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THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1937

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 THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1936,'TO MAEOH 31ST, 193T
PRINTED  BY
AUTHOlilTY  OP THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-third Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1937.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937.
I have the honour to ba,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. I—
DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
BOYES, F. C, Principal. Mayers, W., Vice-Principal.
Moody, Mrs. G., Follow-up Officer. Caesar, Mrs. M. E., Secretary.
Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—During the past year we have continued our policy of trying to create an educational
programme in this institution and we feel that to some degree at least we have succeeded.
Shop classes have begun to show real results and by means of these we have been able to
point some of our boys towards apprenticeships in various trades. We realize that we shall not
have any great degree of success in many cases, as the boys are of low mental calibre and must
compete with bright lads who have graduated from the Technical School. Still the results are
worth the effort, since we are carrying on without expensive machinery and supplies.
For the first time in the past three years we have boys asking for a course in agriculture.
This was a pleasant surprise and every facility has been granted them to study all available
angles. At least two boys are well placed on farms and are giving satisfactory service to their
employers. Should this demand continue, it may be necessary to build up a small live-stock
department, but this should be kept within limits so that it may be instructional purely.
Greenhouse-work with flowers and vegetables has taken hold of a fair number of boys.
If this could be followed by apprenticeships in good seed companies much more could be done
to develop the boys while here. One hesitates to train any boy intensively for a position which
does not exist.
The kitchen is a popular place during the winter months and several lads have besn
trained as cooks and waiters during the year. Three of our graduates have used this training
to secure positions. Again, if openings were available, much more intensive training could
and would be given.
The number of commitments has remained fairly high, the figures being as follows:
1935-36, 89;   1936-37, 76.
As has been previously noted, the average mental rating is low, showing that, in many
cases, lack of ability to make a wise choice is a very potent factor in delinquency. Each new
arrival is given a test as soon as he has become somewhat used to his new surroundings and
the results are carefully checked. Where we find the rating normal we notify the instructors
as to what they may expect in various lines and watch for progress.
If no peculiar physical condition is noted, such cases respond quickly and, on leaving,
nearly always adjust satisfactorily to outside conditions.
With the border-line and moron group more time and care are necessary. Many of these
are taken to the Child Guidance Clinic, where very thorough examinations are made and courses
of treatment are suggested. We have found that these suggestions are invaluable and make
every effort to follow carefully every detail as outlined for us. However, many of this group,
while responding very well to treatment in an institution, can never compete successfully in the
open labour market. Employers invariably ask for and employ " bright" boys, regardless of
the fact that for routine work the boy of slower reactions is much more satisfactory when
trained. Because the training period is prolonged and somewhat tedious the slower lads are
passed by and drift helplessly into further grief. Some progress has been made during the
past year in educating employers to see the advantages of using the occasional " dull " boy, but
we must go farther yet before such lads secure their share of opportunities.
Occasionally we have been forced to transfer one of this group to the Mental Hospital.
Needless to say, this step is never taken until every possible avenue has been explored. On3
case was discovered where the boy had not resided in Canada for the necessary five years.
The Immigration Department was duly notified and a deportation order secured. The boy is
still with us waiting for transportation to his homeland.
During the year we have been asked to detain several boys for observation purposes.
These cases were being held for neighbouring Courts, the. Judges desiring a history before U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
passing sentence. When these cases were called to the Court, either myself or the Vice-Principal
was asked to appear and take the stand. We were questioned as to what conclusions our observation had led to and our answers were given great consideration in the disposition of
each case.
The moral here seems to be that an observation centre under the direct control of the Child
Guidance Clinic would be of inestimable value to Magistrates in handling juvenile problems.
These men are anxious to do the right thing for the boys who come before them and with the
information which such a centre could supply many mistakes could be avoided.
We are still faced with the problem of boys being sent here in order to remove them from
an unfavourable home environment. We realize that the motive behind these commitments is
correct, but the error in the disposal of the case is serious. If only the home is at fault two
remedies suggest themselves. The home may be reconstructed by sympathetic neighbours and
friends under the direction of a capable social-service worker. This has been successfully
accomplished in a number of cases and this is the ideal method of handling the problem.
