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THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1936

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 THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH. COLUMBIA
APKIL 1ST, 1934, TO MARCH 3.1 ST, 1935
TRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chahi.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham JOHNSON,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1935.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,-—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. G. M. WEIR, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Boyes, F. C, Principal. Merilees, W. L., Vice-Principal.
Waldon, Mrs. M. E., Secretary.
Workman, Miss E., Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborn, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Farm Instructor. Scott, W. J., Engineer and Plumber.
Munro, D. W., Poultryman.
Peck, Miss A., Teacher. Blagburn, E. W., Teacher. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
PRINCIPAL'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In submitting this, the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Boys' Industrial School,
I feel that little attention need be paid by me to the various details of operation, since these
will be dealt with by the various reports from members of the staff. I shall, instead, point out
a few of the major changes of policy which have been made and mention some of the results
obtained therefrom.
Realizing that this institution as constructed could not be used as a gaol, I deliberately
planned to use it as a school. Fear of " escapes " had dominated the waking hours of all
members of the staff and had made them irritable and suspicious towards the boys and towards
each other. Because of this eternal watchfulness the " escape " became a heroic episode, and
the newcomer was urged to undergo his initiation by attempting to escape. Many made the
attempt and some succeeded.
It has been an uphill struggle to change the attitude of the staff and the boys along this
one line. In the first place, the word " escape " is a misnomer when used in connection with
this institution as it now exists. A walk-out is a better term. There are no heroics attached
to it, and the boys are gradually seeing that it is rather a cowardly thing to run when no one
chases you and to break a trust reposed in you. True, we have had departures, but in nearly
all cases they have returned of their own volition, and in only four cases have they engaged
in petty thefts while away without leave.
When we remember that the average mental age of this group is around 11 years and that
many are only 9, it can be readily understood that some of the latter group will hardly be able
to tell you what they are going to do next, since they do not know. They will wander unless
locked up securely and such a procedure kills all possibility of teaching citizenship.
Another change which we have attempted with some success was the giving of all our boys
short courses in the various shops. Here and there we have struck sparks, and by following
the leads thus discovered we may be able to start some of our boys on the road to a real
knowledge of a trade.
In carrying on this work the instructor is given the mental rating of his charges and is
shown the boys to whom very special and detailed instruction must be given for the simplest
operation. With this knowledge in their possession, the men on the staff have made amazing
progress and their kindness and patience towards extreme cases cannot be too highly commended.
In our play activities we have broadened our field and have included individual and group
games, fishing, hiking, and any other form of sport such as skiing and tobogganing in season.
All boys must take part in physical exercises and in one or other of these sport activities.
At first we experienced some difficulty in arousing interest in group games. This was hard
to overcome and with most of our newcomers the same difficulty is experienced. These lads
are individualists and the lesson of team play is a real problem. We have persevered until
to-day we have had every boy in one or more team game schedules, and nearly all learn to like
one or other of the games played.
The cultural end of our programme is still too lean. School-work for the young boys and
nothing beyond a few books for the older boys is not likely to lay a very broad foundation of
culture. More attention must be paid to music, art, and dramatics. To find men qualified to
lead in this work is difficult, but from the few attempts which we have made to date it seems
that any effort along these lines will be well repaid. We could not expect to produce artists,
but we could develop a real appreciation of things artistic.
During the year several concert parties have paid us visits and their efforts have been
greatly appreciated. The Elks' Club sent us tickets for the Flag Day celebration at the
Vancouver Exhibition.    A bus was sent and the boys thoroughly enjoyed their trip.    The O 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Kiwanis Club kindly sent us tickets for their spring play, " The Red Mill," and the boys were
delighted with the very excellent performance. Such a play they may not have an opportunity
of seeing again for years to come.
Church services have been held regularly each Sunday afternoon, groups from the
Salvation Army, Sapperton Baptist, Apostolic Faith, and the Oxford Group taking a Sunday
each month in the order named.
May I, in closing, thank you, Sir, and the members of the staff of your Department, and
of other Government departments with whom I have had dealings during the past year, for
the kind and courteous manner in which I have always been received and for the prompt and
efficient way in which my requests have been granted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1934-35.
O 7
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1934, TO MARCH 31st, 1935.
