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PART G ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR ENDED… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1937

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 PART a
ANNUAL REPORT
MINISTEK OF MINES
OP  THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
Year Ended 31st December
1936
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
I'riuteiJ l>y Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937. BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. George S. Pearson, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister and Provincial Mineralogist.
James Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines.
D. E. Whittaker, Provincial Assayer and Analyst.
P. B. Freeland, Chief Mining Engineer.
R. J. Steenson, Chief Gold Commissioner.   INSPECTION OF MINES. G 3
PART G.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in District.
Coast Quatsino, Clayoquot, Alberni, Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Yale, and
Nanaimo Mining Divisions.
Northern Interior Lillooet, Ashcroft, Clinton, Quesnel, Cariboo,
and Peace River Mining Divisions, and
those portions of the Liard and Omineca
Mining Divisions east of the 123rd degree
of longitude.
Interior Similkameen,  Osoyoos,  Nicola,  Vernon,  and
Kamloops Mining Divisions.
East Kootenay and Boundary-. Greenwood, Grand Forks, Trail Creek, Nelson, Slocan City, Slocan, Arrow Lake,
Ainsworth, Lardeau, Revelstoke, Fort
Steele, Windermere, and Golden Mining
Divisions.
Northern Queen Charlotte Islands, Bella Coola, Stikine,
Nass River, Portland Canal, Skeena, and
Atlin Mining Divisions, and those portions of Liard and Omineca Mining
Divisions west of the 124th degree of
longitude.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective
districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang . Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for a period
not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
Richard Nichol Nanaimo Station.
James L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould Princeton Station.
John T. Puckey Fernie Station.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended December,
1936, was 1,346,471 tons, being an increase of 158,503 tons or 13.34 per cent, over the production
of 1935.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton District, and the
Northern District, produced 875,865 tons, an increase of 95,007 tons or 12.16 per cent, over 1935. G 4
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Vancouver Island collieries produced 713,037 tons, an increase of 82,824 tons or 13.14 per
cent, over 1935.
The Northern District produced 5,266 tons.
The Nicola-Princeton District produced 157,562 tons, an increase of 10,343 tons or 7.02
per cent, over 1935.
The East Kootenay District produced 470,606 tons, an increase of 63,496 tons or 15.59 per
cent, over 1935.
The following table shows the output and per capita production daily and for the year
of the various mines:—■
Colliery and Mine.
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Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee daily.
Tons of Coal
mined per Underground Employee for Year.
Western Fuel Colliery, Nanaimo.. —
302,524
154,512
237,733
2,565
8,233
679
2,372
49
276
1,697
2,397
25,461
93,698
10,643
6,430
19,262
1,080
671
317
5,266
91,645
378,961
272
278
247
50
265
99
304
64
51
243
140
170
239
82
310
255
63
67
236
166
240
722
218
583
69
26
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10
110
206
93
32
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16
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152
454
1.54
2.44
1.65
0.74
1.19
0.42
0.86
0.19
0.90
0.87
1.71
1.35
1.90
1.40
0.65
1.51
1.08
2.35
2.22
3.65
3.47
419
709
408
37
317
42
263
12
46
212
240
231
454
114
201
385
68
37
158
526
603
834
438
177
473
57
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77
132
69
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116
343
2.53
3.21
2.03
0.90
1.48
0.69
1.56
0.19
1.35
1.39
2.13
1.94
2.96
1.87
1.30
2.51
2.14
2.35
2.78
4.78
4.60
690
873
502
Northneld mine 	
45
392
68
474
12
69
339
Beban's mine 	
299
330
709
154
402
Blue Flame Colliery 	
642
135
Tulameen Valley Coal Co. (Lind).
56
158
Bulkley Valley Colliery	
658
1,104
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island collieries was 713,037 tons. Of this amount, 79,694 tons
or 11.1 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 79,505 tons or 11.1 per cent, was
consumed by producing companies as fuel, 543,817 tons was sold in the competitive market,
10,021 tons was added to stock, thus 76.2 per cent, of the output was sold. Of this amount
sold in the competitive markets, 506,947 tons or 93.2 per cent, was sold in Canada and 36,870
tons or 6.8 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries of the Nicola-Princeton District.
Of the gross output of 157,562 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-Princeton
District, 22,765 tons of 14.4 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as fuel, 2,717
tons was lost in preparation for the market, 126 tons was added to stock, and 131,954 tons
or 83.7 per cent, was sold in the competitive markets in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries of the East Kootenay District was 470,606 tons. Of this
amount, 46,748 tons or 9.9 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 8,565 tons or 1.8
per cent, was consumed as fuel by the producing companies, 11,534 tons or 2.4 per cent, was
used in making coke, and 400,775 tons was sold in the competitive markets.
Of this amount, 38,565 tons or 9.6 per cent, was sold in the United States and 362,210
tons or 90.4 per cent, was sold in Canada. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 5
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the past
five years.    Similar figures for the years prior to 1932 are shown in previous Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production in Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons of
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of
Employees
at Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Employee for
Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
.
587,875
947,100
1,534,975
477,677
787,069
1,264,746
627,619
719,471
1,347,090
407,110
780,858
1,187,968
470,606
875,865
1,346,741
1,001
2,607
3,608
698
2,396
3,094
754
2,139
2,893
819
2,152
2,971
606
2,208
2,814
587
363
425
684
328
408
832
336
465
497
363
399
776
396
478
752
1,878
2,628
522
1,719
2,241
551
1,499
2,050
614
1,531
2,145
459
1,556
2,015
781
1932   J
504
584
f
915
1933   J
457
564
!■
1,139
1934   J
480
657
f
663
1935   J
510
554
f
1,025
1936   J
563
668
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various collieries
and districts compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— G 6
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
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rH G 8 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1936, 2,814 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the Province,
a decrease of 5.2 per cent, compared with 1935.
Taking the average of all the mines in Vancouver Island District, about 20 per cent, of the
working-days was lost through lack of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton District the different
collieries worked on an average of about 82 per cent, of the working-days. In the East Kootenay District the average for the year was about 67 per cent.
The table on page 7 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and about the
mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground and above
ground, compiled from the returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1936 imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled 287,830,054
gallons, valued at $5,426,353; from the refining of this 45,159,438 gallons of gasoline was produced and the remainder sold, in various grades, as fuel-oil.
In addition to above, 24,048,703 gallons of fuel-oil was imported, duty-free, for marine use;
this was valued at $692,951.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1936 the importation of coal from the United States consisted of 30 tons of anthracite screenings, 1,872 tons of bituminous coal, and 4,775 tons of lignite.
Imports from Great Britain consisted of 662 tons of bituminous coal.
Other imports consisted of 1,120 tons of various sized anthracite from China and 1 ton of
anthracite from Germany.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal brought into British Columbia during past years:—
Year. Short Tons.        Year. Short Tons.
1925   117,037 1931   193,060
1926   1217,868 1932   136,188
1927   187,028 1933   119,026
1928   262,198 1934   123,968
1,929 . .  247,060 1935   221,758
1930   227,386 1936   244,928
The total tonnage of coal brought into British Columbia during 1936 was 253,388 tons.
Approximately 20 per cent, of the coal used in British Columbia was produced outside the
Province.
HYDRO-ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT.
At the end of 1936 the hydro-electric horse-power in use amounted to 728,000 horse-power.
The steadily increasing development of hydro-installations in British Columbia is shown in the
following table:—
Horse-power Horse-power
developed by ' , developed by
Hydro-electric Hydro-electric
Year Plants. Year. Plants.
1900    9,366      1927   473,142
1905   29,384      1928   523,902
M10   64,474      1929   559,792
1915   254,065      1930   630,792
1920   309,185      1931   655,992
192;1 , _ . _ 309,762      1932   713,792
1922  329,057      1933   717,602
1923 355,718      1934   726,000
1924 1 ... 355,718      1935 -...-  728,000
1925 .  414,702      1936   728,000
1926   460,562
For the purpose of comparison it may be stated that one developed horse-power per year is
equivalent to the power value of 6 tons of coal. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 9
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND  COAL MINES.
During 1936, 2,814 persons were employed in and around coal mines. Eight fatal accidents occurred during the year, as compared with five for 1936.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 2.84, as compared with 1.67
in 1935. In 1934 the ratio was 2.07; in 1933, 0<97; in 1932, 2.21; in 1931, 1.22; in 1930,
11.62; in 1929, 2.38; in 1928, 2.64; and in 1927, 2.10; the average for the ten-year period
being 3.17.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1936 was 5.94; during
1935 the figure was 4.21; in 1934, 4.45; in 1933, 2.37; in 1932, 5.21; in 1931, 2.81; in 1930,
28.64; in 1929, 5.33; in 1928, 5.54; and in 1927, 4.48; the average for the ten-year period
being 7.19 per 1,000,000 tons of coal mined.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during 1936
and comparative figures for 1936:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1936.
1935.
4
1
1
1
1
3
1
Coalmont Collieries,  Ltd.. _	
No. 4 mine  "
1
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.. — _	
Michel -  	
Totals  —	
8
5
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents and their percentage of the
whole with corresponding figures for 1935:—
Cause.
1936.
1935.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
2
4
1
1
25.00
80.00
3
1
1
60.00
20 00
12.50
12.50
20.00
Totals -	
8
100.00
5
100.00
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident in their
respective classes in the year 1936 and 1935:—
Cause.
1936.
No. of Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
1935.
No. of Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
By falls of roof and coal— —
By mine-cars and haulage	
By carbon-monoxide poisoning
By electric shock.	
Miscellaneous	
Totals _..  -
673,235
336,618
1,346,471
1,346,471
168,309
399,322
1,187,968
1,187,968
237,593
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1936 was 168,309 tons, compared with
237,593 tons for 1936.    The average for the ten-year period was 138,950 tons. The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during the year
1936, compared with 1935, according to Inspection Districts:—
Number of Deaths from Accidents.
Total.
District.
Falls of
Roof and
Coal.
Mine-cars
and
Haulage.
Carbon-
monoxide
Poisoning.
Electric
Shock.
Miscellaneous.
1936.
1935.
1
1
2
2
....
1
1
5
2
1
4
Nicola-Princeton 	
1
Province (1936K.
2
4
1
1                    8
....        |         ....
Province (1935)	
5
District.
Accident Death-rate.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons of
Coal mined.
1936.                1935.
1936.                1935.
2.98
3.79
1.65
2.42
2.06
7.02
12.69
2.14
6.31
6.79
Province (1936)..
2.84
1.67
5.94
Province (1935) .-	
4.21
The following table shows the ratio of accidents per 1,000 employees and per 1,000,000 tons
of coal mined in the Coast and East Kootenay Inspection Districts for the ten-year period ended
December 31st, 1936:—
District.
No. of
Fatalities.
Accident Death-rate.
Per 1,000
Employees.
Per 1,000,000 Tons
of Coal mined.
93
28
3.41
2.55
Totals for Province  	
126
3.17
7.19
The details regarding the occurrences of the fatal accidents in coal mines during 1936 are
as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to John W. Bilton, rope-rider, No. 1 mine, Western Fuel
Corporation of Canada, Limited, on February 6th was due to deceased being struck by a car
loaded with timber; the car had been derailed on an incline and deceased had put the car on
the track and stood behind the car when he signalled the winchman to pull ahead. When the
winch started a bull-wheel pulled out and allowed the car to run back over deceased.
The fatal accident which occurred to George Hronic, rope-rider, No. 2 mine, Tulameen
Collieries, Limited, on February 13th was due to crushing sustained when a trip on which he
was riding became derailed; deceased apparently fell between the cars while attempting to
signal to the hoistman.
The fatal accident which occurred to Thomas White, tracklayer, No. 1 mine, Western Fuel
Corporation of Canada, Limited, on May 22nd was due to a small breaker-post which fell off a
bench of brushing and struck him on the back, fracturing one of the transverse spinal processes;
deceased apparently was making a good recovery, but died suddenly on June 17th, on which
day he was to have been discharged from the hospital.
The fatal accident which occurred to Joseph Dixon, miner, Reserve mine, Western Fuel
Corporation of Canada, Limited, on August 10th was due to deceased being struck by a loaded
car; this car was moving at little more than walking-pace and a fellow-employee shouted a
warning to deceased to look out for the car, but the warning was either unheard or ignored;
the roadway at this point was 7 feet high and 13 feet wide and free from any obstructions.
Ordinary care on the part of deceased would have averted this accident. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 11
The fatal accident which occurred to George W. Mortimer, miner, No. 1 mine, Western
Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited., on August 18th was due to a fall of roof in his working-
place; this place was alongside a fault and was being abandoned after deceased completed the
car he was then loading; this place was fairly well timbered, but in view of the vicinity of the
above-mentioned fault special precautions in the way of extra timber should have been
observed.
The fatal accident which occurred to Edward Slee, haulage-boy, No. 4 mine, Coalmont
Collieries, Limited, on August 24th was due to deceased being run over by a loaded trip on the
Main slope; it was part of deceased's work to place the safety-drag on loaded trips before the
trips left No. 14 Right Level parting, and on this particular trip there was an empty flat car
among the loaded cars on the trip and deceased apparently decided to ride out on this flat car
and get off on the Main slope, but had failed to get clear of the cars when he attempted to get
off the moving trip; the distance from where the trip started to where Slee was found was
approximately 100 feet.    The regulations prohibit such riding.
The fatal accident which occurred to Thomas Kenda, miner, No. 1 mine, Michel Colliery,
on August 28th was due to shock following a compound fracture of his right leg, due to a fall
of roof when he was testing same with his pick;  he died on August 31st.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Waugh, driver, No. 1 mine, Western Fuel
Corporation of Canada, Limited, at 10.30 p.m. on December 31st was due to electrocution.
Deceased was at work in the Protection area and all the men in this area reach and leave
their work by means of Protection shaft; on this day Waugh and another driver had finished
their work about 10 p.m. and instead of waiting to ascend Protection shaft with the other men
of the shift they decided to walk out to No. 1 shaft by way of No. 1 level; this level is equipped
for overhead electric trolley haulage, the voltage being 250', and about half-way to No. 1 shaft
Waugh made contact with the trolley-wire and sustained a shock from which he did not recover
consciousness.
As this was the last shift of the year there were very few men in the mine and none in this
vicinity; the man who was with Waugh ran to the motor-barn, half a mile distant, and got an
electric locomotive which he drove to where Waugh was lying and took him out to No. 1 shaft
and brought him to the surface, where artificial resuscitation was tried without avail; about
forty-five minutes elapsed between the accident and attempts at resuscitation. When men
are required to travel along this level to and from their work the electric power is cut off the
trolley-wire, but deceased had not been authorized to travel by this route.
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during 1936,
together with the number of shots fired, tons of coal produced per pound of explosive used, and
the average pounds of explosive per shot fired (these quantities include all explosives used for
breaking coal and for rock-work in coal mines):—
Vancouver
Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
used per
Shot fired.
Western Fuel Colliery, Nanaimo  ....
75,717
71,200
52,038
302,524
154,512
237,733
2,565
8,233
679
2,372
49
276
1,697
2,397
144,393
100,298
73,861
3.86
2.17
4.56
1.20
0.56
3.53
1.63
2.76
2.12
11.98
0.52
6,900
1,200
700
30
100
800
200
9,000
2,900
1,200
60
150
1,500
400
Biggs' mine  , -	
0.66
0 53
208,885
713,037
333,762
3.41 G 12
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery.
Quantity
of
Explosive
used in
Pounds.
Tonnage
for
Mine.
Total No.
of Shots
fired.
Tons of
Coal per
Pound of
Explosive
used.
Average
Pounds of
Explosive
used per
Shot fired.
5,650
20,600
2,550
2,500
4,800
500
500
100
25,461
93,698
10,643
6,430
19,262
1,080
671
317
9,050
38,000
4,000
4,400
7,489
1,000
650
150
4.50
4.54
4.17
2.57
4.01
2.16
1.34
3.17
0.62
0.54
0.64
0.56
0.64
0.50
0.77
Hat Creek Colliery     	
0.66
37,200
157,562
64,739
4.23
0.57
Northern District.
I
1,800   ;
5,266
3,000    |
2.92
0.60
1,800
i
5,266
3,000    [
!
2.92
0 60
East Kootenay District.
4
47,242
1
91,645
|     378,961
7
66,807
45,822.50
8.02
47,246
470,606
66,814
9.96
295,131
]  1,346,471
468,315
4.52
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Monobel of different grades
Permissible rock-powder	
Total.
Lb.
236,446
58,685
295,131
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable the
Minister of Mines under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause (2), " Coal-mines
Regulation Act ":—■
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1936 mining-machines produced approximately 880,036 tons, or 65.3 per
cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type of machine
used:—
NlJMBEK DRIVEN BY
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Mavor
and
Coulson.
Anderson
Boyes.
Hardy.
Siskol.
Sullivan.
Pickwick.
Pneumatic
Pick.
Inger-
soll-
Rand.
1
28
22
4
11
3
27
9                1
11
1
27
1                3
11
|      58
|      _      1      ....
Totals	
1
108
5
14
30
20
1
1
27
11 INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 13
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,339 safety^lamps in use in the coal mines of the Province. Of this number,
179 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,160 were electric lamps of various makes,
as follows:  Edison, 2,0>78;  Wolf electric, 83.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking, and
illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery and Mine.
Method of Locking.
Magnetic
Lock.
Screw or
Automatic
Clip.
Illuminant used.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Western Fuel Colliery, Nanaimo.
Reserve Colliery	
Comox Colliery   	
Northfield  Colliery   -
Lantzville Colliery  	
Fiddick mine  	
Ida Clara   (Richardson)  mine..
Jingle Pot mine  	
Biggs'   mine   ~ 	
Chambers'   mine  	
Beban's mine  _	
Totals for district..
33
12
34
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
91
545
201
411
28
10
18
1,237
33
12
545
201
410
28
10
18
1,236
Nicola-Princeton District.
8
10
4
4
2
1
2
2
80
120
75
53
25
24
15     ;
8     1
!
8
10
4
4     !
2
1
2
2         !
80
120
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd.    - - -	
75
53
Blue Flame Colliery — - - - —	
25
24
15
8
33
400
1
33
1
Northern District.
1
2     ;
18
2
2
i
18
1
2
18
East Kootenay District.
7                     120                        7                     120
45                   386                    45                   386
52                     506                     52                     506
178                 2,161                   179                 2,160
1                           i                          1
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the 1930
Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—■
jVo. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of Mines.    The only G 14 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is manufactured by the
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of Mines. This
model of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp approval given under
Approval No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18F
and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland,
Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18h of the United States Bureau of Mines.
This lamp represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18H and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange, New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp
is known as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company,
Orange New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of Mines.
The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is manufactured
by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp
is known as the Edison Model K lamp.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the Department
of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all persons underground in
the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by the officials of the mines in the
carrying-out of their duty and in such cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-
lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at seven mines and underground
at two mines.
The purpose for which it was used, together with the amount of horse-power in each
instance, is shown in the following table:—
Above ground—■ Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Winding or hoisting      365
Ventilation r  1,202
Haulage      158
Coal-washing '. _ 1,216
Miscellaneous  2,470
Total horse-power  5,411
Underground—■
Haulage  1,655
Pumping ,  640
Coal-cutting  30
Miscellaneous  910
Total horse-power  3 235
Total horse-power above and under ground   8,646
Of the above amount, approximately 1,417 horse-power was operated as direct current
and 7,229 horse-power as alternating current. INSPECTION OF MINES. G 15
VENTILATION.
The reports of the District Inspectors give detailed information regarding the ventilation
in the splits and main returns of the different mines; in a number of instances the formerly
existing splits had to be further divided to ensure that the methane content was kept at a
minimum
Methane Detection.
During the year the Burrell Methane Detector was used to test for the presence of methane
in percentages less than can be detected by the flame safety-lamp, which is the usual testing
medium used by firebosses throughout the Province.
Tests were made with the new improved Wolf Safety Flame safety-lamp with methane
percentage indicator attachment, but as this is governed by temperature conditions it was not
found to be reliable for underground use.
A few Ringrose Automatic Firedamp Alarms were tried during the year and were found
to be fairly accurate in showing the presence of methane at percentages of 1.25 and upwards;
this device can be set to come into operation at any point between 1.25 and 2.5 per cent, and
shows a red light when the methane content reaches the predetermined setting. The Ringrose
is operated by a self-contained battery.
Mine-air Samples.
Mine-air sampling was carried out as usual during the year and 308 samples were collected
in the various coal mines of the Province; of this number, twenty-three were spoiled in transit
and accidents in the laboratory.
The most intensive sampling is done in the mines of the Crowsnest Pass District and in
No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, where the methane production is higher than in other mining
districts of the Province; many of the samples were taken in the vicinity of abandoned workings and in fire areas.
The analyses of above samples are filed in the office of the Chief Inspector of Mines.
INSPECTION COMMITTEE.
At practically all the mines throughout the Province inspection committees appointed by
the workmen under General Rule 37, section 101, " Coal-mines Regulation Act," were in operation throughout the year; one exception was the Reserve mine of the Western Fuel Corporation
of Canada, Limited, where the men failed to appoint such a committee.
