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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1936]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECEETAEY
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
FISCAL YEAE ENDED MAECH 31ST, 1935
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1935.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. DR. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM HEADQUARTERS STAFF.
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent. H. Jefferis, Bursar.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant Medical Superintendent.
H. A. Jones, M.D., Physician. A. Hakstian, M.B., Physician.
G. F. Kincade, M.D., Physician.
F. Parslow, Laboratory Technician.
Miss B. Bibby, Matron. Miss L. Wright, Dietitian.
Miss M. Haycroft, Stenographer. Miss I. Cover, Occupational Therapist.
R. L. Davis, Farm Manager.
Miss D. Creech, Book-keeper (Farm). A. N. Low, Steward.
J. Trevors, Laundry Manager. J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
Dr. E. D. McLaren, Chaplain.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS.
J. MATHIESON, Clerk of Works. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1935.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present herewith the Fourteenth Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the year April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935.
Owing to the large number of advanced cases, not suitable for active treatment, in residence, it has not been possible to show any greater number treated than during the previous
year. The percentage applying for admission in the far-advanced stages remains exceedingly
high.    This will continue until a much more active case-finding campaign is instituted.
Present indications are that we may get a Province-wide organization functioning in the
near future, with resulting co-ordination of all anti-tuberculous work under one direction.
At the departmental conference held in Vancouver in November last, tuberculosis was
given a very prominent place in the discussions and the feeling seemed to be that special efforts
should be made to launch a more active campaign during the coming year.
The Sanatorium has done its best under existing conditions, but it could benefit many more
people if the clinic and social-service work was adequate.
Although the number treated was the same, the work of the medical staff was increased
on account of a greater number of special treatments being given, and also through a freer
use of our clinic facilities.
The surgical treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis was carried out to a considerably greater
extent than in previous years. Fewer cases were treated by phrenicotomy, or interruption
of the phrenic nerve.    I think this is true of all treatment centres.
The writer visited most of the larger treatment centres in Canada, and some in the United
States, during the year reported on. The object of these visits was to study particularly their
methods of surgical treatment. The Assistant Superintendent was sent on a similar tour of
the Western States for the same purpose.
During the past year the major surgical procedure known as thorocoplasty was performed
on eleven patients. There were two deaths, three much improved, and six good results.
Phrenicotomy was performed on nine patients.
The following table shows the amount of pneumothorax work performed on in-patients,
and in addition several out-patients were coming in regularly for this treatment:—
Number of Cases receiving Pneumothorax Treatment, Fiscal Year,
April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935.
Month. Total Cases. Bi-laterals.
April      109 17
May      111 15
June      108 15
July      111 16
August     106 15
September      107 17
October      110 16
November     107 15
December    106 14
January      107 17
February     101 15
March .     102 15
The affiliation with the nurses' training-schools appears to be continuing satisfactorily.
Sixty-five students received diplomas during the past year.    Since our classes first began in
February, 1931, there have been 268 student-nurses complete the course. They represented
the various training-schools as follows:— Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vancouver General Hospital  68
Kootenay Lake General Hospital, Nelson  28
St. Eugene, Cranbrook  23
Kelowna General, Kelowna  11
Royal Inland, Kamloops  10
St. Paul's, Vancouver *  59
Prince Rupert  25
Revelstoke  17
Royal Jubilee, Victoria  10
Royal Columbian, New Westminster  8
Duncan Hospital, Duncan  5
St. Joseph's, Victoria  4
Total  268
An important event during the past year was the reopening of the Occupational Therapy
Department. This is proving a valuable aid in treatment, in providing diversional occupation
for a large percentage of our patients. Many intend to continue the crafts learned here, when
they return home, as they have found a ready market for their products. This is particularly
the case with those who have specialized in the various forms of leather-work. A detailed
report of the work done is contained in the report of the Occupational Therapist.
For some years I have advocated the employment of a teacher to work in conjunction with
the Correspondence Branch of the Department of Education. Both elementary and advanced
subjects are available, and many patients would prefer studies to handicrafts. In addition to
providing a form of occupational therapy, these studies would make patients better fitted to
take their place in the world after their discharge from the Sanatorium. Prospects of this
service being provided during the coming year are bright.
