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SIXTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1935-1936 BY THE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1937

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Full Text

 SIXTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OP  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1935-1936
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.  To His Honour Eric Werge Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to present the Sixty-fifth Annual Report of the Public Schools of the
Province.
G. M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
December, 1936.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1935-36.
Minister of Education;
Hon. GEORGE M. WEIR, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A., Ph.D.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Cranbrook. A. R. Lord, B.A., Vancouver.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouver. V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
T. G. Carter, Penticton. A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster. A. E. Miller, Revelstoke.
H. C. Fraser, M.A., Victoria. H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
*W. G. Gamble, B.A., Prince George. *W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., B.Paed., Ps.D.,
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay. Pouce Coupe.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Kelowna. *P. H. Sheffield, B.A., Abbotsford.
*T. W. Hall, Prince Rupert. *K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Smithers.
F. A. Jewett, B.A., Nelson.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
George H. Deane, Victoria. R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
W. Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Officer in Charge of Technical Education:
John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Director of Home Economics:
Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc.
Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:
J. W. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School:
Miss Isabel M. L. Bescoby, M.A.
Registrar: J. L. WATSON, B.A. Officer in Charge of Text-books:  P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
NORMAL SCHOOL STAFFS.
Vancouver: Victoria:
D. M. Robinson, B.A., Principal. V. L. Denton, B.A., Principal.
A. Anstey, B.A. B. S. Freeman, B.A.
W. P. Weston, A.R.C.A. H. L. Campbell, B.A,
H. B. MacLean. • John Gough, M.A.
A. E. C Martin, B.Sc. Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A., Ph.D.
J. A. Macintosh, B.Sc. F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed. Mrs. N. E. Murphy, B.Sc.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A. Miss Barbara Hinton.
Miss E. M. Coney. Model School:
Miss Isabel Coursier. Miss Kate Scanlan.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A. Miss Marion James.
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S., Principal. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education  7
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver   30
Victoria  30
Excerpts from Reports of Provincial Inspectors of Schools—
Inspectors of High Schools  32
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools  36
Report of the Director of the Summer School for Teachers  69
Report of the Officer in Charge of Technical Education  72
Report of the Director of Home Economics  80
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver .  82
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
Victoria  90
New Westminster  92
North Vancouver (City and District) and West Vancouver  93
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind  96
Reports of Officers in Charge of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  99
Elementary School Courses  103
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  106
Report on Work of Adult Education  109
Report of Director of Recreational and Physical Education '.  116
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  119
Report of Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"  121
Statistical Returns—
High Schools (Cities)    124
High Schools (District Municipalities)  136
High Schools (Rural Districts) __L  140
Superior Schools (Cities)  144
Superior Schools (District Municipalities) 1  144
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  144
Junior High Schools (Cities)  150
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  154
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  155
Elementary Schools (Cities)  156
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  188
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  207
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  226
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  229
Enrolment  (Recapitulation)  232
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  233 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF
EDUCATION, 1935-36.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1936.
To the Honourable George M. Weir, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Sixty-fifth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1936.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province decreased during the year from 117,233 to
116,722 and the average daily attendance decreased from 101,893 to 101,873. The percentage
of regular attendance was 87.27.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Total.
15,866
77
5,711
47,067*
3,819
251
614
19,405t
1,434
3,363
62
19,053
21,119
3,691
6,387
85,525
Totals, 1935-36                                     -	
68,721
24,089
23,912
116,722
Totals, 1934-35                                        -—
69,515
23,993
23,720
117,233
* These figures include an enrolment of 87 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include an enrolment of 80 pupils in the Provincial Model School.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the—
High School Correspondence classes, regular students	
Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students	
Night-schools  	
Adult education—
Relief camps—
Elementary School Correspondence Courses      335
High School and Technical Correspondence Courses...     493
Relief-camp schools      156
Training-schools outside of relief camps  1,342
Recreational and Physical Education classes  5,520
Normal School, Vancouver 	
Normal School, Victoria _
Victoria College 	
University of British Columbia
Students.
1,936
1,260
6,980
7,846
191
88
213
1,883
Total
20,397 H
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
Grade I   	
6,422
5,705
5,555
5,918
6,182
6,158
6,252
6,016
4,547
3,103
1,935
1,494
240
5,749
5,299
5,031
5,493
5,661
6,006
6,001
5,861
4,822
3,315
2,119
1,626
212
12,171
11,004
10,586
11,411
11,843
Grade II   -	
Grade III -	
Grade IV  	
Grade V                	
Grade VI.                   	
12,164
Grade VII.     	
12,253
Grade VIII                    	
11,877
Grade IX  	
9,369
6,418
4,054
Grade XII. _ _   .                   	
3,120
452
Totals .     .   .                                                .
59,527
57,195
116,722
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE DIFFERENT
CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
and the percentage of the pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number
of pupils per teacher are shown below:—
Schools.
0)
a
ft  m
O H
.    <"
0 0
O   Q)
P. o
o u
z£
13
o
En
'ft
s
A  QJ
OS      c
rli
si
p.*
*> §
QJ ^ cJ
I1!
M OJ o
SI'S
<!<0
476
123
66
3
7
130
155
16
2
1,240
557
947
61
12
5
38
2
2
97
17
537
136
71
3
7
130
193
18
4
1,337
574
947
15,866
3,819
1,434
77
251
3,363
5,711
614
62
47,067
19,405
19,053
13.59
3.27
1.23
0.07
0.22
2.88
4.89
0.53
0.05
40.32
16.63
16.32
33
31
22
26
36
26
37
38
31
38
35
20
28
19
22
33
32
33
28
Elementary schools   (cities)*   	
33
30
18
Totals                        	
3,722
234
3,956
116,722
100.00
31
27
* These figures include 16 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 87 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
f These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 80 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 9
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class:—
Schools.
a
QJ
T3
03
o
<!
a
E
Second.
n
h
2
O
P.
1
Eh
"o
QJ
ft
CO
QJ
bo
C
CO
.a
u
X
H
QJ
*SJ
s
QJ
13
0
EH
447
115
66
1
16
99
7
1
145
16
42
3
5
81
51
7
647
283
530
1
31
2
1
435
247
365
2
28
10
9
2
1
1
87
20
5
40
3
2
66
16
1
1
16
2
343
72
49
1
3
59
95
9
3
325
152
292
194
63
22
2
4
71
98
9
1
1,012
422
655
537
135
71
3
Superior schools   (district municipalities)
7
130
193
Junior high schools   (district municipalities)
Junior high schools   (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities)*  —-	
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t
18
4
1,337
574
947
Totals, 1935-36       	
955
1,607
1,082
49
4
239
20
1,403
2,553
3,956
Totals, 1934 35                      	
922
1,569
1,150
51
4
237
9
1,342
2,600
3,942
* These figures include 16 teachers employed in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School.
NEW SCHOOLS.
High schools were established in Dawson Creek, Rolla, and Rutland Rural School Districts,
and superior schools at Canal Flat, Cowichan Lake, Lantzville, New Hazelton, Pender Island,
Pioneer Mine, Robson, and Salmo.
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in the following districts:—
Name of School District.
Bella Bella	
Blaeberry	
Cheam View	
Cultus Lake	
Fairbridge	
Lodore	
Pablo	
Ness Lake	
Sanca 	
Sechelt Creek	
Shere	
Silvey	
Electoral District.
Mackenzie.
.Columbia.
-Chilliwack.
. Chilli wack.
.Cowichan-Newcastle.
-Nelson-Creston.
. Cariboo.
Fort George.
-Nelson-Creston.
-Mackenzie.
._Fort George.
..The Islands. H 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and also the
cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
01 "O
U QJ
V.3 O
tSja
2H  QJ
o
o
X
QJ »
ms
<H.S
o %.
£0
si
a o;
oil 3
QJ.5
J. o
on ~
m a
■ajH
QJ
QJ
3
O0     13
» ^. 3
oj     qj'
60      2
CS       g
c    -o
QJ       3
£1        QJ
J-       +J
QJ^+J
Ah 0<
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78  	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28t
3,532,518.95t
3,765,920.692
3,743,317.08t
3,834,727.19t
4,015,074.371
2,849,972.02t
2,611,937.80t
2,835,040.74J
2,972,385.04$   j
1882-83 	
1887-88 	
1892-93 	
1897-98  	
$215,056.22f
425,555.10
1902-03 	
604,357.86
1907-08
1,220,509.85
1912-13	
4,658,894.97
1913-14 	
4,634,877.56
1917-18 	
3,619,014.61
1922-23 -	
1927-28
7,630,009.54*
9,261,094.981
1928-29	
1929-30	
11,149,996.271
10,008,255.661
1930-31.   -	
1931-32 - 	
10,061,387.991
9,719,333.81}:
1932-33 	
8,941,497.34J
1933-34           	
8,213,369.04$
1934-35 	
1935-36  	
8,458,156.00$
8,775,353.781:
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
f This amount does not include the expenditure   (not available)   made for incidental  expenses  in  city  school
districts.
J This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total
Enrolment.
Percentage
at High
Schools of
the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1924-25 	
1925-26 	
1926-27    .
10,597
11,779
12,906
13,516
14,545
14,675
16,197
18,134
18,552
18,932
19,969
21,119
87,357
89,909
92,102
94,663
95,013
96,342
97,717
97,785
98,264
96,860
97,264
95,603
97,954
101,688
105,008
108,179
109,558
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
10.81
11.58
12.29
12.49
13.27
13.22
14.21
15.34
15.80
16.35
17.03
18.09
$27.17
26.09
26.40
26.92
28.32
28.07
28.03
29.62
21.55
19.51
20.40
21.35
$32.17
31.06
31.41
1927-28     	
1928-29	
31.74
33.03
1929-30 - - - 	
1930-31 - --.- 	
1931-32	
1932-33	
1933-34   	
1934-35 -  	
1935-36    	
32.79
32.74
33.18
23.98
21.85
23.47
24.46 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 11
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1935-36.
