Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1937]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0307329.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0307329.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0307329-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0307329-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0307329-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0307329-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0307329-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0307329-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0307329-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0307329.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1936
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.  To His Honour Eric W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1936 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1937. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Nineteenth Annual Report on the work
of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1936.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 19S7. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Statistics of Trades and Industries     7
Total Pay-roll     7
Comparison of Pay-rolls  '.     8
Change in Wage-rates     9
Apprentices   10
Average Weekly Wage by Industries  10
Increased Employment   13
Variation of Employment  14
Nationalities of Employees  15
Statistical Tables    16
Summary of all Tables  :  29
Board of Industrial Relations   30
Statistics for Women and Girls  30
Labour Turnover in each Group   37
Inspections and Collections     38
Court Cases   38
Wage Comparisons    44
New Orders   45
" Hours of Work Act "  1  45
Comparison with Previous Years  •— 46
Average Weekly Hours  46
Summary of Existing Orders   48
Complete List of Orders    63
Labour Legislation   65
Labour Disputes and Conciliation ■  67
Summary of Labour Disputes  73
Inspection of Factories   74
Inspections, Accident-prevention   74
Prosecutions    75
Child-labour   75
Home-work  76
Elevators    76
Employment Service  78
Conditions during the Year   79
Handicap Sections ..  79
Business transacted     81
Unemployment Relief  82
Forestry Training  82
Placer-mining Training     82
Winter Work Projects ...:  83
Statement of Relief  83
Apprenticeship Branch   87
" Trade-schools Regulation Act "  89
Text of Act  90  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1936.
In submitting the Nineteenth Annual Report of the Department of Labour, 1936 can best
be summed up as a year of solid fulfilment of the bright promise of 1935.
The statistical period under review was marked by a further notable recovery from the
long period of depression that followed the collapse of the 1929 boom.
The fact that the advance has been steady rather than spectacular should inspire confidence in the future and justify the expectation that employment and purchasing-power will
continue to expand.
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The continued improvement in business conditions as shown ini the following statistical
survey is sufficient evidence that the strict enforcement of labour legislation has not had the
dire effect upon business conditions so often claimed by those who either do not understand
or fail to appreciate its real benefits.
The legislation is intended to fix for employees a minimum return for their labour, to
control excessive working-hours, and give to employers equitable competitive conditions in so
far as wages and working-hours are concerned.
A study of the statistics will reveal that industry and business has not been handicapped,
but, on the contrary, has shown steady growth, resulting in larger pay-rolls, shorter hours,
increased earnings for the workers, and increased employment.
EMPLOYERS RETURNS TOTAL 4,357.
The total number of firms reporting in time for tabulation in the tables was 4,357, compared with 4,153' in 1935, an increase of 204, which in itself refutes the claim made by some
that labour legislation has been responsible for firms being forced out of business1.
PAY-ROLL.
The aggregate of the twenty-five tables as shown in the summary shows a pay-roll for the
4,357 firms of $107,492,076. This figure should not be accepted as the total pay-roll of the
Province, as we are only dealing with industrial pay-rolls, and must be augmented by the
following, bringing the total to $142,349,591, or an increase of $16,537,451 over 1935.
During 1933 the statistics revealed a pay-roll of $99,126,663; the figures for 1936 thus
show an increase of $43,222,938 over the three-year period.
Pay-roll of 4,357 firms making returns to Department of Labour- -  $107,492,076.00
Returns received too late to be included in above summary    553,965.00
Employees in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending in returns
(estimated pay-roll)   -    1,350,000.00
Transcontinental railways   (ascertained pay-roll)    12,153,550.00
Dominion and Provincial Government workers -   5,500,000.00
Wholesale and retail firms..- —       2,900,000.00
Delivery,  cartage and teaming,  warehousing,  butchers,  moving-picture  operators,
coal and wood yards, and auto transportation _ -   3,500,000.00
Ocean services and express companies. - —     —   7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous  _ —-   —- - - -   1,400,000.00
Total           - -— - $142,349,591.00
The percentage of the total payable to wage-earners has again shown an increase; this is
only to be expected and is additional evidence of either increased employment or higher weekly T 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
earnings for those employed.    Fortunately, the figures show both increased employment and
increased earnings; the percentages are shown in the following table:—
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
Officers, superintendents, and managers.	
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen	
Per Cent.
12.77
14.93
72.30
Per Cent.
12.08
13.62
74.30
Per Cent.
11.05
12.71
76.24
Per Cent.
11.06
12.65
76.29
Per Cent.
10.54
11.70
77.76
Totals    ..          ■
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAY-ROLLS.
Of the twenty-five tables, twenty-three show an increased pay-roll, while two reveal a
decrease.    The lumber industry again headed the list of industries with  an increase of
$5,446,047,  followed by contracting with  $1,379,909  and Coast shipping with  $1,322,060;
metal-mining increased by $1,252,308;   food products with an addition of $1,072,582, followed
by metal trades with $877,637;   wood  (N.E.S.)   showed  an increase of $659,519;   public
utilities, $608,265;  oil-refining, $437,116;  smelting, $402,628;  pulp and paper mills, $400,688'
coal-mining, $352,028; explosives and chemicals with $265,333;  miscellaneous trades, $203,286
house-furnishings, $172,512;  builders' materials, $149,569;  printing and publishing, $99,019
breweries, $98,5321;   laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $90,086;   paint-manufacture, $73,39'9
garment-making, $51,459;  jewellery-manufacture, $15,446;  leather and fur goods, $13,486.
The two industries showing a decrease in the annual pay-roll were headed by cigar and
fobacoo manufacturing with $17,223 and ship-building, $1,444.
The pay-rolls covering the past three years can be conveniently compared in the1 following
table:—■
Industry.
1934.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1935.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-rolL
1936.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders' materials..
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals-
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery  —.
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods..
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting 	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.).
Totals 	
30
63
7
25
111
662
9
535
62
78
40
633
665
389
187
20
10
129
15
34
7
94
94
$751;
643,
29,
3,198,
6,932,
4,703,
804,
8,790,
528,
614,
158,
1,013,
305,
14,951,
4,819,
8,218,
2,729,
1,729
226.
2,723,
3,911,
753,
4,313,
7,735,
1,175,
,440.20
.681.40
.638.20
911.30
756.80
241.50
290.60
400.30
344.20
571.50
874.80
741.70
646.30
858.30
.806.40
.487.40
,705.80
,387.80
.536.40
,886.70
,116.30
.155.20
,022.80
,931.10
,948.00
37
76
6
24
110
705
13
562
61
49
9
87
46
656
683
353
262
24
10
130
17
43
4
96
90
$81,764,381.00
4,153
$845
802
23,
3,064,
7,736,
5,717,
985,
8,836,
613,
733,
177
1,180,
454
18,077
6,134,
8,280
3,450
1,912
251
3,172
4,294
939,
4,300
8,536,
1,548
643.30
305.60
532.50
399.10
,267.50
448.50
511.00
143.70
258.10
428.80
148.50
647.20
.269.10
711.20
803.50
,457.60
312.20
277.80
019.60
,740.20
668.00
555.10
,083.20
318.90
,917.70
36
74
5
27
116
787
16
551
59
56
10
91
50
747
698
311
269
31
14
135
14
43
3
108
106
$92,068,867.90
4,357
$944,
951,
6
3,416
9,058
7,097
1,250
9,908
664
905
192
1,270
467,
23,523,
7,012
9,532
3,653
2,349
323
3,271
4,695
938,
4,702,
9,144,
2,208,
,176.00
,875.00
309.00
428.00
,328.00
358.00
844.00
726.00
718.00
,941.00
595.00
,734.00
,706.00
,759.00
,441.00
,766.00
,599.00
,394.00
,419.00
,760.00
,356.00
,111.00
,712.00
,584.00
,437.00
$107,492,076.00 REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 9
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
With the object of localizing the industrial activities in the Province, we have set up
three industrial divisions, consisting of Greater Vancouver, Vancouver Island, and Rest of
Mainland; with increased activity in lumbering and mining, it is to be expected that the
Greater Vancouver area will suffer and during 1936 the percentage dropped from 39.06 per
cent, to 33.97 per cent.; while Vancouver Island increased from 15.84 per cent, in 1985 to 18.43
per cent, in 1936. The Mainland also showing a gain from 45.10 per cent, in 1935 to 47.60 per
cent, in 1936.
The percentages quoted are based on the returns received, and the same proportion applied
to the other figures which make up the total pay-roll.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
$48,183,910.64
37,980,864.59
16,792,298.77
$41,831,447.67
37,965,508.24
19,329,697.37
$45,972,307.59
47,289,695.86
20,305,950.09
$49,142,221.94
56,728,693.99
19,941,224.22
$48,356,156.06
67,758,405.32
26,235,029.-62
Totals —	
$102,957,074.00
$99,126,653.28
$113,567,953.54
$125,812,140.15
$142,349,591.00
CHANGES IN WAGE-RATES.
For a number of years we have shown a table giving the number of adult male workers
who from the returns are receiving less, than $19 per week, and a steady improvement can be
seen.    A decrease of 2,201 is shown from the 1935 total and of 5,895 from the total for 1933.
Adult Male Workers employed at Low Rates of Wages.
Weekly Rate.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
Under $6 „	
1
11
10
9
44
72
194
171
317
619
602
1,199
1,260
1
3
10
26
70
44
214
143
283
679
574
1,092
1,252
1
97
27
49
110
494
588
1,267
1,550
1,409
3
47
57
88
182
184
816
954
1,024
1,950
1,948
3
35
81
79
147
526
550
1,174
953
1,973
2,675
3,322
1,989
2,757
107
167
420
367
683
914
810
2,145
1,809
2,204
3,159
2,754
2,318
2,574
96
405
728
592
1,187
1,063
809
2,550
2,145
2,436
2,965
2,780
2,280
2,927
378
166
191
257
361
489
473
2,742
1,372
1,952
2,502
4,757
2,081
3,513
304
172
122
125
250
295
352
1,745
1,167
1,413
2,192
5,300
2,267
3,575
243
$6 to $6.99 — 	
98
7 to    7.99 —  	
8 to    8.99.    - 	
9 to    9.99      	
111
308
10 to 10.99...   -	
273
11 to 11.99    	
341
19, t,o 1299
13 to 13.99      	
14 to 14.99      	
1,640
1,949
15 to 15.99	
16 to 16.99        -..             	
4,543
2,216
17 to 17.99 ..     — 	
18 to 18.99 .   '        	
3,586
Totals  — 	
4,409
4,391
5,592
7,253
16,264
20,431
22,972
21,234
19,279
17,078
The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the total
number of adult males employed for the week of employment of the greatest number, tog-ether
with the percentages of those in receipt of less than $19 per week:—
Industry.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing-
Leather and fur goods.- -.
Wood   (N.E.S.)   -- -	
Garment-making    _ 	
Builders'   materials     	
House-furnishing    —	
Miscellaneous trades and industries-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing.	
Food products   	
Metal trades ._. -	
Number
employed.
Per
Cent.
8
75.00
271
47.60
2,104
47.43
173
45.66
938
37.63
566
36.93
2,894
34.11
520
31.54
9,741
30.71
3,936
28.30 T 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Number
employed.
                                  117
Per
Cent.
28.21
                           23,907
21.22
1,209
19.27
766
19.06
                             3,271
19.05
           504
18.06
              1,048
17.56
      —      „    9,084
14.72
6,252
13.87
     2,995
13.36
           .   „                 4,594
12.06
           48
10.42
     1,039
9.72
     2,727
6.89
Metal-mining    	
  - —     7,719
2.76
For the year 1936 considerable improvement is noted in the above figures, the highest
percentage employed at less than $19 per week being 75.00 and the lowest, 2.76.
APPRENTICES.
The number of apprentices as shown in the summary of all tables, 902, should not be con«
fused with the number of registered apprentices as shown in the report of the Director of
Apprenticeship on page 87.
Under both Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts, the Board of Industrial Relations
grants apprenticeship permits in occupations where the Minimum Wage Orders are in effect
and which have not at this date been brought within the scope of the " Apprenticeship Act."
This partially accounts for the difference in the figures. It may be noticed that six apprentices are shown as in receipt of between $35 and $40 per week, and a reference to the tables
will show the particular industry in which these are employed: Contracting, 2; metal trades,
1; street-railways, etc., 3. Seventeen are in receipt of from $30' to $35 per week, distributed
as follows: Coast shipping, 1; metal trades, 2; printing and publishing, 5; street-railways,
etc., 9. Prom the above it will be seen that there are apprentices employed who are not subject
to either of the " Minimum Wage Acts " or the " Apprenticeship Act'' and are in all probability
working under union recognition.
Industries in which apprentices have found opportunities during the year are: Explosives
and chemicals—increase, 5; garment-making, 16; house-furnishings, 17; leather and fur
good!s, 6; metal trades, 14; pulp and paper manufacturing, 7; smelting, 26; street-railways,
etc., 12;   metal-mining and ship-building, 1 each.
Decreases are noticeable in the food products group, 42; laundries, etc., 34; miscellaneous
metal trades, 16; printing and publishing, 21; contracting, lumbering, and wood (N.E.S.), 4
each;  breweries and coast shipping, 1 each.
AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGE BY INDUSTRIES.
The average weekly wage for adult male employees increased in twenty of the twenty-five
tables, and the figures are for the week of employment of the greatest number. It is not
claimed the averages shown would be the same for the whole year, as in many industries there
is always broken time to contend with; the figures have been computed on the same basis as
previous years and thus offer a fair comparison. As an example, Table 1 shows 3 at under
$6 (this we have placed at $6), 2 are shown at from $8 to $8.99; we have called this $8.50 and
applied the same procedure up to the $30 to $34.99 class. As some of the 45 employees shown
in this group would be receiving varying sums between these amounts, we fix the rate for the
45 at $32 and apply the same principle to the following amounts up to those earning $45 to
$49.99.    The four employees earning $50 and over per week were taken to mean $50 only. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936.
T 11
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only) .
Industry.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
Breweries  	
Builders' materials  	
$27.70
28.04
26.58
30.18
32.84
30.57
24.61
26.56
28.68
26.74
36.61
23.16
29.03
26.54
29.50
35.24
26.21
30.50
25.58
40.81
27.87
30.25
33.09
30.70
25.49
$27.40
27.38
25.06
29.03
31.36
30.34
26.66
27.79
28.34
25.54
37.85
27.16
28.31
25.69
29.96
33.31
25.88
29.78
25.85
39.34
27.39
30.35
30.05
30.02
26.03
$27.58
25.81
20.40
28.40
29.63
27.41
26.78
23.43
22.51
23.18
31.29
25.29
25.81
21.09
27.74
30.02
23.43
31.24
26.11
39.78
25.94
29.58
30.44
29.11
23.67
$25.65
21.95
14.28
28.04
26.50
24.78
23.34
21,88
24.07
20.05
23.40
23.26
21.62
18.73
24.24
25.50
22.78
29.34
25.00
37.05
24.63
26.17
22.98
28.89
20.61
$25.70
20.54
14.67
26.80
27.62
23.37
20.66
21.12
25.29
18.91
30.55
21.78
20.73
18.00
22.70
25.62
22.13
23.78
22.53
32.82
21.21
25.25
23.83
24.51
18.05
$25.62
20.19
15.86
28.11
28.58
22.56
22.53
21.10
23.52
19.49
28.88
20.67
22.34
21.32
22.81
27.35
21.26
25.04
22.53
32.51
23.22
26.03
23.88
25.51
18.97
$25.79
22.07
16.59
28.49
26.23
22.72
25.34
22.00
21.29
20.05
31.54
21.92
20.06
22.41
23.67
28.65
22.29
25.55
21.53
32.31
23.53
25.83
25.82
27.09
18.69
$25.00
22.28
17.76
28.75
31 61
Coal-mining   — 	
24 13
23.76
Garment-making  	
House-furnishing— 	
22.74
21.29
Manufacturing leather and fur goods.—
20.48
24 41
Miscellaneous trades and industries
22.07
Paint-manufacturing _.	
21.44
32.72
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
24.24
24.54
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
27.60
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.) —
20.32
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rates are as follows:
Increase.
Builders' materials   $0,
Cigar   and  tobacco   manufacturing      1,
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping    5.
Contracting      1.
Food  products,  manufacture of     1.
Garment-making      1,
House-furnishing      1,
Jewellery,   manufacturing
of      2
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
B reweries 	
Explosives and chemicals.—
Miscellaneous   trades  and
industries 	
21
16
26
38
41
16
45
24
.85
.33
Decrease.
1.79
.58
.22
Lumber industries  $2.42
Manufacturing leather and
fur goods  .42
Metal trades   .74
Metal-mining   .45
Oil-refining   .66
Printing and publishing  .41
Pulp   and   paper  manufacturing   .71
Ship-building   .55
Street-railways, gas, water,
power, telephones, etc  .41
Manufacturing    of    wood
(N.E.S.)    1.63
Paint-manufacturing   $0.09
Smelting   1.28
INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage for all adult male employees was $26.36, an increase of $2.27
over 1935, and the following table shows the average for each year since the formation of the
department:—
 - — $27.97
   29.11
   31.51
  27.62'
1922   — 27.29
1923    28.05
1918-
1919..
1920-
1921-
1924.
1925-
1926-
1927...
1928.
1929-
$28.39
27.82
27.99
28.29
28.96
29.20 T 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
1930         	
   $28.64
1931	
1932
        26.17
      23.62
1933—	
     22.30
1934.
1935.
1936.
$23.57
24.09
26.36
AVERAGE   WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT  MALE  EMPLOYEES.
1918—1936
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
*
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.OO
28. OO
27.00
26.00
25.OO
24.00
23.OO
22. OO
A
1
i\
1
\
\
\
\
\
-~^y-
/
\
\
\
i
\
1
\
/
\
■K
V
30*
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
1934
1935
1936
a
1
■
1
1
!i
■
'
i_
il
r
L
1   I
1
t
1   1
1
1   1
1
i   1
1   i
'!_
1
1 1
|_
j-
|
i_
_■_
X
_ ±
ll
Mt
!
II
1
■ i
h r
1
r-t    t-    t-    t-    t-    <D    W     rHCO
IO   (O    CS    Ol    IO    r»
fc-   fc-   to   fc-
a
a
tN
Cs
r-t
CJ
w
r-
r-
1
ii
0i
is
>
0
ir
C
M
Cv
O    if
CO    04
c
■-a
•<*
c
o
ir
c
CM
©   if
c
ir
■a ta
CD ci
01
O   ITS   ©   iO   o    *o   c
s
<>
CM
CC
er
«4
■"*
IC
«        +J        rr        f        -P        -P
o   o   g
c   US
O   Ui   O   IO   o   io   o
W   IN   CO   «    V   ■*   IO
J^OOOOOOOC
JJ-P+ipHi+Jp4J     rt
jhIOOIOOIOOIOO
KHtNNMCO^-'l'iQ
moooooooS
D4J-p+i4J+)-p+i   rt
E-moioo»ooioo
KHCNNMCO^^ia REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 13
INCREASED EMPLOYMENT.
The average number of wage-earners continued1 to increase; January, 1936, shows 60,666
employed, which figure increased to a peak during September with 81,203, declining to 69,957
for the month of December, a total of 9,301 in excess of the beginning of the year.
To realize the full effect of the recovery, attention may be directed to the employment
figures in January, 1933, when 20,076 wage-earners were shown as employed, and to the figure
for December, 1936, when 69,957 were recorded, an increase in four years of 49,881. These
figures are only for the firms making returns in time to be classified and do not include officers,
superintendents, and managers, or clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, but cover only those
who are in receipt of wages: as shown in line 3 of question 1 in the summary of all tables.
From the above it will be seen that there is every reason to feel proud of the progress
made and gives encouragement to continue creating conditions which will bring a living to
those who so. far have not found steady employment.
The following chart depicts the employment curve for 1921 and from 1929, the peak year,
to 1986:— T 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
*hT3
Oj 0>
X  >>
p ft
G *i£
w
r.rd
nj OJ
,0 >,
S.2
3 ft
5     a
UU     1—1      UN      I—<      UJ     IV     tTJ
co <o ro to co io t-
rH tf   CO   tf   N
March,
r.,  and  Oct.
i
j
[
Xi   X
Oi     OJ
fc fc
<!    »   «   cj   3    «j
£    fc    fc    hj     fr
rtrtcdQJrt^ciJvUCjaicDjjcjajrtrt^    *
-j^b^rjfCirjfeh&nfll-sEliWrjrjfe      fc
CM©r-t IO<C01MO)!flt-00«lOt-(00
t-rHr-t ©COOOlOCTiCqcTSC-vD^OOCOCvlM
CCGO t-    "3"    ©    D-    -3<    <CO    00 IO    ^    H    H    H   O
N   IO*   CD rH rH Q   "$    CO   04
IO O CO N N O
H W O CC N Cl
CO CO 00 r-l O CO
H CO* CO IO CN
>    b   ft   w £
ft o   £   q   o
3 ° 3 3 i
H
ru u
rj ft
3 ft
HOrDroroo-nrs^^MMHroa)
OjoorjorM^iioJooio-^r^rrDurjOJOoro
h r- M io ^ .J uj M rr, n ^ oj o in
ci co  CO        ^* P        oi n ^" rj"
u
p
C
rt
to June	
and Feb.
h 	
1 X
j     i
]      :
<pr<pii(i-jji-jjJ-s<lJ-si-aS
JJBjBCBOJJJ!
S>   d £   d   d   d S. £ £
NrOr."rrcnirJrDrorOMWr-
C~i    ^—    ro   r*.    r     in    ,—    ,o    i^.    ^    w.    »*
orj orj
O   Ol   CD   tr-   t-   CO
w,    ..    .*-   ^.   1 1   00   —~
n rrj ro ^ t- ro
■r# m" ci
co   00   00   OJ   O   00
P  Crj IM*  tfi  P
rSsa      SsSsB^orj^tSggsjBjgSgaBiao
E E
QJ      »
M'
Oj -O    rr,
S    B    J. :
5   " £ I
o   be +J I
-   rt co
oj OJ
S3 E
■m  G „
0, £ ~j * ? B
oj  oj
1* 2
5 3 S Pf S 5 5
3 6
g E
SmS     oooHsoShnSijSgg
;   rd  X>
:  ft i,
OJ ^.
J CO
ft H
.- §
_0
to  a
'I   5
3
rrj
qj    OJ    BB
a    « '£   G  '£    B£   « REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 15
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
Of the total 106,439 employees reported tinder nationalities, 80,276, or 75.42 per cent.,
were natives of English-speaking- countries, a decrease of 1.27 per cent.; 15,789, or 14.83
per cent., were originally from Continental Europe, an increase of 0.32 per cent; natives of
Asiatic countries employed showed a total of 7,939, or 7.46 per cent., increasing 0.38 per cent.
Employees from other countries also increased from 1.72 to 2.29' per cent.
1931.
1932.
1933. '
1934.              1935.
1936.
Natives of English-speaking countries	
Per Cent.
73.60
15.48
7.07
3.85
Per Cent.
75.26
14.57
8.40
1.77
Per Cent.
76.30
14.62
7.80
1 9.9.
Per Cent.
72.83
15.25
8.28
3.64
Per Cent.
76.69
14.51
7.08
1.72
Per Cent.
75.42
14.83
7.46
From other countries, or nationality not
2 29
Totals 	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLLS.
Following the general trend of recovery indicated in 1936, the number of firms with a total
pay-roll of over $100,000 again increased from 150 in 1935 to 174 in 193'6.
As in previous reports, pay-rolls of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal) are not included, nor are wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, or vessels
engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The lumber industry continued to lead, with 63 firms, an increase of 13, followed by food
products with 22, an increase of 4; metal-mining, 17, up 1; Coast shipping, 10', up 1; public
utilities, 7; general contracting, 6, up 1; garages, printing and publishing, pulp and paper
mills, and oil-refining, with 5 each; coal-mining and miscellaneous metal trades, 4 each;
breweries and wood (N.E.S.), 3 each; house-furnishing, miscellaneous trades, and shipbuilding, 2 each; builders' materials, electrical contracting, explosives, fertilizers and
chemicals, jewellery-manufacture, laundries, machine-shops, paint-manufacture, and smelting,
1 each.
Of the 174 firms reported above, two had a pay-roll in excess of $4,000,000, four between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and five between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000. T 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. —Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing. —Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing axd heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.— Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of— Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-rail ways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mi lis,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.— Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining. — Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.— Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage. ;
No. 23. Smelting. —Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns  covering  36  Firms,
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $221,037.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    135,665.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    587,474.00
Total $944,176.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
373
397
412
424
467
497
68
72
88
79
103
82
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
514
508
467
480
505
621
102
95
91
105
137
151
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria.	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
314
153
6
1
1
12
23
2
23
4
1
1
3
10
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under S6.00	
3
2
1
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
2
2
5
2
3
1
1
1
10.00 to   10.99...
4
13
7
122
27
7
2
12.00 to   12.99...
4
2
10
19
10
14
20
21
62
18
16
6
20
15
24
45
36
77
45
16
5
3
4
3
1
6
13 00 to   13.99...
14 00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16 00 to   16.99...
2
17 00 to   17 99...
18.00 to   18.99...
2
3
8
19 00 to   19.99...
20 00 to   20 99
22 00 to   22.99...
23 00 to   23.99..,
24.00 to   24.99.   .
1
4
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Females.
158
32
2 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 17
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns  covering  7U  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     §168,830.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         94,640.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       688,405.00
Total     $951,875.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January..
February
March
April	
May.
June .
Males.
Females.
528
1
522
1
627
1
712
2
757
2
791
2
July	
August. ..
September
October....
November.
December..
751
722
668
607
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly)
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under |6.00	
1
2
7.00 to    7.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10
5
20
6
52
45
103
65
45
.   100
51
51
51
13
68
26
31
28
28
11
65
16
32
8
6
1
2
2
6
9
2
3
2
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto  11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
1
13.00 to   13.99...
2
1
14.00 to   14.99...
15 00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
2
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
1
1
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26 99.
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29,99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35 00 to   39.99.
40.00 to   44 99...
45.00 to   49 99.
50.00 and over. ..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland 	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
497
273
17
2
1
35
6
10
46
4
2
76
Females.
Table No. 3.
CI0AR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns   covering  5  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.   $1,820.OP
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  712.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,777.00
Total ,  $6,309.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
February...
4
3
3
3
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
4
4
4
3
6
8
2
2
2
2
2
3
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14 00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
1.00	
) to   $6.99.
