BC Sessional Papers

PART G. INSPECTION OF MINES. BY JAMES DICKSON. British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

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Full Text

 INSPECTION OF MINES. G 1
PART G.
INSPECTION OF MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
The Province is divided into six Inspection Districts, as follows:—-
Inspection District. Mining Divisions in District.
Vancouver Island Victoria, Alberni, Clayoquot, Quatsino, and that
portion of the Nanaimo Division situated
on Vancouver Island.
Southern Coast Vancouver, New Westminster, and that portion
of Nanaimo Division situated on the Mainland.
Northern Atlin,   Liard,   Stikine,   Portland   Canal,   Nass
River, Omineca, Peace River, Skeena, Bella
Coola, and Queen Charlotte Islands.
Nicola-Princeton Cariboo, Quesnel, Clinton, Lillooet, Kamloops,
Ashcroft, Nicola, Vernon, Similkameen, and
Osoyoos.
West Kootenay and Boundary....Revelstoke, Lardeau, Trout Lake, Ainsworth,
Slocan, Arrow Lake, Slocan City, Nelson,
Trail Creek, Greenwood, and Grand Forks.
East Kootenay Fort Steele, Windermere, and Golden.
The Inspectors inspect the coal mines, metalliferous mines, and quarries in their respective
districts.
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials.
James Dickson Chairman, Victoria.
James Strang Secretary, Victoria.
H. E. Miard Member, Fernie.
Messrs. Strang and Miard and the Inspector of Mines of the district in which an examination
is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to coal-miners.
An Inspector of Mines is empowered to grant provisional certificates to miners for a period
not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations.
J. D. Stewart Nanaimo Station.
Jas. L. Brown Cumberland Station.
Alfred Gould - Princeton Station.
John T. Puckey Fernie Station.
Robert Strachan, senior Inspector of Mines, died on September 20th after a long illness;
he was born in Scotland and studied mining there, and was in charge of mines before coming
to Canada in 1902. He was manager of mines in the Crowsnest Pass area of British Columbia
for a number of years and in 1909 was appointed Inspector of Mines; later he was made senior
Inspector, which position he held until his death. His long experience in mining made his
service particularly valuable to the Department and the mining industry, in which he spent his
whole life.
PRODUCTION.
The total tonnage produced by the coal mines of the Province for the year ended December
31st, 1934, was 1,347,090 tons, being an increase of 82,343 tons or 6.5 per cent, over the production
of 1933.
The Coast District, which includes Vancouver Island, Nicola-Princeton District, and the
Northern District produced 719,471 tons, a decrease of 67,598 tons or 5.3 per cent, from 1933.
Vancouver Island collieries produced 574,508 tons during 1934, a decrease of 38,695 tons or G 2
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
6.3 per cent, from 1933. The Northern District produced 3,277 tons. The Nicola-Princeton
District produced 141,686 tons, a decrease of 28,777 tons or 16.8 per cent, from 1933. The East
Kootenay District produced 627,619 tons, an increase of 149,942 tons or 31.4 per cent, over 1933.
The following table shows the output and- per capita production daily and for the year of
the various mines :—
Colliery and Mine.
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No. 1 mine, Nanaimo	
No. 5 mine, South Wellington	
Comox Colliery	
Lantzville Colliery	
Fiddick mine	
Ida Clara Colliery (Richardson)..
Jingle Pot mine	
Biggs' mine	
Old Adit mine	
Chambers' mine	
Middlesboro Colliery	
Coalmont Colliery	
Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd	
Pleasant Valley Colliery	
Blue Flame Colliery	
Cascade Coal Co.  (Bromley Vale)
Canada Coal & Development Co...
Bulkley Valley Colliery	
Coal Creek Colliery ,
Michel Colliery	
Corbin Colliery	
234,391
136,506
193,002
4,897
1,839
1,345
242
1,498
175
613
24,611
78,764
19,157
4,123
12,897
1,060
1,074
3,277
91,604
292.027
243,988
1.54
2.33
1.91
1.11
0.61
0.48
0.41
1.26
0.88
1.05
1.50
2.33
1.71
0.55
1.38
1.83
1.37
4.09
3.52
3.68
321
452
363
272
167
134
48
150
58
153
226
388
204
121
322
88
119
298
614
818
983
457
244
412
13
4
7
2
3
75
130
72
20
24
6
7
9
116
256
179
2.46
2.88
2.46
1.54
0.84
0.80
0.51
1.80
1.33
1.40
2.16
3.64
2.23
0.93
2.30
3.66
1.67
5.32
4.91
5.10
513
559
468
377
230
224
60
214
87
204
328
605
266
206
537
176
153
364
789
1,140
1,363
Collieries of Vancouver Island Inspection District.
The output of Vancouver Island collieries was 574,508 tons. Of this amount, 34,255 tons
or 5.9 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 63,559 tons or 11 per cent, was consumed
by producing companies as fuel, and 476,887 tons or 81.9 per cent, was sold in the competitive
markets. Of the amount sold in the competitive markets, 454,884 or 95.3 per cent, was sold in
Canada and 22,003 tons or 4.6 per cent, was sold in the United States.
Collieries of Nicola-Princeton Inspection District.
Of the gross* output of 141,686 tons produced by the collieries of the Nicola-Princeton
District, 22,612 tons or 15.9 per cent, was consumed by the producing companies as fuel and
117,589 tons or 83 per cent, was sold in the competitive markets in Canada.
Collieries of the East Kootenay Inspection District.
The output of the collieries of the East Kootenay District was 627,619 tons. Of this amount,
41,471 tons or 6.6 per cent, was lost in preparation for the market, 16,394 tons or 2.6 per cent,
was consumed as fuel, 47,894 tons or 7.6 per cent, was made into coke, and 528,611 tons or 84.2
per cent, was sold in the competitive markets. Of the amount sold in the competitive markets,
505,079 tons or 95.5 per cent, was sold in Canada and 23,532 tons or 4.5 per cent, was sold in
the United States. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 3
The following table shows the per capita production of the various districts for the past five
years.    Similar figures for the years prior to 1929 are shown in previous Annual Reports.
Output and Per Capita Production of Various Districts.
Year.
District.
Gross Tons ot
Coal mined
during Year.
Total No. of
Employees
at Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Employee for
Year.
No. of Men
employed
Underground
in Producing
Collieries.
Tons of Coal
mined per
Underground
Employee
for Year.
1930 J
East Kootenay District-
689,230
1,197,894
1,887,130
661,426
1,046,164
1,707,590
587,875
947,100
1,534,975
477.677
787,069
1,264,746
627,619
719,471
1,347,090
1,252
3,393
4,645
1,211
2,871
4,082
1,001
2,607
3,608
698
2,396
3,094
754
2,139
2,893
550
353
406
546
364
419
587
363
425
684
328
408
832
336
465
931
2,458
3,389
909
2,048
2,957
752
1,876
2,628
522
1,719
2,241
551
1,499
2,050
740
487
556
1931 J
East Kootenay District..
727
510
577
1932 J
East Kootenay District-
781
504
584
1933  J
East Kootenay District-
915
457
564
1934 J
East Kootenay District-
1,139
480
657
The following table shows the production and distribution of coal by the various collieries
and districts, compiled from returns furnished by the owners:— G 4
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
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anadian Collieries   (D.),  Ltd.—
South Wellington, No. 5 mine	
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leasant Valley Colliery	
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ascade Coal Co., Ltd.  (Bromley Vale)
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Totals, Nicola-Princeton District..
Northern District.
ulkley Valley Colliery	
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East Kootenay District.
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o             suehPhMou              ca                  o      o G 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT.
During 1934, 2,893 persons were employed in and about the coal mines of the Province, a
decrease of about 6.5 per cent, compared with 1933.
Taking the average of all the mines in Vancouver Island District, about 30 per cent, of the
working-days was lost through lack of trade. In the Nicola-Princeton District the different
collieries worked from 40 to 77 per cent, of the working-days, averaging for the district about
59 per cent, of the working-days'. In the East Kootenay District the mines worked from 50 to
89 per cent, of the working-days during the year, and worked on an average for the whole district
about 72 per cent, of the time.
The table on page 5 shows the number of persons ordinarily employed in and about the
mines, distinguishing the persons and different classes employed underground and above ground,
compiled from returns furnished by the owners.
FUEL-OIL COMPETITION.
During 1934 the imports of crude oil for refining in British Columbia totalled 158,288.000
gallons-, and from this 40,000,000 gallons of gasoline and 93,000,000 gallons of fuel-oil were
produced and sold in British Columbia.
In addition to this, 23,293,000 gallons of fuel-oil was imported in bond for marine use and
17,787,000 gallons of fuel-oil was imported for use in British Columbia ; of all the above imports
only the latter item is dutiable.
The most recent figures' available regarding the use of fuel-oil in British Columbia show
that of the total fuel-oil used for different purposes in Canada this Province used as follows:
17.4 per cent, of the fuel-oil in domestic and building heating; 22.5 per cent, in manufacturing;
1.2 per cent, for tractors; 70 per cent, by railways; and 48.7 per cent, for ships' bunkers.
British Columbia used 38.8 per cent, of the total fuel-oil consumed in the Dominion.
COMPETITION OF COAL PRODUCED OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During 1934 the importations of coal from United States into British Columbia consisted
of 2,486 tons of lignite, 1,928 tons of bituminous coal, and 5 tons of coke.
Imports of coal into British Columbia from Great Britain consisted of 282 tons anthracite,
42 tons of bituminous coal, and 1,574 tons of coke.
In addition to above, 300 tons of bituminous coal was imported from Japan and 314 tons
of coke from Germany.
The following table shows the amount of Alberta coal sold in British Columbia during
past years:—
Year. Short Tons. Year. Short Tons.
1925  117,037 1930  227,385
1926  127,858 1931  193,060
1927  187,028 1932  136,188
1928  262,198 1933  119,026
1929  247,060 1934  123,968
The total tonnage of coal brought into British Columbia during 1934 was 129,026 tons, as
compared with 151.573 tons in 1933. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 7
HYDRO-ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT.
At the end of 1934 the hydro-electric horse-power in use amounted to 726,000 horse-power.
The steadily increasing development of hydro-installations in British Columbia is shown in the
following table:—
Water-power
developed.
Year. Horse-power.
1900  9,366
1905  29,334
1910  64,474
1915  254,065
1920  309,185
1921  309,762
1922  329,057
1923...  355,718
1924  355,718
1925.   414,702
Water-power
developed.
Year. Horse-power.
1926  460,562
1927  473,142
1928  523,902
1929  559,792
1930  630,792
1931  655,992
1932  713,792
1933  717,602
1934  726,000
For the purpose of comparison it may be stated that one developed horse-power per year
is equivalent to the power value of 6 tons of coal.
ACCIDENTS IN AND AROUND COAL MINES.
During 1934, 2,893 persons were employed in and around the coal mines. Six fatal accidents
occurred during the year, as compared with three for 1933.
The ratio of fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 2.07, as; compared with 0.97
in 1933. In 1932 the ratio was 2.21; in 1931, 1.22; in 1930, 11.62; in 1929, 2.38; in 1928, 2.64;
in 1927, 2.10;  in 1926, 1.88;  in 1925, 1.10;   the average for the ten-year period being 2.89.
The number of fatal accidents per 1,000,000 tons produced during 1934 was 4.45 ; during 1933
the figure was 2.37 ; in 1932, 5.21; in 1931, 2.81; in 1930, 28.64 ; in 1929, 5.33 ; in 1928, 5.54 ;
in 1927, 4.48; in 1926, 4.3 ; in 1925, 2.45; the average for the ten-year period being 6.53 per
1,000,000 tons of coal mined.
The following table shows the collieries at which the fatal accidents occurred during 1934
and comparative figures for 1933:—
Name of Company.
Name of Colliery.
1934.
1933.
1
1
1
3
1
1
Michel  -..-	
1
Totals	
6
3
The following table shows the various causes of fatal accidents and their percentage of
the whole, with corresponding figures for 1933:—
Cause.
1934.
1933.
No.
Per Cent.
No.
Per Cent.
4
2
66.70
33.30
2
1
66.70
33.30
Totals    	
6
100.00
3
100.00
I G 8
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
The following table shows the number of tons of coal mined for each fatal accident in their
respective classes in the years 1934 and 1933:—-
1934.
1933.
Cause.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
No. of
Fatal
Accidents.
No. of Tons of
Coal mined per
Fatal Accident.
4
2
336,772
673,545
2
1
632,373
1,264,746
Totals	
6
224,515
3
421,582
The number of tons mined per fatal accident during 1934 was 224,515 tons, compared with
421,582 tons for 1933.    The average for the ten-year period was 153,082 tons.
The following table shows the fatalities from various causes in coal mines during the year
1934, compared with 1933, according to Inspection Districts:—
Number of Deaths
from Accidents.
Total.
Accident Death-bate.
District.
Falls of
Eoof and
Coal.
Mine-cars
and
Haulage.
1931.
i
1933.
Per 1,000 Persons
employed.
Per 1,000,000 Tons
of Coal mined.
1934.
1933.
1934.          1933.
2
2
2
2
4
2
1
1.73
7.27
3.57
1.43
3.48
6.37
11 73
2.09
—-    I
Province (1934)
Province (1933)
4
2
6
3
2.07
0.97
4.45
2.37
The following table shows the ratio of accidents' per 1,000 employees and per 1,000,000 tons
of coal mined in the Coast and East Kootenay Inspection Districts for the ten-year period
ended December 31st, 1934:—
District.
No. of
Fatalities.
Accident Death-rate.
Per 1,000
Employees.
Per 1,000,000 Tons
of Coal mined.
Coast	
East Kootenay	
Total for Province
100
29
~129~
3.16
2.37
~2789~
8.19
3.84
6.53
The details regarding the occurrences of the fatal accidents in coal mines during 1934 are
as follows:—
The fatal accident which occurred to William Jenkins, miner, No. 1 mine, Michel Colliery,
on April 10th was due to a fall of roof. Deceased and others were detailed to timber a piece
of bad roof and while engaged in this work part of it fell and injured Jenkins', who died shortly
after.
The fatal accident which occurred to William McMillan, miner, No. 4 mine, Comox Colliery,
on May 2nd was due to a fail of coal and cap-rock from the working-face. Deceased had had a
shot fired in his working-place, but the shot did not dislodge the coal, and while completing the
work of the shot with his pick the coal and cap-rock fell outwards and killed him instantly.
The fatal accident which occurred to AVilliam Mitchell, miner, No. 1 mine, Michel Colliery,
on May 14th was due to a small fall of coal which caused deceased to fall against a face conveyor. While the falling coal was a cause of the accident, the fatal injuries were due to the
violence with which he fell against the conveyor. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 9
The fatal accident which occurred to Louis Harman, motorman, " B " seam, Michel Colliery,
on November 2nd was due to deceased being crushed between a moving trip and a " splashboard " at a loading-chute on the main level; he had apparently been coupling cars when other
cars came against the trip and caused all the cars to move ahead, and deceased had come from
between the cars just at the " splash-board " and his head was crushed.
The fatal accident which occurred to Harry A. Meikle, timberman, No. 5 mine, South
Wellington, on November 11th was due to a large fall of rock in an old roadway which he w-as
retimbering.    Deceased and his partner were men of wide experience and former firebosses.
The fatal accident which occurred to George Smith, bratticeman, No. 1 East mine, Coal
Creek Colliery, on November 23rd was due to deceased being crushed, below the right knee,
between the bumpers of two cars. Deceased had been standing in a parting of No. 20 East
slope when an empty trip, intended for a level below, was by some means deflected into the
parting where deceased- was standing against some loaded cars; he died from shock some hours
later.
EXPLOSIVES.
The following table shows the quantity of explosives used in coal mines during 1933, together
with the number of shots flred, tons of coal produced per pound of explosive used, and the
average pounds of explosive per shot flred (these quantities include all explosives used for
breaking coal and for rock in coal mines) :—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery.
Quantity of
Explosive
Tonnage
Total No.
Tons of
Coal per
Average
Pounds of
for
of Shots
Pound of
Explosive
Pounds.
Mine.
fired.
Explosive
used.
per Shot
fired.
80,163
234,391
119,900
2.92
0.66
42,225
136,506
54,793
3.23
0.77
53,623
193,002
53,623
3.59
1.00
5,200
4,897
5,600
0.94
0.93
2,200
1,839
2,900
0.83
0.75
875
1,345
1,771
1.53
0.49
100
242
150
2.42
0.66
700
1,498
1,000
2.14
0.70
20
175
100
8.75
0.20
300
613
600
2.04
0.50
185,406
574,508
240,437
3.09
0.77
No. 1 mine, Nanaimo	
No. 5 mine, South Wellington	
Comox Colliery	
Lantzville Colliery	
Fiddick mine	
Ida Clara Colliery (Richardson).
Jingle Pot mine	
Biggs' mine	
Old Adit mine	
Chambers' mine	
Totals for district..
Nicola-Princeton District.
5,330
18,328
5,400
3,000
4,500
473
24,611
78,764
19,157
4,123
12,897
1,060
1,074
9,540
25,500
9.000
6,000
6,500
940
4.45
4.30
3.54
1.37
1.45
2.24
0.55
0.71
0.60
0.50
0.69
0.50
37,031
141,686
57,480
3.82
0.64
Northern District.
1,950
3,277     j
3,500     j
1.68
0.56
Totals for district	
1,950
3,277     |
3,500     |
1.68
0.56
East Kootenay District.
91,604
292,027
243,988
9.22
29.05
31,673
8,247
50,239
8,740
	
0.63
0.94
39,920
627,619
58,979
15.72
0.67
264,307
1,347,090
360.396
5.09
0.73 G 10
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
Quantities of Different Explosives used.
Lb.
Monobel of different grades  211,331
Permissible rock-powder      52,976
Total  264,307
The following is a list of explosives permitted for use in coal mines by the Honourable the
Minister of Mines under the provisions of section 101, General Rule 11, clause (2), " Coal-mines
Regulation Act" :—
Polar Monobel No. 4. Polar Monobel No. 14.
Polar Monobel No. 6. Polar CXL-ite No. 2.
Polar Monobel No. 12.
MACHINE-MINED COAL.
During the year 1934 mining-machines produced approximately 616,895 tons of coal, or 46.8
per cent, of the total.
The following table gives the district, number of machines, how driven, and type of machine
used:—
Number driven by
Type of Machine used.
District.
Electricity.
Compressed
Air.
Mavor and
Coulson.
Anderson
Boyes.
Little         si<,k„i
Hardy.        &iskoi.
Sullivan. : In|fnd.U'
Vancouver Island
Nicola-Princeton..
East Kootenay	
1
30
23
30
8
1
7                   1
2                  27
12
11
3
12
Totals	
1
83           1             9
n      1        28
23
3                 12
1
SAFETY-LAMPS.
There were 2,488 safety-lamps in use in the coal-mines of the Province. Of this number,
194 were flame safety-lamps of the Wolf type and 2,294 were electric lamps of various makes,
as follows:  Edison, 2,223 ;  Wheat, 4;   and Wolf electric, 67.
The following table shows the distribution of lamps by district, method of locking, and
illuminant used:—
Vancouver Island District.