The Sanatorium library is an important part of the institution, and is ably handled by
Mr. J. G. Simmonds, who takes the library to the wards on specially constructed trucks. New
books only are accepted, and these are mostly provided through funds from Canteen profits.
Our library now contains slightly more than 4,000 volumes, the average weekly circulation
being in excess of 500 and the annual circulation over 24,000.
The Canteen, while not actually part of the Sanatorium operations, is closely linked up
with it. A Board representing the Sanatorium management, the employees, and the patients
is in control. A paid staff of ex-patients is in charge. The Bursar carries most of the burden
of the business management, and has built it up into a very profitable undertaking. Profits
are all returned to the staff and patients in the form of comforts and amusements. Sound-
picture equipment with two projection-heads has been installed, new radios have been purchased, library funds have been provided, and the Amusement Club has been financed. In
addition, during the past year we have been able to build a new, well-equipped store, all out of
profits from a business started on borrowed money in August, 1929.
Our per capita cost is slightly higher than for the previous year, due to slightly higher
prices for provisions and also to the restoration of some services which were discontinued in
1930.    Full details will be found in the Bursar's report.
I wish to take this opportunity to tender my sincere thanks to those individuals and
organizations who have contributed in any way to the entertainment and welfare of our
patients. In this connection I should like to mention particularly the Elks' Club, the Canadian
Legion, the Red Cross, the I.O.D.E., and the Kitsilano Boys' Band and their leader, Mr.
Delamont.
I am very grateful to all members of the staff and employees who have assisted in making
the work of the Sanatorium a success.
In conclusion, Sir, permit me to thank you and the various members of your Department
for the advice and assistance I have received.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP, M.B.,
Medical Superintendent. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
Q 7
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1934-35.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Military.
Female.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1934„
Number of patients admitted, 1934—35—  	
Number of patients discharged, 1934-35	
Number of patients treated, 1934-35— ——	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1935__
Daily average population __  	
Total number of patient-days —   —
145
113
113
258
145
21
34
57
23
148
329
79
213
81
226
227
542
148
316
	
322
117,620
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 213 CASES ADMITTED TO SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1934-35.
Classification.
Male.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
7
27
77
2
1
7
13
8
21
48
2
16
55
138
4
7.5
25.8
64.8
Miscellaneous— - - -    	
1.9
Totals      —	
113
21
79
213
100.0
TABLE No. 3.—CLASSIFICATION OF FOUR CASES ADMITTED AS
MISCELLANEOUS.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Scoliosis of spine—_ - —   —
Debility     -            	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Totals 	
2
2
4
TABLE No. 4.—SHOWING CIVIL STATE OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 3 1st, 1935.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
59
70
1
4
32
41
6
91
111
1
10
Totals   —	
134
79
213 Q 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING NATIONALITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
79
1
1
19
2   '
1
3
3
1
5
1
10
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
54
11
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
133
1
1
30
4
1
1
4
1
3
2
6
1
1
13
1
2
1
Welsh 	
2
Totals	
134
79
213
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Agassiz -	
Aldergrove  	
Armstrong   —
Blubber Bay 	
Bowser   _
Bradner  - -	
Burnaby   	
Canal Flats-   	
Caws ton  	
Cedar P.O    	
Chemainus  - —
Chilliwack   —
Coalmont -	
Courtenay   	
Copper Creek _  	
Deroche- - 	
Duncan   -	
Dawson Creek 	
Eburne    	
Esquimalt   -	
Fanny Bay 	
Fernie   —
Glade   	
Hazelton   : ™
Hope   	
Invermere  	
Kamloops   	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna 	
Carried forward-.
1
1
2
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
1
1
1
2
2
1
11
1
6
61 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
Q 9
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS-
—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
43
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
40
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
18
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
16
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
61
i
l
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
3
1
7
1
2
4
Notch Hill 	
2
Ocean Falls  —- - _ -■
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
Sandwick P.O — ,',    -     _
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
Trail      	
3
Tranquille '	
4
56
4
9
1
Webster's Corners     -	
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
Totals —	
134
79
213 Q 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
17
1
2
1
1
1
15
3
1
1.