As required by above rule, the Chief Inspector of Mines appointed two miners to carry out
this inspection until such time as the men employed in the mine appointed a committee of their
own selection;  the above two men continued to carry out this duty to the end of the year.
COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust as per the Regulations for Precautions against Coal-dust was well
maintained during the year and a total of 800 samples was taken and analysed at the different
mines, and where the analyses showed less than 50 per cent, incombustible matter immediate
steps were taken to see that the mine or part of the mine was rerock dusted.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
During the year the following dangerous occurrences, in addition to those causing injuries,
were reported:—
On January 4th spontaneous combustion was discovered in the gob behind No. 6 conveyor-
wall, 5 East slope, No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery; the men were immediately withdrawn from
the area except those engaged in dealing with the emergency. The heated material was
reached and loaded out without any damage being done.
On January 15th spontaneous heating developed in 11 East level, No. 4 mine, Coalmont
Collieries, Limited; this occurred in the gob where the pillars had been extracted; the men
were withdrawn and this area was sealed off without further trouble. .
On February 5th, in No. 1 mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, Nanaimo,
long-wall workings which were being driven towards the abandoned and flooded workings of G 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
the old North-east slope, abandoned in 1917, with the intention of leaving a 50-foot barrier
between the new and old workings, tapped this water some 60 feet closer than was shown by
the survey. While the above-mentioned barrier was determined from the survey, precautionary
drill-holes ahead were required as a definite precaution, and, as mentioned above, one of these
drill-holes tapped the water ahead of the advancing face-line; this face-line was immediately
stopped until the water was dealt with.
On April 13th a cave-in of some shaft-timber occurred in the Newcastle shaft of No. 1
mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada; this shaft was not in use except as an auxiliary
airway;   the cave-in was cleared up.
On May 1st, in No. 1 shaft, Reserve mine, an empty car being put off the cage at the
shaft-bottom became coupled to the loaded car being put on the cage; this was not seen by
the eager, who signalled to hoist. The empty car was dragged some 300 feet up the shaft and
caused some slight damage.
On May 3rd spontaneous heating was discovered in the floor of the return airway in No. 4
mine, Coalmont Collieries, Limited.    The heated material was dug out and no damage resulted.
On May 4th one of the cages at No. 1 shaft, Western Fuel Corporation, Limited, fouled
the connecting rails at the main surface landing when the signal was given to lower the cage;
the cage remained stationary and 200 feet of slack rope was paid out before the hoist was
stopped;   the cage was secured until the slack rope was taken up.
On August 20th the throttle-valve of the hoisting-engine, No. 1 mine, Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, stuck while the cages were at the top and bottom of the shaft
respectively;  repairs were made during a three-hour delay;  no damage was done.
On September 12th a trip of loaded cars were accidentally pushed over the brow of the
Main slope by a haulage-motor; the cars derailed about 200 feet down the slope and caved
the roof at this point and caused one week's suspension of operations.
On November 28th spontaneous heating was discovered in Jackson's section, No. 1 mine,
Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited; this area was immediately sealed off without
further trouble.
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1936 there were two prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act," as follows:—
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
Jan. 7
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., No.
1 mine, Michel
Fireboss	
Failed   to   examine   for   inflammable
gas prior to firing a shot; in contravention of General Rule 12
Fined  $20  and costs.
Dec. 9
Canadian Collieries   (D.),  Ltd.,
No. 5 mine, Comox
Miner	
Having matches in his possession in
the    mine;    in    contravention    of
General Rule 9
Fined $10 and costs.
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has four mine-rescue stations in different parts of the Province
and centrally located in the mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo, Cumberland, Princeton,
and Fernie. During the year many requests were received from medical men for oxygen and
the inhalators for use in emergencies, and immediate service was rendered in every case. In
the larger coal-mining districts of Crowsnest, Cumberland, and Nanaimo experienced teams
maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the year and so keep ready for any
emergency calls.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual use of
oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere and instruction on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-work. The training
itself is strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a special physical examination
before starting training and must be under 34 years of age. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 17
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, eighty-four new men took
the full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
859
860
861
862
863
864
865
866
867
870
871
872
873
874
875
876
877
878
879
880
881
882
883
884
885
886
887
890
891
892
893
894
895
896
899
900
John Cunliffe	
Thomas H. Cunliffe..
Thomas Adamson..
William Combs	
William Conn	
George A. Dakers..
Harvey Hurd.	
Alexander Hunter-
William A. Johnston	
Thomas Leigh 	
William Logan 	
Alfred W. Maxwell	
Thomas James Morgan-
John Morrison-	
Thomas Mossey 	
James Stewart 	
Alexander McAllister-
William Shearer	
Henry Westfield	
Robert Marston Alexander..
Percy Bailey  	
Alexander T. Brent	
William Joseph Bromley-
Griffith George Francis.—
John Joseph Kelley—	
Charles Luxon	
Samuel B. Meldrum	
John Aubrey McDiarmid-
William Henry Pearce	
Donald Smith : 	
Emil Soderlund. __ .,
Frank Taylor— 	
William R. Triplets _..
John Trudgian  —
Anton Jacob Winkler..
Basil Nixon 	
George Martin Brown-
Richard Bates 	
James Craig ____ ___
j Hugh Mitchell McNeill..
| William Vahle......	
I James Weir  _ __
Princeton.
Princeton.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
Hedley.
New Westminster.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
901
902
903
904
905
906
907
908
909
910
911
912
913
914
915
916
917
918
919
920
921
922
923
924
925
926
927
928
929
930
931
932
933
934
935
936
937
938
939
940
941
942
Melford Biggs	
John Henry Smith 	
Archie Cameron Wotherspoon
Leslie Wilson Younghusband-
William Younghusband-	
Joseph A. Beram.. —
William Cox 	
James H. Dolson  	
John W. Douglas -
Earl C. Mclnnes 	
Walter E. Riedel	
Albert Addison 	
Harold O. Broadrick	
David C. Coulthard	
Douglas Haig Good  -—
George Moore Good  	
William John Higgin	
Henry John Hollister 	
William Edward Ruuska 	
Henry Joseph Salmon.	
John W. Clark-	
Chas. Reginald Dickinson	
Asbjorn R. Fossum  	
Robert McCourt.  	
Joseph A. Salmon  	
Thomas McCourt  	
Owen Patrick Callaghan	
Colin Douglas M. Chisholm	
John Archibald Fingland	
Hedley Stewart Fowler	
Joseph Rinehardt Giegerich.	
George Grahame Hunter_	
Brock Lough Montgomery	
Robert Mulligan :	
Clarence Fred Myrene. __
John Murdo MacDonald 	
J ames O' B rien 	
Arthur Gerald Pentland	
Edwin Peterson 	
Richard Shannon	
Frederick Mark Waldie	
Jasper Matthews Wolverton...
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo^
Nanaimo.;
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley.
Kimberley..
Kimberley.
MINE-RESCUE AND FIRST-AID WORK.
At all the coal-mining centres first-aid classes and training was carried out, and this was
ably supported by the Vancouver Island and Coast District Mine Safety Association, the East
Kootenay Mine Safety Association, the Princeton District Association, and by the Inspectors,
of Mines in the various districts.
The above Safety Associations held competitions in first-aid and mine-rescue work at
Fernie, Princeton, Nanaimo, and Cumberland, and these competitions, in addition to demonstrating the efficiency of this work, did much to spread interest in mine-safety and induce new
men to enter this field.
In the Fernie and Princeton competitions men from both coal and metalliferous mines
took part in both above branches of safety-work and there can be no doubt that each learned
from the other.
During the Vancouver Jubilee Celebration the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company
of Canada, Limited, the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, and the Canadian Collieries (D.),
2 G 18 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Limited, each sent one of their trained mine-rescue teams to Vancouver, where these teams
gave a three-day exhibition of mine-rescue work in Stanley Park, where the Department of
Mines had erected a large demonstration mine for this purpose; many thousands of people
witnessed this work.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year nineteen coal companies operated twenty-two collieries, with thirty-two
mines, employing 2,015 men underground. In the supervision of underground employees there
were ten managers, one safety engineer, eighteen overmen, eighty-three firebosses and shot-
lighters, a total of 112, or one official for every eighteen persons employed underground.
" COAL SALES ACT."
During the year a considerable number of inspections were made under the " Coal Sales
Act"; several complaints were investigated. The majority of the complaints were in the
Vancouver District and most of these were due to small dealers accused of substituting an
inferior grade of coal for a superior grade. Valuable assistance was rendered in this district
by the Weights and Measures Inspector for the City of Vancouver, who keeps a close check
on the sale of coal in the city. Generally speaking, the regular coal-dealers try to conduct
their business in accordance with the " Coal Sales Act." INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 19
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief Inspector of
Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales Act."
Registered Names of Coal.
Colliery and District.
Producing Company.
Comox. 4	
Old Wellington-
Ladysmith-Wellington-
Ladysmith-Extension—
H i-Car b on 	
Nanaimo-Douglas-
Nanaimo.-
Nanaimo Reserve...	
Nan a imo- Wellington „
Mabury-Northfield-
Wellington South, Ida CIara~
C as si dy-W ellington	
Lantzville Wellington..
B iggs-Wellington	
Fiddiek-Douglas	
Little Ash-Wellington-
Jingle Pot _ 	
Old Adit, Wellington-
Chambers-Extension-.
M i ddlesboro	
Nicola Sunshine	
Coalmont	
Princeton Blue Flame..
Tulameen Coal, Princeton	
Tulameen Valley Coal,
Princeton
Diamond, Princeton District,
B.C.
Sunrise, Princeton District,
B.C.
Pleasant Valley, Princeton
District, B.C.
North Thompson Gem	
Red Triangle,  Princeton
Quality
Hat Creek	
Princeton-Black Diamond
Bulkley Valley	
Aveling  	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek-
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Corbin Washed	
Nos. 4 and 5 mines, Comox Colliery (Cumberland).
No. 9 mine (Wellington)  -
No. 5 mine (South Wellington)	
No. 8 mine (Extension) -	
Mixture   of   Canadian   Collieries'   coal   and   B.C.
Electric coke
No. 1 mine, Upper seam (Nanaimo) —	
No. 1 mine, Lower seam (Nanaimo) .
Reserve mine (Nanaimo)	
Blend of No. 1 mine, Nanaimo, and No. 5 mine,
South Wellington
(Recovered from surface dump)   (Wellington)	
Ida Clara No. 1 (South Wellington).
Cassidy Colliery (Cassidy).	
Lantzville (Lantzville)	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)	
Fiddiek mine (South Wellington)_
Little Ash mine (Wellington)	
Jingle Pot (East Wellington)	
Old Adit  (Wellington)	
Chambers (Extension)  	
Middlesboro (Merritt)	
Sunshine (Merritt)	
Coalmont (Coalmont) ,..
Blue Flame (Princeton) ~
Tulameen (Princeton)	
Tulameen  (Princeton)	
Diamond (Princeton).
Sunrise (Princeton) __„
Diamond and Sunrise blended (Princeton).
North Thompson  (North Thompson)..
Red Triangle  (Princeton)—	
Hat Creek (Lillooet) .
Black Diamond (Princeton).
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa)	
Aveling (Telkwa) 	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek)	
Michel (Michel) _ 	
Corbin (Corbin) —
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd.
Ditto.
Mabury Engineering Corporation,
Ltd.
Richardson Bros., Ltd.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Lantzville Collieries, Ltd.
Biggs' mine.
Fiddiek mine.
Little Ash mine.
Jingle Pot Colliery, Ltd.
Old Adit Colliery   (C.  Stronach).
R. H. Chambers.
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
Sunshine Coal Co., Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
W. R. Wilson Mining & Investment Co.
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd.
Tulameen Valley Coal Co.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
North Thompson Colliery, Ltd.
Red Triangle Coal Co., Ltd.
Canada Coal & Development Co.,
Ltd.
Black Diamond Collieries, Ltd.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Corbin Collieries, Ltd. G 20 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND
MINE-SURVEYORS' CERTIFICATES.
BY
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of James
Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; Henry E. Miard, member; and James Strang,
member and Secretary of the Board.
The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the Mines Department in Victoria.
Examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules of the Board of Examiners and
approved by the Minister of Mines on September 28th, 1929.
Two examinations were held in 1936, the first on May 13th, 14th, and 15th, and the second
on November 18th, 19th, and 20th.
The total number of candidates at the examinations were as follows: For First-class
Certificates, 3 (1 passed, 2 failed) ; for Second-class Certificates, none; for Third-class Certificates, 16 (4 passed, 12 failed) ;   for Mine-surveyors' Certificate, none.
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various classes:—■
First-class Certificate.—Edward R. Hughes.
Third-class Certificate.—Isaac R. Hughes, Reginald T. Taylor, William J. Heycock, and
Joseph Karner.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examination and certificates already specified as coming under the Board
of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the holder of a certificate
of competency as such. By miner is meant any person employed underground in any coal mine
to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, whether by hand or machinery.
Examinations are held regularly in all the coal-mining districts.
No certificates have been granted in any case where the candidate failed to satisfy the
Board as to his fitness, experience in a coal mine, and a general working knowledge of the
English language.
Throughout the year fifty-seven candidates presented themselves for examination; fifty
passed and six failed to qualify.
In addition to the certificates granted above, substitute certificates were granted to miners
who had lost their original certificates.
The Board of Examiners desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for the use
of their premises for holding these examinations where necessary.
The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority under the " Coal-mines Regulation
Act " to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a provisional certificate as a coal-miner to
applicants, which entitles the holder to follow the occupation of a coal-miner for a period not
exceeding sixty days or until the date of the next examination before the Board. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 21
REGISTERED LIST OF HOLDERS OF CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY
AS COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
First-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act, 1897."
Name.
Date.
Name.
Date.
Shepherd, Francis H	
Horrobin, William	
Chandler, William .
Priest, Elijah 	
Eandle, Joseph	
Matthews, John  	
Norton, Richard Henry
Kesley, John  	
Smith, Frank B 	
Hardy, Joseph 	
Bradshaw, George B	
Simpson, William G	
Hargreaves, James	
March 5,
1.
21,
21,
18,
May
Dee.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan. 8.
Aug. 26,
March 4,
May 30,
Dec. 17,
June 12,
June 12,
Feb. 5,
1881
1882
1883
1883
1888
1889
1889
1892
1896
1896
1899
1899
1901
Drinnan, Robert G	
Stockett, Thomas, Jr..
Cunliffe, John	
Browitt, Benjamin.—.
Wilson, A. R	
Simister, Charles	
Budge, Thomas	
Richards, James A...
McLean, Donald	
Wright, H. B	
Coulthard, R. W	
Roaf, J. Richardson..
Manley, H. L	
Feb.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
5,1901
3,1901
3,1901
3,1901
17,1902
17, 1902
17,1902
17,1902
21,1904
21,1904
21,1904
21,1904
21,1904
First-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act," 1904-1911-1919. '
Name.
Date.
Date.
Baxter, Andrew	
Bennett, John	
Biggs, J. G 	
Bonar, Robert	
Bonar, Robert, Jr	
Brace, Tom  -
Bridge, Edward	
Brown, David	
Brown, Robert Joyce..
Caufield, Bernard.	
Church, James A. H...
Cox, Richard .
Cunningham, John Howard..
D'Alfcroy, A. C.  	
Davies, David    	
Davies, Stephen	
Davies, Thos. Owen	
de Hart, J. B. 	
Devlin, E. H   	
Dickson, James	
Elliott, John B	
Emmerson, Joseph	
Ewart, William	
Fairfoull, Robert 	
Foster, William R   _.
France, Thos  	
Fraser, Norman  	
Freeman, H. N 	
Frew, Wm. B.	
Galloway, C. F. J.
Gascoyne, Rowland B..
Gillham, John 	
Glover, Francis	
Graham, Charles	
Graham, Thomas	
Gray, James	
Hanson, Wm. B. __
Henderson, Robert..	
Hewlett, Howe	
June 10,
Dec. 30,
July 22,
Oct. 28,
Dec. 15,
May 13,
July 22,
May 21,
May 13,
May 1,
June 10,
May 13,
May 9,
Dec. 20,
June 10,
Nov. 15,
May 21,
May 17,
Dec. 30,
Oct. 31,
June 30,
Nov. 9,
May 19,
June 10,
Dec. 31,
Nov. 22,
March 4,
May 1,
July 6,
July 22,
May 21,
Jan. 5,
Oct. 31,
Nov. 14,
Nov. 9,
Nov. 27,
Dec. 9,
Nov. 27,
May 27,
1911
1926
1908
1911
1932
1915
1908
1914
1915
1909
1911
1915
1912
1928
1911
1917
1914
1917
1926
1912
1928
1907
1922
1911
1925
1906
1905
1909
1932
1908
1914
1925
1912
1905
1907
1909
1930
1909
1913
Higgins, Alexander.-
Hodge, William K....
Howden, Archibald ...
Howells, Nathaniel __
Hughes, Edward R..
Hughes, John C.	
Humphries, Clifford-
Hunter, Alex. B.	
Huntrods, Eustace S. F.Jackson, Thos. R	
Jaynes, Frank	
Johnston, John	
Kellock, George 	
Laird,  Robert	
Leigh ton, Henry	
Littler, James	
Mackinnon, Hugh G._.
Macauley, D. A 	
McCulloch, James	
McDonald, John	
McGuckie, Thomas	
McKendrick, Andrew .
McLean, Michael D	
McMillan, J. H	
McVicar, Samuel	
Mazey, William John .
Miard, Henry Ernest.
Millar, John K	
Miller, Andrew Anderson .
Montgomery, John W	
Mordy, Thomas	
Morrison, Edward..— 	
Mottishaw, Sam. K	
Murray, George	
Newbury, Arthur 	
O'Brien, George.....
Ovington, John..
Peacock, Frank David..
Penman, Hugh	
Dec.
June
May
Oct.
Dec.
May
June
July
May
Nov.
May
June
June
Nov.
May
Dec.
May
June
Sept.
Oct.
July
May
June
Sept.
May
Oct.
May
Nov.
Oct.
May
Sept.
June
Nov.
June
June
May
May
Oct.
May
19,1918
16, 1925
27,1913
28.1911
29,1936
17, 1917
10,1911
8,1916
19,1922
9, 1907
13,1915
30, 1928
10,1911
15,1917
9,1912
2,1929
19, 1922
10, 1911
10, 1910
3,1919
22,1908
27.1913
16, 1925
10, 1910
1, 1909
31,1912
9, 1912
22, 1906
31.1912
1,1909
10,1910
24,1924
15,1917
21,1921
21,1920
21.1914
27,1913
28,1911
21,1914 G 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
First-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act," 1904-1911-1919—Continued.
Date.
Pettigrew, Robert	
Phelan, Arthur	
Powell, J. W	
Quinn, James A.	
Quinn, John Graham...
Ramsay, Peter Millar
Reger, Frederick W—
Rolfe, Emrys... 	
Roper, William	
Russell, John	
Scott, Thomas Wright
Shanks, John	
Shenton, T. J	
Smith, A. E	
Smith, Joseph	
Smith, Thos. Edwin ....
Spicer, J. E. 	
Spruston, T. A,	
Stevens, L. C	
June
May
June
Dec.
July
May
July
Dec.
May
May
Dec.
May
Sept.
Oct.
July
Dec.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
. I Hl^ - :
1, 1933
27, 1913
10,1911
2, 1929
8, 1916
16,1918
6,1932
15,1932
13,1915
21, 1914
22,1921
1,1909
10,1910
28, 1911
22, 1908
19, 1918
28, 1911
27, 1909
27, 1909
Stewart, R. T L
Strang, James	
Stubbs, Clement.
Taylor, James	
Thorne, B. L..	
Touhey, James..
Vincent, Thomas C	
Walker, William	
Wallbank, J	
Warburton, Ernest Leonard-
Wesnedge, William	
Whittaker, John 	
Williams, John Samuel	
Williams, Thos. B	
Williams, Thos. H	
Wilson, Ridgeway R.	
Wilson, Thos. M	
Wilson, William	
Yates, Frank	
Sept.
10,
1910
June
10,
1911
July
21,
1929
May
16,
1918
Sept.
10
1910
May
21
1914
June
24
1924
May
16,
1918
Sept.
10
1910
July
8,
1916
Dec.
19,
1918
Dec.
19,
1918
Dec.
19,
1918
May
17,
1917
Nov.
22,
1906
Nov.
15,
1917
Dec.
23
1927
May
16
1918
Dec.
31
1925
Second-class Certificates of Service.
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Lee, John  S	
Millar, J. K. 	
March    4,1905
March    4, 1905
B     9
B   10
Hunt, John	
Powell, William Baden	
March    4,1905
March    4, 1905
B   13
B   16
Second-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904."
Name.
No.
Adams, Wm. Henry.
Adamson, Robert	
Allan, Alex. McDiarmid-
Almond, Walter	
Alstead, Robert	
Archibald, William	
Ball, Benjamin	
Barlow, Benjamin Robt.-
Bastion, Albert	
Bell, John	
Beveridge, William	
Bevis, Nathaniel	
Biggs, John G 	
Bonar, Robt. B 	
Brace, Tom	
Bridge, Edward :—.
Brown, David	
Brown, George	
Brown, James L	
Brown, John C.	
Brown, John Todd	
Brown, R. J.	
