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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENEEAL
EEPOET
OP
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
FOE  THE  YEAE  ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1934
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.  ■
To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commission
for the year ended December 31st, 1934.
GORDON McG. SLOAN,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1935. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1935.
Honourable Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended December
' 31st, 1934.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAS. G. CUNNINGHAM,
F. R. BUTLER,
A. G. BOLTON,
Game Commission. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION
1934.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
For the purpose of administration the Province is divided into five game divisions, with
an Inspector or Sub-Inspector in charge of each division with the exception of Vancouver
Island and the Lower Mainland sections, which, due to the need for economy, are controlled
or supervised from the Vancouver or Headquarters office.
There is no question, after careful examination of the system of game conservation or
protection in other Provinces in Canada and the States to the south, that the system in
operation in British Columbia stands well to the front as a model that could very well be
copied by other portions of the North American Continent.
During the year and after lengthy service, Mr. A. Bryan Williams was retired as Game
Commissioner and the supervision of the Game Department placed under a Commission of
three permanent members of the organization.
Extended and arduous patrols have been undertaken to many remote portions of the
Province during the year. In some cases these patrols have extended over lengthy periods
and have been accomplished by use of boats, dog-teams, and snow-shoes.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
Many inquiries have been received from Game Conservation bodies elsewhere as to how*
the system of trap-line registration is progressing in this Province, and it is very pleasing
to be able to supply all possible information and to advise that, due to the co-operation of
trappers, both white and Indians, the stand of fur in this Province is steadily increasing.
This condition undoubtedly has been brought about by the regulations covering the registration
of trap-lines.
As new maps are supplied from time to time additional work is required in revising
existing registered trap-lines.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES.
There has been some complaint against certain guides in the Province not fulfilling
their agreements with big-game hunting-parties. While the complaints have not been of
a very serious nature, still, at the same time, they indicate that some alterations should be
made to the regulations and this matter is receiving every consideration.
FUR-FARMING.
Due to the conditions of the fur market and for other reasons, a number of fur-farmers
have discontinued their operations, but the majority are carrying on and appear to be
operating very well financially. More consideration will be given by the Commission to the
fur-farming industry in the future, with a view to improving this business.
BIRD-BANDING.
Again as in past years, the Game Warden at Chilliwack has conducted bird-banding
operations in respect to migratory game birds on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, and
it is pleasing to advise that this station ranked fifth on the North American Continent in
the total number of birds banded.
Many interesting and valuable returns have been received from these banding operations.
One of the objects behind this work is to endeavour to closely study the flight of our migratory
water-fowl so that with this additional and reliable information a better knowledge of the
proper shooting seasons, bag limits, etc., can be obtained.
PREDATORY-ANIMAL HUNTERS.
During the year bounties on certain predatory animals have been put into effect and
a careful study of the situation in connection with these animals is being made by the
Commission, and undoubtedly certain recommendations in regard thereto will be submitted
to the Department for approval in due course. R 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Wardens throughout the Province have been particularly instructed to give every
attention to controlling the increase in vermin of all kinds.
PUBLICITY AND TOURIST TRADE.
Careful consideration is being given to instituting some system of advertising the
wonderful attractions of this Province in respect to game and fish. There is no doubt that
a sufficient amount of sound and fair advertising will be responsible for a decided increase
in the tourist trade and will considerably benefit our Province and the residents generally.
GAME PROPAGATION.
A major step towards increasing the annual liberations of pheasants and other game
birds has been taken during the year. The operations of the Elk Lake Game Farm, operated
by the Department, have been seriously curtailed, with the object in view of purchasing
pheasants from local game-bird farmers and generally encouraging this line of business.
It is pleasing to note that during the year a large number of pheasants were liberated in
various portions of the Province at a cost considerably below that for operating the Game
Farm mentioned.
Details of liberations during the year can be found in a statement farther on in this
report.
Due to repeated complaints of shortage of beaver in portions of the Interior, the Department has had live beaver trapped on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve, near Barkerville, and
' liberated in districts where there is every assurance that they will be protected. As the
beaver increase in the reserve mentioned the surplus animals will be trapped and liberated
where required. It might be mentioned that the traps used in this work are so constructed
that animals taken are not injured in any way.
In past years mountain-sheep and wapiti have been liberated in certain sections of the
Province. It is to be regretted that these big-game animals were not liberated in suitable
areas. Complaints of damage, especially in regard to mountain-sheep, have come to hand and
steps are being taken to trap these animals for liberation elsewhere.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Everything possible has been done during the year to further the interests of all in
providing better conditions in respect to game and fish throughout the Province, and the
assistance rendered in this connection by Game Associations, farmers, and others has been
very greatly appreciated.
The hearty co-operation of the British Columbia Police Force has also been a very
important factor in our work. All members of the Game Department have been particularly
instructed to assist the British Columbia Police at all times and the spirit of co-operation
between the two departments has been most cordial.
REPORT OF OFFICER I/C GAME FISH CULTURE.
A. G. Bolton.
I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Game Fish Culture Branch
for the year ended December 31st, 1934.
From investigations made during the previous calendar year, building operations were
put into effect at Veitch Creek, Sooke, Vancouver Island. A sixteen-trough hatchery capable
of holding and hatching a million trout-eggs was constructed, also eight rearing-tanks of the
most modern design, permitting the retaining until yearling size of not less than fifty thousand
trout. The water volume, water temperature, and natural food content have more than
justified the expenditure of this plant, the growth-rate, also the nominal loss, being very
satisfactory.
In order to facilitate the moving of fry from the Stanley Park Hatchery, Vancouver, it
was deemed advisable to construct a road into the hatchery from the Bridle Path. This was
duly completed and not only simplified the means of transporting the fry for the purposes
of planting, but greatly reduced the cost connected therewith.
As great interest has been shown by the angling public in the propagation of trout in
Seymour Creek, North Vancouver District, it was deemed advisable to mark the fish liberated REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 7
in this stream by the removal of certain fins, and to advertise the markings, whereby this
Department and the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo could obtain the life-habits of the
fish so marked and released. The above-mentioned body of water is especially suitable to
steelhead trout, but it is difficult to capture, strip, and hatch this species in sufficient numbers.
It is believed that Kamloops trout, whose ova can be secured in large numbers, can be
liberated in such water as Seymour Creek, then go to salt water and return as steelhead.
If this is the case, then our efforts in marking these fish as yearlings might very readily prove
a point of great value to the angler throughout streams of the Lower Mainland and Vancouver
Island. It is urgently requested that anglers notify this Department or the Pacific Biological
Station in the event of capturing any fish showing the removal of any fin or fins.
In an endeavour to locate a suitable site for a satisfactory collection of coastal cut-throat
trout eggs, a fence and eyeing-station was constructed at West Lake, Nelson Island.
Unfortunately the run did not warrant the expenditure that would have been incurred, with
the result that operations were withdrawn.
In order to improve fishing conditions in Shawnigan Lake, Vancouver Island, this
Department assisted financially in the removal of log-jams and numerous obstacles in Mill-
stream Creek, where the majority of trout from Shawnigan Lake spawn.
From five rearing-ponds at Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island, a large number of brown
trout fingerlings were liberated in Little Qualicum River, and also a good many were held
until yearling size, attaining a splendid growth-rate at a minimum of cost.
Substantial subsidies have been granted the Kelowna, Cranbrook, and Revelstoke Rod
and Gun Clubs, and these associations are to be congratulated on the success of their fish-
cultural operations.
It will be noted that only a few cut-throat trout were liberated in the year 1934, these
being a carry-over from the hatch of 1933. It is greatly regretted that a serious outbreak of
furunculosis occurred, and after consulting members of the Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo,
and the Department of Bacteriology of the University of British Columbia, it was decided,
in the interest of future fishing, to destroy the balance of cut-throat trout on hand.
This branch of the Provincial Game Department would like to express its appreciation
to Major J. A. Motherwell and staff, of the Dominion Fisheries; to Dr. W. A. Clemens and
Dr. C. McC. Mottley, of the Pacific Biological Station at Nanaimo; also Dr. D. C. B. Duff
and Mr. H. Horn, of the Department of Bacteriology of the University of British Columbia,
for their assistance in various details pertaining to game fish cultural activities being conducted
by the Provincial Government.
Summary of plantings made during the year 1934 will be found on page 32.
"A" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " A " Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1934.
Game Animals.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Shaw Creek Game Reserve and Nitinat River District wapiti are
numerous, and from reports these animals are increasing in most of the districts on Vancouver
Island where they are to be found.
Bear.—Throughout most of the districts of Vancouver Island black bear are increasing,
and some complaints have been received of damage being done by these animals.
In the Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlet areas, brown or grizzly bear are to be found,
as well as in the vicinity of Thompson and McKenzie Sounds.
Deer.—Taking the Vancouver Island District as a whole, deer have not been as plentiful
as in previous years, especially in the Courtenay District. In the Alert Bay area and portions
of the Mainland Coast adjacent thereto deer have been plentiful. Complaints have been
received from some districts on Vancouver Island as to damage by deer to agricultural land.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are still to be found on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve
where they were released some years ago, but they apparently are not increasing to any
great extent. R 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—In some portions of the Division beaver are increasing, and in certain areas
complaints have been received of these animals doing damage to private property.
Otter.—Scarce throughout the Division.
Marten.—In some portions of the Division marten are increasing in number, but, taking
the Division as a whole, they are not to be found in large numbers.
Mink.—These animals are slightly increasing throughout the Division.
Racoon.—Fairly numerous.
Muskrats.—These animals are plentiful and many trappers have made some fairly large
catches, but while some farmers have complained of muskrats doing damage to their lands,
the complaints have not been in such large numbers as in previous years.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—These birds are increasing in most districts on Vancouver Island,
especially in the Lake Cowichan and Courtenay areas.
Grouse (Ruffed).—A slight increase has been noted in many portions of the Division,
but these birds cannot be considered as being plentiful.
Quail.—These birds are to be found in fairly large numbers in the southern portion of
Vancouver Island, especially in the vicinity of the City of Victoria.
Partridge.—European partridge are to be found in the vicinity of the City of Victoria,
but are not plentiful.
Ptarmigan.—In the higher mountain regions of Vancouver Island a few ptarmigan are
to be found.
Pheasants.—A greater number of pheasants have been liberated in this Division this year
than in any year heretofore, and indications point to an increase in these birds in most districts.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—These birds are reported as plentiful throughout the Division.
Brant.—These birds are found in this Division in larger numbers than for some years
past.
Geese.—With the exception of the west coast of Vancouver Island, geese are reported as
having been fairly plentiful.
Sivans.—These birds are and have been protected for some years, and each year greater
numbers are to be observed throughout the Division.
Vermin.
Cougar have been reported as being quite numerous.    Bounty was paid during the year
for the destruction of 423 of these animals on Vancouver Island, while a number were destroyed
by Game Wardens.
Wolves have been increasing, although bounty was paid on only ten of these animals
during the year.
Game Wardens have been carrying out instructions in regard to the destruction of vermin,
and they report having killed, during the year, the following: —
Cougar     32 Wolves       1
Crows  .  269 Owls     16
Cats  251 Dogs     37
Hawks      54 Eagles     57
Ravens  118
Game-protection.