18
1
8
1
2
1
5
11
1
7
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
36
3
2
1
10
6
4
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
22
Constable, R.C.M.P.        _._ -	
1
Cook -   :     '    -	
2
1
2
1
15
4
1
36
3
1
1
18
1
8
1
2
2
1
5
11
1
1
17
1
6
4
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
5
1
1
2
2
1
Totals	
134
79
213 TRANQUILLE  SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
Q 11
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
Age.
Female.
Total.
Under
15 to
21 „
26 „
31 „
36 „
41 „
46 „
51 „
56 „
61 „
66 „
Over
15 years-
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
70
Totals..
18
17
21
22
10
16
14
7
5
3
1
134
21
25
39
42
29
29
18
20
17
9
6
3
1
213
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
Month.
Admissions.
Male.     Female.     Total.
Discharges.
Male.   I Female.     Total.
Deaths.
Male.     Female.    Total,
April..	
May	
June..:	
July.	
August-	
September-
October	
November-
December—
January....
February-
March	
1934.
1935.
Totals-
3
19
10
16
10
11
14
11
9
5
18
4
10
8
7
14
4
5
4
3
1
4
15
7
29
18
23
24
15
19
15
12
213
19
9
5
5
7
9
6
11
2
9
15
2
7
9
12
4
4
1
6
11
10
26
18
17
9
11
15
9
11
3
15
26
170
TABLE No. 10.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 226 DISCHARGES DURING 1934-35.
Classification on Admission.
Results.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
Incipient  	
6
1
5
43
66
1
4
13
11
20
5
51
12
Miscellaneous  — - -	
11
Totals	
7
114
29
20
56
226
Sputum positive on admission or during residence, 158;  sputum positive on discharge, 102 (including 56 deaths)
56 became sputum negative as a result of treatment.
TABLE No. 11.—AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCE OF 226 DISCHARGED
PATIENTS.
Male, 532 days or 17% months; female, 576 days or 19 months. Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY.
The Occupational Therapy Department was reopened at Tranquille Sanatorium in July,
1934. For the first two months occupational therapy was prescribed for about twelve patients
in the Infirmary; then a few patients were added in the Main Building. Gradually the
work increased, and to-day there is an average of forty-five patients doing work in these two
buildings.
In October occupational therapy was prescribed for the male up-patients, and in December
the women up-patients were started on the work, so that at the present time we have thirty-
three patients coming to the workshops. This makes a total of seventy-eight patients doing
occupational therapy work.
The activities which we have been using for the patients who are confined to bed consist
of: Raffia basketry; raffia on canvas; glove-making; simple leather construction; leather
tooling and staining;  oil-painting on parchment.
Each morning the workshop is opened to the patients from 10 to 11.30. Some have a
prescription for the full period, others for one hour, and still others for only half an hour.
The crafts done in the shop are: Leather tooling and staining; metalwork; reed-work;
raffia-work; glove-making; woodwork (this is of the simplest form, due to lack of equipment) ;
weaving on looms is another craft we hope to add to our list in the future.
On the whole the patients are becoming educated to the idea of occupational therapy and
are realizing its value. However, there are still some who see it only as a means of making
money. This is a serious problem and has to be continually guarded against, as it always
leads to overexertion.
So far, a sale of work has not been necessary, as we have never at any time had many
articles on hand.    They have been sold or retained by the patients who made them.
During the nine months that this department has been operating, 106 patients have received
treatment.    A total of 1,090 visits have been made to the bed-patients.
Our aim in this department is, as Dr. G. L. Bellis, Superintendent of Muirdale Sanatorium,
so ably puts it: " To promote recovery from tuberculosis by substituting directed and supervised physical activities for the undirected and unsupervised physical activities destructive of
the benefits gained through sanatorium treatment. To promote recovery from tuberculosis
by substituting normal mental activities of an industrious life for the normal mental activities
of an idle life. To enable the child undergoing treatment to continue school-work under the
most hygienic conditions possible, and to enable the convalescent adult to become educationally
better qualified to ' carry on ' his former occupations or to take up a line of work entirely new
and more adapted to his requirements. To establish morale, simplifying the problems of
administration, especially in the matter of discipline, and promoting in no small degree a most
wholesome institutional atmosphere."
I should like to thank Dr. Lapp, Miss Bibby, and Mr. Jefferis, and their staffs, for the kind
co-operation and interest they have given me in the development of this department.