Colliery and Mine.
Method of Locking.
nra<rr,ot-,-o ' Screw or
S I Automatic
Lock- Clip.
No. 1 mine, Nanaimo	
No. 5 mine, South Wellington
Comox Colliery	
Lantzville Colliery	
Fiddick mine	
Ida Clara (Richardson)	
Jingle Pot mine	
Biggs' mine	
Old Adit mine	
Chambers' mine	
Totals for district....
35
12
28
87
538
204
375
27
10
11
4
Illuminant used.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
1,177
12
87
Electricity.
204
375
27
8
10
11
4
1,177 INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 11
Nicola-Princeton District.
Colliery and Mine.
Method of Locking.
Magnetic
Lock.
Screw or
Automatic
Clip.
Illuminant used.
Naphtha
Gasoline.
Electricity.
Middlesboro Colliery	
Coalmont Colliery	
Tulameen Mines, Ltd	
Pleasant Valley Colliery	
Blue Flame Colliery	
Cascade mine (Bromley Vale)-..
Canada Coal & Development Co
Totals for district	
7
10
5
4
2
2
30
75
181
132
74
25
495
7
10
5
4
2
2
30
75
181
132
74
25
8
495
Northern District.
Bulkley Valley Colliery	
Totals for district..
12
12
12
12
East Kootenay District.
7
36
22
120
330
172
7
36
22
120
330
172
65
622
65
622
194
2,294
194
2,294
Approved Safety-lamps, Electric and Flame.
A list of the approved safety-lamps, both electric and flame, was published in the 1930
Annual Report.    The following lamps, all electric, are now also approved:—-
No. 8.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18 of the United States Bureau of Mines. The only
bulb approved for use in this lamp carries the symbol BM-18 and is manufactured by the
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 9.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18f of the United States Bureau of Mines. This model
of Edison lamp in reality represents an extension of the lamp approval given under Approval
No. 18. The only bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18F and is manufactured by the National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 10.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 18n of the United States Bureau of Mines. This lamp
represents an extension of the No. 18 approval of the United States Bureau of Mines. The only
bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-18H and is manufactured by the
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio.
No. 11.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey. U.S.A., under Approval No. 24 of the United States Bureau of Mines. The only
bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-24 and is manufactured by the
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp is known
as the Edison Model J lamp.
No. 12.—The electric lamp manufactured by the Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange,
New Jersey, U.S.A., under Approval No. 25 of the United States Bureau of Mines. The only
bulb approved for use with this lamp carries the symbol BM-25 and is manufactured by the G 12
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
National Lamp Works of the General Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. This lamp is known
as the Edison Model K lamp.
(Unless otherwise specified, all lamps are cap-lamps.)
Note.—While the use of flame safety-lamps is permitted, it is the policy of the Department
of Mines to encourage the use of approved electric safety-lamps for all persons underground in
the coal mines, except such flame-lamps as may be required by the officials of the mines in the
carrying-out of their duty and in stwh cases as it is considered advisable to provide flame safety-
lamps in addition to the electric safety-lamps.
ELECTRICITY.
Electricity is used for various purposes on the surface at nine mines and underground at
five mines. The purpose for which it was used, together with the amount of horse-power in
each instance, is shown in the following table:—
Above ground—■ Nature of its Use. Aggregate H.P.
Winding or hoisting    1,577
Ventilation        625
Haulage       600
Coal-washing        335
Miscellaneous     2,047
Total horse-power    5,184
Underground—
Haulage   1,870
Pumping    2,120
Coal-cutting    30
Miscellaneous   770
Total horse-power :    4,790
Total horse-power above and under ground     9,974
Of the above amount, approximately 1,442 horse-power was operated as direct current and
8,532 horse-power as alternating current.
VENTILATION.
The District Inspectors' reports give details regarding the ventilation in the splits and main
returns of the various mines. In some instances requests had to be made during 1934 to
increase the ventilation during the year, while in others it was found that in some of the
machine long-wall faces over 20,000 cubic feet of air per minute was passing at a velocity of
over 1,000; this was considered to be too high, even although there was an attempt to reduce
the gas content in the air;   on the whole, ventilation was well maintained throughout the year.
Use of the Biirrell Gas Indicator.
The Burrell Gas Indicator was used throughout the mines of the Province, immediately
determining the methane content where the percentage was too small to be detected by means
of the flame safety-lamp.
Mine-air Samples.
Mine-air sampling was carried out as usual during the year and 355 samples were collected
in the various coal mines of the Province: of this number, twenty-three were spoiled in transit
and accidents in the laboratory. While samples were taken in all the mines at intervals, this
method is carried out most intensively in the mines of the Crowsnest Pass District and No. 5
mine, Comox Colliery, where the gas-inflow is much higher than in other mining districts of
the Province. In Vancouver Island and also the Crowsnest Pass Districts a large number of
samples were taken in old workings and near the seat of fires. Analyses of mine-air samples
taken throughout the coal mines of the Province during 1934 are on file in the office of the Chief
Inspector of Mines and copies will be furnished to any one interested. INSPECTION OF MINES. G 13
INSPECTION COMMITTEES.
Practically all the mines throughout the Province have had inspection committees, appointed
by the workmen under General Rule 37, section 101, " Coal-mines Regulation Act," who made
monthly inspections on behalf of the employees. The courtesy is acknowledged of many of the
inspection committees in forwarding copies of their reports to this office. The different
operations were reported by the above inspection committees to be in good condition generally.
COAL-DUST.
Sampling of dust was well maintained during the year and a total of 1,075 samples were
analysed at the different mines, and where the analyses showed that the incombustible content
of the dust sampled in any mine was only 50 per cent, immediate steps w-ere taken to see that
the mine or part of the mine was re-rock dusted.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
During the year the following dangerous occurrences, in addition to those causing injuries,
were reported:—
On January 8th a severe " bump " occurred on 19 East slope, No. 1 East mine. Coal Creek
Colliery, and heaved the floor 150 feet.
On February 11th open fire was discovered in No. 6 mine, Corbin Colliery; this was in the
vicinity of a heated area that had been dealt with for several months. Every effort was made
to control this Are by means of water and later by sealing off, but due to the crushed nature
of the ground this work was unsuccessful and in July it was found necessary to seal off and
abandon the whole mine.
On March 1st the hoisting-rope in the west compartment of No. 5 shaft, Comox Colliery,
broke inside the cone when the loaded cage was being raised from the bottom of the shaft;
the cage was only 1 foot from the bottom when the rope broke and no damage was done.
On March 14th an open outbreak of Are was discovered in No. 4 mine, Corbin Colliery,
and was dealt with by sealing off the area.
On April 4th three " bumps " occurred at one-minute intervals in No. 20 East slope, No. 1
East mine, Coal Creek Colliery; a considerable amount of coal was displaced and the methane
outflow was increased for some time.
On April 23rd a slight explosion of methane occurred in No. 5 level, Pioneer mine, and
two men sustained slight burns; this was in a raise that had been standing idle for some time
and when the two men went up they lit the gas which had unexpectedly accumulated there.
On April 25th a miner was slightly injured by an explosion of acetylene gas in the Bralorne
mine.
On May 28th a Are of spontaneous origin was discovered in the lower workings of No. 5
mine, South Wellington;  this area was sealed off.
On June 12th a serious outbreak of fire was discovered as a result of an old fire burning
through an old seal;   this was sealed off with concrete.
On June 18th a recurrence of the fire of May 28th was discovered in No. 5 mine, South
Wellington, and was dealt with by further sealings.
On July 13th a man was slightly burned by an ignition of methane in the 11 East level,
Pioneer mine.
On September 15th the hoisting-rope in the sinking-shaft at the Reno mine broke and allowed
the bucket to fall to the bottom of the shaft; this occurrence is dealt with in another part of
this report.
On October 18th spontaneous heating was discovered in 8 West section, No. 4 mine, Coalmont
Collieries, and as a result this area was sealed off.
On October 30th a heavy " bump " occurred in 20 East, No. 1 East mine, Coal Creek Colliery ;
the mine had not worked for five days prior to the " bump."
On December 12th the counterbalance in the main shaft, Sally mine, fell, due to the faulty
fastening of the rope to the hoist-drum; adequate precautions were adopted to prevent a
recurrence of this.
On December 13th spontaneous heating was discovered in 11 West section, No. 4 mine,
Coalmont Colliery, and as a result this area was sealed off.
16
_! G 14
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
On December 27th a small feeder of gas was ignited by a shot in machine-cut coal;   the fire
was promptly dealt with and no damage was done.
PROSECUTIONS.
During 1934 there were three prosecutions made for infractions of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" and special rules, all of which resulted in convictions.
Prosecutions under " Coal-mines Regulation Act."
Date.
Colliery.
Occupation
of
Defendant.
Offence charged.
Judgment.
July   13
Crow's   Nest   Pass   Coal   Co.,
Ltd., Michel Colliery
Miner	
Failed  to  observe  special  timbering
rules
$5 and costs.
Nov.   10
Canada  Coal  & Development
General Su
Failed  to   observe  regulations   pro
$25 and costs.
Co., Hat Creek Colliery
perintendent
hibiting naked lights underground
Nov.  10
Canada  Coal  & Development
General Su
Used     a     non-permitted     explosive
$25 and costs.
Co., Hat Creek Colliery
perintendent
underground
GOVERNMENT RESCUE-STATIONS.
The Department of Mines has now four mine-rescue stations in different parts of the
Province and centrally located in the mining districts—namely, at Nanaimo, Cumberland,
Princeton, and Fernie. During the year many requests were received from medical men for
oxygen and the inhalators for use in emergencies, and' immediate service was rendered in every
case. In the larger coal-mining districts of Crowsnest, Cumberland, and Nanaimo experienced
teams maintain a regular schedule of training throughout the year and so keep ready for any
emergency calls.
The preliminary training course consists of twelve two-hour lessons in the actual use of the
oxygen apparatus and Burrell all-service gas-masks in an irrespirable atmosphere and instruction
on the approved method of dealing with mine fires and recovery-work. The training itself is
strenuous work, and all candidates have to undergo a special physical examination before
starting training and must be under 34 years of age.
During the year, in addition to the regular teams in training, sixty-one new men took the
full training and were granted certificates of competency:—
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
Cert.
No.
"Where
trained.
791
792
793
794
795
796
797
798
799
800
801
802
803
804
805
806
807
808
809
810
811
John Blake   Nanaimo.
Herbert Collishaw :    Nanaimo.
John Gilmour :..   Nanaimo.
Robert H. Hamilton   Nanaimo.
Leslie Hunter    Nanaimo.
William Jardine   Nanaimo.
Joseph R. Laskovitch   Nanaimo.
Gilbert Leigh  Nanaimo.
Joseph Malbon    Nanaimo.
John Midan   Nanaimo.
Christopher Mills j Nanaimo.
John McKellor '.\ Nanaimo.
Walter Richards I Nanaimo.
William Wilson ' Nanaimo.
William B. Rafter....
Sydney Hunt	
Alexander Mossey	
Benjamin Nicholas...
Thos. H. Robertson..
Jack Taylor	
Harry Waterfield	
Nanaimo.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
812
813
814
815
816
817
81S
819
820
821
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
Dominic Armand	
James S. Dobinson	
Othniel Hepworth	
Charles Kules	
Arthur Paul	
Thomas Henry Baker	
David J. Morgan	
Irvine Morgan	
Gordon Hamilton Robertson
John Wm. Watson	
John Coggins	
Sherwood D. Ford	
Walter Forshaw....	
Thomas Grifiiths	
William Home	
Frank Tautz	
Robert M. Gellately*	
Geo. M. Downton	
Daniel Chester	
Perry Casarini	
Levi Elmes	
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Nanaimo.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Cumberland.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Anyox.
Nanaimo.
Coal Creek.
Michel.
Corbin.
* Substituted for No. 721, issued at Princeton, June, 1931. INSPECTION OF MINES.
G 15
Government Rescue-stations—Continued.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
Cert.
No.
Name.
Where
trained.
833
John Eckersley..	
Corbin.
Michel.
Michel.
Michel.
Corbin.
Fernie.
Coal Creek.
Corbin.
Michel.
Michel.
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
834
Herbert D. Hughes	
835
Thomas A. Heyes	
836
837
838
John Mogielka	
839
David McNay	
840
Robert Pettigrew	
841
842
SAFETY AND FIRST-AID WORK.
The Department of Mines through its Inspectors in the different districts has continued to
assist in keeping up the safety and first-aid organizations in all the mining areas of the Province.
There are now active centres of this work at the mines in the Crowsnest Pass, Kimberley,
Princeton, Nanaimo, Britannia, Anyox, and at the newer mines in the Bridge River area.
There is a growing realization that the utmost safety can be attained only by the fullest
co-operation between the mine employees, the mine operators, and the Inspectors of Mines;
most of the different safety associations are on this basis.
SUPERVISION OF COAL MINES.
During the year twenty-one coal companies operated twenty-three collieries, with thirty-
four mines, employing 2,050 men underground. In the supervision of underground employees
there were twelve managers, one safety engineer, nineteen overmen, eighty-six firebosses and
shotlighters, a total of 118, or one official for every seventeen persons employed underground.
" COAL SALES ACT."
A considerable amount of work was done by the Inspection Branch under the " Coal Sales
Act" during 1934, and this was principally directed to the examination of invoices of coal-dealers
and the coal covered by the said invoices to see that all coal was sold under its registered name.
The chief difficulty experienced in this work is during the winter months, when a large
number of small dealers and transfermen enter the retail coal business and peddle coal from
door to door; very few of this class of coal-dealers have a recognized coalyard or place of
business, and as a rule are only concerned in the immediate sale of whatever coal they may
have on their truck.
When a purchaser is found and the coal delivered, the coal is often found to be different
to what he had been led to expect, and when a complaint is made it is often difficult if not
impossible to locate the vendor.
If the authorities in the larger towns took steps to see that only coal-dealers with a
recognized coalyard were licensed, the substitution of inferior coals for the higher grades and
higher-priced coals would largely disappear. G 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
List of Registered Names of British Columbia Coals, approved by the Chief Inspector of
Mines, in accordance with the Provisions of the " Coal Sales Act."
Registered Name.
Colliery and District.
Producing Company.
Comox	
Old Wellington	
Ladysmith-Wellington	
Lady smith-Extension	
Hi-carbon	
Nanaimo-Douglas	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo Reserve	
Nanaimo-Wellington	
Wellington South, Ida Clara
Cassidy-Wellington	
Lantzville-Wellington	
Biggs-Wellington	
Fiddick-Douglas	
Little Ash-Wellington	
Jingle Pot	
Old Adit, Wellington	
Chambers-Extension	
Bromley Vale, Princeton	
Middlesboro	
Nicola Sunshine Coal	
Coalmont Coal	
Princeton Blue Flame	
Tulameen Coal, Princeton..
Diamond,   Princeton   District, B.C	
Sunrise, Princeton District,
B.C	
Pleasant Valley, Princeton
District, B.C	
North Thompson Gem	
Red   Triangle,   Princeton
Quality	
Princeton-King	
Hat Creek	
Aveling Coal	
Bulkley Valley	
Crow's Nest, Coal Creek	
Crow's Nest, Michel	
Corbin Washed	
Nos. 4 and 5 mines, Comox Colliery, Cumberland	
No. 9 mine (Wellington)	
No. 5 mine (South Wellington)	
No. 8 mine (Extension)	
Mixture of Canadian Collieries' coal and B.C
Electric coke	
No. 1 mine, Upper seam (Nanaimo)	
No. 1 mine, Lower seam (Nanaimo)	
Reserve mine (Nanaimo)	
Blend of No. 1 mine, Nanaimo, and No. 5 mine
South Wellington	
Ida Clara No. 1 (South Wellington)	
Cassidy Colliery  (Cassidy)	
Lantzville Colliery  (Lantzville)	
Biggs' mine (Wellington)	
Fiddick mine (South Wellington)	
Little Ash mine  (Wellington) ,
Jingle Pot Colliery (East Wellington)	
Old Adit (Wellington)	
Chambers  (Extension)	
Bromley Vale (Princeton)	
Middlesboro  (Merritt)	
Sunshine  (Merritt)	
Coalmont  (Coalmont)	
Blue Flame (Princeton)	
Tulameen  (Princeton)	
Diamond   (Princeton)	
Sunrise (Princeton)	
Diamond and Sunrise Blended (Princeton)	
North Thompson (North Thompson)	
Red Triangle   (Princeton)	
King  (Princeton)	
Hat Creek  (Lillooet)	
Aveling (Telkwa)	
Bulkley Valley (Telkwa)	
Coal Creek (Coal Creek)	
Michel  (Michel)	
Corbin  (Corbin) ,
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.
Western   Fuel   Corporation   of
Canada, Ltd.
Ditto.
Richardson Bros., Ltd.
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P.
Co., Ltd.
Lantzville Collieries, Ltd.
Biggs' mine.
Fiddick mine.
Little Ash-Wellington.
Jingle Pot Colliery, Ltd.
Old Adit Mine (C. Stronach).
R. H. Chambers.
Bromley Vale Colliery, Ltd.
Middlesboro Collieries,  Ltd.
Sunshine Coal Co., Ltd.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
W. R. Wilson Mining & Investment Co.
Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
North Thompson Colliery, Ltd.
Red Triangle Coal Co., Ltd.
King Colliery, Ltd.
Canada   Coal   &   Development
Co., Ltd.
Aveling Colliery.
Bulkley Valley Colliery, Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Corbin Collieries, Ltd.
During 1934, in addition to numerous inspections of coalyards and invoices, there were two
prosecutions for the substitution of an inferior coal for the registered coal named in the invoices
given to the buyers; in one case the Magistrate held that there had been no intent to deceive
and in the other case a fine of $10 and costs was given.   Both cases were in Vancouver. BOARD OF EXAMINERS,  COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. G 17
BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR GOAL-MINE  OFFICIALS.
FIRST-, SECOND-, AND THIRD-CLASS CERTIFICATES AND MINE-SURVEYORS'
CERTIFICATES.
James Strang.
The Board of Examiners, which was formed on July 10th, 1919, now consists of James
Dickson, Chief Inspector of Mines, Chairman; Henry E. Miard, member; and James Strang,
member and Secretary to the Board. The meetings of the Board are held in the office of the
Mines Department, Victoria. The examinations are held in accordance with the amended rules
made by the Provincial Board of Examiners and approved by the Minister of Mines on September
28th, 1929. Two examinations were held in 1934. The first was held on May 16th, 17th, and
18th, and the second on November 21st, 22nd, and 23rd. The total number of candidates at
the examination were as follows: For First-class Certificates, 2 (2 failed) ; for Second-class
Certificates, 4 (3 passed and 1 failed) ; for Third-class CertiAcates, 13 (9 passed and 4 failed) ;
for Mine Surveyors, none.
The following is a list of the candidates who successfully passed in the various classes:—
Second-class Certificates.—Albert E. Rear, Munro M. Gibson, and John C. H. Davies.
Third-class Certificates.—Douglas AV. Jones, Vernon R. Uphill, Henry Sanders, John H.