(to     7.99.
(to     8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
(to 12.99.
(to   13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99,
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25 99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99
44.99.
49.£
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America.,.
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females. T 18
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
TABLE  NO.   4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns   covering  27  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $140,019.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       149,435.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,126,974.00
Total $3,416,428.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February	
April .....
May	
June	
2,415
2,471
2,388
2,437
2,444
2,440
1
1
1
1
2
2
July	
September .
October
November...
December...
2,455
2,505
2,564
2,621
2,703
2,640
2
1
1
2
2
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
i2. oa
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ,
to   $6,
7.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27 99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
2
1
12
7
24
23
44
11
62
49
17
89
84
47
313
209
111
200
75
209
765
212
98
34
27
Under
21 Yrs.
2
2
12
7
1
18
13
3
16
6
1
5
1
6
12
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country ,	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.
884
1,129
38
3
7
4
217
33
281
36
80
1
113
3
127
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns  covering  116  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $744,640.00
Clerks, Stenographers,Salesmen, etc       450,317.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,863,371.00
Total $9,058,328.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
ilales.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February...
April ...
May	
4,648
4,577
4,777
4,718
4,926
5,072
40
39
42
45
50
62
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
5,165
5,352
5,271
4,997
5,075
5,379
84
84
60
46
46
44
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00..
38
2
14
3
12
18
44
31
4
71
104
242
175
109
88
316
183
418
202
164
281
56
73
66
102
418
684
2,230
137
67
4
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
1
2
1
8.00 to     8.99..
10 00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
7
5
73
2
25
4
14
18
13
4
2
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
10
3
5
3
16.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
1
17.00 to   17.99..
3
41
1
2  *
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99
6
20.00 to   20.99,.
21.00 to   21.99..
1
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
6
2
24.00 to   24.99  .
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99  .
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
1
2
30.00 to   34.99
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99  .
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germanjr and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European coxmtry	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan r	
All other countries    ....
Males.       Females.
3,288
2,375
99
25
27
36
29
24
113
8
10
216
4
17
350
69
34
1 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 19
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns  covering  787 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $906,096.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       711,587.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,479,675.00
Total $7,097,358.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March,.......
May	
June	
3,921
3,864
4,734
5,269
5,485
5,724
68
62
68
84
130
116
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December...
5,926
5,938
5,89rj
5,815
5,296
4,900
157
151
87
67
69
61
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
F.mployment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
19
10
6
9
12
48
24
40
29
234
112
170
316
308
1,965
404
450
1,055
469
700
284
188
217
247
84
569
739
255
75
46
6
7
7
7
5
11
15
H
17
14
33
11
8
1
14
7
2
3
1
1
1
11
$6.00 to   $6.99...
6
7.00 to    7.99...
8
8.00 to    8.99...
9.00to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99.
21.00 to   21.99...
1
1
3
2
74
14
4
21
8
12
5
6
1
4
2
3
1
2
S
2
8
3
6
3
3
1
6
1
1
1
3
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
5
24 00 to   24.99...
1
25.00 to   25.99...
1
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28 99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
1
3
2
40.00 to   44 99.
2
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States ...
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan  	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Males.
4,642
3,297
157
9
13
16
241
173
111
433
175
30
1
1
312
158
63
1
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns   covering  16  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $72,597.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    .... 243,373.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  934,874.00
Total $1,250,844.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January  ..
694
10
685
12
February...
655
10
August	
720
12
685
10
September..
7S0
12
645
15
October..   .
743
10
May	
624
12
November ..
697
10
June	
603
12
December ..
699
12
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
14
3
2
3
1
5
3
17
7
9
8
51
4
19
36
53
38
68
46
67
46
61
41
40
36
79
25
2
3
2
2
$6.00 to  $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99
1
1
3
8.00 to     8.99..
1
1
1
1
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11 99..
1
2
12.00 to   12.99
1
1
1
5
1
3
3
1
1
3
8
13.00 to   13.99..
14 00 to   14.99
2
1
15.00 to   15.99
1
1
17.00 to   17.99
18 00 to   18 99.
2
2
1
21.00 to   21.99..
2
1
26 00 to   26.99  .
28 00 to   28 99.
30 00 to   34.99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.        Females.
401
295
28
3
1
H
7
6
36
5
11
5
1 T 20'
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns  covering  551  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $1,465,980.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,453,608.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,989,138.00
Total $9,908,726.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March	
4,000
3,850
3,975
4,441
5,117
5,824
1,207
1,003
978
973
1,375
1,690
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
7,263
7,727
7,325
6,530
5,389
4,442
3,460
3,659
4,174
3,277
1,988
June	
1,300
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
.7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
3.00 ,
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
28.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34 99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
ite over.
54
37
24
24
141
65
130
189
165
398
370
415
335
654
684
841j
725
476
398
641
616
197
255
239
156
615
276
245
SO
301
Under
21 Yrs.
32
18
13
29
30
31
29
110
23
56
54
46
16
25
19
24
9
8
4
2
5
2
1
2
2
1
Fem,<
LES.
Apprentices.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
127
81
101
214
262
431
z30
598
314
717
445
645
201
220
101
107
84
03
48
61
48
21
24
21
16
27
30
19
30
28
4
6
2
1
2
1
16
4
6
4
16
10
6
2
2
1
41
34
1
45
20
17
18
44
16
4
3
6
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
■ France	
Italy	
Germany and Aur-tria	
Central European and Balkan States ...
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia'and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
J apan   	
All other countries	
Males.
4,589
2,407
97
8
12
24
112
128
150
652
120
62
1,272
3
815
100
Females.
3,660
S34
53
2
2
35
75
139
36
113
113
14
3
452
134
TABLE  No.  9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns  covering   59   Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $124,257.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         83,461.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       457,000.00
Total     $664,718 00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
176
356
July	
182
371
February...
184
401
August	
186
369
March	
192
431
September .
191
409
April	
191
435
October ....
192
403
May	
190
430
November..
189
393
June	
178
386
December ..
194
376
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99..
4
1
10
2
3
2
3
2
1
2
8
1
1
2
18
8.00 to     8.99..
1
1
13
7
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
7
3
44
65
74
66
30
24
31
6
12
3
4
2
2
7
3
4
12.00 to   12 99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14 00 to   14 99  .
8
10
9
19
6
11
9
5
6
4
6
1
8
8
4
6
3
22
16
5
1
4
3
1
1
3
1
15.00 to   15 99..
17.00 to   17 99
19.00 to   19.99..
21 00 to   21.99
23.00 to   23.99
24 00 to   24 99.
2
3
25.00 to   25.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99  .
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
1
2
85.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99..
1
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
103
52
2
12
6
11
1
25
312
105
7
2
1
2
3
9
5
3
5
18
1 REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 21
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns  covering  56  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $151,081.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    133,333.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   621,524.00
Total   $605,941.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
623
641
616
618
626
635
111
121
128
148
146
131
Month.
July 	
August...
September.
October   ..
November.
December..
Males.   Females.
658
692
718
731
743
727
126
128
146
166
151
129
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11 00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29 99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
1
1
3
7
8
11
9
28
81
10
48
69
42
31
45
17
34
23
19
16
14
3
25
13
2
2
5
7
15
54
7
16
29
17
18 Yrs.
&over.
3
7
3
2
8
6
20
63
23
12
10
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprem
tices.
3
6
4
29
2
13
1
i'
l
l
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia ,     	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country.  	
China	
Hindustan  	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
479
219
20
1
2
5
21
7
23
27
23
139
44
Table No. 11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns  covering  10  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $23,830.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   81,419.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   87,346.00
Total $192,595.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April. ..
May....
June
Males.    Females.
57
68
59
59
68
Month.       Males.   Females,
July	
August. ..
September
October...
November
December.
67
58
60
61
62
65
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under$6.00.
$6.00 to
7.00 to
8.00 to
9 00 to
10 00 to
11.00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18,00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40 00 to
45.00 to
7.99.
9.99..
10.99.
11 99..
12.99..
13.99..
14 99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18 99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99
23.99..
24.99..
25.99 .
26.99..
27.99..
28.99 .
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99 .
50.00 and over ..
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
4
6
3
3
11
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland..,
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
39
25 T 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns   covering  91   Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $127,537.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       188,409.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      954,788.00
Total $1,270,731.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        .Males.    Females. Month.        Males.   Females
January.
February
March. .
April ..   .
May	
June
523
514
531
569
560
658
854
841
849
886
July	
August ..,
September
October ..,
November
December .
687
578
579
589
568
578
974
982
943
924
902
900
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
$6.99.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29 99.
to   34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
6
3
8
19
7
42
22
12
43
24
72
13
40
22
27
58
12
18
10
2
38
11
3
3
3
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
7
3
6
16
43
63
64
133
317
82
90
24
5
11
1
7
33
8
5
3
1
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America    	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Males.
251
243
17
1
1
2
4
2
10
8
19
1
Apprentices.
15
7
544
324
34
2
3
9
14
11
9
19
22
4
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns  covering  50  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers,  $76,315.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       70,207.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).  321,184.00
Total $467,706.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
Mav	
June	
279
288
293
297
296
308
61
60
61
65
71
78
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
307
322
316
322
331
324
88
92
101
111
112
101
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners orfly).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
$6.00 to   $6.99..
1
3
8
12
20
27
13
24
21
10
30
13
11
27
'    10
3
8
3
3
9
6
10
14
8
1
11
8
5
6
1
5
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99
11.00 to   11.99..
3
3
4
2
6
7
14
15
10
5
6
4
4
3
1
4
3
2
3
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17 99..
18.00 to   18.99..
2
""l"
1
1
1
1
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
2
5
4
4
1
1
1
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99 .
1
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99 .
27.00 to   27.99 .
28.00 to   28.99..
1
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34 99..
35.00 to   39.99..
45.00 to   49.99 .
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia..	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
136
132
8
25
7
4
12
18
3
Males.      Females.
68
35
2 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 23
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns   covering   7U7  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    .. $1,397,851.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       829,127.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 21,296,781.00
Total $23,523,759.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March..,
April
May	
June
Males.    Females.
14,484
13,987
16,482
17,986
18,458
18,717
37
37
43
44
Month.
Males.
July	
18,227
August	
19,116
September.
20,066
October ...
20,143
November .
19,512
December..
17,686
66
54
46
42
41
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy        	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, PMnland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan     	
All other countries	
11,239
2,793
655
29
42
123
229
430
1,025
3,652
875
311
1,775
696
1,290
305
¥ov Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
5
4
12
8
9
16
20
181
136
152
195
2,519
400
1,416
2,994
704
2,594
939
6S5
2,066
764
839
937
678
368
2,090
1,720
877
312
267
Under
21 Yrs.
2
3
5
44
15
30
187
63
78
37
120
21
27
75
16
77
12
21
24
32
6
16
3
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99...
1
1
1
1
7.80 to     7.99,.
8.00 to     8.99...
1
9.00 to     9.99.
2
10 00 to   10.99.
1
11.00 to   11.99...
1
12.00 to   12.99...
18.00 to   13.99...
6
1
1
8
6
2
1
3
6
3
2
2
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
1
2
2
2
19 00 to   19.99  .
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99.   .
22 00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
3
4
1
26 00 to   26.99. ..
27.00 to   27.99.  .
28.00 to   2*.99...
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99...
1
4
2
1
3
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   41.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Males.       Females.
49
8
1
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns   covering   698  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,419,386.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,758,872.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,834,183.00
Total     $7,012,441.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Montb.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March..
April
May.. ..
June
3,184
3,319
3,498
3,781
3,768
3,816
149
140
144
149
149
157
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November .
December..
3,855
3,961
3,810
3,778
3,740
3,707
180
176
156
144
147
146
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners otfly).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26 00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
,00....
S6.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99
28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.  Under
& over. 21 Yrs.
12
11
29
17
63
50
65
376
138
171
169
231
218
146
244
140
178
216
124
118
141
160
490
231
89
43
53
17
17
16
15
26
40
26
47
14
18
39
45
12
S
16
12
8
3
5
2
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
3
2
4
1
8
5
15
13
6
69
12
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States.
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
3,199
1,412
151
14
11
7
43
36
17
77
19
9
3
1
16
34
Apprentices.
46
22
18
23
15
24
14
16
10
6
13
1
3
Males.       Females.
126
25
5 T 24
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns   covering  311   Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $944,765.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        551,871.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     8,036,130.00
Total    $9,532,766.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females,
January,
February
March.
April ..  .
May	
June
4,536
4,518
4,671
4,724
5,208
5,656
21
23
23
23
29
27
July 	
August....
September.
October ..
November..
December..
5,834
5,872
6,072
6,100
5,844
5,515
26
29
31
26
21
20
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to   $6.9
7.99.
to.   8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
1
4
1
1
9
3
27
52
22
49
41
101
99
232
114
58
986
3S4
488
639
1,084
419
1,953
587
173
110
79
5
33
3
1
12
1
Females.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.,
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
1,570
1,670
232
18
9
19
190
140
383
1,264
78
35
15
218
27
11
1
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns  covering  269  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $680,559.0
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      609,144.0
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,363,896.0
Total  $3,653,599.0
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
1,707
1,690
1,802
1,983
2,122
2,188
316
324
330
330
335
350
2,270
2,429
2,428
1,904
1,860
1,819
361
February...
June	
August
September
October   .
November
December
491
458
360
363
347
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to $6J
to 7.!
to 8.!
to
9.99.
10.99
11.99
12.99.
13.99,
14.99
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26,99.
27,99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
&; over.    21 Yrs.
4
6
30
16
10
32
119
162
155
87
174
199
297
135
199
220
98
294
91
64
66
49
44
201
76
33
10
30
11
14
2
13
9
8
29
16
39
25
7
4
3
i
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
2
5
11
9
13
10
32
34
149
89
24
26
40
13
13
3
16
Under
18 Yrs.
1
4
4
11
1
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.
,918
019
4
4
9
74
54
87
94
12
38
16
19
201
Females.
539
131
9
7
68
SO
9
19
12
130 REPORT  OP  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 25
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns   covering  31   Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $271,839.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       947,198.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,130,357.00
Total    $2,349,394.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ,
February
March..,
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
723
711
772
969
1,010
1,089
15
17
14
21
18
22
Month.       Males.    Females
July	
August.. .
September
October...
November
December.
1,156
1,082
1,003
797
812
795
21
17
16
14
15
18
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.99.
8 99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
to   26.99.
27.!
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.9
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
2
1
35
lti
5
3
58
1
31
42
29
10
35
44
35
106
34
68
66
-  84
43
38
55
185
103
32
17
31
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Countr}- of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France    ...
Italy	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Males.       Females.
747
425
37
4
1
2
69
38
8
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns   covering  14.  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $71,700.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    100,122.0
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    151,597 .CO
Total   $323,419.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January..
February.
March   ...
April.  ...
126
132
136
139
142
142
15
15
15
15
16
16
July	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
139
140
137
135
126
124
16
15
14
14
14
14
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
IS. 00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10 99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25 99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99,
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
7
S
19
2
21
5
13
3
1
3
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc,
Russia and Poland :	
Other European country	
China 	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries   	
104
74
3
Females.
13
4
1 T 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns  covering  135  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $500,571.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,043,721.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,727,468.00
Total $3,271,760.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.        Males.   Females,
January...
February..
March.  ...
April	
May	
June	
1,040
1,054
1,048
1,074
1,103
1,103
143
150
143
157
192
J uly	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
1,095
1,103
1,103
1,103
1,117
1,139
172
169
162
160
170
176
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10 00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45 00
50.00
..00..
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
4
7
3
10
15
44
21
33
23
13
34
18
18
15
27
43
18
12
16
7
57
231
201
98
56
8
12
10
5
16
3
8
3
3
4
1
1
1
IS Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
3
2
8
6
16
15
23
37
19
7
9
6
37
1
3
1
1
10
1
1
Apprentices.
3
13
8
13
6
14
3
3
5
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria.	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland     *..
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Males.      Females.
741
396
27
2
8
4
2
14
3
50
177
56
3
1
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns   covering  H  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $406,683.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      381,951.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,906,722.00
Total $4,695,356.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January
February...
2.771
2,761
2,794
2,843
2,894
2,948
87
89
89
88
90
93
July	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
2,998
3,066
3,209
3,217
3,220
3,214
97
96
93
97
100
98
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.99 .
5
1
1
2
5
3
181
99
70
49
152
55
150
121
549
347
59
395
69
140
65
148
33
262
181
62
13
59
3
1
1
8 00 to     8.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
6
5
17
2
2
4
5
2
8
14
4
11
1
5
11.00 to   11.99..
2
3
38
16
14
10
1
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
16.00 to   15.99..
8
i "
4
3
3  "
1
17.00 to   17.99
18.00 to   18.99
19 00 to   19.99
8
20.00 to   20.99  .
1
1
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99
1
23.00 to   23.99  .
24.00 to   24.99 .
25.00 to   25.99
1
6
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99  .
28.00 to   28 99
29 00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99  .
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99
45.00 to   49.99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy :...,
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland      	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
39
15
3>
18
16
81
15
1
529
157
20
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 27
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDINQ.
Returns   covering  US
Firms.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING
Returns  covering
3  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.     $122,942.00
Total     $938,111 00
Salary and Wage Pa}
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-workei
Total	
'ments, 1936.
40,683.00
24,205.00
37,734.00
02,712.00
       i
s)    3,!
 $4,*
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
64C
605
639
761
801
645
3
3
3
3
3
Jul J
Aug
Sep
Oct
606
677
567
689
637
668
2
2
2
1
1
2
January....
February...
March..
May	
2,791
2,831
2,82:
2,86"
2,99;
2,981
27
25
24
25
25
25
J uly	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
2,970
3,053
3,158
3,110
3,138
3,092
25
February....
March	
ember..
jber	
24
24
23
26
June	
December...
26
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners ortly).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F'or Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Appren.
tices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
63
25
20
18
17
21
25
33
25
22
25
22
29
55
82
128
195
244
332
201
174
236
194
138
158
381
84
35
8
5
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
21
3
2
6
4
4
2
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99,.
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16,99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19 99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99.
22.00 to   22 99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over   .
1
1
7
$6.00 to   $6.
7.00 to    7.
8.00 to     8.
)9...
2
5
19...
4
3
4
5
12
6
4
5
20
7
7
10
15
96
200
28
41
35
11
40
8
129
218
76
28
1
2
4
9.00 to     9.99...
10
1
10.00 to   10.99...
1
2
6
11.00 to   11.99...
3
2
12.00 to   12.99...
16
6
13.00 to   13.99...
1
2
1
2
14.00 to   14.99...
1
1
3
8
15.00 to   15.99...
8
2
16.00 to   16.99...
1
1
17.00 to   17.99...
12
2
18.00 to   18.99...
4
7
6   ,
11
16
16
12
5
7
4
19.00 to   19.99..,
4
20.00 to   20.99...
2
2
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
10
1
23.00 to   23.99...
2
1
3
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
1
1
30.00 to   34.99...
1
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over. ..
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
52S
423
60
2
1,307
1,015
85
4
7
4
384
61
54
159
43
16
1
Great Britain and I
United States of Ar
Great Britain and
3
Australasia .
1
2
4
5
1
24
4
Italy	
Italv    .. . .
Germany and Austr
Germany and Aus
Norwav. Sweden, Denmark. Finland.
Russia and Poland
Other European coi
Russia and Polanc
33
29
1
37 T 28
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns  covering  108  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $690,500.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,731,292.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     6,722,792.00
Total  $9,144,584.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
3,505
3,618
3,517
3,672
3,757
3,946
1,406
1,432
1,462
1,476
1,607
1,567
July	
September..
October 	
November ..
December...
3,934
4,007
3,934
3,896
3,745
3,646
1,566
1,615
1,574
1,479
1,487
1,540
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only),
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00   	
4
2
1
6
2
6
3
17
26
225
16
92
53
101
413
119
97
237
163
270
113
98
187
H2
152
1,330
454
178
38
9
1
2
1
1
1
i
12
8
11
2
1
2
4
1
6
2
1
1
14
193
15
6
368
64
22
61
105
664
21
52
5
$6.00 to   $6.99.
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to     8.99.   .
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
1
I
11.00 to   11.99.   .
12.00 to   12.99...
4
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17 00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
1
2
3
2
2
1
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99..,
24.00 to   24.99.
1
o
1
25.00 to   25.99.
1
26.00 to   26.99.
3
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99.
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99..
1
9
35.00 to   39,99...
3
40.00 to   44.99.   .
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia ,	
Belgium 	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
2,256
2,249
173
14
6
8
103
54
21
129
42
16
6
1
3
16
Females.
1,434
480
66
2
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OP  (N.E.S.).
Returns   covering  106  Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $361,526.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      111,574.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,735,337 .CO
Total   $2,208,437.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
June	
1,848
1,779
2,001
2,059
2,140
2,181
68
65
76
106
142
166
July	
August.
September..
October ....
November...
December ..
2,228
2,270
2,143
1,985
1,945
1,879
162
108
105
97
86
80
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6.99 .
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
1
2
1
4
11
4
29
46
28
29
172
372
135
164
162
70
272
117
73
130
17
67
34
28
12
58
57
4
3
2
2
21
26
74
53
35
78
76
75
13
19
63
5
12
2
14
1
1
".'i'"
1
1
8
1
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
i
i
ii
18
70
20
19
12
3
5
5
1
1
4
1
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99.,
2
4
1
2
2
22 00 to   22 99  .
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy   	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China 	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries 	
Males.       Females
1,759
472
41
2
2
11
20
50
34
109
40
4
26
1
95
157
152
11
13
23
J REPORT OE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 29
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering i.,357 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1936.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.__
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc..
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers) —
$11,333,047.00
12,671,524.00
83,587,505.00
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary 	
Kstimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's
from whom returns were not received 	
Transcontinental Railways -   '.	
inquiry, and
Dominion and Provincial Government workers  	
Wholesale and Retail Firms  	
Delivery, Cartage and Teaming, Warehousing,  Butchers,  Moving-picture  Operators,
Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation   	
Ocean Services and Express Companies    	
Miscellaneous   	
$107,492,076.00
$553,965.00
1,350,000.00
12,153,550.00
5,500,000.00
2,900,000.00
3,600,000.00
7,500,000.00
1,400,000.00
34,857,515.00
$142,349,591.00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January. . ,
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June.  ....
July	
August ...
September
October.. .
November
December.
Males.
476
231
951
104
922
135
492
668
928
368
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States.. ..
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Females.
5,06)
4.928
5,034
5,160
6,741
6,139
8,056
8,375
8,711
7,573
1,288
5,589
Males.
Females.
44,502
7,780
23,474
2,225
1,953
180
153
9
128
5
270
47
1,741
105
1,296
224
2,234
91
7,052
179
1,678 .
167
547
25
3,815
21
'     624
1
2,977
501
2,112
323
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 .   ..
243
99
152
67
Ill
$6.00 to  $6.99..
98
111
97
55
67
7.00 to     7 99 .
98
116
141
36
73
8.00 to     8.99..
111
180
259
82
111
9.00 to     9.99..
308
244
339
39
70
10.00 to   10.99..
273
201
548
42
121
11.00 to   11.99..
341
221
352
37
38
12.00 to   12.99..
761
551
1.153
59
98
13.00 to   13.99..
911
266
897
30
26
14.00 to   14.99..
1,640
282
1,359
48
34
15.00 to   15.99..
1,949
343
1,316
46
43
16.00 to   16.99..
4,543
332
794
9
17
17.00 to   17.99..
2,216
122
342
9
10
18 00 to   18.99..
3.586
119
449
10
4
19 00 to   19.99..
7,617
163
254
1
12
20.00 to   20.99..
3,605
99
879
2
7
21.00 to   21.99..
6,045
193
128
6
22.00 to   22.99..
6,072
88
150
3
10
23.00 to   23.99..
2,923
64
73
2
4
24.00 to   24.99..
6,738
76
60
2
10
25.00to   25.99..
3,547
66
66
40
6
26.00 to   26.99..
2,865
23
51
1
3
27.00 to   27.99..
3,243
27
26
6
28.00 to   28.99..
3,276
10
18
1
2
29.00 to   29.99,.
2,229
4
21
1
1
30.00 to   34.99  .
9,884
25
73
17
35.00 to   39.99..
5,722
10
17
6
40.00 to   44.99..
4,592
1,002
8
1
O
4
1,063
86,431
6
Totals	
4,047
10,029
622
902 T 30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. William Alexander Carrothers  _ Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
3. Christopher John McDowell    ._  1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
4. Fraudena Eaton     1902 Blenheim Street, Vancouver.
6. James Thomson  _ — _.  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Officials of the Board.
Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Vancouver Branch Office      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Third Annual Report of the Board of Industrial
Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1936.
Since its formation in April, 1934, the Board has continued to make orderly progress in
the discharge of its responsibilities.
The first report of the Board laid down the principle upon which the Board intended to
proceed in restoring to- industry the foundations in wage-structures that had been shattered
by the stress of the depression.
The report of the following year disclosed the degree to which that object had been attained
in bringing more than 100,000 workers under enactments establishing minimum wages and
controlling hours of work.
The present report may properly be termed a record of further advancement for during
the period under review a number of new regulations have been promulgated. By the revision
of existing regulations minimum wages in some occupations have been raised, and by the
application of the additional statutory powers vested in the Board by legislative amendments
relating to conditions of labour some improvement in that direction has been accomplished.
That the recovery in industry and business has had its effect upon wages is clearly
demonstrated in the statistical tables. The legal minimum has by no means become the
standard, but rather has proved to be the fundamental incentive that has stimulated and
maintained the upward trend so gratifying to record.
Since its formation the Board has held a total of 181 sessions and 131 delegations have
been heard.
During 1936 fifty-four sessions have been held and forty-six delegations have been received,
representing employers and employees in all parts of the Province affected by the Board's
decisions'. To date fifty minimum-wage Orders have been made, affecting the welfare of more
than 125,000 employees.
In reaching its decisions the Board has tried to give fair consideration to all angles of the
problems of industry and labour, and while it has not been found possible to accede to the
requests of both sides in their entirety, the manner in which the findings of the Board have
been received would indicate that they have been reasonable and justifiable in the circumstances.
The practice of calling all administrative officers into conference with the Board was again
followed this year, and as usual the exchange of views obtained from actual administrative
experience was found most beneficial.