On roll, March 31st, 1934 J.     75
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1934, to March 31st, 1935     50
Released as wards of Juvenile Court.
Completed sentence	
Transferred to Oakalla	
Transferred to Essondale	
Dropped from roll	
125
39
14
1
3
3
—    60
Total in school, March 31st, 1935	
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1935.
65
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
966
1177
1259
1280
1291
1294
1295
1304
1316
1317
1318
1320
1321
1322
1326
1329
1330
1333
1336
1336
1338
1339
1343
1344
1345
1346
1347
1348
1349
1350
1361
1352
1353
1354
1355
1356
1357
1358
1359
1360
1361
1362
New Westminster, B.C..
San Diego, Cal— _	
Liverpool, England	
Victoria, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
Edmonton, Alta.— -	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Nordick, Alta.- -	
Prince Edward Island-
Vancouver, B.C	
Brilliant, B.C.- - _
Peers, Alta 	
Kitimat, B.C -	
Victoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C __
Winnipeg, Man	
New Westminster, B.C..
Finland.	
Port Alberni, B.C _
Nanaimo, B.C.—	
Kincolith, B.C	
Hazelton, B.C	
Savona, B.C.-	
Calgary, Alta —
Prince Rupert, B.C..
Creston, B.C	
Ruby Creek, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Steelhead, B.C -	
Lang Bay, V.I	
Australia —-	
Lytton, B.C.- -
Chilliwack, B.C.	
Hughendon, Alta—
Winnipeg, Man	
Selby, Col., U.S.A..
Hanna, Alta	
Cisco, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C.Edmonton, Alta  —
New Westminster, B.C..
Red Willow, Alta	
Canadian...
American .
English	
English —
Canadian-Icelander..
Scotch-English	
Scotch 	
Italian _	
French-Canadian	
Irish—	
Russian	
American-English—
Indian.— - 	
Canadian	
Canadian-Irish	
Ukrainian 	
Canadian-Scotch	
Finnish 	
Canadian-Irish	
Scotch-English	
Indian	
Canadian-Indian.—
Scotch-Half breed —
Canadian —
American-English-
Canadian-Scotch—.
Indian	
English-American..
Japanese 	
Polish _
Russian-	
Indian 	
Indian	
American -  ..
Scotch - - -	
German 	
Australian-English-
Indian	
Swedish  	
Canadian-Scotch	
Irish  -
Irish—	
Years.
16
9
5
11
8
1
1
6
2
Life.
15
12
Life.
Life.
Life.
11
Life.
3y2
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
15
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
12
7
10
14
Life.
Life.
4
Life.
12
Years.
16
11
8
1
Life
Life.
6
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
3y2
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life. O 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1935—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1363
Chinese   - -. ...
Canadian - 	
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
14
12
Life.
10
6
Life.
Life.
11
9
10
5
Life.
Life.
9
9
Life.
5
5
Years.
Life.
1364
1365
Victoria, B.C 	
Victoria, B.C	
Life.
Life.
1366
1367
Victoria, B.C _	
Canadian 	
Life.
17
1368
Seattle, U.S.A	
12
1369
Life.
1370
Alberta-  -	
Life.
1871
Life.
1372
Life.
1373
Nanaimo, B.C	
Life.
1374
English.	
11
1375
Italy    .. .
England   	
Alberta—  	
Talbot, Alta _	
Victoria, B.C	
9
1376
16
1377
1378
Negro 	
Life.
Life.
1379
French-Canadian  	
Canadian—	
Canadian—	
Canadian 	
Life.
1380
Victoria, B.C -	
Life.
1381
Victoria, B.C l	
Life.
1382
1383
Victoria, B.C	
9
Life.
1384
American-Scotch-	
Life.
1385
Life.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American (both)  3
Canadian (both)  7
English (both)  3
Indian (both)  7
Chinese  (both)  1
Irish  (both)  3
Italian (both)  2
Russian (both)  2
Scotch  (both)	
German (both)	
Ukrainian (both)-
Polish (both)	
Swedish   (both)	
Finnish (both)	
Japanese (both) —
Negro (both)	
Canadian-English      3
Canadian-Irish      2
Canadian-Indian _.
