
Tf
IO
©
©  00
rH
H
o
rH
rH    Oi
ec
C
a
u.
CM   OC
Tf
rr
r-
©   r-
©
9
■UOOOBg
©
©
a
rH   Tjl
TH
c-
r*
lfl
00     Tf
©    OC
r-t
fH
CM
©
IO
tJ
Tf
IO    t>
r-
IO
V,
cc
CO
OJ   CM
8
©
o
C"}
IO
cm
m
CO
co oo
rH
©
tr\
r-
CM
CO    ©
V.
0t
r-
CM    t-
•aa^o
to
©
CO
t- ©
©
r>J
00
CO
t-   t>
IO c-
D-
to
r-
CM
a
03
c<
CO
Oi
©   Tt
©
CC
©
c
ffl
O    r-
cr,
CC
©
C
fN
CM
it
\r.
cc
Tf     OC
co
ir.
a
if:
CM    r-
W
•s^BJ^snui
en
rH
t-
oo eo
IO
1?-]
Tf
en
©
rH   tr-
^
t-
CO
C-
o.
to
Tf     t£
cr
lfl
a
c
C
Oi   CM
O   CT
rH
rH
r-t
rH
rH
Td*
2
rH
o
C<
CO
IO
00   OC
nr
©
»r
or
1—
to  00
«
CZ
CT
CT
f-
©   c-.
tf
•3IU|W
©
o.
O-
Cs.
tr
rH    Ifl
a
CT
io
©
©     Tf
Tf    CC
IO
ta
©
00
rft
<r>
ot
Tf     Hff
rH
00
rr
o
o:
t-   rH
rH    ©
r4
t>.
rH    CM
CM
rH
CO
in
©   00
O
IO
CM
©
©
CO   t-
tN
Of
Tl
tr
<rc
CM   C
r-
CC
it,
CO     Tj
fc
•uaiJBpj;
©
t-
ui
Oi   ©
to
o
t-
Tf     fc-
Oi   C
©
o
rH
CM
r-
t-
Cft   r-
rH
rH
en
m
m
rH   Oi
r*
r-
to
rH
sa
Ph
©
nr
r-
cc
Tl
a>
K
CI
rx
Ui   OC
a
Of
0t
rn
t-
©    Tl
i      o
■xuAq
C^
or.
cc
-i
CO
lO
IO
©    U,
©   IO
©
r-
r-H
o
-1
C£
CO   tf
Tl
<*
r-
r-
CM   CO
'    Q
ta
g
w
■(paraxe^)
©
CM   CM
Tf     CO
t- tf
©
2;
ania 'xo^
^
CO    CM
cm ec
CM
■<
as
CO
E
cv
rH   ©
r-
rr
m
<T3
Tf
CM   CM
•peg 'xo^
CM
Tf
co
ifl
rH
OO    lfl
CM   CM
Ul
CtJ
os  ia
Tf     CO
CM  CM
*
P
CM
%
cr
rv
c
©    IN
C
tf
C
CC
Tf   os
•ssojo
tfi
CM   Tf
e
M
re
©0
CO
Tt
Ci
cm ec
a
c
©
u.
10
C-   CM
©   r-
'xo£
^
CM   CM
rH
1-1
rH   CM
C-
©     Tf
CO
cp
©
1—
■J3AUS
CC
rH    t-
h-
e<
ii-
t-   tf
^
CM
CM
Tf     ©
IO
H
©
rH    tr-
CM    CM
eo cr
cm" cm
-cf
Tf
rH
H
r^
00   Oi
r-
as
rH
CO
rr
CM    Oi
Tl
©    C
•aaiisi^
fc-
VO
lO
©
IO
©   rH
co
t-
CC
u:
©   tr
t^ t-
T?
rH
co
CO   00
CM
r-
r-
cc
Tt
rH   to
IO
Cf
t-    r-
00
o-
C>
Tf    C<
Oi to
Ui
•jaA^ag
cc
IO
CM
rt
00     Tt
r^
Tt
i~
or
P
rH    ©
CM
CC
CM
T—
rH   CM
rH
rt
rH    r-
tr-
CM
1-
<T
Ui   Oi
IO
IO
ir
C-
rH   Tf
00   r-
a
O-
cr
o
CO  cm
cc
ec
e
T*
c
00   lfl
-j«ag
Tl
CM
CM
o-
CO
Ui   w.
IT
©
rH
*s
*j
sa^ j^puaiBQ
o
H
to   tr-
rr
e
0-
CO     Tj
c
B
OI    Cv
'N
i>
e>
e^
p
CO   c
0
O
o
o
c
CT
C
CT
o
o
cr
c
©  cr
O)   CT Q 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Particulars of Various Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid,
January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Particulars op Pelts
of Fur-bearing Animals on which Royalty has been paid.
Government
Agents.
j-
3
3
n
Jh
0)
>
rrj
ru
M
*H
ru
Xt
tn
Pt
C
ru
>
ttl
ri
o
p
ro
rrj
O
Jh
o
o
p
T3
nj
«
K
o
pr,
3 ai
a£
. Ih
Xrri
OCh
P —
X
G
tJ
s
Ih
rrj
s
G
S
rrj
rrj
Jh
.M
ta
G
s
u
G
O
o
rj
rrj
«
r*
G
3
rX
ttl
"qj
to
rrj
ru
is
P
iS
rjj
G
'Z
ci
>
■o
is
38
1
16
342
16
5,647
211
556
34
346
28
6,996
8
24
4
2
25
5
93
21
11
2
28
7
566
2
1
160
122
49
3
263
509
11
46
84
5
11
91
2
2
9
3
1,244
174
83
1
37
1
9
94
1
747
53
42
5
2
34
6
1,159
4
4
4
4
1
115
2
1,246
67
26
9
1
22
6
1,149
4
7
2
1
188
145
3
6
3
210
19
2
1,273
44
40
11
2
7
9
1,880
1
12
6
14
12
18
136
21
13
1
31
1,264
118
805
27
278
133
7,103
18
42
19
16
2
264
47
8
1,053
46
1
96
19
2
16
108
32
835
318
2,067
8
263
53
14,848
199
10
4
47
7
200
250
1,083
60
2
5,351
814
1,630
133
310
1,510
99
79,676
103
358
2
3
i
12
13
5
127
4
11
3
673
1
4
10
2,755
90
1
5
4
3
2
18
9
2
3
360
1
1
126
55
23
992
156
14
1
2,997
2,124
712
116
21
1,602
200
27,082
46
22
18
16
9
261
74
10
26
10
Ashcroft.—	
Atlin -	
l
2
1
3
5
Cranbrook	
1
3
Greenwood	
Merritt .	