STATISTICAL DATA COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
Statistical returns submitted by 3,565 employers for 1936 furnished information regarding
the employment of 21,924 individual women and girl employees. This is the highest total
reached since the Department started to gather figures, and surpasses the 1929 record of the
former Minimum Wage Board, when 20,766 female workers were reported. In that year,
however, 3,602 firms sent in returns, and it is encouraging to note that the peak number was
almost equalled during the year under review. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 31
An increase of 263 firms reporting and of 1,990 women and girl employees is shown over
the 1935 figures, which would tend to indicate that depression conditions have definitely been
overcome.
The following tables have been compiled for the various industries and occupations which
are covered by minimum-wage Orders set by the Board. Comparisons may be made with
figures of four previous years.
In studying these tabulations the reader should bear in mind that the forms sent out to
employers throughout the Province requested figures for the week during 1936 in which most
employees were employed.
Mercantile Industry.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
1932.
479
4,723
4,326
397
$56,086.46
$3,523.49
$12.96
$8.88
8.40%
40.58
421
4,382
3,960
422
1
$51,158.70
$3,353.22
$12.92
$7.95
9.63%
40.38
390
4,239
3,870
369
$48,968.56
$2,750.77
$12.65
$7.45
8.70%
40.92
379
3,930
3,604
326
$46,074.00
$2,622.50
$12.78
$7.12
8.30%,
41.03
402
3,810
Over 18 years 	
3,436
374
Total weekly wages—
$45,984.50
$3,169.00
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
$13.38
$8.47
Percentage of employees under 18 years 	
Average hours worked per week 	
9.82%
42.30
With 58 more firms than in 1935, the total number of female employees is 341 in
advance of the previous year. A slight increase is noted in the average wage for employees
18 years of age or over, being $12.96 per week, as against $12.92 for last year. A relatively
higher increase for girls under 18 years is noted, as the 1936 weekly average worked out at
$8.88, which is 93 cents more than the 1935 figure.
A decline from 9.63 to 8.40 in the percentage of young girls is shown for 1936.
The average weekly hours reveal a slight increase over 1935, standing for 1936 at 40.58
instead of 40.38.
Since the Mercantile Order provided for a higher hourly rate of pay for women working
less than forty hours per week, there has not been such a marked tendency on the part of employers to bring in so many extras for a few hours during rush periods. The payment of a
daily guarantee, equivalent to wages for four or five hours' work, has also helped to curb the
former undesirable practice and has tended towards a more regular employment for a greater
number of employees.
Laundry Industry.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1932.
Number of firms reporting.....	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week 	
81
991
911
80
$11,462.44
$658.04
$12.58
$8.23
8.07%
41.94
81
900
857
43
$10,517.50
$406.74
$12.27
$9.46
4.78%
41.12
72
847
810
37
59,679.17
$309.74
$11.95
$8.37
4.37%
39.91
65
846
785
61
18,964.00
$470.00
$11.42
$7.70
7.21%
37.92
62
864
818
46
19,979.00
$351.00
$12.20
$7.63
5.32%
39.49
Although exactly the same number of firms—namely, 81—completed their returns in 1936
as in 1935, there were 91 more employees on the pay-rolls. The average wage for adult laundry-
workers rose from $12.27 in 1935 to $12.58 per week in 1936. For girls under 18 the average
dropped from $9.46 to $8.23 and 8.07 per cent, of this class of help appeared on the returns as
against 4.78 per cent, in 1935. T 32
DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
While in some instances a shortening of the working-week is looked upon with favour in
this industry, the broken time has been so pronounced of recent years that it causes a certain
amount of satisfaction to note that the average weekly hours rose from 41.12 in 1935 to 41.94
for the following year. As wages are calculated on a strictly pro rata hourly basis in this line
of work, it happens that comparatively few workers receive the equivalent of the legal minimum of $13.50, which is the sum prescribed for a 48-hour week.
Laundry operators contend that the increasing use of electric washing-machines has seriously interfered with the volume of their business; hence staffs are reduced to shorter hours
and corresponding reductions are reflected on their pay-rolls.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years 	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week	
$40
500
2,961
2,878
83
265.89
$956.54
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
42.79
429
2,343
2,303
40
10,189.28
$452.10
$13.11 ,
$11.30
1.71%
41.31
433
2,256
2,209
47
$29,243.64
$499.15
$13.24
$10.62
2.08%
41.31
1933.
1932.
352
1,895
1,797
$24,763.00
$901.50
$13.78
$9.20
5.17%
42.30
361
1,871
1,830
41
$26,448.00
$504.00
$14.45
$12.29
2.19%
43.26
Substantial increases are noted in this group in the number of firms reporting and in the
number of employees recorded. Returns were furnished by 500 in 1936, being 71 firms more
than sent in forms for 1935, accounting for 2,961 female employees, or 618 more than were engaged in this type of occupation during the previous year.
Wage increases for both the adult and the younger worker are revealed by the figures.
For those 18 years or over the weekly average advanced from $13.11 to $13.99, and for girls
under 18 their average weekly remuneration was $11.52 in 1936, an increase of -22 cents per
week over the former year's sum of $11.30.
Comparatively few young girls are found in this type of work, the percentage being 2.80
of the whole number of female workers. This, however, is an increase of a little over 1 per
cent, in comparison with 1935.
Average hours worked per week by woman and girl employees advanced from 41.31 in
1935 to 42.79 for the year under review.
Th.3 Order relating to the Public Housekeeping Occupation provides higher hourly rates
for employees working less than 40 hours a week, with a daily guarantee equal to four hours'
pay. These provisions have again proved their worth in materially assisting to eliminate the
former custom on the part of some employers (chiefly restaurant proprietors) of bringing
girls in for about two hours at the midday peak periods, paying them the mere hourly rate and
deducting for one meal.
Office Occupation.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years 	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years .	
Employees under 18 years  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years .
Average hours worked per week 	
1935.
1934.
1,848
5,344
5,280
64
14,789.14
$645.41
$17.95
$10.08
1.20%
40.88
1,727
4,827
4,809
18
14,596.16
$195.20
$17.59
$10.84
0.37%
40.79
1,716
4,818
4,783
35
12,745.51
$347.80
$17.30
$9.94
0.73%
40.59
1933.
1,810
4,708
4,660
48
1,947.00
$484.50
$17.37
$10.09
1.02%
38.95
1,772
4,614
4,575
39
$83,938.50
$408.00
$18.35
$10.46
0.85%
41.18 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 33
There were 5,344 office-workers reported for 1936, in the employ of 1,848 firms. This
meant 517 more employees than 19®5 and 121 more employers. In 1929, 5,259 females were
recorded on 1,985 office staffs, so it will be seen that the current year's figure of 5,344 clerical
workers has established a record in this classification.
The average weekly wage for the adult worker stands at $17.95 this year, a slight advance
over the 1935 average of $17.59. While cuts that went into effect during the depression years
have been restored in many instances, the general upward swing has not yet overcome the
drastic salary reductions that occurred a few years ago.
Notwithstanding this somewhat slow recovery, it may be of interest to note that the average wage is practically $3 a week more than the minimum prescribed by the Office Order for
experienced employees 18 years of age or over. In tabulating the figures in this group it was
revealed that 502 women in the Province were in receipt of salaries of $25 a week or more.
The average weekly hours showed an almost imperceptible advance over the 1935 figure,
being 40.88 hours in place of 40.79.
A few more girls under 18 were found engaged in this occupation than was the case during
the previous year, although the numbers are still very low. By the time a girl has completed
her schooling and taken a commercial course, usually she will have passed her eighteenth
birthday.
Personal Service Occupation.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
1932.
138
427
417
10
$5,486.48
$66.05
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
38.07
108
376
374
2
$4,873.84
$18.00
1
$13.03
$9.00
0.53%
36.81
110
384
378
6
$4,932.31
$10.25
$13.05
$1.71
1.56%
37.95
90
305
298
7
$4,319.00
$48.00
$14.49
$6.86
2.30%
i           38.93
393
Under 18 years -  .■ ' ■
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years ' ____ _
Employees under 18 years _ - 	
Average weekly wages—
13
$5,302.00
$100.00
$13.95
$7.69
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
3.31%
36.82
Thirty more firms furnished returns in 1936 than in 1935, placing the figure at 138.
These included 427 employees, an increase of 51 over the former total.
Besides beauty-parlour attendants, the Order covers ushers in theatres, whose hours in
suburban localities are often very broken. In some country places picture-shows are held on
certain nights of the week only, and this has a marked tendency to curtail working-hours.
The average working-week was computed at 38.07 hours, which was, however, just about 1%
hours in excess of the 1935 average.
With an average weekly remuneration of $13.16 for employees over 18 years of age, a
gain of 13 cents is recorded from the 1935 figure. The younger workers showed a gain of 1.81
per cent, in numbers from the previous year.
Fishing Industry.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of employees  	
Experienced _	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees —	
Inexperienced employees —	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees 	
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week	
6
32
24
$234.20
$26.73
$9.76
$3.34
25%
26.24
4
11
10
1
$101.35
$4.00
$10.13
$4.00
9.09%
25.33
2
11
11
$96.85
$8.80
26.50
6
15
10
5
$164.00
$50.50
$16.40
$10.10
33.33%
51.60
1
55
48
7
$592.00
$42.00
$12.33
$6.00
12.73%
45.64 T 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Owing to the fact that the Order in this classification specifically excludes the Canning
branch of the industry there are comparatively few employees covered, and, coupled with the
unattractiveness of the work, the result is that very few women are found in this group.
The hours, it will be noted, were short—namely, 26.24 for the average week. The average
weekly wages for experienced employees, however, are not so correspondingly low, standing
as they do at $9.76.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1933.
Number of firms reporting.. __
Total number of employees  	
Experienced- - 	
Inexperienced — 	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees —	
Inexperienced employees -	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees..	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
124
1,791
1,571
220
$28,717.26
$2,462.93
$18.28
$11.20
12.28%
40.46
120
1,689
1,630
59
$27,776.16
$673.00
$17.04
$11.41
3.49%
39.53
109
1,589
1,583
6
1,909.12
$52.50
$17.00
$8.75
0.38%
39.75
104
1,601
1,536
65
$22,622.00
$606.50
$14.73
$9.33
4.06%,
38.42
112
1,646
1,628
18
$28,013.00
$139.00
$17.21
$7.72
1.09%
39.77
Out of the 124 firms who sent in pay-roll data for the current year, those employing private
switchboard operators are included besides the regular telephone and telegraph companies.
A marked increase in the number of operators is recorded for 1936, there having been 102
more women in this type of occupation than appeared in 1935.
It is in this classification that the most noticeable increase in wages occurs. The average
rose from $17.04 in 1935 to $18.28 in 1936, and places the average at $3.28 above the rate of
$15 set by the Board.    The weekly hours were extended from an average of 39.53 to 40.4(6.
The percentage of inexperienced employees showed a marked increase, which, however,
was rather to be expected in view of the greater number employed during the year under
review, new hands evidently having been taken on to be trained.
The average wage for the inexperienced employees worked out at $11.20 per week, a slight
drop from the former figure of $11.41.
Manufacturing Industry.
1935.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees.	
Experienced—	
Inexperienced 	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees-
Inexperienced employees-
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees-
Percentage of inexperienced employees-
Average hours worked per week	
314
2,500
2,167
333
$30,694.89
$3,015.36
$14.16
$9.06
13.32%
42.92
311
2,310
2,111
199
$29,869.50
$1,734.50
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
43.28
284
2,249
1,955
294
$26,975.51
$2,504.27
$13.80
$8.52
13.07%
42.34
284
2,123
1,745
378
$25,627.50
$3,145.00
$14.68
$8.32
17.80%
41.92
290
2,188
1,838
350
$26,036.50
$3,340.00
$14.17
$9.54 .
16.00%
41.23
Although only 3 more firms sent in returns in 1936, still there were 190 more employees
recorded in the industry than in 1935. While the weekly average for the experienced worker
remained practically the same as for the previous year, there was a reduction in the working-
hours. These dropped from an average of 43.28 to 42.92 hours. Girls under 18 years of age
averaged $9.06 per week, which was 34 cents higher than the preceding year's average.
The employees in this group are working in many lines of industrial undertakings.
Reference to the summary of Orders will disclose the varied types of factories covered by the
regulations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 35
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1936.
1935.
1934.
1933.
Number of firms reporting  — ,
75
71
76
62
3,155
3,096
2,986
2,472
2,803
2,681
2,680
2,009
Inexperienced ,  -  	
352
415
306
463
Total weekly wages—■
Experienced employees    	
$41,831.03
$41,167.84
$40,681.77
$31,116.00
Inexperienced employees  	
$3,082.70
$4,032.30
$2,824.65
$4,635.50
Average weekly wages—
$14.92
$15.36
$15.18
$15.49
Inexperienced employees  	
$8.76
$9.72
$9.23
$10.01
Percentage of inexperienced employees  	
11.16%
13.40%
10.25%
18.73%
Average hours worked per week.   _... 	
46.02
46.68
47.17
48.33
There were 59 more employees and 4 more firms about whom the Board received statistical
data for 1936 than for the preceding year.
It will be noted that this is the only group in the nine tabulated in which a decrease in the
weekly average for experienced employees occurred, a decline of 44 cents having been registered.
The average hours worked during the week was 46.02, a drop from 46.68 in 1935. The
actual hours are very broken in this line of work, depending on the run of fruit to the canneries
and packing-houses. At certain times the work is spread over a large number of employees
who are not on duty for a full day, but in this way they are available when the products roll
in in large quantities for immediate handling.
Those engaged in picking fruit are not covered by the Order, as the Act specifically
excludes fruit-pickers from its scope.
The processing of glace cherries was carried on in the Okanagan again in 1936 on a larger
scale than in 1935, many girls being employed to pit the cherries. This work added materially
to the pay-rolls and it happened that in most cases the employees were retained for other work
later on after the cherries were taken care of.
Summary of all Occupations.
1935.
1934.
1932.
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of employees 	
Over 18 years, or experienced..	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced ...
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced,.	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced —
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inex
perienced  	
Average hours worked per week	
3,565
21,924
20,377
1,547
$309,567.79
$14,437.25
$15.19
$9.33
7.06%
41.98
3,272
19,934
18,735
1,199
$280,250.33
$10,869.06
$14.96
$9.07
6.01%
41.79
3,192
19,379
18,279
1,100
$270,232.44
$9,299.13
$14.78
$8.45
5.68%
41.81
$244,
$12,
3,152
17,895
16,444
1,451
596.50
964.00
$14.87
8.11%
41.33
3,184
17,903
16,436
1,467
$255,286.00
$12,934.00
$15.53
$8.82
8.19%,
42.07
With returns bearing on 21,924 actual women and girl employees an all-high mark has
been reached. Since records have been kept by the Department of Labour this is the first time
there have been more than 21,000 gainfully employed women reported. The total shows a gain
of 1,990 over 1935. For one week their total earnings amounted to $324,005.04, which would
go to prove that woman has established for herself a recognized place in the business and
industrial life of the community. We, of course, realize that the yearly pay-roll would not
amount to fifty-two times the sum above mentioned, for, unfortunately, much of the work in
which the women are engaged is of a seasonal nature and sometimes of short duration, as in
certain canneries and packing-houses and some branches of the manufacturing industry. We are glad to note that the weekly average wages for both experienced and inexperienced
workers are a little higher for the year under review than for 1935. They stand at $15.19 and
$9.33, in comparison with $14.96 and $9.07, the respective averages for the two groups during
the prior year.
While the " Female Minimum Wage Act " permits of the employment of not more than 35
per cent, of the female staff at less than the minimum wage fixed by Order for experienced
employees, only 7.06 of this percentage was used by all the firms in 1936, which would indicate
that the quota set by the Statute is a generous one.
For the entire working force of 21,924 women and girl employees their week consisted on
an average of 41.98 hours, which is just a very little longer than was recorded the year before.
During the depression years there was a tendency in certain quarters to place some
employees on part time, but this practice is not in such general use at the present time. Staffs
have been added to, wage-cuts have been restored, and partial employment has been discontinued in many instances, so that more normal conditions of employment are in vogue now
than for several years past.
Name of Industry.
Legal
Minimum
Wage for
Full-time*
Experienced
Employees.
Received Actual
Minimum Wage
for Experienced
Work.
Receiving More
than Minimum
Wage for
Experienced
Work.
Receiving Less
than Minimum
Wage for
Experienced
Work.
Total.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
No. of
Employees.
Per
Cent.
$12.75
13.50
14.00
15.00
14.25
15.50
15.00
14.00
12.96
1,912
113
1,040
1,364
126
165
426
39
40.48
11.40
35.12
25.52
29.51
9.21
17.04
1.24
1,578
270
1,191
3,324
157
7
1,231
944
1,857
33.41
27.25
40.22
62.20
36.77
21.875
68.73
37.76
58.86
1,233
608
730
656
144
25
395
1,130
1,259
26.11
61.35
24.66
12.28
33.72
78.125
22.06
45.20
39.90
4,723
991
2,961
5,344
Personal  service.	
427
32
Telephone and telegraph	
1,791
2,500
Fruit and vegetable	
3,155
Totals,  1936	
Totals, 1935	
5,185
3,796
23.65
19.04
10,559
9,724
48.16
48.78
6,180
6,414
28.19
32.18
21,924
19,934
* Forty-eight hours a week.
The various Orders of the Board, establishing minimum wages for experienced workers
in the respective occupations, also make provision for lower rates for younger or less skilled
employees.
There is nothing in the regulations to prevent employees being paid in excess of the
amounts prescribed by the Orders.
The accompanying table portrays the situation and shows the numbers and proportions
in each industry receiving the actual minimum wage, those in receipt of more than the legal
minimum, and those getting less.
Those whose wages were held to the exact minimum amounted to 5,185 or 23.65 per cent.,
which is over 4 per cent, more than appeared in this category in 1935.
Over 10,000 employees received pay-cheques in excess of the legal minimum, so that 48.16
per cent, of all women and girl employees were paid more than the law actually required.
This is surely very tangible evidence that the minimum wage has not become the maximum,
as certain people continue to assert when this class of legislation is under discussion.
In the section that shows 6,180 employees, or 28.19 per cent, of the total, getting less than
the minimum for experienced workers there are included the less skilled or younger girls
inexperienced employees over 18 years working under permit, and employees working short
time.   This group contains 4 per cent, less than appeared in a similar classification last year. Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in
Continuous Service of Employer reporting.
t3
&
d
ta
u
u
CJ
>
o
ti
13
'•g
s
Name of Industry.
fH
a
C3
ci
CJ
0
OJ
ca
OJ
OJ
a
Cl
ci
OJ
Cl
03
O  QJ    ,
o a
OJ
X
>H
:*
in
!«
in
^
tn
©
CJ
QJ £* cj
j3°r
OQ
O
OJ
tj
S
o
CO
o
O
ta
o
CO
o
o
OO
o
CJ
o
O
*
5S&
z
5
OQ
CO
■*f
ta
CD
t-
00
OJ
•n
£h£
Zp
Mercantile   	
119
2,280
319
437
291
171
163
168
144
164
106
371
4,723
479
Laundry  	
35
294
125
110
46
34
34
45
58
54
38
118
991
81
Public housekeeping 	
104
1,341
292
296
185
151
112
100
81
86
46
167
2,961
500
Office  	
132
1,117
373
464
389
246
255
291
395
335
236
1,111
5,344
1,848
Personal   service 	
19
163
36
62
39
15
24
14
13
14
9
19
427
138
25
1
1
5
32
6
Telephone and telegraph —	
4
408
133
147
70
21
28
76
184
189
78
453
1,791
124
149
871
194
256
164
101
126
137
115
103
54
230
2,500
314
452
1,540
357
267
178
121
56
42
36
39
21
46
3,155
75
Totals, 1936	
1,014 8,039;i,8302,039
1          1          1
1,363
860
798
868
1,026
984
588
2,515 21,924
3,565
The returns received from employers indicated how long each employee had been with the
particular firm, and the appended table sets out the length of continuous service with the
employer sending in the report.
While the total shown as having been with the employer for a period less than one year
may seem rather high, it must be borne in mind that the figures were required for the week of
greatest employment. In the mercantile group this would coincide with the busy Christmas
season, when numerous extra hands are required to cope with the intensive business occurring
at that time. These additional employees do not have steady work and their numbers swell
the total for the short term of service.
The fruit and vegetable industry, being of a highly seasonal nature, contributes an
imposing figure in the short-term column. It can be quite readily understood how necessary it
is to put large numbers to work when the perishable fruits and vegetables are received for
immediate handling. Only a comparatively few firms in this type of industry operate twelve
months in the year; hence the majority of the staffs automatically drop into the section
recording employment for less than one year.
At the other extreme it is noted that 2,515 women had been with their respective employers
continuously for ten years or more. The office group contributes 1,111 such persons out of a
total of 5,344.
It may be interesting to draw attention to the longest terms of service in each classification.
In the mercantile group 1 employee had served her present employer for 28 years, while
two had passed the 25-year mark.
The longest service shown in the laundry and cleaning industry was a 25-year term.
With 28 years of work to her credit, an employee in the public housekeeping occupation
surpassed all others for continuity of employment.
When we come to the office occupation we find 10 employees who have served for 30 years
or more with the respective employers who sent in the returns, the record service period being
one of 39 years.
The personal service group can boast of 1 employee who has put in 27 years of unbroken
employment.
Naturally, in the fishing industry, which is extremely seasonal in character, we do not
expect to find any very long terms of employment, but there were 5 women who had followed
the same line of work with their employers over a period of 6 years.
The telephone and telegraph industry reveals 1 employee with 34 years' uninterrupted
service to her credit and 2 with 31 years.
Sixteen operators have devoted 25 years or more to their employers without changing
firms.
Quite a record is established in the manufacturing group by 1 employee who has devoted
35 years to one employer. T 38
DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
The employee with 19 years' service to her credit appears at the top in the seasonal fruit
and vegetable industry, a rather remarkable achievement, considering the character of the
business.
Proportion of Single, Married, and Widowed Employees and Their Earnings.
Name of Industry
Single.
Earnings.
Married.
Earnings,
Widowed.
Earnings.
3,915
635
1,934
4,630
323
22
1,529
1,852
1,701
$48,267.79
7,509.29
27,211.16
82,206.39
4,094.22
108.13
26,567.33
24,436.93
22,733.55
632
299
774
569
90
10
227
572
1,389
$8,647.81
3,868.80
10,450.20
10,330.94
1,239.07
152.80
3,963.04
8,079.90
21,237.51
176
67
253
145
14
35
76
65
$2,694.35
742 39
Public housekeeping -	
Office  	
3,561.07
2,897.22
219.24
649.82
1,193.42
Fruit and vegetable—	
942.67
Totals              	
16,541
$243,134.79
4,562
$67,970.07
821
$12,900.18
1936, per cent	
75.45%
74.43%
20.81%
21.58%
3.74%
3.99%
The foregoing table depicts the marital status of the women workers and shows the
respective earnings of the single, married, and widowed employees in each class of occupation.
It will be noted that during 19*36 the single wage-earners increased just over 1 per cent,
in comparison with the 1935 numbers. There were fewer married women on the current
pay-rolls by about three-quarters of 1 per cent., and widowed workers accounted for the
remaining one-quarter of 1 per cent, decrease since 1935.
The relative numerical standing of these three classes of employees has shown very little
variation over a number of years, and the Board is still convinced that the married employee
retains her place on the labour market through actual financial necessity. There may be a
few exceptions, but they do not constitute as serious a problem in the distribution of employment as comments of certain critics would appear to indicate.
INSPECTIONS AND COLLECTIONS.
Steadily and systematically inspections and investigations have been made during the
year in all parts of the Province. These inspections amounted to 10,245, and as a result the
sum of $60,172.72, was collected and paid over to men and women who had not received wages
in accordance with the requirements of the various Orders under which they had been working.
Of this amount, $34,796.31 was distributed among men and boys and $21,227.86 to women and
girls. The balance, $4,148.55', was ordered paid to employees as a result of Court cases. In
all, 1,044 firms were affected and 2.043 employees experienced this very tangible benefit of the
protection afforded by the Acts and Orders of the Board.
COURT CASES.
Since the inception of the Board of Industrial Relations we have endeavoured to bring
about observance of the orders and regulations by a process of education. In this we have
met with a great deal of success. Unfortunately, however, there have been and always will
be those who, regardless of warnings, fail to observe the requirements of the Statutes. During
1936 it became necessary to lay charges in the Courts against employers who, when infractions were brought to their notice, failed or refused to abide by the Orders of the Board.
The following summary shows the number of cases and the Statute under which the
prosecution was made, also a resume of the charges and results:—
Cases.
Convictions.
Dismissed or
Withdrawn.
' Female Minimum Wage Act'
' Male Minimum Wage Act "...
' Hours of Work Act "	
' Factories Act'
72
40
56
9
62
38
53
10
2
3
' Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act'
' Truck Act "  	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 39
COURT OASES—Continued.
" Female Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Mah Wing, Ltd., Grand Forks	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Fined $25 and 3.75 costs.
Pacific Cafe, Greenwood  -	
Failure
wage
to   pay   minimum
Fined $25  and ordered to pay arrears.
Mrs.  Hazel Fleming, "Vancouver 	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Fined $25.
Harry  Blacknall,   Courtenay  	
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Fined   $25   and   ordered   to   pay   arrears,
wage
$173.75.
Royal  Cafe,  Courtenay  	
Failure
to   pay   minimum
Dismissed.
wage
Martin Peterson, Trail __	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Fined   $20   and   ordered   to   pay   arrears,
$196.60.
Jack & Jill Coffee Shop, 512 Hastings Street
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
West, Vancouver
wage
arrears,  $92.70.
Independent Financiers, Ltd., 675 Hastings
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Fined   $25   and   ordered   to   pay   arrears,
Street West, Vancouver
wage
$9.10.
North   West   Sack   Co.,   Ltd.,   853   Powell
Failure to keep records
Fined $10.
Street, Vancouver
P.   L.   Barter,   850   Hastings   Street  West,
Failure
to   pay   minimum
Fined $25.
Vancouver
wage
J.  Muckle,  Kapoor _   	
Failure
wage
to   pay   minimum
Withdrawn,  settled;   arrears,  $176.62.
Grosvenor Hotel, Vancouver..	
Failure
wage
to   pay   minimum
Fined $25.
McDonald's   Chocolates,   878   Georgia  West
Failure
to keep records
Fined $10.
and 605 Granville Streets, Vancouver
La   Charme   Beauty   Salon,   Mrs.   Florence
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Guilty ;    suspended  sentence.