Eileen Cover,
Occupational Therapist.
March 31st, 1935. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
Q 13
ARTICLES FINISHED IN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT.
Tooled cowhide purses	
Tooled cowhide book-covers
Tooled cowhide bill-folds	
  55
  6
  45
Tooled cowhide book-ends, pairs  22
Tooled cowhide key-cases  8
Tooled cowhide writing-cases  7
Tooled cowhide school-bags  2
Tooled cowhide picture-frames  7
Tooled cowhide table-mats	
Tooled cowhide telephone-directory covers
Tooled cowhide blotter-corners	
Tooled cowhide cribbage-board covers	
Suede purses	
Suede change-purses 	
Suede shopping-bags 	
Suede book-covers	
Suede school-bags	
Suede writing-cases	
Suede book-ends, pairs	
Suede belts 	
Suede tobacco-pouches 	
Suede book-marks 	
2
3
4
3
26
17
20
8
2
4
6
10
9
4
Suede cushion 	
Suede picture-frames
Suede travelling-kit ..
Peccary hog gloves
Pewter bracelets .	
Raffia purses
  1
  2
  1
Chamois and kid gloves  5
  2
  25
  2
  2
  7
  3
  13
  6
  13
Raffia shopping-bags 	
Raffia baskets and trays
Reed baskets 	
Reed trays	
Woollen purse on canvas __.
Woollen tea-cosy	
Reed serviette-rings	
Parchment lamp-shades 	
Parchment writing-folio  2
  1
  2
  14
  5
  6
  3
  4
  1
Passe-partout picture-frames
Wooden buckles and handles .
Wooden shelves 	
Wooden picture-frames	
Wooden rings	
Chair caned	
LABORATORY REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1935.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the report of work completed in the Laboratory
here during the year ended March 31st, 1935.
The figures show an increase in nearly all types of tests performed. Complete " blood-
counts " have been resumed as being part of the patients' routine examination, and the test
for " blood-sedimentation rate," which was made heretofore only on admission, is now repeated
every three months.
In our examination of sputa we have inaugurated the " Gaffky " method of recording the
number of tubercle bacilli found; this, in conjunction with the " blood-sedimentation rate,"
which is taken at approximately the same time as the sputum specimen, is, I feel sure, proving
to be of great value to the attending doctor in estimating the patients' progress.
We are using now far more frequently the method of guinea-pig inoculation in the case
of patients who show a consistently negative sputum, and also in the case of patients with
albuminuria; so far we have had very gratifying results. Our new animal-house with its
all-metal cages and added room makes it possible to keep up the supply of animals required
for this purpose.
This year has been exceedingly successful; we have been able to do much more blood
chemistry, and the Laboratory is now equipped to perform practically any test the doctor may
order.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you for your interest and encouragement, which has made
the work here very enjoyable; also to voice my appreciation of the work of my assistant and
her whole-hearted co-operation.
I have, etc.,
Frank E. Parslow,
Laboratory Technician. Q 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL WORK DONE IN LABORATORY.
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1
1
2
2
5
5
5
1
27
60
92
164
77
87
50
1
2
7
1
29
29
28
28
15
18
4
7
3
10
10
3
2
1
12
1
4
4
4
1
14
75
104
188
68
90
370
62
12
12
13
13
2
2
1
10
10
49
48
2
3
2
1
6
2
4
8
4
2
24
65
97
212
72
140
69
18
2
40
40
40
40
46
36
3
1
5
3
13
16
1
5
2
3
6
5
5
5
2
1
14
81
93
2,006
772
T.B. negative.—.	
1,234
1,764
5
9
186
62
13
Blood-counts—
235
Haamoglobin -	
241
239
Differential ,	
239
242
243
37
Blood N.P.N 	
4
2
7
44
33
175
Bacteriological smears	
184
15
32
15
T.B. negative. 	
17
26
12
7
Milk tests—
49
53
49
17
2
1
116
791
963 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35. Q 15
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1935.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present herewith the balance-sheet and profit and loss accounts
covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1935.
The tables showing number of patients in residence, analysis of gross per capita costs, etc.,
are also herewith attached.
I have, etc.,
H. Jefferis,
  Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1935.
Assets.
