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FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STATISTICS, 1936 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1937

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 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE FIEE MAESHAL
FOR  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BEITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS, 1936
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Fifteenth Annual Report of the Fire
Marshal for the year ended December 31st, 1936.
GORDON McG. SLOAN,
A ttorney-General.
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1937. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Fire Marshal     5
Table I.—Inspections made and Orders issued     8
Table II.—Fires reported  10
Table III.—Causes of Fires  12
Table IV.—Classification of Property  14
Table V.—Summary  23
Table VI.—Loss of Life  24 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire Marshal,
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1937.
The Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Pursuant to section 34 of the " Fire Marshal Act," I have the honour to submit for
your consideration my Fifteenth Annual Report for the year ended December 31st, 1936,
together with statistics showing fire causes and losses for the different cities, municipalities,
villages and fire districts. While we are glad to note the decrease in losses which started
after our peak year of 1923, when there was $4,229,917, has been maintained until we have
the present figure of $1,689,718, a decrease of $2,640,199 since that time and $251,984 below
the previous year of 1935, yet I do not think that our problem of fire-prevention has been
solved. Our conflagration hazards are still with us, ranges of wooden buildings, poor
housekeeping, smokers' carelessness, defective chimneys and stove-pipes. All are still
demanding their toll. And in addition to this we find that due to the economic conditions in
many cities and municipalities fire-fighting equipment has become obsolete, fire-boats have
been discarded and not replaced, the personnel of fire departments has been decreased until
trained men to man existing apparatus are not available. Water systems have depreciated
until water-mains will not stand the pressure needed to fight major fires. The extension of
water-mains has not kept up with our industrial expansion and we find industrial plants costing
upwards of a quarter of a million dollars and employing hundreds of men with only 4-inch
mains to supply fire protection.
A fire-prevention engineer or an engineer of the Rating Bureau of the Underwriters,
when finding such conditions as outlined above, may possibly look up a Government report
to find what past fire losses have been, but he will also ask himself what will happen here when
a fire starts, and the answer to the latter question will probably govern the insurance rates for
that locality. I feel, however, that we may congratulate ourselves on the fact that there has
been a very decided increase in fire-consciousness in the minds of our citizens. This is shown
in the marked increase in the number of inspections made and orders issued during the year,
and it is also shown in the greater interest taken by Boards of Trade, insurance-men's organizations, leading business-men, and the press in the work of fire-prevention.
I wish to express my appreciation of the courtesy of the members of the Architectural
Institute of British Columbia, who, while not obligated to do so, follow the practice of
submitting plans of public buildings, such as hotels, hospitals, et cetera, to this office for
checking and advice as to the best methods of preventing the spread of fire. Due credit should
also be given to the Fire Chiefs in the cities and municipalities having fire departments and to
the members of the Provincial Police who act as Assistant Fire Marshals in municipalities and
unorganized districts where there are no fire departments. During the year the Fire Chiefs'
organization have held five schools at convenient points throughout the Province, with a total
attendance of 200. At these schools questions dealing with fire-prevention, fire-fighting,
water-supplies, upkeep and handling of fire apparatus and life-saving equipment are discussed
and demonstrations given. Many chiefs attend these schools at their own expense. The
results are obvious. The men take greater interest in their work and acquire increased skill
and efficiency. In the remaining districts which have no equipment the Provincial Police
are doing splendid work. Their training in enforcing law has made them keen observers.
Their carrying-out of the regulations under the Act without fear or favour has taught the
citizens to comply with instructions promptly and to the entire satisfaction of the Fire Marshal.
Many of the police have shown outstanding ability in fire-prevention work.
Fire Investigations and Incendiarism.—The work of this branch has been carried on in
an efficient manner by the Deputy Fire Marshal, who brings to it a long experience of investigating and detecting crime. The prompt and searching investigation of all suspicious fires
reported carried out by Mr. Walker, assisted by the local Assistant Fire Marshals interested, N 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
I believe justifies me in making the statement that the crime of organized arson for gain is
practically non-existent in this Province. Such cases as we have are found to be the work of
weak-minded persons, usually illiterate, who, when they have a fire, whether by accident or
design, attempt to obtain from the insurance companies by means of fraudulent proofs of
loss payment for goods that never existed.