Brown, 3066 Granville Street, Vancouver
wage
Fred Romano, Trail	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Withdrawn  upon  payment  of  Court costs
and arrears.
Harry Taylor, Trail.  	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Fined $25 ;   costs, $2.50 ;   and pay arrears.
$103.10.
Stanley    Theatre,    2750    Granville    Street,
Failure to keep records
Fined $10.
Vancouver
Sargen Singh (Second Avenue Wood Yard),
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Guilty ;   suspended sentence ;   $2.50 costs.
1722 Second Avenue West, Vancouver
wage
White Star Cafe, Vancouver 	
Failure
wage
to   pay   minimum
Fined $25 and costs.
Rob Roy Sandwich Shops, Ltd., 812 Hornby
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Fined $25.
Street,  Vancouver
wage
Pacific Dress & Uniform Co., 619 Granville
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Street, Vancouver
Ziegler   Candy   Co.,   977   Granville   Street,
Failure
to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
Bo-Peep Beauty Shop, 3566 Fourth Avenue
Failure
to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
West, Vancouver
Bess'tt Beauty Shop, 2604 Granville Street,
Failure
to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
Canyon View Hotel, Capilano
Failure
to   pay   minimum
Dismissed.
wage
Canyon View Hotel, Capilano..„ ., ..
Excessive   hours   of   work
Guilty;    suspended   sentence;    ordered   to
pay costs.
Louis Lubin, Vancouver	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Dismissed.
Grandview Lunch, Vancouver	
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
wage
Mrs   Tada, Vancouver
Failure to keep records
Dismissed.
Wilcox  Beauty  Parlors,   6031   West  Boule
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
vard, Vancouver
Pacific   Wood   Products,   Ltd.,   1954   Kent
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Street, Vancouver
Pacific   Wood   Products,   Ltd.,   1954   Kent
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears.
Street, Vancouver
wage T 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Star Hotel, 637 Seymour Street, Vancouver
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears.
G. Ricardo Kemp, 355 Burrard Street, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears, $63.
couver
wage
G. Ricardo Kemp, 355 Burrard Street, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
couver
wage
arrears, $116.10.
Glen Lunch, 513 Pender Street West, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimu-m
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
couver
wage
arrears,  $11.47.
Glen Lunch, 513 Pender Street West, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Ordered to pay arrears.
couver
wage
Glen Lunch, 513 Pender Street West, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Ordered to pay arrears.
couver
wage
Wilcox   Beauty   Parlor,   6031   West   Boule
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears, $50.
vard, Vancouver
wage
Connaught Apartments,  2515 Vine Street,
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears, $318.
Vancouver
wage
Dr. Kenneth McRae, Vancouver. _
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears, $127.
Dr.  J.  L. Turnbull,  Braemar Apartments,
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Suspended   sentence   and   ordered   to   pay
Vancouver
wage
arrears, $50.
Marine Cafe, 936 Pender Street West, Van
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined   $25   and   ordered   to   pay   arrears,
couver
wage
$158.75.
Royal Theatre,   142  Hastings  Street  East,
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs on one charge;
Vancouver
wage
(six  charges)
remainder suspended sentence.
Royal  Theatre,   142  Hastings  Street  East,
Failure
to keep records.
Dismissed.
Vancouver
Sam Silas, 796 Robson Street, Vancouver	
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Guilty and ordered to pay arrears, $75.60.
Miller Stores, Ltd., Rossland	
Failure
wage
to
Pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears, $6.90.
Royal Vancouver Yacht Club, Vancouver ...
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Withdrawn when arrears of $176 were paid.
National  Cafe,  Cranbrook 	
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Ritz   Cafe,   Cranbrook...             _ 	
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Sun Lun Cafe, Cranbrook 	
Failure
to keep records.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Patricia Cafe,  Cranbrook	
"Failurp
-,r> Vppti  rpp.orHs
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Ernie Marr, Cranbrook     ■	
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
New   Moon   Cafe,   1   Pender   Street   East,
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 on one charge and ordered to pay
Vancouver
wage
arrears.
New   Moon   Cafe,   1   Pender   Street   East,
Excessive
hours    (three
Suspended sentence on remaining charges.
Vancouver
charges)
Blue Owl Hamburger, Second and Pender
Failure to keep records
Fined $10.
Streets, Vancouver
Blue Owl Hamburger,  Second and Pender
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears.
Streets, Vancouver
wage
Sullivan Hotel,  Kimberley	
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Fined $25 ; costs, $4.25 ; and pay arrears,
$181.38.
R.  P. Hughes,  Kelowna	
Failure
to
pay
minimum
Dismissed in Police Court. Department
appealed this case;   Judge  Swanson  re
wage
versed the Magistrate's decision and fined
defendant   $25   and   ordered   arrears   of
$38.50 paid.
Maxine   School   of   Beauty   Culture,   Van
Collusion  to  defeat Order
Dismissed;   ordered to pay $8.43.
couver
of Board
Travellers Cafe, Kelowna 	
Failure
to keep records
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
Travellers Cafe, Kelowna 	
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Guilty; suspended sentence; ordered to
pay arrears of $27.56 and $2.50 costs.
Travellers Cafe, Kelowna  	
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Dismissed.
Green Star Cafe, Harrison Hot Springs  •
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Guilty; ordered to pay arrears, $12.15;
costs, $9.75.
Frank Wilbee,  3327 Kingsway, Vancouver
Failure
wage
to
pay
minimum
Guilty ; suspended sentence ; arrears, $3.75 ;
costs, $2.50. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 41
COURT OASES—Continued.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
G. P. Bagnall, Vernon.   .
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and costs.
King's Cafe, 215 Carrall Street, Vancouver
Excessive hours  —
Dismissed.
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Suspended sentence;   pay arrears, $8.50.
Failure to produce records
Failure   to    keep    proper
records
Alberta Lumber Co., Ltd., Vancouver
Failure
wage
to  pay minimum
Fined $150.
Kenmore Apartments, Vancouver	
	
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and pay arrears, $75.64.
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
E. J. Winchcombe, Nelson 	
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and pay arrears, $149.46.
P. Bain Lumber Mills, Ltd., Whonnock	
Failure
to post notices..
Fined $30 and $2.50 costs.
Lazareff & Co., Trail 	
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and $7 costs.
Lazareff & Co., Trail. 	
wage
Lazareff & Co., Trail    ,   ._...
Failure
wage
to  pay minimum
Fined $50 and $7 costs.
Lazareff & Co., Trail -_ _
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and $7 costs.
Nick Yoykin, Trail    ■	
Failure
to keep records..,..
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
Windermere Hotel, Victoria  _
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and pay arrears, $77.46.
Failure
wage
to  pay  minimum
Granville Cabs, Ltd., Vancouver —	
Failure
wage
to  pay minimum
Fined $50 and pay arrears, $83.60.
Vancouver Cabs, Ltd., Vancouver	
Failure
wage
to   pay  minimum
Fined $50 and pay arrears, $521.09.
General Signs, Ltd., and Victor David Neon
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Fined $50.
Signs, Ltd., Vancouver
wage
H. A. Roberts, Ltd., Vancouver.	
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Suspended sentence ; ordered to pay arrears,
wage
(three charges)
$116.63.
Rio Vista Auto Camp  (F. R. Brown)
Bur-
Failure
to  pay  minimum
Arrears paid ;   ease withdrawn.
naby
wage
Refrigerator    Fruit    Stand,     10    Hastings
Failure
to  pay  minimum
Suspended sentence ; ordered to pay arrears,
Street West, Vancouver
wage
$50.
Penticton Sawmills. Ltd.. Penticton...
Failure
Failure
Failure
Failure
wage
to keep records .,.,.
to keep records ._
to keep records
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and $3.75 costs.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Fined  $50  and  $3.75  costs.
Failure
wage
to  pay minimum
(two charges)
Naranjan Singh,  Burnaby	
Failure to keep records	
$7.50 costs.
Dollar   Lumber  &   Fuel   Co.,   North
Van-
Failure
to  pay  minimum
Fined $50 and $14 costs ;   ordered to pay
couver
wage
(four charges)
$747.08 arrears.
Wing   Lee   Co.,   258   Keefer   Street,
Van-
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10.
couver
General   Supply   Co.,   Ltd.,   1127   Granville
Failure to keep records.—
Fined $25.
Street, Vancouver
Archibald & Shepherd, Ltd., Vancouver	
Failure
to   pay  minimum
Suspended sentence;   ordered to pay $48.71
wage
arrears in wages.
Archibald & Shepherd, Ltd., Vancouver	
Failure
to  pay minimum
Suspended sentence ;  ordered to pay arrears
wage
$29.40 and $2.50 costs. T 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
COURT OASES—Continued.
" Hours op Work Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Willock  Truck  Equipment  Co.,  Ltd.,  Van
Excessive hours  , ,	
Fined $25 or two months in prison.
couver
Peter Fomenoff, Castlegar.— — 	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
J. G. Lawrence, Vancouver 	
Failure to keep records	
Suspended sentence.
0. S. Lien, 1049 Sixty-fourth Avenue West,
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
Bowman Creek Lumber Co., Ltd., Nelson ...
Failure to keep records
Fined $15.
Pioneer Fruit & Vegetable Co., 1436 Gov
Failure to keep records    -
Fjned $10.
ernment Street, Victoria
Jagat Singh, 779 Market Street, Victoria „
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10.
Old John Fuel Co., Victoria,..., _ 	
Failure to keep records —
Fined $10.
A. G. Beattie, Victoria  	
Failure to keep records
Withdrawn on payment of arrears.
Blackburn   Market,   Seymour   and   Robson
Failure to produce records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Streets, Vancouver
on request
Ruskin Box Manufacturing Co., Ruskin	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Ruskin Box Manufacturing Co., Ruskin	
Failure to post notices	
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Failure to keep records
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
McKenzie Construction Co., Vancouver	
Failure to post notices	
Fined $25 and costs.
Morris Lipson, Vancouver.— 	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and costs.
Weinstein Produce, Vancouver	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and costs.
Alberta Wood Yard, Vancouver	
Failure to keep records —
Fined $10 and costs.
Clover Leaf Dairy, Ltd., Vancouver —	
Failure to keep records —
Fined $10 and costs.
Willock Truck Equipment,  Ltd., Broadway
Excessive hours  ,	
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
West, Vancouver
Wilbee's Service Stores,  Ltd.,  3327 Kings-
Suspended sentence.
way, Vancouver
Failure to keep records
Failure to keep records
Fined $10.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Withdrawn.
Busy Bee Cafe,  1100 Robson Street, Van
Failure to post notices	
Fined $25.
couver
F. R.  Stewart & Co.,  Ltd., Water Street,
Failure to post proper no
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
tices
Chess  Bros.,  Ltd.,  137 Water  Street,  Van
Failure to post proper no
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
couver
tices
Chess Bros., Ltd., 137 Water Street, Van
Working excessive hours ,.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
couver
Lum Foo Wing, Vancouver.
Failure to produce records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Totem Stores. Ltd.. Chilliwack 	
Working excessive hours...
Fined $25 and $4.25 costs.
Mrs. H. McLean, 1209 Fifth Avenue, Van
Failure to post notice	
Fined $25.
couver
National Lunch, Ltd., Vancouver  _~.
Failure   to    keep    proper
Suspended  sentence;    $2.50  costs  and pay
records
arrears, $74.
National Lunch, Ltd., Vancouver	
Failure    to    keep    proper
Suspended  sentence;    $2.50  costs and pay
records
arrears, $13.40.
Refrigerator    Fruit    Stand,    10    Hastings
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10.
Street West, Vancouver
Refrigerator    Fruit    Stand,    10    Hastings
Failure to post notice	
Fined $25.
Street West, Vancouver
McLennan,   McFeely  &  Prior,   Ltd.,   Van
Working excessive hours„.
Fined $15 and costs.
couver
McLennan,   McFeely   &   Prior,   Ltd.,   Van
Failure to post notices	
Suspended sentence.
couver
David Hall Sign Co., Ltd., Vancouver—
Working excessive hours.,.
Fined $15 and costs.
International Junk Co., Ltd., Vancouver—
Working excessive hours-
Fined $10.
International Junk Co., Ltd., Vancouver-
Failure to keep  true records
Working excessive hours...
Fined $10.
Central Creamery, Ltd., Vancouver 	
Suspended sentence;   $2.50 costs.
Coach Lines News Stand, Victoria	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10.
Wing Lee Laundry, 258 Keefer Street, Van
Failure to keep records	
Guilty ;   suspended sentence ;   $2.50 costs.
couver
H. Brown & Sons, Ltd., 50 Water Street,
Failure to keep daily rec
Fined $10.
Vancouver
ords REPORT  OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936.
T 43
COURT CASES—Continued.
" Hours of Work Act "—Continued.
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Tom   Kee   Co.,   240   Keefer   Street,   Van
Failure to post notice	
Fined $25;   in default, 15 days.
couver
Tom   Kee   Co.,   240   Keefer   Street,   Van
Failure to keep records	
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
couver
Green Star Cafe, Harrison Hot Springs —
Failure   to   keep    proper
records
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
Classic  Cleaners,  278  Tenth Avenue East,
Failure to post notice.. -
Dismissed.
Vancouver
Classic  Cleaners,  278  Tenth Avenue East,
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
Alma  Meat Market,  3685  Broadway  West,
Failure to produce records
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Vancouver
Mainland Transfer Co., Ltd., Vancouver.—
Excessive   hours    (four
charges)
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs.
McGavin, Ltd., Vancouver..— ,	
Failure to keep records	
Fined $25.
Canada Billiard Hall, Trail-	
Failure to keep records	
Suspended sentence:   $2.50 costs.
Associated  Financial   Brokers,   Ltd.,   Van
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
couver
" Factories Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Louis  Lubin,  2706   Granville  Street,  Vancouver
Sec.  12,
Sec. 63,
Excessive
Employir
tory
Open on
Open   on
Open on
Open on
Sec.  63,
' Factories Act "
' Factories Act "
hours in factory
g child in a fac-
Fined $15 and costs.
Canada Nut Factory, Ltd., 1090  Mainland
Drive, Vancouver
Arnot & Sons, Vancouver...	
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence and $2.50 costs..
Fined $50 and $2.50 costs.
toria
Fined $50 and $2.50  costs.
toria
Hin Nom, 1719 Quadra Street, Victoria
Hing Lund, 858 North Park Street, Victoria
holiday
Fined $50 and $2.50 costs.
Fined  $50  and  $2.50  costs.
Emily O. Ehvorthy, c/o David Spencer, Ltd.,
Vancouver.
" Factories
Act"
Fined $50  and $2.50 costs.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act.-'
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
Gray's Sawmill, Quesnel	
Albert White, Hixon Creek  	
Kennedy Lumber Co., Ltd., Barriere	
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Failure to pay wages semimonthly
Guilty;   suspended sentence.
Fined $100 and costs.
Fined $100 and $4.25 costs.
" Truck Act."
Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
J. W. Hughes, Kelowna..
Dismissed. T 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WAGE COMPARISONS, 1918, 1934, 1935, 1936.
The accompanying tables set out in a graphic way the wage trends in non-seasonal occupations for the past three years and afford a convenient comparison with conditions existing
in 1918, the year in which minimum-wage legislation was introduced in the Province.
One very noticeable feature in these figures is the decline in the percentage of the younger
employees, which shows that employers have not taken undue advantage of the lower rates
fixed in the Orders for this class of worker.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.          j
1934.
1935.
1936.
Average weekly wages—
I
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
l
1
$12.65
$7.45
8.70%
$12.92
$7.95
9.63%
$12.96
$8.88
Percentage of employees under 18 years.... -
8.40%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years..
Employees under 18 years.
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$12.58
$8.23
8.07%
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years _	
Employees under 18 years .—
Percentage of employees under 18 years-
$13.99
$11.52
2.80%
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years 	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$17.30
0.73?
$17.59
$17.95
$10.84
$10.08
0.37%
1.20%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years..	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
$13.16
$6.60
2.34%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees ..-.	
Inexperienced employees  .....
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
$15.55
$11.90
8.70%
$17.00
$8.75
0.38%
$17.04
$11.41
3.49%
$18.28
$11.20
12.28% REPORT  OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936.
T 45
Manufacturing Industry.
1918.
1934.
1935.
1936.
Average weekly wages—
$12.54
$9.57
28.64%
$13.80
$8.52
13.07%
$14.15
$8.72
8.61%
$14.16
$9.06
NEW ORDERS.
Reference to the Summary of Orders in the Appendix to this report will show that several
Orders were revised during the year and, in addition, new Orders were promulgated for occupations that had not been covered previously.
The occupation of taxicab-driver was dealt with under Order No. 33, which replaced the
former Order No. 6.
The office occupation came in for revision and Order No. 34 superseded Order No. 4.
By Order No. 35 the wood-working industry was given attention. This replaced Order
No. 11, and one of its new provisions prescribed rates of pay for male persons under 18 years
of age.
Order No. 36 relating to the sawmill industry was promulgated to apply to the whole of
the Province, and in this way took the place of Orders 2 and 14, which formerly dealt with
territories west and east of the Cascade Mountains separately. A reduction in the percentage
of employees permitted to be paid less than the rate for those over 21 years of age was effected
by the Order, which fixed wages for all male employees over or under 21 years of age.
The box-manufacturing industry came in for attention and by Order No. 37 cancelled
Order No. 7, set rates for boys under 18 years of age, and reduced the percentage allowance
whereby certain employees might be paid less than the rate fixed for males 21 years of age
or over.
Order No. 38 relating to the mercantile industry replaced former Order No. 10', and contained new provisions designed to help young men between 18 and 21 and between 21 and 24,
who were either totally inexperienced or who were recommencing employment in the industry.
Special rates were set for their employment under permit from the Board, and the plan has
proved very satisfactory, enabling these youths to find employment where it would otherwise
have been difficult for them to find a place in the industry.
Orders varying conditions in the fruit and vegetable industry were passed during the year,
and certain temporary measures in connection with the male and female mercantile Orders
were also put into effect.
Order No. 39, establishing a minimum wage for first-aid attendants, was a completely new
Order, and by its enactment a class of employee which had not previously enjoyed the benefit
of the Board's protection now became covered by an appropriate Order.
Order No. 40 established a minimum wage in the carpentry trade for employees in the
southerly portion of Vancouver Island.   This was a new enactment by the Board.
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
There still seems to be an opinion in some quarters that the " Hours of Work Act " applies
to all workers in the Province, and it is again considered necessary to print for general information the Schedule in the Act when passed by the Legislature.
schedule.
(1.)   Mining, quarrying, and other works for the extraction of minerals from the earth.
(2.) Industries in which articles are manufactured, altered, cleaned, repaired, ornamented, finished, adapted
for sale, broken up or demolished, or in which materials are transformed ; including ship-building and the generation, transmission, and transformation of electricity or motive power of any kind, and logging operations.
(3.) Construction, reconstruction, maintenance, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic
or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the
preparation for or laying the foundations of any such work or structure. T 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
To the above have been added, with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:—
Occupation of barbering, August 2nd, 1934.
Mercantile industry, August 9th, 1934.
Baking industry, November 22nd, 1934.
Catering industry, December 1st, 1934.
Transportation industry, June 20th, 1935.
Occupation of elevator operator, February 28th, 1935.
Occupation of hotel clerk, September 25th, 1935.
Employers reported 90,871 employees, of whom 87.12 per cent, were working 48 hours or
less per week, 6.42. per cent, between 48 and 54 hours per week, and 6.46 per cent, in excess
of 54 hours per week.
A comparison with previous years may be seen in the following table:—
Year.
Firms
reporting.
Employees
reported.
48 Hours or
less per
Week.
Between 48
and 54 Hours
per Week.
In excess of
54 Hours.
1930                                  	
4,704
4.088
3,529
3.530
3,953
4,153
4,357
87,821
84,791
68,468
71,185
75,435
81,329
90,871
Per Cent.
77.60
83.77
80.36
77.95
85.18
88.78
87.12
Per Cent.
13.36
6.79
7.70
10.93
5.76
5.26
6.42
Per Cent.
9.04
1931       -      - -        -   ....
9.44
1932  	
1933         - -    	
11.92
11.12
1934
1935   	
9.06
5.96
1936 - -	
6.46
The average weekly working-hours for all employees for same years being:
1936        	
1935      j.	
1934         :   _ _	
1933  —       	
1932          	
1931      	
1930 ...         	
47.63
47.17
47.32
47.35
47.69
47.37
48.62
Since the " Hours of Work Act" came into effect we have shown the average weekly hours
by industries and the following table continues this effort:—
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries.
Industry.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
Breweries... 	
Builders' materials, etc. - 	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..
Coal-mining   -
Coast shipping -  	
Contracting — —
Explosives, chemicals, etc.-	
Food products, manufacture of..
Garment-making..—	
House-furnishing   	
Jewellery, manufacture of  	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of..
Lumber industries—
Logging - 	
Logging-railways..
Lumber-dealers	
Planing-mills	
Sawmills.	
Shingle-mills .
Metal trades —
Metal-mining—	
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
46.17
40.64
46.00
46.44
51.11
43.97
49.70
49.25
46.58
41.53
39.16
46.44
46.69
48.28
49.34
45.80
48.55
48.48
47.12
45.70
50.34
46.51
45.81
42.19
42.71
47.93
51.82
43.42
42.00
47.83
43.68
43.33
42.00
44.40
41.33
48.41
50.36
45.28
48.26
49.15
45.50
45.85
52.11
44.96
46.41
44.97
44.13
48.00
50.04
43.68
47.76
50.60
44.89
43.91
43.47
44.05
46.17
48.33
49.69
45.93
48.00
48.37
46.69
45.39
51.51
45.82
45.15
44.55
44.38
47.99
49.72
43.81
48.36
48.85
42.60
45.50
43.54
44.49
46.18
48.46
52.46
47.30
49.16
48.35
47.46
45.02
50.05
48.93
44.98
44.44
43.45
48.03
48.58
44.57
43.83
50.54
44.79
44.92
44.43
44.74
45.61
48.66
50.70
45.07
48.45
48.50
47.28
45.36
49.89
46.17 REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 47
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries—Continued.
Industry.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.
1936.
47.03
44.07
44.61
44.79
42.81
53.24
45.43
44.72
46.29
43.68
44.09
48.30
43.53
46.47
44.87
45.33
44.82
44.01
44.37
47.93
44.06
41.39
44.67
44.19
42.76
43.81
44.10
47.99
43.97
44.27
44.87
46.09
43 87
44 54
Pulp and paper manufacturing— 	
47.85
Smelting _ 	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc	
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified)
47.90
45.29
46.05
Enforcement of the " Hours of Work Act " during the year has been very satisfactory, and
employers are now realizing that overtime cannot be worked without first making application
for a permit.
During the year under review 1,0-53 such permits were granted for emergency work not
exempt by regulations made pursuant to the Act.
Prior to the " Hours of Work Act" employees on a weekly or monthly rate had to work
overtime when required, usually with no remuneration for the additional hours.
In an endeavour to curtail overtime the Board of Industrial Relations has adhered as
closely as possible to the policy that overtime permits- be granted on condition that not less than
time and one-quarter of the employee's rate of pay be paid; this ruling has been a boon to
many workers who would otherwise have worked the additional hours without additional
remuneration.
A return of overtime worked must be made to the Department showing the names of the
employees who worked overtime, their rate of pay, and the amount paid under the permit, thus
affording a complete check on each permit.
Although the number granted for 1936 exceeds the previous year, this has resulted from
closer inspection on the part of the staff, who are on the lookout, even after business hours,
for any infraction of labour legislation.
CONCLUSION.
In concluding this report, we again acknowledge with appreciation the assistance and
co-operation from many quarters which has proved invaluable in assisting the Board and its
officials in the performance of their duties.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
William Alexander Carrothers.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
James Thomson. T 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO "MALE MINIMUM WAGE
ACT, 1934," AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT, 1934."
BAKING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 17, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Bakers—
21 years of age and over —
18 years and under 19 years—
19 years and under 20 years....
20 years and under 21 years ...
Delivery salesmen..	
40c.
25c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
48
48
48
48
54
BARBEEING  (MALE).
Order No. 42, Effective June 14th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 8, Effective August 3rd, 1931,.)
Barbering shall have the meaning set out in section 2 of the " Barbers Act," chapter 5, Statutes,
1924, and amendments.
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
1
$18.00 week                 40 to 48 hours.
(Maximum hours, 48 per week.)
Daily minimum, $1.80
BOX-MANUFACTURING  (MALE).
Order No. 37, Effective April 1st, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 7, Effective August 3rd, 193^.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the making of wooden boxes, barrels, kegs, casks, tierces,
pails, or other wooden containers.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Adult males.. _   _ —. 	
Not more than 10 per cent, of adult males may be employed at not less than
Males 18 to 21 years of age.—   —     -	
Males under 18 years of age —   _	
35c.
25c.
25c.
20c.
48 (except June,
July, August, and
September).
BUS-DRIVERS   (MALE).
Order No. 31, Effective October 28th, 1935.
Includes every male person in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for
more than seven passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which a charge is made.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Hours.
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich-
45c.
50c.
67 He.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours
in  any one day or
50 hours in any one
week. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 49
CARPENTRY TRADE  (MALE).
Order No. 40, Effective February 1st, 1937. *
Includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with the construction and erection of
any new building or structure or part thereof, and of the remodelling, alteration, and repairing of any
existing building or structure or any part thereof.
Area.
Hourly Rate.
Land Districts of Victoria, Lake, North Saanich, South Saanich, Esquimalt, Highland, Metcho-
70c.
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY (MALE).
Order No. 12, Effective October 19th, 1934.
Includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building, railway,
tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well,
telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other work of
construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations of any such work or structure.
Area.
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
over.
Hourly Rate,
18 to 21 Years.
Hours per
Week.
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo,
New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Esquimalt, Saanich, Burnaby,
Oak Bay —   	
45c.
40c.
35c
30c.
48
48
ELEVATOR OPERATORS  (MALE).
Order No. 32, Effective November 28th, 1935.
(Superseding Order No. 19, Effective March 1st, 1935.)
Occupation.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Elevator operators, 18 years of age and over *" _	
$14.00 per week.
37%c. per hour.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
For female operators' wages and hours see Public Housekeeping; Order No. 30.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM   (MALE).
Order No. 18, Effective March 1st, 1935.