Brown, Robert	
Brown, Robert Sneddon..
Brown, William Gold	
Brownrigg, John H	
Bushell, J. P	
June
Sept.
May
Nov.
June
Nov.
June
Dec.
Nov.
May
June
Sept.
Nov.
June
Nov.
Oct.
Sept.
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
May
Oct.
May
May
Dec.
May
May
24,1935
10.1910
27,1913
15,1917
24, 1924
22, 1922
21, 1920
19, 1918
21, 1923
17,1917
21,1920
10, 1910
2, 1907
30,1928
27,1909
23, 1906
10,1910
19,1918
28.1911
23, 1906
9, 1912
28,1911
21,1914
13,1915
19,1918
17,1917
1, 1909
B286
B120
B167
B213
B257
B250
B235
B229
B256
B212
B233
B123
B 40
B270
B 96
B 33
B 108
B225
B 136
B 39
B150
B134
B183
B196
B228
B124
B   81
Carroll, Henry	
Caufield, Bernard	
Caufield, John	
Cawthorne, L 	
Challinor, Jno. Thomas
Challoner, Jno. Arthur.
Chapman, Wm	
Churchill, James	
Clark, Robt.  	
Clarkstone, Wm. W	
Commons, Wm.	
Corbett, Garner S 	
Coupland, George 	
Courtney, A. W	
Cox, Richard	
Crawford, David	
Cunliffe, Thomas	
Dando, John	
Davidson, Hugh	
Davies, J. C. H	
Davies, Stephen	
Dennis, Fred. W	
Devlin, Ernest H	
Dewar, Alexander	
Dickenson, Clifford	
Dunn, Jas. W.	
Dunsmuir, John	
July
Oct.
July
May
May
May
June
July
June
May
Sept.
June
May
Oct.
May
May
May
May
May
June
Sept.
May
May
Oct.
May
July
Nov.
22,1908
23,1906
8,1916
1,1909
27, 1913
21,1914
10, 1927
22, 1908
21,1921
21,1914
10, 1910
30,1928
16,1918
28,1911
9, 1912
1,1909
1, 1909
27,1913
27, 1913
15,1934
10, 1910
21, 1914
21, 1914
31,1912
13,1915
5,1932
14, 1905
B 62
B 30
B199
B 93
B 169
B 178
B268
B 65
B242
B180
B 115
B 272
B217
B138
B 143
B 88
B 78
B164
B165
B285
B 113
B 174
B 179
B 162
B 189
B282
B   26 BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 23
Second-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Duncan, James.	
Dykes, J. W	
Eccleston, Wm.—
Fairfoull, James..
Fairfoull, R	
Finlayson, James..
Ford, Allan	
Foster, W. R-	
France, Thos	
Francis, David M..
Francis, Enoch	
Francis, James	
Frater, George	
Freeman, Henry N.	
Frew, Wm. M	
Garbett, Richard	
Gibson, Munro M	
Gilham, John	
Gillespie, Hugh	
Gillespie, John	
Gould, Alfred—	
Gourlay, Robert	
Graham, Chas	
Gray, David 	
Gray, George	
Greenwell, Archibald-
Gregory, Wm 	
Hamilton, Robert N.._
Hastings, Andrew P._
Heathcote, Joseph	
Henderson, Robert—
Hodge, William K	
Holliday, William	
Hopkins, Harry	
Horrocks, Abner G.._
Houston, Robert	
Howells, Nathaniel —
*Hughes, Edward R...
Hughes, John C	
Hutton, Isaac	
Hutton, John	
Hynds, William	
Hynds, John-
Jackson, Thos. R...
James, David _	
Jarrett, Fred	
Jaynes, Frank	
John, Francis	
John, Howell	
Johnston, John	
Jones, Samuel	
Jones, William T.
Jordon, Thos.	
Kirkwood, John R...
Knowles, James E...
Laird, Robert	
Lander, Frank	
Lane, Joseph	
Lee, Robert John	
Littler, Jas 	
Littler, Matthew	
Luck, George	
Nov.
May
May
May
May
July
May
Nov.
May
May
May
July
July
Nov.
June
Oct.
June
June
July
Oct.
May
Dec.
March
May
July
May
June
May
Dec.
July
July
Jan.
Dec.
June
June
June
Nov.
Sept.
Sept.
May
May
Dec.
May
March
Nov.
May
Sept.
July
Sept.
June
May
July
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
May
May
May
Sept.
June
Oct.
June
21,1923
1,1909
1,1909
21,1914
1,1909
29,1905
27.1913
27.1909
14,1905
21,1914
1, 1909
22,1908
8,1916
2,1907
10, 1927
31, 1912
15,1934
21,1920
29.1905
23.1906
13,1915
19,1918
4,1905
1,1909
8, 1916
16,1918
16,1931
21.1914
19,1918
21,1929
22, 1908
5, 1925
19,1918
16, 1930
10,1911
16, 1925
27, 1909
28, 1931
10, 1910
21,1914
9, 1912
14, 1920
18,1922
4, 1905
2, 1907
1,1909
10.1910
8, 1916
10,1910
10, 1927
16, 1918
22,1908
27, 1909
31, 1912
28.1911
17,1917
13,1915
9,1912
10,1910
10,1927
31,1912
10,1911
B255
B 77
B 87
B 186
B 83
B 21
B171
B102
B 27
B182
B 86
B 63
B204
B 45
B269
B161
B284
B237
B 24
B 36
B 190
B227
B 1
B 76
B207
B220
B278
B175
B223
B273
B 60
B259
B230
B276
B 130
B260
B 97
B280
B 109
B 185
B 154
B240
B247
B 5
B 58
B 84
B 111
B200
B 122
B267
B221
B 66
B104
B 160
B137
B210
B195
B 142
B110
B266
B157
B128
Manifold, Albert-
Mason, Joseph	
Massey, H	
Mather, Thomas...
Matusky, A.
Mayer, Ralph Waldo..
Mazay, W. J	
Menzies, Fred	
Merryfield, William..
Miard, Hy. E	
Michek, John	
Middleton, Robert—
Mitchell, Henry	
Morgan, John	
Morgan, William	
Morgan, Daniel	
Morrison, Edward.	
Morton, Robert W—
Mottishaw, S. K	
Murray,  George	
Musgrave, J	
Myers, Peter-
MacKinnon, Hugh G.
McKay, Walter	
McLaughlin, Alex _
McDonald, J. A	
McDonald, John	
McFegan, W. —
McFegan, Robert	
McGarry, Martin.	
McGuckie, Thomas M..
McKendrick, And	
McLean, Michael D.—
McMillan, D...
McNay, Carmichael.__.
McPherson, James E.
Neen, Joseph	
Newbury, Arthur	
Newton, Wm.	
Nicholl, Joseph 0	
O'Brien, Charles	
O'Brien, George	
Osborne, Hugh	
Ovington, John	
Park, William	
Parkinson, T	
Parnham, Charles	
Pettigrew, Robt	
Quinn, James	
Quinn, John .
Ramsay, Peter Millar..
Rankin, Geo	
Raynes, M. T.- 	
Rear, Albert E	
Reid, Wm	
Renny, James	
Richards, Thomas..
Richards, Samuel-
Rigby, John—
Roberts, Ebenezer..
Robinson, William .
Rogers, George	
May
May
Nov.
June
May
May
Nov.
Dec.
July
Sept.
May
July
July
Nov.
Dec.
Nov.
Nov.
July
Oct.
Oct.
May
May
Dec.
June
May
Oct.
May
Nov.
May
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
June
June
May
July
June
May
Sept.
Dec.
May
May
Dec.
Nov.
June
May
Nov.
Dec.
May
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
June
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
May
July
Sept.
July
May
9,1912
13,1915
27,1909
10,1911
1,1909
9,1912
27, 1909
22, 1921
22, 1908
10, 1910
17, 1917
22, 1908
8, 1916
2, 1907
19,1918
21,1923
21, 1923
22, 1908
28.1911
3,1919
1,1909
9,1912
22, 1921
30, 1926
13,1915
28, 1911
27, 1913
31, 1909
18,1922
31.1912
23,1906
10,1910
21,1920
10,1911
9,1912
22, 1908
10, 1911
21,1914
10,1910
31,1925
9, 1912
1, 1909
14, 1920
2,1907
21,1920
1, 1909
2, 1907
15,1931
21,1914
9, 1912
17, 1917
27.1909
28,1911
15,1934
28,1911
28,1911
2,1907
9,1912
29,1905
10.1910
22,1908
1,1909
B145
B193
B 99
B 127
B 91
B144
B101
B244
B 61
B107
B188
B 72
B201
B 43
B224
B254
B253
B 59
B135
B232
B 90
B149
B243
B262
B191
B 133
B172
B 106
B246
B156
B 35
B112
B234
B125
B151
B 73
B129
B184
B 116
B261
B 148
B 82
B239
B 52
B238
B 80
B 49
B281
B181
B 146
B209
B103
B139
B283
B132
B140
B 57
B 152
B 29
B117
B 69
B 79
* Substituted for B 279, June 16, 1931. G 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Second-class Certificates of Competency issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act
Further Amendment Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
No.
Name.
Date.
Roper, William	
Rowbottom, Thomas...
Russell, John 	
Rutherford, Jasper	
Scarpino, Francis	
Scott, Thomas Wright
Shanks, David	
Shaw, Thomas John ...
Smith, John	
Smart, Robert K	
Spruston, Thos. A	
Stafford, Matthew	
Stewart, John	
Stewart, J. M	
Stobbart, Jacob	
Stockwell, William	
Strang, Thomas  -
Stubbs, Clement	
Sutherland, John	
Taylor, James	
Taylor, Robt	
Taylor, Thomas	
Thomas, J. B	
Thomas, Daniel W	
May
May
Nov.
May
Dec.
June
Oct.
May
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
June
July
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
May
May
May
Dec.
July
Nov.
Nov.
9,1912
16,1918
2,1907
16,1918
19,1918
21.1921
31,1912
27,1913
3,1919
22, 1922
2, 1907
10, 1911
21, 1929
1, 1909
9,1912
2,1907
31,1912
18.1922
16,1918
13,1915
30,1926
8,1916
27,1909
22,1922
B 141
B222
B 47
B219
B226
B241
B159
B166
B231
B248
B 46
B131
B274
B 95
B153
B 56
B158
B245
B218
B194
B265
B203
B105
B249
Thompson, Joseph	
Touhey, James	
Touhey, William	
Tonge, Thomas - -
Tully, Thomas	
Virgo, John	
Waddington, Daniel M.
Walker, William	
Warburton, Ernest L..
Watson, Adam G. _	
Watson, Arthur W	
Webster, James S.	
Wesnedge, William	
White, John .	
Williams, John Samuel-
Williams, Watkin 	
Wilson, Joseph	
Wilson, Robinson —	
Wilson, Thomas 	
Wilson, William 	
Wood, Thos. James	
Worthington, Joseph-
Yates, Frank	
Sept.
May
July
July
Nov.
May
June
May
May
Nov.
May
June
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Sept.
June
May
July
July
May
May
Nov.
10,1910
9,1912
8,1916
22, 1908
15,1917
1,1909
16,1931
13,1915
27,1913
14,1905
17,1917
24,1924
27.1909
2,1907
15,1917
10.1910
30,1928
21, 1914
22, 1908
22, 1908
21,1914
1,1909
22,1922
B114
B147
B205
B 71
B214
B 89
B277
B192
B170
B 28
B211
B258
B 98
B 48
B215
B118
B271
B177
B 74
B 70
B176
B 85
B251 BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 25
COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment Act,
1904," sec. 38, subsec. (2), in exchange for Certificates issued under the "Coal-mines
Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1901."
Date.
No.
Name.
Adam, Robert	
Allsop, Harry	
Ashman, Jabez	
Auchinvole, Alex..
Barclay, Andrew-
Barclay, James ...
Barclay, John	
Bickle, Thos..	
Bowie, James _	
Briscoe, Edward	
Campbell, Dan _.
Carr, Jos. E	
Carroll, Harry	
Clarkson, Alexander..
Collishaw, John	
Courtney, A. W.	
Crawford, Frank	
Davidson, David	
Davidson, John. —
Dobbie, John 	
Dudley, James	
Duncan, Thomas	
Dunn, Geo. 	
Dunsmuir, John	
Eceleston, Wm.._	
Fagan, Daniel	
Farquharson, John	
Findlayson, James	
Gibson, Edward	
Gilchrist, Wm 	
Gillespie, Hugh	
Gillespie, John	
Gould, Alfred 	
Green, Francis	
Handlen, Jas. ._ 	
Hescott, John	
John, David	
Johnson, Geo.  	
Johnson, Wm. R	
Oct.
Oct.
Feb.
March
April
April
April
Oct.
May
Oct.
March
Oct.
March
April
Feb.
Nov.
April
April
March
Nov.
March
Aug
Dec.
March
March
April
April
June
May
March
April
April
April
Oct.
June
Jan.
Nov.
May
March
12.1904
11,1904
5,1907
29.1905
27,1904
27.1904
17.1905
11,1904
13.1905
10.1906
29,1905
11.1904
29.1905
27.1904
7,1905
2,1904
6.1904
3.1905
29.1905
27.1905
22,1905
29.1906
19.1904
29.1905
15,1905
6,1905
27.1904
6,1904
30,1905
29.1905
6,1904
6,1904
17.1906
11,1904
16.1904
16.1905
8, 1904
9, 1904
1, 1905
C 42
C 34
C131
C 89
C 19
C   20
cm
C 37
C116
C 129
C106
C 87
C126
C114
C 128
C 56
C 90
C 80
C 109
C 17
C 25
C118
C 85
C 8
C 5
C 112
C 38
C 122
C 62
C 49
C 124
C   75
Lander, Frank	
Lanfear, Herbert	
Miard, Harry E	
Middleton, Robt __
Miller, Thos. K	
McKenzie, John R	
McKinnon, Arch'd	
McMillan, Peter	
McMurtrie, John	
Myles, Walter	
Nash, Isaac	
Neave, Wm	
Nelson, James	
Nimmo, Richard E.	
O'Brien, Geo	
Pearse, Thomas W. H
Power, John 	
Price, Jas	
Rafter, Wm..— 	
Reid, James	
* Roughead, George-
Ryan, John 	
Shenton, Thos. J	
Shepherd, Henry	
Smith, Geo	
Stauss, Chas. F 	
Steele, John	
Stewart, Duncan H..~
Stewart, John	
Stewart, Daniel W	
Stobbart, Jacob	
Strang, James	
Sullivan, John	
Summers, Joseph	
Thomas, John	
Vass, Robt	
Vater, Charles	
Wilson, Austin	
Woodburn, Moses	
Jan.
Jan.
March
Feb.
Feb.
Oct.
April
March
March
April
June
Oct.
April
April
Feb.
April
Sept.
Nov.
March
March
Jan.
Dec.
July
June
March
Feb.
June
March
April
May
Feb.
April
July
May
March
Dec.
April
Feb.
March
9,1905
27,1905
3,1905
11,1905
21,1905
12.1904
3,1905
29.1905
29,1905
3,1905
1,1904
12,1904
27,1904
18,1911
6,1905
14,1916
8,1920
8.1904
29, 1905
23,1904
30,1907
28,1904
25,1904
13,1904
29, 1905
9.1905
4,1913
28,1904
3,1904
16.1904
21,1905
27, 1904
4, 1916
17, 1920
29.1905
12, 1904
6, 1904
7, 1905
29, 1905
61
63
76
71
74
40
C102
C 94
C 96
C100
C120
C 43
C 16
C 133
C 66
C138
C142
C 50
C 95
C 1
C810
59
30
26
84
69
C137
C 4
C 104
C 23
C 73
C 10
C139
C141
C 97
C 53
C 6
C 67
C 83
* Issued in lieu of No. C 130, destroyed by fire.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904."
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Adams, Wm. H	
Adamson, Robert _
Adamson, Wm.—	
Ainsworth, Edward
Allan, Alexander.—
Almond, Walter	
Alstead, Robt	
Ambrosi, Antonio....
Anderson, John	
Anderson, Robt	
Angell, William	
Arbuckle, John —
Dec.
May
Dec.
May
Oct.
July
June
June
Oct.
Oct.
May
May
9,1930
1,1909
22,1921
16,1918
28,1911
22,1908
21,1921
16,1930
28,1911
14.1914
21,1914
13.1915
C845
C323
C721
C674
C430
C286
C719
C843
C437
C599
C591
C622
Archibald, Geo	
Archibald, Thomas..
Ball, Alfred 	
Bann, Thomas	
Baggaley, J	
Baguley, James	
Bain, James .
Bainbridge, James..
Ball, Benjamin.	
Barker, Robert	
Barlow, B. R	
Barr, Samuel	
May
Oct.
May
Oct.
July
Dec.
May
Nov.
May
June
May
June
21,1914
28,1911
17,1917
31.1912
22,1908
2,1929
27.1913
21,1922
21, 1914
10,1911
1,1909
10,1927
C569
C454
C635
C494
C300
C829
C546
C744
C583
C415
C337
C809 G 26
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Date.
Barrass, Robt.	
Bastion, Albert	
Bate, Horace 	
Bateman, Joseph William-
Beard, Henry C	
Beeton, D. H	
Bell, Fred	
Bell, John	
Bennett, Andrew M	
Bennett, John	
Beveridge, Wm	
Biggs, James	
Biggs, John C	
Biggs, Thomas	
Birchell, Richard	
Blakemore, Roydon E	
Bias, Emil	
Blewett, Ernest	
Blinkhorn, Thomas	
Bond,Frank	
Bowie, James I	
Bradley, William	
Bradley, Wilfred	
Bridge, Edward	
Briscoe, F	
Broderick, Matthew	
Brown, Arthur A	
Brown, David	
Brown, George	
Brown, George A	
Brown, James	
Brown, James	
Brown, James  	
Brown, Jas. Miller	
Brown, John   	
Brown, Matthew	
Brown, Robert	
Brown, Robert D	
Brown, Robert S	
Brown, Wm. A	
Brown, William Gold	
Bryden, Thomas	
Bullen, Thomas	
Bushell, Jas. P 	
B ysouth, Thomas	
Cairns, Andrew	
Cairns, Robert	
Caldwell, Peter	
Calverly, Joseph	
Camamile, Hollis	
Campbell, Samuel	
Campbell, Andrew	
Carroll, George	
Carr, Peter	
Carruthers, Robert	
Carson, George	
Cartwright, Wm. H	
Cass, Wm. 	
Catchpole, Charles	
Caufield, Edward	
Caufield, John	
Challoner, Arthur	
Chambers, Ralph H	
Chapman, Wm	
June
May
Dec.
Oct.
May
May
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
June
June
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
June
July
Dec.
June
May
July
May
July
July
Jan.
Oct.
Nov.
July
Dec.
Sept.
June
July
May
Sept.
July
Oct.
June
June
May
July
June
Sept.
Oct.
May
June
May
June
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
March
June
Dec.
July
May
May
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
30,1926
30.1923
30,1926
28,1913
30, 1923
1,1909
27, 1913
9,1912
15,1917
14, 1914
10,1911
1,1933
22.1933
28,1911
1,1907
27.1934
24, 1924
22,1908
19, 1918
30, 1926
6,1936
22,1908
17,1922
29,1905
22, 1908
21,1913
14, 1914
1, 1909
8,1916
14, 1920
10, 1910
10,1911
8,1916
13,1915
10.1910
5,1932
28.1911
10,1911
10,1911
21,1914
8, 1916
16, 1930
10, 1910
1,1907
16, 1918
10, 1911
27, 1913
21,1921
10,1910
28, 1911
15,1917
27,1917
21,1922
31,1912
22,1933
17.1917
24.1924
30,1926
29,1905
16.1918
1,1909
28,1911
14, 1920
22, 1921
C795
C750
C802
C551
C751
C338
C514
C477
C661
C597
C396
C858
C860
C449
C266
C869
C774
C298
C681
C797
C873
C291
C733
C223
C309
C525
C596
C348
C626
C706
C364
C412
C625
C615
C392
C854
C451
C423
C408
C576
C629
C842
C379
C264
C673
C420
C539
C715
C375
C443
C662
C651
C746
C497
C859
C663
C768
C800
C227
C670
C321
C433
C709
C720
Chapman, John	
Chapman, Thomas H.
Cheetham, Ben 	
Chester, John	
Christie, John	
Clark, Walter Pattison .
Clarkson, Hugh G	
Clarkson, Robert	
Clarkstone, Wm. W	
Cleaves, Walter	
Clifford, William 	
Cloke, Chas. E 	
Coates, Frank	
Coldwell, Daniel 	
Colgrove, Charles Henry-
Commons, William	
Coupland, David	
Cooke, Joseph .
Cooper, John Andrew..
Cope, Frank	
Corbett, Garnet S	
Coulthard, James	
Crawford, David	
Cullen, Alex	
Cunningham, G. F	
Cunliffe, Thos	
Cuthell, George W	
Dabb, Owen	
Dando, John	
Davey, George	
Davidson, Hugh	
Davies, Evan Thomas-
Davies, John H. C	
Davis, John David	
Davis, William .	
Dean, Andrew	
Dean, Joseph ....	
Delprato, Joseph	
Derbyshire, A	
Dewar, Alex.	
