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TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1936]

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 TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
HOME FOR GIRLS
OP   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1934, TO MARCH 31ST, 1935
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY'.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ciiabi.es P. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1936.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B.C.  To His Honour J. W. Pordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour ■
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-first Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1935.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1935.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME
FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed., April 1st, 1935.
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-first Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls from April 1st,
1934, to March 31st, 1935.
During the past year a very important and necessary step in advance was taken in the
appointment of a parole officer, acting for both Girls' and Boys' Industrial Schools. Prior to
this the follow-up work here was done by a member of the staff and sufficient time could not
be given to it. Also the appointment of a principal for both schools, who is always willing to
advise and assist, has lightened the burden of responsibility. Twenty-three girls were
admitted in the past twelve months, problems all of them, and requiring individual planning
and treatment. In some cases parents have asked for assistance in reclaiming one very dear
to them, but so difficult; in others broken homes with poor example, and in a few cases
indifference as to responsibilities or results.
Every girl on admission has the same routine examination, complete physical, including
general development, posture, arches, urine analysis, blood test for Wasserman, and slides
for Neisser infection, also throat and nose swabs for diphtheria. Vaccination is routine
unless history shows a recent good reaction; basal metabolism at the General Hospital is
available for thyroid cases; eyes are tested by a specialist and glasses provided if necessary.
It is advisable to have her remain on hospital floor in a single room for the first fourteen days
because of the possibility of infection, but she is provided with magazines, given certain tasks
to occupy her time, and taken into the garden for exercise. It is explained that this is a
school where her education along many lines will be continued, not at all a place of punishment. It is important that this be made clear, as there is usually resentment to break down,
and to offset poor advice given by girls who have not made an effort to benefit by their training.
As soon as possible each girl is examined by the dentist, and in the majority of cases this is the
first time in years, and in some the only one. Because of this, extractions cannot be avoided,
but every effort is made to prevent further destruction. This year it was necessary to provide
a partial lower set for one.
A girl's " own story " is taken, her parents or guardians interviewed or written to, school
report secured, also a report from social agencies who have been in contact. After gathering
all available history she is examined by Dr. Crease, Psychiatrist, Child Guidance Clinic. This
service has been so valuable in placing and planning. In many cases we are given the
privilege of a second examination at the end of a year to note progress.
Our Home is spacious, well equipped, and not institutional in appearance or atmosphere.
The majority take pride in caring for the Home and grounds. Our sitting-rooms and assembly
and club rooms are colourful and attractive. Single bedrooms would be a decided advantage,
but the dormitories are large, airy, and with twelve beds never all occupied. Our dining-room
is interesting, with small tables for three, white tablecloths, polished floors, and monk's-cloth
curtains embroidered by clever fingers. Almost all year flowers are in the low amber bowls,
while growing plants fill the reed baskets and ferneries, also the work of the girls. We take
one-half hour to all meals, during which the girls may quietly converse, also they are allowed
to bring in their knitting or library book to enjoy when their meal is finished. While realizing
that the girls are of more importance than the plant, we feel that pleasant surroundings contribute to the present happiness and stimulate ambition, even if a little more work is entailed.
The rising-bell is sounded' at 7, and at 7.30 we meet in the club-room to sing our morning
hymn; then to breakfast, which has been prepared by the cook and her girl assistants.
Directly after breakfast any girl needing health advice or medicine comes to medical room. BB 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
They are encouraged to report even very trivial ills, and this may account for the few days in
bed. Within a few minutes all departments are in full swing, and, though work is progressing,
singing and happy laughter comes from all quarters.
The special class is under the teacher's guidance from 9 to 12. Dinner is served at 12.15,
all having changed from working into afternoon dresses previously. Serving meals cafeteria
style has proven popular and economical. Grade VIII. attend school from 1 to 4. The
morning class receive training in laundry, sewing, knitting, and gardening after the necessary
clearing has been done after dinner. Five girls are taking Grade IX., Commercial, using the
Government High School Correspondence Course, under the guidance of the stenographer, who
attends to office routine in mornings and class in afternoon, and a qualified school-teacher who
gives part-time supervision in another department as well as her school class. One girl has
been taking an advanced course in dressmaking at an academy in the city while still making
this her home. ,
If weather permits, every girl is out-of-doors for at least an hour a day. Baseball is
popular when the field is suitable, and basket-ball is enjoyed in the gymnasium. From
November until May physical education classes were conducted twice weekly by a trained
worker. These proved enjoyable and profitable. A programme presented at the close of the
series was indeed creditable, consisting of drills, exercises, and tap-dancing. Interest has
been maintained in the sewing and knitting classes, many attractive garments being completed.