Canadian-Scotch _
Canadian-French
Canadian-Icelander 	
Irish-American	
American-English  3
Irish-English  2
Australian-English   1
English-Scotch   2
American-Scotch   1
Scotch-Halfbreed   1
English-Welsh   1
Total  65
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta	
British Columbia
Saskatchewan	
Manitoba 	
Prince Edward Island
England	
11
39
2
3
1
3
United States   3
Finland   1
Australia   1
Italy  1
Total
65 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1934-35.        O 9
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Incorrigible   10 Shooting cattle „    1
B.E. & S.  19 Attempting suicide     1
Theft   32 —
Receiving stolen property     1 Total  65
Indecent assault     1
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Abbotsford     1 Penticton      3
Agassiz    1 Port Alberni     1
Alert Bay     1 Prince George     1
Cranbrook     1 Prince Rupert    3
Crofton, V.I.    1 Rossland      1
Hazelton     1 Saanich    2
Lillooet     1 Sardis     1
Lytton      1 Trail     1
Maillardville     1 Vancouver   16
Maple Ridge     1 Victoria    9
Mission  2           West Vancouver     1
Nanaimo   4           Transfer from Oakalla    1
Nelson   1 —
New Westminster  7                           Total  65
North Vancouver  1
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
" Juvenile Delinquent Act "  38 Indefinite     4
2 years   17 —
3 years   6 Total  65
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
10 years  2    17 years  13
11 years  2    18 years  2
12 years   5    19 years   1
13 years  4    20 years  1
14 years  5 —
15 years   20           Total  65
16 years  10
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholic   16 Salvation Army    2
Presbyterian     4 Pentecostal    3
Church of England  10 Doukhobor     1
United   23 —
Methodist     3 Total  65
Lutheran     3
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  37
Number who have both parents dead     4
Number who have father living and mother dead    6
Number who have mother living and father dead  16
Number who have stepmothers    1
Number who have stepfathers    1
Total   65 0 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1935, the mouths of all the boys entering the
institution have been carefully examined and record charts made. Of the seventy-six boys
examined, only one mouth was found in a healthy condition because so many had never had
any previous dental work. Since last summer provision has been made for bringing the boys
to my own office, and as a result of having complete equipment I was able to do more and better
work.
" It was necessary to extract 29 hopelessly diseased teeth with local anaesthetic. Of the
174 teeth filled, 109 were amalgam fillings, 9 enamel fillings, and 56 cement fillings. Prophylactic treatments were completed for 9 boys, 12 had to be treated for pyorrhoea complicated
with severe systemic lesions, and 1 had a front tooth devitalized, treated, and filled.
" All patients were taught proper methods of brushing and caring for the teeth, and
I believe the services rendered will be of great future benefit in assisting these boys to become
useful citizens.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
MEDICAL REPORT.
During the past year a decided change was made in the method of handling this part of
our work.
For the first five months of the fiscal year the work was in the hands of Dr. C. R. Symmes,
of Port Moody. While Dr. Symmes was conscientious about his work, the arrangement was
unsatisfactory. A visit once a week was sufficient for routine inspection, but left little time
for more difficult cases. Emergencies meant a long-distance telephone call to Port Moody,
which might or might not find the doctor at home. If the services of a doctor were urgent a
trip from the school to Port Moody took time, and in the winter presented an element of danger
which could not be overlooked.
Realizing that a very efficient medical staff was in residence in a neighbouring institution,
I requested the Department to consider placing the boys under their care. After careful
consideration this suggestion was approved, and since the beginning of September one of the
members of the staff of the Mental Hospital has been in charge of the work. Needless to say,
the arrangement is highly satisfactory to us. Not only are these men skilled medical practitioners, but their knowledge of mental conditions has been of inestimable value to us in
solving some of our more difficult problems. Moreover, when emergencies arise, we are sure
of being able to secure expert advice at a moment's notice.
We are pleased to be able to state that the general health of the boys has been very good
during the year. No epidemics have made their appearance and no serious accidents have
occurred. The list of minor operations performed during the year is as follows: 4 tonsillectomy operations; 1 thyroid gland operation; 1 finger amputation; 1 sterilization operation;
1 circumcision operation.
EDUCATIONAL.
