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THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1935

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 THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
or THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OP THE province op
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1933, TO MARCH 318T, 1934
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Baxfiuld, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Yotjr Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1934.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Poet Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1933, to March 31st, 1934.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,    .
Your obedient servant,
F. C. BOYES,
Principal of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
REPORT OF PRINCIPAL.
The Honourable G. M. Weir,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I  have  the honour of  submitting  to  you  the  Thirtieth  Report  of  the  Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, British Columbia, for the year ended March 31st, 1934.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1933, TO MARCH 31st, 1934.
On roll, March 31st, 1933  192
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1933, to March 31st, 1934    51
243
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  42
Completed sentence  22
Doukhobors  91
Released on writ of habeas corpus     1
Dropped from roll  10
Sentenced to Penitentiary     2
— 168
Total in school, March 31st, 1934     75
Number of escapes during the year     16
Number captured and returned     12
Number still at liberty      4
BISCOQ'S DAILY PROGRAMME.
6.00 a.m.    Reveille. 1.00 p.m.    Trades   and   vocational
7.00 a.m.    Breakfast. training commences.
7.30 a.m.    Morning prayers. 1.30 p.m.    Schools open.
7.45 a.m.    Flag-raising ceremony. 4.30 p.m.    Trades and schools close.
8.00 a.m.    Trades   and   vocational 5.00 p.m.    Supper.
training commences. 5.30 p.m.    Recreation.
9.00 a.m.    Schools open. 8.00 p.m.    Retreat and flag-lowering
11.30 a.m.    Trades and schools close. ceremony.
12.00    m.    Dinner and play. 8.30 p.m.    Evening prayers.
9.15 p.m.    Lights out.
Band practices are held Saturday afternoons at 1.30 and Tuesday mornings at 10.
Sunday mornings are devoted to inspection and check-up of clothing.
Sunday afternoons to religious services and lectures.
.   LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1934.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
966
Years.
16
11
9
Years.
16
1138
11
1177
9 M 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1934— Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1180
Rocky Point, B.C	
Canadian	
Years.
15
16
11
16
17
5
3
7
16
18
16
16
14
15
12
13
18
18
8
13
11
11
12
16
10
15
8
14
7
Life.
Life.
8
6
1
Life.
Life.
1
Life.
Life.
10
Life.
Life.
7
6
Life.
. 10
1
3
3
Life.
Life.
2
12
Life.
15
12
12
Life.
Life.
Years.
15
1190
16
1206
Ukrainian	
11
1223
Ireland	
Port Coguitlam, B.C -
16
1256
17
1259
1260
13
1262
7
1263
Grand Forks, B.C	
16
1264
18
1265
Tate,  Sask	
16
1266
Waldo, B.C	
Canadian	
16
1267
14
1268
Fife, B.C	
15
1269
12
1270
Duff   Sask	
15
1273
18
1274
Indian	
English	
18
1275
8
1277
13
1278
Idaho,   U.S.A	
11
1280
11
1281
Victoria, B.C	
12
1282
Bellis, Alta	
16
1283
14
1284
15
1285
Life.
1286
Life.
1287
Life.
1288
Victoria,  B.C 	
Life.
1290
Life.
1291
Life.
1293
Life.
1294
Life.
1295
Life.
1296
Victoria, B.C	
Life.
1297
14
1298
Harrison Mills, B.C	
Life.
1299
Life.
1300
10
1301
Life.
1302
Victoria   B.C	
English	
Life.
1303
Victoria, B.C	
Life.
1304
Life.
1306
Life.
1307
10
1308
Life.
1309
Lougheed, Alta	
Theodore, Sask	
Life.
1310
Life.
1311
Life.
1314
Alberni, B.C	
Life.
1315
6
1316
French-Canadian	
Life.
1317
Life.
1318
Brilliant, B.C	
Life.
1319
Halifax, N.S	
Life.
1320
Peers, Alta	
Kitimat, B.C	
Life.
1321
Life.
1322
Victoria, B.C	
Life. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34.
M 7
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1934—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1323
Victoria, B.C. .
Years.
Life.
Life.
Life.
Life.
13
. Life.
11
Life.
8
Life.
3%
3
Life.