One hundred and twenty-eight suspicious fires have been investigated and eight inquiries
have been held under section 12 of the Act. Three cases of arson were prosecuted and two
convictions obtained and one acquittal. In these cases a saving of $8,900 to the insurance
companies interested resulted. In another case the accused was found to be insane and
committed to Essondale. The property loss in this case was $1,500 with no insurance. Two
prosecutions arising out of evidence given at inquiries resulted in convictions in both cases.
One of the accused men got a sentence of three years and appealed to the Court of Appeal.
The appeal was dismissed. One, charged with attempting to obtain money under false
pretences as a result of a claim of loss after a fire, entered a plea of guilty. In addition
to this, Mr. Walker conducted thirteen prosecutions for various infractions of the regulations
under the Act and secured twelve convictions, one being withdrawn.
Inspections and Appeals.—Sixty-six thousand five hundred and forty-nine inspections were
made by Assistant Fire Marshals and 5,929 orders to remove hazards were issued. In this
work the local Assistant Fire Marshals were assisted by Mr. Walker and Mr. Oswald, of the
Office staff. Mr. Walker made thirty-seven inspections in connection with his fire-investigation
work and Mr. Oswald made 1,693 of public buildings other than hospitals, film exchanges,
and theatres. In the above cases the orders were issued by the local Assistant Fire Marshals.
Only three appeals from these orders were received by the Fire Marshal under section 20.
There were no appeals from his decisions under section 21.
Theatres and Film Exchanges.—The work of this department, in charge of Mr. W. A.
Oswald acting as Theatre Inspector, has been diligently carried out during the year. One
hundred and thirty-four standard theatres using nitro-cellulose film and 102 theatres using
16 mm. acetate or non-inflammable film have been licensed during the year. Two hundred and
four inspections were made and ninety-seven orders issued to improve conditions. One new
theatre was opened and plans for nine others submitted and approved. Two hundred and
twenty-two licences and permits were issued to projectionists to operate in theatres. Eleven
examinations were held by the Examining Board; five of the candidates were successful and
duly licensed.
Fifty-two inspections of film exchanges were made and twelve orders issued to improve
conditions. Approximately 4,100,000 feet of nitro-cellulose film was taken out of service and
shipped out of the Province and 200,000 feet destroyed by burning.
Government Buildings.—Regular inspection of Government buildings has been made
during the year at the request of the departments having jurisdiction and reports and
recommendations submitted to them.
Public and Private Hospitals.—In the course of our duties and at the request of the
Department of the Honourable the Provincial Secretary, more than seventy-two inspections of
hospitals have been made by the Office staff and recommendations given and orders issued
for improvements of conditions found existing.
Old and Dilapidated Buildings.—We still have many of these buildings in our cities and
towns. During the past year quite a number have been removed, some by fire, and a numbsr
under orders of the local Assistant Fire Marshals. Fires that have originated in such places
have caused serious loss to owners of adjoining property. However, they are gradually being
cleared up or repaired and we expect the good work to continue.
Gasoline Storage Plants.—Forty-one sets of plans for land and marine storage of gasoline
and oils have been submitted, checked, and approved during the year. In this connection, with
reference to marine plants, the fine co-operation of the Dominion Department of Transport
through the courtesy of Colonel A. W. R. Wilby, their representative on this Coast, is greatly
appreciated.
Retail Gasoline Service-stations.—Fifteen plans of service-stations have been submitted
to this office for checking and approval. These are in addition to a large number of plans which
are passed on and approved by the local Assistant Fire Marshals. REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936. N 7
Public Building Plans.—Thirty plans for public buildings for different occupancies have
been submitted to the office for checking and advice as to the best methods of construction
and fire-prevention.
Oil-burners.—One thousand nine hundred and sixty-five labels for oil-burners have been
issued under the authority of the National Research Council after inspection by Mr. Oswald,
and twenty-three plans for oil-burner equipment have been submitted to this office for advice.
In addition, approximately 2,200 burners of all types, labelled by the National Research Council
and the Underwriters' laboratories, have been received, approved by the Fire Marshal, and
accepted for sale and installation in the Province.
In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge the splendid co-operation of yourself as Minister of
the Department and members of your staff. Acknowledgment is also due to Colonel MeMullin,
Commissioner of Provincial Police, and officers of his staff, to all local Assistant Fire Marshals
for the splendid way they have carried out their duties, to the members of the insurance
organizations for their support in our work, and to the members of my Office staff for their
co-operation and efficiency.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. A. THOMAS,
Fire Marshal. N 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
City Municipalities (33).