Includes every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of
a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while
under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder of a special or temporary
certificate.     (See "Boiler Inspection Act," section 28  (1).)
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Engineer...—	
Engineer, special..
50c.
40c.
48
48
Note.— (a.) Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the " Hours of Work Act" 48 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(b.)   For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
tc.) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 40 cents per
hour (Order 18B). ,      .,v.
4 	
T 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS  (MALE).
Order No. 39, Effective August 1st, 1936.
First-aid attendant means every male employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
under the authority of a certificate of competency in first aid, satisfactory to the Workmen's Compensation Board of British Columbia, and designated by his employer as the first-aid attendant in charge.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Rate.
First-aid attendant-
Assistant first-aid attendant	
Overtime rate when engaged in first-aid work~
50c.
$4.00
4.00
Note.— (a.)  " Hours of Work Act " regulates the daily hours in the industry.
(0.) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any industry or occupation within an industry, the first-aid
attendant employed in such industry or occupation must be paid such higher rate.
(c.) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the medical practitioner or hospital.
FISHING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Effective since February 28th, 1920.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50 per week.
$12.75 per week for 1st 4 months.
32%*c. per hour.
13.75 per week for 2nd 4 months.
14.75 per week for 3rd 4 months.
Licences   required  for  inexperienced   employees
18 years of age or over.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY (MALE).
Order No. 47, Effective July 15th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 22, Effective April 18th, 1935.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for
sale or use of any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
38c.
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
57c.
76c.
28c.
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
42c.
56c.
Note.— (1.) Where an employee is paid a higher hourly rate than the minimum fixed for the first ten hours, the
overtime rate for all hours in excess of ten shall not be less than the rates fixed in the Order.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936.
T 51
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 46, Effective July 12th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 21, Effective April 16th, 1935.)
Includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting
for sale or use any kind of fruit or vegetable or seed.
Hours per Day.
Hourly Rate.
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
First ten hours
11th and 12th hours
In excess of 12 hours
(Payable to 90 per cent, of employees.)
45c.
60c.
(Payable to 10 per cent, of employees.)
37y2c.
50c
Note.— (1.) Where an employee is paid a higher hourly rate than the minimum fixed for the first ten hours, the
overtime rate for all hours in excess of ten shall not be less than the rates fixed in the Order.
(2.)   Piece-workers to receive not less than minimum rates.
(3.) After five (5) hours continuous employment, employees must have one (1) hour free from duty, unless
shorter period approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
JANITORS  (MALE).
Order No. 43, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 23, in Effect from April 18th, 19,
October 3rd, 1935.)
5, and Order No. 23k, in Effect from
1. Includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, or janitor-fireman.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of four  (4)  residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month
29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)
per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month. T 52 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitor
shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calender week.
(b.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitor shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calender week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
JANITRESSES  (FEMALE).
Order No. 44, Effective June 1st, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 29, in Effect from October 3rd, 1935.)
1. Includes every person employed as janitress, janitress-cleaner, or janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
3. (a.) Resident janitress in apartment buildings of four (4) residential suites and under, thirty-
seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour.
(6.)  Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $22.00 per month; 29 residential suites, $87.00 per month;
6 residential suites, $25.00 per month; 30 residential suites, $89.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $28.00 per month; 31 residential suites, $91.00 per month;
8 residential suites, $31.00 per month; 32 residential suites, $93.00 per month;
9 residential suites, $34.00 per month; 33 residential suites, $95.00 per month;
10 residential suites, $37.00 per month; 34 residential suites, $97.00 per month;
11 residential suites, $40.00 per month; 35 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $43.00 per month; 36 residential suites, $101.00 per month;
13 residential suites, $46.00 per month; 37 residential suites, $103.00 per month;
14 residential suites, $49.00 per month; 38 residential suites, $105.00 per month;
15 residential suites, $52.00 per month; 39 residential suites, $107.00 per month;
16 residential suites, $55.00 per month; 40 residential suites, $109.00 per month;
17 residential suites, $58.00 per month; 41 residential suites, $111.00 per month;
18 residential suites, $61.00 per month; 42 residential suites, $113.00 per month;
19 residential suites, $64.00 per month; 43 residential suites, $115.00 per month;
20 residential suites, $67.00 per month; 44 residential suites, $117.00 per month;
21 residential suites, $70.00 per month; 45 residential suites, $119.00 per month;
22 residential suites, $73.00 per month; 46 residential suites, $121.00 per month;
23 residential suites, $75.00 per month; 47 residential suites, $123.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $77.00 per month; 48 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
25 residential suites, $79.00 per month; 49 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
26 residential suites, $81.00 per month; 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month;
27 residential suites, $83.00 per month;     over 50 residential suites, $125.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $85.00 per month;
(c.) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the pay-roll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (6).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the pay-roll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause (6).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid thirty-seven and one-half cents
(37%c.) per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for two (2) rooms and
bath-room, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed $25
per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a.) In any apartment building containing twenty (20) residential suites and over, every janitress shall be given twenty-four (24) consecutive hours free from duty in each calender week.
(6.) In any apartment building containing not more than nineteen (19) and not less than twelve
(12) residential suites, every janitress shall be given eight (8) consecutive hours free from duty in each
calender week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 53
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING  (FEMALE).
Order in Effect since March 31st, 1919.
Experienced Employee—Weekly rate, $13.50.    Hours per week,
Inexperienced employee .
Under 18 years of age.
Weekly rate.
$8.00 for 1st 4 months.
$8.50 for 2nd 4 months.
$9.00 for 3rd 4 months.
$10.00 for 4th 4 months.
$11.00 for 5th 4 months.
$12.00 for 6th 4 months.
18 years of age and over.
Weekly rate.
$9.00 for 1st 4 months.
$10.50 for 2nd 4 months.
$12.00 for 3rd 4 months.
Licences required in this
class.
Hours per week, 48
Note.— (a.)  Above rates are based on a 48-hour week.
(6.)  Hours of work governed by " Factories Act."
LOGGING  (MALE), WEST OF THE  CASCADE MOUNTAINS AND EXCLUSIVE  OF  SKEENA
RIVER BASIN EAST OF KHYEX RIVER.
Order No. 1, Effective April 27th, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, mining-prop, and
pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties,
mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Adult males .
Trackmen	
Cook- and bunk-house employees-
40c. per hour
tS7y2c. per hour
$2.75 per day
48
48
Unlimited.
Note.—Certain exemptions regarding working-hours.     (See "Hours of Work" Regulations.)
LOGGING (MALE), EAST OF THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS AND SKEENA RIVER BASIN EAST
OF THE KHYEX RIVER.
Order No. 13, Effective October 19th, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, mining-prop, and
pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties,
mining-props, and piles.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Adult males 	
Cook- and bunk-house employees .
35c. per hour
$2.75 per day
48
Unlimited.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY  (FEMALE).
Order No. 25, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order in Effect since November 20th, 1923.)
Includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting,
printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for use or sale any article or commodity,
exclusive of fish, fruit, or vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees..
$14.00
48 T 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 1.
Includes the manufacture, preparation, or adapting for use or sale
of: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-
powders, molasses, sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and
milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, bread, biscuits, cakes,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, eggs, soft drinks, yeast, chip and shoestring potatoes, cereals, cooked foods, salads, ice-cream cones, other
food products, cans, fruit and vegetable containers, paper boxes and
wooden boxes, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, brushes, whisks, pails,
wash-boards, clothes-pins, matches, explosives, munitions, gas-
mantles, window-shades, veneer products, batteries, plant fertilizers,
maps,   saw-teeth   and   holders,   mats,   tiles,   ropes,   and   shingles
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—■
$8.00 a week for the first two months of
employment.
10.00 a week for the second two months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third two months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 2.
Includes the manufacture of: Cotton bags, paper bags, envelopes,
overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, uniforms, gloves, hats,
caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, boots and shoes, tents,
awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding, pillow-covers, loose
covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made
millinery, knitted goods, blankets, machine-made cigars, pulp and
paper-mill products, artificial flowers, lamp-shades, flags and other
decorations, worsted-mill products, baskets, wreaths, and other
floral pieces, pianos, optical goods, aeroplanes, toys and novelties,
rayon products, stockings and lingerie (including repair of same),
and dipped chocolates
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
basis.
Not less than—
$8.00 a week for the first four months
of employment.
10.00 a week for the second four months
of employment.
12.00 a week for the third four months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Inexperienced Employees—Schedule 3.
Includes   bookbinding,   embossing,   engraving,   printing,   dress-making,
Whether on a time-work or piece-work
men's and women's tailoring, taxidermy, and the manufacture of
basis.
ready-to-wear   suits,   jewellery,   furs,   leather   goods,   hand-made
Not less than—
cigars, and hand-made millinery
$7.00 a week for the first six months of
employment.
10.00 a week for the second six months
of employment.
13.00 a week for the third six months
of employment.
14.00 a week thereafter.
Hours per week, 48.
Note.—Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
MERCANTILE  (MALE).
Order No. 38, Effective July 20th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 10, dated August 10th, 193i.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade.
Experienced Employees.
Rate.
Hours.
(2.) 21 years of age and over..
(3.) 21 years of age and over-
Minimum rate per day	
$15.00 per week
40c. per hour
$1.60 per day.
37% to 48 hours per week.
If less than 37% hours. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 55
Males under Twenty-one  (21)  Years op Age.
Minimum Rates for Beginners under Eighteen (18)  Years of Age.
87% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
(4.)  (1.)
$6.00 per week..
7.50 per week-
9.00 per week..
11.00 per week..
13.00 per week-
15.00 per week-
Under 17 years
17 and under 18
18 and under 19
19 and under 20
20 and under 21
Thereafter
16c.
20c.
24e.
29c.
35c.
40c.
65c.
80c.
95c.
$1.15
1.40
1.60
Beginners and those recommencing, Eighteen (18) Years and under Twenty-one (21), to whom Permits
have been issued by the Board, under Section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate. Daily Minimum.
(4.) (2.)
$8.00 per week, 1st 12 months	
10.00 per week, 2nd 12 months... 	
13.00 per week, 3rd 12 months	
Thereafter rates as shown in 2 or 3.
18 to 21
18 to 21
18 to 21
21c.
27c.
35c.
86c.
$1.10
1.40
Casual Employment.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
Male persona 18 and under 21 years of age, whose work does not exceed five
(5) days in any one calendar month, may be employed without permit at
30c.
$1.20
(5.) Males Twenty-one (21) Years and under Twenty-four (24).
Beginners and those recommencing, to whom Permits have been granted, under Section 6
of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
87% to 48 Hours per Week.
Age.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
Hourly Rate.
Daily Minimum.
$9.00 per week, 1st 6 months....
11.00 per week, 2nd 6 months-
13.00 per week, 3rd 6 months..
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
21 and under 24
Thereafter the rates as shown in 2 or 3.
24c.
29c.
35c.
95c.
$1.15
1.40
Note.—Bicycle-riders and foot messengers, employed in wholesale and  (or)  retail establishments, shall be paid
at the rates shown in the above Order, and are deleted from the Transportation Order No. 26. T 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
DRUG-STORES   (MALE).
Apprentice Scale for Indentured Apprentices approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.
Weekly Rate.
*  Hours per Week.
1
38_ - 	
MERCANTILE  (FEMALE).
Order No. 24, Effective July 1st, 1935.
(Superseding Order dated September 28th, 1927.)
Includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or)  retail trade.
Rate.
Hours per. Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum, 18 years of age or over	
$12.75 a week.
35c. per hour
$1.40 per day.
40 to 48
If less than 40 hours
per week.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$7.50 a week for 1st 3 months.
20c.
per hour during 1st 3 months.
8.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
21c.
per hour during 2nd 3 months.
8.50 a week for 3rd 3 months.
23c.
per hour during 3rd 3 months.
$.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
25c.
per hour during 4th 3 months.
$.50 a week for 5th 3 months.
26c.
per hour during 5th 3 months.
10.00 a week for 6th 3 months.
27c.
per hour during 6th 3 months.
10.50 a week for 7th 3 months.
29c.
per hour during 7th 3 months.
11.00 a week until age of 18 years is reached.
30c.
per hour until age of 18 years is reached.
Minimum of $1.00 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or Over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$9.00  a week  1st 3  months.
10.00 a week 2nd 3 months.
11.00 a week 3rd 3 months.
12.00 a week 4th 3 months.
12.75 a week thereafter.
25c. per hour 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
30c. per hour 3rd 3 months.
35c. per hour 4th 3 months.
Minimum of $1.25 per day.
Note.— (a.)  Licences must be obtained for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over at above rates.
(b.)   Maximum working-hours, 48 per week. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 57
OFFICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 34, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 4 of May 25th, 1934.)
Includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks, filing
clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer operators,
auditors, attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Experienced Employees 18 Years op Age or over.
37% to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 37% Hours per Week.
$15.00 per week.
40c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.60 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age and over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
37 ^ to 48 Hours p?r Week.
Less than 37 M; Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st three months.
12.00 a week for 2nd three months.
13.00 a week for 3rd three months.
14.00 a week for 4th three months.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st three months.
32 ^c. per hour for 2nd three months.
35c. per hour for 3rd three months.
371/^c. per hour for 4th three months.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
37V2 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than Zt% Hours per Week.
$11.00 a week for 1st six months.
12.00 a week for 2nd six months.
13.00 a week for 3rd six months.
14.00 a week for 4th six months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
15.00 a week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st six months.
32He. per hour for 2nd six months.
35c. per hour for 3rd six months.
37M;C. per hour for 4th six months or until
employee reaches age of 18 years.
40c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum in any one day must equal four hours' pay.
Note.—Office employees are not allowed to exceed eight hours per day without a permit.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 27, Effective September 5th, 1935.
(Superseding, in part, Personal Service Order Effective since September 15th, 1919.)
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring; hairdressing; barbering; massaging;
giving of electrical, facial, scalp, or other treatments; removal of superfluous hair; chiropody; or other
work of like nature.
Rate.
Hours per Week.
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over...
Experienced employees 18 years of age or over-
Minimum    	
SI 4.25
37V2C.   per  hour
$1.50   per   day
40 to 48
Less than 40 hours
per week. T 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Inexperienced Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 6 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 6 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 6 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 6 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 6 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 6 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 6 months,
35c. per hour during 4th 6 months,
or until employee reaches
or until employee reaches age
age of 18 years.
of 18 years.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37%c. per hour thereafter.
Minimum,   $1.25 per day.
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or Over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$10.00 a week for 1st 3 months.
27c. per hour during 1st 3 months.
11.00 a week for 2nd 3 months.
29c. per hour during 2nd 3 months.
12.00 a week for 3rd 3 months.
32c. per hour during 3rd 3 months.
13.00 a week for 4th 3 months.
35c. per hour during 4th 3 months.
14.25 a week thereafter.
37 %c. per h»ur thereafter.
Minimum, $1.25 per day.
Licences required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Note.—Employees waiting on call to be paid according to rates to which they are entitled as set out above.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Effective since September 15th, 1919.
This includes the work of females employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries,
and other public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service-stations, or as drivers of motor-cars
and other vehicles.
(Other classes of work originally in this Order now covered by Order No. 27.)
Wage Rate.
Weekly Hours.
$14.25 per week.
2911/i6C per hour.
48  hours.
Note.— (a.) Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, and the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 80 cents an hour, with a minimum payment of
75 cents.
(b.)  Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less than
$10.80  a  week.     (Ushers  in  this  category  may  be  employed  only  between   1.30   p.m.   and   11   p.m.)
(c.)  Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
(d.)   No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age.    No apprenticeship considered necessary for ushers.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION  (FEMALE).
Order No. 30, Effective October 3rd, 1935.
(Superseding Order No. 5 of May 24th, 1934.)
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, cooks, and kitchen-help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where food is cooked,
prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids in hotels, lodging-
houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments are operated
independently or in connection with any other business;   and the work of all female elevator operators.
Experienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$14.00 per week.
37M:C. per hour.
Minimum daily rate, $1.50. REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 59
Inexperienced Employees 18 Years of Age or over.
(Licence required in this Class.)
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$12.00 per week for 1st three months.
14.00 per week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st three months.
Minimum of $1.20 per day.
Employees under 18 Years of Age.
40 to 48 Hours per Week.
Less than 40 Hours per Week.
$12.00 per week.
30c. per hour.
Minimum, $1.20 per day.
Note.— (a.)  Time and one-half for hours in excess of 48.
(b.)   When lodging is furnished, deduction limited to not more than $3 per week.
(c.)   When board or meals are furnished, 25 cents may be deducted for each meal consumed by the employee.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING  (FEMALE).
Order No. 30a, Effective June 15th, 1937, to September 15th, 1937.
Varies Order No. 30 in establishments outside the boundaries of any municipality or any village
municipality incorporated under the " Village Municipalities Act."
Allowing:—■
Hours not to exceed ten (10) in any one day, nor more than fifty-four (54) in any one week.
Hours in excess of forty-eight (48) in any one week shall be paid at not less than time and one-half
(1%) of the legal rates fixed in Order No. 30.
SAWMILLS   (MALE).
Order No. 50, Effective August 16th, 1937.
(Superseding Order No. 2 of April 27th, 1934, Order No. 14 of October 19th, 1934, and
Order No. 36, Effective April 1st, 1936.)
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Adult males  -	
Not more than 10 per cent, of all employees at not less than..
Males under 21 years of age 	
40c.
30c.
30c.
48
48
48
Note.— (a.)   Certain exemptions under "Hours of Work Act."     (See regulations.)
(6.)   For engineers see Engineer Order.
(c.)  For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
(d.)   90 per cent, of all employees not less than 40 cents per hour.
SHINGLE-BOLTS  (MALE).
Order No. 1b, Effective January 4th, 1935.
Includes employees engaged in felling, bucking, and splitting shingle-bolts.
Rate, $1.30 per cord.
Hours, 48 per week. T 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SHINGLE-MILLS  (MALE.)
Order No. 16, Effective November 23rd, 1934.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of wooden shingles.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
48
Note.— (a.)  For engineers see Engineer Order.
(6.)  For truck-drivers see Transportation Order.
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 20, Effective June 14th, 1935.
Includes all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, demolition, painting,
and cleaning of hulls, putting on or taking off the ways, or dry-docking, of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Occupation.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
Ship-carpenter, shipwright, joiner, boat-builder or wood-caulker .
AH other employees .
67y2c.
50c.
48
48
Employees under 21, not more than 10 per cent, of total male employees
in plant may be employed at not less than  	
TAXICAB DRIVERS (MALE).
Order No. 33, Effective January 30th, 1936.
(Superseding Order No. 6, Effective June 29th, 1934.)
Includes an employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven
passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or
operated for hire.
Area.
Drivers.
Daily Rate.
Working-hours.
V vncouver, Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich-.
All ages.
$2.50
Unlimited.
Note.—If uniform or special article of wearing is demanded by employer, it must be without cost to the
employee.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION (FEMALE).
Effective April 5th, 1920.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the various instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and telegraphy, and shall
also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the operation of telephone
or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Weekly Hours.
$15.00 per week.
31^4c. per hour.
$11.00 per week for 1st 3 months.
12.00 per week for 2nd 3 months.
13.00 per week for 3rd 3 months.
Licences  required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
48
48
48
In case of emergency,
56 hours.
Note.— (a.)   Time and one-half is payable for hours in excess of 48.
(b.)  Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
(c.) Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m.,
10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of
employment a week.
(d.) In cases where employees reside on the employers' premises, the employer shall not be prevented from
making an arrangement with such employee to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. REPORT  OF DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 61
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY  (MALE).
Order No. 26, Effective July 4th, 1935.
Includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means
whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public
owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or
road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place
at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
Weekly Hours.
(1.) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 lb. net
weight or over, as specified on the motor-
vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified
in section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(2.) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than
2,000 lb. net weight, as specified on the
motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those
specified in sections 3 and 7 hereof
Hourly rate 	
(3.)   Operators of motor-cycles 	
Hourly rate	
(4.) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger
work
Hourly rate -  	
(5.)   Swampers and helpers .
Hourly rate	
(6.) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than
those covered by section 7 hereof
Hourly rate  :	
(7.) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail
delivery of bread or in the retail delivery
of milk
Hourly rate	
Less than 40
45c.
Less than 40
40c.
Less than 40
30c.
Less than 40
20c.
Less than 40
•      40c.
Less than 40
45c.
40  and  not more
than 50
40  and  not more
than 50
35c.
40  and  not more
than 48
25c.
40  and  not more
than 48
40   and   not   more
than 50
35c.
40  and  not more
than 50
40c.
40c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52 He.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
52V2c.
In excess of 50 and
not more than 54
60c.
Note.— (a.) Where vehicle is provided by employee all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's
behalf shall be in addition to above rates.
(b.)   Where uniforms are required these are to be furnished without cost to employee.
(c.)   Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(d.) Milk-delivery men may work fifteen (15) hours in excess of 48 per week, provided not more than ten (10)
hours is worked in any one day, nor more than three hundred and seventy-eight (378) hours over a period of
seven (7) weeks.
(e.)   Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 38.
WATCHMEN—LOGGING CAMPS  (MALE).
Order No. Ia, Effective November 29th, 1934.
Wages.
Hours.
No minimum wage fixed.
Not fixed. T 62
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
WOOD-WORKING.
Order No. 49, Effective August 16th, 1937.
Superseding Order No. 35 of April 1st, 1936, and Order No. 11 of August 24th, 1934.
Includes all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of manufacturing sash and doors,
cabinets, show-cases, office and store fixtures, wood furniture, wood furnishings, veneer products, and
general mill-work products.
Class.
Hourly Rate.
Weekly Hours.
40c.
30c.
25c.
48
18 to 21 years of age —	
48
48
Note.—After November 14th, 1937, total male employees receiving less than 40 cents must not exceed 33% per
cent, of all male employees. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 63
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE  ORDERS.
The following is a complete list of all Orders made by the Board of Industrial Relations,
compiled as at August 10th, 1937:—
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
17
8
42
7
37
31
40
12
45
45A
48
Baking 	
Barbering  	
Barbering	
Box-manufacture 	
Box-manufacture 	
Bus-drivers Victoria and Dis>
trict) _	
Carpentry _____	
Construction _______	
Construction 	
Construction (Cancelling 45)
Construction ._„_	
19      Elevator Operators 	
32      Elevator Operators	
18 Engineers, Stationary Steam..
18A Engineers, Stationary Steam _
18b I Engineers, Stationary Steam__
18c Engineers, Stationary Steam _
First-aid Attendants _
Fishing 	
3       Fruit and Vegetable _.
3a    Fruit and Vegetable -
21 I Fruit and Vegetable -
2lA    Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency) 	
2lB ] Fruit and Vegetable _
21c I Fruit and Vegetable ..
22 ( Fruit and Vegetable __
22a i Fruit and Vegetable
(Emergency)	
22b    Fruit and Vegetable __.
22c    Fruit and Vegetable .
46 Fruit and Vegetable...
47 Fruit and Vegetable __
23    |
23a I
43    |
Ba 1
29
44
IA
lc
9
13
13a
15
Janitor  	
Janitor  _	
Janitor 	
Janitresses (Public Housekeeping)   	
Janitresses (Public Housekeeping)   	
Janitresses....    	
Janitresses 	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Logging (West of Cascade
Mountains)	
Logging (Watchman) 	
Logging   (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers)	
Logging and Sawmills	
Logging    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains) —-	
Logging  (Skeena and Khyex
Rivers) _	
Cancelling No. 9 _	
Nov. 1/34—
July 12/34...
April 5/37.-
July 12/34...
March 23/36
Oct. 15/35 ....
Dec. 1/36	
Sept. 28/34„
June 14/37...
July 2/37...„
July 29/37—
Feb. 8/35	
Nov. 26/35-
Feb. 8/35	
April 17/35-
June 26/36...
May 14/37-..
June 26/36—
May 2/34.	
June 12/34 ._
April 16/35 .
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36 —
Aug. 26/36...
April 16/35...
Dec. 2/35	
July 21/36—
Aug. 26/36...
July 2/37	
July 2/37	
April 17/35...
Sept. 25/35-
May 14/37	
Nov. 9/34 —
April 17/35...
Sept. 26/35...
May 14/37	
April 7/34.
Nov. 9/34...
Jan.24/36..
July 12/34.
Sept. 28/34
Jan. 24/36..
Sept. 28/34
Nov. 8/34....
July 19/34....
April 8/37 —
July 19/34...
March 26/36
Oct. 17/35 ....
Dec. 3/36	
Oct. 4/34 ...
June 17/37...
July 8/37 ....
July 29/37...
Feb. 14/35 ...
Nov. 28/35 -
Feb. 14/35-
April 18/35-
July 2/36	
May 20/37.-
July 2/36 --
Jan. 15/20...
May 3/34 ...
June 14/34 _
April 18/35-
Dec. 5/35	
July 23/36.-
Sept. 3/36 ....
April 18/35 .
Dec. 5/35 —
July 23/36 _
Sept. 3/36—
July 8/37	
July 8/37—
April 18/35...
Oct. 3/35 _
May 20/37 ..
Nov. 15/34 ...
April 18/35-
Oct. 3/35
May 20/37 —
Feb. 27/19...
April 12/34...
Nov. 15/34—
Jan.30/36 —
July 19/34 —
Oct. 4/34	
Jan.30/36 -
Oct. 4/34	
Nov. 23/34
Aug. 3/34...
June 14/37.
Aug. 3/34 _
April 1/36 .
Oct. 28/35 ..
Feb.1/37—
Oct. 19/34 ..
July 5/37 ...
July 8/37 -
July 29/37 ..
March 1/35
Nov. 28/35 .
March 1/35
April 18/35
July 2/36 ...
June 1/37-
Aug. 1/36 ...
Feb. 28/20 -
May 18/34..
June 29/34
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35 _
July 23/36.
Sept. 3/36 -
April 18/35
Dec. 5/35 ....
July 23/36 _
Sept. 3/36..
July 12/37-
July 12/37...
April 18/35
Oct. 3/35 ....
June 1/37 -
Nov. 30/34
April 18/35 .
Oct. 3/35 —
June 1/37....
March 31/19...
April 27/34 _.
Nov. 29/34	
Jan. 30/36	
Aug. 3/34	
Oct. 19/34	
Jan. 30/36 __..
Oct. 19/34 .	
Male	
Male	
Male —
Male —
Male-
Male —
Male
Male —
Male —
Male	
Male
Male —
Male
Male —
Male	
Male	
Male....