Land and improvements  $12,684.05
Buildings   543,727.50
Plant and equipment   133,026.00
Bedding, linens, etc.   41,715.30
Inventories  16,166.06
Petty cash  1,500.00
Accounts receivable   2,831.86
$751,650.77
Deficit (net cost of operating, 1934-35)     199,207.32
$950,858.09
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia  $950,858.09
Profit and Loss Account for Year ended March 31st, 1935.
Disbursements—
Salaries   $132,800.21
Office supplies   1,946.47
Travel and transportation   3,617.76
Fuel, water, and light  45,727.49
Maintenance and Janitors' supplies   7,468.96
Bedding, linens, etc  6,281.78
Provisions  '    74,106.04
Medical and surgical  _ t  13,523.14
Incidentals   5,083.18
$290,555.03
Depreciation  :       37,814.03
$328,369.06
Revenue (details) —
Dept. of P. and N.H  $30,574.85
Municipalities      88,219.80
Patients'collections    10,214.59
Adjusting municipalities, 1933-34         152.50
129,161.74
Operating cost, 1934-35  $199,207.32 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31'st, 1935.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher—
Salaries—
Headquarters staff     $19,439.07
Sundry employees     180,256.42
  $199,695.49
Office supplies—
Books and journals   $175.62
Stationery, etc.         1,347.62
Telephones and telegrams   450.30
         1,973.54
Travel and transportation—
Travelling expenses  .       $1,596.78
Car and truck expenses         2,058.19
Fuel and light—
Fuel     $45,555.19
Plant supplies  471.68
Medical and surgical—
Medicines and drugs   $5,575.80
Consultants' fees  6,405.35
X-ray and dental  2,747.62
Incidentals and contingencies—•
Laundry   $2,450.59
Freight and express  448.03
Sundry   257.66
Occupational  653.51
Training-school  :  2,028.80
Indigent patients  636.80
3,654.97
46,026.87
Maintenance of buildings, grounds, etc.—
Janitors' supplies        $7,266.53
Equipment renewals         1,571.16
Garden and grounds  219.63
         9,057.32
Bedding and linens, etc.          5,982.98
Provisions—
Groceries  '.     $29,684.39
Meats          8,139.07
Fish         1,534.12
Eggs, etc.         3,522.80
       42,880.38
14,728.77
6,475.39
Gross expenditure by voucher as per Finance Department Statement  $330,475.71
Less deductions for board, etc.     $66,795.48
Less sundry credits          2,551.71
Less revenues     129,161.74
     198,508.93
$131,966.78
Plus inventory, April 1st, 1934       15,378.23
Carried forward   $147,345.01 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
Q 17
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1935—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward   $147,345.01
Less inventory, March 31st, 1935      $16,166.06
Less sundry collections         6,960.15
       23,126.21
$124,218.80
Farms Contra Account—
Purchases from farm     $41,983.19
Less sales to farm        4,808.70
■       37,174.49
Net cost of operating :  $161,393.29
Depreciation  .       37,814.03
$199,207.32
Remarks.
Number of days' treatment given during 1934-35 __
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1935 —
Daily average population for year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day	
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year	
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day	
117,620
316
322
$902.34
,2.47
500.91
1.37
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
Average
Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921-22 	
1922-23      	
1923-24—                                          	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
216.00
214.31
293.00
325.00
330.00
329.00
327.00
322.00
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
308,194.82
294,674.82
299,621.79
347,939.58
342,120.06
313,213.82
290,826.84
283,366.29
290,555.03
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1,506.46
1924-25   	
1925-26     	
1926 27  	
1,357.75
1,312.44
1,382.04
1927-28—          	
1,364.24
1928-29        	
1,400.10
1929-30 -	
1,187.51
1930-31 —   —	
1,052.67
1931-32    	
949.13
1932-33-            	
883.97
1933-34  	
866.56
1934-35                       	
902.34 Q 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
CO
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$9.01
$20.56
$225.14
$138.43
133.03
$57.79
$421.96
$28.37
$72.06
28.46
$1,429.86
1922-23  	
482.22
8.09
11.32
232.81
66.89
472.17
13 07
1,460.65
1923-24  	
479.85
7.46
9.42
243 48
85 77
13.70
441.26
39 95
65.76
1,506.46
1924-25 	
437.52
6.01
11.93
211.11
70.55
25.78
288.86
26.17
33.05
1,357.75
1925-26  	
479.75
8.97
8.09
189.92
68.62
6.62
392.98
34.68
19.31
1,312.44
1926-27  	
501.57
9.51
14.81
173.22
65.85
33.96
426.23
39.32
12.36
1,382.04
1927-28.    	