9
35
73
63
770
42
18
44
444
126
4
3
1
31
2
4
19
13
358
4
809
50
68
731
1,104
4,313
1,156
129
9
70
245
1,411
112
1,074
33
8
6
21
3
98
918
94
13
Port Moody             	
2
91
70
Revelstoke  	
11
81
Salmon Ann	
2
Trail.  	
2,321
37,556
349
10,721
110
Vancouver   _	
3,791
Vernon                   	
180
Victoria.... 	
217
Totals      	
64,243
5,797
District Municipalities (28).
Burnaby   	
Chilliwack 	
1
1
Coldstream 	
4
Delta   	
47
1
Fraser Mills.....	
Glenmcre..            	
3
4
3
Kent _	
4
Langley	
Maple Ridge 	
Matsqui  	
Mission  	
164
North Cowichan	
North Vancouver 	
Oak Bay  	
133
Peachland             	
Penticton  	
254
8
Pitt Meadows  _	
Richmond.. _                	
Saanich   	
Salmon Ann _.   ..        	
Spallumcheen  	
Sumas         _    	
9
Summerland REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 9
TABLE L—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS—Continued.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
District Municipalities—Continued.
30
36
685
17
Village Municipalities (17).
9
386
32
42
7
37
8
16
32
4
16
7
Toflno                                       	
40
29
2
1
Totals  	
589
79
Fire Districts (IS).
144
29
22
1
506
116
211
18
2
2
15
Totals                                         .	
1,032
36
66,549
52,849
53,150
56,998
74,441
5,929
Grand totals, 1935      .                      	
4,742
Grand totals, 1934 	
3,502
Grand totals, 1933                ..    ..           .                	
4,325
Grand totals, 1932      .          .    .                            	
5,753 N 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IL—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
City Municipalities (33).
5
1
9
4
19
7
10
2
4
15
5
11
16
7
6
40
24
85
29
12
1
4
9
11
11
12
9
22
1,167
10
201
$95
146
8,568
114
46,248
2,421
3,008
38
804
4,052
21,762
1,003
24,502
1,748
729
3,271
26,362
17,207
13,355
610
264
441
1,231
8,554
8,139
1,823
7,147
1,046
498,737
1,882
25,171
1,768
$730,478
District Municipalities (28).
66
16
1
8
6
12
1
5        1
16
23
14
7
17
23
50
1
20
1
17
41
7
1
6
5        |
30
15        |
34        !
$33,330
13,576
18
2,771
1,806
672
1,050
Kent                                                 	
3,052
11,301
35,693
12,083
5,853
23,641
63,965
5,863
5
7,348
5
15,626
10,420
12,023
400
3,450
4,815
32,185
11,020
2.065
Totals    	
443         :
$314,036 REPORT OP FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 11
TABLE IL—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Districts reporting.
Amount of
Loss.
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake-
Totals..
Fire Districts (12).
Cariboo, County of	
loco  — 	
Kootenay, County of ...
Nanaimo, County of-—
Pacific Mills, Limited -
Powell River-	
Prince Rupert, County of __
University Area  	
Vancouver, County of	
Victoria, County of -
Westminster, County of_
Yale, County of	
Totals _-.
Grand totals	
Village Municipalities (17).
Tofino      , ■                 	
35
1
97
32
4
28
29
15
69
2,659
$25
4,274
90
4,313
216
350
10
1,327
233
2,360
325
10
2,688
$16,221
$174,428
90
92,559
138,391
16,111
3,910
48,951
82
32,523
20,398
19,454
82,086
$628,983
,689,718
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting  	
Brick or concrete.	
Frame   	
18, loss
224,    „
2,417,    „
2,659,
$12,734
283,521
1,393,463
$1,689,718 N 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Acetylene-torch carelessness.—
Ashes against wood  _
Boiler insufficiently protected-
Candle carelessness _. 	
Carburettor back-firing.	
Car upset 	
Chemical explosion	
Children playing with fire	
Clothes too near fireplace	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe..
Coal-gas explosion  	
Coal-oil carelessness  	
Collision.	
Curtains from lamp. 	
Curtains from stove..._ _
Defective battery connection-
Defective brooder	
Defective chimney.	
Defective fireplace  	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe..
Defective lamp.—  	
Defective matches  	
Defective oil-burner 	
Defective oil-stove —	
Defective oil-valve  	
Defective oven  	
Defective sawdust-burner	
Defective stove or stove-pipe..