Continuous patrols have been carried out during the year, but in most portions of the
Division the unemployment situation has made the work of the Game Wardens extremely
difficult. Sixty-three convictions were obtained during the year for violations of the Game
and Fisheries Acts and regulations.
Game Propagation.
Fallow deer were again trapped on James Island, and a number of these animals were
liberated in the Alberni District and also on some of the Gulf Islands. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 9
In regard to the liberation of game birds, principally pheasants, a statement will be found
on another page of this report showing the total liberations of game birds throughout the
Province.
Game Reserves.
There are a number of game reserves in this Division which, so far as possible, have
been constantly patrolled. There is no doubt that these reserves have been responsible for
the increase in game of all kinds in the districts bordering same.
Fur Trade.
In this Division there is not a great deal of trading in fur, as the majority of fur trapped
is shipped direct to Vancouver or other outside markets.
Fur-farming.
There are still a number of fur-farms to be found on Vancouver Island, and notwithstanding the low prices obtainable for the pelts of fur-bearing animals, only a few of the
licensed fur-farms in the Division have gone out of business.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There are approximately 500 registered trap-lines in this Division, and most trappers
agree that the system of trap-line registration has been very beneficial towards the conservation
of fur, as a registered trapper becomes more or less a fur-farmer and only takes a certain
number of animals off his trap-line each year, leaving a good breeding stock for propagation
purposes.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
Each Game Warden throughout the Division has been called upon to make special patrols
from time to time in remote areas, and there is no doubt that these special and lengthy patrols
have had a good effect.
Hunting Accidents.
During the year 1934 there were a few hunting accidents in the Division, as follows:—
On November 10th James Murray was mistaken for a deer in the Comox District and was
seriously wounded in the right leg.
Charles Spence, while hunting in the Timberlands District, fell over a cliff, resulting in
his death.
On October 31st Thomas H. Douglas, while hunting in Saanich, was killed as a result of
pulling a loaded shotgun through a fence, and F. I. Nichol, on November 1st, near Sidney,
struck at his dog with a loaded shotgun, resulting in the gun discharging and fatally wounding
Mr. Nichol.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Few complaints have been received from farmers in regard to damage by deer and other
game animals, and every complaint has been promptly investigated by a Game Warden and
steps taken to prevent any further damage being done.
Generally, conditions in regard to game have been good, but there has been some abuse by
holders of provisional free miners' certificates in violating the provisions of the " Game Act "
and regulations.
Members of the British Columbia Police Department have assisted Game Wardens
throughout the Division, and the Game Wardens in turn have rendered every assistance to
the Provincial Police Force during the year.
"B" DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " B " Division for
year ended December 31st, 1934. R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Mule-deer are well distributed throughout the Division and in some sections, particularly the East Kootenay and Kettle River, are quite numerous. This condition also
applies to the Similkameen District. White-tail deer are fairly plentiful in the Division, with
the exception of the Okanagan and Similkameen areas. These animals have definitely
increased in the Kettle River District.
The past winter (1933^34) was a comparatively mild one and deer wintered very well, and
as a result very few complaints were received from farmers in regard to these animals invading their orchards. Deer no doubt are compelled to browse on fruit-trees, as sometimes
happens, due to the extremely heavy snowfall.
While it is always a conjectural matter to state whether deer are increasing or otherwise.
I think it is a safe statement that these animals have not diminished in numbers during the
past three or four years. It is also true that fewer deer have been killed this past season than
for some years. This is due no doubt to the fact that the snow came so late it had little effect
in driving the deer down to the lower levels before the end of the hunting season. Possibly
this may be providential, as there is some feeling that our bag limits are too generous. The
kill in the Kettle Valley was tremendously heavy, and as this section is patronized by both
resident and non-resident hunters it would seem that either the season should be curtailed in
that area, the bag limits reduced, or a prohibited area for the hunting of deer established.
Moose.—From all reports received, moose continue to extend their range and now appear
to be quite numerous in some areas where a few years ago they were unknown.
Wapiti (Elk).—There is little change in the range of these animals, and the number killed
during the open season does not materially affect their stand. They are mainly found in the
Rocky Mountain section of the East Kootenay, although a few are to be found on the eastern
slope of the Selkirk Range. To what extent these animals will increase in the Selkirks is
dubious, as the snowfall is deeper than in the Rockies and there is less open country.
A short open season on wapiti in the vicinity of Penticton resulted in a few of these animals
being killed, but from all accounts this open season has driven the animals away from the
farm lands where they had previously been doing extensive damage.
Caribou.—Very few of these animals were taken in the short open season during the past
two years, and they are apparently in sufficient numbers to permit a continuance of this open
season which might profitably be a little later in the year.
Mountain-goat.—In the Rocky Mountains these animals were fairly numerous and were
well distributed over the Division wherever the country is suitable. No doubt, owing to their
more or less inaccessible habits, goat-hunting does not appear to be a popular pastime.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals are also chiefly confined to the Rocky Mountain Range,
where they are numerous. Small bands exist in Okanagan Falls and on the Ashnola watershed in the Similkameen.
Bear.—Black and brown bear are well distributed throughout the Division, but are more
plentiful in the Kootenay section. This also applies to the grizzly bear, which is comparatively
scarce in the Boundary, Okanagan, and Similkameen areas.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Mink, marten, lynx, and weasel are the principal fur-bearers taken, while beaver and musk-
rats are to be found in fair numbers, mostly in the East Kootenay. A few otter, fox, fisher,
and wolverine are trapped each year.
If it were not for our present adequate system of registration of trap-lines during the past
few years the stand of fur-bearing animals would have been seriously depleted. The lack of
ready employment caused a great many people to trap who would otherwise have been working,
and each detachment has a waiting-list of trappers for any trap-line which might be vacated.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue, ruffed, and Franklin's grouse showed little change and are well able to withstand
the present open seasons. Occasionally reports indicate a scarcity of these birds in one particular section, but this seems to be counterbalanced by a definite preponderance somewhere
else. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 11
Prairie-chicken are not numerous in the East Kootenay, but appear to be holding their
own.    This also applies to the Boundary District.
Ptarmigan, on account of the altitude they prefer, are negligible as game birds.
Pheasants are plentiful in the Similkameen and Lower Okanagan and furnish good sport.
A short open season was provided for the Creston and Grand Forks Districts, but the birds are
not so numerous nor so well distributed as in the other areas mentioned.
Partridge do not seem to have attained anything like their former numbers in the Similkameen or Lower Okanagan. They occur occasionally in different parts of the Division, but are
few in number.
Quail are fairly plentiful in the Lower Okanagan and Lower Similkameen where conditions
are suitable.
Migratory Game Birds.
The number of locally reared ducks during the past season was very encouraging, particularly in the Kootenay Flats below Creston and in the Columbia River locality from Inver-
mere to Golden, as well as in the Duncan River and the Lower Okanagan. These areas consist of a main stream flanked by numerous sloughs and wooded lowlands which offer good feed
and cover for the young ducks. There are numerous small lakes and sloughs also throughout
the Division where ducks and geese nest. The fall shooting was good and northern ducks
arrived in satisfactory numbers.
A few swan are still to be found in the vicinity of Creston.
Wilson snipe were plentiful in the early fall, but these birds are hunted but very little.
Vermin.
One hundred and thirty-six hawks, 851 crows, 804 magpies, 52 owls, 17 eagles, 2 ravens,
105 cats, 32 dogs, 54 coyotes, and 5 cougar have been destroyed by Game Wardens during the
course of their patrols this year.    Coyotes taken by trappers also totalled 320.
Game-protection .
Convictions under the " Game Act " and Special Fishery Regulations totalled eighty-one
during the year.
Game Propagation.
Pheasants were released for restocking in the Similkameen, Okanagan, Grand Forks,
Creston, Lower Arrow Lakes, and East Kootenay Districts. The points on the Lower Arrow
Lakes, Robson, Renata, and Deer Park, as well as the East Kootenay between Mayook and
Canal Flats, are experimental at present, but the birds which have been released have done
very well and a decided, increase has been noted. It is hoped to release fresh stock in the
spring, and there is no reason why these places should not provide good pheasant-shooting in
the near future. Our thanks are due to the many interested sportsmen in these districts who
have co-operated with the Game Department not only in releasing but in feeding these birds
during severe weather.
Game Reserves.
Game reserves in this Division consist of the Elk River Reserve, a Bird Sanctuary at
Elko, and a Bird Sanctuary at Vaseaux Lake, in the Lower Okanagan. The Elk River Game
Reserve is patrolled by the Game Wardens stationed at Canal Flats, Cranbrook, and Fernie, but
the main patrols into this area are carried out by Game Warden A. F. Sinclair, of Canal Flats,
by horseback in the summer and fall and on snow-shoes in the winter. The value of this
reserve lies in the fact that on account of this extensive sanctuary we are enabled to have a
generous open season on moose, wapiti, and mountain-sheep without in any way over-hunting
the country, and it is also a great benefit in maintaining the stock of fur-bearing animals.
The deer sanctuary along the Wigwam River near Elko is a noted yarding-ground for
deer during the latter part of the open season.
Vaseaux Lake is an ideal breeding-ground for water-fowl generally.
In addition, the lake-front at Nelson, which remains open throughout the winter, offers
refuge to large numbers of ducks, principally mallards, which remain in the vicinity all winter.
It has been an established custom for these birds to be fed by the former Chief of Police at R 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Nelson, and the present Chief, Mr. A. Stewart.    The members of the Nelson Rod and Gun
Club also distribute feed during the winter months.
Fur Trade.
There are two resident fur-traders in Nelson, and the majority of fur is sold directly to
fur-traders in the Province. Comparatively little fur is exported to Eastern Canada or to
the United States.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farmers in this Division appear to have their industry on a sound footing and
are most optimistic regarding the general outlook for the future.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The present system of trap-line registration is operating very successfully and is continuing to demonstrate its effectiveness in no uncertain manner. It is reasonable to assume
that if this system were not in operation the country would be absolutely overrun with trappers,
to the subsequent detriment of the fur-bearers. That this view is in nowise exaggerated is
attested by the number of applications we have on file for the first vacant trap-line. Although
the price of fur has not been high, many men who are not employed would be only too glad to
trap if there was any territory available.
Registration of Guides.
There are twenty registered guides in this Division, an increase of six over last year.
Special Patrols.
There were no outstanding patrols made during the year, as the usual routine patrols
were carried on at all times. These embraced trips of ten days to two weeks' duration by
Game Wardens, either in pairs or singly, on horseback, snow-shoes, or by canoe.
Hunting Accidents.
On November 4th Donald McRae, aged 73, of Tulameen, went out hunting and did not
return. The police searched the district where he intended to go, which was very heavy and
rocky, and were further hampered by a deep snowfall. They were unsuccessful in their
search.
On or about November 1st Ben Shaw took a load of supplies to his cabin at Sheep Lake,
some 20 miles from Rossland. Six weeks later his wife reported anxiety at his non-appearance,
and investigation disclosed the fact that he had only remained at his cabin for a day or two,
as all his effects were in the place. It is presumed that he was either drowned in the lake or
had perished in the woods near by. A search was made, but was unavailing on account of the
heavy snow in that locality.