Grand total cost of education    $8,775,353.78
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College     $4,473.88
General grant to Victoria College       5,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia :  312,499.97
Normal School, Vancouver .     18,959.52
Normal School, Victoria     30,112.80
Cost of night-schools .     18,978.59
Correspondence Schools—
High Schools     23,156.01
Elementary Schools     11,771.10
Educational reorganization—salaries and expenses       7,670.67
Printing of report of survey of school finance  889.69
Adult education     46,667.83
         480,180.06
Net cost for total enrolment of 116,722 pupils    $8,295,173.72
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  71.07
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on total enrolment  .37
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 101,873 pupils  81.43
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on average daily attendance  .42
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 116,722 pupils for year
($2,972,385.04—$480,180.06)       2,492,204.98
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  21.35
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day   (193 days)   on total
enrolment  .11
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
101,873 pupils  24.46
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days)  on average
daily attendance  .13
Cost per capita for year on population of 694,263 (1931 census)  *11.95
Cost per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 694,263 (1931 census) *.06
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of 694,263
(1931 census)   3.59
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 694,263 (1931 census)  .02
Cost per capita for year on population of 750,000 (1936 estimate)  *11.06
Cost per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 750,000  (1936 estimate)   *.06
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of 750,000
(1936 estimate)   3.32
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 750,000 (1936 estimate)  .02
* Computed on net total cost of $8,295,173.72. H 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows:—
QJ
xn
OJ
2
QJ
OJ
3
CO
ft
C3
<->
oi
3
3
w
«!
a >
QJ  CO
03 3
oi
01
'$
oi
QJ
'o
Ph
3
C3
a
g
QJ
o
A
QJ
3
QJ
tH
oi
3
CQ
CJ
'tH
QJ
a
<
199
30
48
1,042
79
49
601
117
209
2,229
1,604
603
3
2
75
30
40
191
86
64
867
419
527
14
2
31
22
44
26
20
16
173
50
121
43
20
40
552
498
411
18
3
17
137
38
79
104
3
Junior high schools   _ '	
62
306
Elementary schools in district municipalities
43
68
Totals	
1,447
5,363
150
2,154
113
406
1,564
292
586
01
C
.£"
01
3
<tj
3
3
oi
3
3
01
01
3
ft!
oi
3
.2
13
oi
u
o
.3
O
J=
*!
3
o
O
oi
S
CO
'2
a
tH
M
P
oi
U
QJ
3
-.9
QJ  QJ
* a
+J o
Ob
oi
13
43
O
Eh
16
14
11
63
33
59
27
74
22
70
83
100
49
23
24
359
113
113
124
132
64
1,182
147
368
9
44
29
16
795
23
13
31
270
121
195
182
116
66
897
449
440
1,629
695
678
8,282
Elementary schools in district municipalities	
3,745
4,012
Totals 	
196
376
681
2,017
893
653
2,150
19,041
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which schools were
in operation during all or some portion of the year:—
City school districts     32
District municipality school districts     24
Rural school districts  717
Total..
773*
* At the time this Annual Report was prepared 243 of the districts were under the administration of Official
Trustees. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 13
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 15,866. Of this number, 7,840
were boys and 8,026 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment
for 1935-36 and for 1934-35 in each city are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
5
3
11
3
7
3
4
2
6
3
10
1
5
4
2
8
7
30
2
1
4
9
6
4
4
1
8
238
15
7
38
5
3
14
3
7
3
4
2
7
3
13
1
5
6
2
13
8
35
2
1
4
10
7
4
4
1
8
291
15
7
49
156
85
365
75
199
71
143
51
150
76
326
22
145
101
76
254
226
1,045
52
36
114
284
151
97
124
9
283
9,042
538
254
1,316
137
100
Armstrong                   .....
75
195
121
101
64
235
232
1,042
98
254
148
104
Salmon Arm High School Area  	
127
9
254
Vancouver 	
8,663
510
Vernon      -	
210
1,313
Totals -   --  	
43
451
537
15,866
15,270
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools during the year was 3,819.    Of this
number, 1,708 were boys andi 2,111 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the
1935-36 and for the year 1934-35 are shown in the following table:—
year
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
24
4
4
2
6
9
5
6
9
1
5
7
16
4
3
8
6
25
4
4
2
8
10
5
6
13
1
8
9
17
4
4
9
6
910
126
103
40
239
228
127
156
353
12
166
235
479
120
83
267
175
844
Delta                                                                	
118
91
Kent                 '	
38
185
Maple Ridge — —
196
116
133
325
Peachland—      	
12
148
224
453
106
81
247
151
21
119
135
3,819
3,468 H 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 1,434. Of this number, 653
were boys and 781 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the years
1935-36 and 1934-35 are given in the table below:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Britannia  Mine-
Canyon  City	
Cobble Hill  .._..
Comox 	
Creston 	
Dawson  Creek	
Dewdney  	
Ganges-Vesuvius .
Golden 	
Granby Bay	
Harewood	
Howe Sound	
loco	
Keremeos	
Kimberley	
Kitsumgallum	
Lumby 	
Nakusp —	
New  Denver	
North Bend	
Ocean   Falls	
Oliver	
Oyama  	
Parksville	
Powell  River	
Princeton	
Qualicum Beach _
Rolla   	
Rutland	
Saanich,   North —
Smithers	
Squamish	
Telkwa  	
Tsolum —	
University Hill
Vanderhoof	
Totals .	
20
43
39
72
33
29
27
26
60
37
33
22
142
23
22
33
8
23
34
33
13
30
136
71
47
27
30
45
53
44
17
51
55
18
34
20
36
37
73
30
20
20
28
43
26
26
20
133
18
20
28
14
23
28
27
11
30
113
86
26
48
54
38
12
39
51
24
1,231
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city superior schools during the year was 77. Of this number, 50
were boys and 27 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years
1935-36 and 1934-35 are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Greenwood -  	
1
3
3
77
69
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was 251.
this number, 135 were boys and 116 were girls.
Of REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 15
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1935-36 and 1934-35 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Cowichan, North    __
i
7
7
251
236
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools for the school-year was 3,363. The number
of boys was 1,693, of girls 1,670.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment for the school-years 1935-36 and 1934M15:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Ashcroft 	
Athalmer-Invermere .
Baynes Lake	
Blakeburn .	
Brechin 	
Burns Lake 	
Campbell River	
Canal Flats 	
Cedar, North	
Chase   -
Coalmont	
Cowichan  Lake	
Dawson Creek 	
Fort Fraser	
Fort St. John	
Hazelton 	
Hazelton,  New ___	
Hedley —-  	
Hope   	
James   Island— _
Kaleden-  	
Lantzville	
Lillooet  	
Malcolm Island _	
Michel-Natal	
McBride 	
Oyster,   North '.	
Peace: Pouce Coupe.
Pender Island	
Pioneer Mine -	
Port Alice —  	
Procter  —	
Queen  Charlotte	
Quesnel  - —
Robson —   —
Rolla 	
Rutland —	
Salmo — - 	
Silverton 	
Sooke 	
Stewart..— 	
Wellington, South _
Westbank 	
Williams Lake _
Woodfibre — 	
Yahk... _  	
Totals -	
2
2
3
3
2
2
2
3
3
11
3
2
3
2
2
3
2
5
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
3
2
2
2
3
3
11
3
2
3
2
2
3
2
5
2
42
130
90
102
29
81
167
66
62
79
42
87
41
71
55
31
73
77
51
35
59
91
76
385
70
56
71
61
46
63
52
78
55
86
74
96
75
113
123
79
91
92
35
98
160
64
72
53
79
54
113
42
58
60
48
46
81
70
366
59
54
76
55
23
129
67
285
59
71
70
105
77
113
113
80
3,321 	
H 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 5,711. The number of boys was 3,005,
of girls 2,706.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years 1936-36 and 1934-35:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Kamloops '. 	
1
6
8
176
179
Kelowna     	
1
9
12
311
305
Nanaimo     	
1
6
7
230
242
Nelson    	
1
9
11
330
326
Vancouver   	
3
120
155
4,664
4,703
Totals        	
7
150
193
5,711
5,755
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools during the year was 614.
Of this number, 289 were boys and 325 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1935-36 and 1934-35 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Penticton	
Vancouver, West
1
1
9
7
9
9
319
295
342
302
Totals
2
16
18
614
644
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 62. The number of boys enrolled
was 25, of girls 37.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
years 1935-36 and 1934-35 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
1
3
4
62
63 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 17
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled.
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Nujwber of Pupils in
Grades.
VII.
VIIL
IX.
X.
XL
XII.
.S'S.S
§5.3
High schools:
Cities.  	
15,866
3,819
1,434
7,840
1,708
653
8,026
2,111
781
13,350.08
3,277.09
1,226.68
5,501
1,398
541
4,572
1,184
421
3,028
682
273
2,366
504
197
399
51
2
21,119
10,201
10,918
17,853.85
7,440
6,177
3,983
3,067
452
Junior high schools:
5,711
614
62
3,005
289
25
2,706
325
37
5,073.75
525.34
56.04
2,303
187
21
2,122
205
21
1,286
222
20
:::::=:
6,387
3,319
3,068
5,655.13
2,511
2,348
1,528
....--1 ......
	
27,506
13,520
13,986
23,508.98
2,511
2,348
8,968
6,177
3,983
3,067
452
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS-
CITIES.
Of this number, 24,200 were
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 47,067.
boys and 22,867 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school
years 1935-36 and 1934-35 in each city are shown in the table below:—■
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
Alberni	
Armstrong.—
Chilliwack.—
Courtenay-—
Cranbrook	
Cumberland .
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie  —
Grand Forks .
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt 	
Nanaimo —
Nelson	
New Westminster..
Poit Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody .—	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan 	
Trail-Tadanac-
Vancouver	
School for the Deaf and the Blind*..
Vancouver, North	
Vernon   —
Victoria 	
Totals..
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
5
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
52
1
3
1
16
118
5
11
12
9
15
11
12
3
13
9
15
3
17
19
19
65
12
7
6
10
21
14
12
4
2
34
698
9
32
22
114
1,251
5
11
12
9
16
13
12
3
13
9
15
3
17
8
9
19
20
72
12
7
6
11
22
14
12
4
2
35
753
16
32
23
122
176
430
450
326
529
418
463
119
502
357
554
84
664
302
289
708
698
2,532
475
246
212
352
851
498
481
129
63
1,322
26,439
87
1,246
918
4,047
^77067^
160
406
470
305
521
437
468
105
504
368
559
76
686
308
299
761
684
2,622
430
256
210
381
806
508
466
140
62
1,314
27,718
79
1,276
870
4,166
48,421
* Provincial Government School.
2 H 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 19,405. The number
of boys was 10,150, of girls 9,255.
The following table gives the number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the
enrolment in each municipality during the school-years 1935-36 and 1934-35:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1935-36.
Enrolment,
1934-35.
19
16
2
5
2
9
1
3
16
7
12
9
2
1
1
1
7
15
8
4
1
23
5
2
115
39
4
13
2
19
10
7
31
31
19
20
17
2
16
5
38
53
10
10
8
51
20
14
554
123
40
4
13
2
19
12
7
31
31
19
21
18
2
16
6
38
53
10
10
9
53
20
14
4,316
1,232
125
489
53
581
392
218
1,117
1,027
651
640
629
55
604
189
1,429
1,764
301
313
295
1,734
678
573
4,346
1,248
126
442
Cowichan, North    .	
59
597
Esquimalt.      	
Kent	
407
191
1,137
1,053
678
643
Oak Bay     _ ...    	
660
Peachland      _  	
54
598
Pitt Meadows. 	
179
1,449
Saanich     	
1,878
294
Sumas  	
311
311
1,743
Vancouver, North. m „
697
549
Totals  	
171
574
19,405
19,650
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The number of schools, the number of pupils that were enrolled, and the number of
teachers that were employed in the elementary schools of the rural districts were as follows:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Pupils.