Parker, Frank M. Dockrill, John Eckersley, Adolphus J. Tiberghien, William Dinsdale, and
R. E. Blakemore.
There is a continued improvement in the work of the candidates, this time particularly in
the work of the candidates for Third-class CertiAcates, who seem to be getting a better groundwork than formerly.
EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES  OF COMPETENCY AS COAL-MINERS.
In addition to the examination and CertiAcates already specified as' coming under the Board
of Examiners, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall be the holder of a certiAcate
of competency as such. By " miner " is meant any person employed underground in any coal
mine to cut, shear, break, or loosen coal from the solid, whether by hand or machinery.
The work of the Board of Examiners in examining candidates has been carried out in all
the mining districts and at intervals of not less than sixty days as required by the amendment
to the Act.
No certiAcate has been granted in any case where the candidate failed to satisfy the Board
as to his general Atness, experience in a coal mine, and a working knowledge of the English
language. During 1934 examinations have been held in the various coal-mining districts of
the Province. Eighty-seven candidates presented themselves for examination, seventy-three
passed and fourteen failed to qualify. In addition to the above, a number of duplicate CertiAcates
were issued to coal-miners who had lost their original CertiAcates. The Board of Examiners
desires to thank the different coal-mining companies for the use of their premises for holding
the examinations. The Inspector of Mines in each district has authority, under the amendment
(1919) to the " Coal-mines Regulation Act," to grant, after a satisfactory examination, a
provisional certiAcate of competency as a coal-miner to applicants, which entitles the holder
to follow the occupation of a coal-miner for a period not exceeding sixty days, or until the date
of the next regular examination before the Board. G 18 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS.
NANAIMO.
J. D. Stewart.
There were two calls to stand by with the apparatus in connection with underground Ares
at No. 5 mine, South Wellington, but the Area were sealed off without recourse to the rescue
apparatus.
There were nineteen emergency calls for oxygen from local doctors and others.
During the year twenty-four men were awarded CertiAcates for efficiency in mine-rescue
work after a course of training at this station.
The equipment at this station consists of six sets of the McCaa two-hour oxygen apparatus;
six sets of the Gibbs two-hour oxygen apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gasmasks ;   with supplies and spare parts to maintain the equipment in service.
CUMBERLAND.
John Thomson.
During the year five men underwent a full training course and received certificates of
competency in mine-rescue.
During the year twenty-four employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited,
maintained constant practice once a month.    There were no emergency calls during the year.
The equipment at this station consists of eleven sets of the Paul oxygen two-hour apparatus;
eleven sets of McCaa two-hour apparatus; twelve sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks and
twenty self-rescuers; also one pulmotor and one H.H. inhalator. An adequate stock of supplies
for the above machines are maintained at all times.
Two teams from this district competed at the mine-rescue competition held in Nanaimo on
June 16th.
PRINCETON.
Alfred Gould.
No emergency calls from any of the mines during 1934 were received, but eight calls for
oxygen administration from the Princeton Hospital were attended to immediately.
Several men have visited the station regularly during the year for the purpose of keeping
in training, and have thereby maintained a high standard of efficiency as rescue-men.
The equipment at this station consists of the following: Eleven sets of Burrell all-service
gas-masks; seventeen M.S.A. self-rescuers; one M.S.A. high-pressure pump to recharge oxygen
cylinders; one H.H. inhalator ; and an adequate supply of all necessary parts and materials
for the maintenance of the machines' are kept on hand. GOVERNMENT MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. • G 19
FERNIE.
John T. Puckey.
The only emergency calls received during the year were in connection with the continued
fire at No. 6 mine, Corbin Colliery. Six sets of the Burrell all-service gas-masks were sent from
this station and were in frequent use in patrolling and examining the fire area. All the rescue
equipment of the Corbin Collieries was overhauled, but the oxygen apparatus was not required
underground.
The first-aid classes of the East Kootenay Mine Safety Association were held in this station
during the year and ninety-three members obtained the St. John certificate for first aid.
Twenty-three new men completed the course in mine-rescue training and obtained the
Department of Mines certificates for this work; of these, eight men were from Corbin, nine
from Michel, and six from Coal Creek. Members of the local fire brigade carried out several
practices in the smoke-chamber. G 20 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
INSPECTION OF COAL MINES.
VANCOUVER ISLAND INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Geo. O'Brien.
Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd.
Head Office—Nanaimo, B.C.
F. Perry, President, Montreal, Que.;   Lieut.-Col. C. W. Villiers, Vice-President, Nanaimo, B.C.;
P.  S.  Fagan,  Secretary-Treasurer, Nanaimo,  B.C.;   John Hunt,  General  Superintendent,
Nanaimo, B.C.
This company operated the Nanaimo Colliery and the Reserve mine during the year.
NANAIMO COLLIERY.
Arthur Newbury, Mine Manager;   A. W. Courtney, Overman, North Side;
John Sutherland, Overman, South Side.
This mine, situated at the south end of the Esplanade in the City of Nanaimo adjacent to
the shore-line, is the oldest working coal mine in British Columbia.
The mine has four openings, as follows: No. 1 and No. 2 shafts on the Esplanade, Protection
shaft on Protection island, and Newcastle shaft on Newcastle island.
No. 1 shaft and Protection shaft are in daily operation. The other two are used as air-
shafts.
A detailed description of the power-installations, washery plant, and other equipment has
been given in previous Annual Reports.    No additions were made during 1934.
No. 1 mine was in operation 208 days during 1934 and the average daily output was
1,127 tons. This average is considerably below that for the year 1933, chiefly due to the
depression in the coal trade which necessitated the closing-down of the North side of the mine
for five months, from February to July, when it was again started on a reduced scale and kept
in operation for the rest of the year.
The output is from the North and South sides' of the mine in the proportion of about 40 and
60 per cent, respectively. The average number of men of all classes employed underground daily
is 460 for the twenty-four-hour period. On the surface there are approximately 270 men
employed daily, including pit-head, power plants, washery plant, wharves, machine-shops,
colliery railway, office staff, and engineering staff.
There are twenty-five certificated underground mine officials of all classes' employed daily in
the supervision of mining operations, or one mine official for every eighteen workmen and for
every 45 tons of coal produced, which may be considered very close supervision.
The sizes of coal prepared for the market are lump, nut, pea, and slack, and at times there
is a demand by customers for various combinations of these sizes which is readily prepared
for them.
Both the Douglas and Newcastle seams are operated on both sides of the mine and
practically the whole of the workings are submarine, having an average cover of 450 feet.
The whole output is hoisted from No. 1 shaft, which is the main hoisting-shaft 600 feet in
depth.
In the Newcastle seam the entire operations on both sides of the mine are worked on the
long-wall system, with face-lines about 300 feet long. These face-lines are equipped with
conveyors of the Meco type and driven by compressed air. All face-lines are machine-mined,
the coal-cutting machines being driven by compressed air and the depth of cut being approximately 6 feet.
The Douglas seam operations are chiefly recovery of pillars, some of which are machine-
mined.
Where possible, the undercutting is done in rock-bands in the seam or in the under-clays
directly below the seam. Some of the flnely ground cuttings from the undercut are carried along
the face-line by the air-current, which has a similar effect to rock-dusting the face-line and
nullifies to a great extent the dangers from coal-dust, especially where explosives are used. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 21
The surplus cuttings are packed in the waste or gob. Very light charges of explosives are
used in blasting the coal and a large percentage of lump coal is produced as a result.
Ventilation of the underground workings, which are very extensive, is achieved by two
fans, one situated at Protection shaft on Protection island and operated as a " blower " fan;
the other at No. 2 shaft on the Esplanade operating as an exhaust-fan. There is a third fan
at No. 2 shaft held in readiness for immediate use in case of emergency.
The haulage system underground is very extensive and is divided into two phases, animal
and mechanical. Steam, compressed air, and electricity is used on the mechanical haulage.
The animals are used for gathering purposes from the faces to near-by sidings, where trips are
made up for the mechanical haulage.
The pumping system is also very extensive and all three forms of power are used.
Most of the workmen are transported by ferry across the bay, a distance of 1% miles to
Protection island, where they descend the Protection shaft. A very small percentage of the
workmen descend No. 1 shaft.
Every effort appears to be made to keep the accident-rate down to the minimum, and it
is a pleasure to s'tate that considerable progress has been made, as this is the second year in
succession that no fatal accidents have occurred in No. 1 mine. Only two non-fatal accidents
of a serious nature occurred in 1934, and these were caused by falls of rock at the working-
face. This is a very good record and great credit is due to workmen and officials for their
co-operation in the drive to reduce preventable accidents.
The ventilation was kept up to a very high standard at all times and very little inflammable
gas or gas-caps were found in the live workings. In most cases where inflammable gas was
found it was issuing from roof-breaks or in the neighbourhood of " faults " and was immediately
dealt with and rendered harmless.
Precautions against the menace of coal-dust were efficiently carried out during 1934,
especially on the discharge end of conveyors, where a considerable quantity of dust is produced
as the coal from the conveyors is discharged into mine-cars. Haulage-roads and face-lines were
also taken care of, large quantities of lime-rock dust in addition to water-sprinkling being used
in the combat against the coal-dust hazard.
Regular sampling of mine-dust collected from suspected areas, was carried out and analyses
of the samples showed the dust to be well within the requirements of the regulations for precautions against dangerous mine-dust.
Regular sampling of mine-air was also carried on throughout 1934, samples of the mine-
air being taken monthly in every split and return airway, and in some cases bi-weekly samples
were taken. Through the courtesy of the Department of Mines at Ottawa, the samples were
analysed and returns of analysis were sent to this office regularly. As a result a complete
check of the chemical and technical analysis of the mine atmosphere generally is on record.
In conjunction with the taking of samples of mine-air, hygrometric readings are also taken
showing the relative humidity of the mine atmosphere. The analyses of the mine-air showed
the samples to contain but a very small percentage of methane gas and in no instance did it
exceed four-tenths of 1 per cent., showing the mine atmosphere to be well within the safety-zone.
Regular inspections were made by the miners' "gas committee" as provided for in General
Rule 37. This committee very kindly furnished a copy of all their inspections and at no time
during 1934 were there any reports of dangerous conditions existing in the mine made by this
committee.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" are kept at the mine, and
were regularly examined by the writer and found to be conforming to the regulations.
On the whole, general conditions with regard to safety at this mine were very satisfactory
throughout 1934.
RESERVE MINE, NANAIMO.
W. H. Moore, Mine Manager;  A. W. Courtney, Overman.
This mine is situated in the Cranberry district, about 5 miles south of the City of Nanaimo.
The coal-seam is reached by two shafts; the approximate depths of the shafts are 1,000 feet.
This operation was closed down in March, 1930, and remained closed until February, 1934, when G 22 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
it was reopened and some development-work was done, chiefly driving in rock. The mine was
again closed down in August, 1934, and remained closed for the rest of the year, the only work
being done during the latter part of the year was keeping the water from rising in the workings.
About 7,000 tons of coal was produced during the time of operation in 1934.
It is expected that the year 1935 will see this mine in operation again and further development is being considered.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir), Ltd.
Head Office—Montreal, Que.
F. Perry, President, Montreal, Que.; Lieut.-Col. Chas. W. Villiers, General Manager, Nanaimo,
B.C.; H. S. Adlington, Treasurer, Montreal, Que.; P. S. Fagan, Assistant Secretary,
Nanaimo, B.C.; John Hunt, General Superintendent, Nanaimo, B.C.; T. W. Scott, Assistant
General Superintendent, Cumberland, B.C.
The mines operated by this company during 1934 were No. 4 and No. 5 mines, known
as Comox Colliery, Cumberland, and No. 5 mine and the Alexandra mine, known as the South
Wellington Colliery, at South Wellington. No. 9 mine at Old Wellington was not operated
during 1934.
COMOX COLLIERIES.
These mines are situated in the Comox district, about 12 miles from the shipping-point
at Union Bay, which is reached by the company's railway and most of the output is shipped from
this point.
No. 4 mine is situated at the easterly end of Comox lake, about 3 miles from Cumberland.
No. 5 mine is situated about 1 mile from Cumberland. During the month of November the
Comox Colliery was closed down for three wTeeks owing to a labour dispute.
No. 4 Mine.
John S. Williams, Mine Manager.
Practically all the work done in this mine during 1934 was the recovery of pillars, and
at the time of writing the slope pillars are being withdrawn. There is only a couple of months'
work left to recover all the available pillars before final abandonment of the mine.
The coal is hand mined and loaded and is of excellent quality. During inspections the
ventilation was found to be maintained at a high standard. No explosive gas or methane
gas-caps were found on any inspections. All working-places were well timbered and maintained
in a safe condition. The portion of the mine now being worked is naturally damp and there
are no accumulations of dangerous coal-dust.
One fatal and two non-fatal accidents occurred in this mine during 1934. The fatal and
one non-fatal accident were caused by falls of cap-rock and coal at the working-face. The other
non-fatal accident was caused by mine-cars and haulage.
The output from No. 4 mine averaged about 300 tons per day. There are six certificated
mine officials underground, or one official for each 50 tons produced.
Regular monthly inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee," who very kindly
furnished this office with a copy of each report of inspection made by them. At no time during
1934 were any reports of dangerous conditions existing in the mine reported.
Report-books as required by the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" are kept at the mine, and
were frequently examined and found to conform with the regulations.
The Scott slope, which is a part of No. 4 mine and situated about a mile north of the main
portal of No. 4 mine, is ventilated by a separate fan, and may be termed a separate mine though
operating the same seam of coal. The work carried on in this mine during the year was recovery
of pillars. All available pillars were recovered and the mine finally abandoned at the end of
the year. Pumping operations, however, will be continued for some time to come, as a considerable quantity of water can be prevented from flowing into No. 4 mine by keeping the Scott slope
pumps in operation as both mines are connected. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 23
No. 5 Mine.
Robert Laird, Mine Manager;   Sam Jones, Overman.
The seam is reached by a shaft about 280 feet in depth. The present seam being worked
is known as the No. 2 seam and is of excellent quality. All the workings in this mine are on
the dip side of the shaft and are reached by slopes driven down from the shaft-level. The main
slope-face is about 1 mile from the shaft-bottom and the long-wall system is the method of
working. Long-wall faces average about 300 feet in length. The coal is machine-mined by
compressed-air-driven coal-cutting machines; the depth of undercut averages about 5 feet. Meco
conveyors are used on the long-wall faces driven by compressed air and are very efficient.
The power plant, consisting of four air-compressors driven by electricity, is situated underground on the Main slope about 4,000 feet from the shaft-bottom. The compressor-rooms are
built of concrete and iron and are made as fire-proof as it is possible to make them.
The average output daily from the mine is about 800 tons and this can be increased any
time market conditions become favourable.
There are fourteen certiAcated mine officials employed daily underground, or one mine official
for every 57 tons of coal produced.
This seam is known to give off large quantities of methane gas and extreme safety measures
are necessary. Blasting operations are carried on under the following regulations : No shooting
off the solid ; all shots must be properly mined; each individual shot-hole is to be thoroughly
cleaned out and a cartridge of lime-rock dust placed at the back of the hole, the powder is then
inserted, and this is followed by at least three cartridges of lime-rock dust so that the detonation
takes place between two cushions of lime-rock dust for the purpose of preventing flame from the
explosion of the powder. Up to the present time this method has been found to be satisfactory.
All shots are electrically Ared.
During 1934 the ventilation of the mine was considerably improved. A rock-raise 8 by 14
feet and 700 feet long on an angle of 46 degrees was driven from No. 1 level to the surface,
where a perpendicular shaft 22 feet deep was sunk. This shaft is concrete-lined. A double-
inlet Sirocco fan was installed at the top of this shaft in a Are-proof building constructed
of concrete and metal. This fan was put into operation in October last and has made a
great improvement in the quantity of air in circulation in the mine. The old fan-drift is now
used as an additional intake augmenting the shaft intake. The old fan is still in position at
its original site and can be used as a " blower " should it become necessary. At the time of
the writer's last inspection in December he measured 120,000 cubic feet of air per minute passing
in the main intake at a point about 3.000 feet down the Main slope. This air is divided into
four splits, giving each district in the mine a separate split of fresh air continuously circulating
along the working-faces and roadways.
No explosive gas was found during any inspections in the last three months of 1934.
A gas-cap, however, was found in the return air from No. 5 East district which indicated
1.5 per cent, methane. This gas was being given off from the old gob below No. 1 East level
and is gradually diminishing.
The last mine-air sample taken in the main return airway at the bottom of the new fan-
drift showed 1 per cent, methane. The quantity of air measured at this point was between
130,000 and 140.000 cubic feet per minute, or an average of 135.000 cubic feet per minute. This
shows that approximately 1,350 cubic feet of gas is given off per minute, and, carrying the
calculation still further, nearly 2.000.000 cubic feet of gas is given off in twenty-four hours, and
nearly 2.500 cubic feet of gas per ton of coal mined. This mine can well be considered to be a
gaseous mine and every known safety precaution must be used in operating a mine of this
character.
Precautions against the menace of coal-dust are carried out by means of rock-dusting and
water-sprinkling. All conveyors are equipped with water-sprinkling apparatus at the discharge
end.    All trips of coal sent up the slope are sprinkled to prevent the deposit of coal-dust.
Mine-dust samples are collected in different sections of the mine and analysed and the
incombustible content determined, which must be over 50 per cent, of the volume.
Mine-air samples are also collected and analysed and a fairly good check is kept on the
condition of the mine atmosphere. G 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
It is a pleasure to state that no fatal accidents occurred in this mine during 1934, and
only two accidents of a serious nature were reported as occurring underground, both of which
were caused by falls of coal at the working-face. One accident was reported on the surface
which was not of a very serious nature.
WELLINGTON-EXTENSION MINES.
No. 5 Mine and Alexandra Mine.
Wm. Wilson, Mine Manager;  Joseph Wilson, Overman.    (Same Officials for both mines.)
This colliery is situated in the Cranberry district, near the Esquimau & Nanaimo Railway
Station at South Wellington, and the colliery siding is connected to this railway. Most of the
output is shipped over the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway to the loading-wharves of the Western
Fuel Corporation of Canada, Limited, at Nanaimo. A small tonnage is shipped by rail to Lady-
smith to the C.P.R. slip located there and thence transported to the mainland on barges.
No. 5 mine and the Alexandra mine are both operating the Douglas seam and were formerly
connected and ventilated by the same fan. During the early part of the year, however, it became
necessary to isolate each mine, due to spontaneous combustion breaking out in No. 5 mine.
A separate fan was installed for No. 5 mine and both mines are now operated as separate units.
This colliery was in actual operation 194 days during 1934 and the average daily output
was 700 tons. The average number of men employed daily underground for the twenty-four-hour
period was 225. There are eleven certificated mine officials employed daily underground, or one
mine official for every twenty men and for every 65 tons of coal produced.
The ventilation was kept up to a high standard during 1934 and inflammable gas or
gas-caps were rarely found. Both mines are naturally damp and there is practically no coal-
dust menace.
There were two outbreaks of spontaneous combustion in No. 5 mine early in the year.
Both areas were successfully sealed without accident and no damage was done.