On September 9th D. S. Fullmore, of Westbridge, had his left thumb blown off by the
explosion of a rifle while shooting at a target. The gun was designed for black powder and
it is presumed that the high-speed shell was too strong for this weapon.
On October 5th Axel Larson, while hunting about 10 miles from Canal Flats, came around
a rock bluff and met a female grizzly face to face. Before he could shoot, the bear attacked him
by seizing his right arm, threw him down and mauled him. One of her cubs squealed and
the bear moved a few feet away. Larson then fired a shot at the bear and she came back and
mauled him again. He lost consciousness and when he recovered the bear was gone. Larson
made his way to a prospecting-shack, and the occupant, C. Johnson, called a first-aid man
from the C.P.R. lumber camp and he was later taken to St. Eugene's Hospital at Cranbrook,
where he remained for five weeks. He was badly mauled about the right arm, the back, face,
and left eye. Sixty-three stitches were put in his body, and at the present time his right arm
is practically useless and two fingers will not close. Larson states that he had no idea the bear
was in the vicinity and did not see her until he walked round the bluff about 3 feet from her.
On February 7th A. W. Anderson was shooting at a target with a .22 rifle when he slipped
and dropped the gun on the ice. The weapon discharged, slightly wounding him in the right
arm. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 13
G. Peret disappeared while hunting in the Naramata District on November 23rd. This
man was not located, although an extensive search was conducted.
R. J. Thomas, of New Westminster, was slightly wounded while hunting in the Carmi
District, through the accidental discharge of a weapon in the hands of his hunting companion.
Summary and General Remarks.
While the annual reports from this Division for the last number of years have been optimistic in tenor and indicate a general increase of game, still there appears to be no reason to
disagree with this view. In an area as extensive as this Division, and where conditions
range from the salubrious Okanagan, through the deep snow-belt of the West Kootenays and
into the colder but slightly arid Rock Mountain section, there is bound to be a diversity of local
opinion regarding the plentitude of game as well as the factors that govern its increase or
otherwise. While it is difficult to state if there are or are not numerically more deer in the
Division than in the past few years, it is also most debatable if there are any less. The past
two winters have been very mild, with a late snowfall, and this has resulted in the annual kill
of these animals being considerably lighter than in the previous two or three hunting seasons,
when the snow came early and the bucks fell an easy prey to the hunters. Nevertheless, the
hunting was generally good and there appear to be no complaints, with the possible exception
of the West Kootenay District, which on account of its annual heavy snowfall, is not to be considered in the same category as the East Kootenay, Kettle Valley, and Similkameen Districts.
There was a noted increase this past fall in big-game hunters who came into the East
Kootenay for moose, elk, sheep, and goat. Without exception these hunting-parties express
themselves as satisfied with our regulations, the country they hunted in, the guides they
employed, and the variety of game they bagged and saw. Caribou are not so reliable an
attraction, but one known non-resident party went into the Selkirks from Golden hunting these
animals. Good trophies were obtained, with the possible exception of moose, whose heads,
for some reason, do not appear to attain the same size as those of the northern animals, but
even so they are still impressive.
The Rocky Mountain section, from approximately Golden south to the International
Boundary, is really a remarkable district for the variety and numbers of big game. Moose,
elk, sheep, deer, goat, and both black and grizzly bear are definitely plentiful. This area
should maintain its present stand of game on account of the Dominion Parks and our Provincial Game Reserve in that section. Across the International Boundary is Glacier National
Park, which also is a help. Barring some unforeseen calamity, there should be game in
abundance in this area indefinitely, provided proper protection is afforded. At the present
time our open seasons are very fair, and due to the fact that this area is not traversed by
wagon-roads there is little fear that it will be hunted out, as it is pre-eminently a country for
the sportsmen and not the meat-hunters.
There were a great many destructive forest fires in this Division during the past summer,
particularly in the East and West Kootenay. The principal sufferers were trappers, who
had much of their lines completely destroyed. Due to the fact that the fires burned in very
dry weather, but without much wind, it does not seem that game animals perished to any great
extent; at least we have had no reports either from our own observations or the Forestry
Department. There is a possibility, in some instances, that the deer will suffer during the
present winter if they return to their usual wintering-grounds where the browse has been
burned over. If such a contingency should arise it will be necessary to feed these animals.
As a usual rule the forest fires help to clear up a stretch of country which will grow up in the
course of two or three years to young deciduous growths, which provide excellent winter
grazing for deer, elk, or moose, the Bull River in the East Kootenay being an example of this
sort. However, when a great area is burned over at one time it creates an acute problem
regarding winter-feeding for the browsing animals in that locality.
There is every indication at the present time that the winter of 1934-35 will be a hard
one on game, as the snowfall to the end of December has been exceptionally heavy in the East
and West Kootenay.
Conflicting reports are received from the Game Wardens regarding the water-fowl situation. In the Columbia Valley there do not seem to be so many local birds reared this year as
last, but this was counterbalanced by reports from the Kettle Valley, where, due to there R 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
being more water in many of the mountain lakes and sloughs, greater numbers of ducks were
observed than in previous years. The northern flight seemed to be much the same as in the
past year or two. Generally speaking, the duck situation in this Division was about on an
average with the past few years.
A suggestion has been put forward by sportsmen in the Creston area that certain days
of the week should be closed for shooting water-fowl. This is the practice just across the
American border in the neighbouring State of Idaho, and appears to have the approval of the
majority of duck-hunters. The Creston-Kootenay Flats area is a restricted one and very
heavily hunted, and it is felt that these birds should have a day or two during the week to
rest. Several thousand acres of swamp are in the process of being reclaimed, which will
further restrict the feeding-grounds in that locality.
Some instances of diseased liver or liver-fluke in deer were reported in the Fish Lake area
near Penticton, but this disease appears to be confined to that specific locality.
During the past year the usual cordial co-operation has been received from the Provincial
Police and Forestry Departments, and the various sportsmen's organizations throughout the
Division. This co-operation has been greatly appreciated, and it might be mentioned that the
Game Wardens in this Division have reciprocated in helping the British Columbia Police and
Forestry Departments wherever and whenever possible.
" C " DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C "
Division during the year ended December 31st, 1934.
Game Animals.
Caribou.—In the northern portion of the Chilcotin Detachment caribou are increasing, but
very few of these animals were taken by hunters during the past season. In the Quesnel area
caribou appear to be holding their own. It is reported that wolves north of the Bowron Lake
Sanctuary have taken a heavy foil of caribou calves. On the Dragon Mountain Range, east
of Marguerite, a few caribou have been seen, but according to old-time residents are not as
plentiful as in past years.
Moose.—These animals have shown a marked increase in the Alexis Creek District, where
they have been frequently seen in numbers ranging from five to thirty-five.
Black Bear.—rThese animals are reported on the increase and they have done some damage
to cattle.
Grizzly Bear.—East of Barkerville and around Mica Mountain, in the Mahood Lake District, grizzly bear are quite numerous.
Deer.—In this Division deer are plentiful except around Barkerville, where they are
decidedly scarce. The increase in deer is possibly due, to a great extent, to the mild winters
of recent years. The fact that Barkerville is north of the 53rd parallel of north latitude,
where prospectors are entitled to kill game when actually in need of it for food during the close
season while prospecting, has been partly responsible for the decrease not only of deer but of
other-game animals in this unorganized district.
Fur-bearing Animals.
There are 649 white and Indian trappers registered in this Division, and some fifty-five
trappers are trapping on private property.
Beaver.—Generally speaking, beaver are on the increase, but in many parts of the district
conditions are not suitable for the propagation of these animals. If the trappers having fur-
bearing animals on their trap-lines continue to protect and conserve these animals, there is
no reason why beaver and all other fur-producing animals should not increase on these
registered lines.
The poacher has always to be contended with, and is a source of annoyance to all trappers
in this Division. I am greatly in favour of larger trap-lines capable of supporting two trappers, as this provides greater protection. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 15
Reports so far to hand indicate fairly good catches on registered trap-lines, except where
fire has worked havoc. Fire has ruined many trap-lines during the past few years and is
responsible for a decreased fur-supply in many cases.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue grouse and ptarmigan are reported scarce in the Bowron Lake Game Reserve near
Barkerville, but ruffed and Franklin's grouse are fairly plentiful in this district. In the
Williams Lake and Kelowna areas grouse of all kinds are scarce.
Partridge are reported to be increasing in the Kelowna District.
Migratory Game Birds.
Throughout the Division reports indicate an increase in ducks and geese over last year
owing to better water and feed conditions.
Vermin.
The Game Wardens at Kelowna and Vernon destroyed a considerable amount of vermin
during the past year, as follows:—
Hawks   69                Big-horned owls  19
Cats (gone wild)   30                Crows   320
Coyotes     9                Magpies   307
Golden eagle      1
Game Wardens in other districts of this Division were also particularly active throughout
the year in the destruction of vermin.
The annual crow-shoot held at Kamloops this year resulted in a large number of crows,
magpies, and other noxious birds being destroyed.
There are reports to hand of an ever-increasing number of cougar and all classes of
vermin from every section of the Division, with the possible exception of Bowron Lake, although
wolves are occasionally reported in that area. The big-horned owl particularly appears to be
evident everywhere, and together with the domestic cat gone wild is doing considerable damage
to our game birds.
From October to December of this year Predatory-animal Hunter Charles Shuttleworth
has killed seven cougar and is at present on a lengthy hunt in a portion of this Division.
Game-protection.
There were 116 prosecutions with three dismissals under the Game and Fisheries Acts in
this Division during the year. Regular patrols have been made and many attempted violations of the " Game Act " prevented.
A special patrol was made by Game Wardens MacMartin and Quesnel into the Tumtum
Lake District on a check-up of trap-line operations, resulting in six convictions under the
" Game Act."
Game Propagation.
No mountain-sheep were trapped at Squilax last spring, and only eight beaver were
trapped at the Bowron Lake Game Reserve for distribution in other portions of the Division.
It is hoped that more active work along this line will be inaugurated during the coming year.
Arrangements are being made to liberate quail in the vicinity of Kamloops. Pheasants
are also being transferred from one part of the Kamloops District to another area recently
thinned out during the open season.
From Spences Bridge and Squilax reports are to hand that dogs are molesting mountain-
sheep. It is somewhat unfortunate that these sheep are adjacent to and on Indian reservations,
as this Department has no control over the protection of these animals on Indian lands.
Nevertheless, the mountain-sheep at these points have definitely increased and are spreading
throughout the country. Trapping of mountain-sheep will be continued at Squilax and, if
possible, at Spences Bridge.
Game Reserves.
There are two game reserves in this Division, one at Yalacom and the other at Bowron
Lake.    The latter reserve continues principally as a sanctuary for fur-bearing animals and R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
moose. I would suggest that more sanctuaries be established in areas not at present frequented
by hunters. It is good insurance against future depredation, especially during these days of
rapidly developing aerial transportation and prospective mining activity.
Fur Trade.