Years.
Life.
1324
Dutch !...	
Life.
1325
Nelson, B.C	
Life.
1326
Canadian-Irish	
English	
Scotch	
Ukrainian	
Life.
1327
13
1328
Life.
1329
Life.
1330
Life.
1331
North Dakota, U.S.A.
12
1332
Life.
1333
Finland	
Halifax, N.S.
3%
1334
Life.
1335
Port Alberni, B.C.    .
Life.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)    1
Canadian  (both)     11
English  (both)    10
Indian  (both)    5
Irish  (both)     1
Italian   (both)     3
Russian (both)   3
Scotch (both)    5
Ukrainian (both)   4
Dutch   (both)     1
Swedish  (both)     1
Canadian-American   1
Canadian-English   2
Canadian-Irish    5
Scotch-Canadian   4
Irish-Canadian    1
American-English   2
Austrian-Russian   1
Irish-Norwegian   1
Greek-English    1
Austrian-Canadian   1
French-Canadian    5
English-Scotch   3
Canadian-Icelander    1
English-Norwegian  1
Scotch-Newfoundlander    1
Total  75
Alberta     8
British Columbia   41
Saskatchewan   5
Manitoba   2
Nova Scotia   3
Ontario   2
Prince Edward Island  1
England  4
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Scotland   2
Ireland   1
Quebec   1
United States   4
Finland   1
Total  75
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Arson      1
Incorrigible     10
B.E & S  19
Theft   30
Damage to H.M. property      1
Indecent assault      3
Buggery     1
Vagrancy      1
Taking auto without consent    1
Robbery with violence      2
Hold-up     2
Assault     1
Retaining stolen property      1
Carnal knowledge      1
Attempted suicide     1
Total  75 M 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Agassiz    3 Prince Rupert      1
Burnaby    2 Rossland      1
Chilliwack     1 Saanich      2
Cranbrook  7 Sardis       1
Deroche   1 St. John, Fort      1
Kamloops    1 Surrey      1
Kelowna   1 Trail    2
Nanaimo   2 Vancouver   16
Nelson   3 Victoria   16
New Westminster  4 Maple Ridge     1
Penticton   3 Revelstoke      1
Port Alberni  1 —
Prince George   3 Total  75
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 190S     2 Indefinite     4
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929   31 2 years 4 months      1
2 years  26 6 months       1
3 years     5 ■—
4 years     3 Total  75
5 years    2
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
11 years  4    17 years  8
12 years  2    18 years  9
13 years  9    19 years  3
14 years  14 —
15 years  11                         Total  75
16 years  15
Average age, 15.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholic   22 Salvation Army     2
Methodist      4 Christian Science      1
Presbyterian     4 Four Square      2
Church of England  21 Brethren     1
Baptist    3 Pentecostal     3
United   10 —
Lutheran     2 Total  75
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have parents both living  52
Number who have both parents dead     4
Number who have father living and mother dead     6
Number who have mother living and father dead     8
Number who have stepmothers     3
Number who have stepfathers    2
HEALTH.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the past fiscal year the mouths of all the boys entering the institution have
been examined and record charts made. During the time the ninety Doukhobor boys were
present it was very hard to complete all the work required, but after the release of these boys
the work was completed. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 9
"During the year it was necessary to extract 72 hopelessly diseased teeth and local
anaesthetic for the relief of pain was used 75 times. Amalgam fillings were inserted in 31 teeth,
cement fillings in 22 teeth, and porcelain-enamel fillings in 23 teeth. Prophylactic treatments
for the prevention of decay were necessary in 23 cases.
" All the boys were taught proper methods of brushing and caring for the teeth to prevent
disease.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT.
" Superintendent, Provincial School for Bogs,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—I visited the school on December 1st, 1933. At that time there were 37 boys in the
two class-rooms. Both classes were held in the upper rooms in the auditorium. In Division I.,
under Mr. Eric W. Blagburn, there were 17 boys enrolled—5 in Grade VI., 5 in Grade VII., and
7 in Grade VIII. The total number was 17. I consider the teaching I observed very good; it
was logical and thorough. The school management and control was good; the grading and
standing of the pupils was fairly good, as the ability of a number of the pupils was rather
limited; the teacher's attitude to his work was excellent; the tone of this room was good considering the circumstances. The general response in oral tests was pleasing and the results of
a spelling test were generally satisfactory. Mr. Blagburn deserves commendation for the
attitude the pupils displayed toward him and toward their studies.