....
New Westminster.—
21
16
5
1
3
3
62
19
1
2
1
—
Pouce Coupe 	
24
3
10
Quesnel	
7
Telegraph Creek	
15
198
Victoria 	
1
Totals _	
141
14,269
760
2,910
2,165
2,662
336
3,507
10,071
20,362
91,591
754
2,856
408
36,307
406
267
Note.—Royalty schedule or statement covers wild as well as farm-raised fur, this applying particularly to foxes.
List op Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Date of
Confiscation.
Jh
oj
>
rrj
0J
m
4-
C
ii
u
4
a
u
QJ
O
a
0
o
u
rj
rrj
«
Jan.     9	
i
i
i
i
l
3
3
10
1
11
5
2
2
1
13	
Kolb, Ronald	
Feb.     6  ...
Uttley. R. H -
„      12 	
1
'Mause, G., et al.	
April   7	
Kamloops. 	
Fort St. John
May     7	
June 16 	
Hill, Robert	
„     20  .	
Watt, John  ...    .
July     4	
Ogden, P. W.	
Aug. 12	
Sheffield, B. R., et al	
Fort Nelson	
Nov. 19	
Totals ?,	
8
3
29
3
1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 41
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.       8 	
Ovens, Edward.	
Haney _ ,.	
Nanaimo 	
Coquitlam   	
Merritt. — — - —
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9	
13	
Feb.     14	
15
Brevitt, Louis	
March 18 _	
Aug.    12	
Terrillon, F.	
North Vancouver.	
Sept.    17 	
29
Duruisseau, M _
Oct.        5
Holmstrom, E	
Huish, Geo  , __._ _	
6	
13                 	
Duncan -	
31   	
Hopton, L.	
Duncan   	
Nov.       2   	
Totals	
14
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and firearms during the calendar year
1936 amounted to $242.30.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1936.
Government Agents.
Coyotes.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
6
2
82
155
32
230
8
3
27
147
1
45
6
79
35
3
16
41
98
193
138
4
57
35
29
20
77
342
39
1
80
1
15
33
1
130
108
62
4
4
247
1
146
4
90
7
140
72
2
5
1
1
10
9
2
8
49
10
5
3
11
8
1
2
10
16
2
2
6
35
32
10
28
22
$1,040.00
Atlin.     .
812.00
Barkerville 	
4.00
254.00
310.00
2,120.00
Duncan         ..
840.00
94.00
870.00
36.00
25.00
54.00
404.00
2.00
240.00
42.00
Merritt ■	
Nanaimo    	
238.00
790.00
210.00
100.00
1,336.00
Powell River -	
120.00
122.00
1,172.00
Penticton  	
226.00
1,136.00
516.00
8.00
Rossland  	
40.00
174.00
160.00
2,528.00
570.00
1,950.00
294.00
1,084.00
428.00
1,950
837
599
$20,350.00 Q 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Statement
of Bounties pah
FROM 1922 TO 1936.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922 	
1923 -	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924	
172
5,770
10,046
20,398.40
1925    .,  -.-
24,397.00
1926     — 	
41,077.00
1927— 	
2,487
1,025
1,389
403
1
65,377.95
1928	
50,709.25
1929 . -             	
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
1931	
3,427
42,033.15
1932	
80.00
1933	
6,285.00
1934      '
6,825.00
1935	
1,877
1,950
12,374.00
1936	
	
	
20,350.00
Totals	
4,736
5,835
63,280
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$443,456.80
List of Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1936.
Barkerville District.
Becker, Fred W.
Cochran, J. D._—
Houser, W. L	
Peterson, M..
..Barkerville.
-Barkerville.
..Barkerville.
Wooltorten, Eric Barkerville.
Youngs, Grover A Bear Lake, Barkerville.
Moore, W. E Bear Lake, Barkerville.
Boundary District.
..Westbridge.
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts.
Anderson, Dave Clearwater Station.
Archie, George Canim Lake.
Bidstrup, H. Likely.
Bones, Frank Clinton.
Bradford, W. J Bridge Lake.
Cameron, A. L Ashcroft.
Church, R. H Big Creek.
Cleveland, L. C Bridge Lake.
Cochrane, R. R Blue River.
Daniels, Geo. A Canim Lake.
Daniels, Steve Canim Lake.
Davies, Wm. J Lone Butte.
De Wees, R Horsefly.
Dexter, Batiste Kleena Kleene.
Dougherty, E. G Clinton.
Eagle, Clifford Lac la Hache.
Evans, Chas Quesnel.
Fletcher, Wm Pavilion.
Gott, Joe Clinton.
Greenlee, E Canim Lake.
Grinder, John Big Bar.
Hansen, J. F Bridge Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Hansen, W. B Bridge Lake.
Higgins, E Roe Lake.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Holt, J Kleena Kleene.
70-Mile House.
Hutchison, D. B.	
Johnson, J. W Likely.
Johnson, O. M North Bonaparte.
Larsen, Ole Roe Lake.
Lind, Geo Williams Lake.
Mackill, Jas Kleena Kleene.
Manson, Wm Lillooet.
Michel, Thos Lillooet.
Monteith, Percy Horsefly.
McKort, C Alexandria.
Nicol, Alex Horsefly.
Noske, Narcisse Kelly Lake.
Ogden, Percy Lac la Hache.
Ostjord, E Clinton.
Park, Jack P 70-Mile House.
Parminter, R Likely.
Patenaude, G. B Horsefly.