There is a limited amount of fur trade in the Interior, most of the fur being sent to
Vancouver. The principle of protecting merchants in any city from outside competition of a
transient nature through the payment of increased licence fees could well be applied to
transient fur-buyers, as this type of buyer is no asset to any community. Very often he cares
little about the future fur-supply and is open to buy any fur whether in season or out. The
local fur-buyer in any community should receive some measure of protection.
Fur-farming.
Until the price of fur goes up I do not anticipate any increased desire to engage in this
business. To most people who are about to enter this line of farming it is still regarded as
a very interesting experiment, especially when one is trying something apart from fox-farming.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system is long past the experimental stage and is acknowledged throughout as a
success. The fact alone that so many of the trappers renew their licences every year is
strong indication that they have something worth looking after.
If the system of providing breeding areas in each registered trap-line is followed out, and
if trappers are given sufficient territory, there will be little fear of an impending disappearance
of certain classes of fur. This, on the other hand, is to some extent contingent on the price
of fur, and when prices are good the tendency is to trap more heavily.
Registration of Guides.
I would suggest that a system of distribution of non-resident big-game hunters during
the open season be considered by the Department so as to ensure satisfaction to all parties,
including big-game hunters, guides, and outfitters. Too much crowding in certain localities
invariably results in disappointing bag limits.
If the intention of non-resident hunters about to hunt in British Columbia were known
well in advance, the possibility of overcrowding in any one section could be avoided by an
alternative suggestion that other areas be covered or hunted.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made in this Division during the year, especially
in connection with violations of the trapping regulations. A series of major patrols will be
followed out on trap-lines during the coming year if conditions permit.
Hunting Accidents.
Only one hunting accident was reported in this Division during the year. This resulted
in Edward John, Indian, of Chu Chua, B.C., being fatally wounded. The party responsible
for this hunting accident was charged with manslaughter and his firearms licence was
cancelled.
A very simple test of colour visibility was tried out during the past hunting season. The
colours were fixed at a distance of first 300 yards and finally at 400 yards, which is about the
maximum distance at which any killing of game takes place in the Interior. Pieces of cloth
about 20 inches square and about 15 yards apart were erected against a background of pine-
trees and finally sage-brush and bunch-grass. The colours were bright red, bars of red and
white, yellow and burnt orange. The colour that caught the eye first of several observers,
especially when the eyes were cast suddenly across the whole colour scheme from left to right
and reverse, was the burnt orange. Next came white, then red and white bars, and finally red.
As a result of this experiment it is suggested that hunters be asked to wear a cap or sweater
of burnt orange while hunting game. The wearing of khaki in the hills during the hunting
season should be prohibited. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 17
Summary and General Remarks on Game Conditions.
The past year has been a favourable one in so far as water-fowl is concerned. The stand
of pheasants has been better this year than for many years, while the grouse season has been
a mixed one and in certain localities very disappointing.
While the opinion from actual observation as to the stand of big game or bird life in this
Division when describing same as " numerous " or " scarce " may not be scientific, it at least
gives one an idea as to the localities where close seasons should apply. A start might be made
during the coming year to take a census over certain localities after the hunting season is over
on big game and game birds, provided weather conditions are not too severe.
In conclusion, I would like to express my sincere thanks to the Game Wardens in this
Division for their loyal and splendid co-operation and tact in the execution of their duties.
Assistance has also been rendered by Inspector J. Shirras and members of the Provincial
Police Force during the year, and both departments have stood ready to help each other in
every emergency. It is decidedly encouraging to feel that assistance is always at hand
wherever Provincial Police are stationed.
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By T. Van Dyk, Officer Commanding.
Herewith I beg to submit my annual report covering game conditions in " D " Division
during the year ended December 31st, 1934.
Game Animals.
In spite of the present excessive hunting by farmers and prospectors, big-game animals
in this Division are still reported to be numerous. It must be carefully borne in mind, however,
that the observance of numerous animals, especially moose and deer, along the highways and
railway-tracks is not a true indication of their real numbers, as these animals make for the
settled areas when harassed by wolves and coyotes. This fact gives dangerously erroneous
impressions to the ordinary unthinking settler and traveller who believes from what he sees
that the animals of the deer family are increasing, whereas to the contrary would be more
correct.
In order to retain our stand of big-game animals so as to attract the tourist, it will be
necessary to cope with the increase of their natural enemies, the wolves and coyotes. If the
great number of moose and deer killed by these predatory animals be added to those killed by
settlers, prospectors, and hunters, a total is reached that is considerably in excess of what it
should be. There is no doubt that if this state of affairs continues the balance of nature will
be seriously upset and the decrease in their numbers will become more pronounced year by
year. In this case the Department will have a very difficult problem with which to contend,
and it seems obvious that now is the time to take remedial measures and encourage the
destruction of cougars, wolves, coyotes, and other predatory animals.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Owing to the benefits derived from our system of trap-line registration, the fur-bearing
animals in this Division are steadily increasing in numbers. Up to date the fur-catch has been
very satisfactory and shows a substantial increase over the catch of last season. To ensure
a greater yield as the years go on the trapper should unquestionably have better protection
from poachers on his trap-line. In order to give this added protection, and in some cases
necessary supervision, a greater proportion of the moneys derived from the fur industry by
way of licences and fur tax should be devoted to trap-line patrols.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse (except Prairie-chicken).—Although less numerous than in past years, grouse are
in no danger of extermination, as very few birds were killed last season. This was due to the
peculiar weather conditions which prevailed, keeping the birds deep in the woods until much
later than usual. Hunters could obtain very small bags in comparison with other years.
However, after the season closed, many birds were noticed, and I am quite confident that if
2 R 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
given good spring weather an ample supply of birds will be found to have survived the winter,
and so ensure future propagation and excellent hunting.
Prairie-chicken.—These birds are very numerous east of the Rocky Mountains, in the
Peace River District. The few flocks established in the vicinity of Prince George, Vanderhoof,
and Smithers have not been doing very well. This is in all probability due to either a poor
breeding season or to the depredations of predatory animals. Undoubtedly a close season
should be maintained in this Division, except for that portion extending east of the Rocky
Mountains.
Migratory Game Birds.
The line of flight taken by the migratory flocks of ducks and geese does not lie across the
Northern Interior, but there was a notable increase in the number of locally bred birds of both
these species. Some very nice bags were obtained throughout the Division, and especially was
this the case in the Crooked, Finlay, and Stewart River areas.
Vermin.
Again I must bring to your attention the extraordinary increase in the number of wolves
throughout this Division. It is advisable that immediate steps be taken to cope with the extensive slaughter of our big-game animals, especially moose and deer, by these pests.
It has been suggested by various trappers and hunters that the bounty on timber-wolves
should be increased from $5 to $10, and that on coyotes there should be a bounty of $3.50, the
pelt to be surrendered to the Department. It can be taken for granted that if these suggestions
were carried out it would stimulate trappers, farmers, and hunters to destroy these animals in
the summer, when, though the pelt has then no commercial value, the bounty would still stand
as an inducement.
Satisfied as I am that you are fully aware of the serious menace that predatory animals
have become in this Division, I am looking forward to your strong co-operation in dealing with
this urgent state of affairs.
Game-protection.
This phase of our work is receiving constant and intensive attention in the Division.
During the past year a considerable number of patrols were undertaken by all Game Wardens
in their respective areas, resulting in numerous prosecutions for infractions of the " Game
Act." In this respect it is well to point out that the main object of all patrols is not necessarily
to obtain convictions or even to prosecute, but to create a better feeling amongst the settlers,
trappers, and hunters. It is very noticeable that when these people reach the conclusion that
the Department seeks to help them, they co-operate willingly with us and automatically there
are fewer infractions of the " Game Act."
As the number and length of our patrols depend to a great extent on the appropriation,
I am sorry to say that the prevailing economic condition has reduced the number of patrols
undertaken by the Game Wardens of this Division. However, as conditions improve and
greater appropriations are allowed, the systematic patrolling of the Division will be resumed,
especially with regard to trap-lines. This would be to the satisfaction of all game conservationists and result in ultimate benefit to the Province.
For your information I hereunder give the total mileage covered by the Game Wardens of
this Division:—
Miles. Miles.
Train   12,456 Plane         340
Boat   15,666 Foot      8,415
Car  49,706 	
Horse     3,735 Total  90,318
Game Propagation.
No new propagation-work has been undertaken in this Division. Good reports continue to
come in with regard to the elk liberated on Graham Island. There are no reports to hand
regarding the European partridge released in the Vanderhoof District in 1932.
Many applications for the liberation of pheasants in various parts of the Division have
been received, but as past experiences have proven fully that the climate of Northern British
Columbia is too severe for pheasants, these applications have not been encouraged. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 19
Game Reserves.
The three game reserves in the vicinity of Prince George, Smithers, and Prince Rupert,
established as safety-zones and bird sanctuaries, are fulfilling their purpose excellently.
They are easily patrolled and receive constant attention.
The establishment of a game reserve in the Ootsa Lake District has again been suggested.
Should the Department at any time contemplate the creation of such a reserve, steps should
be taken at an early date with regard to the cancellation and relinquishment of all trap-lines
in the area to be covered by the reserve. In any case, trap-lines becoming vacant should
not be reallotted and so; in due course, the whole area would become available for the proposed
reserve.
Fur Trade.
Prices have been consistently low and the trappers have not been trapping extensively.
In spite of the low prices prevailing and the reduced trapping operations, the catch of fur
slightly exceeds that of last year. However, as the bulk of fur caught in this Division is
shipped to Vancouver, it is impossible to obtain an accurate estimate of the amount of fur
produced, but from all appearances there is undoubtedly a greater number of pelts being
handled each year.
Fur-farming.
It is regretted that fur-farming is not improving in this Division. Most farmers are
of limited means and are more or less experimenting, and are taking a long time to get
established. The fur-farming industry is greatly in need of encouragement and it would
be to the advantage of the Department to assist the farmers in their undertaking.
To help the farmers in an advantageous manner, it would most likely be necessary to
have a competent animal pathologist attached or appointed to the departmental staff. The
services of this officer would then be available to all fur-farmers and the diseases afflicting
fur-bearing animals raised in captivity could be studied and fought in a scientific manner.
It would be useful if fur-farms were regularly inspected and the experience gained by their
owners tabulated, and the findings published in pamphlet form for the general use of fur-
farmers.
Many farmers have been interviewed and all of them stress the need and are in favour
of the appointment of such an officer as outlined above.
Registration of Trap-lines.
A great deal of work in connection with the reregistration of trap-lines has been done
during the past year. The new and more accurate maps we received involved a great deal
of extra work in plotting and remapping old-established lines in order to bring them in
accordance with the new maps. It is expected that this class of work will take two or three
years to complete, as the north-eastern portion of the Division has not been very accurately
mapped, and consequently the registration of trap-lines in that area has been considerably
curtailed.
The steady increase in the supply of fur and the consequent rise in revenue derived from
that source is a direct result of the legislation compelling the registration of trapping areas.
Providing the trapper receives proper protection, it is anticipated that in time the
Province of British Columbia will lead the other Provinces of the Dominion in the production
of fur.