When the home is absolutely hopeless a foster-home is the next best solution. Selected
carefully by trained workers, the foster-home will supply those things which the boy's own
home failed to give him. Moreover, he will live a normal life under normal conditions and as a
result will fit into his community with a minimum of friction.
When boys are sent here and then have to be placed in foster-homes a twofold problem
presents itself. Having spent some time with us, they cannot see why they should not return
to their old homes and a great deal of persuasion is necessary to show them that such a step
is for their good. If we are successful in accomplishing this we must face the fact that some
of them grow fond of an institution and dislike the quiet atmosphere of a home after a sojourn
among the crowd. Thus the work of the Children's Aid Society is increased unnecessarily by
having to break down institution habits and build again normal home habits. Many such cases
have been transferred during the past three years and in only one was the move made without
any apparent break. In that one case the boy's stay here was very short—hence the readjustment was easy.
Our Follow-up Officer's report should interest every one. Our work would be wasted in
far too many cases were it not for the work of this official. By constantly keeping in touch with
our " out-patients," which number a great many more than our inmates, their morale is maintained, positions are secured, parents are advised, and the boys feel that they have some one
really interested in their work and progress. This department will have to be enlarged during
the coming year as the volume of work has increased so rapidly that no single person could
keep up with it.
A glance at our per capita cost would lead a casual observer to comment on the amount.
It is high, but several reasons may be given in explanation.
The number of boys in the school remains small, yet the overhead expenses cannot be
lowered on that account. Staff reductions have been made, but to adhere to the eight-hour
day and supply relief for off-days a minimum seems to have been reached. Another item
which adds to our cost is the salary and expenses of the Follow-up Officer, which are paid from
our vote. While this is added to the cost of our inmates, it really should be assigned to our
" out-patients " only. In other words, the cost of probation should be shown separately from
the cost of institutionalization in order to have a true picture, and when the probation office is
officially opened the separation of the two sets of figures should be made.
In spite of certain disappointments, we feel that definite progress has been made during
the year. The uptrend in economic conditions has made it easier for our older lads to secure
a place in the world of work. Two years of study has convinced staff members that the way
to cure lies through education, training, and encouragement. Every month brings its problems
but every problem solved brings new faith in our ability to solve another. While we know
that, in dealing with those who have been failures under every other agency, we must expect a
percentage of failures, we do not like to admit that any boy will be a failure and we work
with him as faithfully as with the rest. When they fail it hurts, but the percentage of successes to date is most encouraging.
During the coming year I hope to see some of the recommendations which I made last year
implemented. Another year's experience has only served to convince me of their need if we
are to finally arrive at a solution of our problem. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1936-37.
U 7
May I, Sir, take this opportunity to thank the members of all other social agencies, public
as well as private, the members of the staff of your Department, of the Department of the
Attorney-General, and of the staff of the Department of Public Works, for the generous
measure of sympathy and encouragement which they have shown towards our problems. We
are looking forward with confidence to the new year and hope that, during the days that lie
ahead, we shall succeed in making some real progress in this field.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1936, TO MARCH 1st, 1937.
On roll, March 31st, 1936	
Number on parole, March 31st, 1936.
Number away without leave	
Number of new commitments during year-
Number committed for second term	
Number transferred from Oakalla Prison Farm..
59
35
4
66
8
2
Number of boys released	
Number successfully paroled 	
Number at present on parole	
Transferred to Oakalla	
Transferred to Children's Aid Society-
Transferred to Mental Hospital	
Escaped and not returned	
174
37
25
60
1
4
2
2
— 131
Total in school, March 31st, 1937-
43
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1937.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
No.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
11
Life.
Life.
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
10
Life.
8
Life.
Life.
Life.      •
13
Life.
16
Life.
Years.
Life
1398
North Vancouver, B.C   - —
Life.
1407
Life
1432
Life
1434
Victoria, B.C '       -
Life.