Prest, Thos Clinton.
Provo, Chester 70-Mile House.
Quanstrom, Wm Quesnel.
Ray, J. B Clearwater Station.
Rioux, Ed Roe Lake.
Robertson, Neil Horsefly.
Scheepbower, J. A 70-Mile House.
Shook, F. A Clearwater.
Stanlaus, Patrick Canim Lake.
Tibbies, Fred Quesnel. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 43
Ulm, R. Cr.
..Clinton.
Walters, Gerald Williams Lake.
Walters, Glenn Horsefly.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Walters, R. I Likely.
White, Thos Likely.
Williams, Ernest Horsefly.
Young, Wm Clinton.
Ball, Geo. B	
Brooks, Ned	
Carlick, Lou Decker..
Carlick, Thomas	
Creyke, John	
Dease, Albert	
Appleby, Gordon-
Moore, S. G	
Etzerza, B.
Cassiar District.
Telegraph Creek. Dennis...
Telegraph Creek.
Telegraph Creek.
Telegraph Creek.
Telegraph Creek.
Telegraph Creek.
  Telegraph Creek.
  Telegraph Creek.
McClusky, Pat  Telegraph Creek.
Pete, Jack  Telegraph Creek.
Williams, Mike  Telegraph Creek.
Coast District.
.Hope.
.125 Warwick Ave.,
Capitol Hill, Vancouver, or Sechelt.
Service, John..
..Kimsquit.
Skuce, Herbert Kimsquit.
Stanton, Jas. R Glendale Cove.
Walker, Thos Bella Coola.
Fort George
Anderson, Stuart Arras.
Beckman, W. H Bear Flats.
Callio, Joe Hudson Hope.
Callio, Peter Little Prairie.
Calliou, John Kelly Lake.
Callison, Lynch Rose Prairie.
Cameron, Patrick Little Prairie.
Carr, Stanley J Tete Jaune.
Cassie, F. W Hudson Hope.
Chase, Fred W Dawson Creek.
Chesser, C. A Mount Robson.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla.
Coe, John C Mapes.
Colebank, G. F ■ Strathnaver.
Davidson, L. H Finmoore.
Dennison, G. M._ Mount Robson.
Garbitt, T Hudson Hope.
Gibson, Harry B Dawson Creek.
Hargreaves, Geo. E Valemount.
and Peace River Districts.
Hargreaves, R Mount Robson.
Haynes, E. B Dome Creek.
Hill.Wm Rolla.
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Hooker, L. J Sinclair Mills.
Keily, Wm. S Hudson Hope.
Kimer, Abe Tete Jaune.
L'Heureux, J. E Mount Robson.
Lonsdale, F. E Snowshoe.
McCusker, K. F Fort St. John.
McKenzie, Harold Mount Robson.
Minaker, Glen Taylor.
Mustard, W. M McBride.
Niven, John Croydon.
Ross, Jas. A Hudson Hope.
Sheffield, C Fort St. John.
Shovar, D McBride.
Smith, J. M Red Pass, Snowshoe.
Hazelton District.
Hamilton, G. G.
Rose Lake.
Harrison, Bryan Wistaria.
Harrison, 0. A Wistaria.
Cornwall, G. E Kamloops.
Marsden, G Savona.
McNeill, J. W Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, Edward Ootsa Lake.
Kamloops District.
Mobley, C. W.
..Tappen.
Sheaves, Thos Chinook Cove.
Kootenay District.
Allen, Russ-
Field.
Bergenham, Peter Beavermouth.
Conover, H. W Castledale.
Danikin, Jos. V Brisco.
Dilworth, Jas Athalmer.
Foyston, Wm. F Athalmer.
Harrison, Wm Edgewater.
Jones, R. K.„ Golden.
Kain, Isadore Wilmer.
Larabee, G Wilmer.
Mcintosh, Ewen Athalmer.
McKay, G. J Athalmer. Q 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Maurer, L.
-Elk Valley.
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Nixon, John H Invermere.
Nixon, W. J Invermere.
Philipps, Frank A 120 Fifth Street West, York, R. A..„.  Invermere.
North Vancouver.
Robinson, Irvine Golden.
Thomas, G. A Parson.
Wardrope, Jack Yahk.
Weidenman, 0. W Leanchoil.
Non-resident Outfitters.
Brewster Transport Clark, S. H Entrance, Alberta.
Co., Ltd Banff, Alberta. Phillips, Donald Jasper, Alberta.
Brown, Frank E Hazelmere, Alberta.       Wood, Vernon Banff, Alberta.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
5 I
. ru
J- .-
Cl   r.
0   O
a a
G   Ol
0 £
Amount.
Cranbrook—
Barton, Dr. J. F., Longview, Wash..
Gilbert, A. C, New Haven, Conn	
Werthmann, P. A., Gustina, Cal	
Fernie—
Dunn, W. W., Jr., St. Paul, Minn...
Fort Fraser—
Bell, H. W., Bakersfield, Cal	
Berschneider, R. F., Seattle, Wash..
Harvey, F. E., Davenport, Iowa	
Smith, G. R., Davenport, Iowa	
Golden—
Ashby, Dr. J., Chicago, 111 _	
Chandler, Mrs. W. C, St. James, L.I., N.Y.
Cneighton, W., Springfield, Mo	
Doty, H. V., Long Beach, Cal	
Douchitt, F. H., Chicago, 111	
Gilbert, F., Chicago, 111	
James, H. V., Denver, Col...	
Lyle, Jas., Kanorado, Kan	
Pace, Mrs. and Mr. E., Paducah, Ken..
Weems, F. C, New York, N.Y	
Greenwood—
Berry, F., Yakima, Wash	
Coffin, A. S., Yakima, Wash _	
Coffin, H. L., Yakima, Wash _.
Efner, D., Seattle, Wash. 	
Fleenor, J. W., Yakima, Wash	
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash	
Loudon, J. A., Yakima, Wash	
McKinney, L. J., Yakima, Wash..
MacKintosh, P. G., Yakima, Wash...