Registration of Guides.
Regarding the registration of guides and the regulation of their operations, it seems
very desirous that these matters should receive closer attention from the Department.
The registration as carried out at present is not quite satisfactory, as any person may
obtain a guide's licence, regardless of his ability as a woodsman or a guide. It also seems
advisable that the men practising this occupation, or applying for licences to practise, should
have sufficient knowledge to fully take care of any trophies taken by the hunter or hunters
they are guiding.
It might be a good plan to license the resident outfitter, such licence to carry the right
to guide.    Any other guide employed by this outfitter would be vouched for and licensed at R 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the request of the outfitter.    This would put the onus on a responsible person and only first-
class guides would be employed.
Non-resident outfitters should be debarred from operation in this Province, as every
outfit originating outside of our borders is a direct loss to the Province. Moneys paid for
wages, horse-hire, and purchase of equipment and supplies remains with the party until they
return to their point of origin.
It is obvious that in the matter of the exploitation of our natural resources, in this case
the big game of the Province, the residents of British Columbia should be given preference.
We have outfitters, guides, wranglers, etc., who are the equal of their class in any other part
of the Dominion and fully qualified and capable of taking care of any party.
Any legislation in favour of our resident outfitters and guides would, besides being ethical
and good business, be beneficial to the conservation of our game, as British Columbia guides
would readily realize that visits from new hunters and repeated visits from old hunters are
dependent on the supply of game, and it would be to their interests to conserve game of all
kinds.
Special Patrols.
In this Division it is practically impossible to single out or differentiate between patrols.
Here in the northern Division patrols that would seem of a special nature, were they undertaken in any other part of the Province, are matters of ordinary routine. However, I feel
justified in drawing your attention to the permanent patrols of the Fort Nelson and Finlay
Forks Detachments. These two detachments are fully equipped with river-boats, dog-teams,
etc., and the Game Wardens are more or less on permanent patrol.
The Game Warden in charge of Fort Nelson Detachment covered 3,000 miles during the
year in his ordinary routine of duty, and the Game Warden in charge of the Finlay Forks
Detachment covered a total of 4,674 miles during the same period.
In considering these figures it must be remembered that these miles represent actual
dog-team or river travel, to my mind a very commendable performance indeed.
Hunting Accidents.
Oscar Albrechtson, of Fort Grahame, B.C., was reported missing between January 15th
and February 12th, presumably drowned.    The body was not recovered.
Gustav Trap, of Fort Grahame, was accidentally drowned on September 11th in the
Finlay River and the body was not recovered.
John Widston, of Ocean Falls, B.C., was accidentally shot by Harold T. Clark, also of
Ocean Falls.    Widston recovered and H. T. Clark was prosecuted under the " Game Act."
Summary and General Remarks.
The first part of the year was very favourable to big-game and fur-bearing animals.
Many healthy calves and fawns were noticed during that period. It is hoped that the weather
conditions, which improved after this heavy snowfall, alleviated to some extent the hardships
suffered.
The wet spring of last year caused the loss of quite a number of young grouse. Second
broods were apparently hatched, the birds being from four to six weeks late coming out with
their young.    Sufficient numbers of birds remain to ensure proper propagation of the species.
During the year the Game Wardens co-operated with other departments, including the
Provincial Police, Forestry, Mounted Police, and C.N.R. Police, to the benefit of all concerned.
This spirit of friendly co-operation will be maintained to the highest possible degree, and
the kind assistance rendered this Department by officers and men of the above-mentioned
departments is worthy of commendation and is certainly much appreciated.
" E " DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND  FRASER VALLEY
DISTRICTS.)
Excerpts from reports of Game Wardens covering game conditions in " E " Division for
the year ended December 31st, 1934.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Excellent bags of deer were obtained in most portions of the Division during the
past hunting season, and from all reports deer are on the increase. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 21
Mountain-goat.—The Game Warden at Powell River reports a slight increase in these
animals in his district, and goat are also to be found in fair numbers in the Upper Pitt River
and Stave Lake areas.
Bear.—Black bear are plentiful throughout the Division and have been responsible for
a number of complaints of their doing damage to domestic stock. At the heads of the various
inlets along the coast grizzly bear are to be found in fair numbers.
Moose.—These animals are increasing in the Pemberton District, where they put in an
appearance a few years ago.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Some fair catches of beaver have been made in the Pemberton Valley and Skagit Districts,
but, taking the Division as a whole, beaver are not plentiful.
Mink, racoon, and marten have been taken in good numbers, and this also applies to
muskrats.
In the Lower Fraser Valley the Game Wardens have been doing their utmost to do away
with red fox, which have been doing considerable damage to game birds.
Upland Game Birds.
It is pleasing to report that during the past hunting season sportsmen have been able
to obtain better pheasant-shooting than in any previous year. The policy of the Department
in purchasing and putting down a greater number of birds each year has undoubtedly been
responsible for the betterment of shooting conditions.
In the spring considerable damage was done to pheasants in the Chilliwack and Sumas
areas, but through the co-operation of the Game Associations and farmers in these districts
in putting out feed a sufficient number of breeding birds were brought through this severe
weather.
Partridge apparently is not a suitable bird for the Lower Mainland, as there has been
no notable increase in this species over a period of years.
Some excellent blue-grouse shooting was obtained in many portions of the Division, and
ruffed grouse were also in fair numbers.
Migratory Game Birds.
Migratory game birds were more plentiful this season than in past years, and from
reports it would appear that there were a greater number of birds bred locally, and there
seemed to be an increase in the flight of northern birds.
Game Warden A. J. Butler caught and banded approximately 4,500 ducks during the
year on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, as compared with 3,900 in the previous year.
Messrs. A. L. Hager and G. C. Reifel also conducted extensive banding operations on their
respective properties at Pitt River and Westham Island.
There seems to be no decrease in the number of wood-ducks in the Lower Fraser Valley,
and although provided with an open season very few of these birds were shot, as apparently
these ducks migrated a day or two after the season opened.
Brant are to be found in large numbers at Boundary Bay and snow-geese are also quite
plentiful at the mouth of the Fraser River.
Wilson-snipe shooting also excellent throughout the Lower Mainland.
Band-tailed pigeons were not as plentiful as in past seasons, and very few complaints
were received from farmers as to damage by these birds in the spring.
A few swans were observed on Lulu and Sea Islands, at Pitt Lake, and on the McGillivray
Creek Game Reserve near Chilliwack.
Vermin.
Several cougar were killed in the Harrison Lake area, and coyotes were seen in odd
numbers in various portions of the Fraser Valley.
House-cats gone wild are undoubtedly the greatest menace to our game birds, and it is
of interest to note that these cats have been destroyed in wooded areas miles away from any
human habitation. R 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Wardens throughout the Division have been most active in the destruction of vermin
of all kinds, and the following is a summary of the vermin killed by these Game Wardens
during the year 1934:—
Red fox         9 Cougar          1
Crows  2,520 Owls       14
Cats     751 Dogs       26
Hawks        78 Eagles       17
Game-protection.
As in 1933, enforcement of the various Acts pertaining to game and game fish was
difficult, due to the unemployment situation.
All members of the Department throughout the Lower Mainland have been actively
engaged in regular patrol-work, not only during the open and close season, and this has
resulted in the laying of a number of informations for violations of the Game and Fisheries
Acts.    During the year 134 convictions were obtained in this Division.
The officers of the British Columbia Provincial Police have rendered valuable assistance
throughout the year in the enforcement of the Game and Fisheries Acts.
Game Propagation.
A greater number of pheasants were liberated on the Lower Mainland than in any year
heretofore, as will be noted on examining the statement of liberations shown on another page
of this report.
The wapiti released at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, in 1933 are increasing.
Game Reserves.
Throughout the Division the game reserves remain the same as in past seasons, although
a slight change was made in the boundaries of the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve near
Chilliwack.
Complaints have been received from residents in the North Vancouver Game Reserve
of damage done by black bear and deer, and every complaint has been promptly investigated.
Fur Trade.
While some fur-traders are still complaining about the royalties on the pelts of certain
fur-bearing animals, there has been no concerted complaint made in this connection. The
fur market has remained normal and the price of furs has been generally fair.
Fur-farming.
There are a number of fur-farms in this Division, but owing to the depression many
small fur-farmers have gone out of business, although the larger fur-farms still remain
active and apparently are operating on a sound basis.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division is working very smoothly, and there is no
doubt that as a result of these regulations the trappers are each year endeavouring to build
up a stand of fur on their respective trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few registered guides in this Division.
Special Patrols.
This Division is regularly patrolled, and a number of patrols have been made into remote
portions of the Division, with beneficial results.
Hunting Accidents.
Few accidents occurred in this Division during the year, as will be noted on examining
the statement covering hunting accidents appearing on another page of this report. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 23
Summary and General Game Conditions.
Game conditions throughout the Division have improved over last year. The records
indicate an increase in the sale of small-game hunting licences, due no doubt to a great extent
to the liberation of a larger number of pheasants in this Division.
The officers and men of " E " Division, British Columbia Provincial Police, and members
of the Game Associations have rendered every possible assistance in conserving the game of
this particular Division, and the Game Wardens have also done their utmost to assist the
members of the British Columbia Police wherever and whenever possible.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms and anglers' licences and game-tags  24
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident licences   25
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' licences and from royalty or tax on fur  26
Comparative statement showing pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has been
collected during the period 1921-34, inclusive   27
Statement showing particulars of various pelts on which royalty has been collected, 1934... 28
Bounties paid during year 1934   29
Comparative statement of bounties paid from 1922 to 1934   29
Total collections from fur trade, 1921-34  30
List of fur confiscated for infractions of " Game Act," 1934  30
List of firearms confiscated for infractions of " Game Act," 1934  31
Statement of vermin destroyed by Game Wardens, 1934  :  31
Statement of migratory birds banded, 1934  31
Summary of trout plantings by Game Department, 1934  32
Hunting accidents, 1934    33
Big-game trophy fees paid by non-resident hunters, 1934   34
Prosecutions, 1934  t  36
Revenue derived from export of game animals, etc., 1934  38
Revenue derived from sale of bird-bands re game-bird farming, 1934  39
Statement of game-bird liberations, 1934   40
List of guides, 1934   40
Comparative statistics, 1913-34, inclusive  42
Returns of trappers, 1933-34   42
Fur-farm returns, 1934 (Statements No. 1 and No. 2) .  43
Statement re game-bird farm returns, 1934  43
Personnel of Game Department, 1934   44 R 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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Ph P- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME  COMMISSION, 1934.
R 25
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-resident Licences, January 1st, 1934, to
December 31st, 1934.
Government
Agents.
General Firearms and
Anglers'
Licences.
Bear, Deer, and
Anglers'
Licences.
Weekly Bird
Licences.
Daily
Anglers'
Licences.
Season
Anglers'
Licences.
Total.
No.  1 Amount.