Devlin, Edward 	
Devlin, Ernest Henry-
Devlin, John 	
Devoy, William	
Dickenson, Clifford	
Dickie, Leslie 	
Dingsdale, Geo..
Dinsdale, William 	
Dockrill, Frank M	
Doherty, J. S.  	
Doney, John  	
Donnachie, John	
Dorrance, Orlin William .
Douglas, D. B	
Dow, And. Y  	
Drybrough, Robert	
Dunn, Andrew	
Dunn, James	
Dunnigan, Richard	
Dunsmore, Alexander-
Dykes, Joseph W	
Eccleston, Thomas	
Eceleston, Thomas	
Eccleston, John J 	
May
Jan.
July
Oct.
Dec.
May
May
June
Oct.
May
July
June
June
May
Dec.
July
June
March
Dec.
Oct.
Dec.
June
March
July
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
May
May
June
May
May
May
May
May
Dec.
May
June
June
Sept.
Oct.
May
Oct.
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
June
May
March
June
Jan.
Oct.
May
June
Jan.
July
June
Dec.
Oct.
May
June
May
30,1923
5,1925
22,1908
28, 1911
20, 1928
9, 1912
17,1922
21,1920
28,1911
9,1912
22,1908
16,1925
16, 1925
17, 1917
19,1918
22,1908
21, 1921
4, 1905
19,1918
28,1913
23,1927
10,1911
4, 1905
21, 1929
11,1905
1, 1907
2, 1929
21, 1914
9, 1912
21, 1921
9, 1919
9, 1912
17, 1922
16, 1918
1, 1909
19, 1918
13,1915
16, 1930
10,1911
10,1910
23, 1906
27, 1913
3,1919
17, 1917
27, 1917
20, 1923
28,1911
27,1934
15,1934
1,1909
4,1905
10,1911
21,1913
23, 1906
21, 1914
21, 1920
7, 1936
21.1929
21, 1921
9, 1930
1,1907
17, 1917
16.1930
30, 1923
C753
C779
C311
C440
C820
C480
C736
C696
C431
C475
C313
C 782
C789
C639
C679
C304
C713
C209
C689
C549
C812
C407
C208
C824
C229
C265
C832
C578
C465
C718
C464
C463
C729
C669
C 339
C688
C611
C837
C401
C369
C241
C538
C693
C638
C532
C762
C459
C868
C865
C340
C211
C425
C517
C235
C587
C701
C871
C821
C716
C847
C248
C482
C841
C757 BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 27
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Date.
No.
Name.
Date.
No.
Eckersley, John	
Edwards, John	
Elliott, John	
Elliott, John B	
Elmes, Levi	
Evans, D. 	
Ewing, Robert	
Fairfoull, James	
Farrow, John William-
Ferryman, Henry	
Fitzpatrick, T. J	
Flockart, David	
Ford, Allen	
Forsyth, William —
Fowler, Robert.
Francis, David Morgan-
Francis, James	
Frater, George	
Frater, Joseph ..	
Freeman, H. N	
Frew, William M	
Frew, Andrew-
Frodsham, Vincent
Furbow, John	
Gabriel, Ernest P	
Garbett, Richard	
Gascoyne, Rowland B.
Geater, Jas. Gordon —
Gibson, Munro M	
Gillham, John	
Gillies, William	
Glen, James ._ 	
Gordon, Davis John .
Gourley, Robert	
Gray, George _ __
Gregory, William	
Gregson, John B	
Green, William	
Greenhorn, John	
Groat, Ed. Murray-
Griffiths, Edward _.
Gunnell, James	
Gunniss, Matthew—
Guy, George _ 	
Haile, Joseph G	
Hall, James	
Halsall, J	
Hamer, Joseph _
Hamilton, John .
Hamilton, Robert Nesbitt..
Hampton, Abel E	
Hampton, Samuel	
Hancock, Arthur	
Hannah, Archibald 	
Hanson, T. H	
Hardy, Edward.... 	
Hartley, Thomas..
Hart, Daniel St—
Harwood, Fred.	
Harvey, Thomas...
Harvie, George.	
Harwood, S	
Hayes, Ernest	
Heaps, Robert	
June
May
May
Dec.
July
July
May
Oct.
Dec.
June
Oct.
Jan.
Oct.
June
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
May
July
Nov.
May
Nov.
July
Jan.
May
Sept.
Jan.
May
Dec.
May
May
Oct.
May
May
May
May
Dec.
Nov.
May
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
May
June
May
May
July
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
Jan.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
July
June
Oct.
May
Sept.
May
Sept.
July
Dec.
Sept.
,1934
,1913
,1913
,1927
,1932
,1908
,1915
,1911
,1918
,1920
,1911
,1913
,1911
,1930
,1912
,1913
,1907
,1915
,1929
,1905
,1923
,1909
, 1908
,1913
,1922
,1910
,1913
,1914
,1931
,1915
,1918
,1911
,1912
,1912
,1912
,1923
,1925
,1917
,1914
,1923
,1914
,1912
,1912
,1931
,1922
,1922
,1908
,1930
,1911
,1913
,1936
,1917
,1917
,1929
,1908
,1920
,1912
,1922
,1910
,1912
,1910
,1908
,1929
,1910
C866
C542
C541
C811
C856
C284
C608
C453
C683
C697
C452
C531
C445
C836
C495
C558
C250
C616
C82S
C230
C752
C360
C282
C528
C739
C377
C513
C573
C850
C623
C668
C435
C474
C470
C467
C756
C 790
C659
C575
C764
C 508
C505
C460
C848
C731
C742
C307
C846
C444
C550
C872
C 650
C656
C834
C280
C694
C510
C730
C384
C466
C378
C312
C830
C373
Hemer, Herbert	
Henney, Jonathan...
Hendry, James	
Herd, William	
Hetherington, Geo..
Heycock, James E—
Heycock, William J.
Heyes, Edward	
Heyes, Thos. 0	
Hilton, Arthur	
Hilton, Mathias	
Hilton, R. G 	
Hindmarsh, John G—
Hindmarsh, Peter	
Hodson, R. H 	
Hodge, William K	
Holdsworth, William..
Holliday, William	
Hopkins, Harry	
Horbury, Joseph W..~.
Horrocks, A. G	
Houston, Robert 	
Howells, Nathaniel	
Hughes, Edward R	
Hughes, Isaac R	
Hunter, Peter M	
Hunter, Thomas	
Hutchison, Ben	
Hutchison, Fred	
Hynd, John	
Hynds, William	
Ireson, John	
Irvine, David— 	
Jack, John  —
Jackson, Harry	
James, Thos..
Jardine, Geo. Edward-
Jarrett, Fred. J	
Jaynes, Frank	
Jenkins, John	
Jenkinson, Jonathan-
John, Howell... 	
Johnston, Fred	
Johnston, Robert	
Jones, Alf. Geo	
Jones, Douglas M	
Jones, Samuel	
Jones, William E	
Jones, William T—	
Jones, Samuel	
Joyce, Walter	
Judge, Peter
Earner, Joseph	
Keenan, Wm. James..
Kelly, Ernest __ _..
Kelly, Francis	
Kemp, Wm 	
Kirkham, Alfred	
Kirkeberg, H. S	
Klejko, Steve	
Lane, Joseph	
Lazaruk, Steve	
Leeman, T.	
Lester, Frank	
Oct.
June
May
Dec.
July
July
Dec.
May
Jan.
Dec.
Dec.
Sept.
June
May
March
Nov.
May
July
Dec.
June
May
July
May
Dec.
June
June
June
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
July
Oct.
June
May
June
May
Jan.
Oct.
July
Sept.
Dec.
July
Dec.
May
May
June
May
Jan.
Oct.
March
Nov.
Sept.
Dec.
June
May
June
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Oct.
June
May
May
,1914
,1911
,1912
,1918
,1929
,1932
,1936
,1909
,1936
,1929
,1918
,1910
,1926
,1923
,1905
,1923
,1918
,1916
,1925
,1911
,1909
,1916
,1909
,1930
,1936
,1926
,1925
,1905
,1909
,1920
,1916
,1912
,1911
,1914
,1924
,1914
,1913
,1907
,1908
,1910
, 1927
,1908
,1926
,1912
,1914
,1934
, 1913
,1913
,1913
,1905
,1909
,1910
,1936
,1911
,1917
,1930
,1914
,1913
,1909
,1920
,1907
,1928
,1909
,1922
C595
C424
C471
C682
C825
C852
C876
C320
C870
C831
C825
C376
C799
C755
C216
C761
C671
C634
C791
C406
C324
C631
C316
C844
C874
C798
C786
C232
C358
C707
C632
C 507
C413
C 582
C776
C588
C521
C256
C277
C390
C813
C305
C803
C479
C 584
C861
C518
C556
C221
C 544
C361
C391
C877
C428
C646
C839
C594
C559
C350
C703
C254
C815
C345
C734 G 28
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Date.
No.
Name.
No.
Lewis, Benj. J.	
Leyward, Paul	
Lindsay, William ..
Linn, George Y	
Litherland, David-
Littler, James	
Littler, John	
Littler, Matthew-
Littler, Robert	
Livingstone, Alex..
Loxton, George	
Loxton, John ...	
Lloyd, Thomas	
Luck, George 	
Lynch, Stewart	
Mackie, John	
Makin, J. Wm	
Malone, John	
Maltman, James	
Manifold, A	
Marrs, John	
Marsh, Daniel Parks .
Martin, James	
Mason, Joseph	
Massey, Henry	
Mather, Thomas	
Matusky, Andrew	
Mawson, J. T	
Maxwell, Geo...
McAlpine, John	
McArthur John Malcolm..
McArthur, Robert	
McBroom, Al	
McCourt, John.. 	
MeCourt, Thos	
McCulloch, James	
McDonald, Allen 	
McDonald, John	
McFagen, Alexander..
McFegan, Robert	
McFegan, W	
McGarry, Martin	
McGrath, James	
McGuckie, Thomas	
McGuire, Thomas	
Mclntyre, Neil 	
McKay, Walter	
McKenzie, Peter	
McKibben, Matthew..
McKinley, John	
McLaren, John-
McLaughlin, James-
McLachlan, Alex	
McLean, M. D.	
McLellan, William...
McLeod, James	
McLeod, John	
McMeakin, James.....
McMillan, D. .
McMillan, Edward-
McMillan, Neil	
McNay, Carmichael
McNeill, Adam L	
Sept.
May
May
May
June
June
June
June
June
Oct.
June
June
May
May
Oct.
June
Sept.
May
Oct.
May
May
May
June
July
May
July
Oct.
Nov.
May
March
May
Dec.
July
Oct.
Dec.
May
June
Oct.
May
June
May
May
July
July
Oct.
May
Nov.
June
May
Oct.
May
May
June
Sept.
•March
July
May
May
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
July
July
10.1910
17, 1917
17, 1917
17.1922
30,1928
30, 1926
10, 1911
10,1911
10.1911
28,1911
10,1911
10, 1911
17, 1922
1, 1909
28,1911
10, 1911
10.1910
21,1914
31,1912
1, 1909
17,1917
27, 1913
10.1911
22,1908
1,1909
22.1908
1.1907
27.1909
21.1914
4, 1905
17, 1917
22,1921
2.1908
14,1914
30, 1926
1, 1909
30, 1928
28, 1911
9,1912
21,1920
1, 1909
1, 1909
8, 1916
29, 1905
28, 1913
21, 1914
20.1923
10, 1911
21,1914
28, 1914
30,1923
9, 1912
10,1912
10,1910
4,1905
22, 1908
13.1915
13,1915
10, 1910
31.1912
15,1917
22, 1908
22, 1908
C386
C637
C642
C737
C816
C792
C410
C417
C418
C436
C428
C416
C740
C31S
C432
C421
C385
C585
C501
C336
C640
C543
C398
C297
C317
C293
C259
C359
C571
C217
C648
C723
C287
C605
C805
C315
C817
C448
C490
C698
C319
C326
C630
C226
C553
C574
C763
C427
C580
C442
C754
C485
C419
C389
C 219
C296
C609
C612
C363
C493
C654
C306
C281
McNeill, Robert 	
McVeigh, Francis	
McWhirter, Archibald	
Meek, Matthew	
Meikle, Harvey Alexander..
Menzies, Frederick	
Merrifield, George	
Merrifield, William	
Michek, John	
Miles, John	
Miller, Frederick	
Mitchell, Charles	
Mitchell, Henry	
Moore, George	
Moore, John 	
Moreland, Thomas..
Morgan, William-
Morgan, Cornelius .
Morgan, John	
Morris, David	
Mottishaw, Samuel K...
Murdoch, Jno. Y	
Murray, Robt	
Myers, Peter.
Nash, George William-
Nash, George F	
Nee, Wm. R	
Neen, Joseph  	
Nelson, Horatio	
Neilson, William	
Newman, John	
Nicholson, James	
Nimmo, James	
Norris, Joshua	
Nuttall, Wm	
Oakes, Robert	
OBrien, Charles	
Odgers, Eli	
Orr, Alexander	
Osborne, Hugh	
Oswald, Geo. L	
* Owen, Thomas	
Park, William 	
Parks, Alexander	
Parker, John H 	
Parker, L	
Parkinson, James Wm..
Parkinson, T	
Parkinson, Thomas..
Parrott, Jas. E.	
Parson, Herbert	
Parsons, Albert-
Patrick, Andrew	
Pearson, Jonathan	
Penman, Hugh 	
Perry, Geo. Harewood..
Phillips, Richard S	
Phillips, James	
Pickup, A.  	
Picton, W	
Plant, Samuel. 	
Pollock, John	
Poole, Samuel	
Sept.
July
June
May
July
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
May
June
July
May
Sept.
Oct.
May
July
May
Dec.
June
May
Oct.
May
June
Oct.
May
Dec.
Dec.
Nov.
Oct.
May
Oct.
May
May
Oct.
June
Oct.
Nov.
Jan.
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
May
Dec.
Jan.
June
May
Nov.
July
June
May
May
June
June
May
Oct.
May
May
Nov.
July
May
Nov.
May
May
10, 1910
5,1932
30,1926
9, 1912
8,1916
14, 1920
23,1906
23, 1906
21,1914
10,1911
21,1929
1, 1909
10, 1910
23,1906
1,1909
22, 1908
17, 1917
22, 1921
24, 1924
9, 1912
23, 1906
21,1914
30.1926
28,1911
17, 1917
22.1921
22, 1921
27,1909
1,1907
9,1912
14.1914
9,1912
9,1912
28,1913
16, 1925
31,1912
27, 1909
21, 1913
28,1911
28,1913
10, 1910
1, 1909
19, 1918
21,1913
15, 1934
1, 1909
15,1917
22,1908
24, 1924
21,1914
13.1915
10.1927
16, 1931
9,1912
28,1913
17,1917
17,1917
21.1922
22,1908
1,1909
14, 1905
30.1923
27, 1913
C387
C855
C 794
C484
C 627
C704
C239
C236
C563
C414
C823
C 322
C366
C242
C335
C299
C636
C725
C773
C472
C237
C564
C796
C446
C565
C727
C724
C352
C263
C481
C603
C469
C461
C557
C780
C498
C349
C523
C434
C555
C370
C347
C684
C519
C864
C341
C655
C289
C769
C590
C621
C808
C849
0 473
C552
C643
C620
C749
C310
C333
C233
C760
C536
* Issued as substitute for No. C 342. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 29
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Name.
Date.
No.
No.
Price, Walter	
Puckey, John Thomas..
Quayle, Alex. B 	
Quinn, James	
Quinn, John	
Radford, Albert	
Rallison, R 	
Rallison, James	
Rankin, George 	
Rankin, Wm. Shaw	
Raynor, Fred 	
Rear, Albert E	
Reid, Thos	
Reid, Wm	
Reilly, Thomas	
Renney, Jas..
Richards, James	
Richards, Samuel _.
Richardson, J. H	
Rigby, John 	
Roberts, Arthur	
Roberts, Ebenezer..
Robinson, Michael-
Robinson, Asa	
Robson, James A.
Robson, Thomas	
Rogers, Ellis	
Roper, William —
Rowan, John .
Rowbottom, Thomas-
Royle, Edward	
Russell, Robert	
Rutherford, Jasper..._
Rutledge, Edwin	
Sanders, Henry	
Scales, Joseph	
Scott, Henry	
Saunders, Eustace L..
Scarpino, Francis	
Seddon, James	
Shanks, David 	
Sharp, James 	
Sharpe, Henry	
Sharpies, J. T	
Shaw, Robert	
Shea, Thomas J..	
Shields, Thomas	
Shipley, John W	
Shooter, Joseph	
Shortman, J	
Simister, J. H.	
Simister, W.	
Sim, James .
Simms, Hubert Allan-
Sinclair, William	
Skelton, Thos	
Slee, Thomas	
Smellie, John	
Smith, A. E.
Smith, John Watterson	
Smith, Joseph	
Smith, Richard Beveridge..
Smith, Thomas	
Sept.
Dec.
Jan.
Oct.
Oct.
May
July
May
July
May
Oct.
June
May
June
July
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Oct.
July
June
May
May
June
June
May
May
July
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
May
July
June
May
July
Jan.
May
Oct.
Sept.
May
June
Sept.
June
Dec.
May
Oct.
Oct.
May
Nov.
May
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
May
June
May
Sept.
May
March
Oct.
Dec.
10.1910
19,1918
5, 1925
28, 1911
28, 1911
21, 1914
22, 1908
30, 1923
22, 1908
9, 1912
1, 1907
10, 1927
21, 1914
10, 1911
22, 1908
27, 1909
1,1907
23, 1906
28.1911
29, 1905
24, 1924
1, 1909
1, 1909
16, 1925
16, 1925
21, 1914
13,1915
22,1908
14, 1914
31,1914
31,1912
27, 1909
17, 1917
22, 1908
15,1934
17, 1922
22,1908
21,1913
17,1917
3,1919
10, 1910
1,1909
16,1925
10, 1910
1, 1933
22, 1921
16, 1918
28, 1911
1,1907
1, 1909
27, 1909
1, 1909
14, 1920
21, 1913
21, 1913
1, 1909
30, 1926
29,1923
10,1910
16,1918
4, 1905
28,1913
30,1926
C371
C687
C77S
C441
C429
C579
C279
C759
C275
C489
C257
C807
C 592
C403
C303
C354
C249
C244
C458
C225
C772
C327
C332
C787
C788
C 566
C 624
C274
C 602
C492
C506
C351
C644
C 302
C863
C738
C294
C 520
C649
C824
C 372
C325
C783
C 380
C857
C722
C667
C456
C261
C331
C 353
C334
C711
C526
C 527
C344
C793
C758
C367
C665
C207
C561
C804
Smith, Thos. J.Smith, Thomas..
Smith, Thomas-
Snow, Aubrey .
Sopwith, Reginald Scott-
* Sparks, Edward 	
Spencer, G   	
Spruston, Thomas A	
Stafford, M 	
Starr, Wallace	
Staton, Edward	
Steele, Walter	
Stewart, George..	
Stewart, James M.—
Stewart, James B..__
Stewart, John   	
Stobbart, David	
Stockwell, William .
Stone, Wm. C	
Strachan, John	
Strang, James	
Strang, Thomas	
Strang, Wm	
Surtees, Edward	
Sutherland, John —
Sweeney, John	
Taylor, Charles M..
Taylor, Henry	
Taylor, Hugh	
Taylor, James	
Taylor, Jonathan
Taylor, J. T 	
Taylor, Leroy	
Taylor, Reginald T.
Taylor, Robert	
Taylor, Thomas	
Tennant, Joseph	
Thacker, Geo	
Thomas, Thomas	
Thomas, John B.  	
Thomason, Charles	
Thomson, Charles	
Thompson, Thomas	
Thompson, John 	
Thompson, Joseph 	
Tiberghien, Alphonse	
Tolley, John	
Touhey, William	
Travis, Joseph	
Tully, Thomas	
Tune, Elijah 	
Unsworth, John  	
Uphill, Vernon R. 	
Valentine, Wilfrid	
Vardy, Robt. 	
Vaton, Harry 	
Vaughan, John Henry ...
Vincent, Thomas C —
Waddington, D. M.	
Walker, George	
Walker, Jas. Alexander..
Walker, Robert C	
Walker, Wm. 	
Oct.
May
Dec.
June
Jan.
Oct.
May
March
Sept.
May
May
Oct.
May
Oct.
June
Dec.
June
Oct.
June
Oct.
May
June
June
June
May
May
March
Dec.
Jan.
May
Dec.
Oct.
Sept.
June
June
May
June
May
Sept.
Nov.
Nov.
June
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
June
Dec.
May
June
May
May
June
June
July
May
July
Oct.
Nov.
June
July
Oct.