Boys.
Girls.
Number of
Teachers
employed.
741
19,053
9,779
9,274 REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
H 19
SALARIES.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average monthly salary  (quoted in
dollars only) paid to teachers during the school-year 1935-36 (ten monthly payments) :—
High Schools.
Junior High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
$175
190*
170
242
176
188
142
274
204
277
162
251
170
120
231
342
319
228*
170
155
160
183
250
233
210*
120
310
359
222
255
335
$135
120*
120
127
120
128
120
134
130
150
162
149
120
120
122
127
124
145*
120
155
125
125
145
132
168*
120
127
122
125
140
120
$148
140*
137
150
139
143
131
158
158
186
162
177
131
120
141
219
221
164*
145
155
136
143
172
160
178*
120
195
226
163
181
237
$160
277
$130
115
	
$143
146
$160
161
179
160
229
187
175
142
130
180
223
130
130
150
200
130
261
264
222
130
140
190
180
220
194
185
110
221
323
202
250
266
$80
79
78
78
94
78
81
81
110
90
101
100
100
85
90
78
99
87
102
85
85
78
96
96
91
117
85
80
85
90
85
105
$106
Courtenay  	
Cranbrook     —   .
Cumberland   	
103
134
107
96
110
117
109
133
110
Enderby   	
Grand Forks   	
Kamloops    	
Kaslo   	
Ladysmith    	
Merritt   	
Nanaimo 	
Nelson   	
231    j      122
306     |       144
1
141
189
104
111
108
135
139
120
97
102
109
121
118
113
134
97
120
147
127
116
161
Prince George   	
Prince Rupert   	
Revelstoke   	
Vancouver, North 	
Vernon    	
Victoria —    	
--- ! -	
—- i -	
........ | ........
For all cities   	
5359
$245
-
150
222
120
190
185
135
200
297
130
180
189
250
130
$120
$120
	
120
140
120
120
120
120
120
156
130
118
120
120
120
_|
$207
$157
130
181
120
126
129
125
147
224
130
157
141
170
122
$359    !      $95    !    $169
$323
$78
$140
D'strict Municipalities.
Purnaby  	
$158
$102
$127
$218
141
130
119
102
150
239
112
110
150
90
200
289
85
172
105
178
180
110
100
	
S78
78
84
82
95
78
111
78
78
78
78
80
103
78
82
80
78
80
80
80
$113
93
110
96
99
87
134
86
86
90
80
98
153
81
109
90
103
107
91
87
Coldstream  	
Coquitlam      	
Cowichan, North   	
Delta  "    .-.-	
Esquimalt —  	
Kent         .
Langley  	
Maple Ridge 	
Matsqui   	
Oak Bay	
* These figures refer to the High School area. H 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
S AL ARIE S—Continued.
High Schools.
Junior
High Schools.
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
District Municipalities—Contd.
$200
164
226
$140
120
153
$144
131
178
$192
$125
$148
$200
119
157
174
$90
78
90
100
$111
89
109
129
For all district municipalities .
$297
$118
$155
$192
$102
$138
$289
$78
$103
Rural Districts.
For all rural districts —	
$290
$110
$150
$200
$180
$192
$216
$78
$89
Superior Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Ashcroft   .-    —
$153
145
110
120
126
125
165
125
110
120
160
120
120
120
110
152
120
110
140'
150
150
125
110
$90
100
80
85
78
90
115
95
78
90
90
85
96
100
78
85
100
78
100
95
108
80
85
$111
119
95
96
95
102
133
110
90
103
108
102
105
110
89
109
110
94
113
113
129
102
97
Lillooet   .—	
Malcolm Island 	
Michel-Natal
$120
110
160
120
110
110
110
110
130
126
150
110
120
150
120
150
110
120
147
130
120
$102
84
97
80
78
80
80
95
78
95
95
80
90
80
90
108
78
80
95
96
100
$111
93
108
McBride 	
Oyster, North 	
95
94
97
95
Pioneer Mine . 	
102
103
111
Quesnel    	
118
95
Salmo - 	
Silverton  	
Sooke 	
Fort St. John. __	
Greenwood-— 	
126
Wellington, South 	
Westbank _	
89
97
Yahk
107
For all superior schools
Lantzville    „
$165
$78
$105
The average monthly salary (ten monthly payments per year) paid to teachers employed in
all public schools (high, superior, junior high, and elementary) of the Province for the school-
year 1935-36 was $132; to teachers employed in all high schools, $192; to teachers employed
in all superior schools, $105; to teachers employed in all junior high schools, $167; and to
teachers employed in all elementary schools, $115. REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
H 21
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
The following table shows the number of teachers in the Province receiving the annual
salary indicated:—■
Salary.
oj
Salary.
o oj
Salary.
O oj
Salary.
OS
Below $780 .
$780	
781-   800
801-   820
821-   840
841-   860
861-   880
881-   900
901-   920
921-   940
941-   960
961-   980
981-1,000
1,001-1,020
1,021-1,040
1,041-1,060
1,061-1,080
1,081-1,100
1,101-1,120
1,121-1,140
1,141-1,160
1,161-1,180
1,181-1,200
1,201-1,220
1,221-1,240
1,241-1,260
1,261-1,280
1,281-1,300
1,301-1,320.
1,321-1,340.
1,341-1,360
1,331-1,380
1,381-1,400.
1,401-1,420
1,421-1,440
1,441-1,460
458
198
23
52
137
28
182
21
40
89
56
117
53
41
71
44
86
41
25
57
30
150
27
39
57
57
71
50
16
59
40
58
43
40
47
$1,461-
1,481-
1,501-
1,521-
1,541-
1,561-
1,581-
1,601-
1,621-
1,641-
1,661-
1,681-
1,701-
1,721-
1,741-
1,731-
1,781-
1,801-
1,821-
1,841-
1,861-
1,881-
1,901-
1,921-
1,941-
1,961-
1,981-
2,001-
2,021-
2,041-
2,061-
2,081-
2,101-
2,121-
2,141-
2,161-
1,480-
1,500....
1,520...
1,540..
1,560...
1,580...
1,600-
1,620-
1,640...
1,660-
1,680-
1,700...
1,720...
1,740 ...
1,760 ..
1,780-
1,800 ..
1,820...
1,840-
1,860-
1,880...
1,900.-.
1,920...
1,940...
1,960...
1,980...
2,000-
2,020...
2,040....
2,060.-.
2,080...
2,100-
2,120...
2,140...
2,160...
2,180...
320
40
10
30
57
11
36
22
25
6
13
27
21
12
29
12
52
10
9
18
20
19
7
17
22
7
19
5
33
6
11
4
16
7
7
$2,181-
2,201-
2,221-
2,241-
2,261-
2,281-
2,301-
2,321-
2,341-
2,361-
2,381-
2,401-
2,421-
2,441-
2,431-
2,481-
2,501-
2,521-
2,541-
2,561-
2,581-
2,601-
2,621-
2,641-
2,661-
2,681-
2,701-
2,721-
2,741-
2,761-
2,781-
2,801-
2,821-
2,841-
2,861-
2,881-
2,200
■2,220
-2,240
■2,260
-2,280
2,300
■2,320
2,340
■2,360
2,380
2,400
2,420
2,440
2,460
■2,480
-2,500
■2,520
2,540
■2,560
-2,580
■2,600
■2,620
2,640
■2,660
■2,680
■2,700
■2,720
2,740
■2,760
■2,780
2,800
-2,820
■2,840
■2,830
■2,880
2,900
16
6
11
7
10
7
4
26
8
1
4
27
7
7
6
10
4
9
2
76
4
6
1
4
5
5
5
2
20
1
2
$2,901-
2,921-
2,941-
2,961-
2,981-
3,001-
3,021-
3,041-
3,061-
3,081-
3,101-
3,121-
3,141-
3,161-
3,181-
3,201-
3,221-
3,241-
3,261-
3,281-
3,301-
3,321-
3,341-
3,361-
3,381-
3,401-
3,421-
3,441-
3,461-
3,481-
3,501-
3,521-
3,541-
3,561-
3,581-
2,920
■2,940
-2,960
■2,980
3,000
3,020
3,040
3,060
3,080
3,100
3,120
3,140
3,160
3,180
3,200
3,220
3,240
3,260
3,280
3,300
3,320
■3,340
■3,360
3,380
3,400
■3,420
■3,440
■3,460
3,480
-3,500
3,520
■3,540
■3,560
3,580
-3,600
♦Total.
3,923
* Exchange and part-time teachers not included.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR  SCHOOL-YEAR 1935-36.
Minister's Office:
Salaries	
Office supplies 	
Travelling expenses
General Office:
Salaries 	
Office supplies	
Travelling expenses
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc.
$4,164.00
223.65
677.20
$21,228.37
2,135.37
261.36
$5,064.85
23,625.10
52,051.36 H 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
Correspondence Schools—High:
Salaries   $21,217.42
Office supplies  :  5,681.58
Revision of courses   829.75
Travelling expenses  92.3 5
Science equipment   633.56
Payment to Text-book Branch for special services  180.00
$28,634.66
Less fees        5,478.65
Correspondence Schools—Elementary:
Salaries     $8,860.04
Office supplies   2,374.26
Revision of courses  248.15
Incidentals   288.65
Industrial Education:
Salaries  .  $9,064.04
Office supplies   1,508.64
Travelling expenses   2,302.30
Grants in aid ,.  3,038.88
Night-schools    18,978.59
Inspection of Schools:
Salaries   $68,232.47
Office supplies        5,404.73
Travelling expenses      29,437.41
Administration  (new areas)        2,008.11
$105,082.72
Less amount paid by School Boards        4,558.00
Normal School, Vancouver:
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)  $31,212.78
Office supplies   1,927.48
Travelling expenses   74.85
Fuel, light, and water   2,071.98
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  415.39
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  782.13
Incidentals   584.91
$37,069.52
Less Normal School fees      18,110.00
Normal School, Victoria:
Salaries (part by Public Works)  $30,916.85
Office supplies , .  1,701.86
Travelling expenses   454.27
Fuel, light, and water (by Public Works)  2,299.60
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  2,247.23
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  290.72
Incidentals   522.27
$38,432.80
Less Normal School fees       8,320.00
$23,156.01
11,771.10
34,887.45
100,524.72
18,959.52
30,112.80 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 23
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Salaries (less deductions for rent, etc., $3,974.49)  $24,464.01
Office supplies   781.12
Laundry and janitor supplies  236.21
Travelling expenses   139.50
Fuel, light, and water  2,107.88
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)  1,790.70
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment  1,317.33
Provisions    :.  3,659.02
Incidentals     461.65
$34,957.42
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta        1,700.00
      $33,257.42
High. Junior High. Superior. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities  $266,680.60 $84,624.48 $2,478.90 $545,126.80      898,910.78
Salary grants to district municipalities        81,506.15 12,637.40        4,358.40 346,936.85      445,438.80
Salary grants to rural school
districts        50,566.98 1,775.00 89,559.38 642,725.24      784,626.60
$398,753.73    $99,036.88    $96,396.68    $1,534,788.89
School buildings, erection and maintenance, and special aid to school districts         44,899.80
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses  9,970.15
Examination of High School and Entrance classes  $32,832.52
Less fees for examination and certificates     28,358.03
 :  4,474.49
Conveying children to central schools          66,689.63
School libraries  1,707.81
Summer schools and teacher-training for special certificates     $8,509.72
Summer School fees      9,599.71
Credit    $1,089.99
Official Trustees, Community School Districts:
Salary   -  $2,182.80
Expenses   805.32
$2,988.12
Less paid by districts       1,494.06
Board of Reference  '.        $446.72
Less fees         135.00
1,494.06
311.72
Adult education:
Extension and adult education and education of the unemployed $27,894.92
Recreational and physical education for youths over school age    18,772.91
        46,667.83
Educational reorganization—Salaries and expenses  7,670.67
Printing of Report of Survey of School Finance      $1,299.50
Less sales         409.81
 ■ 889.69 	
H 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
Curriculum revision	
Incidentals and contingencies 	
University of British Columbia 	
Special grant to Victoria College	
Matsqui-Sumas-Abbotsford Educational Administrative Area, special grant..