One fatal accident and two serious accidents occurred at the colliery during 1934. The fatal
accident was caused by a fall of rock and one non-fatal by a fall of coal; the other non-fatal
accident was caused by the person injured falling off a scaffold.
Regular inspections were made by the miners' " gas committee " as provided for in General
Rule 37, and this committee very kindly furnished the writer with copies of its reports. At no
time during 1934 did this committee report any dangerous conditions existing underground.
Regular monthly sampling of the mine-air and mine-dust was made, and the analyses of
same showed the different samples taken to be well within the requirements of the " Coal-mines
Regulation Act."
Report-books as required by the regulations are kept at the mine and were regularly
examined and found to conform to regulations.
On the whole, general conditions with regard to safety at this colliery were fairly satisfactory.
Lantzville Collieries, Ltd.
No. 1 MINE, LANTZVILLE.
Arthur Challoner, Overman.
This colliery is situated on the shore of Nanoose bay, in the strait of Georgia, about 9 miles
north of Nanaimo. The mine is entered by means of a slope 270 feet long and dipping at an
angle of 30 degrees. The seam operated is the Wellington seam and the method of working
is a semi-long-wall system. The coal is hand mined and loaded. Gateways are driven at from
30- to 40-foot intervals and the brushing is done in the floor, chiefly, to get the required height.
The mine worked for 244 days during 1934. Only a small daily tonnage is produced, the
total for 1934 being 4,900 tons. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 25
The ventilation of the mine, which is produced by mechanical means, was kept up to a fairly
high standard during 1934. No explosive gas or methane gas-caps were found during any
inspections.
Report-books as required by the regulations are kept at the mine and were regularly
inspected.
Regular sampling of the mine-air was done at monthly intervals and the analyses showed
the mine atmosphere to be in good condition.
One serious non-fatal accident occurred in this mine during 1934 and was caused by a
runaway mine-car on an incline. This car had not been properly blocked to prevent it getting
away. It is a pleasure to comment at this point that a very remarkable record of freedom from
accidents in this mine has been achieved, this being the first accident recorded in five years, but
to maintain this record complete co-operation and continued use of safety appliances is necessary
at all times to prevent avoidable accidents.
BIGGS' MINE, WELLINGTON.
James Biggs, Operator.
This mine is situated about 1 mile from Wellington and about 7 miles north of Nanaimo.
The seam is the very well-known Wellington seam and the mine is on the site formerly worked
by the Dunsmuir interests many years ago. Pillars left in by the former operators are being
recovered.    The coal is of excellent quality and is hand mined and loaded.
This mine did not operate steadily during 1934; a total of 119 days, only were worked,
with a total tonnage for the year of 1,478 tons. The mine closed down in August, 1934, and
remained closed for the rest of the year.
The ventilation was produced by natural means and at no time during the period of
operation was any explosive gas or gas-caps found. The cover on the seam at this point
is very thin;  in many places there is only 6 to 8 feet of clay and gravel on top of the seam.
The mine is naturally damp and there is practically no coal-dust menace.
No accidents were reported from this mine.
STRONACH MINE, WELLINGTON.
Charles Stronach, Operator;  J. W. Sanders, Fireboss.
This mine is situated about iy2 miles from Wellington and only a short distance away
from the Biggs' mine. It is; part of the old Dunsmuir property where the Adit mine was
worked many years ago. The present operations consist of recovering the pillars left in near
the surface of the Adit mine. The daily output is small and is handled by truck over a good
road. Approximately 200 tons was recovered during 1934 and sixty-six days were worked.
The mine closed down in August, 1934, and is now permanently abandoned.
JINGLE POT MINE, EAST WELLINGTON.
Alex. McLachlan and Associates, Operators;   Alex. McLachlan, Overman.
This mine is situated on the site of the original Jingle Pot mine at East Wellington, about
3 miles from Nanaimo. The seam is the Wellington seam and the present operations consist
of recovering the pillars left in by the former operators. The mine is reached by a good road
and the output, which is small, is handled by truck and sold locally.
The mine did not operate steadily during 1934; only 108 days were worked, with a
total tonnage for the year of 235 tons. The mine closed down in October, 1934, and remained
closed for the rest of the year. No accidents were reported from this mine during the period
of operation in 1934. .
G 26 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
FIDDICK MINE, SOUTH WELLINGTON.
Richard Fiddick, Sr., Operator;  Wm. Roper, Overman.
This mine is situated on the site of the former operations of the Pacific Coast Coal Company,
near the South AVellington Station of the Esquimau & Nanaimo Railway. The seam is the
Douglas seam and the present operations are the recovery of pillars left in by former operators.
The mine was worked for 271 days during the year and 1,849 tons produced. Most of the
output is sold locally.
The ventilation, which is by natural means, was ample for this small operation. Roadways
and working-places were well timbered. The mine is naturally damp and there is practically
no coal-dust menace.
Report-books as required by the regulations are kept at the mine, and were regularly
examined and found to conform very well with the regulations. No accidents were reported
from this mine during 1934.
RICHARDSON BROS.' MINE, SOUTH WELLINGTON.
Richardson Bros., Operators;  Daniel Caldwell and John Unsworth, Firebosses.
This mine is on the site of the former operations of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and is
close to the Fiddick mine, near the South Wellington Station of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Railway. The seam is the Douglas seam and the present operations consist of recovery of the
pillars left in by the former operators. The mine was worked for 278 days during 1934 and
1,794 tons produced. The mine is reached by a good road and the output is handled by truck,
though some of it is shipped over the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway.
The ventilation, which is by natural means, was ample for this small operation. No
accidents were reported from this mine during 1934.
CHAMBERS' MINE, EXTENSION.
Ralph H. Chambers, Operator.
This mine is situated at Extension, on the site of the original No. 1 mine at Extension
operated by the Dunsmuir interests many years ago. Access to the mine is by the Nanaimo
Lakes road, the location of the mine being about 7 miles from Nanaimo.
The seam is the Wellington seam and the present operations consist of recovery of pillars
left in by former operators. The mine was worked for 145 days and 696 tons produced. The
output is sold locally and is handled by truck from the mine to Nanaimo.
The ventilation, which is by natural means, was ample for this small operation. No explosive gas or gas-caps were found during any inspections in 1934. No accidents were reported
from this operation during the year.
COWIE'S PROSPECT, SOUTH WELLINGTON.
Cowie and Associates, Operators.
Prospecting for the Douglas and Wellington seams was carried on by A. Cowie and
associates, of Nanaimo, during part of 1934 in the area between Extension and South Wellington
in the Cranberry district. The seams were not located and prospecting was discontinued when
the bad weather set in.   It is expected to resume prospecting in the spring of 1935.
This covers in a general way the active operations in the coal mines of Vancouver island
during 1934.
All workmen in the coal mines of Vancouver island are equipped with electric cap-lamps,
chiefly of the Edison type.    All flrebosses and shotlighters are equipped with flame safety-lamps INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 27
for the purpose of gas-testing. All shot-firing is done electrically by shot-firing battery and
cable under the supervision of certiAcated mine officials and permitted explosives only are used.
All serious accidents were investigated and inquests attended on the fatal accidents. In a
number of the accidents investigated it was regrettable to And that they could easily have been
prevented if only ordinary care had been taken, and the writer again stresses the fact that if
the accident-rate is to be kept down to the minimum complete co-operation by all concerned is
necessary in the interests of safety. Safety appliances and safety measures are of very little
use if not taken advantage of by the persons for whom they are provided. Careful workmen
and officials are the best preventives, and it may be added here that most of the workmen and
officials in this inspectorate are careful, but there is always the odd one here and there who
either forgets or entirely disregards safety measures, and it is to him that an appeal for closer
co-operation in reducing preventable accidents is made.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
John G. Biggs.
The following coal companies operated in this district during 1934: Coalmont Collieries,
Limited; Middlesboro Collieries, Limited; Tulameen Coal Mines, Limited; Pleasant Valley
Mining Company, Limited ; Wilson Mining and Investment Company, Limited ; Bromley Vale
Collieries, Limited;   and the Cascade Coal Company, Limited.
There were no fatal accidents in the coal mines during 1934 and only two that caused serious
injuries.
During the year rock-dusting of the roads in the above operations has been well attended
to, and with the exception of the mines that are naturally wet, samples of material from the
roads have been taken each month for analysis and in almost all cases were in accordance with
the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations. No methane was detected in the mines during
1934 and only slight percentages were found by analyses.
Coalmont Collieries, Ltd.
Blake M. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  General J. AV. Stewart, Vice-President, Vancouver,
B.C.; A. H. Douglas, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C ;  D. McLeod, Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C.;
Geo. Murray, Superintendent, Blakeburn, B.C.
(This plant has been described in previous reports.)
This is the largest colliery in the district and is. situated 12 miles west of Princeton.
The power plant, screens, and mine-yard are situated at Coalmont and are served by a spur
off the Kettle Valley Railway; mining operations are conducted at Blakeburn, 3 miles distant
and 1,700 feet higher in elevation. An aerial tramway 2% miles in length is used for transporting the coal from the mines to the tipple at Coalmont.
This colliery consists of Nos. 3, 4, and 5 mines, which operate in the same seam; the
measures are separated into two coal-basins by a large intrusive dyke cutting through the coal-
basin. No. 3 mine is on the east side of this dyke, while Nos. 4 and 5 mines are on the west
side of the intrusion. All the work in Nos. 3 and 4 mines consists of the extraction of pillars,
while the slope developments in the No. 5 mine are developing a section of the Coalmont basin
lying to the west of the No. 4 mine.
No. 3 Mine.
John Davis, Allen McDonald, and Robert Barrass, Firebosses.
The entrance to this mine is close to the upper terminal of the overhead tramway. The mine
has been in operation since 1920, but is now near exhaustion and pillars are being extracted
within 500 feet from the portal.    Ventilation is produced by a 5-foot diameter fan situated near G 28 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
the portal of the counter-level, and during the last visit of inspection 12,000 cubic feet of air
per minute was passing into this mine for the use of ten men. The air was well conducted
around the working-faces, the brattice and stoppings being in good order. The working-places
and roadways were well timbered and, being naturally wet, were free from dangerous coal-dust.
No. 4 Mine.
Harry Hopkins,  Overman;   Robert Murray,  Frank Bond,  Thomas  Smith,  and
Thomas Bryden, Firebosses.
This mine is situated 5,400 feet north of the entrance to No. 3 mine and is reached by a light
electric railway running from the top terminal of the overhead tramway; it is entered by a
cross-measure drift 1,600 feet in length that intersects the Main slope. The seam has an average
pitch of 25 degrees and the operations at present consist of the extraction of pillars on the
No. 11 West level.
The measures at the Coalmont Collieries are of unusual thickness, highly volatile in
character, and may be better described as a number of seams of coal separated by a number
of bands of shale and bone, with the result that the operations are conAned to the best sections
of coal in the series. The coal is very susceptible to spontaneous combustion and all caved
areas have to be closely watched for indications of heating, which, when detected, is usually
followed by the suspected area being sealed off; two sections were sealed on account of
spontaneous combustion during 1934.
Ventilation is produced by an 84-inch double-inlet belt-driven Sirocco reversible mine-fan
operated by a 75-horse-power constant-speed motor situated near the entrance to the counter-
slope. During the last visit of inspection to this mine 25,000 cubic feet of air per minute was
passing for the use of twenty men. The brattice and stoppings were in fairly good order, the
working-places well timbered, the roads in fairly good condition and well treated with inert
dust. Analysis of material taken from the roadways showed them to be in accordance with the
requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations.
A well-appointed surgery and Arst-aid room is maintained at this colliery under the supervision of a first-aid man who is in attendance to render any service that may be required, while
the doctor is in daily attendance and resides at the mine camp at Blakeburn. A mine-rescue
station, with smoke-room, is also provided at the camp and equipped with five sets of Gibbs
self-breathing apparatus, gas-masks, inhalator, charging-pump, with a supply of oxygen and
regenerators at all times ready for use in case of emergency; Edison electric head-lamps are
used by the employees underground. Blasting is done, under the supervision of certificated
officials, with permitted explosives; shots are flred by electric detonators: and batteries and flame
safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used by the officials for inspection purposes. Copies of the
" Coal-mines Regulation Act" and special rules are posted at these mines.
No. 5 Mine.
William G. Brown and Wilfred Valentine, Firebosses.
The portal of this mine is situated 2,800 feet north of and at an elevation of 252 feet above
the portal of No. 4 mine." It is in the same seam as Nos. 3 and 4 mines. The coal is transported
down a surface incline to a siding situated near the entrance to the No. 4 mine; here the
mine-cars are again collected in trips and transported by means of the electric railway to the
top terminal of the overhead tramway. The development of this' mine has been confined to the
driving of a pair of 20-degree slopes from the surface outcrop and at the end of the year had
reached a distance of 2,300 feet from the portal. It is intended to drive these slopes- as far as
possible without any lateral work with a view to extracting the coal by the retreating method ;
by doing so it will be possible to have all abandoned areas under water.
Ventilation is produced by a small force-fan situated near the portal of the counter-slope,
and during the last visit of inspection 6,000 cubic feet of air per minute was passing into this
mine for the use of ten men. The air was well conducted around the working-faces, the brattice
and stoppings being in good order and the mine free from any trace of methane. The measures
are of the usual friable nature found at Coalmont. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 29
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd.
E. W. Hamber, President, Vancouver, B.C.; Thos. Sanderson, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
Robert Fairfoull, Superintendent, Merritt, B.C.
(This plant has been fully described in previous reports.)
This colliery is situated 1 mile south of Merritt and is connected to the Kettle Valley Railway
by a branch line; the colliery at present consists of No. 3 North and No. 2 South mines. There
was no change in the plant during the year and no new developments underground. The
measures are steeply inclined and form a series of small basins.
No. 3 NORTH MINE.
Alex. McDiarmid Allen, Overman;   Garnet S. Corbett, Fireboss.
This mine is situated 200 feet above and 2,000 feet south of the mine-yard near the top
terminal of the surface incline which provides transportation facilities from the mines to the
screening plant situated in the valley below. This mine is developed by a slope driven in the
seam from the surface outcrop and is in a seam 6 feet thick with the coal steeply inclined;
all the work consists of the extraction of pillars in proximity to the outcrop and the life of the
mine will be very limited. The mine is well ventilated by natural means and free from any
trace of methane.
No. 2 SOUTH MINE.
James Fairfoull, Overman;  Leslie Dickie, Thomas Rowbottom, and
William Ewart, Firebosses.
This is the most important mine of the Middlesboro Collieries; it is situated on the same
elevation and 1,000 feet south of the No. 3 mine, being developed from the surface outcrop by
an adit-level following the strike of the seam for a distance of 3,500 feet; the basin shape of
this area causes this level to form a large part of a circle and at the present time it is headed
outwards towards the outcrop on the side of the basin opposite to the portal. The seam is
about 8 feet thick and is fairly clean. Headings have been driven from the Main level to the
surface outcrop, a distance of 400 feet, for the purpose of ventilation; slopes are down the
pitch to the bottom of the basin.
Compressed air is the only power used underground for haulage, pumping, and coal-cutting.
Ventilation is natural and during the last visit of inspection 12,500 cubic feet of air per minute
was passing into this mine for the use of forty-five men: the air was well conducted around
the working-faces and the mine free from any trace of methane. . The working-places and roads
were well timbered, with a sufficient supply of suitable timber provided for the use of the miners,
and, being naturally wet, were free from dangerous coal-dust. The coal is mined by machines
of the post-puncher type and very little shot-firing is required. Electric head-lamps are used
by employees underground, while safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used by the officials for
inspection purposes.
Tulameen Coal Mines, Ltd.
Robert Dixon, President, Vancouver, B.C.;  A. B. Barclay, Secretary, Vancouver, B.C.;
Thos. M. Wilson, Superintendent, Princeton, B.C.
This mine is situated on the west side of the Tulameen river some 2 miles from Princeton
and is connected to the Kettle Valley Railway by a half-mile spur; there was no change in the
surface plant during 1934.
No. 2 MINE.
William Strang, Overman;   Frank Lester, David Francis, and
Thomas Dobie, Firebosses,
The seam is reached from a 20-degree rock slope which intersects the coal-seam 500 feet
from the portal, at which point the Main level follows the contour of the seam for some 1,700
feet;  the seam has an average thickness of 7 feet and all mining is done with the post-puncher
type of machines.   Practically all the coal in the developed area below the Main level has been
17 G 30 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
extracted and most of the present production is from the inclined area between the Main level
and the outcrop. Most of the underground workings are below the river elevation and as
a result this mine makes water rather freely and is faced with considerable expense for
pumping;   compressed air is the only power used underground.
Ventilation is produced by a steam-driven enclosed-type fan situated near the portal of the
counter-slope, and during the last inspection visit 18.000 cubic feet of air per minute was
passing into this mine for the use of forty-four men. The air was fairly well conducted around
the working-faces, the mine being free from any trace of methane; the working-places and
roads were well timbered and, being naturally wet, were free from coal-dust.
Pleasant Valley Mining Co., Ltd.
W. R. Wilson, President. Vancouver, B.C.;  R. R. Wilson, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C.:   Miss
M.   Duncan.   Secretary-Treasurer,   Vancouver,   B.C.;    Robert   Henderson,   Superintendent,
Princeton, B.C.
This colliery is situated on the south side of the Tulameen river 2 miles west of Princeton;
the power and cleaning plant being located on the river-flats.
No. 2 MINE.
Thomas Cunliffe, Overman;   John Gillham and James Sim, Firebosses.
This mine is 1,700 feet west of the mine-tipple and has been developed by the No. 1 West
levels, following the strike of the seam for a distance of 3,000 feet from the portal. The present
production of the mine is from the Nos. 4 and 5 Incline sections, where the work consists of the
extraction of pillars, and, owing to the low inclination of the seam, belt-conveyors are used for
transporting the coal from the working-places to the level below, where it is loaded into
mine-cars.
During 1934 the ventilation of this mine was found to be fairly good with no trace of
methane. The working-places and roadways were well timbered, with a sufficient supply of
suitable timber provided for the use of the miners. The coal at the working-faces is mined
by machines of the post-puncher type. Edison electric head-lamps are used by the employees
underground, while safety-lamps of the Wolf type are used by officials for inspection purposes.
Wilson Mining and Investment Co., Ltd.
W. R. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C.; H. P. Wilson, Vice-President, Fernie, B.C.; J. S.
Irvine, Secretary, Fernie, B.C.; Miss M. Duncan, Assistant Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver,
B.C.;   Robert Henderson,  Superintendent, Princeton, B.C.
BLUE FLAME MINE.
Robert Alstead, Overman;  Arthur Hilton and John Yards, Firebosses.
This mine is situated on the right bank of Lamont creek and about 10 miles from Princeton.
It is reached by the Hope-Princeton road, over which the coal is hauled by motor-trucks to
the Kettle Valley Railway near Princeton. This mine has been in operation under various
companies since the year 1927 and during 1933 was acquired by the AVilson Mining and Investment Company, since which time considerable improvements and developments have been
accomplished;   among the improvements are better living accommodations for the employees.