Male ....
Female
Female.
Female
Female.
Female
Female
Female
Male —
Male—
Male
Male —
Female
Male	
Male
Male —
Male.—
Female
Female
Female
Female-
Female
Male—.
Male	
Male	
Male	
Male —
Male	
Male ...
June 14/37
April 1/36
July 8/37
Nov. 26/35
April 18/35
April 18/35
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
July 12/37
March 31/36
July 12/37
July 12/37
May 31/37
May 31/37
April 18/35
Oct. 3/35
May 31/37
Oct. 19/34 T 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Board of Industrial Relations Minimum Wage Orders—Continued.
Serial
No.
Industry.
Date of
Order.
Date
Gazetted.
Date
effective.
Minimum
Wage Act.
Date
cancelled.
28
25
10
10
24
24
24a
24b
38
38
4
34
27
27A
5
30
30A
2
14
28
36
50
IB
16
20
Logging and Sawmills   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area) —
Manufacturing -	
Mercantile —  	
Mercantile     (Supplementary,
1935) -  	
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)  —  	
Mercantile   	
Mercantile
1935)—
(Supplementary,
Mercantile (Christmas Cards,
1935)    	
Mercantile (Supplementary,
1936)   	
Mercantile  -	
Mercantile ( Supplementary,
1936).— — 	
Office Occupation .
Office Occupation .
Personal Service  	
Personal Service — 	
Personal     Service      (Temporary) -   -
Public Housekeeping	
Public Housekeeping -	
Public Housekeeping 	
Sawmills— 	
Sawmills    (East   of   Cascade
Mountains) — 	
Sawmill  and  Logging   (Cost
of Board, Cranbrook Area)
Sawmills    	
Sawmills    	
Shingle-bolts   	
Shingle-mills   —
Ship-building  	
6    | Taxicab-drivers  -	
33    | Taxicab-drivers    (Vancouver,
Victoria, and District)	
Telephone and Telegraph	
2a    Tie-cutting _  	
26      Transportation  _
26A 1 Transportation   —
11    [ Wood-working
35    [ Wood-working .
49    I Wood-working.
Sept. 25/35.
May 29/35 ...
July 24/35—
Nov. 26/35 ..
Oct. 15/35—
May 29/35—
Nov. 26/35...
Oct. 15/35 ...
Dec. 1/36 —
June 26/36 _
Dec. 1/36 —
May 2/34 __
Jan. 24/36...
Aug. 29/35 ..
Dec. 17/35 ...
May 2/34 .....
Sept. 26/35...
April 2/37—
April 7/34 ...
Sept. 28/34...
Sept. 25/35 _
March 23/36
August 3/37
Dec. 14/34 _
Nov. 1/34 ....
May 28/35 ._
June 13/34 .
Jan. 24/36 ...
May 2/34 ....
June 19/35 _
June 26/36 -
Aug. 1/34 ...
March 23/36
Aug. 3/37 ....
Sept. 26/35 _
June 6/35 —
July 26/35 -
Nov. 28/35 ...
Oct. 17/35._
May 30/35...
Nov. 28/35 ...
Oct. 17/35 —
Dec. 3/36	
July 2/36 .....
Dec. 3/36 —
May 10/34 ...
Jan. 30/36 _".
Aug. 14/19 -
Sept. 5/35 —
Dec. 19/35 ...
May 10/34 ...
Oct. 3/35 —.
April 8/37 —
April 12/34 .
Oct. 4/34 —.
Sept. 26/35 .
March 26/36
Aug. 4/37 __..
Dec. 20/34 _.
Nov. 8/34
May 30/35 ..
June 14/34 .
Jan. 30/36 ..
March 4/20 .
May 3/34 ....
June 20/35 _
July 2/36 ....
Aug. 9/34 ...
March 26/36
Aug. 4/37—
Sept. 26/35 .
July 1/35	
Aug. 10/35 —
Nov. 28/35 ....
Oct 17/35 ......
July 1/35	
Nov. 28/35 —
Oct. 17/35 —
Dec. 3/36	
July 20/36 —
Dec. 3/36	
May 25/34 ......
Jan.30/36 —
Sept. 15/19 —
Sept. 5/35 —
Dec. 19/35	
May 25/34 —
Oct. 3/35	
June 15/37 to
Sept. 15/37-
April 27/34._.
Oct. 19/34	
Sept. 26/35	
April 1/36 ....
Aug. 16/37 —
Jan. 4/35 	
Nov. 23/34 —
June 14/3.5  ...
June 29/34 —
Jan. 30/36 —
April 5/20 ..._.
May 18/34 —
July 4/35	
July 20/36 —
Aug. 24/34 —
April 1/36 .....
Aug. 16/37	
Male —
Female
Male —
Male —
Male —
Female
Female
Female
Female
Male	
Male —
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Female
Male —
Male —
Male —
Male ....
Male —
Male —
Male —
Male
Male
Male —
Female
Male —.
Male —
Male —
Male —
Male
Male —
July 20/36
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Dec. 31/35
Jan. 2/37
Jan.2/37
Jan. 30/36
Dec. 31/35
Oct. 3/35
Sept. 15/37
April 1/36
April 1/36
Aug. 16/36
Jan.30/36
Sept. 30/34
April 1/36
Aug. 16/37 REPORT  OP  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936. T 65
LABOUR LEGISLATION.
FIRST SESSION.
" Barbers Act Amendment Act."—Board of Examiners increased to four members, three
elective, one who is an employer, two who are journeymen or employees for hire, and one
appointed by the Minister of Labour.
Providing for examination fee of $10' and, if unsuccessful, $5 for any subsequent examinations.
Providing for apprenticeship in accordance with " Apprenticeship Act," " Male Minimum
Wage Act," and the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
Transferring the administration from the Provincial Secretary to the Minister of Labour.
SECOND SESSION.
" Apprenticeship Act."—The " Apprenticeship Act, 1935," was amended to provide for
apprenticeship for youths over 21 years of age; the Act as passed in the 1935 session limited
its application to those between the ages of 16 and 2:1 years.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."—This Act was amended, giving the Board of Industrial
Relations power to stipulate " conditions of labour and employment" when promulgating
minimum wage orders. It also makes it an offence for any person to impersonate an Inspector
of the Board of Industrial Relations.
"Female Minimum Wage Act."—This Act was amended, giving the Board of Industrial
Relations power to stipulate " conditions of labour and employment" when promulgating
minimum wage orders. It also makes it an offence for any person to impersonate an Inspector
of the Board of Industrial Relations.
" Fire Department Hours of Work Act."—-This Act was amended to grant firemen in any
municipality where there is a paid fire department two full days of twenty-four hours each
in each week off duty.
" Trade-schools Regulation Act."—This is new legislation having for its purpose Provincial
regulation of all trade-schools.    Its principal objects being:—
(1.)  To prevent the exploitation of students.
(2.)  To assure that all trade-schools have a proper course of study.
(3.) To prevent alleged trade-schools from competing unfairly with properly equipped and
bona-fide establishments.
(4.)   To require trade-schools to keep proper records of all their transactions.
(5.)  The Act comes into operation January 1st, 1937.
" Factories Act."—Where an employer is found guilty of employing women and girls
under conditions whereby their health is endangered the penalty is increased.
Boxing Day has been deleted as a holiday under the " Factories Act," also a factory has
been given the option of closing either on Good Friday or Easter Monday; prior to this amendment it was compulsory to close on both days.
Strict provisions known as Part II. deal with home-work in an endeavour to regulate
factory-work being done in private homes. Any employer who gives out home-work must
obtain a licence from the Factory Inspector.    The home-worker must also secure a permit.
" Barbers Act."—This Act was amended to bring barber-schools in conformity with the
" Trade-schools Regulation Aot." The Board of Examiners have been increased by a fourth
member appointed by the Minister of Labour, to eliminate criticism arising regarding examinations and the granting of certificates.
" Hairdressers Act."—This Act was amended, bringing " schools " in conformity with the
" Trade-schools Regulation Act." The Board of Examiners have been increased by a fourth
member, appointed by the Minister of Labour, to eliminate criticism arising regarding examinations and the granting of certificates. The cost of examinations has been reduced where partial
examination or examination in certain subjects is taken.
"Workmen's Compensation Act."—This Act has been amended, bringing silicosis and
infected blisters within its scope.
5 T 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act."—This Act was amended to conform to the change
in the " Workmen's Compensation Act." It is also amended that (except as permitted by the
" Workmen's Compensation Act") a workman whose employment takes him into a mine, or
into any ore-crushing or rock-crushing operation of any mine, except where the ore or rock is
crushed in water or a chemical solution, and is kept constantly in a moistened or wet condition,
shall be examined by a physician at the expense of the employer at least once in every twelve
months. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 67
LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
The year 1936 was one of comparative peace; sixteen disputes took place, affecting 5,741
employees, resulting in 75,311 working-days being lost.
During the year many employers increased the wage-rates after consultation with their
workmen, and we are happy to record that, on the whole, relations between employers and
employees have been of a cordial and helpful nature.
The question of organization is one of great importance. The more progressive employers
do not appear to be adverse to dealing with a regularly constituted organization of workers,
and it is sincerely hoped that both employer and employee will approach any differences in
that spirit of mutual helpfulness which has been in evidence during 1936.
There is no dispute which cannot be settled to the satisfaction of both parties, if only a
reasonable attitude is adopted in the early stages.
The officials of the Department are at all times ready in the cause of industrial peace to
assist in so far as statutory powers will allow.
Most serious of the 1936 strikes was that of salmon-fishermen in the Rivers Inlet area,
resulting in a loss of 40,000 working-days by 2,500 fishermen, followed by the strike of lumber-
workers in the Vancouver Island and Coast District, which affected 2,000 men, with a loss of
20,000 working-days. The other disputes did not assume the proportions of those above
mentioned.
The following table shows the record for the past five years:—
Year.
No. of Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1931                           	
11
11
14
17
23
16
2,322
4,136
2,397
4,427
7,321
5,741
79,310
37,740
25.760
73,977
140,706
75,311
1932 	
1933                                               	
1934	
1935 	
1936 -	
GOLD-MINERS, CAMBORNE.
A strike of gold-miners at Camborne occurred on January 8th, 1936, when some twenty-
four men ceased work against a reduction from the prevailing scale of $4 to $4.50 per day
of eight hours to $3.50 to $4. After being out one day and unsuccessful in securing their
demands, most of the workers resumed work on January 10th, the remainder being replaced.
Favourable to the employer.
SHINGLE-MILL WORKERS, PORT MOODY.
On January 15th a strike occurred involving shingle-weavers and packers employed at a
shingle-mill at Port Moody, the dispute arising over the discharge of a Union worker, discrimination, and a 10-per-cent. reduction in the Union wage scale.
Following a period of ten days, during which negotiations were carried on between both
parties, an agreement was signed, reinstating the Union workers, and a compromise was
reached regarding wages, the reductions being modified, and work resumed on January 28th
at the reduced scale.
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
Seven waiters in one cafe in Vancouver went out on strike on February 18th, demanding
an increase in wages to meet the Union scale, and back pay.
The management was approached by the workers requesting a $2 per week increase in
wages. On the refusal of this request the staff of seven men ceased work and all wages were
paid up to the time of the strike. The restaurant continued to operate, the strikers being
replaced by new workers commencing at the previous rate of wages with no change in conditions.    Favourable to employer.
LOGGERS, COWICHAN LAKE.
Employees in one camp of a lumber company ceased work on March 10th in protest
against the discharge of two workers, alleged to be for Union activity. Picketing was carried
on at the logging camp and at localities where the employer might be securing new employees. T 68 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
On March 20th employees in another camp of the same company ceased work in sympathy.
The strikers were members of the Lumber Workers' Industrial Union, but this Union has
been transferring its membership to the Lumber and Sawmill Workers' locals of the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, in accordance with the policy adopted by
the Workers' Unity League in 19'3i5 and applied by the various central bodies and local unions
affiliated with it.
On May 26th the strike was terminated.
LOGGERS, SAWMILL AND SHINGLE-MILL WORKERS, VANCOUVER
ISLAND AND COAST DISTRICT.
Employees in a number of logging camps and in sawmills, shingle-mills, etc., ceased work
on May 4th, demanding recognition of the locals of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners of America which had been formed by the transfer of members from the Lumber
Workers' Industrial Union. This was done in accordance with the policy adopted in 1935 by
the Workers' Unity League—namely, the transfer of the membership of its various organizations to the International Unions. The Union scale of wages in the State of Washington and
Oregon was also demanded, this involving increases of $1.50 per day and upward, or about
20 per cent. The reinstatement of the two Union members discharged at Cowichan Lake was
also demanded by some of the strikers. The employers had been granting increases of about
10 per cent, before these demands were made and this continued while the dispute was in
progress, so that work was resumed in many of the camps and mills between May 11th and
May 18th. On May 26th the strike was called off and work was resumed generally on May 28th.
Many of the employers reported that their employees were not on strike, but owing to the
interference of pickets the camps and mills were closed for an interval.
SALMON-FISHERMEN, UPPER FRASER RIVER.
Commencing on May 26th, a strike involving some seventy salmon-fishermen on the Upper
Fraser River occurred, the fishermen demanding 1 cent a pound increase in the price paid for
salmon, or 7 cents per pound, the rate paid on the lower part of the river, instead of 6 cents.
Owing to flood conditions preventing fishing and the fresh-fish market being supplied by
shipments from the Coast, employment conditions were no longer affected by June 3rd.
Following lower-water conditions on the river, fishing was resumed, with no change in
conditions.     (Indefinite.)
SALMON-FISHERMEN, LOWER FRASER RIVER.
In sympathy with the fishermen's strike of May 26th on the Upper Fraser River, a further
dispute occurred on June 3rd among fishermen on the Lower Fraser River. This strike was
similarly affected by flood conditions and the receipt of supplies for the market from the Coast,
so that by June 3rd employment conditions were no longer affected, and by June 10th, the flood
conditions having abated, some men resumed work.     (Indefinite.)
LABOURERS (EXTRA GANG), TERRACE.
A number of men in extra gangs engaged in track-maintenance work near Terrace ceased
work on June 24th, demanding an increase in wages from 25 cents per hour, the extra gang
rate, to 40 cents, the sectionmen's rate, and improved camp conditions.
Following negotiations, work was resumed on June 25th, the officials agreeing to improve
camp conditions, the same wage-rates prevailing.    Favourable to workers.
SALMON-FISHERMEN, RIVERS INLET, ETC.
A number of fishermen at Rivers Inlet (approximately 1,400) ceased work on July 5th,
demanding an increase in the minimum price of fish from 40 cents each to 50 cents. An agreement as to the scale of prices for the season had not been reached before the season opened
and the cannery-owners issued a scale. The Provincial Minister of Labour and Commissioner
of Fisheries proposed that the dispute be referred to arbitration under the " Fisheries Act,"
so that fishing might proceed in the meantime, but the fishermen's committee insisted on
collective bargaining with the cannery operators.    Meetings were held on July 14th and July REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936. T 69
15th and they offered to accept 46 cents per fish, but the operators preferred to have arbitration. Numbers of fishermen in neighbouring districts also ceased work later, in some cases
resuming work in a short time.
At Alert Bay 315 fishermen were out from July 5th to July 15th. At Smith Inlet 370
went out on July 12th and small numbers were reported to be out for short periods at Butedale
and Prince Rupert. Several canneries were closed, fish not being available, and about 1,000
employees were thus indirectly involved in the dispute.
On July 22!nd and July 23rd about 100 fishermen resumed work under police protection at
Rivers Inlet. Other fishermen left for southern districts, where the fishing season was opening.
By the end of the month, the sockeye run in the district being over, the dispute lapsed.
(Indefinite.)
GOLD-MINERS, ATLIN.
On July 17th some fifty gold^miners employed by a mining company at Atlin went out on
strike, demanding an increase in wages. The prevailing rate at the time of the dispute was
$7 per day, the strikers demanding this be increased to $8.25 per day for shaft-work.
Following an interval of some twenty days, the workers returned to their work on August
10th under the previous rates, no changes being effected.    In favour of employer.
RAILWAY-CONSTRUCTION WORKERS, MIDWAY.
A group of employees of one contracting firm (approximately thirty in number) engaged
in demolition of a railway-line at Midway went out on strike on August 10th, demanding shorter
hours and an increase in the scale of wages paid. The workers reported they were working
long hours, and asked an eight-hour day on the job, with an increase from 40 to 50' cents per
hour wages, and improvements in the board supplied.
Following arbitration between a representative of the Department of Labour on behalf
of the workers and officials of the Company involved, a satisfactory agreement was reached,
the demands of the workers being granted, and the men resuming work on August 17th under
the new agreement.   In favour of the workers.
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
A number of the employees in one restaurant ceased work on August 29th, demanding
increases in wages and reduced hours. The employees were members of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees' International Alliance, Local 28 (Cooks and Waiters), and thirty-four other
employees were reported to be indirectly involved.
Following negotiations, a Union agreement was signed providing Union conditions, and
resulting in wage increases of $2 to $4 per-week and a forty-eight-hour week, the dispute
terminating on September 5th, 1936.    In favour of the workers.
BAKERY EMPLOYEES, DRIVERS, ETC., VANCOUVER.
Drivers employed at one bakery establishment ceased work on September 19th, their
demand for a Union agreement not having been complied with. The drivers were paid $15
per week plus a commission on sales. The agreement in force in one large establishment provides for a minimum rate of $23 per week. The Union claimed that it had presented the
agreement to the employer in July, but the management stated that the employees had not
made any complaints prior to the strike. It is reported that bakers, etc., also sought Union
rates, but it is not clear that any of them ceased work, but several appear to have become
involved indirectly.   At the end of the month a settlement had not been reached.
The Deputy Minister of Labour for British Columbia had met representatives of the
parties involved on October 1st, but the Union refused to accept proposals of the employer that
work should be resumed for thirty days pending a settlement or that the employer would recognize a Union of its own employees. The employer stated that the Union demands could not
be accepted until approval was secured from the head office of the Company. The Union offered
to refer the dispute to arbitration. The agreement as finally reached is reported to provide
that the new conditions shall not go into effect for thirty days and also that bakers in the
establishment will receive Union wages.    (Favourable to workers.)
6 T 70 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SEAMEN, VANCOUVER.
A minor dispute, involving six members of the crew of one ship at Vancouver, occurred
on October 21st, 1936. The men refused to sign on when the ship was preparing to resume
service, requesting the dismissal of four workers who were not members of the Seafarers'
Industrial Union. This request was refused, the strikers being replaced next day, and the
ship went on its voyage.    (In favour of employers.)
LONGSHOREMEN, VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, ETC.
Members of the locals of the International Longshoremen's Association at Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster declared a strike on November 23rd in sympathy with the
strike of water-transportation workers on the Pacific Coast in the United States. The members
of these Unions had been employed to some extent on work for coastal shipping since the
strike which terminated in December, 1935, but had very little work on ocean-going ships,
as this was done since the strike by members of independent Unions which have agreements
with the Shipping Federation of British Columbia. The Unions involved in the strike of 1935
had been affiliated with the Longshoremen and Water Transport Workers of Canada and to
a great extent ceased to exist after the strike, but the Coastwise Longshoremen's Union at
Vancouver and those at Victoria and New Westminster later became locals of the International
Longshoremen's Association. From time to time the members of these Unions have attempted
to obtain a greater proportion of the work in the ports and have been supported by the crews
of United States ships, these on some occasions having refused to work the ship if loaded or
unloaded by members of other Unions. In some cases cargoes were not handled and in other
cases compromises were reached. In the present strike the members of these Unions are
demanding jurisdiction over all longshore-work in the ports and have been picketing the docks.
Large quantities of cargoes to and from United States ports, carried by the railways, have
been handled at British Columbia ports owing to the strike in the United States. The shipping
companies have, therefore, been employing about 1,400 longshoremen, almost twice the normal
force. Some time ago the coastal shipping employers joined the Shipping Federation and
notified the longshoremen to join the Unions with which the Federation had agreements. Some
of them did so and are not involved in the present dispute.    The strike was finally called off.
MEAT-PACKING WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
A number of employees in one establishment (202 out of 280) ceased work on December
29th, against the dismissal of eighteen workers, including officers of the Meat Cutters' Union,
organized some months previously. The management stated that the men were dismissed
partly owing to slackening of trade and partly for inefficiency. At the request of the officers
of the Trades and Labour Council, the Provincial Deputy Minister of Labour and the Western
Representative of the Department of Labour interviewed the manager, who expressed willingness to meet a committee of the strikers, but not if it included any of the men dismissed or
the Union officers, as it was not the policy of the Company to recognize Unions. The strikers
insisted on the inclusion of two of the men dismissed.
Mediation by the Provincial Deputy Minister of Labour and the Western Representative
of the Department of Labour not having resulted in a settlement, the Provincial Minister of
Labour arranged a meeting of the representatives of both parties with the officials on January
19th. The management refused to reinstate the men dismissed or to recognize the Meat
Cutters' and Packing House Employees' Federal Union, No. 95, affiliated with the Trades and
Labour Congress of Canada. Proposals were made for the reference of the dispute to a Board
under the " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act" or to an investigation under the " Public
Inquiries Act " of British Columbia.
On February 23rd the Government of British Columbia appointed Mr. Justice J. C.
Mcintosh a Commissioner under the " Public Inquiries Act" to inquire into the dismissal of
employees, to report on the effect of the strike, and to endeavour to bring about a settlement.
The inquiry under the " Public Inquiries Act" began on March 17th and evidence was taken
until March 30th, when the inquiry was adjourned pending negotiations for a settlement.
Evidence had been given as to the dismissal of twenty-five workers in December, 1936, claimed
by the Union to be for Union activity, following which over 150 of the remaining employees
ceased work on December 29th. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936. T 71
The report of His Honour Judge Macintosh to the Administrator follows:—
To His Honour the Administrator of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please your Honour :
By virtue of the Commission issued to me under the Great Seal of the Province to hold an inquiry, under the
provisions of the " Public Inquiries Act," into the causes leading up to the labour dispute between Burns & Company,
Limited, and its employees; into the question of what efforts have been made towards settlement of the said dispute;
into all matters incident to the foregoing; and to report in writing as soon as conveniently may be after concluding
such inquiry, and to include recommendations as to settlement of the dispute in a fair and amicable manner; and
such inquiry having been held, no objection having been taken by either party to its jurisdiction or the right to
pass upon and adjust the present differences between the parties, it is expedient and in the public interest, because
of the serious and emergent situation which exists, that immediate effect be given thereto by the instant making and
public release of such report and recommendations, which procedure you have graciously approved, and with the
consent of the Honourable George S. Pearson, Minister of Labour, the following is submitted:—
The situation disclosed is unusual in labour disputes in Canada. No question of wage scale, hours of work, or
working conditions has arisen or is involved, as all such conditions were and are satisfactory to those affected, but
consisted wholly of the activities of the newly formed Labour Union to which the majority of the employees belonged
and the retaliatory action of the employing Company's manager in relation thereto. Much valuable data was supplied
relating to the operations of the Company here, the uninterrupted continuity of which is so important to the community, the difficulties which beset those operations, and the contemplated plans for pensions and improved working
and social conditions, but such recitals are unnecessary in deciding the main issue as they are merely corollary
thereto. It is also considered unnecessary to set forth in detail all the happenings which have taken place, as many
were unfortunate and ill-advised, and their repetition would only tend to disrupt the avowed desire of both parties
to reach a satisfactory conclusion of their differences, aided by the conduct of the employees during a very trying
period, which has, generally speaking, been admirable. Several indecisive conferences of an authorized committee
of the employees and the management of the Company, at the request of your Commissioner, have been held during
the inquiry without reaching a satisfactory conclusion. Therefore the real issue only will be dealt with, and the
resulting conclusions and recommendations stated.
In April, 1936, a number of the plant employees considered it desirable and in the interest of all to form a
Trades Union, and in due course a charter was granted to them by the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, as
Meat Cutters' and Packing House Employees' Union, Federal Local 95, and a constitution was adopted which
contained no power for the extension of membership to others than craftsmen. This Union was formed with the
sole purpose of advancing and protecting the interests of the Company's plant employees and meat-cutters generally
in Vancouver and vicinity, and to improve the conditions of the workers, and with no ulterior motive. As is usual
in such cases, a business agent was appointed in the person, unfortunately as it developed, of one confessedly and
wholly without experience in trade-union practices, and whose activities outran his discretion and authority as to the
Union's true objectives. He received from some unknown source the unfortunate and mistaken idea of recruiting
owners of retail butcher-shops, being employers of labour, in addition to those workmen properly eligible as trade-
unionists, to extend the membership and to increase his remuneration, and with the object of increasing the force
of the Union by adding such retailers as members of a section of it, which is foreign to regular trade-union practice
in the type of employment here involved. This mistake was later recognized and rectified by the formation of a
separate and distinct organization by the retail butchers concerned. His activities in this direction were unknown
to many members of the Union, but must have been known to the members of the executive. This repugnant
affiliation had serious repercussions in the broken relationships of the Company and its customers, and was later
greatly detrimental to its business operations. The activities of the business agent, the wearing of Union buttons
by certain employees of the Company while at work, and the general activities of the Union, so disturbed the
manager (only recently appointed and not fully conversant with local conditions and the personnel of the plant)
that in November he had the employees of several departments in the plant brought before him in groups and as
individuals, and informed them (among many other things) that they must discontinue their Union activities or be
penalized in the manner described by reliable witnesses; that he would not allow Union activities to interfere with
or be projected into the business of the Company. No complaint was made by the manager of the service rendered
by the employees, and an increase in pay was promised and later put into effect. He also informed the employees
that they should seek to deal with the Company in matters of mutual concern only through the medium of a plant
or Company Union with no outside affiliations, this being the method adopted by most packing plants of consequence
in Canada and the United States, of bargaining between the employees and employer, functioning in many cases
side by side with a local Union in such plants.
On December 29th, 1936, on instructions of the manager, nineteen employees of the Company were discharged,
all being members of the Union, and including all members of the Union's executive and its officials, without
assigning any legitimate reason or excuse for such action, although most of these employees had been long with the
Company and the previous service of most of them satisfactory. These men thus reasonably assumed that they had
been dismissed for their Union activities and not for unsatisfactory service. The executive of the Union thereupon,
acting upon the authority vested in them by a resolution of the Union previously passed in general meeting, declared
a strike of the employees of the Company, which action was confirmed the following day by a secret ballot of the
members at a general meeting with only three dissenting votes, and was further considered and confirmed on
January 12th, 1937.