Patrick. H. S., Yakima, Wash	
Reid, D. C, Yakima, Wash	
Schau, O., Seattle, Wash 	
Kamloops—
Gibson, W., Wenatchee, Wash	
McKenzie, R. E., La Crosse, Wis	
Pralle, V. H., La Crosse, Wis	
Lillooet—
Gilmore, W. W., Seattle, Wash __
Merritt—
Bice, Dr. D. F., Seattle, Wash	
Brill, F. W., Seattle, Wash	
$70.00
85.00
80.00
80.00
30.00
25.00
60.00
25.00
1
80.00
1
55.00
1
80.00
40.00
15.00
1
50.00
15.00
15.00
1
105.00
1
25.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
80.00
15.00
15.00
55.00
25.00
40.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 45
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1936—
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Merritt—Continued.
Coleman, W. F., Seattle, Wash _
Churchill, N. D., Centralia, Wash.
Cullen, C. C, Seattle, Wash..	
Fair, A. J., Blaine, Wash	
Fair, F. E., Blaine, Wash	
Grant, Miss E., Seattle, Wash	
Hamilton, P., Prosser, Wash	
Henderson, W. S., Seattle, Wash	
Knudson, T. R., Los Angeles, Cal	
Mower, Dr. M. P., Olympia, Wash...
Nelson, E. H., Seattle, Wash..	
Peterson, W. E., Seattle, Wash. -
Potter, C, Tacoma, Wash..	
Taylor, Dr. O., Kent, Wash.	
Todd, W. O., Los Angeles, Cal...-	
Walters, H., Longview, Wash. -	
Whitcomb, C. N., Seattle, Wash..
Zeek, R. L., Arlington, Wash	
Whaley, R. S., Seattle, Wash	
Nanaimo—
Donagh, S. W., Seattle, Wash......
Green, S., Seattle, Wash 	
Kern, E. A., Seattle, Wash	
New Westminster—
Bell, Dr. W. W., Seattle, Wash....
Brau, M. L., Portland, Ore	
Bull, J. A., Ellensburg, Wash	
Chase, E., Electron, Wash	
Conley, J. C, Coldwell, Idaho	
Davis, S. W., Coldwell, Idaho ......
Griffin, J. H., Bellingham, Wash	
Hills, J. R., Jasper, Ore...	
Hoedemaker, E. D., Seattle, Wash..
Johnson, L. A., San Mateo, Cal	
Jones, H. B., Jasper, Ore	
Kleinberg, L., Seattle, Wash..	
Luckey, F., Portland, Ore 	
Marcus, D. A., Los Angeles, Cal	
Markham, J. H., Centralia, Wash...
Merkley, E. W., Seattle, Wash	
Sachs, W. T., Downey, Cal..	
Sachs, Mrs. W. T., Downey, Cal	
Scott, R. J., Los Angeles, Cal..
Studebaker, C. W., Castle Rock, Wash..
Wright, H. W., Brownsboro, Ore 	
Baker, D. R., Seattle, Wash. .._	
Behrns, R. K., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Gilbert, W. J., Mount Vernon, Wash—.
Green, S., Seattle, Wash	
Hall, A. D., Stan wood. Wash 	
Harsh, R. H., Mount Vernon, Wash..
Henry, W. K., Blanchard, Wash	
Keon, E. H., Seattle, Wash —
Rouse, K., Seattle, Wash.  	
Sandona, T., Cle-Elum, Wash..	
Savage, S. L., Seattle, Wash..	
Sund, A., Conway, Wash 	
Species.
rd  G
3  1
33
Pi
5J
. ci
nig
G ex
G ru
O ru
S^
rr.   tn
Amount.
$25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
70.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00 ■
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00 Q 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1936—
Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
N
N
'u
O
u
tf
3
CQ
a d
Mo
G
o
rQ
rr!
O
a
a
Cl ^i
OJ   rt
rurr
4-3
CO
cd
O
O
u
S
Oi
Q
'ca
h
°  Q
qj
ro
O
O
s
G
"5
e d
G Cl
O ru
^ tn
it
s
"ft
cd
is
Amount.
Penticton—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
-
$25.00
Templeton, C. L., Seattle, Wash _  	
Pouce Coupe—
15.00
25.00
Bowers, Dr. J. W., Fort Wayne, Ind _   ..
75.00
65.00
Care, Dr. J. R., Norristown, Penn. _  	
Chadwick, L. S., Cleveland, Ohio. 	
40.00
90.00
50.00
40.00
Feathers, E. A., San Leandro, Cal —
Gill  G   J    Beverley Hills, Cal.             	
155.00
40.00
40.00
80.00
Laauwe, Dr. H., Paterson, N.J   — _	
Liebold, Dr. H. H., Parker's Prairie, Minn   -
90.00
55.00
65.00
100.00
40.00
105.00
55.00
Powell River—
10.00
10.00
10.00
Oliver—•
15.00
30.00
Lavender, G., Seattle, Wash   	
Van Thiel, T., Seattle, Wash.— _ ',...;
Prince George—
Bartlett, A. G., Louisville, Ky	
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
75.00
90.00
90.00
25.00
Frazer, A. S., Glen Falls, N.Y      	
75.00
Frazer, N. R., Glen Falls, N.Y _	
75.00
McBride, H. R., Glen Falls, N.Y	
75.00
Molson, A. Q., London, England -     »* 	
Parks, Dr. 0. J., New York, N.Y  	
15.00
30.00
50.00
Smidt, P., Robie, Ind	
105.00
Smidt, Philip, Robie, Ind	
105 00
Todd, J. M., New Orleans, La.—	
25.00
40 00
Prince Rupert—
Aldrich, B. F., Santa Paula, Cal-  	
Call, A. H., Santa Paula, Cal.
25.00
Tanke, W., Modler, Wash  _	
Quesnel—
Holyman, Cmdr. E. G., Bremerton, Wash.	
Mitchelm, G. W., Klamath Falls, Ore 	
25.00
50.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 47
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st to December 31st, 1936-
Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
>t
rrj
'u
a
rl
a
Cl
m
CJ    .
rrj G
3|
rrjW
o
rG
'u
rrj
O
-a
G
a
0J_;
I'l
H.-S
© j-
■*->
ui
tf
O
Q
G
S   .