" In Division II., under Miss Ayra E. Peck, the number enrolled was 20, divided into three
classes—6 in Grade V., 8 in Grade IV., and 6 in Grade III. The pupils were diligent. Miss
Peck had her work well organized. Some four or five pupils in this room were very low in
achievement and mental ability.
" It was noted that the desks in this room should be turned so that the light would come
from the left side of the pupil.
" At the time of my second visit most of my time was devoted to Division I., checking up
the Grade VIII. pupils who were contemplating taking the Entrance Examination and seeing
how many of them could be promoted to high school without having to write. At this time an
atmosphere of unrest and uncertainty pervaded the institution and was reflected in the classrooms. This was due to the fact that changes in the management of the institution were
expected to be announced at any time.
" Yours very truly,
" J.  T. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
EDUCATIONAL.
Report of Division I.
" Sir,—For the first month or so of the fiscal year we carried on with four teachers, as we
had the Doukhobors then. However, when they went home it was necessary to lay off two of
the teachers.    Beginning the fall term, Division I. was moved into the Auditorium Building.
" The standard of the boys' work has, on the whole, been satisfactory, considering the
general retardation most of them have experienced before coming to this institution.
Pupils on register, April 1st, 1933  16
Pupils admitted during year  16
Pupils received from Division II     5
37
Pupils removed for various reasons  11
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1934  26
" Eric W. Blagburn." M 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Report of Division II.
" Sir,—The following shows the movement of the boys in this division from April 1st, 1933,
to March 31st, 1934 :—
On register, April 1st, 1933  20
Admitted  11
Sent to Division 1     4
Discharged     8
On register, March 31st, 1934  19
" Nearly all the boys have displayed interest and progress has been fairly satisfactory, considering the abilities of the pupils, all of whom are retarded and require individual attention.
" Ayra E. Peck."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Sample Menu for One Week—Staff.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, boiled or fried eggs, toast, marmalade, stewed fruit, brown and white
bread, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, apple sauce, brown, white* bread
and butter, boiled pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, sausage, eggs, French-fried potatoes,
cheese, fruit, cake, jam, tea.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, boiled eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea
or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish-balls, cold meat, cake, fruit, tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, poached eggs, bacon, toast, marmalade, peanut butter, brown and
white bread, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, milk pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, meat pie, salmon, cold meat, fruit,
cake, tea.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, eggs, bacon, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea
or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast or stewed chicken, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, fruit
pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish or meat, potatoes, pickled beets, fruit,
cake, tea.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Porridge or corn-flakes, eggs, bacon, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread,
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, vegetables, gravy, brown and white bread, butter, boiled
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, boiled ham, cold meat, fried potatoes,
cheese, fruit, cake, tea.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade or stewed fruit, brown and white
bread, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, vegetables, Yorkshire pudding, blueberry pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, jam, liver and bacon,
potatoes, cheese, fruit, cake, tea. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 11
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Porridge or corn-flakes, eggs, bacon, toast, marmalade, hot cakes, brown and
white bread, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, vegetables, gravy, brown and white bread, butter, cake pudding,
sauce, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, meat-balls, potatoes, pickles, canned
tomatoes, cake, fruit, jam, tea.
Sample Menu for One Week—Boys.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed fruit, brown and white bread, butter, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Sausage   and   onions,   baked   potatoes,   brown   and   white   bread,   butter,   boiled
pudding, sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, jelly, cake, tea.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed fruit, brown and white bread, butter, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Hamburger with potatoes baked  on top,  brown  and white bread,  butter,  sago
pudding with raisins.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, pork and beans, tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed fruit, brown and white bread, butter, coffee or milk.  '.