Defective wiring	
Dust explosion —	
Electrical appliances..	
Engine back-firing 	
Exposure ., 	
Film igniting from hot aperture plate..
Fire-crackers   — 	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected-
Gas explosion    _  	
Gasoline carelessness    	
Gasoline explosion...  	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe.  	
Gasoline-pump damaged by car.....
Gasoline-torch carelessness	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected-
Grease on stove.. 	
Hot brick placed in bed-
Hot slag falling on beam..
Incendiary- 	
Incense-burner upset	
Kettle boiling dry.....	
Lamp explosion 	
Lamp upset.	
Lantern upset	
Lightning 	
Liquid-dye explosion	
Live coals	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with...
Mattress too near stove-
Oil-furnace back-firing—
Oil-stove explosion	
Overheated asphalt-mixer..
Overheated cyclone-pipe	
Overheated electric motor-
Overheated fire-box 	
Overheated machinery-bearings..
2
33
2
12
22
6
1
6
5
58
1
1
164
20
5
1
1
10
3
1
2
1
23
20
1
114
5
92
1
19
17
6
26
8
15
1
3
2
25
1
1
30
rl
1
1
6
2
18
1
7
34
21
4
7
1
1
1
1
1
4
$42
3,180
656
164
3,330
2,428
74
407
96
6,598
51
993
475
3
128
20
80
102,302
6,142
209
1,210
22
2,854
2,816
250
436
280
18,234
11,672
200
9,208
8,325
299,435
200
5,221
2,488
8,399
10,695
9,633
3,806
504
103
34
16,420
18
8
26,812
10
60
500
4,627
3,681
3,960
30
85
5,007
3,838
24
988
75
25
200
131
55
16,008 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 13
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Paper from fireplace .
Paper from stove	
Sawdust-burner back-firing : 	
Sawdust-burner insufficiently protected..
Seat ignited from exhaust-pipe	
Shavings, caught in conveyor, ignited..
Short circuit —	
Smokers' carelessness	
Sparks from acetylene-torch..
Sparks from boiler..	
Sparks from bonfire —	
Sparks from burning rubbish..
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from cupola 	
Sparks from engine	
Sparks from fireplace— 	
Sparks from forge	
Sparks from furnace ,	
Sparks from grass fire	
Sparks from lead-pots .—
Sparks from locomotive..	
Sparks from mill burner	
Sparks from slash fire	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe	
Sparks from picking-machine 	
Spontaneous combustion.— —
Static electricity.—	
Steam-pipe insufficiently protected .
Stove explosion	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected..
Sun's rays	
Tar boiling over ..—
Thawing pipes   	
Thawing radiator.	
Unknown —	
Watch fell in sawdust-burner..
Wood too near furnace	
Wood too near stove	
Totals	
1
1
7
4
1
1
131
607
2
5
1
8
5
293
1
4
197
2
8
3
2
2
8
3
39
1
19
2
2
8
102
1
7
15
1
256
1
1
$7
19
3,808
177
8
255
23,895
56,625
275
27,273
1,000
625
5,351
148,089
339
125,066
3,405
4,176
1,090
523
1,010
32
6,180
6,251
28,675
1,897
33,467
3,175
1,425
261
81,662
17
10,381
5,209
50
497,949
18
2,659
$1,1 N 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES.
Property.
Apartments .
132
Asphalt plants 	
Automobile camps
Automobiles 	
1
2
211
Bakeries
Banks
Causes.
Candle carelessness 	
Children playing with fire
Clothes too near stove	
Curtains from stove 	
Defective chimney 	
Defective  oil-burner  ...	
Defective oil-stove 	
Electrical appliances  _„	
Exposure   	
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected .
Grease on stove 	
Incense-burner upset	
Liquid-dye explosion ______	
Match carelessness 	
Sawdust-burner back-firing
Short circuit  	
Smokers* carelessness 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Sparks from fireplace  __..
Stove explosion	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Thawing pipes 	
Unknown ._ _	
Overheated asphalt-mixer   	
Smokers' carelessness
Unknown 	
Carburettor back-firing
Car upset  _ 	
Collision	
Defective battery connection
Defective wiring „ -	
Exposure - — -	
Gasoline carelessness _	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe 	
Incendiary   __ _.
Match   carelessness   _	
Matches, children with  	
Seat ignited from exhaust-pipe .