1
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
8
4
1
1
2
7
30
14
12
4
3
1
29
6
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
5
11
1
2
1
2
13
6
$25.00
2
4
36
13
38
12
45
192
21
305
2
13
55
11
4
68
9
39
13
47
40
71
10
25
6
10
4
2
6
6
14
32
8
20
1
7
$54.00
20.00
47.00
16.00
48.00
249.00
28.00
376.00
4.00
20.00
66.00
15.00
4.00
115.00
9.00
56.00
22.00
80.00
48.00
92.00
11.00
9
1
1
13
4
2
2
3
9
1
7
1
14
2
3
1
8
1
46
3
25
$90.00
$169.00
20 00
Atlin -	
47.00
10.00
10.00
130.00
40.00
20.00
20.00
26 00
$500.00
379.00
68.00
200.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
75.00
646 00
149.00
95.00
116.00
30.00
120.00
4.00
100.00
$10.00
90.00
10.00
70.00
10.00
140.00
20.00
30.00
10.00
315.00
19.00
25.00
151.00
32.00
125.00
345.00
350.00
1,600.00
418.00
275.00
1,997.00
21.00
1,150.00
25.00
1,175.00
37.00
7.00
15.00
6.00
2.00
13.00
7.00
16.00
80.00
117.00
1,000.00
50.00
1,057.00
10.00
25.00
6.00
250.00
25.00
277.00
13.00
7.00
50.00
66.00
300.00
50.00
2,050.00
300.00
50.00
Vancouver	
325.00
20.00
95.00
8.00
33.00
4.00
10.00
460.00
30.00
250.00
2,950.00
38.00
300.00
50.00
250.00
150.00
733.00
54.00
260.00
Totals
127
$8,300.00
52
$1,320.00
6
$30.00
1,195
$1,633.00
156
$1,560.00
$12,843.00 R 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Pur-traders' Licences and from Royalty or Tax
on Fur, January 1st, 1934, to December 31st, 1934.
Resident
Fur-traders.
Non-resident
Fur-traders.
Royalty or Tax
on Fur.
TAXmERMISTS'
Licences.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
5
1
2
1
21
4
3
1
29
11
7
7
9
45
1
3
16
$125.00
1
6
4
24
1
29
1
22
12
117
14
2
\zi
1
6
31
8
30
14
2
227
87
72
8
15
1
3
4
27
14
485
4
48
8
5
$79.60
17.00
254.14
12.27
120.88
.40
91.09
90.23
1,286.17
182.12
2.00
208.46
2.00
78.87
120.94
2.70
199.20
32.46
2.40
7,457.21
982.46
2,310.43
27.40
261.41
44.76
6.65
30.70
638.69
506.41
27,412.71
8.65
185.45
14.97
26.96
1
1
1
3
1
4
$204.60
17.00
Atlin                           	
25.00
50.00
25.00
279.14
62.27
$5.00
150.88
.40
91.09
525.00
5.00
95.26
1,811.17
Golden                         	
182.12
2.00
100.00
308.46
2.00
78.87
120.94
2.70
75.00
274.20
32.46
25.00
725.00
275.00
175.00
27.40
8,182.21
5.00
1,262.46
2,485.43
27.40
175.00
436.41
44.75
6.65
30.70
225.00
863.69
506.41
Vancouver	
1,125.00
25.00
76.00
400.00
$200.00
15.00
5.00
20.00
28,752.71
38.65
414.97
26.96
Totals	
166
$4,150.00
1
$200.00
1,346
$42,697.81
11
$55.00
$47,102.81 —
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 27
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C R 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Particulars of Various Pelts on which Royalty has been paid, January 1st, 1934, to
December 31st, 1934.
Number and Kind of Pelts
on  which Royalty has been
PAID.
Government
Agents.
co
H
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33
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2
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5
2
13
3
4
1
1
1
39
6
3
3
2
139
26
1
76
48
24
276
59
79
2
7
34
2,455
249
603
76
2
209
148
6,477
2
2
32
3
41
18
13
5
27
3
565
1
139
101
9
113
11
100
575
40
77
31
35
30
4
84
5
21
8
1,167
40
160
18
1
1
5
65
1
1
468
33
37
20
9
20
7
577
3
1
8
2
5
69
1
717
59
19
26
1
13
7
604
1
75
6
21
2
128
21
19
2
32
6
5
8
1
2,048
4
26
2
9
2
7
1,352
66
5
2
35
160
40
2
84
1
17
1,037
147
463
25
44
4
177
303
7,116
6
13
228
17
193
6
22
39
1,092
19
14
17
21
167
204
8
941
503
3,049
55
3
11
1
226
60
14,229
3
260
19
1
16
21
1
1
1
16
2
22
9
156
5
4
1
518
13
18
30
2,344
27
9
1
3
21
2
43
22
9
14
438
158
9
86
8
37
1,179
44
360
25
24
77
5,292
3,141
871
269
40
1,124
132
30,371
22
5
285
7
13
15
1
320
21
74
3
15
14
Atlin	
563
6
502
8
23
227
4,783
1,332
371
1
35
29
Nelson 	
2,008
1
Pouce Coupe	
Prince George.	
Prince Rupert   	
10,134
3,711
2,531
15
4
19
1,050
Rossland _ 	
38
1
916
133
98,507
5
Telegraph Creek-
5
Victoria 	
Williams Lake
182
12
1
Totals—	
254
10,826
709
2,769
1,249
1,532
232
3,543
9,747
21,408
127,111
770
2,419
562
1
43,666
476
207 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 29
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1934.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Total.
3
1
9
7
11
1
21
40
7
87
29
4
1
120
6
206
59
1
2
16
5
1
3
20
7
2
8
3
1
2
2
5
62
8
18
11
4
$15.00
1,205.00
60.00
2,105.00
590.00
10.00
55.00
Golden  ...    .   	
160.00
50.00
10.00
30.00
200.00
70.00
20.00
55.00
85.00
135.00
210.00
20.00
20.00
85.00
435.00
765.00
80.00
180.00
130.00
45.00
Totals    .                 	
221
572
$6,825.00
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922 to 1934.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922  	
1923                                    	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924     - '
172
20,398.40
1925                                    	
24,397.00
1926                                     	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927           	
2,487
65,377.95
1928                                     	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929                                 	
42,122.00
1930                                      	
36,090.25
1931                                    	
3,427
42,036.15
1932
80.00
1933                                      	
6,285.00
1934                                    	
6,825.00
Totals              	
3,338
4,806
59,453
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$410,732.80 R 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921-34.
Calendar Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-trade
Licences.
Total.
1921   	
1922                 	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
1923.                                   	
67,524.18
1924                               	
62,446.68
1925 _.... ' 	
1926                      	
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927   	
71,324.96
1928- .     .                               	
58,823.07
1929                                          	
47,329.89
1930   	
1931                                        	
45,161.11
45,981.08
1932  	
1933                                            	
40,363.79
44,167.48
1934                                        	
47,102.81
Totals..   - —
$651,417.65
$85,880.00
$737,297.65
List of Fur confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st, 1934, to December 31st, 1934.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Jan. 27.
30
31
Feb.     22
March 3
8
10
12
13
13
1G
April 4
20
May     16
June 8
11
21
July 5
25
Oct.        6
Nov. 28
28
29
Dec. 3
6.
11
11
11.
27
April   10
Bush, Joseph—
McNab, H. C	
Crysler, R -
Hopkins, H	
Savage, John	
Hedricks, S	
Haller, Edward..
Oien, Thomas—
Bodey, H	
Devitt, G	
Brotherton, John..
Holman, Albert—
Lougheed, G. A.„.
Pound, W. C	
Thibart,   Charlie...
Holland, J.__.	
Godfrey, Charles....
Joseph, George	
Basil, "William	
Gray, Louis	
George, Frank..- _..
Hill, F 	
Poohachoof, P	
Shaw, David, et al—
Reid, Joseph H	
Seymour, Thomas P..
Sam, Justa 	
Sagalon, Pierre.	
Lazard, Felix	
(Unknown)	
Totals .
Powell River..
Waldo—-..	
Cranbrook 	
Nanaimo	
Kamloops	
Hutton	
Clinton	
Alert Bay ....
Cloverdale	
Cloverdale	
Burns Lake~
Westholme-.
Burns Lake	
Vernon 	
Telegraph Creek.
Telkwa __
Parksville _
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
Courtenay	
Vanderhoof	
Miocene.	
Nelson	
Kitimat	
Kamloops __...
Fort St. James...
Fort St. James-
Fort St. James ..
Oliver 	
Penticton	
5
1
7
9
	
10
3
4
15
1
1
3
1
6
8
2
1
27
1    |    28    |    22
I I
91
I I
3     |     10
I REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 31
List of Firearms confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st, 1934,
to December 31st, 1934.
Date of
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Kind of Firearms
confiscated.
tion.
Rifles.
Shotguns.
Jan.        24
Arola, Mat   _  ,„	
Moen, Clayton A -  	
Weeks, Russell  _	
Campbell River	
1
1
1
1
July       10
„          28
Garrett _
Port Coquitlam. 	
Totals    -	
2
2
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of confiscated and surrendered fur and firearms under the " Game Act ■
during the calendar year 1934 amounted to $268.66.
Statement of Predatory Animals and Vermin killed by Game Wardens, 1934.
Fox          9 Dogs  93
Cougars      38 Hawks  458
Coyotes    133 Eagles  118
Wolves        1 Magpies  1,392
Crows  ; 4,522 Bear  5
Owls     238 Groundhogs   99
Cats 1,191 Ravens   120
Statement of Migratory Game Birds banded by Members of the
Game Department, 1934.
Mallards   3,545 Baldpates  	
Green-wing teal      381 Wood-duck	
Pintails      197
60
1 R 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Fish Culture Branch—Summary of Plantings for the Year 1934.
Plantings,
River or Lake.
Cutthroat
Trout.
Brown
Trout.
Kamloops
Trout.
Steelhead.
District and Area.
Finger-
lings,
No. 3.
Finger-
lings,
No. 3.
Finger-
lings,
No. 'i.
Yearlings.
Finger-
lings,
No. 2.
Yearlings.
Total.