May
May
1,1907
9,1912
14, 1920
15, 1918
21.1913
1,1907
1, 1909
4, 1905
10, 1910
9, 1912
21, 1914
28.1911
27, 1913
23, 1906
16, 1925
30, 1926
16,1925
23, 1906
21,1921
14, 1914
13, 1915
10, 1911
10,1911
16, 1930
27, 1913
17, 1922
4, 1905
20, 1928
21, 1913
21.1914
19, 1918
28,1911
10, 1910
18, 1936
21, 1920
21,1914
24, 1924
27, 1913
10, 1910
14, 1905
15, 1917
24, 1924
1,1917
31, 1912
1, 1907
15, 1934
19, 1918
27, 1913
21, 1920
9, 1912
9,1912
16, 1925
15, 1934
21, 1929
21,1914
5, 1932
28, 1913
21,1922
10,1927
8, 1916
31.1912
17,1922
21,1914
C271
C486
C705
C675
C512
C314
C329
C206
C 382
C488
C581
C439
C534
C240
C785
C801
C781
C238
C714
C604
C614
C400
C395
C835
C545
C735
C213
C818
C530
C567
C680
C447
C381
C875
C695
C577
C770
C537
C365
C231
C 657
C765
C267
C509
C269
C867
C678
C 547
C699
C468
C476
C784
C862
C826
C570
C
C 560
C745
C806
C633
C496
C728
C586
* Issued in lieu of No. C 255, destroyed by fire. G 30
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Third-class Certificates issued under " Coal-mines Regulation Act Further Amendment
Act, 1904 "—Continued.
Date.
Name.
No.
Wallace, Fred	
Waller, Wm. E	
Walls, John	
Warburton, Ernest L	
Ward, Ernest Hedley	
Wardrop, James	
Watson, Adam G	
Watson, Arthur W	
Watson, George	
Watson, Joseph	
Watson, William	
Watson, William	
Watson, John  	
Weaver, William	
Webb, Herbert 	
Webster, James Stewart-
Weeks, John	
West, James Gloag	
Whalley, William 	
White, James	
White, John	
Wicks, Roy	
Wilkinson, Edward	
Oct.
July
Dec.
June
May
Oct.
March
May
July
Jan.
Oct.
May
May
Nov.
Oct.
Dec.
March
May
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
July
Oct.
1,1907
5,1932
14, 1920
10,1911
17.1917
31,1912
4,1905
27,1913
22,1908
21,1913
22,1906
17, 1917
17, 1922
17,1922
28,1911
19, 1918
4,1905
16,1918
19.1918
31, 1912
22, 1906
21, 1929
28, 1911
C260
C851
C710
C399
C 641
C504
C212
C535
C288
C515
C246
C645
C743
C748
C457
C 685
C214
C676
C 686
C499
C245
C827
C438
Williams, Cadwaladr..
Williams, John Sam...
Williams, Watkin	
Wilson, Joseph 	
Wilson, Joseph	
Wilson, Robinson	
Wilson, Thomas M	
Wilson, William	
Wilson, William 	
Winstanley, Robert	
Winstanley, H. 	
Wintho, Thomas A...
Witherington, George
Wood, Thos. James ...
Worthington, J	
Wright, John	
Wright, Robert 	
Wright, William	
Yates, Frank	
Yates, John	
Yeowart, Hudson	
Young, Alexander	
June
June
June
June
June
June
Oct.
Oct.
May
Nov,
July
July
Oct.
Oct.
July
May
May
Jan.
May
June
June
May
16,1930
10,1911
22,1908
24,1924
30, 1928
10,1911
1,1907
1, 1907
17, 1917
21, 1922
22, 1908
29, 1905
28, 1913
31, 1912
22, 1908
21,1914
21,1914
21,1913
17, 1922
16, 1930
24,1924
16, 1918
C838
C404
C301
C767
C814
C397
C272
C262
C647
C747
C283
C222
C554
C491
C295
C593
C589
C522
C732
C840
C771
C666 BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS.
G 31
Mine Surveyor Certificates issued under the " Coal-mines Regulation Act Amendment
Act, 1919."
Name.
Date.
Date.
No.
Anderson, Harry C	
Baile, Wynne Jeffreys
Bonar, Robert B	
Bowerman, Everard S.
Boyce, Joseph Patrick
Caufield, Bernard 	
Corbett, Garnett S	
Cox, Richard	
Crosscombe, James S...
D'Altroy, A. C 	
Daniell, Geo. W. B	
Davis, Gerald D.	
Delaney, James	
Dickson, James	
Drewry, Wm. Stewart.
Edwards, Jas. 	
Freeman, Harry N.	
Gardner, Harold H	
Gibson, Munro M	
Gregory, P. W. 	
Graham, Charles	
George, Frank J.  	
Hargreaves, James	
Heaney, Chas. J	
Hepburn, James T	
Holdsworth, William ...
Holmes, Terence C	
Hughes, Edward	
Hunter, George	
Howden, Archibald	
Jackson, Thos. R	
King, Alfred Geo.-	
Kneen, Percy	
Lancaster, Peter	
Lauderbach, Wilfrid P.
Lindoe, Luke	
May
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Oct.
May
May
May
May
July
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
May
June
May
June
Dec.
Nov.
May
May
Nov.
June
Dec.
Oct.
June
Dec.
Oct.
May
May
Oct.
Dec.
Oct.
June
June
19,1922
3,1919
30, 1926
14, 1920
3, 1919
19, 1922
19, 1922
19,1922
31, 1923
21,1929
3, 1919
3,1919
3,1919
3,1919
19,1922
10,1927
19,1922
16, 1930
15, 1931
17, 1919
19,1922
19, 1922
29, 1920
16, 1930
14,1920
3,1919
16,1930
14,1920
3,1919
19, 1922
19,1922
3,1919
20, 1928
3,1919
16, 1925
21, 1921
59
16
64
39
5
54
49
57
60
68
29
28
21
3
56
65
47
72
77
32
50
48
33
73
37
9
74
38
30
55
43
27
67
23
63
41
Lymn, Albert Crompton..
MacDonald, John	
McKenzie, Frank	
Miard, Harry Ernest	
McCulloch, Robert	
Owen, Wm. Arthur	
Pettigrew, Robt	
Priest, Elijah	
Rafter, Wm	
Reger, Frederick Wm.—
Richards, Chas. Clifton..
Ridley, James	
Roaf, Jos. R	
Richards, James A	
Rutherford, John A....
Schjelderup, Vilhelm .
Scott, Thos. Wright-
Spruston, Thos. A	
Strachan, Robert	
Stropkay, John	
Sandland, Joseph	
Stewart, R. T	
Townsend, Neville F...
Vallance, Wm. Dixon..
Verkirk, Lucas ..
Waddington, Geo. W.White, Harold	
Williams, John S	
Williams, Paul E. R	
Wilson, R. Robinson	
Wilson, Arthur Rupert-
Wilson, Chas. Jas	
Wilson, Hartley Paul-
Wilton, Douglas D	
Wilkie, Octavius B. N._
Wright, Austin	
Oct.
May
June
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Dee.
May
May
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Dec.
July
Oct.
May
May
June
May
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
June
June
Oct.
Dec.
Dec.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
May
Oct.
Dec.
3,1919
19,1922
10,1927
3,1919
3,1919
3,1919
9, 1930
19, 1922
19, 1922
3, 1919
3,1919
3,1919
3,1919
3,1919
2, 1929
21, 1929
3,1919
19, 1922
19, 1922
16,1931
31, 1923
17, 1923
17.1919
3, 1919
21,1921
21.1920
3, 1919
15, 1932
2, 1929
3,1919
3, 1919
3,1919
3, 1919
19, 1922
3,1919
14,1920
17
46
66
2
6
10
75
53
51
7
19
18
14
15
70
69
4
52
45
76
61
62
31
8
42
35
25
78
71
12
13
22
24
59
26
40 G 32 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
BY
Richard Nichol.
The equipment maintained at this station consists of six sets of the McCaa two-hour
oxygen apparatus; six sets of the Gibbs two-hour apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-
service masks; one H.H. inhalator; one Sparklet resuscitator; and seventy self-rescuers, with
sufficient supplies to maintain the above in service.
There were no emergency calls for the rescue apparatus during the year, but the inhalator
was called for a number of times and requests for demonstration of the inhalator at Nanaimo,
Ladysmith, and South Wellington were given immediate attention.
There were also twenty-three emergency calls for oxygen from the Nanaimo and Ladysmith
Hospitals and from local medical practitioners.
Two trained teams from the Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, maintained
practice-work during the year and twenty-two new men completed the full training course and
received certificates of competency in mine-rescue work.
Practically all of above new men were below 30 years of age.
CUMBERLAND.
BY
James L. Brown.
The equipment of this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; one Sparklet
resuscitator:   and twenty self-rescuers, together with adequate supplies.
On January 5th I accompanied Inspector O'Brien in making an inspection of a spontaneous
heating in No. 5 mine, Comox Colliery, with some of the testing equipment, but this showed no
carbon monoxide.
During the year four fully trained teams from the Comox Colliery carried out regular
practice-work at this station and twenty-three new men took the full training course and
received certificates of competency in this work; the above trained teams are paid by the
Colliery for the time spent in rescue-training.
There were a number of emergency calls from the Cumberland Hospital for oxygen; these
were given immediate attention.
PRINCETON.
BY
Alfred Gould.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the MaCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; eleven sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; and seventeen
self-rescuers, with adequate supplies to maintain same in service.
The only emergency calls during the year were for oxygen treatment at the Princeton Hospital, which were given immediate attention.
Upon instructions, I visited the Nickel Plate mine of the Kelowna Exploration Company
at Hedley at intervals during April, May, and June, and gave a full course of rescue-work and
training to sixteen men, who completed the course and obtained certificates of competency in
this work.
Part of the equipment from the Princetan Station was used for this training. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. G 33
FERNIE.
BY
John T. Puckey.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks; one H.H. inhalator; and thirty self-
rescuers, together with adequate supplies.
During the year twenty men from the Sullivan mine of the Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, took a full course of training and received certificates
of competency in this work during the early part of the year; the above included most of the
active mine officials.
In December I attended to a number of calls from the Fernie Hospital for oxygen.
Two trained teams from Coal Creek Colliery carried on regular practice during the year;
these teams are paid by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company for the time they devote to this
work. G 34 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Geo. O'Brien.
Western Fuel ^' ^" Boyd, President, Montreal, Que.; Lieut.-Col. C. W. Villiers, Vice-
Coruoration f President, Nanaimo, B.C.; P.S. Fagan, Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo, B.C.;
Canada Ltd J°nn Hunt, General Manager, Nanaimo, B.C. This company operated the
No. 1 and Reserve mines, Nanaimo.
No. 1 Mine, Nanaimo.—William Frew, Mine Manager; T. J. Wood, Overman, North Side;
John Sutherland, Overman, South Side. This mine is situated at the southerly end of the
Esplanade in the City of Nanaimo and adjacent to the shore-line of the Strait of Georgia. It
is the oldest working coal mine in British Columbia and has four shaft openings, as follows:
No. 1 and No. 2 shafts on the Esplanade; Protection shaft, Protection Island; Newcastle shaft,
Newcastle Island.
A detailed description of the power plant and equipment has been given in previous
annual reports.    No additions were made during the year.
No. 1 mine was in actual operation 272 days during the year and the average daily output
was 1,100 tons. This average is lower than the average for 1935. The output is produced from
the North and South sides of the mine, the proportion being about 46 and 55 per cent, respectively. The mine is gradually becoming exhausted and the daily output is decreasing, so also
is the number of men employed underground decreasing. At the end of the year the average
number employed underground was 400 daily, whereas at the end of 1935 the average was 525
daily. On the surface the average number employed daily was 265, and includes pit-head,
power plants, washery, wharves, machine-shops, car-shops, colliery railway, office staff, engineering staff, etc. There are twenty certificated mine officials employed daily in the supervision of mining operations, or one mine official for every twenty men employed underground
and for every 56 tons of coal produced.
Both the Douglas and Newcastle seams are operated and a large proportion of the workings are submarine, having an average cover of 450 feet. The total output is hoisted from
No. 1 shaft, which is 600 feet in depth.
Practically the whole of the workings in the Newcastle seam are operated on the long-wall
conveyor system, the walls averaging about 300 feet in length and equipped with conveyors of
the Meco type driven by compressed air. All face-lines are machine-mined, the average depth
of undercut being about 6 feet. The Douglas seam operation is largely confined to the recovery
of pillars, some of which are machine-mined.
Where possible, the undercutting is done in the rock-bands in the seam or in the clays
immediately below the sea. A good proportion of the machine cuttings is carried along the
face-lines by the air-current and has the effect of rock-dusting, which reduces to a great extent
the dangers from coal-dust where explosives are used. The surplus cuttings are packed in the
waste, or gob. Very light charges of powder are used and a good percentage of lump coal is
produced.
Ventilation of the underground workings is achieved by two fans, one situated at Protection
shaft, which is operated as a " blower " fan; the other is situated at No. 2 shaft on the Esplanade and is operated as an exhaust-fan. These fans are, approximately, 1% miles apart. The
ventilation was kept up to a very high standard during the year and very little inflammable gas
was found in the live workings.
The haulage system underground is very extensive and is divided into two types, animal
and mechanical. Animals are used for gathering purposes from the face-lines to near-by
sidings, where trips are made up for the mechanical haulage. Steam, compressed air, and
electricity are used for the mechanical haulage on the different levels and slopes.
The pumping system in the mine is very extensive and all three forms of power are used,
steam-power being confined to the large pumps at the bottom of No. 1 shaft. INSPECTION OF GOAL MINES. G 35
Most of the workmen are transported by ferry across the bay to Protection Island, a distance of about \y2 miles, where they descend the Protection shaft. A very small percentage of
the men descend No. 1 shaft.
Precautions against the menace of coal-dust were efficiently carried out during the year
by means of rock-dusting and water-sprinkling. Regular sampling of the mine-air and mine-
dust was carried on, air samples being taken monthly in every split and main returns. Dust
samples were taken on haulage-roadways, the analyses of which showed the dust to be well
within the requirements of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act."
Regular inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee " as provided for in General
Rule 37.    This committee very kindly furnished copies of all reports of inspection.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " are kept at the mine and
were regularly examined and found to be conforming to regulations.
There were four fatal accidents in No. 1 mine during the year, and four serious non-fatal
accidents. Of the four fatal accidents, one was caused by haulage and mine-cars; one by a
fall of rock; one by being struck with a breaker-post; and one by electrocution. Of the four
serious non-fatal accidents, one was caused by a fall of rock; one by a fall of coal; and two
by mine-cars and haulage. In addition to the above there were a large number of small accidents, necessitating loss of time from a few days to several weeks. It is regrettable to report
that a large percentage of these accidents could have been avoided had ordinary precautions
been taken by the victims themselves.
Reserve Mine, Nanaimo.—William Roper, Mine Manager; A. W. Courtney, Overman;
Joseph Wilson, Shiftboss. This mine is situated in the Cranberry District, about 5 miles south
of the City of Nanaimo. The Douglas seam, the only one in operation, is reached by two shafts
at a depth of 1,000 feet.
The mine was in actual operation 278 days during the year and the average daily output
was 562 tons. The average number of men employed daily underground is 195 for the twenty-
four-hour period, and about forty men are employed on the surface daily. There are twelve
certificated mine officials employed daily in the supervision of mining operations, or one mine
official for every sixteen workmen and for every 47 tons of coal produced. No coal-mining
machines are used in this mine. A large part of the output is produced from pillar-extraction.
There is some solid work being opened up by a new slope which is expected to give good results
in the coming year. The seam is very badly distorted by faults and rolls, which appear to be
characteristic of this area and is not conducive to a well-defined plan of development being
followed.    The output is shipped over the company's railway to the wharves at Nanaimo.
The ventilation was kept up to a fairly high standard during the year, but there were
occasions when inflammable gas was found in the live workings in small quantities and was
removed without delay. Precautions against the danger of coal-dust were carried out by means
of rock-dusting in dry and dusty areas. Regular sampling of mine-air and mine-dust was
carried out during the year.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" are kept at the mine and
were regularly examined and found to conform to regulations.
During the year one fatal accident and four serious non-fatal accidents occurred in this
mine. The fatal accident was caused by mine-cars and haulage; and of the four non-fatal
accidents, one was caused by a fall of coal and three by falls of rock. Investigation of these
accidents again proved that none of them should have occurred had simple precautions been
taken by the victims themselves.
In addition to the above major accidents, there were a number of small accidents necessitating the lay-off of workmen from a few days to several weeks.
J. A. Boyd, President,  Montreal,  Que.;    Lieut.-Col.  C.  W.  Villiers,  Vice-
Canadian Col-    President, Nanaimo, B.C.; P. S. Fagan, Assistant Secretary, Nanaimo, B.C.;
lieries (Duns-    John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.    The mines operated by
muir), Ltd.      this company during the year were No. 5 mine and No. 8 mine, Comox
Colliery, Cumberland; arid the Northfield mine at Northfield, near Nanaimo.
The Comox Colliery is situated in the Comox District near the City of Cumberland. The
shipping-point is at Union Bay, a distance of about 12 miles from the colliery, and a company
colliery railway connects both points. The whole output from the Comox Colliery is shipped
over this railway. G 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
The Northfield Colliery is situated close to the Island Highway, about 4 miles north of the
City of Nanaimo. This colliery is connected to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway by a spur
at Northfield, and the output from this mine is hauled over the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway
to Nanaimo, where it is transferred to the Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited,
railway, and from thence to the loading-wharves at Nanaimo. This is a new colliery put into
operation toward the end of the year.
No. 5 Mine, Comox Colliery.—Robert Laird, Mine Manager; Samuel Jones, Overman, East
Side; A. W. Watson, Overman, West Side, The coal-seam is reached by a shaft 280 feet in
depth and the seam now being worked is known as the No. 2 seam. All the workings in this
mine are on the dip side of the shaft and are reached by four slopes driven from the No. 1
Seam level. The face of the Main slope is about 1% miles from the shaft-bottom. Practically
the whole of the operations in this mine are carried out on the long-wall conveyor system, with
the exception of the solid work being driven for development purposes. The long-wall faces
average about 300 feet in length. There are altogether ten of these walls in operation and
all are equipped with conveyors of the Meco type driven by compressed air. All long-wall
faces are machine-mined by compressed-air-driven mining-machines of the Anderson-Boyes
type, the depth of undercut averaging about 6 feet. All cutting is done in rock-bands in the
seam where possible, or in the under-clays immediately below the seam. In the solid work
cutting is done by puncher machines of the post type, also driven by compressed air.
No. 5 mine was in actual operation 247 days during the year and the average daily output
was 962 tons. The average number of all classes of workmen employed daily underground
during the twenty-four-hour period is 400.    There are about forty men employed on the surface.
There are twenty certificated mine officials employed daily in the supervision of mining
operations, or one official for every twenty men employed and for every 48 tons of coal produced.
The ventilation was kept up to a very high standard during the year, but there were
occasions when inflammable gas and gas-caps were found in the live workings. There are
now seven splits of air in the mine and the gas content of the return airways is kept down as
low as possible. The analyses of samples taken in the main return airway showed that the
methane content averaged between 1 and 1% per cent. An additional fan was put into
operation toward the end of the year to augment the existing fan and the total air entering
the mine is now about 200,000 cubic feet per minute. The average outflow of methane is
approximately 3,500,000 cubic feet in twenty-four hours. Every precaution is being taken
to combat this large outflow of methane.
Rock-dusting is extensively done throughout the mine, and in this respect 90,000 lineal
feet of roadways, or approximately 3,600,000 square feet of surface, was rock-dusted, in which
319,000 lb. of rock-dust was used. In addition to this, water-sprinklers are installed at the
delivery end of every conveyor, and at all main sidings where trips are made up for the Main
Slope haulage in an effort to keep the coal-dust below the point of explosibility.
In connection with the improvement and enlarging of airways for the purpose of increasing
the ventilation, a new airway 1,400 feet long, with an area of 7 by 12 feet, was driven on the
West side of the Main slope from No. 2 West district to a point just below No. 5 East district
where it joins the main return over a new overcast at this point. The main return airway has
been enlarged to an area of 100 square feet for a distance of 1,600 feet, connecting to the above
new airway from the West side. Another new airway, 7 by 12 feet in area, is now under
construction on the East side of the Main slope, which will be driven a distance of 1 600 feet
to connect the East side to the main return.
A 1,400-foot rock drive was completed during the year, connecting the Main slope to the
shaft-bottom level, thus doing away with one stage of haulage. A 500-horse-power electrically
driven hoist was installed at the top of the Main slope, having a 6-foot drum carrying 5,300
feet of 1%-inch rope with an average rope-speed of 13 miles per hour peak load. An Ironton
storage-battery locomotive was installed to haul the trips from the top of the Main slope to
the shaft-bottom.    Both of the.installations are working very satisfactorily.
Regular sampling of mine-air and mine-dust was carried on during the year and a good
general knowledge of the condition of the mine atmosphere is obtained as a result. Regular
inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee " under General Rule 37, and this
committee very kindly furnished copies of reports of every inspection made by them during
the year. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 37
All report-books required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" are kept at the mine and
were regularly examined and found to conform with the regulations.
The writer is very pleased to be able to report that no fatal accidents occurred at this
mine during the year. There were, however, two non-fatal accidents of a serious nature
and both were caused by falls of coal at the face. There were a number of minor accidents
necessitating from a few days' lay-off to a few weeks in some instances. This speaks volumes
for the workmen and officials in their campaign for the reduction of accidents.