Short circuit  ___. _ 	
Smokers* carelessness	
Sparks from chimney ..__ _
Thawing radiator  _	
Unknown	
Defective oven 	
Defective wiring 	
Exposure	
Match  carelessness  _	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Stove insufficiently protected
Sparks from chimney 	
Smokers' carelessness
Sparks from chimney
Unknown 	
Incendiary 	
Lamp upset _	
Lantern upset
Lightning 	
Matches, children with
Amount of Loss.
$18
305
51
il
155
1,210
339
549
537
111
88
10
30
3,762
150
140
2,816
467
22
8
4,520
275
250
$2,892
2,428
475
20
583
445
1,647
3,433
540
525
44
381
11,574
1,803
22
50
3,103
$436
595
2,454
27
13
700
$3
24
575
$2,320
360
3,681
766
1,500
$16,603
25
258
29,965
4,225
10
602 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 15
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Bath-houses
Blacksmith-shops
Boarding-houses ~
Boat-building works
Boat-houses
Bunk-houses
Canneries .
Chicken-houses
Churches
Clubs
Coal-bunkers
Coal-yards .
Cold-storage plants
Cooperages  _	
Drill-halls  	
10
Short circuit  	
Spontaneous  combustion
Unknown _	
Unknown
Unknown
Electrical appliances     _	
Smokers' carelessness	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from fireplace 	
Stove-pipe   insufficiently   protected-
Dry-cleaning establishments  1
Dwellings   1,616
Exposure  	
Sparks from mill burner
Clothes too near stove 	
Short circuit ____ _
Sparks from stove
Unknown 	
Sparks from boiler	
Defective brooder  .-	
Defective chimney —	
Sparks from burning rubbish
Sparks from stove —	
Spontaneous combustion 	
Unknown	
Candle carelessness
Defective stove 	
Short   circuit   „ —
Sparks from chimney
Unknown	
Ashes against wood  	
Furnace insufficiently protected
Smokers' carelessness  	
Sparks from chimney  	
Sparks from fireplace  	
Defective  wiring
Gas explosion 	
Unknown  	
Sparks from engine
Sparks from boiler „
Exposure  	
Gasoline explosion __
Ashes against wood -	
Candle carelessness 	
Children playing with fire	
Clothes too near fireplace _I	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe .
Coal-gas explosion 	
Coal-oil carelessness —_	
Curtains from lamp 	
14
$550
2,295
18,205
$2
67
26
25
8,027
$17,165
$15
120
$2,070
1,628
75
25
250
160
3,931
$25
25
100
250
34,636
$1,154
189
20
643
$1,700
50
$1,802
121
102
96
4,724
51
935
3
$29,677
10
8,147
17,261
135
3,698
22,298
4,521
2,014
1,750
158
225
175
1,245
500 N 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Curtains from stove	
7
$66
Defective   chimney   	
135
97,908
19
6,132
Defective furnace 	
3
136
1
1,210
22
1
3
149
2
2,477
17,023
5,548
16
Defective wiring  	
7
Electrical appliances   	
87
4,264
Exposure  — —
42
18,672
9
4,818
855
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected..
8
3
149
Gasoline carelessness —	
12
1,432
2
703
Gasoline-torch carelessness'	
1
62
Gas-plate insufficiently protected	
1
20
19
7,909
18
Hot brick placsd in bed  ■	
1
8
6,495
500
1
3
2,312
2,661
12
7
85
Match carelessness   	
24
589
Matches,  children with 	
16
2,204
4
4
24
660
1
75
1
7
Paper from stove  —	
1
19
5
3,617
54
•I
12
1,487
16,907
600
329
6
3
1,560
241
74,959
2,690
34
187
Sparks from furnace —	
3
Sparks from grass fire  	
2
506
1
22
29
14 648
Spontaneous combustion  .'.	
3
1,324
Stove  explosion	
6
231
75
42,954
17
1
4
10
130
3,560
143,417
Unknown	
132
1
6
99
3,886
Wood too near stove     :..
1
2
1
1
$505,740
6
Dye-works 	
$1,897
Factories (bed and mattress)..
Sparks in picking-machine _;
Unknown 	
1
64
1
1
1
1
1
1
1,961
Factories (box)	
Factories   (broom)   	
	
3
1,571
Factories   (chemical)  	
Clothes too near stove-pipe REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 17
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND  CAUSES—Conmued.
Property.
Causes,
Amount of Loss.
Factories   (furniture)   	
Factories (roofing material).