" Sir,—The following is the report on the boys attending school during the fiscal year:—
" For the months April, May, and June very little could be accomplished as a spirit of
unrest pervaded the institution due to the impending changes in the administration.
" Under the new administration an entirely different policy was followed, which necessitated changes in the school routine. Beginning the fall term, the boys, instead of putting in
full time in the class-room, were sent to various trades for an hour a day. This meant a certain
amount of loss as far as school-work was concerned, but I think that this was more than made
up by the good derived from the trades. The teachers during this time occupied themselves
with getting case histories.    Between fifty and sixty boys were dealt with in this manner.
" Three of the boys who had finished public school decided to continue their studies, so
correspondence courses were obtained. Two took commercial courses and the other a general
course. They were under the supervision of the teachers. The results were quite satisfactory,
the boys showing a real desire to progress. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1934-35.        O 11
" Use was made of Intelligence and Achievement Tests. In the former group tests were
given to the entire school, while individual testing was done in particular cases. The highest
I.Q. was found to be 108, while the lowest was 53. The median was 83. Some of the low I.Q.'s
could not be considered entirely accurate as a few of the boys had difficulty in reading, either
due to foreign birth or not having had the opportunity of learning to read properly before
coming to this institution.
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1934  34
Pupils admitted during year  34
Pupils removed for various reasons   50
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1935  18
" Eric W. Blagburn."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Kitchen routine varies little from year to year and most kitchens carry on a similar routine.
The real change this year has been the attempt to teach boys to become real cooks. Several
have taken advantage of the opportunities offered, and of this group three have developed into
good general cooks. One has taken charge of all cooking in a mining camp, another is waiting
to be placed on a Coast steamer, while the third has unfortunately been unable to carry on in
this work although released.
Several more boys have graduated from the dish-washing and pot-cleaning department
to positions as assistant cooks and waiters, and during the coming year we hope for real
progress for them.
During the spring of the year we were fortunate in having our kitchen block painted
throughout. With this work done, the floors were sanded and resurfaced and our kitchen block
is as good as new.
The following tables show clearly the manner in which the boys and the staff of the
institution were fed during the year and the cost per meal:—
Boys' Menu—One Day.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, bread and butter, stewed fruit or dates, milk or tea.
Dinner.—Hamburger with potatoes baked on top, turnips, cake pudding with sauce and
milk, bread.
Supper.—Brown, white, raisin bread and butter, peanut butter, salmon salad, milk or tea.
Staff Menu—One Day.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, bacon and eggs, toast, marmalade, bread and butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, potatoes, beans, gravy, bread and butter, apple pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, raisin bread and butter, fried halibut, potatoes, lettuce, fruit cake,
tea.
Average cost per meal, 13 cents.
J. L. MacPherson.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
(1.)   Office and school supplies  $774.85
(2.)  Travelling expenses  978.61
Gas, oil, and repairs  1,416.35
(3.)  Purchase of clothing  409.90
Shoe-shop supplies   517.98
Tailor-shop supplies  5.00
(4.)  Janitors' supplies  433.51
(5.)   Light  1,518.00
Water  603.33
Fuel  4,01937
Carried forward  $10,676.80 O 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST—Continued.
Brought forward  $10,676.80
(6.)  Provisions   5,510.35
(7.)  Medical—Doctor's salary, medicine, and operation expenses  1,239.59
Dentist—Salary and supplies  609.47
(8.)   Laundry  -  1,288.45
(9.)   Feed for stock, farm, and poultry  4,560.62
(10.)  Purchase of live stock  30.00
(11.)  Vocational supplies for various departments  758.94
(12.)  Incidentals and contingencies  1,352.24
Salaries   29,125.37
Total expenditure, Vote 149  $55,151.83
Expenditure, Special Warrant No. 4       1,806.72
Expenditure, Public Works      4,592.64
Total expenditure for year  $61,551.19
Total amount of revenue for year—
Board and room  $4,574.57
Sale of eggs     4,610.86
Municipality receipts  10,955.60
     20,141.03
$41,410.16
Per capita cost for the year 1935-36, $2.30.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
" Sir,—I submit the annual report for the year 1934-35 of the work that has been done
in the Tailor-shop and the boys to whom I have given instruction during the year. This, I think,
will be of great benefit to them when they leave here. It is something they do not forget and
some of the boys have shown real progress. Six boys have worked fairly regularly in the shop
within the last twelve months and fourteen boys were given an elementary course in tailoring.