$756.92
3,372.03
312,499.97
5,000.00
4,683.75
Less credit for summer schools
Total cost to Government
$2,973,475.03
1,089.99
. $2,972,385.04
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High.
Cities  $1,235,329.89
District municipalities       264,695.27
Rural school districts       103,162.70
Junior High.
$427,185.53
34,517.58
7,445.58
Superior.
$2,494.86
7,380.09
110,351.73
Elementary.
$2,552,172.06 4,217,182.34
555,373.08 861,966.02
502,860.37 723,820.38
$1,603,187.86    $469,148.69    $120,226.68    $3,610,405.51
Grand total cost of education
3,775,353.78
EXAMINATIONS.
High School Entrance Examination, June, 1936.
The High School Entrance Examination was held on June 24th, 25th, and 26th at 228
centres throughout the Province.
Under the regulations of the Department, promotion by recommendation is granted as
follows:—■
"(a.) Entrance pupils attending' a public school in a school district where a high or
superior school is in operation and Entrance pupils attending a public school in a school district
adjacent to a district having a high or superior school who are reported by their teachers to
have covered thoroughly the work prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction for Grade
VIIL, and who are recommended for promotion to high school by a committee composed of the
principal of the school, the principal of the nearest high or superior school, and the Inspector
of Schools, Provincial or Municipal, having jurisdiction in that district, shall be issued
Entrance certificates by the Department.
"(6.) In any other public school, where, in the opinion of the Inspector, the grading of the
pupils is satisfactory, their standing is of a high order, and a teacher of proven work is
employed, Entrance pupils who are reported by the teacher to have covered thoroughly the work
prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction for Grade VIIL and are jointly recommended
for promotion to high school by the teacher and the Inspector for the district, shall also be
issued Entrance certificates by the Department."
The number of pupils1 who obtained certificates was as follows:—
By recommendation (including 123 who entered the competition for the
Governor-General's medals)    6,252
By examination   1,007
Total.
7,259
Mary Janet Handling, 14 years of age, a pupil of Queen Mary School, North Vancouver,
had the honour of leading the Province with 543 marks out of a possible 600. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
H 25
Medals.
The  names  of the  winners  of  His  Excellency the  Governor-General's  bronze  medals
were:—
District.
Name.
School.
Marks.
No.   1
Stuart Cleland Burnell..: 	
523
No.   2
Duncan Consolidated  	
Walter Moberly, Vancouver	
Queen Mary, North Vancouver  _	
520
No.   3
No.   4
No.   5
Frederick   Reginald  Hole.__ 	
Mary Janet Handling..  ,
484
543
524
No.   6
No.   7
Irene Frances Smith - —
Balmoral   	
493
529
No.   8
Henry Douglas  Gray	
Trail	
499
No.   9
Creston  __ 	
525
No. 10
Albert Norman  Blackhall    .
511
High School Examinations, 1936.
The following are the results of the examinations held in the various high schools throughout the Province:—
June, 1936.
Total
No. of
Candidates
Writing.
Writing the Full Examination.
Writing Partial
Examination.
No. of
Candidates.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
No. of
Candidates.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade XII	
4,193
786
1,575
310
999
172
576
138
2,618
476
2,329
372
Totals ...
4,979
1,885
1,171
714
3,094
2,701
August, 1936.
Total No. of
Candidates
Writing.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade XII.                                                          	
947
303
492
189
283
1,250
681
344
Grade XII.
Of the 356 Grade XII. candidates who secured " complete" standing at the August
Examinations, 1936, 140 had written a full examination for the first time in June, 1936, and
obtained partial standing. Thus, of the 1,575 candidates who wrote a full examination for the
first time in June, 1936, 999 + 140, or 1,139, completed their standing in one year (1936). This
is 72.3 per cent.
Senior Matriculation.
Of the 85 Senior Matriculation candidates who secured " complete " standing in August,
1936, 57 had written the full examination in June and secured partial standing. Thus, of the
310 Senior Matriculation candidates writing for the first time in June, 1936, 172 + 51, or 223,
completed their standing in one year (1936).    This is 71.9 per cent. H 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
Medals.
His Excellency the Governor-General's silver medals which are awarded annually to the
five leading Junior Matriculation students were won this year by the following:—
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Prince of Wales, Vancouver , 	
North Vancouver   _  	
John Oliver, Vancouver  _	
91.5
91.5
91.5
90.9
90.6
Scholarships.
The  Royal  Institution   Scholarships   awarded  annually  by  the   University   of   British
Columbia to the students who led in their respective districts were won by the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarship.
No. 1
87.7
86.6
91.5
91.5
91.5
87.5
85.3
90.6
$150
„    2
Clara Wikdal	
Prince Rupert    	
North Vancouver  	
Prince of Wales, Vancouver	
John Oliver, Vancouver	
King George V., Ladner 	
Oliver  	
150
„    3
150
„ ....{
„    5 -
„    6	
*Richard Alan Montgomery	
150
150
Donald Anthony Moore Doyle...	
Ulah Bernice Jacobson 	
150
150
,    1
150
* These thiee students tied for leading place in the Junior Matriculation Examination.
The winners of the three scholarships awarded by the University of British Columbia on
the results of the Senior Matriculation Examination to (1) the two students obtaining the
highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining the highest standing in districts
other than Greater Vancouver and New Westminster, were:—
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Scholarship.
89.1                 $150
87.8                  150
RK.ft                  1Kn
REVISION OF THE CURRICULUM.
Early in the year 1935 the Department of Education decided to make a thorough revision
of the curriculum of Elementary, Junior High, High, and Technical Schools. Every two or
three years partial revisions had been made. The last partial revision of the Elementary
Programme of Studies was made in 1933, of the Junior High School Programme in 1932, and
of the High School Programme in 1933. While it was recognized that much excellent work
was exemplified in these programmes, it was felt that more recent contributions of the Science
of Education justified a complete revision of all programmes.
This revision was to be made under a carefully organized plan. Committees composed of
administrative officers, normal-school instructors, inspectors of schools, and teachers were
selected to carry out the work under the direction of the Minister of Education and the Superintendent of Education.    The articulation of these committees is shown in the following:— REPORT OP SUPERINTENDENT.
H 27
The Minister of Education.
The Superintendent of Education.
The Central Committee.
General Elementary
School Committee.
Subject Committees.
General Junior High
School Committee.
Subject Committees.
General Senior High
School Committee.
Subject Committees.
While it was necessary and desirable to limit the number of persons appointed as members
of these committees, it was not forgotten that valuable assistance and contributions might be
obtained from many sources. Accordingly, an invitation was cordially extended to all teachers,
school trustees, parent-teacher associations, industrial leaders, and local councils of women to
submit suggestions for an improved curriculum. A special meeting of the Central Revision
Committee was called to provide such organizations an opportunity to present their views.
Some did.
The personnel of the main general committees selected to direct the revision was as
follows:—
Central Revision Committee.
D. L. MacLaurin, Assistant Superintendent of Education, Chairman.
H. B. King, Vancouver (Curriculum Adviser).
H. N. MacCorkindale, Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver.
C. B. Wood, Department of Education, University of British Columbia.
J. Roy Sanderson, Principal, King Edward High School, Vancouver.
General Committee for Revision of Grades I. to VI.
D. L. MacLaurin, Assistant Superintendent of Education, Chairman.
P. A. Armstrong, Principal, Richard McBride Elementary School, Vancouver.
F. A. Jewett, Inspector of Schools, Nelson.
H. E. Patterson, Principal, Alexandra Elementary School, Vancouver.
E. W. Reid, Principal, Seymour Elementary School, Vancouver.
R. F. Sharpe, Principal, Central Elementary School, Vancouver.
O. J. Thomas, Principal, Stratheona Elementary School, Vancouver.
T. W. Woodhead, Principal, Model School, Vancouver.
W. H. Wilson, Principal, Sir James Douglas School, Victoria.
H. W. Creelman, Principal, Esquimalt Public School, Esquimalt.
T. R. Hall, Inspector of Schools, Kelowna.
H. H. MacKenzie, Inspector of Schools, Vancouver.
C. B. Wood, Department of Education, University of British Columbia.
Miss L. G. Bollert, Normal School, Vancouver.
Miss H. R. Anderson, Normal School, Victoria.
General Junior High School Revision Committee.
Convening Section.
H. B. King, Vancouver, Chairman.
H. B. Fitch, Principal, Templeton Junior High School, Vancouver.
P. N. Whitley, Principal, Point Grey Junior High School, Vancouver.
J. R. Mitchell, Principal, Junior High School, West Vancouver.
A. S. Towell, Principal, Junior High School, Nanaimo. H 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
Advisory Section.
F. A. McLellan, Principal, Junior High School, Ocean Falls.
J. F. K. English, Principal, Junior High School, Kamloops.
C. J. Frederickson, Principal, Junior High School, Kelowna.
L. B. Boggs, Principal, Junior High School, Penticton.
H. McArthur, Principal, Junior High School, Nelson.
General Senior High School Revision Committee.
Convening Section.
H. N. MacCorkindale, Superintendent of Schools Vancouver, Chairman.
J. R. Sanderson, Principal, King Edward High School, Vancouver.
R. B. Vaughan, Principal, T. J. Trapp Technical High School, New Westminster.
A. Bowles, Principal, Magee High School, Vancouver.
James Gordon, Acting-Principal, Kitsilano High School, Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, Principal, University Hill High School, Point Grey, Vancouver.