Vancouver Island—
Qualicum-  	
Little Qualicum River	
37,375
37,375
18,000
2,000
7,000
3,000
4,000
2,000
1,000
3,000
20,000
38,000
20,000
38,000
21,000
18,000
Sutton Creek .,	
McLean Creek 	
Docherty Creek	
2,000
7,000
3,000
4,000
Wolfe Creek
2,000
Wolfe Lake
1,000
3,000
20,000
38,000
20,000
Shawnigan Lake	
38,000
21,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
4,800
Lower Mainland—
4,800
3,400
4,800
3,400
Nicomekl River	
Seymour Creek —	
4,800
13,200
13,200
6,900
6,900
Stave Falls — ■
19,850
19,850
5,000
Deer Lake	
5,000
5,000
1,300
5,000
5,000
1,300
5,000
2,250
Kakawa Lake -	
2,250
2,975
2,975
10,500
10,500
Totals-
13,000
37,375
193,300
33,050
10,500
18,125
305,350
The following fish are being held for liberation in the spring of 1935:-
Qualicum Retaining-ponds, Qualicum Beach,
Brown trout 	
Stanley Park Hatchery, Vancouver—
Cut-throat trout	
Kamloops trout	
Steelhead trout	
Veitch Creek Hatchery, Sooke, V.I.—
Kamloops trout	
Steelhead trout	
V.I.-
80,000
65,000
20,000
55,000
4,500
20,000 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 33
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o fe o I? o R 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-residents, January 1st, 1934, to
December 31st, 1934.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Barkerville—
McDuffie, Malcolm, Pasadena, Cal	
Williams, Herbert, Pasadena, Cal	
Clinton—
Hills, Fred A., Jasper, Oregon	
Cranbrook—
Pope, J. W., Fort Lauderdale, Florida-
Pope, J. A., Fort Lauderdale, Florida-
Gilbert, A. C, New Haven, Conn „
Donner, Capt. P., London, England 	
Pilcher, Mrs. H., London, England ~	
Cumberland—
Fox, Win., Mount Vernon, Wash 	
Fernie—
Mould, Capt. C. L., India	
Kettering, O. L., et al., Greensburg, Pa	
Fort Fraser—
Seifert, H. K., Seattle, Wash 	
Philipp, Julius, Sacramento, Cal—
Loring, Dr. J. H., Burlingame, Cal—
Golden—
Chanler, W., New York, N.Y	
Grand Forks—
Berry, Frank, Yakima, Wash—	
Greenwood—
Bauer, Eddie, Seattle, Wash—. 	
Klemburg, L., Seattle, Wash _	
Dills, L. H., Yakima, Wash	
Dills, H. H., Yakima, Wash	
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash	
Nanaimo—
Rouse, H. C, Seattle, Wash..	
Kern, E. H., Seattle, Wash	
Hahn, E. H., Seattle, Wash	
Hahn, E. A., Seattle, Wash I	
New Westminster—
Day, W. F., Seattle, Wash.. 	
Fox, W. L., Mount Vernon, Wash 	
Fowler, G. W., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Hollingsworth, O. R., Bellingham, Wash...
Walker, L. B., Seattle, Wash	
Burke, Victor, Pullman, Wash	
Eba, Earl, Seattle, Wash  .._	
Aubert, C, Bellingham, Wash	
Markham, J., Centralia, Wash	
Penticton—
Lanedis, Nick, Seattle, Wash	
Bauer, Mrs. E., Seattle, Wash	
Pouce Coupe—
Lawrence, A. A., Topsfield, Mass..
Ladd, Wm., Milton, Mass. 	
Fiksdal, J. R., Webster, S.D	
Shearer, M., Rifle, Col	
Goodwin, George, New York, N.Y	
Prince George—
Towne, G. Scott, Saratoga Springs, N.Y—
Kerr, Edward, Downington, Pa 	
Species.
3 ?
^  0
a Z
0) o
2 ....
1 ....
1 _..
2 ....
3
1
1
'        1
sS
Amount.
isS
$30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
75.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
60.00
30.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 35
Big-game Trophy Fees paid by Non-kesidents, January 1st, 1934, to
December 31st, 1934—-Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
4J fa
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XI
CO
AM
Amount.
Quesnel—
Sacks, Helen E., Downey, Cal	
Vancouver-—
Hughes, E., Seattle, Wash ,   _ —
Bates, D. H„ Portland, Ore._ _ -	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
i
i
i
1
1
l
l
3
1
1
i
i
$15.00
15.00
30.00
60.00
Blair, 0. L., Redmond, Wash	
25.00
15.00
30.00
Rice, Clarence, Hanford, Cal 	
Wright, Lloyd, et al., Beverley Hills, Cal	
45.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
Victoria—
Bull, Mrs. L., Seattle, Wash  _	
Williams Lake—
Driskell, C. C, Hanford, Cal , 	
5.00
45.00
Rice, G. E., Rudley, Cal	
15.00
Lacey, H. E., Hanford, Cal   	
30.00
15.00
15.00
Hockwalt,  E.  B.,  Edmonds,  Wash	
Windermere—■
Wolfe, C. Dale, Wewoka, Okla .._  	
Greenwood, H. S., Ashville, N.C	
15.00
60.00
30.00
Totals     	
12
7
6
14
15  1    7
29
,.
9
$1,485.00 R 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1934, to December 31st, 1934.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
3  P
: Q
0>
: Q
p >
s P
:  P
Fine or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Game on premises of a boarding-house, etc	
Hunting game between one hour after sunset and one hour before
sunrise _ -  	
Killing or having in possession game animals of the female sex.	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game animals during close
season   	
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season —
Possession of untagged deer   	
Running deer with dogs    	
Removal of evidence as to sex of a game animal killed or taken..
Selling or buying game animals or parts thereof 	
Trapping or snaring big game  	
Using poison for the taking of game animals — 	
Failing to report killing of game animals doing damage to private
land -     _ _  	
Taking or killing a deer while swimming ._  	
Game Birds.
Hunting or in  possession  of migratory game birds  during  close
season   ___.
Hunting migratory game birds between one hour after sunset and
one hour before sunrise  	
Hunting, killing, or having in possession upland game birds during
close season  	
Selling or buying game birds  	
Trapping game birds.      	
Killing or hunting game birds in game reserve or bird sanctuary	
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds between April 15th and August
15th-  _	
Hunting game birds on cultivated land with an automobile 	
Having game birds on premises of boarding-house, etc	
Trapping.
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence..
Trapping during close season	
Trapping without first registering a trap-line .
Trapping on a game reserve	
Using meat of game as bait for trapping	
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence...
Buying or trading in furs without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult
holder of a licence _ _	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Non-resident angling or carrying fishing-tackle without a licence _
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an automobile or other vehicle	
Carrying or in possession of an unplugged pump-shotgun or an
automatic shotgun —  	
Carrying firearms or traps within a game reserve-
17
15
4
3
1
2
39
11
$30.00
495.00
115.00
440.00
80.00
40.00
20.00
25.00
10.00
25.00
85.00
20.00
235.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
20.00
10.00
100.00
140.00
160.00
195.00
10.00
10.00
20.00
280.00
300.00
660.00
100.00
20.00
50.00
106.00
55.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 37
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1934, to December 31st, 1934-
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
: P
Firearms—Continued.
Discharging firearms on or across a highway in a municipality	
Carrying firearms in automobiles, etc., during close season on game
without a permit —   	
Miscellaneous.
Exporting pelts of fur-bearing animals without a permit.	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to a Game Warden or
Constable     	
Trespassing   _	
Possession of deer-tags belonging to another person 	
Fur-trader not keeping proper record-book   —
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding daily bag limit on fish —  —	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited area 	
Fishing or in possession of fish during close season..
Jigging, using set-lines, or shooting fish— —
Netting fish illegally    —	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length— 	
Indians taking salmon other than for own use as food..
Using artificial lights in taking fish. _ 	
Gaol Sentences.
Angling in non-tidal waters without a licence _. 	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during close season	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game animals of the female
sex or during close season- — _	
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an automobile, etc   __ __   	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence    	
Non-resident angling without a licence   	
Trapping without a licence __  	
Carrying firearms without a licence.  	
Possession of untagged deer   _ 	
Making false application for a licence .  _	
Possession of pump-shotgun not permanently plugged or automatic
shotguns.—   — - _— _., — _
Trapping on registered trap-line of another  	
Selling game animals or birds illegally   	
Using another person's  licence  or allowing licence to  be used by
another.-       — — _
Fishing during close season or in prohibited waters _	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of game birds during close season
Discharging firearms on or across a travelled highway in a municipality     — - 	
Trapping during the close season.. __	
Totals —  	
5   P
!    VI
: a
: a
113
w >
-. a
23
Fine or
Penalties
imposed.
477
$52.50
20.00
10.00
95.00
120.00
10.00
60.00
65.00
30.00
45.00
4.00
7.00
67.00
10.00
4.00
$5,227.82
Note..—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and Boundary
areas. " C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division: Atlin, Skeena.
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas.    Gaol sentences ranged from one to ninety days. R 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Export of Game Animals, etc., 1934.
Date.
Jan.
Feb.
March
May
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Macomber, O. K..
Clarke, A. K	
Kelly, T	
Walback, A	
Baker, P. B —
Montrose, C. W.Faulkner, J....	
Clark, G	
Welsh, P	
Hager, R. L-
Langlois, P...
Wardlaw, J..
Railway Express Agency..
Norris, J. L  	
Wright, Lloyd „
Dixon, James 	
Barton, Dr. J. F  	
Total —	
Address.
Particulars.
Amount.
Seattle, Wash-
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Needles .	
Burnaby...	
Gibsons Landing-
Powell River	
New York...
Vancouver..
North Vancouver-
Vancouver	
Longview, Wash—
Beverley Hills, Cal.
goat-head (gift)	
moose-heads (gift)	
deer-head (gift)	
set deer-horns (gift).
live marten	
grizzly-bear hide (gift)	
deer-heads, 3  goat-heads,  3 bear-hides
(gifts) —	
sets moose-horns (gifts) 	
sets deer-horns (gifts) 	
moose-head (gift)  -	
moose-head (gift) 	
set moose-horns (gift) 	
deer-head (gift)  	
goat-skin (gift)   	
bear-hide (gift) _  	
bear-hide (gift)	
goat-skin (gift) _	
$1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
30.00
1.00
8.00
4.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
$59.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 39
Revenue derived from Sale of Game-bird Bands to Game-bird Farmers, 1934.
Date
issued.
Name of Game-bird Farmer.
Address.
Band Nos.
Amount.
Jan.
March
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Shurie, R. M	
Esworthy, Jack..
Freer, J. K,_	
Caine, T. K._	
Sleeth, T. E _
Shurie, R. M	
Foster, James ._
Downing, T. W._
Rochon. F 	
Downing, T. W	
Edmondson, H. E...
Shurie, R. M	
Smythe, H. E. R	
Mundy, Stanley	
Esworthy, Jack	
Miles, H. A 	
Barge, C. E	
Stroulger, Mrs. A. E.
Normoyle, W	
Delong, G. T	
Clay, H. L	
Mundy, R 	
Graham, W. C	
Esworthy, Jack	
Hall,E._	
Fawdry, Mrs. M. E..
Trott, Win -	
Gilmour, H	
Adair, W. J	
Lang, J. L 	
Tucker, W	
Plant, A.	
Frey, L. R.
Wooley, M. J—
Greenall, John.
McEwan, Thomas	
Greenshields, J. S	
Brunt, Thomas	
Sanderson, S.	
Esworthy, Jack	
VanValkenburg, S. J	
Greenslade, T—	
Neaves, C. A	
Downing, T. W	
Ilott, J. J 	
Wiegand, Miss E.—	
Petts, W. L 	
Stroulger, Mrs. A. E	
Wilde, J. E -	
Hitch, A. A 	
Trott, Wm 	
Gunn, Grant	
Downing, T. W-.	
Odin, G. F	
Roberts, C  	
407 bands at 10 cents
Pitt Meadows	
Vancouver..-.	