1441
Life
1465
Victoria, B.C. .              	
Life
1472
Victoria, B.C.
Canadian-American   	
1481
Edmonton, Alta 	
Life
1482
Life
1484
Theodore, Sask  	
Life
1487
Life
1491
1492
Welsh-Scotch	
Life
1494
1500
1502
Sapperton, B.C   — 	
Vancouver, B.C 	
French  	
English     	
Life.
Life.
Life
1511
Vancouver, B.C....   	
Life.
1514
Life
1518
Canadian-Scotch 	
Life U 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN
SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1937—Continued.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
Admission to School.
No.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1519
Victoria, B.C.            .            	
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
8
9
4
5
14
Life.
Life.
Life.
3
9
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
6
6
Life.
Years.
Life.
1520
Life.
1521
Life.
1523
Life.
Saskatchewan    	
Life.
1528
Life.
1530
Norway 	
5
1531
Life.
1532
Canadian-French - 	
Life.
1533
Maillardville, B.C.
Life.
1534
Creston, B.C.
German-Scotch  - _   ...
Belgian — —	
Life.
1535
1539
Saskatchewan  	
Manitoba   —	
Life.
Life.
1540
Life.
1541
Life.
1542
Victoria, B.C. .
Life.
1543
1544
Winnipeg, Man   	
Ukrainian    	
Life.
Life.
1545
Lomond, Alta    _   .
Saanich, B.C. _ ..... _ 	
Life.
1546
Life.
1547
11                         11
1548
10                           10
1549
Hazelton, B.C	
Life.                    Life.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Canadian (both)
English (both) ...
Scotch (both) _
French (both) ___
German (both) _
  2
  4
  1
  2
  1
Indian (both)   3
Ukrainian (both)   3
Swiss (both)   1
Norwegian (both)   2
Belgian (both)   1
Doukhobour (both)   1
Russian (both)   2
Chinese (both)   2
Yugo-Slavian (both)
Canadian-English __
Canadian-American .
  1
...  1
  3
English-Irish  3
Canadian-French .-.         4
  1
  1
  1
  1
  1
  1
English-Scotch _
Canadian-Scotch
Welsh-Scotch _____
French-Swedish .
German-Scotch ...
Indian-Irish 	
Total 43
Alberta     7
British Columbia  24
Manitoba      2
New Brunswick     1
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
     7 Norway	
Saskatchewan     7
South Africa     1
Total  43
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Incorrigible    1
Theft   24
B.E. & S.   11
Obtaining goods by false pretences      1
Carnal knowledge      2
Receiving stolen property     2
Creating a disturbance     1
Indecent assault     1
Total.
43 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1936-37. U 9
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Burnaby      2 Penticton 	
Chilliwack   2 Prince Rupert     1
Cranbrook   1 Prince George     1
Duncan, V.I.   1 Rossland      2
Grand Forks   1 Saanich      2
Hazelton   1 Slocan City     1
Kitwanga   1 Vancouver   11
Maillardville   3 West Vancouver     1
New Westminster  3 Victoria      4
Nelson   1 —
North Vancouver  3 Total  43
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
" Juvenile Delinquent Act "  33 2 years      5
1 year     2 3 years      3
Total  43
AGES OF BOYS.
12 years   6 16 years      8
13 years   2 17 years   11
14 years   9 18 years      1
15 years   6 —
Total  43
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Church of England     7 Baptist      3
Roman Catholic  16 Lutheran      1
Salvation Army     5 Doukhobour      1
Presbyterian      5 —
United      5 Total  43
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  24
Number who have both parents dead     3
Number who have father living and mother dead     5
Number who have mother living and father dead  10
Number who have stepmothers      1
Total  43
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—The following is a report of dental services rendered to the school:—
" During the year ended March 31st, 1937, the mouths of all the boys entering the institution have been carefully examined and record charts made.