C. G. Brown, Principal, Burnaby South High School.
J. G. Sinclair, Principal, Technical High School, Vancouver.
W. K. Beech, Principal, Fairview High School of Commerce, Vancouver.
F. Wilson, Principal, High School, Matsqui.
W. H. Morrow, Principal, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
H. L. Manzer, Principal, Langley High School, Langley Prairie.
H. L. Smith, Principal, High School, Victoria.
A. Sullivan, Inspector of High Schools, Victoria.
Advisory Section.
J. B. DeLong, Inspector of High Schools, Vancouver.
L. B. Boggs, Principal, High School, Penticton.
L. V. Rogers, Principal, High School, Nelson.
A. A. Chapman, Principal, High School, Kelowna.
Leonard A. Wrinch, Principal, High School, Port Moody.
J. D. Jones, Principal, Surrey High School, Cloverdale.
J. F. K. English, Principal, High School, Kamloops.
H. M. Morrison, Principal, High School, Prince George.
W. H. Grant, Principal, High School, Salmon Arm.
F. P. Levirs, Principal, High School, Creston.
E. T. Oliver, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
\
Under these general committees over 250 teachers, supervisors, normal-school instructors,
and inspectors of schools were selected to revise the programmes of study in the various
subjects. All committees, both general and subject, began their work by a study of literature
upon curriculum-building and an examination of modern curricula produced elsewhere.
The General Elementary School Committee started its work first. On Saturday, March
30th, 1935, it held its first meeting in the Parliament Buildings at Victoria. The Superintendent of Education outlined the purpose for which the committee was appointed and stressed
the importance of its work. Under the Chairmanship of Mr. C. B. Wood, a well-defined
Philosophy of Education was prepared which, with slight alterations and additions made to
adapt it to all types of schools, was adopted by the General Junior High Committee and the
General Senior High School Committee for insertion in all Programmes.
The Central Revision Committee held its first meeting on May 11th, 1935. The Superintendent of Education addressed the committee and indicated the scope of its work.
At the beginning of October, 1935, the subject committees for Grades I. to VI. were
appointed and the revision of the Programme for Elementary Schools was proceeding smoothly.
In January, 1936, the subject committees for the revision of the Junior High and High School
Programmes were advised of their appointment.
Because of the diligence with which the members of these committees applied themselves
to their work, the Department of Education was enabled to issue new Programmes of Study
for Elementary and Junior High Schools for the opening of the school-year 1936-37. It is
expected that the revised Programme for High Schools will be ready for the school-year 1937-38. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. H 29
To all who gave, in addition to their regular duties, so fully of their time and effort the
Department of Education is deeply indebted.
CHANGES IN THE STAFF.
On August 15th, 1935, Mr. Kenneth B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Supervising Principal
of Elementary Schools, Trail, B.C., was appointed Inspector of Schools with headquarters at
Smithers.
Mr. F. Arnold Jewett, B.A., Principal, Lord Nelson School, Vancouver, was appointed
Inspector of Schools, September 1st, 1935, and placed at Nelson.
Mrs. Nita E. Murphy, B.Sc, was added to the staff of the Provincial Normal School,
Victoria, on September 1st, 1935.
Mr. William Gray, M.A., Inspector of Schools, North Vancouver, on April 1st, 1936, was
made Municipal Inspector of Schools of the City of North Vancouver and the District Municipalities of North and West Vancouver.
Three additional appointments were made to the Inspectorial staff just after the close of
the school-year. Mr. C. G. Brown, B.A., Principal of South Burnaby High, was appointed
Inspector of Schools, August 1st, 1936, and assigned to the District Municipality of Burnaby.
Mr. A. S. Matheson, B.A., Supervising Principal of University Hill High and Elementary
School, on August 17th was made Inspector of Schools for the Okanagan District and placed at
Kelowna. Mr. Harold McArthur, B.A., Principal of the Nelson Junior High School, was also
appointed Inspector of Schools on the same date and stationed at Kamloops.
On September 30th, 1935, Mr. J. T. Pollock, Inspector of Schools, Vancouver, and Mr. L. J.
Bruce, Inspector of Schools, Vancouver, were retired on superannuation. Both of these men
had given many years' service in educational work in this Province. Mr. Pollock, then Principal
of the Central School at Revelstoke, was appointed Inspector of Schools in August, 1910. Mr.
Bruce was appointed Inspector of Schools in December, 1912, while holding the position of
Principal of Fernie Elementary School.
Mr. D. M. Robinson, B.A., Principal of the Provincial Normal School at Vancouver, retired
on superannuation, August 31st, 1936. Mr. Robinson had a long and excellent record of teaching service in the Province, having been Principal of the Central School, Vancouver, for many
years before his appointment to the Vancouver Normal School staff. For seventeen years he
was a member of the Provincial Board of Examiners. In August, 1920, on the retirement of
the late William Burns, Mr. Robinson was promoted to the Principalship, a position which he
has filled efficiently for sixteen years. He was much beloved of all his students, who will long
remember with great respect his sound advice and kindly criticism as well as his fine teaching
ability.
The staff of this school suffered a second loss at the same time in the retirement of Mr. J. A.
Macintosh, B.Sc. Mr. Macintosh entered upon his duties as Assistant Master at the Vancouver
Normal School in August, 1919, with the ripe experience of a teacher who had given years1 of
efficient service in his profession. At the time of his appointment he was Principal of Richmond High School. For seventeen years the teachers-in-training had reaped the benefit of the
rich and full scholarship possessed by Mr. Macintosh.
Following the retirement of Mr. D. M. Robinson, Mr. A. R. Lord, B.A., Inspector of Schools,
Vancouver, was appointed Principal of the Provincial Normal School at Vancouver on September 1st, 1936. Mr. Lord had been an Inspector of Schools for fifteen years and while
occupying that office at the time of his appointment as Principal had been for several years an
Assistant Master on the staff of the Vancouver Normal School.
Mr. T. R. Hall, B.A., Inspector of Schools, Kelowna, was appointed on the same date
Assistant Master at the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver. Mr. Hall has had wide experience as a teacher and principal in both elementary and high schools of the Province, as Inspector
of Schools, as lecturer in the Summer School, and as an instructor for one year on the staff to
which he has now been appointed.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. WILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. H 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF D. M. ROBINSON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1935-36 opened on September 11th. During the term, September to
December, 181 regular students and one special student were in attendance. During the term
one student withdrew. At the close of the term in December three students with previous
Normal School training were granted diplomas. One student discontinued the course at the
close of the September-December term.
At the opening of the new term in January 176 regular students together with the one
special student returned. These were joined by nine special students (five of whom were
regularly certificated teachers from Saskatchewan or Alberta). Thus the total enrolment
for the January-June term was 186.
The following shows the enrolment and results of the session:—■
!
Young
Women.
Young
Men.
Total.
126
7
133
2
1
123
55
3
58
3
52
181
10
191
2
4
175
The personnel of the staff remained as it was in 1934-35.
The instruction in physical education (Strathcona Trust) was conducted by Sergeant-
Instructor Frost.    Grade B certificates were awarded to 171 students.
During the session eight weeks were set aside for observation and practice-teaching by
the students—seven weeks in graded city schools and one week in one- or two-roomed schools
in neighbouring municipalities and on Vancouver Island. I should like to take this opportunity
to thank principals and teachers for their very hearty co-operation in this department of the
work of teacher-training.
Throughout the session, Dr. Crease, Superintendent of the Mental Hospital at Essondale,
delivered a series of lectures on mental health to the students. These lectures proved both
interesting and instructive to the student-body.
While the academic and professional sides of the training have been stressed during the
session, the social and athletic sides have received due consideration. The school has been
represented in the various branches of sport, and in soccer the Normal School team was
successful in winning the cup for the district.
The students have shown a fine spirit of enthusiasm in all school activities and a spirit
of most willing co-operation with the staff has been strongly in evidence.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF V. L. DENTON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1935-36 opened on September 11th, 1935, and closed on June 5th, 1936.
During the year eighty-eight students were in attendance. Of these, seven were repeating
the course and two took refresher courses in order to qualify for a British Columbia- certificate.
Diplomas were awarded to seventy-four students, of whom eight received honour standing. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
H 31
The Strathcona Trust gold medals for excellence in physical training were won by Miss Taimi
Esther Aho, of Nanaimo, and Kenneth James Reid, of Saanich.
The following table presents a summary of the enrolment:—
Women.
Men.
Total.
46
8
28
6
74
Failed    ...  ....   _ 	
14
Totals	
54
34
88
Practice-teaching was carried on in the municipal schools of Victoria, Oak Bay, Esquimalt,
and Saanich, and in near-by rural schools. The principals and critic-teachers gave valuable
assistance in this important part of the work.
Lectures on modern trends in education were provided by Miss Isabel Bescoby, Officer in
Charge of the Elementary Correspondence School. During the summer of 1935 Miss Bescoby
made a study of the Winnetka School system and was able to bring a fresh and vigorous
approach to the teachers-in-training. The students' summary in " Anecho " is worth recording : " Her direct and unassuming manner, her sense of humour and broad educational
background have made her a valuable assistant in the Normal School."
The Course in Public Speaking and Oral Expression was placed in charge of Mrs. E.
Reese Burns. During the year a very noticeable improvement was made by the students
in speaking pleasingly, correctly, and distinctly. Mrs. Reese Burns has been added to the
staff as a part-time instructor.
At the end of the school-year in 1935 Miss L. B. Isbister resigned, after being eleven
years in charge of the Home Economics Course at this school. During this time she was
also Dean of Women and proved to be a most capable and faithful instructor. This important
position on the staff was filled, in a very acceptable manner, by the appointment of Mrs. N. E.
Murphy.
The enrichment of the curriculum and the rather light enrolment made it possible to
give the students more individual attention. There was a marked increase in the number
of students who reached a high degree of efficiency in subject-matter courses and in practice-
teaching. ; : H 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL INSPECTORS
OF SCHOOLS.
INSPECTORS OF HIGH SCHOOLS.
INSPECTOR J. B. DeLONG, B.A., VANCOUVER.
For many years the high schools of this Province taught science without providing any
facilities for experimental work. When the Department made experimental work by the
pupils compulsory, the schools were for the most part without science laboratories and had
little or no science equipment. Inspectors and principals experienced considerable difficulty
in persuading School Boards to make the appropriations necessary for the proper teaching
of science. Now most of the larger high schools of my district are provided with fine well-
equipped science laboratories. The laboratories of the following schools are a credit to the
districts and compare very favourably with the laboratories of the large schools of Vancouver:
Mission, Penticton, Summerland, Kelowna, Vernon, Armstrong, Enderby, Grand Forks, Rossland, Trail, Nelson, Kaslo, Kimberley, University Hill, and Cranbrook. Most of the small
one- and two-room schools are carrying on under great difficulties, as experimental work
has to be done in the class-rooms or in very small rooms set aside for this purpose. I do not
see much hope for the establishment of proper laboratories in these small schools until there
is a distinct improvement in economic conditions. During the years of the depression many
of these schools have been carrying on without even proper class-room accommodation. In
almost every school the Boards have provided a very satisfactory supply of science apparatus
and supplies.