Two major mistakes were thus made by the two representatives of the parties, that of the business agent of
the Union and that of the manager of the Company, which precipitated the present crisis. The provocation of the
Union in bringing in as a section of the Union the retail butchers, many of whom were customers of the Company,
was followed by the retaliatory discharge by the Company of the nineteen employees without (although not legally
necessary) assigning a proper and legitimate reason for such drastic action. The intermingling of those nine
employees against whom cause could be assigned, and those ten against whom no cause could be assigned except T 72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
their activities as executives' of their Union, left only one implication.     The manager must have known and anticipated that his action would culminate in a walk-out of the employees, being members of the Union.
Both mistakes were grave errors of judgment, made without proper deliberation and thought as to the results.
Both parties were equally culpable in the making of them and both are equally responsible for the strike which
ensued. The result has been far-reaching in its effects, and the community in general as well as the Company have
suffered from the disruption of normal business relations, and the employees have suffered from the consequent
misery and privation of themselves and their families, all established citizens of the community and not transient
labour. This unfortunate condition would never have arisen if just consideration had been given to the rights of
each by reasonable and deliberate discussion at the proper time. Settlement could have been had if the mediation
offered by Government labour officials had been accepted, or by a Conciliation Board established under the prescribed
conditions of the Department of Labour of Canada, The unnecessary loss of business by one and the unnecessary
loss of employment by the others has happily brought forth the bona-fide desire of the parties to effect a fair and
reasonable settlement. Both are agreed in principle that the present condition is untenable and should be ended.
This can only be accomplished by the agreed return of the employees to their regular employment with the Company,
and difficulty in reaching such a desired conclusion lies only in the detail to be worked out and followed. This detail
is the manner of return, in what numbers, and the time for re-employment of the employees affected. There is
also the question of the dismissal and disposal of the nineteen employees, members of the Union, and of its- executive,
seemingly dismissed for their Union activities, nine of whom, however, it is found, were discharged in fact for
services unsatisfactory to the Company. The situation is complicated by the fact of a number of employees, not
members of the Union, continuing in their employment, the taking-on by the Company of new employees in the
place of those who left, and the lapse of time since the strike occurred, all making for some difficulty of adjustment.
As is usual in such cases, the men taken on for the duration of the strike will probably leave of their own accord
on settlement being made.
No agreement having been arrived at by the parties, it has devolved upon your Commissioner to supply a plan
of settlement which is possible of application, workable, and effective within a reasonable time.
It is submitted as a reasonable plan for the reinstating in employment of the 131 employees affected, apart
from the nine mentioned, that the Company shall re-employ 50 of these former employees in April, 1937 ; 4l in
May, 1937 ; and the remainder, being 40, in June, 1937, accelerating the numbers if the opportunity offers, at the
scale of wages and working conditions now existing, with the following provisoes:—
(a.) The selection of such employees shall be by some arrangement agreeable to the parties, married men
in any event to be first selected when possible.
(b.) Upon this settlement being made effective, the Union shall immediately return the products of the Company
to the fair list.
(c.) There shall be no discrimination on the part of the Company towards returning employees because of their
former Union activities.
(d.) The employees shall have the right to belong to any organization or association of their own choosing, and
the Company shall recognize a committee elected by all of its employees to represent them in their dealings with the
Company's management.
(c.) The nine employees objected to by the Company for cause shall have the privilege of appearing before the
management of the Company and being heard.
It is considered advisable that the President and General Manager of the Company, Mr. John Burns, or his
personal representative, meet the committee of the Union which had been appointed during the negotiations, at the
earliest possible date to implement these recommendations. The services of your Commissioner (if required) to be
at all times available.
It is not submitted, but suggested for obvious reasons, having regard to the future harmony of all concerned,
that both the business agent of the Union and the manager of the Company be transplanted by their respective
employers to other fields of endeavour.
It is to be expected that the lessons of the past will so heavily weigh upon the minds of everyone concerned that
future disturbances will be carefully avoided by the use of conciliatory methods.
Effective machinery should be provided by the Legislature of the Province for the amelioration of industrial
disputes, as the subsisting legislation is sadly inadequate.
A pleasing- and satisfactory factor apparent throughout the proceedings was the consistently pacific attitude
of Mr. John Burns, President and General Manager of the Company, who reached far in friendly advances toward
settlement, reminiscent of the late lamented Senator Burns, whose just and generous treatment of his employees
is still a living memory.
Due recognition is given to the efforts of the Department of Labour of British Columbia through its Minister,
Honourable George S. Pearson; its Deputy Minister, Mr. Adam Bell; and the Department of Labour of Canada
through its Western Representative, Mr. F. E. Harrison, to end this complicated dispute.
My personal thanks are due to C. H. Locke, Esquire, K.C., of counsel for the Company, and to W. W. Lefeaux,
Esquire, of counsel for the Union, for their unfailing courtesy and their fair and reasonable presentation of the
claims of their respective clients, which has proved invaluable.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
(Signed) J. C. McIntosh,
Commissioner.
On May 26th the Union called the strike off, when the Company took back six females and
nineteen males who had been on strike and agreed to re-employ others as soon as business
returned to normal, the Union agreeing to cease interfering with the Company's business and to
do all in their power to regain the business lost through the strike. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 193G.
T 73
SUMMARY OF LABOUR DISPUTES, 1936.
No. of
Time lost
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
Employees
affected.
in
Working,
days.
Gold-miners, Camborne __ _	
Commenced January 8th, against decrease in wages.
Workers replaced, strike terminating January 10th.
Unsuccessful
24
24
Shingle-mill workers, Port Moody
Commenced January 15th, against discharge of Union
workers and reduction in wages.   Terminated January 28th,   with  compromise:    Reduction   modified;
workers  re-employed
26
200
Restaurant employees, Vancouver...
Commenced    February    18th,    demanding    increased
wages.     Workers   replaced;    no   change   in   conditions.    Terminated February 20th.    Favourable to
employer
7
14
Commenced March 10th, against discharge of workers,
140
4,000
allegedly for Union activity.    Terminated May 26th.
Camp  closed.    Indefinite
Loggers  Cowichan Lake
Commenced March 20th, in sympathy with strike of
120
6,500
March 10th.    Negotiations and return of workers.
Terminated May 28th.    Favourable to employer
Loggers,    Sawmill   and    Shingle-
Commenced May 4th, for Union recognition and in
2,000
20,000
workers, Vancouver Island and
creased wages.   Return of workers, strike terminat
Coast District
ing May 28th in favour of employer.    Some wage
increases made
Salmon-fishermen,   Upper   Fraser
Commenced May 26th, for increase in price per fish.
70
450
River
Strike lapsed owing to flood conditions.    Work resumed  June  3rd.     Indefinite
Salmon-fishermen,   Lower   Fraser
Commenced   June   1st,   in   sympathy  with  strike   on
270
500
River
Upper Fraser.    Lapsed owing to flood conditions.
Situation no longer affected by June 3rd.   Indefinite
Labourers (extra gang), Terrace—
Commenced June 24th, for improved camp conditions
and   increase   in   wages.     Terminated   June   25th,
with improvement in camp conditions.    No increase
in wages.    In favour of workers
50
50
Salmon-fishermen, Rivers Inlet	
Commenced July 5th, demanding an increase in the
price  per fish.     Strike lapsed at  close  of  season.
Work resumed July 31st.    Indefinite
2,500
40,000
Gold-miners, Atlin  ■
Commenced July 17th, for increase in wages.    Return
50
700
of   workers   under   previous    rates.      No    change
effected.     Terminated   August   10th   in   favour   of
employer
Railway- construction    workers,
Commenced August  10th,  for shorter hours and in
30
210
Midway
crease in wages and conditions.   Terminated August
17th.      Wage    increase    granted.      Favourable    to
workers.
Restaurant employees, Vancouver-
Commenced  August  29th,   to  secure  Union   recognition with an increase in wages with reduced hours.
Terminated   September   5th  in   favour  of  the  employees ;    a   Union   agreement   being   signed   and
wage   increase   granted,    with   48-hour   week   observed
14
63
Bakery   employees,   drivers,   etc.,
Commenced   September   19th,   for  Union   wages  and
38
1,200
Vancouver
working   conditions.     Following   negotiations   and
conciliation, with intercession by representatives of
the   Provincial   Department   of   Labour,   a   Union
agreement was signed and work resumed October
29th.    Favourable to the workers
Longshoremen,   Vancouver,   Vic
Commenced  November  23rd,   in  sympathy  with  the
200
2,000
toria, etc.
strike of water-transportation workers on the Pacific  Coast in the United States,  the workers  demanding Union recognition.    Unterminated at the
end  of year
Meat-packing employees, Vancou
Commenced December 30th, against alleged dismissal
202
400
ver
of workers for Union activities.    Unterminated at
end of year
Totala 	
5,741
75,311 T 74 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., July 15th, 1937.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection Branch for the
year 1936.
During the year under review, almost without exception all lines of industry experienced
an increased demand for manufactured goods. In order to meet this demand some factories
operated two eight-hour shifts, and a number of factories which had during the depression
moved into smaller rented premises found it necessary to acquire more room in their present
location or move to larger quarters because of improved industrial conditions. In the majority
of cases this procedure was followed voluntarily by the employer. We had to prohibit suggested structural additions in a number of instances, which, if introduced, would have resulted
in overcrowding and unhealthy working conditions. Continued industrial improvement throughout all portions of the Province changed the view-point of a great many employers and employees who not so long ago could see little hope for the future.
INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1936, 1,840 inspections and reinspections of factories were made.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
One of the most encouraging features noted throughout the turmoil and complexity of
conditions during the past few years was that at no time was the need or importance of
accident-prevention questioned. The successful elimination or minimizing of industrial accidents depends very largely on whether or not the employer has the right attitude and accepts
his responsibility; he must do his part in a visible way by eliminating practical hazards
through the installation of safeguards and safety appliances, and insist on safety being at
all times a necessary part of the process of production. If the employer does not accept
responsibility for the safety and welfare of his employee (and I regret to state that not all do),
it is our responsibility to see that the factory in which he is employed is a safe place in which
to earn a livelihood. As an example of the failure on the part of an employer to realize his
responsibility in this connection, we give the following:—■
While making an inspection of a factory we found a motor-driven machine being operated
at such an excessive speed that it was a constant source of danger to the operator and other
employees of the factory. Following our placing a notice on this machine suspending its
operation until such time as the speed would be reduced to permit safe operation, the owner,
resenting the fact that production had been retarded, discharged the machine operator, telling
him he had done so because he had given information to the Inspector regarding same. As
such a statement was not in accordance with the facts, we were instrumental in having the
operator resume his employment with the company the following day.
Comment was made in a previous report regarding the responsibility of management,
superintendent, and foreman in instructing the young entrant to factory-life of the dangers of
industrial occupations; such instruction, widely applied, affords the best hope of producing a
new generation of workers that will avoid dangerous practices as a matter of course due to
the result of early training. Severe accidents due to the absence or removal of safeguards
required by law are always particularly regrettable, and never more so than when the victims
are young workers who may be needlessly handicapped at the outset of their career by permanent injuries. One of the most distressing accidents investigated during the year, for
which the superintendent of the plant must bear a large share of responsibility, occurred to
a boy 18 years of age while operating a rip-saw from which the guard had been removed—he
losing four fingers of the left hand as a result. While injured would not admit he had removed
the guard, it was an admitted fact the saw was being operated unprotected for some considerable time and should have been noted by the superintendent in charge.    Furthermore, the REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936. T 75
type of work being performed could have been done more safely and expeditiously on a resaw.
This fact was admitted by the superintendent in charge, and he informed us that a resaw
had been purchased since the accident.
The fact that we have less accidents to investigate each succeeding year should be conclusive proof that the majority of employers realize " prevention is a benefaction, compensation
an apology."
PROSECUTIONS.
Four proprietors of Oriental laundries were each fined $50 and costs upon being convicted
of operating their laundries on a statutory holiday.
A proprietor of a furrier's workshop was fined $15 for working female employees
excessive hours. The proprietor of a peanut-butter factory was fined $25 and costs for
working female employees excessive hours.
The managers of two confectionery-factories were each fined $50 and costs for working
their employees on a Sunday.
CHILD-LABOUR.
The proprietor of a wood-working plant was prosecuted for employing a boy under 15
years of age. Upon a conviction being secured, the Magistrate imposed a fine of $2.50 and
costs. We are paying tribute to the owners and managers of factories when we state that
this is the first instance of employment of child-labour to come before the Courts of British
Columbia.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
During recent years, when competition was so exceptionally keen for the business offered,
factories eager to procure this business were inclined to make commitments for delivery of
manufactured articles which quite frequently could not be fulfilled without making application
for an overtime permit. In every case these requests were thoroughly investigated, in order
to determine as far as possible whether or not the firm making the request for an overtime
permit had secured the business at the expense of a competitor who had submitted a tender
which would permit of delivery without resorting to overtime.
It would be much more satisfactory to all concerned if it were more fully realized by
manufacturer, wholesaler, and retailer that demands made and service given during the
depression years are not applicable to the present day.
In 1933 forty-seven overtime permits limiting the hours to nine in the day and fifty-four
in the week were issued, as authorized under section 14 of the Act.
HOLIDAY PERMITS.
Permits granting permission to operate factories on certain specified statutory holidays
numbered 592 in 1936, 274 of which were issued for the King's Birthday, June 23rd, 1936.
Also fifteen were issued in December, 1936, for New Year's Day, January 1st, 1937. Each
application  (written)  for permit stated therein reason for making request.
FACTORY CONDITIONS.
Ventilation and the removal of dust-fumes and harmful vapours in factories to the satisfaction of all concerned are problems which at times are hard to solve. In some instances
the dusty processes can be segregated, exhaust systems installed, and the dust removed at its
point of origin; this also applies to the removal of fumes and harmful vapours. The value
of this removal as a preventive of industrial diseases can hardly be questioned. When this
equipment has been installed for the protection of the worker, it is hard to understand why
he at times renders the whole system ineffective by removing the hoods or other appliances
forming part of the suction system. While it is realized that operations being carried on
in some plants are of such a diversified nature dust-removal appliances must be temporarily
removed, it is only reasonable to expect their replacement as soon as the nature of the operation will permit. While dust can he effectively removed from the work-room, once it is stored
away in the lungs there is not much that can be done about it.
Proper and adequate lighting in industry increases production efficiency and decreases
hazardous accidents, and also has a great deal to do with the health and comfort of the worker.
Frequently we inspect factories in which the best of tools and equipment are installed, but 	
T 76 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
find the management has failed to consider the importance of the eyes of the worker and the
handicap of poor lighting. We have in mind a particular plant in which the entire lighting
system was rearranged because it was found the employees were being subjected to excessive
glare.
The provision of adequate sanitary conveniences for male and female factory employees
always receives our attention. Deplorable conditions which will not permit of details in a
report of this nature are sometimes found to exist because a class of employer and employee
does not seem to have the slightest conception of industrial hygiene.
AMENDMENTS.
At the fall session of the Legislature several important amendments were made to the
" Factories Act." Clauses (2) and (3) of section 4 were struck out and clarifying clauses
substituted;   these deal with working conditions in laundries.
While a substantial fine has always been imposed upon a conviction being secured for an
infraction of section 12, a Magistrate before whom an employer was convicted for working his
female employees 14 % hours a day disposed of the case by imposing a nominal fine. In order
that the penalty to be imposed should not in future be left entirely to the discretion of the
convicting Magistrate, section 11, which prescribed the penalty, was so amended that upon
conviction being secured a fine of not less than $50 and costs must be imposed.
Section -63 was repealed and clauses (1) and (2) now more clearly define the statutory
holidays to be observed throughout the year.
HOME-WORK.
Recognizing the introduction of industrial home-work in the Province as an industrial and
social evil, the 1936 second session of the Legislature passed a very important amendment to
the " Factories Act," making it a statutory requirement for every employer who in his trade
or business in personal or household articles gives out any work to be performed in the home,
to first obtain a permit from this Department. And, further, this work when given out can
only be performed by home-workers in possession of a permit issued by this Department.
Following the passing of this amendment letters were, mailed to all firms manufacturing
personal or household articles, requesting the names and addresses of all persons performing
work in the home; replies received and investigations made revealed that home-work of
considerable magnitude was being performed almost exclusively by Japanese women.
Owing to the irregularity of the work, it was impossible to obtain information regarding
hours worked from the home-workers visited, as it was stated that household duties were
included in the day's work. We were, however, successful in a number of instances, where
a time record was kept and the piece-work rate set, in establishing the fact home-workers
were being paid as low as 27 cents for an eight-hour working-day. One of the outstanding
facts brought out during the investigation was that the small remuneration received by home-
workers was not the only source of income, as in most instances the husbands were employed
in some line of industry.
Our survey has proven there is no justification for such a large volume of work being
performed in homes, and we have, without exception, refused to grant Japanese applicants
either an employer's or home-worker's permit authorizing work to be given out or performed
in the home, as we are of the opinion this should be carried out in factories where it can be
regulated in accordance with the statutory requirements relating to the industry. This policy
has resulted in home-work being discontinued, and contractors that previously had the work
performed in homes have requested us to inspect several proposed factory premises previous
to leases being taken and power-driven machinery installed.
ELEVATORS.
The " Factories Act" being entitled an " Act for the Protection of Persons employed in
Factories," the titular expression would indicate that its provisions extend only to persons
employed in and around factories. I do not think the public generally realize that certain
sections are embodied therein delegating to the Department of Labour through the Factory
Inspection Department the responsibility of subjecting all passenger-elevator equipment to a
very rigid inspection, in order to safeguard the thousands using this form of conveyance daily. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936. T 77
While passenger-elevators are operated by licensed operators required to first pass a
written examination as to their competency, the manner of performing certain operations in
connection with their operation depends to a large extent upon the human element, such as to
closing the hoistway doors and car-gate before the car is started and vice versa, or attempting
to level the car after the doors are opened. These unsafe practices have over a period of
years proven a prolific cause of persons receiving major and fatal injuries. In order to
prevent accidents attributable to these causes, mechanical devices in the form of interlocking
equipment are now being installed on the hoistway doors and car-gate of passenger-elevators
and the hoistway doors or gates of freight-elevators, in compliance with rules and regulations
issued under Order in Council February 4th, 1935.
I am pleased to report that no fatal or major accidents occurred to any person while being
transported on passenger or freight elevators during the year under review. This record has
been achieved largely because a great many of the hoistway doors and gates of the older
elevator installations have had interlocking equipment installed as required by the " regulations." In order that this record be maintained, all elevators still requiring this equipment
should have same installed before the amended expiry date, which is February 28th, 1938.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS' LICENCES.
In 1936, 812 operators' licences were renewed and 227 temporary and 204 permanent
licences issued.
NEW ELEVATOR INSTALLATIONS.
The following number of plans and specifications relating to installation of modern elevator
equipment were approved: Six freight-elevators, seven passenger-elevators, and one power
dumb-waiter.
ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS.
During the year 1936, 1,121 passenger and freight elevators were inspected.
CONCLUSION.
We wish to take this opportunity of thanking all officials and employees connected with
industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. T 78 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent  _  .  - .Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer and
, Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets    1   _      -._.....,. .   .     -
,. ,--- ,   -. ,. TT . ^- .    _,, !- Jas. Mitchell, Superintendent.
Vancouver (Women s Branch), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets — {
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets     ) _,_   _  _.
,,. .    .     ,__,          ,   _.         , .    _.        .           . _                   -^ )■ W. G. Stone, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women s Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets   \
New Westminster    _  Robt. MacDonald, Superintendent.
Nanaimo        J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops  _   _ _    J. H. How, Superintendent.
Penticton  _      A. Coy, Superintendent.
Nelson  __   ..J. M. Dronsfield, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert _     J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
f G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets      J R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets  l    W. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—■
This is the Eighteenth Annual Report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1936.
There are ten offices operating within the Province, as follows: Vancouver (2), Victoria
(2), New Westminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Nelson, Kamloops, and Penticton. Separate
offices are provided in Vancouver and Victoria for the employment of women, as well as separate
sections dealing with the employment problems of men handicapped through war service and
industrial occupations.
INTRODUCTION.
As in the previous five or six years, the Province was confronted with a large surplus of
labour, creating a situation which was intensified by the influx of large numbers from other
Provinces. The usual difficulties were met in the conducting of public employment offices
wherever the number seeking employment is much greater than the jobs available, but it is
gratifying to report that the tact displayed and the sympathetic consideration given by the
staff to the many appeals of those seeking employment was equal to the occasions, with the
result that no disturbances occurred in any of the offices during the year and no serious criticisms regarding their operations and administration have been voiced. While the year just
ended was heralded in with considerable agitation on the part of the camp workers and other
factions of relief recipients, it is somewhat remarkable that it did not long survive the coming
of the new year, with the result that there was only one demonstration in Vancouver resulting
in serious property damage during the period under review.
Early in the year it was decided to discontinue the shipment of men to the National
Defence camps and this phase of our work came to an end during February. These camps
continued to operate to the end of July, but during the months of May, June, and July the men
engaged in them were given the opportunity of employment with the Canadian National and
Canadian Pacific Railways on track-work during the summer months.
The improvement shown in the industrial and commercial activities was unfortunately not
sufficient to absorb the men available and a further experiment in the operations of camps for
single, homeless, destitute men was agreed upon, and these men were offered employment in
both Public Works and Forestry projects at the rate of 30 cents per hour, with the understanding that the period of employment would be terminated as soon as the men had accumulated sufficient deferred pay to their credit to maintain them over a given period. The success
of this scheme was more than demonstrated by the attitude of both the men and their leaders,
in that they were at all times ready and willing to proceed to the camps as directed.    This REPORT  OF DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936. T 79
Service was called upon to provide these men with transportation both to and from the camps,
and in this connection arranged with the shipping companies for a 50-per-cent. reduction in the
tariff rates, which resulted in a very considerable saving in transportation costs.
Early in the year it was decided to again offer a limited number of the young men of this
Province an opportunity of receiving training in placer-mining and forestry and, as in the
previous year, a large number of young men eagerly enrolled for these projects. The suitability of the applicants was passed on by the staff of this Service and many of those not
accepted have expressed their keen disappointment. The training of young men in the basic
industries of the Province met with the general approval of the public and appears to have been
entirely satisfactory to the men concerned, and many have expressed the hope that the policy
of training which has proven itself so beneficial would be greatly extended.
CONDITIONS DURING THE YEAR.
General improvement continued in all basic industries of the Province, and, as expected,
the increased opportunities for employment during 1936 attracted a large number of workers
from other parts of Canada, so that the number of those seeking employment very materially
increased the surplus labour already available, which necessitated the continuance of direct-
relief measures on a large scale.
The services of the Department are, as in the past, freely utilized by those seeking employment. The co-operation of this Service with the Department of Immigration has been
maintained and many applications were received for permission to import labour from foreign
countries. As the Immigration regulations prohibit the admission of contract labour, it is
necessary to very carefully review all applications and to investigate the possibilities of securing the required labour in Canada. Every effort has been made, with good results, to induce
those seeking the importation of labour to train local men for the positions available, and
many of the firms have readily agreed to this procedure and limited their applications for
importation to persons required for training citizens of Canada.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED DURING THE YEAR.
While the tables of figures indicate that portion of the Service's operations which can be
translated into figures, they only represent a small portion of its total activities and varied
duties it is called upon to assume, many of which are self-imposed by members of the staff and
readily undertaken in an effort to render a real service to the communities they serve.
All the offices, with the exception of Penticton, which was placed on a part-time basis in
September, have been operated on a full-time basis to meet the steadily increasing volume of
business in connection with both employment and relief matters.
The returns show a marked increase in the number of applicants and reapplicants seeking
employment, which amounted to 202,264 for the year under review, against 118,040 for 1935.
It is, of course, impossible to tabulate the work of the staff in meeting and dealing with
applicants under existing conditions.
WORK IN THE HANDICAP SECTIONS.
The Dominion Government continues to recognize its responsibility for the care of unemployed handicapped ex-service men and maintains a staff in the Vancouver and Victoria
offices. With the passing of the years, the problems which confront this class of applicant
grows greater. This is due to the fact that the men are growing older and many of them,
due to their experiences, are prematurely aged. The situation which confronts these men
is not only intensified by the continuation of the depression, but also by the application and
speeding-up of machinery, which makes it almost impossible for them to successfully compete
in the labour market. Here again there continues to be a steady influx of ex-service men into
this Province, not only seeking employment, but also the more congenial climatic conditions
to be found here.
Slowly but surely the number of men handicapped in the industrial activities of the
Province is increasing, many of whom are to-day limited to light work and sedentary occupations which many are not qualified or trained to perform. This class of men, together with
those suffering from the effects of the Great War, presents a serious problem, especially in
those cases where their pensions and Workmen's Compensation awards are insufficient to T 80 DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
maintain them and their families. The light work which the major industrial firms have to
offer is already largely taken up by men who were injured in the employ of the firms, with the
result that the prospects of these two classes of men being absorbed in industry are extremely
doubtful.
The co-operation of this Service was sought by those in charge of the training of the deaf
and dumb, and as a result of the knowledge and experience gained in the past eighteen years
suggestions were offered regarding suitable training whereby the students could become
qualified in occupations which the students could start and complete without in any way
involving any hazards to normal employees. Trades and occupations suggested did not require
the use of high-speed machinery, where the prevention of accidents requires full exercise of
the faculty of hearing.
OTHER BRANCHES OF ACTIVITY.
During the year public interest was aroused regarding the question of industrial and
commercial training of the youth of this Province. The agitation was based on the belief that
there existed a serious shortage of trained mechanics and commercial workers and many of
those interested approached this Service regarding the matter. While it is not suggested that
industrial and commercial training is not desirable, a review of the married applicants on
relief in the City of Vancouver revealed that many were trained in the various industrial and
commercial callings and that no real shortage existed of men fully qualified to meet any
reasonable demands. The view-point expressed by those in favour of public training could
not, in many instances, be supported solely on the ground that a shortage of skilled labour
exists, unless the workers from middle age up are disregarded and discarded.
In the women's sections, both Vancouver and Victoria offices continue to show a steady
improvement in the wages and conditions offered to domestics, and they report very little
trouble in placing experienced applicants with good families paying above the average wages
for this class of work. Unfortunately, the demand continues for help of a domestic nature
from families who, owing to sickness, are in need of help but are unable to pay more than a
low standard of wages or to offer accommodation of the more desirable type. In the Vancouver
office a feature has been introduced having for its purpose closer personal contact between
young women seeking employment for the first time than is possible in the general office.