° o
6
til
Q
O
rt
G
'3
-JJ     .
S fl
G ru
0 ru
s-g
2
5
*-4->
"ft
cd
1*
Amount.
3
4
2
2
4
$355.00
1
	
	
1
	
40.00
1
....
1
—
2
2
25.00
50.00
50.00
15.00
1
1
2
	
2
1
2
195.00
1
1
1
65.00
2
3
1
■4
250.00
1
1
1
65.00
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
	
3
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
195.00
25.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
55.00
55.00
=
=
=
1
1
1
25.00
25.00
25.00
—
—
....
....
1
1
....
i
25.00
40.00
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
.._
95.00
40.00
15.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
2
....
....
1
1
....
50.00
15.00
15.00
1
1
	
1
i
80.00
1
	
	
	
	
15.00
2
—
2
1
1
....
105.00
15.00
 ».
....
....
1
1
1
....
i
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
27
26
47
43
13
73
97
43
"
$7,845.00
Telegraph Creek—
Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. R. H., Maui, Hawaii	
Beal, C, Los Angeles, Cal 	
Briggs, G. S., Santa Anna, Cal  -..
Cobbs, T. F., Santa Monica, Cal	
Fleming, Gen. A. S., Portland, Ore	
Haverstrite, R. E., Los Angeles, Cal 	
McCormick, J. S., Jr., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Moss, W. W., Berkeley, Cal. _	
Mudge, Mr. and Mrs. E. W., Gainsville, Texas	
Murdock, R. A., Westport, Conn	
White, K. B., Winchendon, Mass	
Vancouver—
Bates, D. H., Portland, Ore 	
Barton, Dr. J. F., Longview, Wash —
Blau, O. L., Redmond, Wash	
Cravens, E. H., Excelsior Springs, Mo —
Hedges, B. C, Excelsior Springs, Mo	
Kamman, Dr. H. F., Los Angeles, Cal..	
Kerr, E., Dowington, Pa 	
Luckey, F. E., Portland, Ore 	
Lyman, L. F., Manden, N.D	
Marshall, G. W., Seattle, Wash	
Nfewton, J. H., Manden, N.D - 	
Norris, Dr. J. L., Longview, Wash -
Osthoff, H., Orange, N.J _  	
West, Wm., Beverley Hills, Cal _	
Wright, L., Los Angeles, Cal  — 	
Williams Lake—
Bolton, W., St. John, Wash   	
Frazer, Lieut.-Col. W. D., Fort Warden, Wash 1
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash  \
Sweet, B. A., Oakland, Cal 	
Wilson, H. D., La Verne, Cal	
Windermere—
Bussard, R. D., Klamath Falls, Ore.- 	
Haun, C. B., Blackwell, Okla....  	
Hoebeke, C. M., Chuquicamata, Chili 	
Holmes, D. W., Tulsa, Okla 	
Jones, H. C, Shelbyville, Ind  	
Lnscombe, D. A., West Trenton, N.J	
Luscombe, Mrs. D. A., West Trenton, N.J.... —	
McKee, R. E-, Tonkawa, Okla—	
McKee, W. W., Blackwell, Okla    	
Strain, W. A., Dallas, Texas. _  	
Totals...  	 Q 48                                                       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st,
L936.
Description of Offence.                  p
See Foot-
NOTE
th
'tf
ta
H
a
tn
a
B
p
'>
S
0
o
b3
— d
*H —
o tn
■ B
o o
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
is
o
B
p
.    tn
B
O
;    tn
o'>
: P
C
.2
"    to
P.i,
= a
B
o
.  'tn
Game Animals.
1
4
3
2
1
5
1
1
10
19
1
5
1
1
1
2
28
16
4
3
3
2
3
3
13
1
1
3
2
3
3
1
1
14
3
5
8
9
13
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
5
1
4
4
6
1
3
10
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
14
1
1
15
1
23
1
1
6
2
3
3
i
i
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
6
26
1
6
8
3
5
4
2
4
23
1
3
14
1
12
14
7
1
1
62
4
84
5
1
3
4
3
1
13
2
3
1
3
12
1
6
2
3
6
26
1
6
8
4
5
4
2
4
25
1
3
14
1
14
15
8
1
1
64
5
84
5
1
3
4
3
1
14
2
3
1
1
3
12
1
7
$10.00
70.00
132.50
430.00
Hunting game between one hour after sunset and one hour before
Killing or having in possession game animals of the female sex
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals during the
Non-resident hunting big game without a licensed guide or a resi-
100.00
80.00
32.50
45.00
20.00
72.50
40.00
257.50
30.00
90.00
10.00
150.00
100.00
90.00
10.00
50.00
410.00
100.00
546.00
20.00
10.00
10.00
150.00
30.00
105.00
20.00
30.00
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during the close season	
Removal of evidence of sex of a game animal killed or taken. ...
Game Birds.
Hunting or in possession of migratory birds during the close season
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
Hunting certain specified game birds with a rifle 	
Hunting pheasants when surface of ground covered with snow.. _
Using live birds as decoys while hunting migratory game birds	
Trapping.
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence 	
Trapping during the close season    .	
Licences.
Altering a firearms licence -	
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence _	
Guiding big-game hunters without a licence 	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult
1
1
1
2
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling without a licence	
Firearms,
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an  auto-
Carrying or  in  possession   of  an  unplugged  pump,  repeating,, or
automatic shotgun   ■ ,  	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
Miscellaneous.
Failing to give satisfactory proof as to where and when game was
killed  '"	
Failing to submit a return of cateh of fur-bearing animals trapped
Fur-trader failing to keep record-book of furs purchased 	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to a Game Warden or
10.00
100.00
50.00
10.00
35.00
Shipping pelts of fur-bparing animals without properly preparing REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 49
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to December 31st, 1936-
Continued.