" The following is an outline of the work for the past year: 29 pairs of tweed pants were
made, 86 pairs of overalls, 14 dozen aprons, 12 pairs of curtains, and 10% dozen tea-towels.
In addition, 256 pairs of pants were pressed and 45 suits, also the necessary repairs to clothing,
window-blinds, gymnasium-mats, etc.
" J. Henderson, Tailor."
Shoemaking Department.
" Sir,—In presenting my annual report for the year you will notice that only 50 pairs of
new shoes were made. These were made between April and September. There are also
12 pairs partly made. The reason I did not make more was because I had quite a large stock
of good second-hand shoes which had been worn very little owing to the number of boys going
home. There were 756 repairs made to shoes, several pieces of farm harness repaired,
2 baskets made for basket-ball, and several baseballs were re-covered.
" During the year three boys have worked steadily in the Shoe-shop, two of them making
very good progress. Since January I have had classes of boys for an hour each day and they
have done very well. Besides instructing them in practical work, I gave them talks on the
different methods of making shoes and how to repair them, the different kinds of leather, and
how to select suitable parts for certain work.
"J. Osborn, Shoemaker."
Garage Department.
The expenses for the latter half of the year in this department were considerably lower
than in the first part, owing to certain changes in the policy of the administration of the
institution. The most far-reaching of these changes was the discontinuing of the practice of
pursuing runaways.    This in itself cut the consumption of gasoline about 55 per cent., with ERRATUM.
Page 12, line 22, should read:   " Per capita
cost for the year 1934-35, $2.30." REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1934-35.        O 13
other things in about the same ratio.    On the other hand, owing to the equipment getting old,
repairs and servicing costs increased.
It being part of the new administration policy to take the boys to games and other outings
in various parts of the surrounding country, it was felt that the truck, while satisfactory for
hauling freight, was not suitable for carrying passengers. The main defect was the braking
system. The result was that the old truck and the old passenger-car were traded in and a
new truck obtained. This is larger than the old one and is better equipped in the interests of
safety.    The body has been built at the school.
Included in the expense of this department are the oil and gasoline supplied to the other
departments of the school.
In November, 1934, we inaugurated a class in motor mechanics. It only takes in» motor-
work as we have not as yet been able to obtain a complete automobile. Up to the end of the
year eight boys have taken this work. The number does not compare with the number taking
other work, because of the complexity of the subject making it necessary that more time be
taken. Interest in this work is very keen and there is always a large number on the waiting-
list.
The amount spent this year for gasoline, oil, tires, and other equipment amounts to
$1,416.35.    The cost of the new truck, $799.50, is included in this total.
Credits accruing to the department during the year amounted to $134. These come from
hauling eggs to Essondale Mental Hospital.
H. Hart, Instructor.
Carpentering Department.
This department has done the following work during the past year:—
The Trades Building was finished on the outside with 10-inch resawed siding, all window-
frames put in place, water-table and moulding completed. All new work received two coats
of paint.
A double garage, 18 by 20 feet, was built and painted. The exterior was finished to
conform with the existing buildings.
The following routine work was carried on: Several drawing-boards and squares were
made, 130 lights of glass were replaced, and many repairs were made to wagons and carts for
the farm and poultry. The usual repairs to doors, windows, floors, cupboards, etc., was carried
on.    The interior of the kitchen block was also painted.
Four boys received a fairly complete course of instruction during the year, while ten of
the younger boys were given an elementary course in woodwork.
D. Stewart, Carpenter.
Plumbing, Heating, and Blacksmith Department.
Daily attention was given to furnaces, radiation, hot-water heaters, and the hot- and
cold-water supply, all necessary repairs being made. Attention was also given to refrigeration and the usual repairs carried out in regard to plumbing fixtures, valves, drains, and septic
tank. m
Fire-extinguishers were checked and recharged;   the swimming-pool cleaned and filled
regularly.
Many locks, tools, and farm, poultry, and garden implements were repaired.
Daily instruction was given in sheet-metal work and blacksmith-work to boys; twenty-
four having taken this course.