Victoria  —
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Pitt Meadows	
Coombs —	
Cloverdale	
Capilano P.0	
Cloverdale-—	
Sardis	
Pitt Meadows	
Revelstoke	
Clayburn —	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
White Rock	
Duncan 	
Burnaby	
Gahriola Island	
Eburne.—	
Mats qui	
Kamloops	
Vancouver	
Nanaimo -	
Cobble Hill	
Duncan-—	
Wellington.-	
New Westminster.
Victoria	
Kelowna —	
Vancouver.	
Lynn Creek P.O....
Lulu Island	
New Westminster.
Comox	
Burnaby.—	
Nanaimo 	
Parksville	
Vancouver	
Cobble Hill	
Vancouver	
Royal Oak, V.I...
Cloverdale	
Victoria 	
Vancouver	
Steveston	
Duncan.—	
Powell River..
Hatzic—	
Vancouver -
Cloverdale —	
New Westminster-
Vancouver	
4022-4025
4026-4027
4028-4042
4043-4046
4047-4050
4051-4055
4056-4060
4061-4065
4066-4067
4068-4077
4078-4082
4083-4086
4087-4116
4117-4133
4134
4135-4137
4138-4141
4142-4154
4155-4157
4158-4167
4168-4175
4176-4185
4T8S-4195
4196
4197-4198
4199-4213
4214-4223
4224-4228
4229-4230
4231-4232
4233-4262
4263-4285
4286-4288
4299-4300
4289-4298
4301-4307
4308-4312
4313-4319
4320-4322
4323-4326
4327-4330
4331-4338
4339-4345
4348-4351
4352-4354
4355-4364
4365-4370
4371-4380
4381-4385
4386-4395
4396-4400
4401-4410
4411-4415
4416-4421
4422-4424
4425-4428
$0.40
.20
1.50
.40
.40
.50
.50
.50
.20
1.00
.50
.40
3.00
1.70
.10
.30
.40
1.30
.30
1.00
.80
1.00
1.00
.10
.20
1.50
1.00
.50
.20
.20
3.00
2.30
.30
.20
1.70
.50
.70
.30
.40
.40
.80
.70
.60
.30
1.00
.60
1.00
.50
1.00
.50
1.00
.50
.60
.30
.40
$40.70 R 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Liberation of Game Birds, 1934.
Vancouver Island.
Lower Mainland.
Interior.
District.
No. of
Pheasants.
District.
No. of
Pheasants.
District.
No. of
Pheasants.
421
325
130
149
43
98
.    78
18
30
730
271
592
589
638
158
308
61
636
340
34
116
41
36
Bonaparte 	
24
25
Squamish and North Vancou-
48
24
18
Summerland    	
20
20
20
Penticton     ._	
36
20
12
12
12
6
Totals- 	
1,292
4,357
490
Vancouver Island, 1,292 ;   Lower Mainland, 4,357 ;   Interior, 490 ;   total liberations, 6,139.
Note.—Due to the closing of the Elk Lake Game Farm and the policy of purchasing pheasants from game-bird
farmers throughout the Province, difficulty was encountered in apportioning correct number of birds for each district, but steps will be taken to remedy this condition in 1935.
List of Guides, 1934.
Barkerville District.
Cochrane, J. D.
Riviere, G. F._	
Barkerville.
.Barkerville.
Thomson, W. E..
.Barkerville.
Peterson, Morris
Bidstrup, H.
Brammer, C.
Cameron, A. L.
Daniels, G. A.  .
Decker, English
Gaspard, E. 	
Hansen, R. L. ...
Hooker, F. C.	
Hooker, S. B. ....
McKort, C.
Boundary District.
Westbridge. Peterson, S. G Westbridge.
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts.
..Likely. Manson, W. M Lillooet.
.Likely. Peters, Machel Clinton.
.Ashcroft. Pinkham, H. Canim Lake.
..Canim Lake. Prest, Thos.  70-Mile House.
..Canim Lake. Rioux, Ed.  Roe Lake.
..Williams Lake. Tibbies, Fred Quesnel.
..Bridge Lake. Turney, William  Fawn.
..Horsefly. Walters, Glen Horsefly.
.Horsefly. Walters, Lloyd Horsefly.
..Alexandria.
Lawson, Fred
Cassiar District.
.Big Horn, Atlin.
Coast District.
Stanton, J. R.
.Glendale Cove. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 41
Fort George District.
Chesser, Chas.
.Mount Robson.
Colebank, G. F.  Strathnaver.
Corke, Ben  Port Grahame.
Gerlach, Louis  Fort Grahame.
Hargreaves, G. E. Valemount.
Hargreaves, R. S.  Valemount.
Holdcroft, J. E. Legrande.
Hooker, E. G. Dome Creek.
Hooker, J. B.   .Dome Creek.
Lebeck, Ole Tete Jaune.
McKenzie, H.  Mount Robson.
Smith, J. M. Snowshoe.
Hazelton District.
Beirnes, G. M...
Hardy, Sam 	
.Hazelton.
.Ootsa Lake.
.Ootsa Lake.
Holland, Julian  Telkwa.
Houston, Tommy Houston.
Jack, Tommy	
Mobley, Chas.
McNeill, J. W	
Morgan, J. E. Ootsa Lake.
Widen, Emil Telkwa.
Woods, L. N. W.  Wistaria.
 Hazelton.
Kamloops District.
Salmon Arm.
Kootenay District.
Appleby, G. Duncan.
Ashman, Levi  Akinuna Creek.
Baker, M. C Natal.
Baker, M.  Natal.
Barnes, J. N.  Corbin.
Bowen, W.  Natal.
Butwell, F. H.  McMurdo.
Eberts, Max Natal.
Garrie, Methin Grasmere.
Hellman, Oscar E. Wardner.
Jones, R. K. Forde.
Kain, I.  Wilmer.
McGinnis, E. E Natal.
Moore, J. S.  Wardner.
Nicol, A. H.  Fort Steele.
Nixon, J. H. Invermere.
Philipps, F. A 120 Fifth Ave. W.,
North Vancouver.
Pommier, Emil Skookumchuck.
Tegart, R. Windermere.
Turnor, Madeline  Skookumchuck.
White, Jas. F.  Fort Steele.
Wiedenman, 0. W.  Leanchoil.
Peace River District.
Beattie, R. Hudson Hope.
Calliou, Joe.  East Pine.
Calliou, P. Little Prairie.
Calliou, John  Kelly Lake.
Carter, William  Hudson Hope.
Garbitt, T.  Hudson Hope.
Dawson Creek.
Gibson, H. B.	
Lamont, Al.  East Pine.
Ross, J. A.  Hudson Hope.
Thomas, J. N Arras.
Wanyandie, P. Kelly Lake. R 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Comparative Statistics.
Prosecutions.
Revenue
derived from
Sale of Game
Licences, Fees,
and Furs.
Calendar
Year.
Informations laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,673.50
4,768.00
6,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
1914    	
1915 _	
1916	
1917 - 	
1918     --
	
1919  	
1920  	
1921 - 	
1922 	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
1923 	
1924 	
1925 	
1926 	
1927  	
1928 	
1929 -   -.
1930-	
1931 -
1932	
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
1933	
1934 .. 	
44,167.48
47,102.81
Returns from 1,780 Holders of Traders' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1933-34.
Big Game.
._ 543
Bear 	
Caribou      84
Deer    887
Goat    126
Moose .
Sheep -
Wapiti
460
8
5
Fur-bearing Animals.
Badger   1
Beaver    4,907
Fisher       331
Fox   1,159
Lynx       951
Marten   5,305
Mink    6,207
Muskrats  54,228
Otter         188
Racoon       208
Skunk   95
Weasel  27,248
Wildcat   19
Wolverine         106
Predatory Animals.
Cougar
60
Wolves
45
Coyotes   1,058 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934.
R 43
Fur-farm Returns, 1934 (Statement No. 1).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died.
Killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1934.
Foxes	
3,525
15
4,961
2,117
550
2,662
23
4,150
585
88
4
186
104
3,392
81
3,365
Muskrats	
8,324
Cancelled permits, 39 ;   Nil returns, 14;   no returns received, 33.    The figures in respect to. muskrats are only-
approximate.
Fur-farm Returns, 1934 (Statement No. 2).
Kind of Animals.
Reared.
Died or
killed.
Sold.
Total on Hand
as at Dec. 31st,
1934.
77
15
7
7
12
22
1
299
52
22
1
Cancelled permits, 7;   Nil returns,  2;   no returns received,  29.    The figures in respect of beaver  are only
approximate.
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1934.
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 193U-
Pheasants
Quail 	
1,314
26
Ducks
Geese
Number and Kind of Birds raised, 193U.
Pheasants
Quail 	
Ducks 	
2,793
2
133
Geese _
Grouse
Number and Kind of Birds purchased, 193U-
Pheasants
Pheasants
Quail 	
92
10
86
Number and Kind of Birds sold, 193 U.
  2,296 Ducks 	
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 193U-
Pheasants  1  1,542 Geese 	
Quail        10 Grouse 	
Ducks       83      ■
104
15
1
Note.—During the year 1934 there were 161 licensed game-bird farmers in the Province,
but during the year forty-five of these farmers discontinued operations. R 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1934.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General   (Minister) Gordon McG. Sloan, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission  (members) Jas. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
F. R. Butler Vancouver.
A. G. Bolton Vancouver.
Clerk R.  P.  Ponder Vancouver.
Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Clerk G. E. Marshall Vancouver.
Stenographer : Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Kelly Vancouver.
Fish Cultural Branch.
Fishery Officer C. 0. Mellor Vancouver.
Fishery Officer E. W. Baker Vancouver.
Fishery Officer J. D. Inverarity Sooke.
Fishery Officer  (Special) S. E. Deno Qualicum Beach.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Game Warden R. Marshall Duncan.
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden 0. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden B. Cash Victoria.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Lake Cowichan.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Royal Oak, V.I.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Thompson Nanaimo.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Sub-Inspector —C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Stenographer Miss G. M. Lowery Nelson.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Canal Flats.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson Penticton.
Game Warden L. F. Washburn Fernie.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden M. B. Ewart Revelstoke.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Greenwood.
Game Warden W. H. Cartwright . Creston.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Sub-Inspector R. M. Robertson : Kamloops.
Stenographer Miss H. M. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden R. W. MacMartin Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden F. E. Aiken Nicola.
Game Warden W. 0. Quesnel Clinton.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
Game Warden W. A. Broughton . Alexis Creek.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Quesnel.
Game Warden F. D. Kibbee Barkerville. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1934. R 45
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon
Boundary Districts).
Inspector T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden S. G. Copeland Prince George.
Game Warden W. L. Forrester Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game Warden D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Stenographer ..Miss H. Walker Prince Rupert.
Game Warden J. S. Clark..,. Fort Nelson.
Game Warden   (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden S. F. Faherty Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden . G. M. Kerkhoff Fort St. John.
Game Warden . V. L. Williams Finlay Forks.
Game Warden L.-_ P. Brown Vanderhoof.
" E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Game Warden W. Clark Vancouver.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Game Warden T. D. Sutherland Sechelt.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden G. Williams Abbotsford.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden L. H. Walker South Pender Isl.
Game Warden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
J.  C.  Smith Comox. C.   Shuttleworth Kamloops.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Trinted by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.
825-1235-6518   

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