Boys treated      70
Diseased teeth extracted     36   •
Local anaesthetic used    36
Amalgam fillings inserted  107
Enamel fillings inserted     40
Cement caps or fillings inserted     91
Prophylactic treatments      27
Treating abscessed teeth       6 U 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Because of the co-operation of the school in keeping appointments I was able to complete
more work than in any previous year. As far as possible the mouths of the boys leaving the
institution were in healthy condition and the services rendered should be considerable help in
making these boys useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
MEDICAL REPORT.
The work of the doctors who have had charge of the health of our boys has once more been
of the greatest value to us.    They have come promptly and cheerfully on every occasion and
their advice has shown real thought in regard to the peculiarities of each case.
Because of the lack of trained nursing service in the school we were handicapped in cases
where continued applications were necessary. On the advice of the medical officers such service
was secured, Mr. Spence being added to the staff in February. Trained in hospital-work, he
has been able to follow out the doctors' instructions with due attention to detail, the results
being most satisfactory.
During the year routine Wasserman tests have been given to all inmates. Only one
reaction was secured and a second test eliminated this one case.
On several occasions we have made use of the chest clinic, but we are pleased to be able
to report that in each case the results were negative.
The following is a list of cases requiring hospital attention or special services:—
Tonsil operations  5
Circumcision   3
Dislocated knee   1
Measles   1
Eye test and glasses  1
Impetigo     1
When it is remembered that most of the boys come to us undernourished and in poor
physical condition, we feel that the success which we achieve from a health point of view speaks
volumes for the efficiency of our medical services.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—The educational policy followed during 1936-37 was the same as that of the
previous year—namely, dividing the school-boys into two groups, each attending class half a
day. There were fifty-three boys placed on the register during the year, of whom seventeen
remained as on March 31st, 1937.
" The work done was of very fair grade, taking into account the mental handicap under
which many of them laboured. Generally speaking, mental ability was of a lower standard
than that of the previous year.
" An attempt was made to follow the new curriculum provided for public schools, commencing September, 1936. Owing to the limited time and ability of the pupils we had to modify
this to some extent.
" Every boy coming to this institution was given an intelligence test shortly after arrival.
Although this was taken as no final analysis of the case, it enabled us to get an idea of what
we might reasonably expect from the boy and so place him in his proper group.
" The Intelligence Quotient of all boys averaged approximately 80. There were several
boys who ranked as high as ' Superior Class,' while one or two were as low as ' Imbecile.'
" A reading class was organized and part of each evening devoted to library books. By the
number of books read it was evidently very popular.
" Eric W. Blagburn."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Because we have been successful in placing several boys trained in this department in
positions which have proven permanent, we find many boys applying for positions on the
kitchen staff.
During the past year we have had several boys show real promise as cooks and waiters.
On leaving us they have tried to find similar situations and one or two have been successful.
If we could be sure of placing all such graduates we would feel justified in developing a very
thorough course of training.    As it is, we do our best, and since we do not grant a diploma REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1936-37. U 11
or tell our boys that they are trained cooks, they do not expect too much when seeking work
and are not upset when they have to accept some other type of employment.
These sample menus, prepared by a dietitian, illustrated the type of meal served to the
boys:—
Boys' Menu—One Day.
Breakfast.—Porridge, toast, butter, syrup, coffee, milk.
Dinner.—Soup, cold meat, potatoes, carrots, chocolate custard, bread, butter.
Supper.—Baked beans, bread, butter, stewed apricots, tea, milk.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
(1.)   Office and school supplies  $996.00
(2.)   Travelling expenses   1,587.60
Gas, oil, and repairs   559.42
(3.)   Purchase of clothing  1,500.39
Shoe-shop  supplies    458.54
Tailor-shop supplies   205.42
(4.)   Janitor supplies  589.67
(5.)   Light  612.00
Fuel  2,438.20
Water   365.82
(6.)   Provisions   7,056.47
(7.)   Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and operation expenses  1,233.62
Dentist—Salary and supplies  600'.00'
(8.)   Laundry _•_  1,194.97
(9.)   Feed for stock   327.13
(10.)   Purchase of live stock  Nil
(11.)   Vocational supplies for various departments  101.33
(12.)   Incidentals and contingencies  _  1,149.98
Salaries    26,740.13
Total expenditure, Vote 155      $47,716.69
Expenditure, Public Works         2,520.48
Depreciation of stock  171.70
Total expenditure for year      $50,408.87
Total amount of revenue for year—
Board and room        $1,957.82
Municipality   receipts           11,082.40
       13,040.22
$37,368.65
Per capita cost for the year 1936-37, $2.19.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" sir,—I submit the annual report for the year 1936-37 of the work done in the tailor-shop
and the boys to whom I have given instruction.