W. J. Scott, Plumber.
Gardens.
Besides the routine work of raising flowers and vegetables from seed in the greenhouse,
pruning trees, caring for flower-beds, and assisting with work on the lawn, certain major
changes were carried out during the past year.
Much of the space once taken up with flowers was cultivated and planted in vegetables.
Two of the four lower chicken-runs were converted into vegetable-gardens and the rock borders
were removed to facilitate weeding and cultivating.
During the year ten boys have received instruction in the various branches of gardening
and many of them have shown real progress.    At least two of these boys were engaged to work O 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in gardens on their release, and from present indications two more are likely to follow the
same occupation when their turn comes.
Cement and Plastering.
Besides carrying on repair-work on drains, stairs, walls, and curbs, we constructed the
foundation and floor for the new garage and finished the exterior with stucco.
G. Wingrove.
GENERAL FARMING AND GARDEN STATISTICS.
During the early part of the year work on the farm proceeded much as in former years.
Four boys were instructed in dairying and became good all-round farm-hands. About twelve
more received part-time instruction and were useful in one or other of the departments of the
work.
The wet weather in July hurt the crops considerably, the hay and potato crops suffering
the most. The late blight ruined the potatoes, while one whole field of oat-hay was lost because
of continued rain.
Late in the fall it was decided to reduce overhead and the dairy herd was disposed of.
Two horses were also sold and the work of this department was curtailed accordingly.
The small number of boys now in the school was the reason for the change, and unless the
commitments increase very suddenly and unexpectedly it seems unlikely that farming operations on a large scale will ever be resumed.
The following is a summary of the produce for the year:—
Vegetables—
Potatoes, 18,195 lb.   $272.92
Onions, 537 lb       23.13
Lettuce, 69 pails       17.00
Beets, 1,943 lb       28.41
Peas, 146 lb         7.30 ,
Marrow, 205 lb.         4.10
Carrots, 1,525 lb      15.25
Beans, 316 lb       15.80
Turnips, 252 lb         2.52
Cabbage, 1,583 lb       63.32
Chard, 405 lb       12.06
Squash, 125 lb         2.50
Pumpkin, 200 lb.          4.00
Parsnips, 5 lb.         1.25
Cauliflower, 30 lb.          1.50
Fruit-
Rhubarb, 579 lb.   $11.58
Raspberries, 117 lb.  8.16
Apples, 516 lb.   30.68
Plums, 57 lb  4.00
$471.06
54.42
Milk, 29,456 lb -.     1,178.24
Pork, 2,014 lb :        181.26
Miscellaneous—
Mangels, 35 tons  $245.00
Oats and peas for silage, 4 tons      28.00
Timothy-hay, 8 tons     104.00
Oat-hay, 5 tons -     65.00
Cabbage for silage, 3 tons       21.00
        463.00
Total credits  $2,347.!
J. McDowell. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1934-35.        O 15
POULTRY REPORT.
The past year was marked with progress in our Poultry Department in many ways.
Over forty boys passed through a course of instruction given by the poultryman in charge.
The instruction given was mostly practical, with some theory worked in for the boys anxious
to become engaged in the poultry-work when released. Nine boys became very proficient in
the work, although the majority were very eager, especially during the incubation of eggs and
rearing of the young stock.
The course of instruction covers:—
(a.)  Choice of location.
(6.)   Type of buildings,
(c.)  Choice of breed.
(d.)  Feeding.
(e.)   Culling.
(/.)  Diagnosis and control of disease, also control of vermin.
(g.)  Care of eggs.
(h.)  Dressing of poultry.
(i.)  Breeding;  type of bird;  incubation and rearing of young stock.
Feeding requires a great deal of attention and is gone into thoroughly.    It would be more
beneficial to the boy receiving instruction if the egg-mash could be ground from the several
grains necessary and mixed with the animal protein and mineral requirements.    Feeding is
of major importance if high egg production is to be obtained.
Culling received attention. All birds over 2 years old were disposed of and close culling
carried out among the pullets and yearlings.
The lower laying-houses were altered; modern mash-hoppers replacing the old type, which
were very wasteful. The water system was put underground. Runs were fenced on the
upper side of the houses, making it possible to alternate their use and prevent any possibility
of disease from old infested soil.