The districts have not done so well in providing supplementary reading-matter, although
several schools have really good libraries. University Hill, Nelson, and Trail deserve commendation for the number and quality of the books provided. About a dozen other schools
have fairly good libraries, but the majority of the small schools are deplorably lacking in
this respect. Very few schools have rooms devoted wholly to library purposes. University
Hill, Kaslo, Armstrong, and Grand Forks have rooms set aside for library purposes.
During recent years I have been stressing the need of supplementary books for the
different subjects of the High School Course and have been successful in obtaining a satisfactory supply of these in most schools. I felt there was a more pressing need for these
than for professional books. This year, at the time of my first visit, I stressed the need of
professional books, and was very pleased to see on the occasion of my second visit that fully
50 per cent, of the schools had obtained a number of these books. Some were donated by
the teachers; others were purchased out of school funds. Following receipt of my letter
of November 4th last, several School Boards decided to place a considerable sum in their
estimates to be devoted to the purchase of such books. I have encouraged the circulation of
professional books among the teachers in the more populous sections of the district. This
practice was carried on in both the Kootenay and Okanagan Districts. A goodly number of
standard professional magazines and other current magazines are taken regularly by the
following schools: University Hill, MacLean, Powell River, Squamish, Penticton, Vernon,
Nelson, Fernie, and Enderby. A number of teachers of other schools are taking one or more
professional magazines.
During the past few years the teachers of my district have shown a marked desire to
improve their academic standing and to keep abreast of the times in educational matters.
This is evidenced by their practice of taking summer courses. The survey of last year
disclosed that fifty-six graduate courses and twenty-seven undergraduate courses were taken
by teachers of this inspectorate during the years 1933, 1934, and 1935, while twenty-nine
took summer courses at institutions other than universities. This makes a total of 112
courses. It seems to me this is a good record—the more especially when it is considered
that each year I have from fifteen to twenty beginners in my schools. I discussed the
question of summer courses with the teachers during my visits of the past year. A considerable number assured me they were planning on attending summer school at the close of the EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS.    H 33
year. I know that several did so, but I shall not be able to give the exact number until I make
my first visits this year.
For many years systematic school records were almost non-existent in our small high
schools. In some cases new teachers have been unable to find any records of their pupils.
I have been stressing the importance of school records for years, and am pleased to state
that there has been a great change for the better in recent years. Last September, after
receipt of the letter from the Honourable the Minister of Education, I notified all principals
of the matters of fundamental educational policy outlined in that letter, including the matter
of school records. On my first visit I told the principals I would expect to find record-cards
and other records up to date when I visited the school the second time. In most cases I found,
on the second visit, that the record-cards were in good shape; and in practically all the
remaining schools the cards were as nearly complete as it was possible to make them with
the information available. On the whole, the medical cards were well kept, but in a few
schools the medical inspection was found to be inadequate.
I have been advocating the 6-3-3 plan throughout the year with beneficial results. The
Maple Ridge trustees were convinced of the desirability of this system and anxious to put
it into effect, but lacked accommodation and were reluctant to submit a by-law covering the
cost of a proper building. Their somewhat modest by-law for a senior high school was turned
down. The idea was endorsed in Blakeburn, Keremeos, and loco. In these places Grades
VII. and VIIL have been grouped with the high-school grades and the work of the six grades
is being divided between two teachers. Fernie is starting a junior high school and has
established courses in manual training, home economics, and commercial work. Music and
physical education are to receive much more emphasis than in the past. Port Moody has
established a junior high school with the commercial option. Princeton is introducing junior
high-school ideas with generous options this year. Vernon's by-law for a combined junior
and senior high school was turned down by the voters, but the Board is going ahead with the
establishment of a junior high school. Last term Kimberley decided to begin junior high-
school work this year and I believe this work is now under way. Powell River has also
established a full-fledged junior high school giving options in home economics and industrial
arts. I have been advocating the 6-3-3 system in these and other districts for some time,
but much of the credit should be given to the Elementary School Inspectors. Junior high
schools have been operating for several years at Kelowna, Nelson, and Penticton.
For years I have been encouraging the development of the High School Graduation
Course with liberal options. A few high schools are still offering only courses leading to
Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance, but the great majority are each year recommending pupils for High School Graduation. In the school-year 1934-35 about 50 per cent,
of the pupils in the Nelson High School were headed directly towards the High School
Graduation Course. This school offered courses in the following optional subjects: Home
economics, manual training, commercial subjects, art, two foreign languages, and four
sciences. A course in geology was being given there. I believe this is the only high school
in the Province offering such a course. Penticton has been offering fairly liberal options
up to Grade XL Two years ago I pointed out to the principal and trustees that a considerable
number of pupils in their junior high school who had taken up commercial subjects were
being led into a blind alley. When these pupils reached Grade XL they found it impossible
to select subjects sufficient to give them thirty credits, as commercial work was not being
carried on beyond Grade X. This condition was remedied somewhat last year, as commercial
work was made available for Grade XI. pupils and music and art were offered as options.
Educational authorities in the larger centres often fail to realize the difficulties experienced
by the teachers in small schools in their efforts to give generous options. If industrial arts,
home economics, or commercial subjects are not being given in a district, where are the
options to be found? True, the course of study provides courses in three foreign languages
and four sciences, but the teachers of one- and two-room high schools cannot be expected to
be specialists in all of these. Again, the teachers in the small schools are teaching all the
time even when no options are offered. They do not have three or four spare periods a week
as is the case in the larger centres. I have taught in the small high schools myself and am
thus in a position to appreciate these difficulties. Despite the handicaps under which these
schools are working, I am convinced the proportion of pupils taking High School Graduation
3 H-34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
Courses in the schools of my district compares very favourably with the proportion in
Vancouver; in fact, I should not be surprised to find a comparison unfavourable to the big
municipalities at the Coast, where conditions are so much more favourable. Last year the
one-room Kaslo School offered so many options that the teacher had no time for class-teaching
and could do only tutorial work. I question whether this experiment will be successful but
am watching it with interest. Practically all the Kaslo pupils are working for a high-school
diploma.
All but one of the high schools of my district are following the four-year course for all
pupils. Kaslo changed over last year. Armstrong still continues with the three-year course
notwithstanding that in 1933 and again in 1934 promises were given me that the change
would be made.
For years I have been urging the importance of music and physical education. Penticton,
Fernie, Summerland, and University Hill have been doing creditable work in music. Athletics
are flourishing in practically all the larger schools but physical education suffers because of
the lack of gymnasium facilities. Enderby, Cranbrook, Nelson, Penticton, and Rossland
are the only schools which have gymnasiums in the buildings or on the grounds. Port Moody,
Squamish, Trail, and Vernon make use of gymnasiums located at some distance from the
schools.
For several years the majority of schools in my inspectorate have been using tests, either
wholly or partly objective, constructed by the teachers themselves; in fact, the wholly subjective test was discarded by most schools years ago. Each year a few schools give intelligence
tests; but there seems no necessity for these in most schools, since nearly all the pupils wrote
such tests in their Entrance year. In special cases I have asked teachers to give an intelligence test and have laid down the rule that these should be given when the necessity arises.
Standardized achievement tests have not been used to any great extent. For years I have
been looking for good tests in the different high-school subjects and have failed to find many
which are suitable for our courses. I believe the Department would be well advised to
construct such tests from time to time.
Last year I had copies made of tests more or less standardized and prepared and used
in the schools of Greater Vancouver. On February 19th I sent copies of these tests to all
my schools and asked that they be given at Easter. I requested the teachers to mark the
tests and return them to me with the median mark for the class. The teachers appreciated
the receipt of these; but I was not very well satisfied with the results. If one is to form
any judgment from tests, they should be given by one person and at about the same time.
It is absolutely impossible for me to follow this procedure, however, as it would take me
at least two or three months to cover my district if I did nothing but give the tests. The
examinations sent out were in the following subjects:—
Grade IX.—Health, French, and algebra.
Grade X.—Health and social studies.
Grade XL—Health and composition.
Since I began inspecting I have been encouraging the teachers to do all in their power to
foster extra-curricular activities. Most of the larger schools and a considerable number of
the smaller have literary and debating societies, athletic societies, and students' councils.
Dramatic work received marked attention in many schools and the annual school concert is
the most important district event of the year. Several schools give physical-education displays occasionally; a number have glee clubs or school orchestras. A number of schools
have been operating a system of " houses " which has stimulated interest in the various school
activities. Many publish school magazines. It is worthy of note that the Daily Province
shield for the best school publication in the high schools of the whole Province was won this
year by the Penticton High School.
The above-mentioned school activities are exceedingly important, but to my mind the
most important work of an Inspector in a district such as mine is to advise and guide teachers
regarding the organization and government of the school and the presentation of subject-
matter. We should as far as possible " protect the pupils from the incompetent teacher."
The schools in this inspectorate last year may be classified as follows: One division, 18;
two divisions, 8; three divisions, 5; four divisions, 1; five divisions, 3; more than five
divisions, 8;   total, 43. EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS. H 35
Many principals have very little or no experience and are of little help to assistant
teachers. The outstanding exceptions are: Mr. Matheson, of University Hill; Mr. Rogers,
of Nelson; Mr. Pepper, of Vernon; Mr. Affleck, of Princeton; and Mr. Allison, of Trail.
Many of the teachers each year are fresh from the Teacher-training class. Of last year's
list nineteen teachers were beginners, twelve had only one year's experience, ten had taught
two years, and eight had three years. . These teachers need guidance and direction and in
many cases the only person to give them much help is the Inspector. My regret is that
I have not more time to spend with young teachers. Last year I made 252 visits of inspection,
but was unable to carry out my objective of two visits a year to each teacher. I visited
some inexperienced teachers three times and visited all teachers without experience twice,
except teachers employed in schools where the principal was a man who I felt could and
would guide his assistants wisely and well. On the whole, I am well satisfied with what
the teachers are doing. I feel that the standard of these schools in academic work, in
character-building, and in preparation for life is superior to that in many of the large schools.
There are no special teachers to act as counsellors for the boys and girls; but each teacher
or principal has to assume the duties of such an officer. It is always interesting to me to
hear the teachers talk about their pupils. In many schools the teachers have an extraordinary
knowledge of the pupils. They know their history, they have learned of their aptitudes and
dispositions, and, on the whole, possess a sympathetic understanding of young people and
their problems. In this connection the following principals come to my mind: Mr. Affleck,
of Princeton; Mr. Matheson, of University Hill; Mr. Allison, of Trail; Mr. Pepper, of
Vernon; Mr. Boggs, of Penticton; Mr. Welland, of MacLean; Mr. Kellie, of Enderby;
Mr. Lee, of Squamish; and Mr. McDonald, of Woodfibre. The kindly feeling which exists
between teachers and pupils and the interest shown by the majority of teachers in their
work are largely responsible for the satisfactory standing of the majority of schools. Most
teachers come early and remain late and show a willingness to devote much of their time after
school-hours assisting and advising pupils who are looking for help.