554.98
10.32
11.89
169.48
64.20
34.93
448 96
53.82
15.65
1,364.24
1,400.10
1928-29 	
603.51
9.67
12.60
190.78
82.77
24.66
421.89
42.95
11.27
1929-30  	
544.63
10.21
8.78
157.94
62.23
.92
338.82
50.34
13.64
1,187.51
1930-31  	
484.06
8.09
6.52
132.71
48.92
14.23
297.72
44.93
15.69
1,052.67
1931-32  	
447.65
6.73
7.64
148.82
33.16
13.32
226.62
41.04
24.15
949.13
1932-33 -	
406.95
5.53
5.08
150.71
30.24
19.08
209.44
38.09
18.85
883.97
1933-34    .      .     ■	
397.67
5.02
7.95
150 35
33 12
15 94
1934-35    	
412.42
6.04
11.24
142.02
23.19
19.51
230.14
42.00
16.78
902.34 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35.
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Table E.—Summary of Laundry-work, April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935.
Month.
Personal.
Flat-work.
Total.
Earnings.
1934.
April	
May	
June	
July— -
August	
September.
October	
November-
December..
1935.
January	
February-
March	
Totals..
18,103
19,170
15,944
18,067
17,610
16,831
20,010
17,252
16,425
19,121
16,533
16,702
211,768
50,566
55,446
52,305
52,539
54,985
50,320
56,417
51,948
51,600
55,089
48,689
52,754
632,658
68,669
74,616
68,249
70,606
72,595
67,151
76,427
69,200
68,025
74,210
65,222
69,456
844,426
$3,702.28
4,060.43
3,582.76
3,789.73
3,782.82
3,526.92
4,007.00
3,601.00
3,467.65
3,908.59
3,431.06
3,568.74
$44,428.98
Personal laundry
Flat-work 	
Totals
Pieces.
211,768
632,658
844,426
Average per month— Pieces.
Personal laundry  17,647
Flat-work   52,721
Totals  70,368
Cash received for cleaning, pressing, and laundry, $191.
Earnings.
$26,379.55
18,049.43
$44,428.98
Earnings.
$2,198.29
1,504.12
$3,702.41 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35. Q 21
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1935.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the operation of the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1935.
The crops, in so far as I have been able to determine, were up to the average of previous
years, there being sufficient hay, ensilage, and root crops to adequately feed the various herds
on these feeds throughout the winter.
During the course of the year several head of beef cows were sold to farmers of the
Province. These cows did not show the characteristics of the beef breed maintained at the
Tranquille Sanatorium Farm, or else were considered not profitable as producing individuals.
The elimination of these cattle not only improved the appearance of the range herd, but should
make this unit more profitable.
Through judicious culling of the dairy herd and a concentration of proved blood-lines
within the herd the average production of this unit is being materially improved.
The swine herd was permitted to decrease in numbers below that desired. This was caused
primarily through the retention of aged animals within the herd. These animals have been
replaced by younger and more prolific individuals.
I have, etc.,
R. L. Davis,
Farm Manager.
BURSAR'S REPORT, TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1935.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements   $90,462.65
Equipment  3,822.80
Land  70,405.88
Auto-truck   511.10
Dam Account  2,074.80
Petty cash  500.00
Inventories   53,193.76
$220,970.99
Deficit for year 1934-35        23,948.93
$244,919.92
Liabilities.
Capital balance   $244,919.92
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1935.
Disbursements.
Salaries  $18,911.23
Office .  47.70
Travel and transportation  2,037.76
Fuel  .  1,086.71
Maintenance   1,946.16
Feed  10,739.20
Carried forward     $34,768.76 Q 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1935—Continued.
Disbursements—Continued.
Brought forward 	
Provisions
Leases 	
Implements and harness
Live stock	
Drugs, etc. 	