The choir, which includes every girl, has faithfully practised, and their musical selections
added considerably to our spring programme. Recently they provided the anthem at the
morning church service, where we usually attend. They were requested to prepare another
to sing in the near future. Our voluntary teachers in religious education have given a profitable hour each Thursday evening, with almost a complete attendance from choice.
Junior first-aid lectures were given every Saturday evening by Miss White, Director of
St. John Ambulance Association, and the girls showed their appreciation by close attention
and study. They will be examined by Dr. Perry at the end of June and certificates granted to
those who complete the work satisfactorily.
Visitors, relatives, or friends who are known to be reliable call on Saturday afternoon or
the first Sunday afternoon of the month. Out-of-town visitors are made welcome at any time.
A letter is written each week to relatives, and letters and parcels containing little gifts come
to the majority of the girls, though sometimes there is a lonely one who seems to be forgotten.
The radio is a source of enjoyment, the varied programme appealing to different groups in
turn. They put on an entertainment occasionally arranged entirely by themselves, not
censored, and they are entertaining and enlightening.
We are very pleasantly located, the 14 acres giving us space for recreation, gardens both
useful and ornamental, also valued privacy, but near enough the centre of things to have the
contacts we desire. During the season we can count on three or even four programmes a
month provided by the musical groups of the city, and we were invited to attend as guests
several very enjoyable concerts. The organ recital at St. Andrew's Wesley with choir and
soloists was a new experience to many, and the dainty refreshments served to us specially in
the club-room upstairs afterwards by the Pals added to the evening. The Kiwanis Club
provided matinee tickets for the " Red Mill " operetta, and the boys and several of the staff
of the Boys' Industrial School, who were also guests there, came home with us for high tea and
a social evening, thus rounding out a most enjoyable afternoon. We are grateful to the Red
Cross Society, Women's Musical, Philharmonic Society, Burnaby Choir, Sea Rangers, Dr.
Raleigh, and others for providing enjoyable programmes. At Christmas we were remembered
by the W.C.T.U., Salvation Army Officers, Oxford Group, Bible Student Graduates, and others,
thus adding to our happiness. There has been a growing interest in the Home and a kindlier
understanding. Another interesting experiment this year was taking twelve girls for ten
days to a summer home near the beach. The remainder were brought out on two different
occasions to spend the day.    There was nothing to mar a delightful holiday.
As usual, the Social Workers' Club held their annual meeting at the Home and our library
benefited to the extent of $15.40 worth of books. Lavender from the school was also exchanged
for books.
Our girls who have finished their training have been placed mostly in domestic service,
and the demand is greater than the supply because of their varied training, clean bill of health, REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1934-35. BB 7
and pleasing outfit of clothing provided.    More than the usual number of released girls have
written frequently or visited us, bringing, in some cases, the baby for us to admire.
One of our girls with impaired vision, on leaving, was placed by the Canadian Institute
for the Blind in a suitable position where she is happy and self-supporting.
ESTIMATED VALUE  OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 9,297 lb.   $81.70
Carrots, 2,744 lb.   29.09
Parsnips, 1,000 lb.  12.50
Turnips, 3,060 lb  28.80
Vegetable marrow, 115 lb.  3.00
Green tomatoes, 30 lb.  1.50
Ripe tomatoes, 15 lb.  1.50
Peas, 365 lb.   19.10
Beets, 2,235 lb  24.40
Beans, 242 lb  12.10
Asparagus, 109 lb.  15.55
Rhubarb, 372 lb ,  10.68
Spinach, 230 lb  11.50
Onions, 1,550 lb  17.50
Onions, pickling, 30 lb.   3.50
Onions, green, 1,992 bunches  57.00
Radish, 936 bunches   20.40
Corn, 960 ears   12.00
Cauliflower, 360 heads  36.00
Cabbage, 1,260 heads  113.52
Lettuce, 2,616 heads  137.36
Cucumbers, 372   14.20
Parsley and mint  2.00
Manure, 15 loads  60.00
$724.90
Fruit.
Raspberries, 277 lb  $26.93
Loganberries, 174% lb.  5.25
Apples, 360 lb.   18.00
Crab-apples, 60 lb  3.00
Cherries, 35 lb  4.40
$57.58
PIGS.