" Three boys attended every day during the year and a course in elementary training—
i.e., cleaning, pressing, and repairing clothing,—was given to about forty boys.
" During the year we made 59 pairs of tweed pants, 110 pairs of overalls, 10 pairs of
cowboy chaps for concert-work, 10 table-cloths, 3 window-curtains, and 15 pairs of pants were
altered and made over.    In addition, 36 suits and 141 pairs of tweed pants were cleaned and
pressed.
" Raincoats, ma.ckinaws, overalls, and many other articles of clothing came in for their
share of repairs. „ j   Henderson>
Tailor." U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Shoemaking Department.
" Sir,—In presenting my annual report for the year 1936-37, I wish to emphasize the good
the boys get from the classes for elementary training.
" I have had an average of four boys each month for one and a half hours daily and
instructed them in the different methods of making and repairing shoes, also hand-sewing.
The majority took a great interest in the work—some having asked to continue in the shop and
have done very well.
" During the year six boys spent full time in the shop, all of them doing well considering
the time they were studying this vocation.
" During the year 90 pairs of new shoes were made, 493 pairs of shoes were repaired,
also several pairs of gum boots. Footballs, baseballs, and basketballs were kept in good repair
throughout the year.
,: J.   OSBORN,
Shoemaker."
Garage Department.
" Sir,—During the past year the truck has been used extensively for taking the boys on
outings, in addition to hauling supplies and other work at the institution and in the surrounding
country.
" Trips made for the pleasure of the boys were approximately as follows: Picture-shows,
17; picnics and sightseeing, 261; lacrosse, soft-ball, hockey, and rugby games, 19; games played
by boys outside institution, 9. Several trips were made with the school concert party. The
Vancouver Exhibition was the scene of one day's visit. All these were much enjoyed and
behaviour was all that could be desired.
" The Girls' Industrial School also benefited by several excursions to the beaches and other
resorts in the vicinity of Vancouver.
" Expenses for the truck were higher than usual, due to the severity of the winter and
the fact that there is no protection for the truck.
" Gasoline, oil, greases, and repairs for the past year cost $559.42.
" H. J. Hart,
Instructor."
Blacksmith and Sheet-metal Department.
" Sir,—The boys who have worked with me during the past year in the blacksmith-shop
have done very well and all showed lively interest in the work, also they were a great help to
me on various jobs that had to be done.
" I also had quite a number attend for instruction in sheet-metal work. The boys seemed
to thoroughly enjoy this and several of them made various articles.
" It has been a real pleasure to me to have helped each and every one of them.
" W. J. Scott,
Instructor."
Greenhouses and Gardens.
" Sir,—During the year quite a number of boys have worked with me in the greenhouse
and in the gardens, all showing a keen interest.
" I gave them all instruction in the cultivation of flowers and vegetables and the results
of their work were more than satisfactory. „ __~   T   ■'
" W. J. Scott,
Gardener."
Farm Report.
" Sir,—It is a pleasure to prepare a report regarding the activities taking place on the
farm during the past fiscal year at the Boys' Industrial.
" During the early part of the year quite a large area of land which had previously been
poultry-runs was ploughed and prepared for the planting of potatoes, carrots, onions, tomatoes,
cabbage, cauliflower, and corn. While the above plants were coming into readiness for weeding
and thinning, several hundred strawberry and raspberry plants were set out, so they would
be ready for bearing the following year. As the summer rolled in we were engaged constantly
in cultivation and weeding and quite busy constructing a root-house which would serve to REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1936-37.       U 13
house the crops when the harvest would be ready. Several tons of hay, nicely cured, were
taken care of for fall-feeding of the horses.