No. 8 Mine, Comox Colliery.—John S. Williams, Mine Manager. This mine was reopened
in November after a shut-down of twenty-two years. There are several seams in this area
which are reached by two shafts 1,000 feet in depth. At the present time the Upper (or No. 1)
seam is being developed from the 700-foot level on the triple-entry system. Very little development had been done prior to the shut-down in 1914. The present plan of development is the
long-wall conveyor system with walls about 300 feet long. A large shaft-pillar 1,000 feet in
diameter will be left in to support the shafts, and only narrow entries will be driven through
this pillar for development purposes. There was no coal production up to the end of the year,
but it is expected that there will be a fairly good production early in 1937. About forty men
were employed cleaning up and repairing during the twenty-four-hour period, but this number
will be considerably increased in a short time.
Northfield Mine.—Arthur Newberry, Mine Manager. This mine was reopened during the
year after a shut-down of forty-two years. There are several seams in this area, but the one
now being developed is the famous Wellington seam. The coal is reached by two shafts 440
feet in depth. This colliery is situated close to the Island Highway, about 4 miles north of
the City of Nanaimo. The first coal produced since reopening was in October, when 73 tons
were sent to the surface. In November the output for the month was 997 tons and in December
1,495 tons. It is expected that the daily output will increase rapidly. A considerable amount
of diamond-drilling was necessary to contact the flooded workings of the old No. 5 mine of
the Wellington Colliery. This was successfully done, the water being contacted on December
13th. The water was allowed to run to the main sump of the Northfield shaft under control
and was then pumped to the surface by powerful electrically driven pumps. Efforts are now
being made to contact the flooded workings of the old No. 6 mine of the Wellington Colliery.
In addition to the cleaning-out and repairing of both shafts, a large amount of repair-
work and rock-driving has been done underground; 3,400 feet of old roadways have been
cleaned out and repaired and 1,170 feet of rock-driving done.
All surface machinery is electrically driven, power being supplied by the Nanaimo-Duncan
Utilities Power and Light Company.    All buildings are practically fire-proof.
No.   1   Mine,   Lantzville.—Arthur   Challoner,   Overman.    This   colliery   is
Lantzville        situated on the shore of Nanoose Bay in the Strait of Georgia, about 9 miles
Colliery.        north of the City of Nanaimo.    The mine is entered by means of a slope 270
feet long and dipping landwards at an angle of 30 degrees.    The Wellington
seam is operated on a semi-long-wall system and is hand-mined.    In this area the seam averages
about 2% feet in thickness and is of excellent quality.
The mine worked 265 days during the year and produced 8,233 tons. There are eighteen
men employed underground and five on the surface and the employees operate the mine on
a co-operative basis.
The ventilation was kept up to a very high standard throughout the year and no explosive
gas or gas-caps were found at the time of inspections during the year. No accidents were
reported during 1936.
James Biggs, Operator.    This mine is situated about 1 mile from the town
Biggs' Mine.     of Wellington and about 7 miles north of the City of Nanaimo, and is on the
site of the old original Wellington Colliery which was  operated by the
Dunsmuir interests many years ago.    The present work consists of recovering the few remaining pillars left in by the former operators.    Very little work was done during the year
however, only fifty-one days being worked and 276 tons of coal produced.
The mine is ventilated by natural means, which is quite ample for this small operation.
No inflammable gas or gas-caps were found during the period of operation. The mine is very
damp and there is no coal-dust hazard.    No accidents were reported during 1936. G 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
A. McLachlan and Associates, Operators; A. McLachlan, Overman. This
Jingle Pot Mine,   mine is situated on the site of the original Jingle Pot mine at East Wellington,
about 3 miles from the City of Nanaimo. The present operation consists of
recovery of pillars left in by the former operators. Very little work was carried on during
the year, only sixty-four days being worked and 64 tons of coal produced.
The mine is ventilated by natural means, which is quite ample for this small operation.
No inflammable gas or gas-caps were found during the period of operation. The mine is very
damp and there is no coal-dust hazard.    No accidents were reported during 1936.
Richard Fiddiek, Sr., Operator.    This mine, situated at South Wellington,
Fiddiek Mine,    was permanently closed down in the month of May and all material and
equipment was taken out of the mine. A total of ninety-nine days had been
worked up to the time of suspension of operations and 762 tons of coal produced. No accidents
were reported during the period of operation.
Richardson Bros., Operators. This mine is situated on the site of the former
Richardson operations of the Pacific Coast Coal Company near the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Bros.' Mine.     Railway Station at South Wellington and close to the Fiddiek mine.    The
present work consists of the recovery of the pillars in the Douglas seam left
in by the former operators. The mine worked steadily during the year, a total of 303 days
being worked and 2,646 tons of coal produced. The mine is ventilated by natural means,
which is quite ample for this small operation. No inflammable gas or gas-caps were found
at the time of inspections. The mine is very damp and there is no coal-dust hazard. No
accidents were reported during 1936.
Ralph H. Chambers, Operator. This mine is situated at Extension on the
Chambers' Mine,  original site of the old No. 1 mine which was operated by the Dunsmuir
interests many years" ago, and the present work consists of the recovery of
the pillars left in by the former operators. The mine is reached by a good road known as the
Nanaimo Lakes Road, and the output is hauled by trucks to Nanaimo, a distance of about
7 miles. The mine worked fairly steadily during the year, a total of 243 days being worked
and 1,910 tons of coal produced.
The mine is ventilated by natural means, which is quite ample for this small operation,
and no inflammable gas or gas-caps were found at the time of inspections during the year.
This mine is very damp and there is no coal-dust hazard. No accidents were reported during
1936.
Frank Beban, Operator.    This is a new mine brought into production during
Beban's Mine,    the year and is situated on the same site as that of Chambers' mine.    This
mine is being developed to reach a solid area believed to have been left by
the former operators. Operations were commenced in July and a slope sunk down to the coal.
Since that time the mine has worked fairly steadily, a total of 140 days being worked and
1,538 tons of coal produced.
Up to the time of writing the ventilation is by natural means and is quite ample for this
small operation. No inflammable gas or gas-caps were found during the period of operation.
The mine is very damp and there is no coal-dust hazard.
A small steam-boiler and compressor was installed toward the end of the year. A puncher
machine of the post type is now in operation and more will be added if conditions warrant the
additions.
No accidents were reported from this mine during the period of operation.
Wm. D. Loudon, Operator.    This mine was opened in the month of December
Loudon's Mine,   and is at present closed down due to weather conditions and surface inflow
of water. It is located near the No. 9 mine of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, about 1 mile from the town of Wellington. The operation was intended
to recover some pillars of the Wellington seam left in by the former operators. A slope was
driven down to the coal, but due to the inflow of surface water and poor equipment for handling
same the mine was closed after working fourteen days and about 50 tons of coal produced.
PROSPECTING FOR COAL.
Cowie's Prospect, South Wellington.—Cowie and Associates, Operators. This prospect is
situated in the Cranberry District adjacent to the City of Nanaimo.    The area between South INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 39
Wellington and Extension is being prospected. A small shaft was sunk a distance of about
30 feet, and the writer was informed by the owners that a seam of coal 4 feet thick was located
at the bottom of this shaft. The shaft was full of water at the time of inspection and has not
been dewatered since the reported discovery. Some surface-trenching was done to correlate
the coal-measures.
Westwood's Prospect, East Wellington. — Ira Westwood, Operator. This prospect is
situated near the site of the Old Jingle Pot mine at East Wellington. A small slope was sunk
down into the shales a distance of about 50 feet on a 30-degree pitch, but the coal-seam was
not located at the time of writing.    Work was carried on very intermittently during the year.
Valdes Island Prospect, Valdes Island.—H. M. Davidson and Associates, Operators. This
prospect is situated on the west side of Valdes Island at a point locally known as West Bay.
A 6- by 7-foot slope was driven down a distance of about 50 feet on a pitch of 18 degrees in the
shale-measures, but work was discontinued in October due to lack of finances. The coal-seam
had not been located at the time of closing down.
Somenos Prospect, Cowichan Municipality.—Kovich and Associates, Operators. This
prospect is situated on Section 12, Range 4, in the Somenos District of the Cowichan Municipality, near Duncan. It consists of a 6- by 7-foot slope being driven down in the shales on
a grade of 25 per cent. The slope is down about 50 feet, but the coal-seam has not yet been
reached.
All workmen in the coal mines of Vancouver Island are equipped with Edison electric
cap-lamps. All firebosses and shotlighters are provided with flame safety-lamps of the Wolf
type for gas-testing. All shot-firing is done electrically by battery and cable under the
supervision of certificated officials and permitted explosives only are used.
All serious accidents, both fatal and non-fatal, were specially investigated, and in the case
of fatal accidents the inquests were attended. In this connection the writer wishes to thank
the Coroner of the Nanaimo District for the privilege of being permitted to question all
witnesses to determine, if possible, the underlying cause of these deplorable accidents. It is
regrettable to have to report that the majority of the accidents could have been avoided had
only ordinary precautions been taken by the unfortunate victims. This is a serious situation
and calls for greater efforts by all concerned. Until such time as all employees and officials
become safety-minded and live up to the principles of " safety first," these deplorable accidents
will continue to cause untold suffering to those left behind. Eternal vigilance is the price of
safety, so let the slogan for 1937 be " Safety first and less accidents."
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John G. Biggs.
The following companies operated in this district during 1936: The Coalmont Collieries,
Limited; Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; Tulameen Collieries, Limited; the Wilson Mining
and Investment Company, Limited (Blue Flame Colliery) ; the Pleasant Valley Mining Company, Limited; the Black Diamond Coal Company, Limited (Bromley Vale Colliery) ; and the
Tulameen Valley Coal Company.
The Coalmont Collieries, Limited; the Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; the Pleasant Valley
Mining Company; and the Wilson Mining and Investment Company, Limited (operating the
Blue Flame Colliery), have continued to operate during the year, while the Tulameen Collieries,
Limited, ceased to operate during the month of March, and the material was withdrawn and
the mine allowed to fill with water. The Black Diamond Collieries, Limited (operating the
Bromley Vale coal mine), ceased operations during the month of October. The Lind coal
mine, situated on the Tulameen flats, was sold during the year to interests known as the
Tulameen Valley Coal Company, which commenced operating in a small way during the month
of November.
Blake M. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;   General J. W. Stewart, Vice-
Coalmont       President, Vancouver, B.C.;   A. H. Douglas, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
Collieries, Ltd.   D. McLeod, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;   George Murray, Manager, Blake-
burn, B.C.    This is the largest coal operation in the district and consists of G 40 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
Nos. 4 and 5 mines, at present employing about 210 men. The mining operations are conducted at Blakeburn, situated on the North Fork of Granite Creek at an elevation of 1,600 feet
above, and 4 miles by road from, the town of Coalmont, where the mine-tipple, screening plant,
and power plant is located on a spur off the main line of the Kettle Valley Railway. The coal
is transported over the mountain to the mine-tipple below at Coalmont by means of an aerial
tramway 2V2 miles long; the buckets on the tramway constitute the body of the mine-cars
and have a capacity of 1 ton.    (Plant and tipple described in previous reports.)
No. 4 Mine.—James Littler, Overman; Robert Murray, Frank Bond, Thomas Bryden,
Robert Barrass, and James Dunn, Firebosses. This mine is situated 1 mile north of the top
terminal of the aerial tramway, to which the coal is hauled on an electric-trolley railroad from
the mine; this electrical haulage enters No. 4 mine main level for some 1,600 feet.
During the year work chiefly consisted of the recovery of pillars in the Nos. 14 East and
16 West sections, both of which were nearly exhausted at the end of the year, and preparations
are being made for the extraction of pillars in the upper section of the mine.
Ventilation is produced by an 84-inch double-inlet belt-driven mine-fan driven by a 75-horse-
power electric motor. On the Main slope below the No. 6 level ventilation measured 12,000
cubic feet of air per minute passing into the lower section of this mine for the use of forty
men. The brattice and stoppings were in fairly good order, the working-places well timbered,
a sufficient supply of suitable timber provided for the use of the miners, and no trace of
methane was found. The roads were well timbered, in fair condition, and analysis of material
taken from the roads showed them to be in accordance with the requirements of the Coal-dust
Regulations. However, the roads and working-places in the lower section of this mine are subject to " squeeze," making it a very hard matter to keep the same in working condition.
No. 5 Mine.—William G. Brown, Wilfred Valentine, and Robert Barrass, Firebosses.
The portal of this mine is 2,800 feet north of No. 4 mine and 252 feet higher, and is connected
to No. 4 mine yard by a double-track surface incline; this mine is in the same seam as No. 4
mine. The main entrance is by a slope on a pitch of 20 degrees; this having been driven 2,600
feet, at which point inferior coal was encountered and retreating recovery of developed coal
commenced. Due to previous experiences with spontaneous combustion in other parts of this
field, only the main development roads were driven until the extraction was started as above;
this will allow the abandoned areas to be filled with the mine-water and prevent hazardous
gob-fires.
Ventilation is produced by a small electric-driven mine-fan situated near the portal of the
counter-slope, and during the last visit of inspection ventilation measured showed 6,000 cubic
feet of air per minute passing into this mine for the use of twenty-one men. The air was well
conducted around the working-faces and the mine free from any trace of methane. The
working-places were well timbered and a sufficient supply of suitable timber was provided for
the use of the miners. The roads were well timbered, in fairly good condition, and treated
with " inert dust "; analysis of material taken from the same show them to be in accordance
with the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations.
A well-appointed surgery and first-aid room is maintained at Blakeburn under the supervision of a first-aid man who is in daily attendance to render any service that may be required,
while the resident doctor resides at the camp and is in daily attendance at the office. A mine-
rescue station, with smoke-room, is also provided at the camp and is equipped with Gibbs self-
breathing apparatus, Burrell all-service gas-masks, inhalator, charging-pump, and other equipment necessary for mine-rescue work; this is supplemented by the modern equipment at the
Government mine-rescue station at Princeton.
His Honour E. W. Hamber, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  E. McDonald, Sec-
Middlesboro     retary, Vancouver, B.C.;   Robert Fairfoull,  Superintendent, Merritt, B.C.
Collieries, Ltd.   This colliery is situated 1 mile south of Merritt and consists of No. 2 South
and No. 3 North mines.    There were no changes in the surface installations,
which have been described in previous reports.
No. 2 South Mine.—James Fairfoull, Overman; Leslie Dickie, Thomas Rowbottom, and
William Ewart, Firebosses. The main development of this mine is by an adit-level which,
owing to the basin-like structure of this area, curves around until it again reaches the surface
about 1,000 feet from the main portal; the seam is 8 feet thick and lies at a steep pitch.
Numerous chutes driven to the surface facilitate ventilation, and during the last inspection INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 41
the writer measured 12,500 feet of air per minute passing through this mine for the use of
fifty men. The working-places were well timbered. The roads were well timbered, in good
condition, and, being naturally wet, free from coal-dust.
No. 3 North Mine.—This is a slope operation and has been driven down the pitch for a
distance of 450 feet and a raise has been put up to the surface for ventilation. The mine is
free from any trace of gas, is well timbered, and in good working condition; analyses of
material taken from the roads show the same to be in accordance with the requirements of the
Coal-dust Regulations.
Compressed air is the only power used underground for haulage, pumping, and the operation of the coal-cutting machines at the mines of the Middlesboro Collieries and very little
shot-firing is required. Electric head-lamps are in use by all the employees underground and
safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used by the officials for the purpose of inspection. General
and special rules are posted at the mines. No accidents of a serious nature were reported at.
this operation during the present year.
T. M. Wilson, Manager,  Princeton,  B.C.    This mine is situated approxi-
Tulameen       mately 2 miles west of the town of Princeton and has a railroad connection
Collieries, Ltd.   with the Kettle Valley Railway;   the plant has been described in previous
reports.    Operations were suspended in March and the mine allowed to fill
with water;  work was not resumed during the year.
W. R. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.; R. R. Wilson, Vice-President,
Pleasant Valley Vancouver, B.C.; Miss M. Duncan, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;
Mining Co., Ltd. T. Cunliffe, Superintendent, Princeton, B.C. This colliery is situated on the
south side of the Tulameen River, 2 miles west of Princeton. A large modern
steam-power and screening plant is installed on the river-flats and the mining operations conducted in the adjoining hill. All work at the present time is confined to the development of
the No. 2 mine, situated on the same elevation as the screening plant and 1,700' feet west.
No. 2 Mine.—Thomas Cunliffe, Overman; David Francis and William Foster, Firebosses.
There has been little change made at this mine during the present year and practically all the
work has been confined to the development of the main and counter levels, which have been
extended to a distance of 4,500 feet from the portal of the mine; during the last 1,000 feet
there has been a marked improvement in the thickness and quality of the coal. Horse-haulage
is used for hauling the mine-cars from the time to the screening plant.
Ventilation is produced by a small compressed-air-driven mine-fan situated near the portal
of the counter-level, and ventilation measured showed 9,000' cubic feet of air per minute passing
into this mine for the use of eighteen men. The air was well conducted around the working-
faces and the mine free from explosive gas. The working-places were well timbered and a.
sufficient supply of suitable timber provided for the use of the miners. The roads were well
timbered, in fairly good condition, and, being naturally wet, free from dangerous coal-dust.
The coal is all mined by compressed-air machines of the " post-puncher " type and little shot-
firing is done with a view to producing a high percentage of lump coal. Edison head-lamps
are used by the employees underground and safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used by the
officials for the purpose of inspection.
Wilson Mining W. R. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.; H. P. Wilson, Vice-President,
and Investment   Fernie, B.C.; Miss M. Duncan, Assistant Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver,
Co., Ltd. B.C.;   John Gillham, Superintendent, Princeton, B.C.
Blue Flame Mine.—John Gillham, Manager; Arthur Hilton and John Yards, Firebosses.
This coal-mining operation is situated on the north side of Lamont Creek, 10 miles west of
Princeton, and has been developed from the surface croppings. It is accessible by a branch
road from the Hope-Princeton Highway, and the coal is hauled by motor-trucks from the screening plant at the mine to the bunkers situated on a spur off the main line of the Kettle Valley
Railway east of the railway-tunnel near Princeton.
The face of the Main level is now approximately 4,000 feet from the portal and the seam
in this area is 7 feet thick and on a pitch of 30 degrees; the faces are driven up the pitch and
the coal handled to the Main level by chutes. The mine is operated on a modified " panel"'
system.    All the coal at the working-faces is mined by machines of the " post-puncher " type.
This mine is ventilated by a 4-foot direct steam-driven enclosed-type ventilating-fan
situated near the entrance to the counter-slope, and during the last inspection the ventilation -
G 42 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
measured showed 8,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing into this mine for the use of
eighteen men. The working-places were well timbered and a sufficient supply of suitable
timber provided for the miners. The roads were well timbered, in good condition, and analysis
of material taken from the roadways showed them to be in accordance with the requirements
of the Coal-dust Regulations. The mine was free from explosive gas. Edison electric headlamps are used by the employees underground, while safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used
by officials for the purpose of inspection. There was no change made at this power plant
during the year.
T. A. Betz, President, Princeton, B.C.;   George Thallhaimer, Superintendent,
Tulameen Valley  Princeton, B.C.;   John Yates, Manager, Princeton, B.C.    This mine is situ-
Coal Co. ated near Princeton and was developed by means of a slope on the pitch of
(formerly        the seam, which dips 20 degrees towards the Tulameen River;  the seam is all
Lind Mine).      clean coal and 7 feet thick;  the slope had been driven 150 feet at the end of
the year and a small amount of lateral work done.
A small power plant and screening installations were in operation at the end of the year;
the coal is handled from the mine by motor-trucks.
Eight men were employed and general conditions were found to be satisfactory at the
different inspections during the year.
James Brown and George Gray, Shiftbosses.    This is a small coal operation
Black Diamond  situated on Bromley Creek, 5 miles west of the town of Princeton, and acces-
Collieries, Ltd.   sible by a side-road from the Hope-Princeton Highway;  the output is hauled
(formerly  '    from the bunkers at the mine by motor-truck.    This mine has been developed
Bromley Vale),  by a short rock tunnel driven 100 feet, where a 12-foot seam of coal was
intersected at an angle of 30 degrees; the upper section of the seam is of
poor quality and operations have been confined to the lower 6 feet.    The Main level followed
the strike of the seam for several hundred feet, at which point the ground was faulted, with
the result that the pillars were extraced in this area.    Slopes are being driven from this level
and the coal down the dip appears to improve with depth.
This mine is well ventilated and free from methane; the working-places and roadways are
well timbered and, being naturally wet, free from coal-dust. There were twelve men working
at this mine.
There has been no change made with the power plant during the year, which consists of a
return-tubular boiler and a compressor having a capacity of 360 feet of free air per minute.
Electric head-lamps of the approved type are used by the employees underground, while safety-
lamps of the Wolf type are used by the officials for the purpose of inspection. There is also a
small screening plant and bunkers at this mine.
L. D. Leonard, Manager, Ashcroft, B.C.;   Robert Hamilton, Fireboss.    This
.   ee, mine worked intermittently and on a small scale during the year, with only
iery a few men employed.    Conditions were generally satisfactory.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
F. M. Dockrill, Lessee and Operator;   Edward R. Hughes, Overman.    This
Bulkley Valley   mine is located on Goat Creek, a tributary of Telkwa River, about 7 miles
Colliery. from Telkwa, to which point the coal is hauled by motor-truck and shipped
via Canadian National Railway;  the market is chiefly domestic and limited
to the line of the Canadian National Railway between Prince George and Prince Rupert.