April 1st, 1934, on premises     17
Born April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935       7
24
Killed for consumption of Home (1,298 lb.)      10
Sold to butcher to apply on meat bill (2,110 lb.)      12
Died       1
Transferred to Boys' Industrial School       1
POULTRY.
Killed for table use, 222 cockerels, 667% lb. at 22 cents  $146.85
Killed for table use, 7 geese, 73 lb. at 25 cents       18.25
Killed for table use, 5 turkeys, 54 lb. at 25 cents       13.50
$178.60 BB 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EGGS.
Applied on meat bill, 426 dozen at 14 to 17 cents  $65.01
Consumed by Home, 1,359 dozen at 25 cents  339.75
Hatched, 96 dozen at 60 cents  57.60
$462.36
POPULATION OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1935.
On roll, March 31st, 1934      27
Girls admitted during year March 31st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935     23
50
Released as wards of Juvenile Court     9
Released by order of Attorney-General     2
Released by Provincial Secretary      6
—    17
Total in Home, March 31st, 1935     33
Number of escapes during year       2
Number captured and returned _       2
Number returned in one and a half days     1
Number returned in two days     1
EXPENSE AND REVENUE  STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1935.
Total inmate days from March 31st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935  10.130
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $795.70
Gross maintenace per capita cost, one day  2.18
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year :  593.855
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  1.627
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries   $12,505.71
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies   $290.55
Telephone and telegraph      123.61
  414.16
Travelling expenses   389.65
Farm operations   265.64
Household equipment (other than furniture)    658.72
Clothing—
Clothing  $686.55
Boots and shoes     232.79
  919.34
Janitors' supplies   317.54
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel    $2,299.17
Water        488.50
Light and power       434.62
       3,222.29
Provisions—
Groceries  $3,430.66
Meat   581.05
Fish   140.18
4,151.89
Carried fomvard   $22,844.94 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1934-35. BB 9
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1935—Continued.
Brought forward  $22,844.94
Operating expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Medical attendance and hospital supplies—
Doctor's salary       $400.00
Medical supplies         160.17
Surgery (tonsillectomies)          105.00
Dental cost         231.00
  896.17
Good Conduct Fund   55.70
Incidentals and contingencies  238.17
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $24,034.98
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)   994.22
$25,029.20
Less board and rent  $1,953.83
Less sale of pigs   43.17
Less inventory, supplies on hand        943.96
       2,940.96
$22,088.24
Less Revenue Account (maintenance of inmates)        5,600.76
Net cost of inmates' maintenance to Government -_  $16,487.48 BB 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF GIRLS IN HOME, MARCH 31st, 1935.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to Home.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
399
400
Kouye River, B.C 	
Bella Bella, B.C.--	
French-English, Japanese-Eskimo
French-English,  Japanese-Eskimo
Scotch	
Years.
13
16
5
15
3%
Unknown
13
16
3
15
8
11%
6%
14
16
14
5
5
8
9
13
14%
16
14
16
14%
16%
14
16
2
13
Years.
13
16
5
18
3%
Unknown
15
19
5
16
15
15
8
14
6I/4
14
16
14
10
10
8
15
13
14%
16
14
16
14%
16%
14
16
15%
13
Two to five years.
409
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
410
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
411
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
412
Unknown...	
Italian...	
413
Children's Aid Society.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
415
Victoria, B.C.
416
Polish    	
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
417
Irish, French-English
English, Spanish-Irish
Sechelt Band Indian...
Scotch-Canadian,
French-American
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
418
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
419
Sechelt Reserve, B.C.
420
421
dren's Aid Society.
422
424
London, England	
Vernon, B.C 	
English 	
Roumanian 	
Juvenile Delinquents Act.
425
426
Victoria, B.C 	
English-Canadian
German-American
German-American
427
428
429
430
Scotch,   Scotch-Canadian
431
London, England 	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
432
433
English  	
English-Canadian_	
Irish-Canadian, American
Irish-American, Italian-American
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
434
435
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
436
Victoria, B.C.
437
Austrian 	
438
London, England—	
Trail; B.C	
Craik, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
439
440
Italian  	
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
441
Scotch. 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English (both)   3
Scotch (both)  :  4
Irish (both)   1
American (both)   1
Indian (both)   1
Italian (both)   2
Unknown (both)   1
Polish (both)   1
Roumanian (both)   1
Austrian (both)   1
English-Canadian (both)   2
German-American (both)   2
English-Japanese  2
English-Irish  2
English-Scotch   1
Scotch-Canadian  1
Irish-English  3
Canadian-American  2
German-English   2
Total.