Factories (rubber gloves) 	
Factories  (sash and door)  ...
Factories   (ski)    	
Factories  (tent and awning).
Fishing-boats 	
Fish-reduction plants .
Flour-mills 	
Foundries   	
Freight-cars	
Fruit-packing plants
Gaols 	
Garages     -	
Gasoline-stations
Golf-club houses .
Grandstands
Greenhouses
37
Unknown
Unknown
Static electricity .
Unknown —_	
Exposure „	
Unknown  	
Engine back-firing 	
Gasoline carelessness
Spontaneous combustion
Overheated machinery bearings
Sparks from chimney .....
Sparks from cupola 	
Sparks from furnace _—
Sparks from locomotive
Unknown   	
Tar boiling over .
Unknown	
Incendiary
Acetylene-torch   carelessness
Ashes against wood	
Carburettor back-firing 	
Coal-oil carelessness  —	
Defective chimney 	
Electrical  appliances  	
Exposure  — —
Gasoline  carelessness 	
Incendiary  	
Matches, children with .
Oil-furnace back-firing .
Short circuit  -	
Smokers' carelessness ...
Sparks from chimney ...
Unknown	
Carburettor back-firing  	
Gasoline carelessness 	
Gasoline-pump damaged by car
Incendiary	
Short circuit —-	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from mill burner
Unknown 	
Smokers' carelessness  ...
Stove insufficiently protected
Unknown 	
Smokers' carelessness
Defective   chimney   ....
$607
2,000
$150
339
991
10
170
$42
25
425
58
94
72
25,676
18
1,150
10
98
851
1,249
4,000
11,668
$13
5
504
15
32
5
15
710
5,200
418
$93
40,534
2,935
30
20
5,957
2,607
20,123
1,660
200
22,481
10
45,436
1,299
5,351
100
25 N 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OP PROPERTY BURNED AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Halls                                 	
11
Defective fireplace   - —
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
58
6
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
$10
75
50
5,607
5
7,503
2
2,401
1
4
81
Gasoline explosion     	
Incendiary - —	
$15,653
Haystacks  	
Hospitals	
175
$7
93
15
2,774
2,889
Hotels
$10
70
1,317
11
9,265
2
25
150
6,364
5,109
19,960
23
10,289
2
Defective chimney   —	
Defective wiring   —	
52,595
$150
75
1
1
Wood too near stove      	
9,612
100
8
$620
41
1,050
20
2,150
5
Matches, children with  	
3.8S1
$464
3,499
240     '
3,620
11
1
Spontaneous combustion  	
Engine back-firing   ...:..  	
7,823
$1,400
8,270
591
38,500
4,841
5,736
3,028
62,363
25
Lumbisr-yards	
4
Exposure	
$100
1,897
55
178
Unknown	
2,230 REPORT OP FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Machine-shops _	
3
1
Exposure .—  	
Gasoline carelessness	
1
1
1
1
1
$212
16
120
Unknown  	
$348
CO
7
2
1
$994
7,240
250
791
120,000
4,121
1,100
1
. ..         1
1
1
1
1
Exposure —     - —
1
1
1
1
2
134,496
Motor-cycles  	
$75
4
Exposure	
Electrical appliances   	
79
7,500
16
$1,837
234
2
100
183
2,174
4,569
120
15
12,000
1
2
1
1
1
1
Smokers' carelessness  	
Sparks from chimney   	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe	
Spontaneous combustion   	
3
2
2
9
1
Unknown	
1
1
21,234
73
1
$10
39
Gasoline  carelessness  —	
1
1
41
95
1
10
2
1
3
1
$20
15
1
1
35
75
Shavings, caught in conveyor, ignited	
Short circuit    	
Unknown   —	
Ashes against wood  —	
1
1
1
1
1
$255
300
1,500
6
2,055
$4
82
1,950
99
5
5,023
4
2
15
Lamp upset —  	
1
1
1
1
Overheated machinery bearings 	
3
1
7,163
$13,002
1,352
Incendiary  —	
1
1
17,354
Railway-stations —	
$3,000
1,198
Ashes against wood —	
Defective chimney  	
Defective   stove    	
Incendiary      	
1
3
1
_-'         1
4,198
Restaurants 	
$40
160
62
10 N 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
37
1
4
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
17
6
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
5
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
$24
485
17
82
22
$902
$831
10
20
7
14
9
41
376
138
7
49
23
20
Gas-plate insufficiently protected	
Smokers' carelessness   -
Electrical  appliances      — —
1,502
Sawmills __.  —
$250
200
523
6,000
412
131
200
3,000
1,000
5,950
40,170
Exposure  — -	
Sparks from boiler	
Sparks from mill burner  	
57,836
$74
135
65
200
220
84
46
42
323
3,000
14
17,059
•   18
1
Smokers' carelessness    	
21,280
250
19
5
Ashes against wood   	
$75
5
318
10
150
192
60
872
20
515
25
5
243
Gasoline-torch carelessness  	
Grease on stove —
Smokers' carelessness  	
Sparks from stoVe  	
Spontaneous combustion     	
2,490
$1,550
119
101
55,293
Spontaneous combustion  	
Unknown    	
57,063 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 21
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
5
13
3
1
1
3
3
IS
5
1
3
7
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
3
1
1
1
3
4
1
2
2
5
$1,524
1
191,611
1
500
16
$250
200
50
8,200
8
200
1,025
25
25
1,010
25
10
2
Furnace-pipe  insufficiently  protected   	
Hot slag falling on beam ____   __	
Sparks from acetylene-torch 	
Thawing pipes -	
Defective   chimney       ,. M
11,028
$500
15
515
55
78
Ashes against wood  - ,„. ,. 	