The seam is slightly inclined and about 7 feet thick, all mining being done with the post-
puncher type machines. New operations are being conducted in the No. 1 Right Heading section,
600 feet east of the slope, where a pair of levels are being driven north 30 degrees east, and
have reached a distance of 800 feet from the heading with a view of developing a new area.
The mine is ventilated by a 4-foot-diameter direct-driven enclosed-type ventilating-fan
situated near the entrance to the counter-slope. During the last visit of inspection thirty
men were employed and 8,000 cubic feet of air per minute was passing into this mine for the
use of twenty men.   The working-places and roadways were well timbered and treated with INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 31
inert dust; analysis of material taken from the roadways showed them to be in accordance
with the requirements of the Coal-dust Regulations, and the mine was free from any trace of
explosive gas. Edison electric head-lamps are used by the employees underground, while safety-
lamps of the Wolf type are used by the officials.
Cascade Coal Co., Ltd.
R. Haigh, President, Princeton, B.C.;  P. W. Gregory, Secretary, Princeton, B.C.
BROMLEY VALE MINE.
Antoni Ambrosi, Superintendent.
This mine is situated 5 miles west of Princeton and is accessible by a branch road off the
Hope-Princeton highway; the coal being hauled by motor-trucks from the mine-bunkers to the
loading-chutes situated on a spur off the Kettle Valley Railway near Princeton.
The mine was operated for the greater part of the year by the Bromley Vale Company,
which was succeeded by the Cascade Coal Company. The seam has an inclination of approximately 30 degrees and is about 14 feet thick; however, the upper part of the seam is somewhat
inferior in quality, with the result that only the lower 6 feet is mined.
The mine was found to be well ventilated, free from methane, and the working-places and
roadways well timbered. The coal is mined by machines of the post-puncher type and Edison
electric head-lamps used by the employees underground, while safety-lamps of the Wolf type
are used by the officials for inspection purposes.
The power plant consists of a return-tubular boiler, this power chiefly being used for
operating a single-stage 250-cubic foot compressor, which in turn was used for operating the
mining-machines.
Report by Thos. R. Jackson, Inspector.
Canada Coal Development Co., Ltd.
The above company operated the Hat Creek mine intermittently during 1934 and suspended
work indefinitely in November.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
Charles Graham.
Bulkley Valley Colliery.
F. M. Dockrill, Operator;   Edward E. Hughes, Overman.
This mine is located on Goat creek, 7 miles from Telkwa. Coal is hauled by truck to the
railway siding at Telkwa. The market is chiefly domestic and is confined to the line of the
Canadian National Railway between Prince George and Prince Rupert. The Canadian National
Railway uses it in all their stations between these points, and also in their steam-shovel and
ditchers, which are the only coal-burning units they have on this section.
The Main slopes were extended about 150 feet farther during the summer months and
practically all the operations are on No. 1 level. The ventilation is natural, frequent openings
to the surface providing sufficient ventilation. No explosive or inflammable gas has been noted
in the mine and it is free from coal-dust. ,
Skeena Development Syndicate.
Asa Robinson, Fireboss.
This is an organization of local men who have taken a lease on the Aveling property on
the Telkwa river. Considerable work had to be done on the road to the property and a bridge
built across the Telkwa river close to the mine.    At the end of the year the mine was ready for G 32 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
production. It is a different seam and different class of coal from that mined by the Bulkley
Valley Colliery, and an unfortunate feature is that they will have to share a very limited
market.    Two levels have been started and were in about 60 feet at the end of the year.
Lake Kathlyn Anthracite Coal Co., Ltd.
Thos. Campbell, Superintendent.
A crosscut adit was started at the foot of the mountain with the object of intersecting the
various seams outcropping farther up the mountain, the seams dipping at 65 degrees at the
outcrops. This adit was worked in a very spasmodic way owing to lack of funds. A new
organization has taken over control of the property, with Thomas Campbell in charge. It is
expected that active developments will be started early in 1935.
EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT.
John MacDonald.
Three collieries, consisting of seven separate mines, were operated during 1934—namely,
Coal Creek and Michel, owned and operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited,
with head office in Fernie; and Corbin Colliery, owned and operated by Corbin Collieries,
Limited, with head office in Vancouver.
A welcome improvement in trade was noted in the coal business generally and all collieries
in the district recorded increased outputs as compared with the 1933 production, as follows:
Coal Creek, 70 per cent.; Michel, 41.3 per cent.; and Corbin, 21.2 per cent.; the increase for
the district as a whole being 35.4 per cent. The production of coke at Michel Colliery amounted
to 22,178 tons, which was a substantial increase over the unusually low figure of 5,442 tons in
1933. Coal Creek Colliery worked 150 days during 1934; Michel Colliery, 232 days; and
Corbin Colliery, 267 days; this shows an increase of 22 per cent, in working-time when
compared with the total days worked in 1933.
Except for one short stoppage at Michel and Corbin over minor matters, no serious labour
troubles developed during the year; excepting the above, good relations have existed in general
between the various companies and their employees.
ACCIDENTS.
Fourteen accidents, four of which were fatal, were reported to this office and fully
investigated. Three of the fatalities occurred at Michel Colliery and one at Coal Creek Colliery.
By occupations the accidents occurred to: Miners, 3 (one fatal) ; miners' helpers, 2; driver, 1;
Vratticeman, 1 (fatal); motorman, 1 (fatal); conveyorman, 1 (fatal); mine mechanic, 1;
car-coupler, 1;   rollerman, 1;   truck-driver, 1;   and timber-packer, 1.
DANGEROUS OCCURRENCES.
Seven notices were received under this heading in accordance with section 71, subsections
(d) and (h), of the "Coal-mines Regulation Act," three of which were in connection with
" bumps " that occurred in January, April, and October respectively in No. 1 East mine, Coal
Creek Colliery; three had relation to outbreaks of fires at Corbin and Michel Collieries, and
one dealt with a mishap to a truck on the roadway between the " Big Showing" and the
loading-chute at Corbin Colliery. All of these were fully investigated and reported on in detail.
Of the Ares reported, two occurred at Corbin, one in No. 4 mine and one in No. 6 mine, while
the other was detected at the concrete seal in the old Are area of No. 3 East mine, Michel
Colliery, where it was found the fire had burnt through some faulted ground at the inby end
of the seal and ignited the timbers on the main return airway. This was finally brought under
control and the fire seal extended to more solid ground. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 33
Regarding those reported from Corbin, that in No. 6 mine proved very serious indeed. This
was first discovered on the night of February 11th when the fireboss was making his usual
inspection of the mine. Notwithstanding the fact that the most vigorous steps were taken
during the following five months to control this fire and seal off the district affected, it eventually
assumed such proportions that it was found necessary to abandon the mine, permanent seals
being erected at the various openings in the latter part of July. The outbreak in No. 4 mine
was found to have originated in an old Are area and had burnt through a seal on the north
angle in the No. 1 Chute district. On account of this Are being found in close proximity to the
main intake and return airways, all work was ordered suspended in the mine, with the exception
of that absolutely necessary in and around the various Are areas and the driving of a new
airway clear of the heated ground. After a suspension of four weeks, and conditions being
found comparatively favourable, permission was given the management to resume production,
provided the affected areas were constantly patrolled by experienced men on each shift, who
had instructions to withdraw all men at the least sign of anything unusual in regard to Are
or smoke. A considerable amount of cleaning-up and repairing of old workings has been done
during 1934 in the heated areas of this mine, as past experience has proven this to be the
only effective method of dealing with such conditions. In extracted areas, where the direct
method of Aghting fire is impossible, fire seals composed of gravel or crushed limestone-dust
are erected in all roadways through which leakages of noxious gases may be anticipated, and
these have generally been very effective in isolating such portions of the mine from the active
workings.
VENTILATION.
Conditions in this respect have been generally satisfactory and are dealt with more fully
at a later stage in this report. Seventy-nine samples of mine-air were sent to the Department
of Mines at Ottawa for analysis, eighteen being sent from Coal Creek Colliery, twelve from
Michel, and forty-nine from Corbin. Following the practice of the previous year, the majority
of these were taken in and around old workings where heating was suspected or in progress to
check on the possibility of carbon-monoxide leakage rather than methane, as the latter has
rarely exceeded 1 per cent, in the regular air-currents. The carbon-monoxide contents of several
samples taken in the Are areas of Nos. 4 and 6 mines, Corbin Colliery, varied from a slight
trace to 0.10 per cent.
REGULATIONS FOR PRECAUTIONS AGAINST COAL-DUST.
Except for a few isolated cases, which were usually attended to immediately the attention
of the management was directed to same, conditions generally with respect to this danger have
been kept fairly satisfactory. Crushed limestone-dust is the medium used to combat the dust
hazard, in addition to being extensively used at and around all fire areas. Eight hundred and
eighty-five samples of dust were taken in the district in accordance with the Coal-dust Regulations, all but fourteen being in keeping with the standard set by Regulation No. 4. In all cases
where samples are found to be under the standard, additional treatment is given the roadways
in question and further samples taken.
INSPECTION ON BEHALF OF THE WORKMEN.
This inspection has been made at regular intervals at all mines throughout the district,
and it is very satisfactory to report that a most commendable spirit of co-operation was shown
by the various committees in maintaining and encouraging safety-first methods in and around
the mines. No complaints or unsatisfactory reports in regard to working conditions were
received from any inspection committee. Searches for matches or other articles prohibited by
General Rule 9 were made regularly, but no contravention of the above rule was discovered.
EXPLOSIVES.
At Michel and Corbin explosives are used in certain districts to bring down the undermined
coal; no explosives are used for this purpose at Coal Creek Colliery. General Rules 11 and 12
regarding the handling and use of explosives have been fairly well complied with. Full particulars in the matter of the amount of explosives used and total number of shots fired are
given in the regular returns under this heading. G 34 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
COAL-CUTTING MACHINERY.
The coal-cutting machines that were installed during 1933 on the long-wall faces in the
" B " seam district of No. 1 mine, Michel Colliery, have been operated steadily and given very
satisfactory service; additional machines of the percussive type have also been introduced in
this district and have greatly facilitated the driving of the main development places. It might
be stated here that the greater portion of the Michel output is machine-mined coal, full particulars of the tonnage produced by this means being given in detail in the annual returns under
this heading.
MINE-RESCUE AND FIRST AID.
Successful classes in first aid were held during 1934 at Fernie, Michel, and Corbin;
while none were held at Coal Creek, arrangements have already been made regarding the
resumption of this work in the latter centre and the initial lectures and practices are to
commence in the beginning of January, 1935. The measure of success which has attended the
above classes reflects great credit on the various doctors who gave the lectures and the
certificated instructors who take charge of the practical work, as these gentlemen have devoted
much of their spare time to the teaching of this important subject in the various local centres.
It is very gratifying indeed to report that a total of twenty-three candidates took the
Department of Mines' course in mine-rescue training and were recruited from the different
collieries as follows: Coal Creek, 6; Michel, 9; and Corbin, 8. All of the above students
passed a creditable examination and the interest shown individually in the training will no
doubt react favourably on our mine-rescue personnel in the future.
BRIEF DETAILS RE OPERATING COLLIERIES.
At all collieries operating in the East Kootenay Inspection District the Edison electric cap
safety-lamp is used exclusively by the workmen, while AVolf safety-lamps are used by the officials
and bratticemen for testing purposes, all lamps being cleaned and repaired in well-equipped
lamp-rooms located in a central position at each colliery; Burrell gas-detectors are also provided
at all the mines and readings taken regularly in the return air-currents. Copies of the " Coalmines Regulation Act" and special rules are posted up at each mine and all report-books
required to be kept at the mines have been periodically examined.
Following is a brief summary on the conditions prevailing underground during 1934.
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd.
Head Office—Fernie, B.C.
AV. R. AVilson, President, Fernie, B.C.;   A. H. MacNeill, K.C., Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C.;
J. S. Irvine, Secretary, Fernie, B.C.;   A. A. Klauer, Treasurer, Fernie, B.C.;   B. Caufleld,
Superintendent,  Michel Colliery, Michel, B.C.:   E.  Morrison,  Superintendent, Coal Cre.ek
Colliery, Coal Creek, B.C.;   H. P. Wilson, Manager, Fernie, B.C.
The above company operated, during 1934, Coal Creek and Michel Collieries on the western
slope of the Rocky mountains in East Kootenay Inspection District. Coal Creek Colliery is
situated at Coal Creek, about 5 miles from Fernie. Railway connections from the colliery are
made with the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway at Fernie, over the
Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway. Michel Colliery is situated on both sides of Michel creek,
about 24 miles in a north-easterly direction from Fernie.
COAL CREEK COLLIERY.
E. Morrison, Manager.
This colliery is situated at Coal Creek and has railway connection with the Canadian Pacific
and Great Northern Railways at Fernie by means of a branch line, 5 miles in length, called the
Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway.
No. 1 East was the only mine operated during 1934 and worked an average of 12.5 days
per month, or a total of 150 days for the year, with a crew of 150 men all told.    Conditions INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 35
in the coal trade have not warranted the reopening of any of the other mines of this colliery
which were sealed off and abandoned in the latter part of 1932 and the first three months of 1933.
A general description of the method of working, system of haulage in and around the mines,
and- surface plant has appeared in previous Annual Reports. As the coal-seams at Coal Creek
are of a very friable and dusty nature in general, the company installed a calcium-chloride
plant in the latter part of the year for the purpose of treating certain classes of coal before
shipment with a view to removing the dust nuisance. This consists of a tank having a capacity
of 1,000 gallons and a force-pump capable of producing a pressure of 300 lb. per square inch,
together with the necessary piping and sprays. Three different sizes of coal are treated and
the finished product has aroused many favourable comments from satisfied customers.
No. 1 East Mine.
J. Caufield, Overman.
This mine operates the eastern portion of No. 1 seam and is ventilated by an electrically
driven 11- by 7%-foot Sirocco fan, which, running at a speed of 174 r.p.m., produced an average
quantity of 166,520 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 3.4 inches. Ventilation
is divided into two splits; the quantities passing in each at the last inspection measured as
follows:—
No. 1 Split.—40,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty men and six horses.
Burrell gas-detector, 0.6 per cent, methane.
No. 2 Split.—39,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of forty-eight men and seven
horses.    Burrell gas-detector, 0.7 per cent, methane.
North Return.—90,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty-one men and seven
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated 0.7 per cent, methane.
AVest side of fan-shaft, 110,500 cubic feet of air a minute ; east side of fan-shaft, 56,000 cubic
feet of air a minute;  total return air, 166,500 cubic feet of air a minute.
Explosive gas has been found several times in the course of inspection, mostly in cavities
in the roof above the timbers and close to the face of the long ventilating crosscuts which are
driven when necessary through the barrier-pillars which separate each series of rooms. Burrell
readings taken regularly in the return air-currents have varied from 0.6 per cent, in the No. 1
split to 1.3 per cent, in the No. 2 split. Roadways and timbering have been kept in a satisfactory
condition generally and fairly well treated for coal-dust, all roadways and working-places being
treated periodically with crushed limestone-dust where required. Three hundred and seventy-
six samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations,
nine of which failed to reach the standard set by the above regulation.
MICHEL, COLLIERY.
B. Caufield, Manager.
This colliery is situated on Michel creek, 24 miles north-east of Fernie, on the Canadian
PaciAc Railway. A general description of the method of working, system of haulage in and
around the mines, and surface plant has appeared in previous Annual Reports. In the latter
part of the year this colliery has been specializing in the production of a certain class of coal
for selective marketing which is meeting with a ready sale and is in keen demand by customers.
This is termed- a stoker coal and varies in size from iy2 inches to *4 inch. To provide a suitable
product to All the above requirements it was found necessary to install another coal-crusher
in the fall, together with the necessary elevators and conveyors.
In the month of June Robt. Bonar resigned his position as manager of Michel Colliery and
retired from further active participation in mining. As; a result B. Caufield was transferred
from Coal Creek Colliery to take charge at Michel. It might be mentioned in passing that
Mr. Caufleld held the position as manager of Coal Creek Colliery for over twenty years, during
which period he was frequently called upon to exercise all his powers of ingenuity and originality
in dealing with the many emergencies that occurred during his tenure of office as the active head
of a colliery such as Coal Creek, where mining was carried on at all times under the most
difficult conditions in past years, particularly with regard to bumps, blowouts, mine fires, etc.
It is needless to add that Mr. Caufield carries with him the good wishes of his many friends
for his continued success in his new sphere of operations. G 36 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
No. 3 Mine.
Robt. McFegan, Overman.
This mine operates the upper No. 3 seam and is ventilated by an electrically driven 12- by
6-foot Sullivan fan, which, running at a speed of 240 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of
123,720 cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 3.1 inches. Ventilation is divided
into three splits;   the quantity passing in each at the last inspection measuring as follows :—
No. 1 Split.—19,600 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and four horses.
Safety-lamp indicated a slight trace of methane.
No. 2 Split.—12,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and two horses.
Safety-lamp indicated a trace of methane.
No. 3 Split.—5,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of five men and one horse. Safety-
lamp, nil.
Main Return (all Mines).—130,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of 145 men and
sixteen horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.5 per cent, methane.
Explosive gas has been found on two occasions in this mine during the course of inspection;
in both cases the places in question were being driven through faulted ground. Burrell gas-
detector and safety-lamp readings taken regularly in the various return air-currents have varied
from nil in the No. 3 split to 0.6 per cent, methane in the main return airway. Roadways and
timbering have been kept in a satisfactory condition and generally well treated for coal-dust.
Where it is found to be necessary, all working-places and roadways are treated regularly with
crushed limestone-dust. Two hundred and twenty-eight samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were in keeping with
the standard set by the above regulation.
No. 1 Mine.
C. Stubbs and AV. McKay, Overmen.
This mine is reached by a crosscut from the upper No. 3 seam of No. 3 mine, which intersects
Nos. 2, 1, " A," and " B " seams; Nos. 1 and " B " only being operated at the time of writing.
Until the end of March, 1934, this mine was ventilated by No. 3 East fan; since then all mines
have been ventilated by No. 3 mine fan. Ventilation is divided into two splits; the quantities
passing in each at the last inspection measured as follows:—
No. 1 Seam, Return.—19,900 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and three
horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a slight trace of methane.
" B " Seam, Return.—30,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of fifty men and four
horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.5 per cent, methane.
Explosive gas has been found on several occasions during the course of inspection, usually
close to the faces of the development-places that have to be driven from time to time through
the barrier-pillars for the purpose of opening up new walls. Roadways and timbering have been
kept in satisfactory condition and generally well treated for coal-dust. All roadways and
working-places, where required, are treated regularly with crushed limestone-dust. One hundred
and seventy-three samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the
Coal-dust Regulations, three of which failed to reach the standard set by the above regulation.
No. 3 East Mine.
J. Henney, Fireboss.
This mine is ventilated by an electrically driven 8- by 3%-foot Jeffrey fan, which, running
at a speed of 240 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of 81,700 cubic feet of air a minute, under
a water-gauge of 2.2 inches. During the first three months of the year this fan provided the
ventilation for Nos. 1 and 3 East mine; the quantities passing at the inspection made prior to
closing down the fan measured as follows:—
No. 1 Mine, Main Return.—56,250 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of seventy men and
Ave horses.    Safety-lamp, 0.5 per cent, methane.