Below are listed some problems pressing for solution:—
(1.)   Consolidation of the high schools of loco, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody.
(2.)  Consolidation of Canyon one-room school with Creston.
(3.) The appointment of some person to supervise the schools of the Princeton area.
In addition to the Princeton three-room high school, there are the one-room high school at
Keremeos and the three superior schools of Hedley, Blakeburn, and Coalmont. There are
about fifty elementary- and high-school teachers in- the area—the majority of them in small
one- and two-room schools. Mr. Affleck did good work here in encouraging meetings of
teachers at Princeton and in sending out mimeographed copies of test papers and exercises.
INSPECTOR A. SULLIVAN, B.A., VICTORIA.
During the period July 1st, 1933, to June 30th, 1936, five high schools, which were formerly
under my supervision, have been allocated to new inspectorial districts. The high schools of
North Vancouver and West Vancouver were placed under the supervision of Inspector
Wm. Gray, and those at Abbotsford, Matsqui, and Mount Lehman, in the Administrative Area,
under Inspector P. H. Sheffield.
There are now 160 teachers in the thirty high schools of this inspectorate. High-school
areas have been established at Abbotsford, Duncan, Ganges-Vesuvius, and Salmon Arm. The
high schools at Comox, Courtenay, Cumberland, and Tsolum are not widely separated. If a
consolidated high school were established in the area served by these high schools, Courtenay
would appear to be the most favourable centre for such a purpose.
Four-year Course.—The principle of the four-year High School Course has been endorsed
in every high school of this inspectorate except Salmon Arm, and even there the trustees at
their meeting in March went on record as being in favour of the four-year course. As Salmon
Arm is a farming area the subject of agriculture is emphasized in the High School Course.
The physical-training and sports activities in connection with the high school are outstanding.
Junior High Schools.—Junior high schools have been popularly and firmly established at
Kamloops and Nanaimo. During the past three years Boards of School Trustees and the
public generally are more anxious than ever before to give wider educational opportunities to H 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
boys and girls of junior high-school age. At Duncan and North Saanich, junior high schools
will be opened during the coming year. Ladysmith is also contemplating the establishing of
such a school.
High School Graduation.—I have continually stressed the importance of the High School
Graduation Course in conversation with teachers and in letters sent to all principals of high
schools in this inspectorate. At Ladysmith, Nanaimo, and Port Alberni, where commercial
subjects are offered, the High School Graduation Course is a popular one.
A number of principals complain of the indifferent attitude of the public and of certain
organizations in connection with the professions, including that of nursing, to the High School
Graduation diploma. One principal, however, has overcome this difficulty in the manner
indicated in this excerpt from his letter:—
" Furthermore, it has been our constant endeavour to enlighten the public as to the merits
of the Graduation Course and this effort has met with considerable success. Through newspaper articles, speeches, and other methods, we have now reached the point where a Graduation
diploma is acceptable to many prospective employers. The bank, for instance, will accept our
graduates, whereas I believe that elsewhere a Matriculation certificate is demanded."
Professional Growth of Teachers.—From 1933 to 1936 the majority of high-school teachers
in this inspectorate have taken courses in education and academic subjects. A number have
improved their academic standing, but a still greater number have improved their professional
standing and outlook not only by attendance at summer schools, but through the reading of
magazines and books upon psychology, as well as treatises relating to the subjects which they
teach in the class-room.
Libraries.—Nearly all schools have libraries for the pupils' reading, together with a few
professional books for the teachers' use. The Oak Bay and Salmon Arm High School libraries
are worthy of special mention, both for choice of books and for the large number that are
read by the pupils.
Many teachers throughout the Province make use of the books loaned by the Public
Library Commission, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, and by the Union Library at Abbotsford
for the Fraser Valley District, at Kelowna for the Okanagan Valley District, and at Nanaimo
for Vancouver Island.
Intelligence and Achievement Tests.—Intelligence tests and standardized achievement
tests are used in the majority of the high schools, and non-standiardized objective tests are
constructed in practically every high school by the teachers themselves.
Medical and Cumulative Record-cards.—The keeping of pupils' medical cards and cumulative record-cards is now up to date except in the latter, where a number of the smaller high
schools have been allowed to use the percentage method temporarily.
The principal of the five-room high school at Alberni states in his letter that " Medical
cards are kept up to date, although medical inspection here is usually at a comparatively useless
time of year—namely, the end of June."
Reports asked for by the Honourable the Minister of Education have had a stimulating
effect upon the high-school teachers, especially with regard to their professional outlook, their
use of achievement and objective tests, and in the keeping of pupils' record-cards. A larger"
number of teachers than ever before are taking courses this summer, while throughout the
past year many teachers have been reading professional books and have made acquaintance
with experimental studies in the special subjects in which they are interested.
INSPECTORS OF ELEMENTARY AND SUPERIOR SCHOOLS.
(Those marked with an asterisk inspect high schools also.)
INSPECTOR J. E. BROWN, M.A., CRANBROOK.
The following is a summary of improvements in Cranbrook Inspectorate, 1933-36:—
(1.)  Four-year high schools have been established in the Michel-Natal and Athalmer-
Invermere Districts.
(2.)  Plans for the reorganization of schools on the 6-6 plan are well under way at Fernie,
Kimberley, and Athalmer-Invermere. EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS. H 37
(3.) A new school has been built in Creston. Plans are proceeding for a new junior-
senior high-school building in Kimberley. There is a new elementary school in Hosmer.
General improvements have been effected on the buildings and equipment of many other
schools.
(4.) Plans are being made for home economics and manual training in the five larger
centres.    Graduation and Vocational Courses are being added in all the high schools.
(5.) Greater use is being made in rural districts of the Correspondence Courses for high-
school pupils;  particularly at Waldo, Baynes Lake, Wynndel, and Canyon City.
(6.) Plans are being made for central reference libraries in Cranbrook, Creston, Michel-
Natal, and Fernie. Many rural teachers are co-operating in the endeavour to establish
libraries' or library corners for their pupils.
(7.) Intelligence tests were given last year to all Grade VII. and VIIL pupils and others.
There is an improved interest in the use of standardized achievement tests, especially of the
general survey and diagnostic types.
(8.) The improvement in the keeping of record-cards correspondingly increases with
the extended use of standardized tests, and teachers are showing more self-reliance in grading
and classification of pupils and depending less upon " Entrance results."
(9.) Increased interest in the problems of consolidation is especially noticeable in the
Creston and Athalmer-Invermere Districts.
(10.) Supervising principals are responsible for all branches of school-work in Fernie
and Michel-Natal.    This is also recommended for Kimberley and other districts.
(11.) There is an increased interest in the teaching of music and physical training in the
schools. Better facilities for the latter course are being provided in Fernie, Michel-Natal, and
Kimberley.
(12.) Official Trustees have been appointed at Kimberley, Michel-Natal, Fort Steele,
Corbin, and ten other rural districts.
(13.) General interest in professional growth is evidenced by the number of inquiries for
books and periodicals. Bibliographies of professional books have been supplied to many
teachers upon request. The number attending the 1936 Summer School classes at the University and at Victoria was at least twenty-two.
INSPECTOR F. G. CALVERT, VANCOUVER.
The question of establishing junior high schools was discussed with the School Boards of
the Delta, Langley, and Surrey Municipalities and with teacher groups. All three Boards
are keenly interested. The Surrey Board is faced with a building programme and is exceedingly anxious to provide two junior high schools. The Reeve and Council are sympathetic.
Steps have been taken toward the selection of sites and securing of suitable building plans,
but the Board realizes that a by-law submitted at this time to the ratepayers would meet with
defeat. Unless some financial assistance is forthcoming there is little likelihood that the
Surrey Board will be able to accomplish much. The Langley Board is in practically the
same position. Although no junior high schools have been established thus far in this inspectorate, the junior high-school idea has been thoroughly discussed with the Boards and they
entertain the idea with favour. It is to be hoped that all the efforts expended during the past
year will bear fruit in the near future.
During the past years I have endeavoured to bring before the principals and teachers the
latest professional books. Copies of some of these I have usually carried with me on my
inspection trips that I might discuss them with the teachers. At teachers' meetings these
books have usually been displayed and discussed. As a result, many of my teachers have
taken advantage of the excellent library provided at the Vancouver School Board Office.
There are, unfortunately, some of my teachers who as yet do not realize the necessity for reading and study. Because of the close proximity of the above-mentioned municipalities to
Vancouver the teachers have not as yet seen fit to establish a school library for themselves.
Throughout the districts the principals and teachers are using objective tests and so far
as it is possible they are securing intelligence tests and standardized achievement tests, but
they are handicapped in that the Boards are very reluctant to spend any money in securing H 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
such tests. I have used such tests extensively, but to secure the best results it appears to me
that such tests should be in the hands of principals.
During the last year a careful check was made regarding the medical cards and the
cumulative record-cards. These were in splendid order in some schools. In others they were
not in evidence. So far as the cumulative record-cards are concerned, it appears to me that
some more definite plan is necessary if such a system is to be of value.
One subject which has been neglected in the past is music. I have endeavoured in every
way to have this subject taught as it should be taught, but it is either crowded out or the
teacher has no ability to teach it. It is an important subject and I hope ultimately that a
Music Supervisor for each municipality will be provided.
A goodly number of teachers in my inspectorate attend the summer schools each year.
Some are anxious to raise their academic and others their professional standing. In several
cases teachers have intimated that they wished to attend summer school and keenly felt the
need, yet they were unable to do so on account of financial embarrassment.
With the advent of the revised curriculum and the keen interest shown I trust that good
progress will be made toward a betterment of rural conditions.
INSPECTOR T. G. CARTER, PENTICTON.
I beg to submit the following information regarding the school system of my inspectorate
for the period July 1st, 1933, to June 30th, 1936 :—
During this time new school buildings were constructed at Christina Lake, Kaleden,
Osoyoos, Penticton, and Stirling Creek, and additions were built to the schools at Okanagan
Falls and Testalinda Creek. In a number of the other districts considerable improvements
were made to the existing school buildings and grounds.
In the greater part of my inspectorate the population is sparse and widely scattered.
Furthermore, the winter conditions throughout most of the area are severe, thus making the
roads difficult for regular transportation. As a result few consolidations of schools may be
satisfactorily effected. I hope, however, that arrangements will soon be made whereby the
Cawston pupils may be transported to Keremeos, and those of Gilpin to the school at Grand
Forks.
At the present time the only junior high school in my area is at Penticton. This type of
school is, however, being considered at Rossland, Princeton, and Grand Forks, and I feel that
progress in this direction has1 been made at each of these centres.