Dinner.—Roast pork, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, rice pudding with raisins.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish-cakes, syrup, tea or milk.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, stewed prunes or jam, brown and white bread, butter, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread,  butter, ginger
pudding and sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, beans and tomato puree,
tea or milk.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Corn-flakes, fresh apples, brown and white bread, butter, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Meat and vegetables with potatoes baked on top, brown and white bread, butter,
cream-of-wheat pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fish, fruit, tea.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, brown, white bread, butter, stewed fruit or dates, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Beef stew with dumplings, vegetables, potatoes, brown and white bread, butter,
milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, egg omelette, stewed fruit, tea or milk.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, brown and white bread, butter, jam or marmalade, coffee or milk.
Dinner.—Meat and vegetable pie with pastry top, potatoes, brown and white bread, butter,
cake pudding with sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, macaroni and cheese, stewed fruit, tea
or milk. M 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries   $4,594.42
Meat and fish  1,355.06
Bread   1,535.20
Flour, rolled oats, etc  196.03
Ice  247.51
Milk from farm, 47,072.9 lb  1,882.91
Eggs from poultry-farm, 3,938 dozen   789.66
Poultry from poultry-farm  546.70
Vegetables from farm   830.81
Beef from farm, 926 lb  64.82
Pork from farm, 2,101 lb  168.08
Fruit from farm   102.09
$12,313.29
Meals supplied—
Boys  105,133
Staff and extras      31,616
Total   136,749
Average cost per meal, 9 cents.
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST.
(1.)  Office expenses   $791.10
School supplies   137.35
(2.)  Travelling expenses   242.95
Gas, oil, and repairs   445.64
(3.) Purchase of clothing and shoes  1,004.47
Supplies for Shoe-shop   1,149.62
Supplies for Tailor-shop   431.19
(4.)  Janitors' supplies   537.96
(5.)  Light  2,030.00
Fuel    4,748.16
Water  643.99
(6.)  Provisions   7,928.22
(7.)   Doctor—
Supplies, hospital costs   339.67
Salary   .'  600.00
Dentist—
Supplies  11.50
Salary    600.00
(8.)  Laundry  .-. [  1,809.32
. (9.)  Feed for stock—
Farm     1,400.24
Poultry     5,359.68
(10.)  Purchase of live stock   270.00
(11.)  Vocational purchases for various departments   853.81
(12.)  Incidentals and contingencies   1,444.18
Salaries   37,164.80
Total cash expenditure   $69,943.85
Carried  forward     $69,943.85 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 13
CASH EXPENDITURE AND PER CAPITA COST—Continued.
Brought forward   $69,943.85
Less cash from sale of poultry, eggs, etc.,   $5,768.00
Money refunded for board and room      8,009.05
Municipal receipts   16,685.60
Doukhobor allowance      1,669.53
Rebate on sugar tax          114.00
    32,246.18
Balance   $37,697.67
Per capita cost per boy per month   $37.49
Per capita cost per boy per day      1.23
KITCHEN EXPENDITURE.
Supplies purchased  $7,928.22
Produce from farm  3,048.71
Produce from poultry  1,336.36
Salaries, three officials   3,063.31
Light, fuel, and water   1,694.80
$17,071.40
Cost per clay, 39 cents.
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
Tailoring Department.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 229 pairs      $324.25
Tweed pants, 47 pairs       192.50
Uniform pants, 2 pairs          12.00
       $528.75
Value of work for other departments—
Repairing aprons, waiter-coats, sheets, towels, pillow-slips, etc         101.00
Repairs to clothing and pressing suits, etc         675.25
Value of time spent on other duties         310.00
Total credits      $1,615.00
Debits.
Salary of Instructor  $1,666.44
Material purchased and repairs to machines   431.19
Light and water used   73.55
Total debits  i.    $2,171.18
Shoemaking Department.
Credits.
New shoes made, etc.—
265 pairs at $4.90     $1,298.50
Value of repairs       1,499.05
Total credits     $2,797.55 M 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Shoemaking Department—Continued.
Debits.
Salary of Instructor   $1,323.96
Material used  1,140.82
Repairs to machines   8.80
Light and water   103.30
Total debits   $2,576.88
Garage Department.
Salary of Attendant-Mechanic   $921.60
Gasoline, oil, and grease for all purposes   290.90
Repairs     154.74
Light    23.00
$1,390.24
Less credit for hauling eggs to institutions for shipment  336.00
$1,054.24
Cost to institution for use of truck and passenger-car, per day, $2.89.