" Although a hard fight was necessary against weeds owing to the land being previously
used for.poultry-runs, the crops turned out exceptionally well and a great deal of credit is
due to the boys who took part in making the results obtained possible.
" When the fall set in and harvest was taken care of, all ditches were put in shape to
carry off the surface water, which would otherwise have washed away a lot of surface soil.
Fall ploughing was taken care of preparatory to spring work.
" Winter is not so quiet as many might think. Harnesses were cleaned and oiled, all
farm implements repaired and painted, as well as vegetables sorted in case any decay might
set in.
" This spring's work is well under way; fertilizing and ploughing under same are nearly
completed. Some fences were taken down, allowing for more ground to be put under
cultivation. Guide-wires were put up for the raspberry-canes and another 250 strawberry-
plants were added to last year's setting of plants.
" The average number of boys per month in the department is five and it is very pleasing
to note the interest displayed by them. So often they will remark on how fast the time is going,
which certainly would signify that agriculture, being so diversified, loses any monotony which
might be attached to it.
" A suggestion I would like to make, if permissible, is that I hope a thorough course of
lectures, along with the practical work which is being carried on, will be available shortly.
I am sure it would go a long way towards fitting those committed from country points with a
brighter outlook as to how an adequate living may be obtained from the soil if theory and
practice are followed.
"Produce from Garden.—Potatoes, 5 tons; carrots, 1 ton; green beans, 300 lb.; broad
beans, 234 lb.; onions, 1,000 lb.; lettuce, 600 heads; cabbage, 800 lb.; tomatoes, 541 lb;
celery-sticks,   200';    cucumbers,   1,000';    marrows,   500;    spinach,   400   lb.;    sprouts,   70   lb;
rhubarb, 30O lb. .. •     __   ,,
" D. W. Munro,
Farm Instructor."
Motor Mechanics Report.
" Sir,—Motor mechanics plays a lively part among the different trades, which are made
possible for boys admitted to the Provincial Industrial School. Moments are far from dull
when the class puts in an appearance for lectures. So many questions are asked which are
quite important and so encouraging to the instructor, for it goes to show that the boys are
seeking knowledge. Surprising to report, it is not information which would later be used for
destructive purposes.
" The class period in this department is limited to three and a half hours per week, which
is hardly sufficient to cover theory and practice as thoroughly as one might desire. Considering
that this work is only in the embryo stage, too much cannot be expected, other than a preliminary
training consisting of the common ailments related to the automobile.
" The course covers brake adjustment and relining of same, cleaning and adjusting of
carburettors, grinding and proper adjustment of valves, taking-up of bearings, and ignition
and lighting problems. The above course of instruction is certain to be of value to the present-
day boy, as we are quite aware the day of horses and carriages is a thing of the past and we
have with us a mechanical age.
" Thirty-one boys took advantage of the motor mechanics course and some of the boys
returned to take the course over again as often as three times.     u Munro
Instructor."
Wood-working Department.
" Sir, For the period from September to March I have the following report to present:—
" My efforts have been mainly directed to the organization of a wood-working shop, also
the teaching of classes in mechanical drawing. For the wood-working department I was given
a suitable room in the utility-house of the former poultry plant. The immediate problem
was the construction of sturdy work-benches, a suitable tool-cupboard, and other appurtenances
for a good workshop.    Also, during this period, cupboards, racks, shelves, cabinets, partitions, U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
and odds and ends were made for the institution. For the accomplishment of this work I was
given groups of boys, averaging six per month, whom I conducted as a class, giving them all
along instruction in the correct use of tools, fundamentals of construction, etc. The outstanding
feature of this class was the response and eagerness of the individual boy to learn and endeavour
to do his best.