I find that the quality of the teaching in the schools of my inspectorate is, on the whole,
steadily improving. In the past three years the qualifications of the teachers employed has
been as follows:—
1933-34—■ No. Per Cent.
Teachers with B.A. degree     7 6.4
Teachers with First-class certificate   49' 45.0
Teachers with Second-class certificate  50 45.9
Teachers with other certificates      3
1934-35—
Teachers with B.A. degree  12 10.4
Teachers with First-class certificate  58 50.0
Teachers with Second-class certificate   42 36.5
Teachers with other certificates     3
1935-36—
Teachers' with B.A. degree   14 11.4
Teachers with First-class certificate  62 50.4
Teachers with Second-class certificate  44 35.8
Teachers with other certificates     3
It will thus be seen that the proportion of teachers holding First-class, or higher, certificates is steadily increasing. I know, too, that there has been much greater interest than
formerly in the reading of professional literature, as evidenced by the requests for information regarding teachers' books and magazines. The number of teachers taking advantage of
the various summer courses available was greater this year than at any previous time. EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS.    H 39
I have continued to urge upon Boards the need of supplementary books and the wisdom
of building up the school libraries with additions each year. In many cases the response has
been gratifying, but there is still a number of schools in which the libraries are quite
inadequate.
In the larger of my schools the medical cards and cumulative record-cards are kept up to
date. I found that these cards were not being filled in by the teachers in some of the small
schools, but in future I plan to maintain a more accurate check in this respect.
It has been my practice to keep on hand at all times a record of the achievement and
mental ability of the pupils in certain of the upper grades as measured by standardized tests.
This record is renewed each year.
INSPECTOR E. G. DANIELS, B.A., NEW WESTMINSTER.
During the period 1933 to 1936 my territory was composed of the municipalities of Burnaby and Saanich, with a staff of 186 to 191 teachers.
There was no possibility of consolidation, as the term is commonly used, but the avoidance
of duplication of work by arranging for upper-grade pupils from small schools to attend at
a larger graded school has been carried to the limit of feasibility, unless transportation is
provided to a greater degree. Entrance Class work was taught in only twenty-two out of
thirty-three schools.    Ten schools do not teach above Grade VI.
Regarding the establishment of junior high schools, I had, as you are aware, planned to
make a start on this work at the beginning of the 1937 fall term, as our high-school accommodation called for relief by that time. I had been working and planning with the idea that the
course could be centred at three points—Edmonds Street, Gilmore Avenue, and Kingsway
West. The boundaries of several school areas would be changed to utilize the few spare
rooms in other schools and leave these three centres in a position to start Junior High work.
One of the principal obstacles has been certification of teachers. Only four of the 1935-36
elementary staff held Academic certificates. Only two of these would be included in a Junior
High programme. I felt that, if vacancies appearing this summer were filled by the appointment of teachers with Academic standing and normal range of subjects, we should be able to
staff the junior high schools, when those to be drawn from the regular High School staffs were
considered. I ascertained the possibilities of each suitable member of the elementary staff
who held First-class standing. Unfortunately, I shall not be able to carry out these plans.
I have, however, passed on this information to my successor.
In Saanich the attitude toward manual training and home economics is a difficulty to be
overcome. I believe that this will be surmounted in time. Last year not a single member of
the elementary staff held an Academic certificate, although several are working faithfully to
that end.
The curriculum having been fixed by the Department, I did my best to see that it was
taught completely and effectively. In a large number of cases I have seen a steady development in teaching technique. So far as success at attaining Entrance standing can be considered a measure of progress, the past year's record shows fewer pupils failing of promotion
than formerly. Largely as result of the numbers gaining Entrance standing in Saanich, the
elementary staff has been materially reduced.
During the years 1933-36, approximately eighty-eight courses were taken either at summer
school or at a university by teachers of these municipalities. I have persistently urged
teachers to take advantage of Summer School Courses. This year over 25 per cent, of the
elementary staff of Burnaby will be receiving the minimum salary. Under these conditions
teachers find it increasingly difficult to meet the expense entailed. Half of the elementary
staffs of these two municipalities have had from twelve to thirty-eight years' experience.
A great majority of Summer Courses were taken by those of under twelve years' length of
service.    The older are, of course, drawing the more substantial salaries.
Just here I should like to mention the " refresher course " given on the teaching of singing
by Miss E. M. Coney. When I approached her regarding this matter, she very readily consented to my request for a series of four lectures on four Wednesday afternoons after 4 o'clock.
An average of ninety-five teachers attended. The enthusiasm which she elicited from the
teachers gave a new impetus to this part of our programme. H 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1935-36.
When I approached Miss L. G. Bollert, of the Normal School, with the request that she
give a series of three lectures on primary work to Burnaby teachers, she very willingly consented to do so. Fifty-five teachers, including some principals, attended. Improved methods
were at once noticeable in the work of these teachers. The results of these excellent addresses
will continue to be felt for years to come.
The use of approved intelligence tests and standardized achievement tests has been a
quite regular part of my work. In the past year I personally administered intelligence tests
to over 700 Entrance pupils. In the four non-examination subjects I tested 714 pupils and,
as I have done for the last three years, obtained the class medians as well as the medians for
the municipality in each subject. This was for comparison of the work of teachers. One
copy of the scores made by each pupil in each subject was sent to his teacher or principal,
showing, as well, the subject medians for the class and for the municipality. Further, I may
say that I have used during the year many hundreds of tests in arithmetic, reading, and
general achievement.
In connection with the new courses for Grade IX. in home economics, manual training,
and mechanical draughting, I have given every possible assistance.
INSPECTOR H. C. FRASER, M.A., VICTORIA.
Consolidation of Districts.—In reporting on the schools of my inspectorate, it is safe to say
that, during the last few years, the tendency towards consolidation has been slowly but steadily
growing. At Duncan a consolidated school has been in operation for several years. A junior
high school is now being organized. A second district, composed of Sidney, North Saanich,
and Deep Cove, voted for consolidation last spring, and will have its new buildings ready for
occupation by the new year. In this newly consolidated district the elementary schools conducted in the former districts will be continued, but placed under the supervision of the principal
of the North Saanich Consolidated High School. Grades VII., VIIL, and IX. will be combined
to form a junior high school. Most of the pupils who have reached high-school age had been
attending at the former North Saanich High School for some years. Conveyance is provided
for a few pupils in the new district, but many of the pupils ride to school.
Ladysmith, always forward-looking and progressive, is experiencing increased activity
through the operations of lumber interests. For a second year the school district immediately
to the south of Ladysmith, Oyster, or Saltair as it is locally known, is sending its pupils to
Ladysmith. This arrangement appears to be giving entire satisfaction. The teacher formerly
employed in the Oyster School has been made a member of the staff of the Ladysmith School.
Some thirty pupils are conveyed from the Oyster District to Ladysmith School. The convenience that Ladysmith affords to Oyster might easily be extended to Waterloo, North Oyster, and
Diamond Districts, as these schools are located along the Coach Line route. The pupils could
easily be transported by the regular coach service morning and afternoon. Some of the pupils
of the upper high-school grades from Chemainus are also accommodated at Ladysmith. To
accommodate the high-school pupils of North Cowichan Municipality, a high-school building
must soon be built at Chemainus or in the near vicinity.
The consolidation of the schools in the Sooke region has also been discussed. Happy
Valley, Colwood, Langford, Goldstream, Metchosin, Albert Head, and East Sooke might very
well be served by one large consolidated centre. This has been discussed but nothing definite
has been accomplished. These discussions are a healthy sign and may lead to the formation of
larger units of administration.
Improved Facilities.—Consolidation of districts renders the establishment of domestic-
science and manual-training centres feasible. Both of these courses have been re-established
at Duncan and Ladysmith. The new junior high school which has been organized at Duncan
provides courses in both of these subjects, over which teachers and pupils are highly enthusiastic. At Ladysmith, where these courses were discontinued for a number of years, excellent
progress is now being made. An evening Adult class is now in operation there also. In the
Fairbridge School, which has been in operation for over a year, a fine beginning has been made
in these courses. Arrangements have been made to provide workshops for the boys and
domestic-science courses for the girls.    The school which is now under construction at this point EXCERPTS FROM REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS.    H 41
will be provided with the most modern equipment.    Under the capable direction of Professor
Logan, one may look forward to marked success in the work of this institution.
Quickening of Professional Interest.—The new Programmes of Study are being welcomed
enthusiastically by the teachers of this inspectorate. There is a perceptible quickening of
professional interest. At no time has there been a greater number of teachers in this inspectorate seeking improved professional and academic training. A great many teachers in the
larger schools have been taking reading courses leading to a degree and have been attending
universities during the summer. Some have obtained their University degrees in this way.
Of the 160 teachers in the inspectorate, forty-five are at various points of advancement in their
University work. Five have obtained the degree of Bachelor of Arts, seven are now in their
final year of that work, and three are on leave of absence to complete their work this year.
All these are progressive teachers. In addition to those working for a degree must be mentioned the large number who, while not working for a University degree, yet faithfully attend
the summer schools for teachers. These qualify as teachers of special subjects, and the service
they render is highly commendable.
INSPECTOR W. G. GAMBLE, B.A., PRINCE GEORGE.
This inspectorate comprises the schools in that portion of the Canadian National Railway
Belt extending from Hulatt to Red Pass, and the schools in the area from Prince George southward and eastward to Likely and Horsefly.
During the year there were in operation in this inspectorate seventy schools, employing
ninety-two teachers. Of these schools, two are high schools, one is a superior school, one is an
elementary city school, and sixty-six are rural schools. A new school was authorized at Alexandria, to be known as the Lansdowne School; new schools were opened at Shere and Ness
Lake, and a second division was added to the Wells School. The Fort George Canyon School
was closed in December.
One hundred and eighty-two visits of inspection were made to class-rooms during the year,
and, in addition to these, many special visits were made to.schools and school districts in connection with matters of departmental administration.
During the past three years there has been a decided improvement in the professional work
of teachers, and a more marked determination not only to do their work well in school, but also
to count for much in the betterment of conditions in their communities.
In the class-room, organization has been improved by the grouping of grades and classes
whenever possible, especially in schools where the work was heavy because of the number of
grades. The teachers generally are accustomed to write previews of work and to keep a
definite record of all work done. In the Prince George and Quesnel Schools the platoon system
is effectively used in the upper grades.
It is regrettable that in most rural schools it has seemed necessary to give an undue proportion of the time to arithmetic. The attention of teachers has been drawn to the desirability
of giving more time to English subjects and to health lessons and physical education. The
response in the great majority of cases has been very favourable. Oral English especially has
received more attention, and the results have been commendable. During inspectorial visits,
teachers have been requested, almost invariably, to give lessons in health and demonstrations
in physical training, with the result that these phases of education have received somewhat
greater recognition. Quesnel Dam, Beaverly, and Harpers Camp Schools were recommended
for awards in physical drill. More attention has been paid to games and training for field
sports, which have now become established throughout