Very few poultry plants can boast of freedom from rats and ours is no exception. Many
poison preparations are fatal to them, several of which we have tried obtaining good results.
Excellent hatches have been procured so far from incubation. The young chicks show
plenty of vigour, and mortality so far is practically nil. All birds on the plant are being raised
here from our own stock, so that the boys have the opportunity of studying the methods of
poultry care from the egg to the laying bird. Vigorous, healthy stock is constantly emphasized.
Preparation is made for a large acreage of mangels for winter-feeding. Runs not in use
have been sown to kale and rape for summer and fall use.
The boys are taken on inspection trips to other well-known poultry-farms, which gives an
opportunity for comparison to be made and proves of great value from an educational standpoint.
The interest of the boys in all phases of the work is displayed by their splendid co-operation
and complete harmony.    The work offers sufficient variety to hold their interest at all times.
Our working-day requires attention to feeding; cleaning water-troughs and filling;
cleaning dropping-boards; checking mash-hoppers; giving green feed; collecting, grading,
and candling of eggs; care of incubators and young stock in season.
Debits.
Cost of feed for year  $3,567.75
Incidentals, light, water        420.54
Salary of Instructor    1,350.00
Total debits   $5,338.29
Credits.
Sale of eggs, 12,660 dozen  $2,808.15
Sale of chickens  859.24
Value of eggs used in own kitchen, 3,623 dozen  751.56
Value of poultry used in own kitchen, 2,485 lb.  496.19
Total credits ,-  $4,919.56
D. Munro. 0 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SPORTING ACTIVITIES.
The following is a resume of the various recreations and games participated in by the boys
of the Provincial Industrial School during the past year:—
Many activities were indulged in, and I, who have had the privilege of instructing as well
as engaging in the different exercises performed, have no hesitation in extending my sincere
congratulations to the various participants for the friendly fight, aggressiveness, and sporting
spirit they displayed. It has been a privilege and a pleasure to have been of any support or
aid to the many new friendly boys I have associated with during the year.
During August soft-ball, swimming, and golf were actively engaged in by the various
groups. In September, in addition to the continuance of soft-ball and golf, physical training
(compulsory to all) and soccer were started. The Biscoq golf championship was decided in
this month, the honours going to one of the younger boys who won from a field of thirty-five
entrants. October brought forth volley-ball as well as P.T. swimming, basket-ball, and soccer.
The last two months of the year were active ones for the boys. A soccer team was entered in
the Fraser Valley Soccer League, and exhibition basket-ball games were contested by both
senior and junior teams in New Westminster and Coquitlam as well as at home. To complete
a successful two months the Westminster Y group visited Biscoq and performed in a clever gym
exhibition enjoyed by all.
January, February, and March saw the instigation of a house league in basket-ball. Five
teams entered, their schedule calling for twenty league games as well as their exhibition games.
Forty boys participated in this league and the improvement in the standard of play throughout
the season was very gratifying. In addition to the basket-ball activities, a senior soccer team
was entered in the New Westminster and District Juvenile League, playing nine games, of
which they won six, lost two, and drew one. During the period they had the privilege of seeing
the Adanac Basket-ball Club play several of their league games. Later the Adanac players
visited the school for an exhibition game, after which an enjoyable social evening was had
by all.
April finds the golf-course nearly in readiness for a busy season and the soft-ball house
league ready to start.    It is with great enthusiasm that we look forward to the summer season.
W. Mayers, Instructor.
BAND REPORT.
During the early part of the year a small band practised quite regularly and gave several
concerts, some at the school and some in near-by centres.
As the number of boys dwindled the better-trained players were among the first to go, and
we were unable to function as a band without the help of outside players. However, we have
continued with our practices twice a week and many of the younger lads are learning the
rudiments of the art.    We hope to organize again very shortly.
During the year individual instruction has been given to some twenty-five boys.
A new departure last year was a singing class. Few of the boys have shown any
knowledge of, or liking for, singing, but a start has been made and results seem to warrant
further efforts.    In all probability a choir of boys will be developed during the coming winter.
J. H. Rushton, Instructor.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chakles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1935.
380-1035-5946    

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