Carpentering Department.
This department has done a great deal of work during the past year, and the following are
a few of the larger tasks:—
The roof of the Trades Building was framed and put on; the ceiling-joists (2 by 10 by 30)
were put on;  the rafters trussed, shiplapped, and shingled, and the shingles were painted.
One hundred and eight window-frames were made for this building, complete with pulleys.
Thirty thousand shingles were put on the roof of L-l chicken-house and painted. A platform
was also built for the young chicks (12 by 30) and four compartments made with wire and
2 by 4 around same.
The Piggery Building was changed into a root-house, being fitted with partitions and bins.
The roof of this building was shingled, 22,000 shingles being used on the job.
The bull-pen was then changed and made into a piggery with pens and troughs.
A new lattice fence was constructed (1,115 feet) and painted with two coats of paint.
Ninety lights of glass were replaced; 150 tin shingles were used on various roofs and 110 chairs
were glued together.
In addition to the above, all the usual repair-work was carried out and done very
thoroughly.
Plumbing, Heating, and Blacksmith Department.
The Blacksmith Department repaired carts, wagons, whiffle-trees, forks, shovels, and various
tools for the farm;  also made gate-hangers and grates for the boilers.
Lawn-mowers and garden-tools were made and resharpened ; rock-drills, hammers, chisels,
picks, hoes, etc., were repaired.
The kitchen-range and various utensils had their share of overhaul, also the furnaces and
heaters.
All plumbing fixtures were attended to and daily attention given to furnace fires, radiation,
and hot-water heaters. Attention was also given to the fire-hose and extinguishers were all
recharged.
A new heater was installed for the poultry-brooder system and repairs were made to piping,
valves, and water-troughs.
All outside valves and fire-stands were packed and protected against the winter months.
Cement and General Work.
This department built a new road up to the farm, fencing it and planting trees and shrubs
on either side.    A new rock wall was also completed and several chimneys rebuilt. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 15
The chimney was completed on the Trades Building, for which we made cement bricks, and
a concrete floor was laid under the stairs of this building.
The cottages came in for their share of repair-work. Drains and sand-pits were cleaned,
plaster and cement repaired, and a little kalsomine and paint-work done.
New lawns were made, trees and shrubs were pruned, and the flower-gardens and greenhouse given daily attention.
GENERAL FARMING AND KITCHEN GARDEN STATISTICS.
Dairying.
Credits.
Milk, 47,072.9 lb. at 4 cents per pound     $1,882.91
Beef to kitchen, 926 lb. at 7 cents   64.82
Total credits      $1,947.73
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $300.59
Stock registration and herd fees   13.10
Milk-strainers    5.90
Total debits         $319.59
Piggery.
Credits.
Pork to kitchen, 2,101 lb. at 8 cents        $168.08
Debits.
Feed purchased         $129.43
Pigs purchased from Colony Farm   50.00
Total debits         $179.43
—-   -   i—
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Vegetables—
Potatoes, 33,677 lb  $485.68
Onions, 329 bunches  ■. 13.50
Lettuce, 131 pails  32.75
Beets, 2,088 lb  41.77
Peas, 520 lb  25.90
Marrow, 745 lb  14.90
Carrots. 1,912 lb  38.24
Beans, 577 lb  28.85
Turnips, 3.225 lb  32.25
Cabbage, 1,338 lb  70.50
Cucumbers, 204 lb  4.08
Chard, 422 lb  12.26
Squash, 379 lb  7.58
Pumpkin, 300 lb '.  6.00
Corn, 48 dozen   9.60
Parsnips, 205 lb  2.05
Corn, sold   5.00
       $830.81
Carried forward       $830.81 M 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward        $830.81
Fruit—
Strawberries, 173 lb  $8.65
Rhubarb, 775 lb  38.70
Raspberries, 160% lb :  12.84
Cherries, 58 lb  6.96
Apples, 443 lb  26.58
Plums, 66 lb  3.96
Greengage, 35 lb  2.10
Prunes, 29 lb  1.75
Crab-apples, 9 lb .*.  .55
,r.     ,,          102.09
Miscellaneous—
Mangels, 24 tons at $7   $168.00
Turnips, 1% tons at $20   35.00
Carrots, 1% tons at $20   25.00
Beets, 2V4 tons at $20   45.00
Potatoes, iy2 tons at $15 (seed)   22.50
Potatoes, 4y3 tons at $12, for pigs   54.00
Corn for silage, 12 tons at $7   84.00
Oats and peas for silage, 18 tons at $7   126.00
Timothy-hay, 3% tons at $13   45.50
Oat-hay, 7 tons at $13   91.00
 696.00
Total credits      $1,628.90
Debits.