$45
15
1,100
8
184
280
139
1,796
669
10,150
255
50
60
71
20
943
3,837
40
11,921
15,979
25
14
22
Defective sawdust-burner    _	
Defective stove-pipe    	
Defective wiring _ —	
Electrical appliances  —   	
Match carelessness   -,	
Sparks from chimney  ,    - -
Wood too near stove —„. — - -	
47,587
Stores and apartments 	
$215
15
31
17
75
20
18
24
Defective chimney   —	
Smokers' carelessness _. _
Sparks from chimney  _. -	
Sparks from fireplace   -
$415
Stores and dwellings 	
$77
22
3
9,786
104
300
35
6,951
99
9,366
Sparks from chimney ._. - ~~.	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe  —
26,743 N 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND  CAUSES—Confirmed.
Property.
Stores and halls ..
Stores and hotels
Stores and offices
Stores and rooms
Street-cars
Tug-boats
Undertaking-parlours .
Warehouses
Water-tanks
Wharves 	
Wood-working plants
Wood-yards 	
Workshops 	
47
Incendiary	
Smokers' carelessness
Smokers' carelessness
Defective chimney 	
Electrical appliances
Smokers' carelessness
Stove insufficiently protected
Ashes against wood
Defective chimney ....
Defective stove 	
Exposure 	
11
Totals  2,659
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
Gasoline carelessness _
Gasoline-torch carelessness  _	
Grease on stove	
Oil-furnace  back-firing	
Short   circuit    —	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from stove  	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected .
Unknown  	
Short circuit  	
Smokers' carelessness
Unknown  —
Film   igniting   from   hot   aperture-plate
Fire-crackers    	
Unknown     	
Engine back-firing .
Unknown 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Stove  insufficiently  protected
Thawing pipes  	
Defective chimney
Exposure 	
Furnace insufficiently protected
Gasoline carelessness	
Smokers' carelessness  	
Spontaneous combustion 	
Tar boiling over 	
Unknown    —.	
Thawing pipes 	
Gasoline explosion
Boiler insufficiently protected
Unknown  	
Defective chimney 	
Smokers' carelessness
2
1
6
1
1
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
23
4
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2,659
Amount of Loss.
$1,448
950
$159
10
1,026
11
$25
833
350
862
851
5,489
31
3
80
350
1,132
1,544
57
83
9,000
30
5,498
$200
35
530
$5,800
391
1,613
99
$51
2,643
223
49
12,507
5,257
439
7,114
$40
850
$2,398
509
1,206
28,283
1,265
90
192
5,017
890
$1,689,718 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1936.
N 23
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE VI.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1932-36.
Occupancy.
Barn _
Dwelling..
D welling „
Dwelling.
Shed	
Totals, 1936.
Totals, 1935 .
Totals, 1934 .
Totals, 1933 .
Totals, 1932..
Cause of Fire.
Unknown	
Sparks from stove..
Unknown _	
Unknown	
Defective stove	
Loss op Life.
Adults.       Children.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. 1U.\-field, Printer to the King's Musi Excellent Majesty.
1937.
700-437-5770

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