The Main slope has been extended and a second pair of levels turned off to the right.
Pillar-extraction is proceeding on No. 1 level.
A small electric-driven fan with a capacity of about 3,500 cubic feet per minute has been
installed, which provides adequate ventilation for the ten men and one horse employed. No
inflammable gas has been detected on any inspection.    The mine is wet and dust treatment is
* By Thos. E. Jackson. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 43
applied to take care of coal-dust. The production this year was 5,266 tons, the largest production to date.
Thos. Campbell, Superintendent; James Taylor, Mine Manager. This mine
Northwest is situated in Glacier Gulch, on Hudson Bay Mountain, near Smithers. The
Anthracite crosscut tunnel has intersected various seams, all of which show severe
Syndicate.       crushing.    Some raising has been done on one of the seams, which are highly
inclined. There is a considerable improvement in the seam conditions in
the raise. A second opening was made to the surface to improve the ventilation, which is
natural. The work has been done on a small scale and there have been several stoppages
during the year.    No signs of inflammable gas were found in the mine.
Nothing has been done at this property during the past year on account of
Skeena Develop- the bridge across the Telkwa River having been washed out in October, 1935.
ment Syndicate.   To date no attempt has been made to rebuild the bridge.    A small amount
of coal for blacksmithing purposes was mined from the surface of a seam
near the site of this bridge.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
John MacDonald.
Two collieries only were operated during 1936—namely, Coal Creek and Michel—both of
which are owned and operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, with head
office in Fernie; Corbin Colliery still remains closed and, at the time of writing, there are no
immediate signs of operations being resumed in this locality. Both Coal Creek and Michel
Collieries report increased production as compared with 1935, while at Corbin a quantity of
109 tons of loose coal was gathered off the benches at the " big showing " to provide a supply of
fuel for the local school, colliery office, and a few residences.
Ventilation has been maintained at the usual high standard and is treated in detail at
a later stage in this report.
The general conditions in regard to the treatment of coal-dust have been found satisfactory,
except on a few occasions where certain roadways required additional treatment, these being
given attention as soon as was reasonably possible after the attention of the management had
been directed to same. Crushed limestone-dust is the medium generally used to reduce the
hazard of coal-dust on all roadways where necessary, and is also used to treat all entrances
leading to old workings and extracted areas. Seven hundred and fifty-eight samples of dust
were taken in the district in accordance with the Coal-dust Regulations, sixteen of which were
under the standard set by Regulation No. 4. In all cases where the analysis show samples
to be under the standard, the particular places where such samples were taken receive
additional treatment.
Explosives are still used generally at Michel to loosen the coal after it is mined, but none
are used for this purpose at Coal Creek. The regulations governing the handling and use of
explosives have been strictly attended to by the present staff of officials. All particulars
regarding the amount of explosives used and total number of shots fired are given in the
regular returns under this heading.
Coal-cutting machines are now being operated satisfactorily on the long-wall faces in the
" B " seam district of No. 1 mine, and also on one new wall which has been opened out in No. 3
mine, Michel Colliery; these, together with the large number of punching-machines used for
mining coal, are producing practically 80 per cent, of the total output at the above colliery.
Full information regarding the tonnage produced by machinery is given in the annual returns
under this heading.
A total of 146 lost-time accidents were investigated and reported on in detail, and the pity
of it is that, in the opinion of the writer, nearly 70 per cent, of these would never have happened
if the men had only exercised reasonable care in the performance of their various duties.
At all collieries operating in the East Kootenay Inspection District, the Edison electric
cap safety-lamp is used exclusively by the workmen, Wolf safety-lamps being carried by the
officials and bratticemen for testing purposes, all lamps being given every attention in well- G 44 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
equipped lamp-rooms located in a central position at each colliery; Burrell gas-detectors are
provided at all mines and readings are taken regularly to check the methane content in the
return air-currents. Copies of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" and special rules are posted
up at each mine and all report-books required to be kept at the mines have been examined
periodically.    Following is a brief summary of conditions prevailing in the mines during
1936:—
W. R. Wilson, President, Fernie, B.C.; A. H. MacNeill, K.C., Vice-President,
Crow's Nest Pass Vancouver, B.C.; J. S. Irvine, Secretary, Fernie, B.C.; A. A. Klauer,
Coal Co., Ltd. Treasurer, Fernie, B.C.; H. P. Wilson, General Manager, Fernie, B.C.;
B. Caufield, Manager, Michel, B.C.; C. Stubbs, Manager, Coal Creek, B.C.
During 1936 this company operated Coal Creek and Michel Collieries, Coal Creek Colliery being
situated at Coal Creek, a distance of 5 miles from Fernie, where it has railway connection with
the Canadian Pacific Railway over the Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway. Michel Colliery
is situated on both sides of Michel Creek, a distance of 24 miles in a north-easterly direction
from Fernie.
Coal Creek Colliery.—C. Stubbs, Manager. Following the procedure of the past two
years, No. 1 East was the only mine operated during the year, the whole of the output coming
from Nos. 26, 27, and 28 Incline districts on the west side of the main tunnel. Extensive repairs
to airways and old roadways in the No. 16 East old workings have been carried on steadily
with a view to providing efficient ventilation in this section of the mine, and also providing an
easier means of access for regular inspections being made around these old workings.
No changes of any importance have been made to the surface plant at this colliery, nor
has it been considered necessary to proceed with any new development, although certain
changes involving a modified extraction of pillars have been introduced. During 1935 " shaker
conveyors " were installed and used principally to cut through the large pillars in preparation
for extraction, and also in the driving of levels and rise headings in the blocking-out of
developed ground. This work was continued during the present year and pillar-extraction
begun in three different sections and under different conditions in each section.
In two of these districts the seam has a thickness of 10 feet, being divided by a friable
shale-parting varying from 6 to 8 inches in thickness, the upper section of the coal averaging
from 3 to 5 feet in height. In these sections the full thickness of the seam is taken by advancin-r
the conveyor across the strike, leaving in small stumps of the pillars for the purpose of
controlling the roof-action. At the time of writing, no break in the main roof has yet occurred,
and it is assumed that the pillar-stumps left in will have the effect of causing the floor to
heave and the stronger roof-strata to bend.
In the third section the seam conditions are different and permit a variation of method.
The section of top coal above the shale-parting averages 7 feet in thickness and extraction is
confined to this upper portion. The immediate roof consists of shale having a thickness of
from 2 to 8 feet, with the strong conglomerate above this. A conveyor-face is prepared by
driving a pair of headings up the pitch a distance of 300 feet and then advancing the face and
conveyor across the strike to the next pair of headings outby. Small pillars are left between
the gob and the new face with the same object in view as in the other districts, but here the
shale roof overlying the seam can be readily broken by drawing the timber, although up to
the present no sign of movement can be detected in the main conglomerate roof. This system
is still in the experimental stage, but sufficient information has been procured to warrant tin
continuance of the plan.
No. 1 East Mine.—J. Caufield, Overman. This mine is ventilated by an electrically driven
11- by 7y2-foot Sirocco fan, which, running at a speed of 174 r.p.m., produced an average
quantity of 136,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 3.6 inches. At the
present time the ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantity passing in each at the
last inspection measured as follows:—■
No. 1 spit: 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and four horses.
The Burrell gas-detector was not acting satisfactorily on this occasion, but the safety-lamp
reading indicated a methane content of 0.6 per cent, travelling in the air-current.
No. 2 split: 24,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and four horses.
Burrell gas-detector, 0.6 per cent, methane. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 45
Main return: 137,200 cubic feet of air a minute. Safety-lamp indicated 0.6 per cent,
methane. (Note.—A large proportion of the above total quantity of air is being used to
ventilate abandoned districts in this mine.)
Explosive gas has been found in five different places during the course of inspection, while
Burrell readings taken in the return air-currents have varied from 0.5 to 1.1 per cent, methane.
Roadways and timbering have been kept in good shape generally and fairly well treated with
rock-dust, all roadways and working-places being treated regularly where such treatment is
considered necessary. Three hundred and twenty-six samples of dust were taken in accordance
with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all but five of which were above the
minimum standard set by the above regulation.
Michel Colliery.—B. Caufield, Manager. During the latter part of the year the tipple
has been remodelled and enlarged to hold three new wet jigs of the " Vissac " type; these were
installed specially to clean the following sizes of coal; No. 1 jig, from %e to 1% inches; No. 2
jig, from m, to 2 inches; No. 3 jig, from 2 to 8 inches. Installed in connection with the new
washers are all the necessary conveyors, elevators, motors, sludge-tanks, and two return-
tubular boilers for the heating and drying of the washed product.
The above installation necessitated considerable changes being made at the feed end of
the tipple to conform to the new arrangements; a new four-track double Howe-truss bridge,
65 feet in length and resting on concrete pillars, was erected over the Michel Creek near the
mine entrance. Three of these tracks will carry loaded cars, while the other one will take care
of the empties. At the tipple end all loaded tracks will converge to a point where a creeper-
chain will pick up the loads and deliver them to a tippler estimated to handle 300 tons per hour;
from this point the coal will be delivered to the screens by means of a 42-inch conveyor-belt.
All coals will pass over a new screening installation, where the various sizes are separated and
sent on to the jigs, the lumps larger than 8 inches being passed into a set of rolls and broken
down to that size and then carried by means of a flight-conveyor to the top of the screening '
plant to be rescreened; the coal under 9io inch in size passes over new " Hummer " screens and
then transferred to the air-cleaning plant. When this plant is in full operation, all sizes of
coal from fine dust to lump will be cleaned mechanically, provision being made to load any size
or mixture of coal after it leaves the jigs by an arrangement of both belt and flight conveyors,
and railway-cars can be loaded on any or all of the eight tracks supplying the different loading-
points at the tipple. Mine-run coal can also be loaded either from the jigs or direct from the
shaking screens over a picking-table, the disposal of refuse from the jigs being taken care of
by means of elevators, conveyor, rock-bin, and finally by trucks to the dump.
A new method of work has been tried out in No. 3' mine by the introduction of a retreating
system of long-wall on a 30-degree pitch. The coal is undercut to a depth of 6 feet by means
of a chain coal-cutter operating up the pitch. After the mined coal is shot down, a scraper-
loader is used to pull the loose coal on to a " Meco " conveyor, which loads the mine-cars on a
suitable parting prepared for the purpose. While this system may be termed as still in the
experimental stage, the results obtained to date have been generally satisfactory, and further
improvements along these lines are anticipated with greater experience in the working-out of
the many details connected with this method of work.
No. 3 Mine.—Robt. McFegan, Overman. This mine operates the upper No. 3 seam and is
ventilated by an electrically driven 12- by 6- foot Sullivan fan, which, running at a speed of
240 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of 135,000 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-
gauge of 3.1 inches. Ventilation is divided into three splits; the quantity passing in each at
the last inspection measured as follows:—
No. 1 split: 12,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-eight men and six horses.
Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
No. 2 split: 10,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty-two men and three
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a slight trace of methane.
No. 3 split: 3,800 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of seven men and one horse.
Safety-lamp, nil.
Main return: 2'6,400 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighty-seven men and ten
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated 0.4 per cent, methane travelling in the air-current.
While explosive gas has been found on two occasions during the regular course of inspection, the ventilation has been generally good all over the mine and the methane content has G 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
never exceeded 0.5 per cent, in any of the return air-currents. A steady programme of repairs
has been carried out on all return airways with a view to providing the highest possible
standard of ventilating efficiency. One hundred and thirty-five samples of dust were taken in
accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were above the
minimum standard set by the above regulation.
No. 1 Mine.—W. McKay and R. B. Bonar, Overmen. This mine is reached by a crosscut
tunnel from the upper No. 3: seam of No. 3 mine, which intersects Nos. 2, 1, " A," and " B "
seams; Nos. 1 and "B" only being operated at present. This mine is ventilated by No. 3
mine-fan. Ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantity passing at the last inspection
measured as follows:—
No. 1 seam, return: 20,800 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-two men and six
horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.4 per cent, methane.
" B " seam, return: 21,600 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty-four men and
five horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 0.6 per cent, methane.
Main return: 73,500 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of ninety-six men and eleven
horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.5 per cent, methane.
Main return (all mines) : 140,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of 183 men and
twenty-one horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.4 per cent, methane.
Explosive gas was found on one occasion during the regular course of inspection and the
ventilation in general has been maintained at a standard sufficient to keep the methane content
down to 0.5 per cent, in the main return. Burrell and safety-lamp readings taken have varied
from a trace of methane in No. 1 seam return to 1.1 per cent, in " B " seam return. Roadways
and timbering have been kept in a good state of repair and fairly well treated for coal-dust.
Two hundred and ninety-seven samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4
of the Coal-dust Regulations, eleven of which failed to reach the minimum standard set by the
•above regulation.
No. 3 East Mine.—J. Henney, Shiftboss. Following the practice of recent years, operations
in this mine have been confined to repairing the main roadways and patrolling the fire seals
which enclose an old fire area adjacent to the main return airway. It was not considered
necessary to operate the fan as the natural ventilation passing was sufficient to keep all
accessible workings clear of noxious gases.
Corbin Colliery.—M. M. Gibson, Acting-Accountant, in charge. With the exception of
gathering a little over 100 tons of loose coal off the benches at the " big showing " during the
latter part of September and October to provide a supply of fuel for the colliery office, school,
and a few residences, this colliery remained closed during the year, and at the present time
there are apparently no immediate prospects of operations being resumed in this locality. In
addition to Mr. M. Gibson, who is in charge, two watchmen are constantly employed in patrolling the property. ,   ■-  ■■'.'■     -
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
G 47
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1936 (Second
James Dickson.
During 1936 the " Workmen's Compensation Act " was amended to include silicosis as a
compensable disability, and at the same session the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act"
was amended as follows:—
AN ACT TO AMEND THE " METALLIFEROUS MINES REGULATION ACT."
HIS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the '
Session)."
2- The " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," being chapter 46 of the Statutes of 1935, is amended
by inserting therein the following as section 26a:—
" 26a. (1.) Except as permitted by the Workmen's Compensation Board, every workman whose
employment takes him into any mine, or into any ore-crushing or rock-crushing operation of any mine,
except where the ore or rock is crushed in water or a chemical solution and is kept constantly in a
moistened or wet condition, shall be examined by a physician selected by and at the expense of the
employer, at least once in every twelve months; and every workman who is being given such employment, to whom the certificate mentioned in subsection (2) has not been issued, shall be so examined.
"(2.) If the physician finds upon examination that the workman is free from diseases of the respiratory organs and fit for work underground, he shall certify in the prescribed form that such is the case
and shall deliver the same to the workman.
"(3.) Every such certificate shall remain in force for not more than twelve months from the date
of issue, and, if so required by the manager or superintendent of the mine in which the workman is
employed, it shall be delivered to and remain in the custody of such manager or superintendent during
the period of the workman's employment, and shall be returned to him on his being discharged from
or leaving the same.
"(4.) Except as provided in subsection (1), a workman as to whom such a certificate is not in force
shall not, without the written permission of the Workmen's Compensation Board, be employed in underground work in any mine or in any ore-crushing or rock-crushing operations of any mine for a greater
period than two months in any twelve-month period, except where the ore or rock is crushed in water
or a chemical solution and is kept constantly in a moistened or wet condition.
"(5.) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 41, the Workmen's Compensation Board shall prescribe the nature of the medical examination to be made, the information to be obtained and recorded,
and the form of certificate to be issued under the foregoing provisions, and generally make rules for
the better carrying-out of the requirements of this section. Upon request from the Board the medical
officer so examining shall furnish to the Board the information and record from which the diagnosis was
made in any case."
PRODUCTION.
The output from the metalliferous mines for 1936 was 4,456,521 tons, a decrease of 459,626
tons from the tonnage of 1935. This tonnage was produced from 168 mines, of which seventy
produced 100 tons or more.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES, PLACER MINES,
AND MILLS.
There were fourteen fatal accidents in and around the metalliferous mines and concentrators in 1936, being a decrease of one from the figures of 1935. There was also one fatal
accident in th'e quarries of the Province.
There were 4,799 persons under and above ground in the metalliferous lode mines and 720
persons in the concentrators in 1936. The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed
was 2.53.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident during 1936 was 318,322 tons, compared with 327,743
tons during 1985.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident for the last ten-year period was 404,368 tons. G 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1936 and
comparative figures for 1935:—•
No. of Accidents.
Mining Division.
1936.
1935.
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Bralorne     —   	
1
1
Pilot Gold ...     -    . 	
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
Ymir Yankee Gir
Nirltel Plate
 ;	
Velvet Gold  (mill
Sullivan   (concent]
     ._.. 	
14
15
The following table shows the cause, the percentage to the whole of the fatal accidents,
with comparative figures for 1935:—
Causes.
1936.
1935.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
4
2
5
1
2
28.57
14.29
35.71
4
2
2
6
1
26.65
13.34
13.34
40.00
6.67
7.14
14.29
Totals        	
14.         :       1(10(10         [         IS
ion no
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES.
The fatal accident which occurred to Albert James Walsh, teamster, Motherlode mine,
Reno Gold Mines, Limited, on February 22nd was due to deceased being crushed by a snow-slide
while on his way from the mine to the bunk-house. This accident occurred after deceased had
finished his shift at the mine.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alvia L. Taggart, mucker, Bralorne Mines, Limited,
on February 28th was due to a fall of ground; deceased was engaged in washing down a stope
and apparently the washing process removed debris that had been sustaining a slab of rock
which fell on deceased.
The fatal accident which occurred to E. Wesley Rusnell, mill-helper, Velvet Gold Mining
Company, on May 6th was due to a severe crushing of his right arm when it was caught
hetween the crushing-rolls in the mill; he had tried to release a large piece of ore from the
rolls by means of a bar which was caught by the rolls and pulled his arm into the rolls with
above result.
The fatal accident which occurred to James Thomson, timberman, and William Brockbank,
helper, Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, on June 29th was due to a fall of ground! INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 49
The two deceased were engaged in timbering in the vicinity of a large slab of rock on the
hanging-wall; this was held by two sprags which were found displaced when the accident
was discovered. It could not be established whether the sprags gave way or if deceased had
made some change in the course of their work;  both men had been instantly killed.
The fatal accident which occurred to Melville N. Gallpen, carpenter, Sullivan mine, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, on June 25th was due to deceased
being dragged into a hopper by a conveyor and instantly killed. Deceased had been detailed
to make some minor repairs to the bottom of the hopper and at the same time a mechanic was
carrying out repairs on the conveyor, which was shut down for this purpose. The conveyor
is driven by an electric motor and all employees engaged in repairs on machinery are required
to place a " Not to Go " notice on the switch controlling the machinery on which they are at
work; the mechanic removed his notice when he was finished and the electrician threw in the
switch as he was unaware that there was another man still repairing. Deceased had failed
to place his own notice on the switch.
The fatal accident which occurred to L. Venier, skip-tender, Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, on July 10th was due to deceased being struck by drill-steel which he
was conveying in the Victoria shaft. The steel threw him off the cage, which crushed him
in passing and -caused him to fall 390 feet to the bottom. The regulations require that steel
and other material be secured while being handled in shafts, but while deceased was an
experienced skip-tender he had omitted to observe this precaution and the movement of the
cage caused some of the steel to project and spike the shaft-timbers with above result; two
other men who were on the cage at this time narrowly escaped with their lives.
The fatal accident which occurred to Albert Moline, miner, Thunderbird Mines, Limited,
on October 24th was due to blasting; at the face of No. 3 tunnel a drill-steel had become stuck
in a drill-hole at one side of the tunnel, and on the following round a 2-foot hole had been
drilled under the stuck drill and loaded with two sticks of powder to release the drill; this
shot had been spit along with the face-round, but after blasting it was found that the face-shots
had cut off the fuse of the side-shot about 6 inches from the collar of the hole and left the shot
unfired. Instead of attempting to put off this shot again at this time, it was decided to leave
it until the next round was ready for blasting, when another stick of powder, detonator, and
a 7-foot fuse was used in this hole. This fuse was coiled around the projecting drill and was
spit first, and the men then proceeded to spit the round and had this half-completed, using
2-foot spitters, when the side-shot went off and instantly killed Moline, who was standing
opposite; the other two men narrowly escaped with their lives as the concussion knocked them
down and part of the face-round had been spit. It would appear that when the fuse of the
side-hole had been spit and released the spitting end had contacted and spit the cut-off fuse
of the previous attempt to fire this shot and that this short fuse fired the original charge;
this short fuse would be about 12 inches long at time of this second spitting.
The fatal accident which occurred to Sam Myneo, miner, Britannia Mining and Smelting
Company, Limited, on October 27th was due to deceased drilling into unexploded powder left
by the previous round in a small shaft that was being sunk for a powder-blast; the previous
shift had mucked out the shaft and had cleaned the floor with compressed air, but apparently
had not discovered the powder which had remained unexploded by the blast; deceased was
instantly killed.