No. 3 East Mine, Main Return.—79,800 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of seventy-Ave
men and six horses.    Safety-lamp indicated a slight trace of methane. INSPECTION OF COAL MINES. G 37
Operations during 1934 have been conAned strictly to enlarging and repairing the main
return airway and reinforcing the fire seals around the fire area. As stated under the heading
of " Dangerous Occurrences," a serious outbreak of fire occurred in June at the inby end of
the main concrete seal close to the junction of the AVest level and the main return airway.
For two days following this occurrence every effort, was put forth to get the situation under
control, but without success until the fan was started as a blower. While this had the effect
of causing the fire to burn more fiercely for a time, it had the advantage of clearing out the
dense smoke, and by following up closely with the rock-dust and water-lines the fire on the
airway proper was soon extinguished. When the surrounding strata were sufficiently cooled,
the main fire seal was extended to connect with the solid ground clear of the faulted area.
Corbin Collieries, Ltd.
Austin Corbin, President, Spokane, AVash.; E. J. Roberts and J. M. Fitzpatriek, Vice-Presidents,
Spokane, AArash.; A. M. Allen, Secretary-Treasurer, Spokane, AVash.; E. L. Warburton,
Manager, Corbin, B.C.
CORBIN COLLIERY.
E. L. AArarburton, Manager;   F. W. Reger, Assistant Manager.
This colliery is situated 14 miles from McGillivray Junction on the Crowsnest branch of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, to which it is connected by a branch line, called the Eastern
British Columbia Railway. This colliery consists of four mines—Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6. All of
these were on the active producing list with the exception of No. 5; this mine did not operate
during 1934.
A general description of the method of working, system of haulage in and around the mines,
and surface plant has appeared in previous Annual Reports. Due to the closing of No. 6 mine
in July, preparations were begun in August for a new opening in the No. 6 seam in an isolated
portion of the bed situated to the north-west of the new incline. For the purpose of transporting
this coal to the railway it was necessary to grade an incline 2,200 feet in length across the
mountain-side; this has an average pitch of 18 degrees and is laid with railway steel. A new
dumping-tipple was ei'ected adjacent to the railway-tracks to handle this coal, while a hoist and
boiler were also installed to operate the incline. Coal production was commenced at this new
opening on October 1st.
No. 3 Mine.
M. M. Gibson, Overman.
This is an open-cut mine, the overburden being stripped off ahead of the face and the coal-
seam mined in a series of benches. It is then loaded direct into trucks by gasoline-shovel and
hauled to the main loading-chute at the colliery yards. Where blasting is necessary, all shots
are prepared and fired under the direct supervision of certificated officials. Conditions in
general were satisfactory at all inspections and the roadway down the mountain kept in good
shape. This mine resumed production in July and operated continuously until December 22nd,
when heavy snow blocked the roadway and stopped the hauling of coal. An attempt was made
to plough out the road, but the constant drifting of snow offset every effort made in this direction
and operations ceased at the end of the year for the balance of the winter.
No. 4 Mine.
J. Taylor, Overman.
This mine operates the No. 4 seam and is ventilated by an electrically driven fan of the
Guibal type, which, running at a speed of 160 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of 19,000
cubic feet of air a minute, under a water-gauge of 1.5 inches. This mine is all on one split, with
the exception of the fire areas ; the quantity passing at the last inspection measured as follows:—
A Level Intake.—18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of thirty men and three horses.
Explosive gas has been found on several occasions during the course of inspection, mostly
at the barricades in the caving areas. Burrell and safety-lamp readings taken regularly in
the return air-current have varied from 0.5 to 1.1 per cent, methane.    Considering the continual G 38 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
movement on the workings of this mine, roadways and timbering have been kept in a fairly
satisfactory condition, and good progress made in the repairing and enlarging of the main
return airway. All roadways and working-places, where required, are treated regularly with
crushed limestone-dust. Sixty samples of dust were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4
of the Coal-dust Regulations, all of which were in keeping with the standard set by the above
regulation.
No. 6 Mine.
W. Almond, Overman.
This mine operated the No. 6 seam and was ventilated by an electrically driven fan, which,
running at a speed of 280 r.p.m., produced an average quantity of 47,000 cubic feet of air a
minute, under a water-gauge of 0.5 inch. AVith the exception of the fire areas, the ventilation
was all on one split:  the quantity passing at the last inspection in July measured as follows :—
East Side Return.—18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of sixteen men and one
horse.    Safety-lamp. nil.
No trace of explosive gas was found during the course of inspection, while the methane
content in the return air-current was always under 0.5 per cent. Roadways and timbering
were kept in satisfactory shape and well treated for coal-dust. Forty-eight samples of dust
were taken in accordance with Regulation No. 4 of the Coal-dust Regulations, all but two of
which were above the standard set by the above regulation.
As mentioned elsewhere in this report under the heading of " Dangerous Occurrences," a
serious outbreak of fire occurred in this mine on the night of February 11th in the East Side
district, which in all probability originated in the extracted area on this side of the mine.
Although every effort was exerted for a period of five months to isolate this district from the
remainder of the mine, ■ the fire gradually kept spreading and gaining ground as the broken
nature of the strata, together with the fact that the breaks extended right through to the surface
and along the mountain-side for a distance of several hundred feet, made it practically impossible
to erect satisfactory seals. This situation assumed such alarming proportions that a decision
was given on July 13th to close the mine : from this date until the end of the month as much
of the material as could be got out safely was recovered and permanent seals erected at the
main entrances to the mine.
AA7est No. 6 Mine.
AV. Almond, Overman.
This is a dual operation, being operated on the surface as well as underground, and was
opened in the beginning of October for the purpose of providing some tonnage to help replace
that inadvertently lost by the closing of No. 6 mine. It is the intention of the company to
drive a new opening in virgin ground to the south of the former No. 6 mine; to do this it will
be necessary to construct a grade of a quarter of a mile in length around the mountain from the
top of the new incline, together with the driving of an adit in rock 500 feet long to tap the seam
at this location. Plans are also under consideration to branch out along the same lines at the
No. 3 mine or " Big Showing," as the experience of the past few years has proved that this
section of the property should be operated from underground in conjunction with the surface
workings.
CONCLUSION.
All accidents that occurred in this district were investigated and. where these ended fatally,
the inquests were attended on behalf of the Department. The writer wishes to express his
appreciation to the Coroners for their courtesy in allowing him to question witnesses with a
view to arriving at the cause of the fatal accidents.
The writer again wishes to thank all workmen, officials, and the different companies for the
co-operation and assistance given in carrying out his duties during 1934, and looks forward
with every confidence to this pleasant relationship being continued in the future, as it is
generally conceded by all concerned that it is only by this whole-hearted effort on the part of
every one connected with the industry that our accident-list can be reduced to the lowest possible
minimum. INSPECTION OF QUARRIES. G 39
INSPECTION OF QUARRIES.
BY
James Strang.
VANCOUVER MINING DIVISION.
Coast Quarries, Ltd.—This company operates a quarry at Granite Falls, Burrard inlet, about
18 miles from Vancouver. The granite is used for general construction-work. During 1934 work
has been very irregular, the number of men engaged varying from twelve to four. The regulations, generally, have been well observed and no accidents of a serious nature have occurred.
Thomas Burrows is in charge of operations.
Kilgard Red-shale Quarry.—This quarry is the property of the Clayburn Company and is
worked in conjunction with their clay mines. No material has been taken from the quarry
this year.
Deeks Sand and Gravel Pit.—T. O. Burgess, superintendent. This quarry is about 3 miles
above Second Narrows bridge on Burrard inlet. It is a hydraulic operation, electrical power
being used for mechanical operations of the plant, which has a producing capacity of 100 tons
per hour. The number of days worked at the plant was considerably less than last year. The
condition of the machinery, fencing, and other equipment was in good condition generally and
no accidents were recorded.
Cascade Sand and Gravel Quarry.—North Vancouver ; Alfred Ellis, superintendent. This
operation, which operated only part time during 1934, recovers sand and gravel from the
bed of Seymour creek by means of a large power-shovel. The condition of machinery, equipment,
and fencing was good and no accidents were recorded.
B.C. Sand and Gravel Quarry.—North Vancouver; William Monks, foreman. This operation produced very little during 1934. The machinery, equipment, and fencing were quite
satisfactory and no accidents were recorded.
Hillside Sand and Gravel Quarry.—West Howe Sound; John Campbell, superintendent.
This plant has been described in previous reports. On account of trade depression the plant
did not operate many days during 1934. The machinery, equipment, and fencing were in good
condition and no accidents were reported.
NEW WESTMINSTER MINING DIVISION.
Gilley Bros.' Quarry.—Situated at Silver valley, on the Pitt river. A plant for crushing
and screening granite is built on the banks of the Pitt river; the stone from this quarry being
used for general construction-work. AArork has not been steady at this plant during 1934, the
number of men varying from twelve to five. Machinery is in good condition and securely fenced.
Regulations have been well observed.
Maryhill Sand and Gravel Pit.—Operated by Gilley Bros.; is situated on the banks of the
Fraser just below the junction of the Fraser and Pitt rivers. The screening and loading plant
is operated electrically, a power-shovel and conveyor being used in the gravel-pit. The entire
plant is kept in good condition and regulations fully carried out. About twelve men are
employed when the plant is running to capacity.
VICTORIA MINING DIVISION.
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.—This company operates their main plant at Bamberton, where there
are two limestone-quarries and a cement plant. Bamberton quarry has not worked steadily
during 1934 due to lack of orders for cement. About thirteen men are employed in the quarry
when working. Officials and men at this plant are interested in safety measures and the
regulations are strictly observed.
Pioneer Sand and Gravel Co., Ltd.—This company operates a sand and gravel pit at
Albert head, but very little work has been done here during 1934.
Producers Sand and Gravel Co.—Situated at Royal bay. This sand and gravel pit has
been idle the greater part of 1934. G 40 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
NANAIMO MINING DIVISION.
Pacific Lime Co.—This company operates a large limestone-quarry, lime-kilns, and sawmill
on Texada island. The material from the quarry is conveyed by an aerial tramway to the
bunkers at the lime-kiln. Over 120 men are employed over the whole plant, an average of about
twenty men being employed in the quarry. Conditions at the quarry and plant were generally
found to be good.
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.—On the opposite shore of Blubber bay from the Pacific Lime Company
a quarry is operated by the B.C. Cement Company. The limestone is crushed and shipped by
scow to Bamberton. Work has been very irregular in 1934. The number of men employed
varied from seven to two. This plant is kept in good condition and regulations are fully
observed.
Marble Bay Quarry.—This quarry is operated by F. J. Beale and is situated at Marble bay,
near Vananda.   No work is being done at present.
Vananda Quarry.—Also operated by F. J. Beale and was opened in 1933. A loading-wharf
and crushing plant have been built. Conditions at this quarry were found to be satisfactory.
The number of men employed varied from twenty-two to thirteen, depending on the trade.
Vancouver Granite Co.—Operates a granite-quarry on Nelson island, producing a fine
dimension stone.    Work has been intermittent throughout 1934.
It is satisfactory to report that no fatal accidents occurred in the Coast District during 1934.
NANAIMO AND ALBERNI MINING DIVISIONS.
BY
Geo. O'Brien.
McDonald Cut-stone Operators.—Eugene Bottiselle, superintendent. This quarry is situated
near the northerly end of Gabriola island and the work consists of getting out cylindrically cut
stones for pulp-grinding mills, etc. The stones average about 5 feet in diameter, with a 3-foot
grinding-face. The stones are faced, bored, and dressed ready for installation in mills before
they leave the quarry. Blasting is done by electric battery and cable under the supervision of
a certificated blaster.    No accidents were reported from this operation during 1934.
Gabriola Shale Products, Ltd.—Charles T. De Long, manager. This quarry is situated near
the southerly end of Gabriola island. The work consists of getting out shale for the brick-
making plant located near by. A good grade of shale is produced for brick-making. The quarry
and plant were in operation for a short period only during 1934 and were then closed down
for an indefinite period. Blasting is done by electric battery and cable under the supervision
of a certificated blaster.    No accidents were reported from this operation during 1934.
The regulations under the " Quarries Regulation Act" are very well observed in these two
operations.
KAMLOOPS MINING DIVISION.
John G. Biggs.
Falkland Quarries.—Alex. Jessiman, superintendent. These quarries are operated by the
Gypsum Lime and Alabastine, Canada, Limited, at Falkland. The quarries are situated 30
miles north of Vernon and 2 miles north of the Vernon-Kamloops highway. Operations are
conducted in a large gypsum deposit; the work during 1934 being generally confined to
the upper or No. 3 quarry. The rock is blasted at the side of the mountain and loaded at
the foot of the quarry into 1-ton mine-cars and trammed by hand to the upper terminal of
a self-acting surface incline running down the side of the mountain to a bin below; from here
it is transhipped to an aerial tramway which delivers it to bunkers at the railway. The rock
is of a friable nature and as a result the walls of the quarry have to be maintained at a safe
inclination to provide for the safety of the men working on the floor;   this was well attended INSPECTION OF QUARRIES. G 41
to during 1934. About twenty men were employed at this operation and during inspections
working conditions were found to be good and the provisions of the " Quarries Regulation Act"
well complied with.
BELLA COOLA MINING DIArISION.
BY
Chas. Graham.
Cunningham Island Quarry.—This quarry, from which the Paciflc Mills at Ocean Falls
obtained their limestone in previous years, has been abandoned.
A quarry has been opened at Koeye river, about 7 miles south of Namu, by Christenson and
Neielson, and has produced 1,779 tons. AVork was just being commenced on this quarry at the
time of the writer's visit. Information and advice as to the requirements of the " Quarries
Regulation Act" was given to the operators; four men were employed. The balance of the
limestone required by the PaciAc Mills for the year, 6,761 tons, was obtained from F. J. Beale,
Vananda.
^^^—^^^— G 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES.
BY
James Dickson.
FATAL ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES   (INCLUDING
UNDERGROUND PLACER MINES).
There were twenty-two fatal accidents in and about the metalliferous mines in 1934, being
an increase of twelve from the Agures for 1933.
There were 4,525 persons employed under and above ground in the metalliferous lode mines
in 1934. The ratio of fatal accidents was 4.86, compared with 3.20 in 1933. The ratio for the
last ten-year period was 2.95.
The tonnage mined per fatal accident was 446,390 tons for the last ten-year period.
The following table shows the mines at which fatal accidents occurred during 1934 and
comparative Agures for 1933:—
Mine.
No. op Accidents.
Mining Division.
1934.
1933.
4
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
Morning Star	
1
Vital	
3
Otter Creek	
1
1
1
22
10
The following table shows the cause, the percentage to the whole of the fatal accidents, with
comparative Agures for 1933:—
1934.
1933.
Cause.
No.
Percentage.
No.
Percentage.
1
7
4
7
3
1
2
3
4
10.00
4.54
31.82
18.18
31.82
13.64
20.00
30.00
40.00
Totals	
22
100.00
10
100.00 INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 43
ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINES.
It will be noted that many of the following accidents are of an individual nature, where
greater care on the part of the deceased would have prevented the accident, and point to the
need of increased education and instructions on safety-first to the extent that every person
employed underground should personally realize the necessity of constant vigilance.
The fatal accident which occurred to Norman Mclvor, motorman, Sullivan mine, on
December 27th, resulting in death on January 14th, 1934, was- due to deceased being crushed
between his motor and the side of the working; his left leg was crushed below the knee.
Deceased had stopped his motor to allow another train to switch off his track and started his
motor ahead before the other train had cleared, with the result that the motor driven by
deceased collided with the other train and was derailed. He was crushed as he attempted
to jump clear;   normal care on the part of deceased would have prevented this accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Joseph A. Lewis, miner, Sullivan mine, on February
6th was due to deceased being carried down a raise where he was engaged in moving loose ore;
the ore under him started to move and deceased was caught and crushed by the moving ore.
The connected fatal accidents at Britannia mine on March 1st, whereby Joseph Coyle,
shiftboss, Robert AVhite, chute-drawer, and Samuel Perkins, motorman, lost their lives, is dealt
with in a separate part of this report.
The fatal accident which occurred to Ferdinand Turk, compressor-man, Alexandra mine
(Premier Gold Mining Company), on March 16th was due to deceased attempting to examine
the stuffing-gland of a belt-driven air-compressor while the compressor was going full speed.
He had leaned over the guard-fence and apparently was struck on the head by the bolts on
the driving-belt and when found was hanging over this fence; he was alone at the time and
died several hours later.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alexander Rea, miner, Sullivan mine, on May 10th
was due to a fall of ground when deceased was engaged in making a trail in a stope; the ground
fell from the back some 50 feet up the slope from deceased and some of the rocks rolled down
on him.
The fatal accident which occurred to Domenico Morrone, pluggerman, Hidden Creek mine,
on May 14th was due to deceased falling down a stope ; deceased was ballasting a trail which
was protected by iron pickets and three side-ropes and had apparently gone outside the fence-
ropes to obtain some fine rock to put a smoother surface on the trail and had fallen down the
stope;  deceased had no orders or need to go outside the fence.
The fatal accident which occurred to Alexander Gillis, miner, Bralorne mine, on June 4th
was due to the misuse of explosives. Deceased was engaged in bulldozing the rough ore on
the mill grizzly, which is a short distance from the mine portal; on this occasion deceased had
arranged two bulldoze charges, and after spitting the first apparently had trouble in spitting
the second charge and told his helper that he would get the second shot later. Both men left
the grizzly-house and went in different directions to prevent persons approaching until the shot
went off, deceased entering the portal of the adit. At this point he stopped an ore-train until
blasting was completed, and was talking to the train crew when the shot went off in the grizzly-
house ; he said. " All right boys, only one shot," but a second shot went off immediately and
deceased was found on the ground seriously injured. Apparently under the impression that
he had failed to spit the second shot, he had picked up the charge (one stick of dynamite) and
put it in his hip pocket, where it went off, causing injuries from which he died several hours
later.    Ordinary common sense would have prevented this accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Carl Lauderbach, miner, Pre Cambrian mine, on June
19th was due to deceased drilling into part of an old charge of dynamite. This was in a surface
open-cut operation which had been started and abandoned in 1923. Deceased was engaged in
drilling in the floor with a jack-hammer drill, and after the hole had been put down about 2 feet
the drill jammed, and deceased and several others tried to release the drill by various methods.
AVhile trying to get the drill out a small explosion occurred which did no damage, but made
the men suspicious that there might be an old missed shot in the immediate area; and they
made an examination to discover whether this was so, but did not And anything of this nature.
The air was then turned on the machine to assist in releasing the drill and an explosion occurred
that injured deceased so seriously that he died several hours later. G 44 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
An old hole was discovered about 18 inches from the new one and parallel to it; examination
showed that apparently only part of the charge in the old hole had been detonated at the time
of the original Aring. This shot had cracked the ground and apparently the heat in the ground
had caused the nitroglycerine to run through the cracks to where the new hole was being drilled.