Incidentals 	
Boarding-house 	
Depreciation 	
Milk-sales to Sanatorium
Garden produce	
Swine products 	
Deficit for year
Receipts.
$34,768.76
4,276.60
1,265.00
785.84
11,268.97
29.89
400.50
596.51
$53,392.07
5,356.33
$58,748.40
$29,825.60
252.75
4,721.12
$34,799.47
23,948.93
$58,748.40
Expenditure by Voucher, Vote 130b, 1934-35.
Salaries—
Staff  .
Sundry employees
Office supplies—■
Stationery
Telephone and telegraph
Travel and transportation—
Travelling  	
Truck and tractors	
Fuel	
Maintenance and repairs—■
Equipment renewals	
Fencing	
Dams and ditches	
Garden and grounds
Feed	
Provisions
Leases	
Implements and harness-
Implements 	
Harness 	
$3,499.55
25,876.47
$38.35
9.35
$503.21
1,488.04
1,438.31
31.90
110.66
471.25
$383.45
400.38
$29,376.02
47.70
1,991.25
1,086.71
2,052.12
11,995.08
64.41
1,265.00
783.83
Carried forward
$48,662.12 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1934-35. Q 23
Expenditure by Voucher, Vote 130b, 1934-35—Continued.
Brought forward      $48,662.12
New sires—■
Sires       $557.93
Other stock  412.00
■  969.93
Drugs and veterinary—
Drugs  $22.14
Veterinary   7.75
Incidentals—
Registration fees   $66.75
Express  101.69
Miscellaneous   232.06
29.89
400.50
Gross expenditure by voucher as per Comptroller-General's Account     $50,062.44
Less perquisite deductions        10,464.79
$39,597.65
Sundry revenue     $3,417.95
Accounts receivable, 1934, collected  194.39
         3,223.56
$36,374.09
Inventory as at March 31st, 1934       72,586.76
Less inventory as at March 31st, 1935—
Live stock—
Holstein herd  $11,985.00
Hereford herd  8,220.00
Range cattle  19,410.00
Horses  1,985.00
Swine   2,752.23
Slaughter-house merchandise and equipment  621.45
Feed - I  4,540.77
Maintenance supplies  458.21
Produce (garden)   175.00
Travel and transportation   29.81
Implements and harness   3,016.29
$108,960.85
Purchases from Sanatorium—
Provisions      $4,212.19
Laundry   596.51
53,193.76
$55,767.09
4,808.70
$60,575.79
Depreciation           5,356.33
$65,932.12
By sales to Sanatorium       41,983.19
Deficit for year 1934-35       $23,948.93 Q 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Sundries sold to Sanatorium, etc.
Beef and beef products, 59,395 lb. at 8% cents  $5,197.07
Pork, 11,762 lb. at 12 cents  1,411.44
Bacon, 7,475 lb. at 25% cents  1,878.09
Ham, 11,428 lb. at 20 cents  2,273.60
Ham, 60 lb. at 12 cents  7.20
Sausages, 2,964 lb. at 12 cents  355.68
Lard, 5,409 lb. at 8 cents  432.72
Bakeasy, 109 lb. at 8 cents  8.72
Laundry lard, 2,780 lb. at 6 cents  166.80
Milk, 85,760 gallons at 34.72 cents  29,775.20
Apples, 327 boxes at 50 cents per box  163.50
Pears, 61 boxes at $1 per box  61.00
Vegetable marrow, 370 lb. at $1.50 per 100  5.55
Honey, 550 lb. at 10 cents  55.00
Greengages, 50 lb. at 3 cents  1.50
Potatoes, 8,620 lb. at 5 cents   43.10
Carrots, 1,270 lb. at $1 per 100 .  12.70
Beets, 680 lb. at $1 per 100  6.80
Parsnips, 360 lb. at $1 per 100  3.60
$41,859.27
Sundry sales  ,  3,223.56
$45,082.83
Milk Production for Fiscal Year 1934-35.
1934. Milk, Lb.
April   84,755.7
May   87,446.2
June  83,089.7
July   81,960.7
August  78,283.9
September   80,082.6
October   79,871.0
November   74,515.8
December  _-  75,076.2
1935.
January   77,552.0
February  70,094.6
March   79,616.7
Total   952,345.1
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.
500-1135-6500

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