" More credit is due to the boy when it is known that his tools were merely cast-offs from
the old carpenter-shop, and to which I was forced to supplement my own kit of tools. With
the new year I will have a complete set of tools, wood-shop equipment, and materials. With
this in hand I will give exact, steady instruction in the mechanics of wood-construction and
manipulative skill, beginning at the individual boy's latest stage of woodwork knowledge and
ablity. The course they will follow will be parallel to the one as laid down for junior high
schools of the Province.
" The classes in mechanical drawing have enjoyed a high degree of success. The
enthusiasm of the boys for study and work in this class is admirable. I endeavour here to
cater to individual ability, which, under encouragement, has produced very pleasing results.
The course I have laid out has a steady progression from the first sheet of printing, the
simple elements of geometry, orthographic projection, mechanical fastenings, sketching, and
complete mechanical drawing to tracing and blue-print reading.
" The classes in mechanical draughting are conducted three afternoons per week; the
woodwork classes two afternoons per week. I have accommodation now for ten boys in the
wood-working department and an equal number in the draughting class. In all, these classes
promise results of good value for the time and small expense involved.
" The foregoing has been a resume of the activities in the two departments under my
direction. For the balance of my time I have worked in collaboration with Mr. Jones in his
department.
" W. Catherall,
Instructor."
RECREATION.
" Sir,—Another year has come to an end, and, summing up the activities in my department,
I find they are gratifying and have been more than pleasant.
" The summer of 1936 was a continual round of outdoor athletics suited for the season,
lacrosse being the favourite. The boys, although starting at scratch in the latter game, put
in such hard practising that they gave every team they played against a real hard battle.
Coquitlam and New Westminster were their rivals on various occasions and the rivalry was
keen. At the close of the season the honours, summed up, were ' All even! ' A great help to our
boys were the numerous invitations to some of the major lacrosse league games at the Arena,
New Westminster.    Here the boys were able to study the various plays of the older players.
" Soft-ball also had a real run, and although no outside games were available inter-school
games were numerous.
" For those not well equipped physically, the river was a great attraction and swimming
and fishing were in full swing. Variety being the spice of the programme, the boys heartily
agreed with the hikes that were suggested, we being very fortunate in the number of interesting
places within walking distance. When an interesting project was to be viewed and the walk
too long, the truck was used as a means of transportation.
" Towards the end of the season our concert party came into its own, giving a number of
performances at the school and two outside—the first being at the Preventorium in Vancouver
and the second at the Alexander Orphanage. The boys deserve a great deal of credit for
the diligent rehearsing and ultimate success which was theirs at both institutions.
" As the winter season closed in the activities changed to indoor sports, and our gymnasium
once more rang with the excited voices as basket-ball, volley-ball, boxing, etc., held sway.
Basket-ball teams from the local centres were entertained and our boys looked forward eagerly
for the games that were scheduled. Constant practice had moulded into shape a clever batch
of players and they emerged victorious on quite a number of occasions. Return matches were
arranged and the scores were close either way. Boxing-matches were held twice and sometimes
three times a week.
" As a diversion from the above-mentioned programme, our community singing was once
more introduced, with the boys co-operating with impromptu performances on the auditorium REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1936-37.       U 15
stage. To add to the fun, mock trials were arranged, the boys themselves using their own
initiative in making them as humorous as possible.
" Towards the Christmas season Mother Nature beckoned us outside. Snow was falling
fast and in a few days the ground was covered with a thick, white blanket. A variety of bobsleds were produced and the thrills and spills were countless. However, it was all fun and
the scratches and bumps were soon forgotten. Ice formed on the river and skating was the
sport for those so inclined. An ingenious idea for skates was brought to light by the boys.
A triangular-shaped piece of wood about a foot in length, with a thin strip of iron driven into
one angle, served the purpose admirably and many of the boys learned to skate.
" On the night of December 16th a grand concert was held in the auditorium, artists from
Vancouver, New Westminster, and Coquitlam taking part. Some of our boys acted as ushers,
the remainder assisting enthusiastically in preparing the stage and auditorium for the
occasion.    The concert was a huge success and thoroughly enjoyed by every one.