The temperature of the rock at this time would be approximately 90 degrees, and this dynamite
must have been affected by varying temperatures since 1923, when operations were suspended
in this open-cut.
The fatal accident which occurred to Martin Kralj, pluggerman, Hidden Creek mine, on
July 6th was due to deceased being carried down a raise by loose ore which he had blasted from
a " hang-up " position some Af teen minutes prior to the accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Robert Fornasa and Steve Cernak, miners, Juneau-
Vital Mining Company, on A^ital creek, on July 30th was due to an inrush of mud and gravel at
the face of the main level. This is an underground placer operation and four men were engaged
at the face at the time of the occurrence, which gave no previous indications of danger; the
working was filled for some 14 feet outwards from the face and completely covered both men,
whose bodies were recovered the following day.
The fatal accident which occurred to Gunnar Brothen, miner, Pioneer mine, on August 16th
was due to a fall of ground while deceased was engaged in loading a round of shots; a piece
of the rock pushed him back some 10 feet from the face and crushed him against a stull.
The fatal accident which occurred to Joseph Umiljenovich, miner, Britannia mine, on
September 4th was due to a fall of ground from the side of a working. Deceased and his
partner were detailed to bar down and timber this part of the working, some 500 feet from the
face, and apparently thought they had taken down all the loose rock as far as they had gone, when
a large piece of rock slid down from the side of the working and toppled over on deceased, who
was barring down ahead. Both men understood this part was being timbered, as the ground
showed signs of being loose, and should have exercised greater care.
The fatal accident which occurred to Marco Dangela, nipper, Hidden Creek mine, on
September 6th was apparently due to deceased falling some 15 feet from a trail in a stope;
there were other men in the vicinity who saw his light disappear, but there was no evidence
to show what caused him to fall.
The fatal accident which occurred to Rasmus K. Lodomell, miner, Josie No. 1 mine, on
September 20th was due to deceased falling into an abandoned raise. Deceased was engaged,
with a number of other men, on a lease taking out ore, and while tramming had got off the
usual track with his ear and followed along the track to the abandoned raise, where his car
was derailed and the resulting jerk apparently caused deceased to fall into the old raise.
The fatal accident which occurred to Stephen Slonky, cage-tender, Pioneer mine, on October
10th was due to deceased falling out of, or being dragged out of, the cage while it was ascending
the shaft. Deceased and his partner were taking up a load of steel when they heard some
unusual noise, and apparently deceased had put his head outside the cage to investigate.
His head was caught by the timber and he was dragged over the safety-bar of the cage and
fell down the shaft. One-half of the cage-door was open at this time and was a direct contributory cause of this accident.
The fatal accident which occurred to Ole Loberg, miner, Bralorne mine, on October 17th
was due to deceased entering a chute to start the ore running and was caught and suffocated
by the moving ore. Deceased and his partner had taken all the ore that would run in this
chute and had then taken some ore from another chute, after which they returned to the first
one. Deceased said he would go into the chute to start the ore running, and his partner warned
him of the danger, but was unable to dissuade deceased from entering the chute.
The fatal accident which occurred to Ernest Fox, mucker, Twin Lakes mine, on October
28th was due to a fall of ground. A shot had been fired at this point a few hours previously
and the ground had been examined and apparently deemed safe. This was only some 30 feet
in from the entrance of the mine.
The fatal accident which occurred to Joe Annett, chuteman, Hidden Creek mine, on November 4th was due to his being struck on the head by a piece of ore while looking up a chute from
the gate; deceased was apparently examining a " hang-up " a short distance above the gate
when struck.    The " hang-up " did not move. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 45
The fatal accident which occurred to Samuel Popatz, mucker, Morning Star mine, on
November 25th was due to a fall of ground shortly after the miner had barred down the roof
at this point and the place was examined by the mine foreman some fifteen minutes prior to the
accident.
ACCIDENTS AT BRITANNIA MINE INVOLVING THE LOSS OF THREE LIVES.
On March 1st two separate but connected accidents caused death to Joseph Coyle, shiftboss;
Robert White, chute-drawer;   and Samuel Perkins, motorman.
Perkins was engaged on the afternoon shift as motorman and nipper on the 1,050-foot level,
and his work consisted of taking the necessary supplies from No. 1 shaft to the miners on this
level, and after delivering some timber to miners had started with his motor in the general
direction of Nos. 1 and 2 shafts; with the apparent intention of going to No. 2 shaft. To reach
No. 2 shaft he had to reverse and back-switch at a point some 700 feet from No. 1 shaft, and it
is the writer's opinion that when he reached this point and stopped his motor to throw the
track-switch for No. 2 shaft he found that he had not cleared the track-points with his motor
and had started his motor a few feet ahead.
There was about 3 feet clearance on the left side of the track and 1.5 feet on the right side
at this point and the control of the motor was on the right side. Instead of resuming his seat
in the motor to move this short distance ahead, Perkins had gone between the motor and right
side of the working to operate the control while standing outside the motor, and by some means
had been crushed and fatally injured when the motor started ahead.
The motor went on uncontrolled to No. 1 shaft and went down one of the hoisting compartments in which Coyle and AA7hite were being lowered at that time and were then 600 feet below
the 1,050-foot level.
The Arst intimation of these accidents was when the hoistman on No. 1 shaft hoist heard a
noise while he was lowering the two men and looked over his hoist in time to see the motor go
down the shaft; he immediately stopped his hoist and gave the alarm by telephone and then ran
to the nearest men on this level, and on the way to them found Perkins lying on the track near
where he had been injured.    Perkins was still alive, but died shortly afterwards.
A party descended the shaft and found that Coyle and AVhite had been instantly killed and
the cage totally wrecked, with the whole mass of the cage and the motor jammed in the shaft.
There is an established rule in this mine that motormen must not move their motor except
when they are in the motor, and apparently Perkins had ignored this rule and had, in this
instance, started his motor when standing outside.
At a distance of 80 feet from No. 1 shaft is a safety-switch for the protection of the shaft,
but at this vital time the switch was open to the shaft. At 18 feet from the shaft there were
stop-blocks over both tracks; these consisted of 4- by 6-inch timbers, faced with 3.5- by 0.5-inch
iron, and pivoted securely at one end, with the outer end held by a short hinged member.
These blocks were in position, but the motor rode over them and apparently kept the track,
as there were no marks of derailment, and reached the shaft; the shaft-opening is protected
by the usual collapsible gate of the lazy-tong type and this offered appreciable resistance to
the motor.
No ore or waste is handled on this level, which is used only for travel and supplies, and
while the stop-blocks offered a measure of safety they were not designed to resist a motor-
locomotive under power.
Perkins was a former shiftboss and had the reputation of being a disciplinarian in regard
to safety-work, but apparently he thought he could handle his motor in a way that he would
not have tolerated if done by a man in his charge. On his last trip from No. 1 shaft he had left
the safety-switch open apparently under the belief that as he was the only man using a motor
or cars on this level on the afternoon shift there was no need of the usual precautions.
Simple observance of the safety rules would have prevented these accidents.
REPORT ON A HOISTING-ROPE AVHICH BROKE DURING SINKING OPERATIONS
IN RENO GOLD MINES, LIMITED.
This rope was %-inch diameter and of non-spin construction and the material was best
plough-steel acid quality.    The construction  consisted  of five inner strands,  of seven wires
18 G 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
each, over a hemp core; these five strands and core making a complete rope with a left-hand
Lang lay, and over this was eleven strands, of seven wires each, with a right-hand Lang lay.
The normal load on this rope was a 600-lb. bucket and 2,400 lb. of rock; the bucket and
load fell from the clump to the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 350 feet, but luckily no one
was injured, although there were men at the bottom of the shaft.
The rope was installed on July 20th, and on September 1st some 14 feet at the bucket end
was cut off and hoisting continued until September 16th, when the rope broke with above results ;
the actual point of breakage being at the cross-head button, which was some 5 feet above the
bucket.
The dumping arrangement at the top of the shaft was by the fixed anchor-chain method;
that is, this fixed chain was hooked to the bottom of the bucket after the safety-door was closed
and the bucket was tipped upside down as the bucket was lowered by the hoist.
There was considerable bending of the rope in this process, and it is probable that this
bending was partly arrested and concentrated by the cross-head button and clamp, with possibly
some abrasion or cutting of the rope where it made contact with the clamp.
The fact that all the strands broke at this point (all the strands broke within less than
2 inches of rope-length) would indicate that the cross-head button and clamp had an important
bearing on the rope-failure.
Parts of this rope were sent to Alctoria for examination, and so far as could be determined
by visual inspection the rope appeared to be satisfactory and well lubricated and presented the
general appearance of a new rope.
Tests were carried out at the University of British Columbia, with the following results:—
No. of Test.
Part of Rope tested.
Strain at which
Rope broke under
Test.
Elongation of First
Sign of Breaking.
1	
1 in. to 3 ft. below break
1 in. to 3 ft. above break
13 to 15 ft. above break
Lb.
36,940
37,640
37,890
Inches.
1 60
2    	
1 30
3	
1.35
Remarks.—AVhile under test it was noted that all the outer strands failed simultaneously,
but that the strands composing the inner rope were not affected to the same extent, and during
test No. 3 the testing-machine was stopped immediately the outer strands broke and an examination made of the inner rope; as far as could be determined by visual inspection, the inner rope
appeared to be intact and it required further strain from the machine to break the inner rope.
No additional strength from the latter part of this test is included in the breaking strength
given, as the writer considered that when the outer strands broke the rope as a whole had failed.
It would appear that in a rope of this construction the inner rope and the outer strands
act as two separate ropes so far as their reaction to load ratio is concerned; whether, over
a greater length of rope, this difference is maintained is a matter of conjecture.
From above tests the writer is of the opinion that the non-spin advantage of a rope of this
construction is gained at the cost of slightly reducing the total available strength of the rope as
compared with the strength of a rope of the same diameter and standard construction, and
while the non-spin rope has very decided advantages in sinking operations, the diameter of
such ropes should be slightly increased as compared with the diameter of a standard rope
designed for the same load.
From the above results it will be seen that the rope itself can be regarded as satisfactory
for the duty it had to perform and had been subjected to severe usage, if not abuse; a careful
examination of this rope should have discovered some indications of the impending breakage.
While it may be conceded that a rope used in sinking operations is subjected- to more severe
conditions than obtain in normal hoisting, there is need for greater care in the examination
and supervision of the rope.
The knowledge that a rope is practically new and of good general appearance may tend to
cause those charged with the daily inspection of ropes, as per the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," General Rule 16, to rely on this knowledge rather than on a strict examination of
the rope itself and its reaction to the severe duty it is performing. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 47
It is with a view to securing co-operation in having all hoisting-rope examinations made
as carefully as the responsible nature of this work demands that this report is made.
EXPLOSIVES USED IN MINING.
During 1934 slightly over 10,000,000 lb. of explosives were used in mining operations in
the Province and approximately 4,000,000 shots were fired, of which 605,000 were fired electrically ;   21,000,000 feet of fuse was used in above blasting operations.
PRECAUTIONS REGARDING ROCK-DUST.
In the latter part of 1934 a Konimeter was obtained for sampling the dust content of the
air and much information of an interesting nature has been found, although much work will
have to be done to determine the nature and possible dangers of such dust in the mine-air;
this testing-machine shows a considerable amount of dust in mine-air which, to the eye, appears
to be perfectly clear of dust. The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company has purchased
a similar testing-machine for use in the Sullivan mine.
Particular attention is being devoted to improved ventilation underground and to, as far
as possible, having the main blasting done at the end of the shift, in order that the dust raised
by blasting may be largely cleared away before the next shift of men enter the places where
blasting has been done.
QUARRIES.
Most of the quarrying operations throughout the Province have been of an intermittent
nature and with considerably reduced crews, and at the different inspections under the " Quarries
Regulation Act" were found to be generally in good working condition; any recommendations
by the Inspector regarding increased safety were immediately acted upon.
There were 377 men employed in the various quarry operations and no fatal accidents
occurred during the year.
CONCLUSION.
The writer desires to express his appreciation of the faithful co-operation and assistance
afforded during 1934 by the District Inspectors and Instructors in mine-rescue work. He also
wishes to thank the management and employees at the various collieries for the assistance and
support given in making operations as safe as possible, and looks forward to a continuance of
the same during the coming year. It is only by the closest and efficient co-operation of all
par'ies concerned that the number of accidents can be kept down and so make the mining
industry a safer and more congenial occupation. The writer is much indebted to the Director
of the Mines Branch at Ottawa for co-operation in the work of mine-air sampling.
LILLOOET MINING DIVISION.
BY
Thos. R. Jackson.
Throughout the Bridge River, Lillooet, and Barkerville districts there has been developed
a keen practical interest in mine-safety and first-aid methods, and it is hoped that at the larger
operations a safety engineer will be appointed.
There were four fatalities and three serious accidents reported during 1934. Two of the
fatal accidents occurred at the Pioneer mine and two at the Bralorne mine. Explosives were
responsible for one death: ore in a chute suffocated another; one was killed by a fall of rock
in a stope: and a cage accident proved fatal to another. Excepting the stope accident, the
others can be classiAed as avoidable, assuming that ordinary care and judgment had been used.
A fairly good number of mine-air samples were taken in the various mines during the year.
In several samples traces of white-damp were found and one sample recorded a content of
0.03 per cent, some five hours after blasting. Black-damp registered as low as 0.75 per cent,
and as high as 3.01 per cent. Several air samples from the Pioneer and Bralorne mines showed
traces of methane and in the former mine this gas has been found in inflammable quantities.
At the Pioneer mine an excellent six-bed hospital has been built; on the ground floor is
a three-bed ward, a two-bed ward, and a single-bed ward, as well as an operating-room,
dispensary, doctor's office, etc.    On the upper floor is the nurse's living-quarters. G 48 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
The hospital equipment is up to date and includes a portable X-ray machine. Dr. G. R.
Barret is in charge and Miss M. Gibbons is resident nurse. Greater first-aid activity has been
manifested by some of the employees urged on by their own personal desires, the company's
assistance in this respect, the able services of Instructor J. D. Stewart, and the help, guidance,
and lectures given by the new medical incumbent, Dr. G. R. Barret. Quite a large number
attended these classes and were rewarded by certificates, labels, etc., just as the higher-grade
student passes his St. John Ambulance examination from one year to another. It is to be hoped
that some time during the year 1935 a suitable centre will be agreed upon by the chief operating
companies, so that a Bridge River District first-aid competition, with mine-safety equipment
and appliances on display, could be organized and carried out successfully.
During the writer's visits of inspection general operating conditions were found to be
satisfactory; the fatal accidents causing some improvements to be carried out as a future
safeguard.
B.R.X. Gold Mines. Ltd.—The general superintendent, is E. H. Shepherd. First-aid equipment is provided at different strategic points for the convenience of those who may be injured.
Safety notices and warning-signs are posted in conspicuous places for the guidance of employees
and explosives are very well looked after. No reports of accidents have reached this office
during the year.
Bralorne.—Operated by the Bralorne Mines, Limited, with Richard Bosustow as general
manager. An excellent hospital was built and a nurse is in constant attendance. Considerable
activity in first-aid and mine-safety work was maintained in the latter months of 1934,
resulting in the formation of a branch of the St. John Ambulance Association. This resulted
in twenty-seven employees gaining the St. John first-aid certificate. Richard Bosustow has
rendered every conceivable assistance towards encouraging first-aid work and has arranged for
classes for ladies, boys, and girls. It is also intended to hold an open Arst-aid competition
some time during the year, at which representatives from other mining companies will be
requested to compete.
General conditions in the mine were found to be good and attention immediately given to
any recommendations in regard to safety.
Minto.—Operated by Minto Gold Mines, Limited, with Warren Davidson as superintendent.
First-aid equipment is satisfactory and a qualiAed St. John Ambulance attendant is on the
ground to render first aid when necessary. Dr. Osborne is the medical officer for the company,
with head office at Minto City.
At the Grange mine it was requested that a second exit be provided and this work was
completed.
The following properties were also inspected during the year and general conditions found
to be satisfactory: Wayside, Grull Wihksne, Bradian. National Gold. Olympic, Bonanza. Butte
I.X.L., Congress, Pilot, Tuscarora, and Federal.
CARIBOO MINING DIVISION.
There were no major accidents during 1934 at the Cariboo Gold Quartz property; such
minor accidents as did happen were taken care of by a regular first-aid man and a doctor who
resides at Wells, where a small hospital is maintained. Throughout the year the doctor
conducted classes in first aid and twenty-one St. John Ambulance Society certificates were
obtained by those attending. All men working underground are required to wear hard hats
and those operating stoper-machines to wear gloves. It is proposed to have all men wear
hard-toed safety-shoes.
The Island Mountain, Richfield Cariboo, Cariboo Coronada, Barkerville, Quesnelle Quartz,
Bullion, and Sovereign Creek operations were inspected.
At the property of Consolidated Gold Alluvials of B.C., Limited, a surgery has been fitted
up at the mine, medical services arranged with doctors from Quesnel, and a qualified first-aid
man is always at hand for emergency work. A committee has organized a first-aid class with
weekly lectures and the first-aid man demonstrates the practical work between lectures. A St.
John Ambulance Association has been formed and a charter for same applied for to the proper
authorities.    No accidents were reported during 1934.
ASHCROFT MINING DIVISION.
The Lytton Gold and Vidette Gold, properties were inspected during 1934. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 49
SOUTHERN COAST INSPECTION DISTRICT.
BY
James Strang.
VANCOUVER MINING DIVISION.
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co.—C. P. Browning is general manager, C. G. Dobson is
mine superintendent, and N. D. Bothwell is safety engineer. General conditions were found to
be satisfactory.
There is no slackening in the efforts of the officials and men in safety education. First-aid
courses were conducted under the auspices of the St. John Ambulance Association, and sixty-two
persons, including men, women, and children, received awards of various grades. At the annual
first-aid meet, competitions are held where the skill of the members of the first-aid classes is
demonstrated to the residents and visitors.
Meetings are held every two weeks for each group of employees, at which recent accidents
are described and discussed with a view to finding means to prevent their recurrence. At these
meetings the men are encouraged to bring forward suggestions on any matter pertaining to
safety. Safety posters are put up on bulletin-boards at the entrance to the mine and in
illuminated cases underground. Simple charts are also drawn up and displayed showing the
records of accidents in each mine and on each shift. In addition to the location of stretchers,
blankets, and splints at all hoists and other strategic points, twenty-six first-aid kits containing
all the necessary requirements for immediate treatment of injuries are distributed about the
property. The importance of immediate treatment of cuts and bruises is stressed. The use
of hard hats is general and the use of hard-toed shoes and the wearing of heavy gloves is
encouraged.
The underground workings were found to be in good condition and ventilation is generally
good. A series of doors w-as installed to direct the natural ventilation on the 1,200-foot level,
which was inclined to be smoky, and further work is being done here. Timbering was in good
condition. Ropes are continually examined and reported on, careful records being kept, and
there is no hesitation in changing the rope—even before it might be strictly necessary.
Four fatal accidents occurred during 1934, on which full reports were submitted to the
Chief Inspector.