See
Foot-note
1
tn
3
rrj
B
o
'-C
a
'>
G
O
o
B2
w 3
<H —
O rrj
dg
_, tf
Description of Offence.
fl
p
*      Ul
: Q
s
o
J    tn
P'.i,
e
#o
E    tn
<p'.>
- a
B
r:  're
Q.E
: a
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
2
5
2
3
3
3
4
1
1
1
3
10
6
2
4
1
1
2
2
3
1
2
3
3
2
1
4
5
1
1
i
5
5
18
8
16
3
3
12
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
5
5
18
9
16
3
3
12
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
$55.00
15.00
113.50
243.00
82 50
Gaol Sentences.
$3,965.00
birds during
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals or
;lose season...
Totals _                               .
77
97
110
67
95
15
436
451
Note.—" A " Division ; Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from five days to two months. Q 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Export of Game Animals, etc., January 1st to December 31st, 1936.
Name.
Kind of Game.
Bear.      Caribou.     Deer.        Goat. Elk.
Moose.     Sheep.
Amount.
Kirkaldy, S. N....
Daniken, J	
Edwards, C. M...
Chase, F. W	
Peterson, M	
Britton, H.._	
Blackman, W	
McNeill, J. W	
Harrison, O. A...
Henson, W	
Van Tine, E	
Morgan, J	
Schrieber, N	
Davidson, G. C._
Widen, E	
Bradley, J...	
Jaeck, E. G	
Mullen, Mrs. J	
Kunsisto, T	
Smith, Mrs. F. C...
Duffus, A	
Rucker, J	
Green, R	
Wyatt, J. S	
Kohse, E. _
Lasher, E. A	
Tripp, J 	
Mant, Henry	
Oliver, Mrs. R....
Paula, J.—	
Chute, G. R..	
Miller, L. A	
Edwards, C _
Hocks, A	
Harding, F. W.~
Parminter, R	
Boule, H. H	
Cox, S	
Jaeggi, J	
Bramberg, J	
Ross, Henry	
Reybolds, W. R.,
Dickson, J. M—
Pop, G. L	
Pop, G. L.	
Pigg, W. F	
Daem, Frank	
Butler, L	
Mix, R 	
Cox, S	
Hagemeyer, H	
McManamy, C	
Gregg, C. A	
Steinegger, A	
Turner, Mrs. W...
Alsin, C. J	
Farmer, L 	
Hudson's Bay Co.—
Export of two live fisher....
Export of one live marten..
Export of one live fisher	
Export of one live marten..
$40.00
15.00
20.00
15.00
$1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
4.00
6.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 51
Summary.
Export of portions of game animals as noted in above schedule..
Export of live fur-bearing animals as noted in above schedule	
Total    	
.. $81.00
..    90.00
..$171.00
Revenue derived from the Sale of Game-bird Bands to Game-bird Farmers, 1936.
Date.
Name of Game-bird Farmer.
Address.
Band Nos.
Amount.
6
7
8
13
15
25
27
29
4
13
14
l   6
9
13
17
2
16
29
20
3
10
17
4
8
21
21
22
5
5
9
14
14
17
19
20
22
24
30
30
2
16
24
24
30
7
10
16
16
17
18
21
22
29
31
31
Hall, E - _
4944
4945-4947
4948-4951
4952-4968
4969-4972
4973-4983
4984-4988
4989-5000
5001-5008
5009-5011
5012-5022
5023-5032
5033-5035
5036-5055
5056-5100
5101-5105
5106-5109
5110-5111
5112-5116
5117
5118-5122
5123
5124-5135
5136-5138
5139-5140
5141-5146
5147-5156
5157-5162
5163-5165
5166-5187
5188-5207
5208-5211
5212-5216
5217-5232
5233-5242
5243-5267
5268-5292
5293-5302
5303-5312
5313-5317
5318-5329
5330-5333
5334-5339
5340-5345
5346-5355
5356-5359
5360-5365
5366-5375
5376-5390
5391-5395
5396-5400
5701-5702
5703-5722
5723-5733
5734-5753
5754-5763
5764-5766
5767-5768
$0.10
Freer, J. R 	
.30
Hickey, R. E  	
White Rock                  	
.40
»
Beldam, C. H	
Odin, G. F        -	
Sumas   	
1.70
.40
Miles, H. A.              	
Vancouver	
1.10
Downing, T. W...  	
.50
Crumner, E. R  	
Tennant, B ._ 	
Feb.
2.00
.30
Langley Prairte 	
1.10
Downing, T. W 	
1.00
Petts, W- 	
.30
Downing, T. W	
2.00
5.00
.40
Vancouver    	
.20
Brunt, T.                                 	
.50
Perry, W. H	
.10
Esworthy, Mrs. J...	
Murray, T. P ...	
.50
.10
Miller, L. H  	
1.20
Greenslade, W   —
Hickey, R. E.          	
.30
Sept.
White Rock
.20
White, C. A. _. -
Webber, H  	
Rice, A. P. - 	
.60
1.00
.60
New Westminster   	
.30
Oct.
Rice, A. P   	
2.20
Nanaimo—    	
2.00
Buckland, D.. '	
Robertson, M. S     	
Lightfoot, E. A..	
Downing, T. W.	
Hodges, H. G —-   	
Lucy, W.—	
Greenslade, W   —	
Downing, T. W. 	
Hattie, D. G.
.40
.50
1.60
1.00
2.50
2.50
»
Vancouver	
Cloverdale...   	
1.00
1.00
.50
1.20
Ruff, R. H  	
Esworthy, Jack.... r  	
Turner, T	
Webber, H... 	
.40
Vancouver  	
White Rock
.60
.60
■•
Haney   	
Vancouver    	
1.00
.40
Dec.
Shone, J	
.60
1.00
Webber, H.   ....	
1.50
Vancouver.  	
Vancouver  	
.50
••
Wiegand, Miss E 	
Webber, H   ...	
Conibear, F — 	
Webber, H 	
Trott, W...  .	
Gilroy, R. R   	
Bird, E. E. -	
Totals	
.70
2.00
1.10
2.00
1.00
.30
..