" Christmas Day was started with expectant looks at the Christmas tree, which was
brightly decorated and placed in the dining-room. Parcels were soon opened and the various
presents and tokens of good-will were on display.    In all, it was a very happy festive season.
" In mentioning our social activities, may I express our appreciation to the Essondale
Dramatic Club for allowing our boys to be guests at their production of the play ' Mama's
Baby Boy.'    The boys enjoyed it immensely.
" In conclusion, I wish to convey my sincere thanks for the co-operation and assistance
received in all matters pertaining to the betterment of the boys in our care and the returning
to society of good citizens. „ ____     -    _.
"W. R. Jones,
Instructor."
BAND NOTES.
" Sir,—Band practices on Tuesday and Thursday have continued throughout the year,
and since the time set is similar to that of the various vocational classes the attendance has
been quite regular.
" Because of the short stay of the boys, it is still impossible to develop a band. The aim
of the classes has been to interest as many boys as possible in band music, to give those
interested preliminary instruction in the use of band instruments, and to try and encourage
them to carry on with organized bands when they leave the school. In these aims we feel that
we have had some success and because of this we are encouraged to carry on.
" During the past year approximately fifty boys attended these classes and we hope an
even larger number will avail themselves of the training during the coming months.
" J. H. Rushton,
Bandmaster."
REPORT OF  FOLLOW-UP OFFICER.
" Sir,—I beg to submit the following report for the year ended March 31st, 1937:—
Visits to homes  1,086
Visits to office      636
Business calls and interviews  _■      626
Telephone calls       826
" While the greater portion of my time is spent in and around Vancouver, I have, during
the year, visited Victoria, Nanaimo, and Chilliwack in connection with boys and girls from
those areas.
" The improvement in economic conditions has begun to show in my work this year. Many
of our graduates have found positions in various occupations and are making good in those
positions. In such cases the behaviour problem ceases after a few months and we have another
good citizen in the making.
" Another good sign is the interest many employers are now prepared to take in building
up a boy or girl. Slowly it is dawning on the minds of our public men that such work is
interesting and worth while. Perhaps the Government's work in apprenticeship is responsible
to a large extent, since under this scheme employers must become interested in their junior
employees. Whatever the cause, we welcome the results and hope to see this attitude develop
and flourish. U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The harmonious relationship which exists among all social agencies, both public and
private, has been a source of real pleasure as well as being of invaluable assistance. A call
for help is answered at once from all sources and this tends towards finding the proper-
solution in most cases.
" One point might be stressed, a point which must be studied in the near future. Often
young boys and occasionally a girl may be sent to the school by a well-meaning Magistrate,
more to remove them from unfavourable home conditions than to punish or reform the boy
or girl. When the question of returning the inmate to his or her home arises, there is trouble.
Local authorities, feeling that the boy will have little opportunity in his old surroundings,
object to his return. If the Magistrate transfers the case to the Children's Aid Society
he is criticized by the local authorities for saddling the municipality with a new expense.
While arguments fly back and forth the patient doesn't improve. If foster-home care is
indicated by school record and clinic report, then a quick transfer to such a home should be
possible. The question of payment for such a service is the knotty problem, but an answer
should be found soon.
" Before closing this report, I feel that I should mention certain community activities
which will be of great assistance to us in settling boys who have erred. In Vancouver, boys'
clubs have been started by the Kiwanis Club and the Rotary Club. The value of these
contributions to the various communities can scarcely be estimated. A new club, the Junior
G Men, created by Constable Eveleigh, bids fair to do untold good. These young lads are
securing the true perspective of the police from an active member of the force and in the
future will be allies instead of enemies of law and order.
" In closing, I wish to thank the various officials in our own department, the Department
of Labour, the Provincial Police, the local police in Vancouver and surrounding municipalities,
and the various Judges and officials of the Juvenile Courts with whom it has been my pleasure
to work during the past year. Any measure of success which has greeted my efforts has been
made possible by their co-operation, and I am sure that I can look forward with confidence
to their continued support during the coming year.
" K. A. Moody,
Follow-up Officer, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools."
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.
390-737-7332

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