Complete first-aid equipment is kept at the property of the B.C. Nickel Mines, Limited, and
a competent first-aid man is also employed. General conditions were good and compliance with
the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" carried out under the management of Major C. B.
North.
The Ideal Gold and Nickel Mines, Limited, and Clayburn Company, Limited, properties were
inspected during 1934.
NANAIMO MINING DIVISION.
Alexandria Mining Co.—This mine was reopened early in 1934 by the Premier Mining
Company and worked until August, when it was again closed down.
A fatal accident occurred to Ferdinand Turk in the power-house at this property. He was
struck by the belt-fasteners while leaning over the guard-rail. A full report of the accident
was submitted to the Chief Inspector.
Enid Julie, Hercules Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, White Pine, and
Gem properties' were visited during the year and general conditions found to be satisfactory.
NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT.
John G. Biggs and Thos. R. Jackson.
Satisfactory conditions were found to exist at the various mining properties in this district
and the provisions of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act" being followed. G 50 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
There were four accidents at the mines in this district during 1934, three of which ended
fatally.    Two of these accidents happened at the surface and two underground.
Nickel Plate, Fairvieiv Amalgamated, Grandoro, Morning Star, Osoyoos, Stemicinder, Gold
Mountain, Mak Siccar, Hedley Sterling Creek, Tioin Lakes, Pre Cambrian, Nicola, Jenny Long,
Home Gold, and Windpass properties were inspected during 1934.
NORTHERN INSPECTION DISTRICT.
Charles Graham.
Conditions in general at the various operations in the district were satisfactory and in
compliance with the provisions of the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act." In the ease of
new operations those in charge were given information and advice with a view to having the
mines and power plants comply with the regulations from the start.
ATLIN MINING DIVISION.
Placer operations on Spruce, Otter, Boulder, McKee, Cracker, Ruby, Pine, Gold Run, and
Wright creeks and O'Donnel river were inspected.
A second opening was ordered at the Beaton mine, Spruce creek, but due to litigation very
little was done on this work.
Lode operations inspected include the Atlin-Ruffner, Atlin Pacific (Norgold), and Engineer.
STIKINE MINING DIVISION.
The Lady Jane, Jackson, and Big Chief groups, all lode operations, and a placer operation
on the Barrington river were inspected.
NASS RIVER MINING DIAnSION.
The Hidden Creek, Bonanza, and Granby Point mines, owned by Granby Consolidated
Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited ; Charles Booking, president; W. B. Maxwell,
general superintendent;  and F. S. McNickolas, mine superintendent.
Mine safety and first aid was given considerable attention by the officials and is under the
direction of T. Waterland, safety engineer.
A safety committee composed of the operating officials, two men from each section of the
mine, and surface representatives, meets regularly every two weeks. At these meetings questions
of safety are discussed and the employees are urged to bring up any matter which they consider
requires attention. The various members of the committee make inspections of their districts
with the safety engineer and discuss any matter with him with reference to safety in their
particular district. The writer attended several of these safety meetings and was very well
satisfied with the manner in which safety problems were discussed and decisions arrived at.
First-aid work has been very active during the past two years. Last year at Hidden Creek
mine sixty men obtained first-aid certificates. The Hon. G. S. Pearson very kindly donated a
cup on behalf of the Department of Mines for competition in the Northern District, but as
there was not sufficient time to arrange a district competition the cup was put up for competition at Anyox. (A competition was held at the mine on May 23rd, at which three teams
competed.) The cup was won for the first time by a team captained by Sam Reid. The competition created a great deal of interest in the work. This year they have had the largest
classes in first aid in the history of Anyox; 140 men enrolled for the classes at Hidden Creek
mine; ninety-four passed the examination and obtained certificates. There are now at Hidden
Creek mine about 200 men capable of rendering first aid to the injured. In addition, there
was a large class at the beach composed of mill, smelter, and miscellaneous employees. The
benefits of such a large number of men trained in first aid is incalculable. Prompt rendering
of competent first-aid service reduces suffering and prevents further injury through unskilled
handling. A well-trained first-aid man is also a safer man, and it is to be hoped that some day
all men engaged in mining and indeed in all industrial occupations will have first-aid training. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 51
The Granby Company has also trained a number of men in the use of the Gibbs and Paul
breathing apparatus. Two teams of five men each were given training. Six men were granted
the certificate of proficiency in mine-rescue work issued by the Department of Mines. The other
members of the teams were already the holders of these certificates. These teams were under
the instructions of T. Waterland and the men on examination showed the result of his careful
coaching. The company sent Mr. AA'aterland to the Rescue Station at Nanaimo to take some
further instructions in the use and care of the apparatus.
The Mastadon, Elkhorn, Esperanza, Gold Reef, and Homestake mines, all lode operations,
were inspected.
PORTLAND CANAL MINING DIVISION.
The following properties were inspected: Premier, Big Missouri, Salmon River Gold,
Unicorn, Pioneer Syndicate. Spider, Troy, Portland group, McKay Syndicate, Dunwell, Glacier
Creek, Lakeview, United Empire, L. and L., Argentine Syndicate, L.L. and H., Lucky Date,
Sure Thing, and Helena Gold Mines, Limited.
OMINECA MINING DIVISION;
The Columario, Lucky Luke, Diadem, Free Gold, Jessie, Glacier Gulch, Mamie, Gold Brick,
Topley Silver, Gold group, and Radio Gold properties were inspected.
Vital Creek.—This placer property is owned and operated by Juneau Vital Creek Mining
Company, Limited. The company owns some leases and has a lease on some other ground
owned by a group of Chinese. The lower adit was started and driven a considerable distance
by the Chinese operators. It starts in the creek-bed and follows the bed-rock grade for the'
entire length of the working, about 1,200 feet. Only a single working was driven. Ventilation
was by water-blast and wooden air-boxes. As very little blasting was required the ventilation
was fairly good.
Owing to the dangers from possible slides at the mouth of the adit, a second opening was
ordered. This will be either a vertical or inclined shaft and will be put down near the present
face of the adit.
Two men were killed at the face of the adit by a cave. The face and all of the adit was
well timbered. The cave was due to an inrush of water and glacial mud which was unexpectedly
tapped.
Other placer operations inspected were those on Tom, Slate, Manson, Lost, and Germansen
creeks and on McLeod river.
QUEEN CHARLOTTE MINING DIVISION.
The Kitsault Eagle, Haida, and Gold Harbour properties were inspected, but only the Haida
group had any work done on it during 1934.
SKEENA MINING DIVISION.
Surf Point and Surf Inlet mines were visited during 1934.
EAST KOOTENAY,  WEST KOOTENAY,  AND  BOUNDARY
INSPECTION DISTRICTS.
H. E. Miard.
Seventy-one operations were visited in the course of regular inspections. The total number
of men employed in and around the mines and mills of the district is varying constantly, and
the establishment of an absolutely correct census of those so employed is a difficult undertaking,
as fluctuations occur between inspections. A close estimate, made in November, placed this
number at 2,380.
During the year, 316 certificates of competency as blaster were granted, twenty-nine were
issued as substitutes, and ten certificates of the same class were cancelled, five owing to the
I	 G 52 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
death of their holders, the others for various reasons, chief among which was incorrect spelling
of the holder's name on the original. In addition, twenty-five certificates of competency as
blaster were issued under the provisions of the " Quarries Regulation Act," twenty-one being
granted to men engaged in road-work and four to holders of surface leases at Rossland.
Efficient ventilation is the chief prerequisite of successful mine operation, and this fact
is now recognized at most of the larger mines. In the gold-producing section intensive development has led to the sinking of shafts and the driving of long crosscut adits in order to gain
depth on the veins. To supply an adequate volume of pure air to new workings thus opened,
until they may be connected to the surface or to higher levels by raises, is a problem which, if
not readily solved, was until recently but too often looked upon as being only of secondary
importance. Fortunately, this attitude is now fast disappearing, although improvement is still
desirable in some cases.
Advantage was taken of the facilities placed at the Department's disposal by the Dominion
Department of Mines, and samples of air were sent to Ottawa for analysis when doubts were
entertained regarding the quality of a mine atmosphere. The practical value of the assistance
afforded in this respect cannot be overestimated. The use of explosives is, of course, the chief
cause of air contamination in metalliferous mines, but in some cases exhaust gases from gasoline-
engines may be drawn either into the ventilating-current or into the intake of compressors, and
the greatest care must be exercised in the selection of a site for machinery of this type and in
its operation. Carbon-monoxide poisoning (the so-called "gassing" of the miners) should be
unknown even in its mildest form, and its repeated occurrence may be accepted as an unmistakable indication of reprehensible carelessness.
The condition of manways and ladders was not always found to be satisfactory, dimensions
being reduced to the minimum and poor use made of the restricted space available. The most
unsatisfactory conditions in this respect are perhaps to be found in mines operated on lease.
One of the chief menaces to the metal-miner's health is the dust produced in the course of
drilling and mucking operations. This matter claimed considerable attention during 1934
and seventy representative specimens of the rocks encountered underground were sent to Victoria
for examination at the Bureau of Mines laboratory. In many cases both vein-matter and wall-
rock must be looked upon as potentially dangerous in this respect. No dry machine-drilling has
been done in the Kootenays for some years.
The explosive in universal use in this district is Polar Forcite gelatine of 35, 40, 50, and
60 per cent, strength. A small quantity of Polar " Stopeite " has been used experimentally at
one operation with apparently good results. In ftopes and drifts blasting is done with time fuse
and, in the overwhelming majority of cases, with No. 6 lead azide detonators. In shaft-sinking
operations electric blasting is the method adopted, as demanded by the " Metalliferous Mines
Regulation Act," and it is highly desirable that this practice be extended to important raises
as well, as it presents distinct advantages. For such work it has been already introduced at
the Sullivan mine with excellent results.
At all but the smallest operations there is some one able to render first aid in case of
accident, but there is still room for considerable improvement in this work. The distances to
be covered before expert medical assistance can be obtained present a somewhat disquieting
feature, particularly in the case of the mines situated in the Camborne, Lightning Peak, and
Salmo areas.
Three fatal accidents occurred during 1934 in the district and are described in another
part of this report. One was caused by a fall of rock from the back in a high stope. The other
two were the results of men falling into an ore-chute in the one case and into a disused raise
in the other. Two dangerous occurrences were reported. A hoisting-rope used in shaft-sinking
broke while a loaded bucket was being hoisted, and a counterbalance weight broke away and
fell down a shaft.    No personal injuries resulted from either incident.
FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION.
Sullivan.—Owned by Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited.
General superintendent, E. G. Montgomery; mine superintendent, AVm. Lindsay; and safety
engineer, J. M. Wolverton. The ventilation is very good and so much progress has been made
with the handling of smoke (which in the past has often proved troublesome in some parts of INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 53
the mine) that considering the problem as very nearly mastered does not betray an undue
amount of optimism. A Jeffrey aerovane fan has been installed at No. 10 shaft, and another
fan of the same type and a Sirocco are used underground as boosters. The two surface fans
are run constantly as long as the surface temperature remains; above zero degrees Fahrenheit,
below which natural ventilation, properly guided and assisted by boosters, proves quite sufficient.
Samples of the mine-air taken in July under the most unfavourable conditions that could he
discovered at the time, and at a point at which the smoke appeared very dense, were analysed
at Ottawa, with the following results: Carbon dioxide, 0.15 per cent.; oxygen, 20.74 per cent.;
carbon monoxide, nil; nitrogen, 79.11 per cent.; or air, 99.09 per cent.; and black-damp, 0.91
per cent. The small deficiency in oxygen and the total absence of carbon monoxide indicate
efficient ventilation.
The production of rock-dust is combated by an abundant use of water. The working-places
are thoroughly washed down and broken rock is sprayed before loading, as are the loaded cars
on their way out. It may be noted here that dampening the ore as freely as is done in the
stopes, in order to keep the dust down, is not assisting the flotation process at the mill, as rapid
oxidation follows. One of the company's field engineers, L. Telfer, is in charge of the research-
work undertaken in order to ascertain the nature of the dust carried in suspension by the air-
current. The first point to be established was the actual quantity of dust of all sizes so held
in suspension, and a simple and very satisfactory apparatus operated by compressed air was
designed for the purpose. A small ejector creates a depression, drawing air through a Sprague
meter and a AA'hatman's extraction-thimble enclosed in a steel shell and containing a wad of
cotton-wool. The air passing through the apparatus is thus thoroughly filtered and the dust is
trapped in the thimble. The latter, with the cotton-wool partly Ailing it, is weighed carefully
on a chemical balance (turning on !/io milligram) before and after the test. As each test may
be extended over any length of time desired, the quantity of dust in suspension at any point
may be estimated with great accuracy. Some difficulty is presented by the fact that cottonwool absorbs water-vapour from the air and must be dried carefully before and after the test,
following which it begins to gather moisture again with extraordinary rapidity, this becoming
at times apparent even in the short time during which a thimble remains on the balance. Lately,
this trouble has been largely overcome through the use of asbestos wool as filtering material.
A Zeiss konimeter has been added to the equipment.
As the insoluble contents of the ore amount only to about 11 per cent, of the whole and it
carries barely 3.5 per cent, of free silica, the dust produced in the stopes may be considered as
being comparatively innocuous. Drifts and raises are driven in quartzite and penetrate the
chert-zones surrounding the ore-bodies, with the result that the dust in such places is looked
upon with considerable suspicion.
There are now about thirty wet pluggers on hand at the mine and practically all those in
frequent use are of this type.
A number of 100-watt flood-lights have been in use in scraper stopes for some time with
very satisfactory results. Several Model K Edison electric safety-lamps have also been obtained
and seem to have met with the approval of shiftbosses and other officials who tried them.
Periodically, the employees are brought in groups of about twenty to the office of the safety
engineer to hear a short address on accident-prevention. The writer attended some of these
gatherings and found the subject treated in a very appropriate manner. The safety-first and
accident-prevention committees continued their excellent work during 1934. The minutes of
their meetings make very interesting reading, as does also each issue of the " Safety Bulletin "
published every six months.
The number of shifts lost, owing to accidents, per thousand worked remained about the
same as last year. The underground average stood at 4.4, against five in 1933, but an increase
in the surface ratio offset this gain. All departments worked forty days (May 25th to June
5th) without a single lost-time accident. However, the number of shifts lost per thousand
worked was appreciably higher in the course of the last six months than during the first half
of the year, a matter that gave the officials no little concern. A rapid increase in the number
of men employed may not have been entirely foreign to the enlargement of this percentage.
Hard-toed boots will soon be worn as generally as protective hats, gloves, and goggles
are now. G 54 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
First-aid classes were held in the fall at both MacDougal and Chapman camps, with a total
attendance of 225 (about 200 being employees of the company), of which 213 took the final
examination. There are now 555 certificate-holders at the mine and 294 at the mill, this
bringing the percentage of employees qualified to render first aid to 89.
At the end of the year 72.5 per cent, of the employees were of British origin and 6.6 per cent,
came from the U.S.A., while Scandinavians represented 10.1 per cent., Italians 5.7 per cent.,
and other Europeans 5.1 per cent, of the total.
In the course of inspections the conditions prevailing both underground and on the surface
were always found very good, and on every occasion some improvement of one kind or another
was observed.
The property of B.C. Cariboo Gold Fields, Limited, near Aldridge was also inspected
during 1934.
GOLDEN MINING DIVISION.
The Monarch mine at Field, operated by Base Metals Mining Corporation, Limited, with
F. Eichelberger as general superintendent, was included on the inspection list for 1934.
REVELSTOKE AND  TROUT  LAKE  MINING  DIVISIONS.
Such properties as the Allco Silver Mines, Limited : Meridian Mines, Limited : the Gold
Pinch claim, and the Teddy Glacier Mines were visited during 1934.
AINSWORTH  AND  SLOCAN MINING  DIVISIONS.
Wellington.—This mine, under lease to Ross Mining Syndicate, has workings consisting of
a long crosscut difficult to ventilate adequately with the equipment on hand and becoming rapidly
inaccessible when the small fan in use is stopped.
Utica Mines, Ltd.—The ventilation at this mine depends on a galvanized-iron pipe in which
circulation is induced by three compressed-air jets, and the workings were in good condition in
this respect, but the ultimate capacity of this arrangement was nearly reached at the time of
the last inspection, and the management was advised to procure a fan as soon as possible,
particularly in view of the fact that the next step in the scheme of development has to be the
driving of a long raise connecting the present workings with the level above them.
The Whitewater, Slocan Monitor Silver Mines, Limited, Victor, Black Colt, Silversmith,
Noble Five, and Molly Hughes properties werg inspected during 1934.
GRAND  FORKS AND  GREENWOOD  MINING DIVISIONS.
General conditions were found to be satisfactory at the following properties during 1934:
Dictator, Waterloo, Lightning Peak, Pay Day, Yankee Boy, Union, White Swan, Helen, Dynamo,
Providence, and North Star. The two latter under control of Superior Gold Mines, Limited.
Dentonia, Rainbow group, C.O.D., Beaver, Bell, Highland Lass, Sally, Wellington, Revenge, Tiger,
Bounty, Olympic, and Carmi, Butcher Boy, and May. The three latter controlled by Carmi Gold
Mines, Limited.
NELSON MINING DIVISION.
The following properties were visited during 1934 and conditions found to be satisfactory:
Venus-Juno-Athabasca group, Granitc-Poorman, Royal Canadian, Nevada, Perrier, California,
Porto Rico, Fern, Euphrates, Goodenough and Ymir. The two latter operated by the Ymir
Consolidated Gold Mines, Limited;   Wilcox and Yankee Girl.
At the property of the Two Star Mining Company samples of the mine-air analysed at
Ottawa revealed the presence of a small percentage of carbon monoxide in the temporarily
unventilated blind end of the Twilight drift. As a raise nearly 700 feet high will have to be
driven before natural circulation is established, the ventilation will present a delicate problem
and will require close attention during the present year.
The Dundee, Ymir, Centre Star, Howard. Clubine-Comstock, Aspen, Gold Belt, Reno,
Kootenay Belle, Queen, Emma, Black Rock, Arlington, and Second Relief properties were also
inspected during 1934. INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. G 55
TRAIL CREEK MINING DIVISION.
Rossland properties inspected include the following leases: Le Roi shaft, Le Roi Peyton
vein, Black Bear and Le Roi, Centre Star, Iron Mask, Josie No. 1, Josie No. 2, Idaho and Idaho
No. 2, Annie, and Nickel Plate.
The War Eagle, Virginia, Evening Star, North Star, Midnight, Gold Drip, I.X.L., O.K.,
Velvet Gold, and Portland properties were also inspected in 1934.
The writer desires to express his grateful appreciation of the courteous manner in which
he was received on all occasions, the friendly attitude assumed towards the suggestions advanced,
and the sincere efforts made to maintain satisfactory conditions. Considerable progress was
made in the course of the past year, and the willing co-operation met during that period justifies
the hope that it may be possible to record still greater improvements at the end of 1935. G 56
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1934.
\frh
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' x IO" Strap
PL A N
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ELEVATION
RAIL  STOP BLOCK
Scale £-l'0"
B.M &S.Co.
Rail Stop Block as used at Britannia Mine.     (See page G45.)

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