33 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1934-35. BB 11
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
British Columbia   16 United States     1
Alberta     3 Poland      1
Saskatchewan      5 Unknown      1
England      3 —
Scotland    3 Total  33
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible   20 Intent to defraud     1
Theft      2 Found in disorderly house     1
Transferred   from   Protestant Sexual immorality     1
Children's Aid Society as in- Prostitution    1
corrigible      1 Recidivists      5
Transferred from Catholic Chil- —
dren's Aid Society as incor- Total  33
rigible     1
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Burnaby     1 Rosemont      1
Fernie      1 Trail      2
Fort St. John     1 Vancouver   14
Kelowna      1 Vernon      1
North Pine     2 Victoria     6
Oak Bay     1 —
Ocean Falls     2 Total  33
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929   11 Sec. 59, Infants Act     1
Two years     4 Industrial Home for Girls Act—    5
Three years     3 Recidivists     5
Two to five years     2 —
Until 18 years of age    2 Total  33
AGES OF GIRLS IN HOME.
13 years  2    18 years  1
14 years   8    19 years   2
15 years  8     20 years   1
16 years   7 —
17 years    4 Total  33
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist      1 Roman Catholic  11
Bible Student     1 Seventh Day Adventist     1
Church of England     5 United Church     8
Four Square Gospel     1 —
Gospel Hall      1 Total  33
Presbyterian
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  16
Number who have father living and mother dead     8
Number who have mother living and father dead     6
Number who are adopted    3
Total   33
Of the above, 4 parents are separated, 5 divorced, 4 girls have stepfathers, 4 have stepmothers, and 3 have foster-parents. BB 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Matron and cook Mrs. C. E. M. Dickson.
First Assistant Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
Linen-keeper Miss Katherine M. Smith.
Attendant (Sewing Supervisor) Miss M. E. Murray.
Teacher Miss Doris Lumb.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener Henry Philip.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1934,
to March 31st, 1935:—
Calls made by physician        51
Patients seen by physician, including treatments      306
Complete physical examination        34
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection         9
Total number of days in isolation     527
Smears taken for Neisser infection     252
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman       33
Treatment for syphilis intravenously        28
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously         2
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection 1,346
Urine tests        27
X-rays          1
Vaccination        25
Toxoids          2
Goitre cases treated daily         2
Basal metabolism          4
Tonsillectomies at General Hospital by specialist         3
Sexual sterilization  _—_        2
Maternity case attended in General Hospital (girl)          1
Examination by eye specialist         3
Glasses provided        2
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives a
complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
Each girl has been examined by dentist and necessary fillings or extractions attended to.
Three cases of trench-mouth were treated successfully.
All of which is respecfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1934-35. BB 13
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
Owing to the lack of equipment it has been found satisfactory to bring the girls to my city
office.
The following report applies to the period from April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935:—
Visits to dentist     13
Number of girls seen     50
Amalgam fillings      52
Cement fillings     30
Extractions      18
Cleanings        8
Novacaine administrations      31
Lower removable partial plate       1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D.
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
.   Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following report applies to the period between April 1st, 1934, to
March 31st, 1935:— , .
Morning Class (9 a.m to 12 noon).—The average monthly attendance for this class was
10.54 and the total time 4,874% hours.
The morning class is for the girls capable of doing Grades I. to VI work, the time being
divided between academic and hand-work.
Hand-work entails the making of baskets, trays, toys, magazine-racks, and other small
pieces of furniture.    Gardening in spring and summer takes the place of hand-work.
Gardening, aside from the training and health standpoint, affords many opportunities for
concrete nature and geography lessons.
Afternoon Class (1 p.m. to 4 p.m.).—The average monthly attendance was 11.5 and the
total time 5,495% hours.
The regular Grade VIII: curriculum is taken in this class, successful pupils being recommended for high school.
The past year has been rather outstanding, in that the girls have put an honest effort
behind their work to successfully complete the Grade VIII. course.
Three girls of the afternoon class will be recommended for high school and two girls
promoted to Grade VIII. from the morning class.
The general spirit of the girls in both classes this past year has been excellent, and
splendid progress has been made by every girl.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Doris Lumb,
School-teacher.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
193C.
425-236-7461   

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