The fatal accident which occurred to Edward Ivory, mucker, Minto Gold Mines, Limited,
on November 8th was due to deceased falling down a hoist-raise from above the 300 level to
the 400 level: deceased had gone up the ladder-way from the 400 level to examine the contents
of an ore-pocket above the 300 level and by some means had got into the hoisting compartment
and fell as above. He was alone at the time. Deceased was an athlete and on the previous
night had injured one of his arms while training, and on complaining of his injury to the
shiftboss a short time before the accident the shiftboss advised him to go home, but Ivory said
he would finish his shift; it is probable that his injured arm prevented him from climbing
safely.
The fatal accident which occurred to Gordon Ritchie, miner, Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining
Company, Limited, on November 20th was due to a fall of ground; this place had been blasted
and partly barred down. Deceased had tried to bar down a slab that was seen to be loose,
but was held in position by the muck from the blast, and later started to work in front of this G 50 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
slab, which rolled over and broke his neck. The Coroner's jury returned a verdict that the
accident was due to neglect on part of deceased.
The fatal accident which occurred to John Dobrocky, miner, Kelowna Exploration Company, Limited, on November 22nd was due to a fall of ground in the Bulldog tunnel; deceased
had gone back from the face to get a supply of steel when at a point 30 feet from the face
a piece of ground fell, killing him instantly.
The fatal accident which occurred to Chow Gar Chong, Chinese labourer, in the Blubber
Bay quarry of the Pacific Lime Company, Limited, on November 28th was due to deceased being
struck by a crane-boom which temporarily got out of control when its position was being
changed; deceased was on top of a truck to release the load of rock carried by the crane at
this time. This accident was largely due to improper supervision of the work being carried
on at this operation.
The fatal accident which occurred to Claude Everts, prospector, Zeballos River area, on
November 30th was due to an explosion of detonators on a placer claim; deceased was 22 years
of age and apparently had very little experience in the use of explosives. Information gained
on investigating this accident showed that deceased did not appear to be aware of the potential
danger of handling detonators roughly, and it is presumed that he caused the explosion by
forcing a badly cut and gritty fuse into the detonator-shell; he had a box with twelve detonators
in his hands at the time and all exploded.    Everts died the following day.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alex Hrynuik, miner, Ymir Yankee Girl mine, on
December 28th was due to an explosion of powder in the underground magazine on the 900
level of this mine. Deceased had entered the magazine for some purpose and, in contravention
of the regulations, had taken his lighted carbide-lamp with him; it is presumed that his lamp
had fallen into a box of powder and caused this, and all the other powder in the magazine, to
explode. There was about 225 lb. of powder in the magazine at this time; there were no
remains of Hrynuik.
A study of above fatalities and their causes shows that a proper observance of the different
safety regulations and a common-sense regard for the potential dangers of mining on the part
of all mine employees would do much to reduce fatalities in mines.
The same applies equally to the non-fatal accidents, of which over 600, involving a disability of seven days or more, were reported and investigated by the different Inspectors during
the year; intensive safety education by the management -and safety committees at the different
mines offers the greatest opportunity to reduce the toll of accidents.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
On January 19th the cage of No. 2 shaft, Pioneer mine, was being slowly hoisted betwe?n
the adit-tunnel and the surface when it became jammed due to ice in the shaft; the hoistman
applied more power to release the cage and the extra strain broke the sheave-wheel and the
back-legs of the head-frame.    There were no persons in the shaft at this time.
On January 21st, in the Pacific Eastern mine, methane gas was discovered after blasting
at the face of the main crosscut; a flame safety lamp is used for testing purposes in all
suspected places;   no person was injured.
On January 26th, in the Pacific Eastern mine, methane gas was discovered after blasting
at the face of the main east drift;   no person was injured.
On February 17th, in the Melvin shaft of the Consolidated Gold Alluvials of British
Columbia, Limited, a large amount of slime and water entered from an old level known as the
Jones level, which had tapped alluvial ground many years before; the Melvin shaft is a
deepening and enlargement of the shaft from which the Jones level had originally been driven.
Following the above occurrence, the position of the Jones level was located a short distance
from the Melvin shaft and a 10-inch-diameter bore-hole was put down from the surface to
this level a distance of 136 feet; through this hole a large amount of hay was tamped to form
a plug and a second bore-hole 6 inches in diameter was put down to the level, and through
this 30 cubic yards of concrete was forced to make a solid plug in the level. This work was
successfully completed.
On August 17th, in the Pioneer mine, two miners were severely burned by an explosion of
methane gas in a raise off the 2,600 level. This raise had been blasted at the end of the day
shift (3 p.m.), and when the above men entered the raise at 7 p.m. they ignited gas which had INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
G 51
accumulated. Wolf flame safety-lamps were ordered to be used for testing all suspected places,
and the use of electric safety-lamps were ordered to be used, instead of carbide-lamps, in all
the lower levels.
On September 10th, in the Sullivan mine, 3,901 shaft, the hoist-drum broke when a loaded
skip was being started up from the 3,250 ore-pocket and allowed the skip to drop some 40 feat
to the bottom of the shaft;  no person was injured.
On December 5th, in the Velvet mine, two trammers had taken an empty car off the cage
at the No. 2 station and due to a failure of the signal system the cage was taken away without
their knowledge; when they pushed a loaded car from the station the car went down the shaft
and the men had a narrow escape from also falling down the shaft; the signal system was
remedied.
On December 17th, in the Pioneer mine, an ascending cage in No. 2 shaft split one of the
cage-guides and caused the cage to hang up; on attempting to lower the cage the rope became
kinked at the cage-clamp and had to be shortened. No further damage resulted and no person
was injured.
On December 17th, in the Pacific Eastern mine, methane gas was discovered after blasting
at the bottom of the main winze;  no person was injured.
PROSECUTIONS.
During the year 1936 there were three prosecutions made for infractions of the
liferous Mines Regulation Act" and special rules, as follows:—
Metal-
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
April 29..
Crocker    Lease     (underground
placer)
Owner
Failure to comply with safety order
under section 7 until requirements
of  General  Rule  60   (a)   had been
fulfilled
Fined $100 and costs.
May 6	
Richfield   Cariboo   Gold   Mines,
Contrac
Failed to report accident; in contra
Fined $20 and costs.
Ltd.
tor
vention of section 14 (1)
June 9
Velvet Gold Mining Co., Ltd.
Manager...
Failed to report fatal termination of
an   accident;   in   contravention   of
section 14  (2)
Fined $100 and costs.
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1936 the explosives used in the metalliferous mines in British Columbia comprised
8,789,000 lb. of high explosives, 3,292,000 fuse detonators, 707,200 electric detonators, 103,000
delay detonators, and 18,937,000 feet of safety-fuse; the use of electric and delay detonators
is increasing each year.
During the year 23,200 Hot Wire Lighters were used for spitting rounds, and it is anticipated that the increased safety factor, in giving the miner a quite accurate knowledge of the
time elapsed since he started spitting a round of shots, of this device will result in a much
increased application.
The use of this Hot Wire Lighter would have averted some of the accidents due to
explosives reported elsewhere in this report.
AIR-SAMPLING.
Most of the air samples taken in the metalliferous mines were taken to determine the effect
produced by blasting at the faces of long drifts, and where traces of carbon monoxide were found
by analyses steps were taken to have the ventilation augmented and a greater length to time
between blasting and men returning to work.
DUST AND VENTILATION.
The work done by the Inspectors of Mines in testing the dust content of the air in mines
and mills during the past two years has aroused interest in this work to the extent that at the
more progressive mines the management has taken up this work to determine the dust condi- G 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
tions produced by drilling, blasting, and handling of ore, and also in mills where dry-crushing
is carried on; at Britannia, Sullivan, Premier, Pioneer, and Bralorne mines the Konimeter is
being used for this purpose.
While it will require some time to correlate the information obtained, there is no doubt
that this will result in showing where dust production can be reduced and how the dust that is
produced can be most efficiently controlled and removed from the mine.
During the year an increased use of sprays at transfer-chutes and dumps was noted, and
at two of the larger mines tests are being carried out with the new-type drill in which the
exhaust air is not discharged through the drill-steel; an increased water-pressure being applied
to remove the drilling debris.
The blasting of rounds at the end of the shift is practically standard throughout the
Province and, with a few exceptions, there is an interval of from two to four hours between
blasting and the next shift entering the mine.
In conjunction with above efforts to reduce the amount of dust produced and prevent the
exposure of men to dust after blasting, there has been a steady advance in the application of
augmented and controlled ventilation, although several important mines still depend on natural
ventilation with all its fluctuations and deficiencies, which probably cost more in one year than
would the installation of a modern ventilating-fan.
At the Sullivan mine of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada there
are now three fans in constant operation, having capacities of 100,000, 60,000, and 30,000 cubic
feet of air per minute respectively. These fans are" situated on the surface at different shafts
and in December they were passing a total of 187,000 cubic feet of air per minute for a total
of 230 men on shift, or well over 800 cubic feet per man per minute. The above fans are of the
Jeffrey Aerovane type and are driven by electric motors. The total power costs for above
fans is $380 per month.
On the main bulldoze level in Britannia mines a 75,000-cubic-foot-capacity Jeffrey Aerovane fan was installed during the year and removes the smoke and dust from blasting immediately. This fan, together with the great difference in elevation between the upper and lower
openings of the mine, ensures a large volume of air passing through the mine.
At several other mines fans of smaller size, but still larger than those formerly considered
suitable, have been installed, and general efforts are being made not only to have more air
passing through the mines, but also to control and direct the air to the stopes and working-faces.
Adequate ventilation offers the most efficient and economical means of removing dust
from mines.
MINE-LIGHTING.
The use of the electric safety cap-lamp in the mines increased greatly during 1936, as
shown by the following installations: Sullivan mine, 510 lamps; Reno mine, 100 lamps;
Kelowna Exploration Company, Limited, 50 lamps; Hedley Mascot mine, 25 lamps; Nicola
Mines and Metals, Limited, 25 lamps; Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company, Limited, 180
lamps; Bralorne mine, 260 lamps; Vidette mine, 80 lamps; Pioneer mine, 42 lamps; and
Britannia mines, 40 lamps; the above lamps are all of the Edison Model "K" type, and in
addition to above the Pioneer mine has ordered 100 of the Wheat-type electric cap-lamp; the
small installation at Britannia mine is in the nature of a test unit.
The increased safety and efficiency offered by the electric safety-lamp fully warrants the
change from the carbide-lamp which was formerly the standard miner's lamp in the metalliferous mines in British Columbia.
The different Inspectors report that, with few exceptions, the miners are pleased with the
new electric safety-lamp.
FIRST-AID AND SAFETY WORK.
First-aid work has been maintained at all the longer-established mines and during the
year this work was taken up at a number of the newer mines.
In the Hedley District a large number of the men at the Kelowna Exploration Company
and the Hedley Mascot Company took up first-aid work and qualified for certificates, and twenty
men of the former company also qualified for certificates in mine-rescue work under the
Department of Mines Instructor from Princeton. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 53
During the year most of the officials of the Sullivan mine of the Consolidated Mining and
Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, took a full course in mine-rescue work and qualified
for certificates.
Safety committees are in operation at all the larger mines and at a number of the smaller
ones, and are doing splendid work in spreading safety education with consequently safer
working practice.
A study of the fatal accidents, reported elsewhere in this report, will show that a keener
appreciation of potential danger on the part of the individual mine employee would greatly
reduce mine fatalities; the same applies equally to non-fatal accidents, of which over 700
were reported and investigated during 1936.
At the different mines where safety committees are in force regular meetings are held and
the cause and possible prevention of accidents are discussed; among the many points raised
at some of these safety committee meetings may be mentioned the following: The keeping of
replacement rungs in the vicinity of ladder-ways so that broken rungs could be replaced at once;
the safest way to carry explosives up a raise; the frequent barring-down of roof or back
during the shift; the use of goggles during operations such as starting holes and moiling;
the need for paying special attention to a safe withdrawal time when spitting rounds in wet
ground; the increased use of safety equipment such as good gloves, safety-hats, safety-shoes,
and goggles, etc. Many of the points raised would appear, at first sight, to be comparative'y
unimportant and would probably in most cases escape the attention of an Inspector or mine
official, but in many accidents one of these apparently minor points can be the main contributing factor, and in having these things brought to attention and rectified the safety committee
is making a worth-while contribution to safety in mines.
HEALTH AND WELFARE.
The solarium installed at the Sullivan mine (see 1935 Report) has been kept in constant
operation during the year and 95 per cent, of the underground employees regularly avail themselves of the benefits of this installation.
During the year considerable improvements have been made in the bunk-house accommodation at many of the mines, but much more requires to be done in this direction, particularly in
the case of some of the formerly abandoned mines that have been reopened recently.
In a number of instances double-tier bunks, prohibited by the Provincial Board of Health,
were found in use and evidence of overcrowding was found in cases where the mine and crew
were expanding beyond the proper capacity of the living accommodation; these matters are
being dealt with and it is expected that 1937 will show a considerable improvement.
At many of the newer mines the bunk-houses are more in line with modern requirements
and are reasonably comfortable for this mode of living.
At Wells the Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company has built a number of modern houses
for officials and employees and a modern small hospital equipped with X-ray and other medical
aids was built during the year; this is situated less than a mile from the mine of this company
and the Island Mountain mine.
At Bralorne the bunk-houses have been improved and sixty houses fully modern have been
built for married employees; a large recreation-hall was also built during the year with
sufficient floor-space; additions were also made to the modern fully equipped hospital during
the year and other improvements to general social and living conditions have raised Bralorne
from the status of a " mine camp."
Mining activity at Hedley has also resulted in a large number of new houses being built
for the accommodation of married mine employees. Both the Kelowna Exploration Company
and the Hedley Mascot Company built houses and many of the employees have built their own
homes.
Medical service in the different mining areas has greatly improved in the last few years,
as practically at all the producing mines there is either a resident medical man or one easily
available.
QUARRIES.
Quarries of the Province are still showing increased activity. The improvement in 1935
still continues its upward trend.    There were 931 men in quarries and sand-pits, as compared G 54
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1936.
with 536 men in 1935, and there were 288 men employed in processing plants, as compared with
270 men in 1935.
There was one fatal accident in quarries during the year; this was due to the boom of
a crane falling over a truck while it was being loaded, the man being in the truck at the time.
Lack of proper supervision and discipline was the cause of this accident. INDEX.
G 55
INDEX.
Page.
Accidents in Coal Mines  G9
Metal Minss  G 47
Air-sampling   G 51
Alberta coal, imported  G 8
Aveling Colliery G 19
Beban, Frank (Nanaimo) G 38
Beban's mine, coal G 4, 6, 38
Betz, T. A., Princeton coal G 42
Biggs, John G., report as Inspector G 39
Biggs'mine, coal G 4, 6, 37
Black Diamond Collieries, Ltd.  (formerly Bromley Vale) G 4, 6, 42
Blakeburn, coal at .G 40
Blue Flame Colliery G 4, 6, 41
Bonanza  (Nass River) G 48
Boyd, J. A.  (Nanaimo) G 34, 35
Bradian, accidents in G 48
Bralorne, accidents in  G 48
Britannia (Vancouver), accidents in G 48
Bromley Crejk  (Similkameen) G 42
Bromley Vale Colliery (later Black Diamond Collieries, Ltd.) G 42
Bulkley Valley Colliery.-^ G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 42
Campbell, Thomas (Omineca), coal G 43
Canada Coal and Development Co G 19
Canadian   Collieries    (Dunsmuir),   Ltd.,
production  G 6
Accidents in   G 9
Report by Inspector G 35
Carbide miners' lamps abandoned G 52
Cariboo  Gold  Quartz  Mining  Co.,  accidents at  :.G48
Challoner, Arthur  G 37
Chambers, R. H., coal mine G 6, 19, 38
China, coal from •.  G 8
Clydesdale (Atlin), accidents G 48
Coal, Alberta   G 8
Per capita output  G 5
Prospecting for, on Vancouver Island   .G 38
Glacier Gulch, Hudson Bay Mountain.G 43
Report by Inspector G 34
Production tables  G 3
Registered names of coal G 19
Submarine workings G 34
Coal Creek Colliery G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 44
Coal-mines officials, examinations G 3, 20
List of certificate-holders G 21
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd., reference G 4, 6
Accidents in   G 9
Report by Inspector G 39
Coal Sales Act G 18
Corbin Colliery, report by Inspector G 46
Cowie's prospect, coal G 38
Comox Colliery  G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 36
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd., report
by Inspector  G 44
Accidents in   G 9
Reference  G 6
Davidson, H. M., coal prospector..
Dickson, James 	
.G39
...G3
Report as Inspector G 47
Dockrill, F. M	
Dust in coal mines..
Page.
 G 42
G15, 51
Electricity in coal mines G 14
Explosives G 11, 51
Extension, coal at G 38
Everts, Claude (Clayoquot) G 50
Fagan, P. S.  (Nanaimo) G 34, 35
Fiddiek, Richard  G 38
Fiddiek mine, coal G 4, 6, 38
First-aid work G 17, 52
Fuel-oil  G 8
Granby  Consolidated Mining,  Smelting,
and Power Co » G 19
Graham, Charles, report as Inspector G 42
Goat Creek (Omineca), coal G 42
Gold King (Nelson), accidents in G 48
Glacier Gulch (Omineca), coal G 43
Gibson, M. M., Corbin coal G 46
Gillham, John, coal G 41
Germany, coal from  G 8
Hamber, Hon. E. W G 40
Hat Creek Colliery G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 42
Homestake (Kamloops), accidents in G 48
Hunt, John (Nanaimo), coal G 34
Hydroelectric Co.  G 8
Ida Clara mine, coal G 4, 6
See a.lso Richardson mine.
Inspection committee, coal mines G 15
Irvine, J. S., Crow's Nest Coal G 44
Island Mountain (Cariboo), accidents in..G 48
Jackson, T. R., report as Inspector G 42
Jingle Pot mine, coal G 4, 6, 38
Klauer, A. A., Crow's Nest Coal G 44
Kootenay East, collieries of  G 4
Kovich, Mr G 39
Labour in mines.
  G 8
Lantzville Colliery G 4, 6, 37
Leonard, L. D.  (Ashcroft), coal G 42
Lind Colliery.    See Tulameen Valley Coal
Co.
Little Ash mine, coal G 19
Loudon, Wm. G. (Nanaimo) G 38
Loudon's coal mine G 38
Mabury Engineering Corporation G 19
See also Northfield Mine, coal.
Machine-mined coal   G 12
Miard, H. E  G 3
Michel Colliery  G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 45
Middlesboro Colliery  G 4, 6
Report by Inspector G 40
Men employed   G 8
Metal mines, inspection of G 47
Methane gas in coal mines G 15
Mine-air samples  G 15
Mine-rescue stations	
Minto, accidents at	
Murray, George (Similkameen), coal G 39
G32, 33
G48 G 56
INDEX.
Page.
McDonald, John, report as Inspector G 43
McLachlan, A. (Nanaimo) G 38
Nickel Plate (Osoyoos), accidents in G 48
Mine-rescue at G 32
Nicola-Princeton District collieries  G 4
Northfield Mine, coal G 4, 6, 37
North Thompson Colliery, Ltd G 19
Northwest Anthracite Syndicate G 43
Nugget, accidents  G 48
No. 1 Mine (Nanaimo), coal G6
O'Brien, George, report as Inspector of
Mines  G 34
Old Adit Colliery G 19
Pacific Lime Co., accidents at
Pilot Gold, accidents at	
Pioneer, accidents at
_G50
_G48
G48
Pleasant Valley Colliery G 4, 6
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd G 41
Privateer (Clayoquot), accidents in G 48
Prosecutions  G 16, 51
Protection Island, coal G 34
Quarries, report by Inspector G 53
Red Triangle Coal Co., Ltd G 19
Reno (Nelson), accidents at G 48
Rescue stations G 16
Reserve Mine, coal G 4, 6, 35
Richardson Mine, coal G 4, 6, 38
See also Ida Clara.
Safety-lamps, use of	
Silicosis, Act relating to..
..G13
.G47
Page.
Skeena Development Syndicate, Omineca,
coal in G 43
Somenos prospect, coal G 39
Strang, James, Inspector  G 3
Stronach, C, Colliery G 19
Sullivan (Fort Steele), accidents at G 48
Sunshine Coal Co G 19
Telkwa River, coal G 42
Thunderbird (Windermere), accidents at G 48
Tulameen Collieries, Ltd., accidents at	
 G 4, 6, 9
Report by Inspector G 41
Tulameen   Valley   Coal   Co.    (formerly
Lind)  G4, 6, 42
Valdes Island, coal prospects.
G39
Vancouver Island, collieries of  G 4
Velvet (Trail Creek), accidents at G 48
Villiers, Lieut.-Col. C. W G 34, 35
West Bay, coal-prospecting at G 39
Western   Fuel   Corporation  of   Canada,
Ltd.  G 4, 6
Accidents at  G 9
Report of Inspector G 34
Westwood, Ira (Nanaimo) G 39
Westwood's prospect, coal G 39
Wilson, T. M., Princeton, coal G 41
Wilson, W. R., Princeton, coal G 41
Wilson Mining and Investment Co., Ltd._..G 41
W. R. Wilson Mining and Investment Co.,
Ltd G19
Ymir Yankee Girl (Nelson), accidents at~G 48
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.
1,225-237-4740

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