Clayburn   	
.20
$52.50 Q 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Vermin destroyed by Game Wardens during Year 1936.
Kind of Animals or Birds destroyed.
Game Divisions.
• B."
' C."        " D."
Total.
Bear	
Bobcats..
Cats	
Cougar...
Coyotes.
Foxes	
Groundhogs..
Dogs	
Skunks	
Weasel	
Wolves 	
Animals.
Birds.
Blue jays	
Crows	
Eagles	
Hawks.	
Magpies	
Merganzers..
Owls 	
Ravens	
Starlings	
234
27
49
687
36
72
17
19
46
113
21
366
1
71
113
93
12
73
82
32
989
16
107
520
81
2
143
34
36
1
686
10
43
9
1
2,175
14
66
36
4
2
3
1
1,132
40
102
10
82
152
9
1
10
2
4,340
77
342
633
51
188
50
2
Summary of Liberations of Game Birds, 1936.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
Area.
Pheasants.
241
45
199
234
303
60
25
50
860
200
18
928
781
387
955
200
601
83
996
30
928
Ashcroft	
192
Cobble Hill ..- 	
72
Chilliwack     	
Cloverdale-Surrey - ~
Delta         	
96
10
Camp Lister 	
Deer Park   (Renata) 	
6
Saltspring Island 	
Lulu Island  	
24
20
96
North Vancouver	
Pitt Meadows    	
4
48
96
Kamloops - -  	
Lumby	
96
48
192
48
55
96
Robson	
24
96
96
Totals 	
2,017
6,107
1,415
Summary.
District.
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland ..
Interior	
Quail.
Totals .
9,539
3 Mountain.
20 Bob-white.
23 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 53
Fur-farm Returns, 1936 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1936.
7,091
24
5,891
1,046
508
3,171
17
4,653
300
93
816
65
3,319
Marten	
Mink.                          	
66
4,380
5,034
Note.—Figures in respect to muskrats only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 34;   Nil returns, 15;   no returns
received, 5.
Fur-farm Returns, 1936 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1936.
70
15
2
8
12
17
1
197
47
15
Note:.—Figures in respect to beaver only approximate.    Cancelled permits, 8;   Nil returns,  2•   no returns
received, 7.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1936.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1936.
Pheasants ._-  1,686 Ducks   20
Quail
Pheasants
Quail 	
70
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 1936.
  8,164 Ducks 	
75
200
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 1936.
Pheasants      209 Ducks   12
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 1936.
Pheasants   6,569 Ducks   40
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1936.
Pheasants  3,319 Ducks   29
Quail       270 Geese      3
Partridge  1
Note.—During the year 1936 there were 170 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year twenty-three of these farmers discontinued operations.
returns from 2,167 Holders of Special (Trapping)  Firearms Licences, showing Big
Game, Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1935-36.
Bear
Big Game.
368 Moose
Caribou     86
Deer   843
Mountain-goat   111
  519
Mountain-sheep    11
Wapiti (Elk)       1 Q 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   5,402 Otter   282
Fox   1,938 Racoon  1,622
Fisher  388 Skunk   104
Lynx   1,720 Weasel  25,246
Marten   5,674 Wildcat   158
Mink  .  6,179 Wolverine   152
Muskrats  48,731
Predatory Animals.
Badger       3
Cougar       95
Coyotes  3,950
Wolves      149
Statement of Migratory Game and Non-game Birds banded by Members of the Game
Department during the Year 1936.
Baldpate        7
Green-wing teal  887
Mallards   601
Pintail ....
Shoveller
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences, Fees,
and Furs.
Calendar
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913        	
188
181
7
$4,417.50
$109,600.80
1914	
294
273
21
5,050.00
92,034.20
1915 	
279
127
111
194
267
258
110
97
167
242
21
17
10
13
25
5
36
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
1916.	
1917	
1918	
1919.....	
1920 	
293
266
27
46
6,073.00
132,296.50
$5,291.39
1921	
329
312
17
74
6,455.00
114,842.00
1922 	
359
317
42
44
7,275.00
127,111.50
51,093.89
1923     	
309
280
29
24
5,676.50
121,639.50
60,594.18
1924 -	
317
283
34
24
4,768.00
125,605.50
56,356.68
1925 	
296
279
17
43
5,825.00
123,950.50
56,287.78
1926	
483
439
44
39
7,454.00
135,843.50
62,535.13
1927.	
518
469
49
47
10,480.50
139,814.00
71,324.96
1928...	
439
406
33
29
7,283.50
140,014.75
58,823.07
1929	
602
569
33
54
9,008.00
142,028.22
47,329.89
1930. 	
678
636
32
33
9,572.75
147,660.00
45,161.11
1931	
676
625
51
40
8,645.00
137,233.31
46,091.08
1932	
538
497
41
37
5,493.50
141,269 55
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
1933
498
474
24
22
3,531.00
135,876.94
149,955 11
1934	
477
454
23
4
5,227.82
1935  	
454
438
16
19
4,399.50
148,689.64
1936	
451
436
15
14
3,965.00
157,674.30
52,196.50 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 55
G G
CD
CO
05
tn
Z
a
a
rn
U
O
<
o
z
rn
m
Z
D
M
O  i>
SlS
s
rrj
2;
tH        t-       O
t—    **    >    £    *
CC  CO l>  K TO
J >i .fl
3 T3    bl)
. 8 3
J — +-<
j fl +■
J —   rn
! m   aj
, +j "~
, ii   fl
j ™ £ *
• »^S
; c fl U
) <1J   o .s
• Iri-r'
'   C j-   H
S » !