Here, in a room specially furnished to create an atmosphere of friendliness, women are given
an opportunity to discuss their affairs frankly and privately and are encouraged to report
employment conditions as they find them. Information gained in this way is of material
assistance in correcting conditions where such correction by the Service is possible. Another
branch deals with women in receipt of relief or applying for it. Every effort is made to persuade relief recipients to accept employment and to encourage those who have lost hope that
employment is preferable to relief from whatever standpoint it is considered. The work of
these sections is a complete answer to those who are pleased to allege that nothing is being
done to assist unemployed women either to secure work or to improve conditions of employment.
The Service continues to be utilized to a very great extent in matters relating to relief-
work, and includes the arrangements and checking of medical examinations of all men proceeding to the various relief-work projects, furnishing transportation to and from the projects, as
well as maintaining records and files dealing with such men. During the early part of the
winter the Service was called upon by the City of Vancouver to engage the men required for
snow-shovelling, which necessitated keeping the office open for many extra hours to adequately
meet the situation created by snow-storms. To prevent the necessity of men waiting long
periods, the co-operation of both the Vancouver Daily Province and Vancouver Sun radio news
services were utilized to broadcast to those waiting at home the hours at which their services
would be required. Not only was satisfaction expressed by the city officials at the new and
more humane method of handling this class of temporary help, but the men themselves
expressed a wish that it be continued in all other phases of the city's employment activities.
The Service was also called upon to co-operate with the general contractors and Provincial
Public Works Department in connection with the Dominion and Provincial highway projects,
and, contrary to the generally accepted opinion that men who had been on relief for a considerable period of time would be unsuited for such work, proved themselves, in a very short space
of time, capable of performing the heavy work in question, and in some cases the men in
receipt of relief who were furnished the contractors to meet the requirements of the quota REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,  1936.
T 81
demanded by the agreement between the Dominion and Provincial Governments were the last
to be discharged, in spite of the fact that their quota requirements were considerably exceeded.
The Service and members of the staff continue to hold the confidence of the vast majority
of people they come in contact with and are called upon to deal with many problems outside the
sphere of employment, and every effort is made to see that the information given is reliable
and advice on matters which the citizens of the Province require is sound.
-    CONCLUSION.
With a continuation of the improvement already shown in the industrial and commercial
activities of the Province, it is the hope of the Service that the numbers on direct relief or
engaged in relief projects will steadily decrease and enable the Service to again more fully enter
into the industrial employment activities in the interests of the bona-fide residents of this Province, which can only be realized by a closer co-operation of the business firms and a service of this
nature, whereby the employers can be induced to greater consideration of the applications for employment from the responsible citizens definitely established in the Province. The Service is
to-day recognized in British Columbia and throughout the Dominion of Canada as necessary in
the industrial life of the country, and the past few years have more than proven its value. The
knowledge gained in the eighteen years of its operation has been freely used, not only by the
residents of our own Province and Dominion, but also by many outside of these boundaries.
With the closing of the period under review, it appears that the clouds of depression of the
past few years are slowly but surely lifting, and that with the co-operation of all sections and
classes and their recognition of the responsibilities involved in their varied activities, the future
prosperity of the Province and the stabilization of industrial and commercial operations will
be greatly improved.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1936.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
January	
February 	
March 	
April	
May	
June 	
July _	
August	
September 	
October... —
November	
December	
Totals-
21,364
17,944
16,500
15,772
20,038
14,582
17,326
15,114
13,850
19,988
15,713
14,073
202,264
3,894
3,235
2,125
2,267
2,889
2,613
3,398
2,594
2,068
2,574
2,031
2,474
32,162
3,912
3,224
2,113
2,259
2,873
2,585
3,371
2,569
2,054
2,565
2,017
2,470
32,012
12
15
32
14
16
14
26
23
16
27
13
9
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1936.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of B.C.
3,543
5,442
2,577
5,251
3,263
158
5,110
136,661
21,790
14,007
4,462
783
4,978
2,191
1,891
893
83
1,326
5,243
4,183
9,098
1,493
728
4,975
2,192
1,891
841
57
1,326
5,230
4,182
9,097
1,493
28
142
35
8
4
Prince George  	
3
Totals	
202,264
32,162
32,012
217
3 T 82 DEPARTMENT  OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF ADMINISTRATOR OF UNEMPLOYMENT
RELIEF, 1936.
During the year under review there was a more marked improvement in the relief situation
than in the previous year. The decrease in the average monthly numbers receiving relief in
the Province as a whole was over 10 per cent. The percentage reduction in unorganized territory was almost double that shown in the municipalities, being 16 per cent., with approximately
8 per cent, reduction in organized territory. The peak number receiving relief was in March,
1933, when 128,858 received assistance.    The lowest number was 64,996 in October, 1936.
This Department continued to absorb 80 per cent, of the cost of relief afforded to municipal
residents, the municipalities paying 20 per cent. In addition, the Province continued to pay
the whole cost of transient and Provincial cases residing within municipal limits. Effective
in April, 1936, the Federal Government reduced the grant in aid by 15 per cent., and in July,
1936, there was a further reduction of 10 per cent., the whole of which was absorbed by the
Province. It has been noticeable that many municipalities increased their relief expenditures
during 1936 as compared with 1935, despite the general improvement in the employment situation. It is reasonable to assume that in some municipalities greater leniency has been shown
since the Province has been paying approximately 85 per cent, of the cost of relief to all
categories residing in organized territory.
Registration.—Sinee August 1st, 1934, when a reregistration took place, a total of 79,439
applications for assistance has been received. This is made up of the following categories:
Standard, 61,044; farmer, 5,954; transient, 12,441; each application representing either a
head of family or single person.
Grub-stakes.—We continued the policy of affording grub-stakes to enable men to follow
placer-mining or lode prospecting. The average monthly number of men receiving grubstakes was sixty.
Garden Seeds.—A total of 8,342 collections was distributed to relief recipients in unorganized territory.
Camps.—The Department of National Defence ceased to operate work camps for transient
single men by the end of June. The Federal Department of Labour arranged with the Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways to carry out deferred maintenance-work in order
to afford employment to the men being discharged from camps.
Assistance to Settlers Plan.—An agreement was entered into with the Federal Department of Labour on December 31st, 1936, whereby assistance could be provided to destitute
farmers for the purpose of re-establishing them by granting assistance for the clearing of
more land and the purchase of a limited amount of farm stock, poultry, implements, etc.
Where a farmer was located on unproductive land, provision was made for moving him to a
more suitable location. Due to existing weather conditions it is doubtful whether any action
can be taken under the plan before the expiry date, March 31st, 1937, but it is anticipated that
the Federal Government will renew the agreement.
Forestry Training Plan.—The scheme inaugurated in 1935 of giving training in forestry-
work to young men was continued. The age-limit was broadened to take in young men between
the ages of 18 and 25, inclusive, instead of 21 to 25. The work was carried out by the Forestry
Branch and the total number of men on the pay-roll was 544. One hundred and twenty-nine
who qualified did not accept appointments for various reasons, while 100 who could not be
absorbed under the Forestry Scheme were transferred to Placer-mining Training, but of this
number 71 did not accept. The total applications numbered 1,348. Of the men enrolled, 41
secured employment through Government endeavours, 85 secured employment through their
own efforts, 34 left camp to return to school or because of illness, 18 quit, 15 were discharged
as unsatisfactory, while the balance were laid off on termination of the projects. The young
men were given training in Forestry Experimental Stations and on trail crews, with about 20
per cent, being enrolled as Forest Ranger Assistants.
Placer-mining Training Plan.—This form of training was continued during the current
year with the operation of two larg-e camps. The men were handled in two training periods
of six weeks each, enabling us to double the number of men handled. A total of 306 received
six weeks' training, 31 failed to report, and 249, including those transferred from the Forestry REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936.
T 83
Training Plan, were unabsorbed or rejected, the total number of applications dealt with being
586. After completing the course the young men were given an opportunity to prospect on
their own. Eighty-one enrollees in the first group trained took advantage of this plan and
went to various parts of the Province. The men were assisted with transportation, equipment,
and grub-stakes. Most of the parties consisted of four men and some of the parties made
considerable gold-recoveries. The enrollees took a keen interest in the training and no doubt
a large number of the young men will go prospecting next year without asking for assistance
from this Department.
Winter Work Projects.—An agreement was entered into with the Federal Department of
Labour for the purpose of providing work for single homeless men during the winter months.
Camps have been established to take care of approximately 2,500 men, about half on forestry-
development and the balance on Public Works projects. There are twenty-one Forestry Camps
and twelve Public Works Camps. The men are being paid at the rate of 30 cents per hour
for an eight-hour day, with 75 cents per day deducted for board and shelter. They are required
to purchase their own clothing. A proportion of their earnings will be withheld, so that when
their period of employment terminates they will be paid an amount of $4 per week until the
amount withheld has been paid. On a rotation basis it is estimated that we will be able to
provide useful work for possibly 6,000 men.    The agreement expires on March 31st, 1987.
The details of all expenditures' made in connection with unemployment relief appear in
the Annual Report of the Department of Public Works and Public Accounts.
E. W. Griffith,
Administrator.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of British Columbia, 1936.
(As from Returns received from the Field.)
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
January.
Municipal—
11,916
1,502
946
31,796
3,998
2,584
43,712
5,500
11,151
903
3,530
11,151
903
Provincial—
4,870
255
15,381
922
20,251
1,177
Single men — ■ _ —
3,094
141
196
3,094
141
Camps—
Hospital,_ _
196
Totals  - - -	
19,489
54,681
15,485
89,655
February.
Municipal—
12,317
1,548
1,025
5,155
290
32,677
4,106
2,708
44,994
5,654
3,733
11,257
931
3,166
142
222
11,257
Single women .._	
Provincial—•
16,358
1,049
931
21,513
1,339
3,166
142
Camps—■
Hospital ___._   -.../— -	
-
222
	
Totals--  -- -— 	
20,335
56,898
15,718
92,951 T 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1936—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
March.
Municipal—
Resident families .—
Provincial families..
Transient families _
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—■
Resident families
Transient families..
Single men .	
Single women	
Camps—
Hospital 	
Totals _	
12,485
1,475
981
1,275
277
20,493
Municipal—
Resident families ..
Provincial families
Transient families .
Single men —	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families —
Transient families .
Single men 	
Single women _.
Camps—
Hospital 	
Totals 	
April.
Municipal—
Resident families ...
Provincial families
Transient families -
Single men  	
Single women	
Provincial—■
Resident families ...
Transient families.
Single men 	
Single women	
Camps—■
Hosp ital 	
Totals	
May.
Municipal—■
Resident families
June.
Provincial families -
Transient families..
Single men ~.
Single women	
Provincial—■
Resident families ....
Transient families.
Single men	
Single women	
Camps—■
Hospital  .
Totals	
12,012
1,418
946
5,074
260
19.710
11,259
1,331
897
4,697
259
18,443
10,798
1,233
813
4,461
239
17,544
33,234
3,928
2,636
16,733
1,007
57,538
31,815
3,773
2,559
15,916
985
55,048
29,876
3,504
2,406
14,860
11,634
957
3,285
143
188
16,207
11,361
970
3,328
155
16,004
10,285
946
3,107
154
192
51,614
14,684
28,549
3,228
2,176
14,075
924
48,952
9,327
912
2,868
145
175
13,427
45,719
5,403
3,617
11,634
957
22,008
1,284
3,285
143
188
94,238
43,827
5,191
3,505
11,361
970
20,990
1,245
3,328
155
190
90,762
41,135
4,835
3,303
10,285
946
19,557
1,227
3,107
154
192
84,741
39,347
4,461
2,989
9,327
912
18,536
1,163
2,868
145
175
79,923 REPORT  OF  DEPUTY  MINISTER,- 1936.
T 85
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1936—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
July.
Municipal—
10,199
1,084
750
26,952
2,856
1,978
37,151
3,940
2,728
8,144
877
2,375
139
177
457
153
8,144
877
Provincial—
3,987
226
12,550
865
16,537
1,091
2,375
139
	
Camps—
177
457
153
Totals  	
16,246
45,201
12,322
73,769
August.
Municipal—■
9,472
979
732
25,013
2,544
1,904
34,485
3,523
2,636
7,989
842
2,141
142
169
447
288
7,989
842
11,403
808
Provincial—■
3,616
201
15,019
1,009
2,141
142
	
Camps—■
169
447
288
Totals- 	
15,000
41,672
12,018
68,690
September.
Municipal—
9,787
989
688
25,568
2,597
1,779
35,355
3,586
8,030
839
1,875
141
176
447
155
2,467
8,030
839
Provincial—
3,146
183
9,810
722
12,956
905
1,875
141
Camps—•
	
176
	
447
155
14,793
!
40,476
11,663
66,932 T 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Statement of Relief administered in the Province of
British Columbia, 1936—Continued.
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
October.
Municipal—
9,498
943
730
24,417
2,484
1,881
33,915
	
3,427
2,611
8,614
841
8,614
841
Provincial—
2,955
156
9,181
628
12,136
784
1,992
136
190
350
1,992
136
Camps—
190
350
Totals- —   — ...
14,282
38,591
12,123
64,996
November.
Municipal—■
9,662
969
735
24,847
2,562
1,876
9,181
633
34,509
Provincial families  —  	
10,610
871
3,531
2,611
10,610
871
Provincial—■
2,983
150
12,164
783
1,944
152
188
77
1,944
152
	
	
Camps—
188
77
Totals _   	
14,499
39,099
13,842
67,440
December.
Municipal—
10,251
1,060
776
3,390
180
26,812
2,806
2,035
10,702
754
37,063
3,866
2,811
12,112
12,112
862
Provincial—
14,092
934
Transient families  _ '	
2,298
155
195
_      668
173
583
2,298
	
	
583
Totals.       	
15,657
43,109
17,046
75,812 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1936. T 87
REPORT OF APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
J. F. Keen  _     6446 Churchill Street, Vancouver.
James Thomson     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Officials of the Branch.
Hamilton Crisford, Director of Apprenticeship...... 907 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver.
Thomas V. Berto, Assistant Director of Apprenticeship._-..907 Stock Exchange Building, Vancouver.
The fiscal year of 1936 was the first complete year of the operation of this Branch established under the provisions of the " Apprenticeship Act."
The year commenced with a total of twenty-three apprentices., largely consisting of those
youths who had been signed up under contract under the voluntary system, inaugurated in the
City of Vancouver, who had not yet completed their period of apprenticeship.
The Act originally covered only the following trades:—
(1.)   Carpentry and joinery (bench-work).
' (2.)  Painting and decorating.
(3.)   Plastering.
(4.)   Sheet-metal working.
(5.)   Plumbing and steam-fitting.
(6.)  Electrical work.
On the recommendation of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, the additional trades
as under have been added during the period:—
(7.)   Automobile maintenance.
(8.)   Sign and pictorial painting.
(9.)  Ship and boat building.
(10.)   Servicing and repair of current-consuming electrical appliances.
(11.)  Jewellery manufacture and repair.
At March 31st, 1937, the number of active apprenticeship contracts was as follows:—
Carpentry and joinery  31
Painting and decorating  10
Sheet-metal work  21
Plumbing and steam-fitting  16
Electrical work  2&
Automobile maintenance   51
Sign-painting        6
Ship and boat building _  28
Jewellery manufacture and repair.       7
Other trades not designated under the Act  65
Total  261
In addition to the above, two apprentices completed their apprenticeship period and were
issued certificates.
It is the established principle of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee to consider each
apprenticeship contract individually before approval and to maintain a standard of training
on the job and through Night School and Correspondence Courses that will offer every facility
to the apprentice of making himself proficient.
During this first year's operation of the Provincial Act the principle of apprenticeship in
skilled trades has become generally recognized and firmly established, and, with extending
facilities and continued stability in business generally, the youth of this Province and industry
should materially benefit and the number of apprentices should steadily increase. Care, however, is being taken that these increases are controlled to the extent that apprentices shall not
displace qualified help and that there is every reasonable likelihood of continued; employment
in the industry at the end of the period of training. T 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Minimum wages with periodic increases have been established in all trades designated
under the Act, and it is a matter of some interest that over one-third of the apprentices
indentured are already receiving more than the required minimum.
The period of apprenticeship varies in different occupations, and in individual cases may
be shortened, at the discretion of the Committee, where the prospective apprentice is able to
show some previous experience or special training and aptitude in any trade.
At the last session of the Legislature an amendment to the " Apprenticeship Act" was
passed to make it possible to extend the benefits of apprenticeship to those over 21 years of age.
This was thought necessary owing to the large number of young people from 21 to 25 years
who, during the depression period, had materially suffered through lack of opportunity.
Some of these are now learning a trade and are signed up under contract at wages considerably
above the minimum.
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee have under advisement at the present time a
recommendation to bring the metal trades under the provisions of the Act and to extend the
scope of the activities of the Branch in other suitable channels.
Hamilton Crisford,
Director of Apprenticeship. REPORT  OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936. T 89
" TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ACT."
Administrative Offices.
Mr. J. A. Ward Bell, Chief Administrative Officer.
Mrs. Rex Eaton, Administrative Officer.
Mr. Hamilton Crisford, Administrative Officer and Secretary.
At the 1936 session of the Legislature an Act was passed, to be known as the " Trade-
schools Regulation Act," which had as its object the protection of the public and particularly
the young people of this Province by correcting abuses and eliminating unfair practices in the
operation of trade-schools.
The Act provides for the registration with the Department of any trade-school or place or
any course of study carried on by correspondence, teaching or purporting to teach the skill and
knowledge requisite for or intended for use in an industrial or commercial occupation, calling,
or vocation. It further provides that the Minister of Labour must be satisfied that competent
instruction and sufficient equipment is provided, reasonable rates are charged, and that fair and
ethical practices are abided by both in obtaining students and their tuition.
The Act came into force on January 1st, 1937, and allowed thirty days for registration.
Practically all business colleges and trade-schools operated in the Province readily complied with the requirements of the Act. Investigation showed that, as far as business schools
were concerned, they were, generally speaking, operated on a high standard, minor adjustments
being asked for in some cases and willingly carried out.
Trade-schools teaching definite trades under personal supervision required a great deal
more attention, and it was found that, in some cases, special regulations would be required,
notably in the cases of barbering and hairdressing schools, as it had become their common
practice to use their schools more or less as shops operated by student-labour in competition
with the legitimate shops paying their employees the minimum wage.
Special regulations were therefore passed by Order in Council and these are reacting to
the benefit of the students, legitimate schools, and the industry.
By far the greatest problem that has arisen in connection with the administration of the
Act occurs in connection with some correspondence and home-study schools. It has been found
that such schools, operating under the cloak of educational institutes or colleges, prostitute the
name and objects of the legitimate educational organization. Misrepresentation, excessive
charges for out-of-date instruction, unfair contracts, advertising and sales talks that are imV
leading, and false promises of many descriptions have been uncovered. Such schools usually
approach inexperienced youths and their parents and obtain their signatures on the dotted
line of an irrevocable contract, frequently for a course that is unsuitable and that seldom opens
up the avenues of employment represented.
The task of sorting out the legitimate from the illegitimate school is one of some magnitude, but considerable progress is being made and special regulations satisfactory to the best
type of school have been prepared. When such special regulations are passed, we believe that
much can be done to safeguard the interests of the students, the legitimate school, and the
public generally.
Hamilton Crisford,
Secretary. T 90 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TEXT OF THE NEW ACT.
CHAPTER 288.
An Act to regulate Trade-schools.
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
Short title. 1. This Act may be cited as the " Trade-schools Regulation Act."    1936
(2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 1.
Interpretation. 2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:—■
" Minister " means the Minister of Labour:
" Trade " means the skill and knowledge requisite for or intended
for ,use in an industrial or commercial occupation, calling, or
. vocation, and, without derogation from the generality of the
foregoing, includes the construction, building, repair, and
operation of aeroplanes, automobiles, steam-engines, boilers,
internal-combustion engines, machinery of all kinds, bricklaying, building, carpentry^ the work of a stone-mason, plastering,
plumbing, the fabrication of iron and steel, aviation, mining,
lumbering, barbering, beauty-culture, hair-dressing, dressmaking, millinery, and any other occupation, calling, or vocation
designated as a trade by the regulations:
" Trade-school " means any school or place or any course of study by
correspondence kept or operated by any person, other than the
University of British Columbia or a Board of School Trustees
or Official Trustee under the " Public Schools Act," wherein or
whereby any trade is taught or purported to be taught. 1936
(2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 2.
Operation of trade; 3. No person shall keep or operate any trade-school in the Province
tration^rohibite6!.'3"   unless ihe is registered pursuant to this Act.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 3.
Application for 4. After the coming into operation of this Act, every person desirous of
trade-schools? " Ure commencing the keeping or operating of a trade-school in the Province shall
make application for registration in writing to the Minister in such form and
with such particulars as he may prescribe in respect of the proposed trade-
school.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 5.
Expiration and 5. Every registration under this Act shall expire on the thirty-first day
tratixm' °f reglS"      '   °^ December of the year in respect of which the registration is. effected, and
every person who is registered may make application to the Minister for the
renewal of his registration in the same manner as hereinbefore provided in
the case of a first registration.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 6.
Certificate of 6. Upon the applicant for registration or for renewal of registration, as
registration. .y-e case may be, complying with the requirements of the Minister and satisfy
ing him that the trade-school is provided with competent instructors and
sufficient equipment for the teaching of any specified trade or trades, and is
furnishing or is prepared to furnish proper instruction in such trade or
trades, at reasonable rates, the Minister may cause the applicant to be
registered as the keeper or operator of a trade-school for the teaching of the
specified trade or trades, and may issue a certificate of registration accord^
ingly.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 7.
Power to inspect ?■ The Minister, or any person authorized by him in writing, may inspect
trade-schools. any trade-school at any time during which the same is being kept or oper
ated, to observe the method of instruction given therein, and to inspect the
business books and records, and all circulars, pamphlets, and other material REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1936. T 91
used for advertising the trade-school and the instruction afforded therein, and
any person who obstructs the Minister or authorized person in making any
inspection or observation or who refuses or neglects to produce any business
book or record upon demand shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine
of not more than one hundred dollars, and, in default of payment, to imprisonment for a term of not more than two months.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 8.
8. If, as a result of any inspection of any trade-school, or upon being Cancellation of
otherwise credibly informed, the Minister is satisfied that a trade-school in reBls ra lon'
respect of which registration has been made under this Act is insufficiently
provided with the means of instruction, or that the charges made for the
instruction given are unreasonable, or that any regulation pursuant to the
provisions of this Act is not observed therein, he may cancel the registration,
and thereupon the registration and the certificate thereof shall be null and
void.    1936  (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 9.
9. Every person Who :  Offences and
(a.)  Keeps or operates a trade-school at a time when he is notPenaItles- ,
registered pursuant to this Act as the keeper or operator of
that trade-school;   or
(6.)  Keeps or operates a trade-school for the purpose of giving
instruction in a trade not specified in his certificate of registration ;   or
(c.)   Enters into any contract for the furnishing of instruction in a
trade other than the contract set out in the application for
registration, or a contract which has been approved by the
Minister,—
shall, in addition to any other liability, be liable, upon summary conviction,
if a corporation to a penalty of not more than five hundred dollars, and if a
natural person to a penalty of not more than two hundred and fifty dollars,
and, in default of payment, to imprisonment for a term of not more than three
months.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 10.
10. The Lieutenant-Governor in Council may from time to time make Regulations.
regulations:—
(a.) Prescribing the security to be provided by the keeper or
operator of any trade-school operated in the Province for the
due performance of his contracts:
(b.) Prescribing the minimum number of hours of instruction in
any trade which shall constitute a course of instruction in
that trade:
(c.) Prescribing the maximum fees which shall be paid for a course
of instruction in any trade:
(d.) Prescribing the terms and conditions upon which money paid
for or on account of instruction in any trade-school shall be
either retained by the payee or be repayable to the payer:
(e.) Prohibiting the use within the Province of any advertising
relating to any trade-school which may tend to mislead, and
requiring the discontinuance of any specified advertisement or
means of advertisement by the keeper or operator of any
trade-school:
(/.) Prescribing the amount that may be asked, charged, or received
from the public for any article produced entirely or in part in
any trade-school, or for the material used by or for the services
of any employee or student of the trade-school:
(g.) Limiting the amount of articles, goods, or commodities produced in any trade-school so that it may not compete unfairly
with the production of similar articles, goods, or commodities
in any factory or shop: T 92 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(h.) Fixing the times during which the public may obtain service
in any trade-school:
(i.) Designating any calling or vocation as a trade within the
meaning of this Act:
(j.) Fixing the fees that shall be payable on application for registration or renewal of registration under this Act:
(fc.) Providing, in the case of any specified trade-school, that no
certificate or other document as to the competency of any
person shall be issued by that trade-school unless that person
has submitted himself to such examination and by such persons
as may be prescribed by the regulations; and prescribing fees
for such examination and certificate:
(..) Generally, as to the conduct, operation, and management of
trade-schools or any of them, and the nature of any examinations for certificates of competency, the manner, times, and
places of holding such examinations, and the persons who shall
sit as examiners.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 11.
Supremacy of Act 11.   (1.)   The provisions and requirements of this Act and the regulations
m case of conflict. shall be in addition to all provisions and requirements made by or under any
other general or special Act of the Legislature, and no examination held or
certificate or other document granted by virtue of this Act or the regulations
shall in any way be deemed to be a compliance with the provisions or
requirements made by or under any other general or special Act respecting
examinations to be held or certificates or documents to be granted thereunder.
(2.) Subject to the provisions of subsection (1), in case of any conflict
arising between the provisions of this Act and the regulations and the provisions of any other general or special Act of the Legislature, the provisions
of this Act and the regulations shall govern.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 12:
Appointment of staff. 12. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act, the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council may appoint such officers as may be considered necessary o<r expedient.    1936 (2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 13.
Appropriation for 13. The expenses necessarily incurred in the administration of this Act
tratton68 °f admmls"   shall, in the absence of a special appropriation of the Legislature available
for that purpose, be payable from the Consolidated Revenue Fund.    1936
(2nd Sess.), c. 54, s. 14.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.
1,725-737-7344

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0307329/manifest

Comment

Related Items