E   -J   c   rrj   ,,
G    tr    >    Cl   *2
(S  M CO  fr,  W
bO   O    *-,    O    CD
£
-3
a
et
Ji
bo
.5
ri
u
0
bo
'£
Z
o
*B
0}
tj
P
ed
Oi
u
0
tj
►3
-t->
a
cd
c
OJ
c
c
0)
-ti
CD
i»
ol
""-j
Ti
I   CR   ■
T3  T3  '
ri   ri
bl   01    li    R    ^
m    ^    M
-■■   ^   —    — i~   ri   ci
ro5 I h %
3   ij   u   o
§ E
M    OJ
S   3
■o J -3 c 3 .S
5  c  ru  2  j. ^
Zr.rr.ZrC^t'ZCl*-
"j 11 -s
r£ W  n  <v  r
oPainoKPO>tti     &
£   G ,
<   rr)
«3'
cy    Ci    li    CJ
L_"J QJ QJ rT W ,J -1"^ rT QJ (TJ
S oicoOH    iSommco
MM
BBS
o   fl   ru
n   . jj   <r   tr   u
ru   S   3  .fl   O   rr!
COB   S
A   ra     •   »
O  I ^  2
OMS^ratoOocSWr-aco     o
.    CJ
O
u .3
.   ro
c .2
§ B
crj   £
bO   CJ
So
rS    0,
S-l
z o
1  2
U
a -xi
fc)   C
Si   G
i. >
K     ri Q 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Fish Culture Branch—Summary of Trout Plantings for the Year 1936.
Plantings,
River or Lake.
bod
11
DiiB
COco
Brown
Trout.
Kamloops Trout.
Steelhead.
Total.
Yearlings.
Fry.
Finger-
lings.
Yearlings.
Finger-
lings.
Yearlings.
Vancouver Island.
Wolf Lake     	
1,907
2,176
1,634
1,907
Big Thetis Lake	
40,000
42,176
Little Thetis Lake    	
1,634
Cowichan River...	
	
20,807
20,807
1,000
2,000
45,793
1,000
	
2,000
Little Qualicum River	
45,793
56,341
2,970
2,970
Shawnigan Lake	
56,341
23,225
	
20,000
23,225
Lower Mainland.
Stave	
30,000
7,834
9,735
2,400
57,834
Seymour Creek	
Mill Lake  	
10,019
19,754
9,487
9,486
2,400
Lake of the Woods	
9,487
9,486
9,000
9,000
Capilano River.	
10,108
5,687
5,500
3,000
5,500
15,795
Coquitlam „-
5,500
S u rr ey 	
Campbell River 	
3,000
5,500
Totals	
23,225
48,793
126,341
38,973
37,656
10,108
50,513
335,609
Note.—A number of Game Clubs or Associations were, as in past years, subsidized in
connection with their Game Fish Culture operations; subsidies being granted by the British
Columbia Game Department, and a summary of the plantings made by these clubs or associations is given hereunder:—
Revelstoke District Rod and Gun Club liberated approximately 94,000 Kamloops trout
in Griffin, Three Valley, Victor, and Summit Lakes.
Powell River District Board of Trade liberated approximately 30,000 Kamloops trout
fingerlings in the Gordon Pasha Lakes.
Cranbrook Rod and Gun Club, Inc., handled 2,407,000 cut-throat trout eggs during the
year;  plantings made in a number of lakes in the district.
The following trout are being held in our hatcheries for liberation during the spring of
1937:—
Qualicum Rearing-ponds, Qualicum Beach, V.I.—■
Kamloops trout   121,425
Stanley Park Hatchery, Vancouver—
Steelhead trout      52,704
Kamloops trout      92,168
Veitch Creek Hatchery, Sooke, V.I.—
Steelhead trout      40,769
Kamloops trout      18,132
Total
325,198
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1936.
Attorney-General (Minister) ___
Game Commission (members).
..Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C.
..Jas. G. Cunningham	
F. R. Butler	
.Victoria.
..Vancouver.
..Vancouver. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1936.
Q 57
Corporal	
Clerk	
Clerk	
Stenographer.
Stenographer.
Headquarters.
__.R. P. Ponder.
.J. B. Smith	
-G. E. Marshall-	
..Miss T. Jones	
..Miss I. Pettigrew-
MVancouver.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
Fishery Officer-
Fishery Officer-
Fishery Officer-
Fishery Officer-
Game Fish Culture Branch.
 C. 0. Mellor	
 E. W. Baker	
.J. D. Inverarity..
.A. Higgs	
.Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
..Sooke.
.Qualicum.
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden R. Marshall-
Game Warden..
Game Warden .
Game Warden.
Game Warden .
Game Warden.
Game Warden..
Game Warden-
Game Warden
..A. Monks	
..W. N. Massey..
-S. H. McCall—
..B. Cash—	
,F. H. Greenfield-
..B. Harvey	
..F. P. Weir	
.J. W. Jones	
.Duncan.
.Alberni.
Alert Bay.
.Victoria.
..Victoria.
-Nanaimo.
-Courtenay.
.Lake Cowichan.
Royal Oak, V.I.
Sub-Inspector-
Stenographer—
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden .
Game Warden
Game Warden .
Game Warden .
Game Warden-
Game Warden .
Game Warden..
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
 C. F. Kearns	
Miss G. M. Lowery..
A. F. Sinclair	
_N. Cameron	
 Nelson.
 Nelson.
 Canal Flats.
 Golden.
-M. J. Wilson Penticton.
- L. F. Washburn Fernie.
-B. Rauch Cranbrook.
-.M. B. Ewart Nelson.
_W. H. McLean Greenwood.
..H. Morgan Revelstoke.
_.W. H. Cartwright Creston.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts).
Sub-Inspector R- M. Robertson Kamloops.
Stenographer-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden..
_.Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
-R. W. MacMartin Kamloops.
..D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
_.W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
-C. F. Still Vernon.
-L. Jobin Williams Lake.
..J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
-F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
- 0. Mottishaw Lillooet.
_.E. H. Martin Merritt.
J. W. Stewart Clinton. Q 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon
Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George,
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game Warden D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Corporal J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden V. L. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden P. Brown Vanderhoof.
Game Warden S. F. Faherty McDame Creek.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Finlay Forks.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Dawson Creek.
Stenographer Miss H. Walker Prince Rupert.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Inspector W. Kier Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game Warden L. H. Walker South Pender Isl.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
J. C. Smith Comox. J. Dewar Nanaimo.
C. Shuttleworth Kamloops.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.
925-637-5918  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0307343/manifest

Comment

Related Items