Feed purchased   $970.24
Freight on hay  48.09
Fertilizer  95.25
Shovels, forks, etc  3.95
Rope, twine, bull-rings, etc  36.64
Seed  159.07
Laundry, soap, etc  16.99
Repairs to harness   65.66
Drugs, fly-spray, etc  39.23
Sawdust  4.00
Repairs to machinery  30.17
Lime   7.95
Brushes, combs, etc  15.38
New machinery   21.70
Fuel, light, water   148.45
Horse-shoeing and blacksmith repairs   195.75 -
Total debits      $1,858.52
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy        $1,947.73 $319.49
Piggery          168.08 179.43
General farming, kitchen gardens       1.628.90 1,858.52
Salary of Instructor and Assistant   2,555.88
$3,744.71 $4,913.32 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 17
BISCOQ POULTRY-RANCH STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Expenditures during Year.
Credits.
Eggs produced during the year, 33,133y2 dozen;   eggs in storage from March, 691 dozen;
total, 33,824y2 dozen.
Eggs disposed of as follows :—
For own use in kitchen, 3,938 dozen   $789.66
B^or hatching purposes, 488 dozen   122.0
Eggs shipped to Tranquille, 16,560 dozen   3,783.63
Eggs shipped to Provincial Home, 690 dozen   155.40
Eggs shipped to Essoudale Mental Hospital, 2,100 dozen   479.40
Eggs shipped to New Westminster Mental Hospital, 420 dozen.... 93.60
Eggs shipped to relief camps, 6,330 dozen   1,092.00
Eggs shipped to Burns Co., Vancouver, 1,200 dozen   152.67
Eggs shipped to Government Agent, New Westminster, 30 dozen.. 6.30
Eggs in stock, April 1st, 1934, 649 dozen   123.31
Poultry used for kitchen, 1,137 birds   546.70
To 12 tons mangels grown for feed   84.00
Total credits   $7,428.67
: :—>—
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $5,364.68
Chicks purchased during year  220.00
Salary of Instructor  ',  1,350.00
Salary of two part-time assistants, two days per week   322.40
Salary for holiday relief  48.00
Transportation of eggs by own truck   336.00
Express on empty crates from Tranquille Sanatorium   89.93
Light, fuel, water   384.65
Laundry, soap, etc  20.86
Lime  71.55
Seeds  13.85
Flats, tops, and laths for egg-crates   17.60
Thermometers, wick, coal-oil, drinking-jars, etc  37.09
Denim for brooders   3.80
Association fees   1.00
Eggs broken and unfit for use, 983 dozen  98.30
Shortage of 436% dozen eggs   82.93
New heater for brooder system and fittings   80.00
New runways in front of L-l poultry-house   76.00
Total debits   $8,618.64
BOYS' BRASS BAND.
" Sir,—I beg to make the following report on the activities of the band at the Boys' Industrial School for the year 1933-34 :—
" During the year over- forty boys took advantage of the opportunities offered to secure
training in the playing of various instruments.    Many of them made splendid progress.    With
two visits per week—namely, Wednesday from 5 to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m.—
I was able to give considerable time to beginners, and the results were very gratifying in
• most cases.
" Visits to Cloverdale, Colony Farm, and Essondale marked the high-lights of the year for
the boys, and we are looking for more visits of a similar nature next year.
2 M 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" One pleasing feature was the number of boys who purchased their own instruments. This
shows that they have developed a real interest in the work arid that it will be carried over into
their later days when Biscoq has become merely a memory.
" Thanking you and the members of your staff for your whole-hearted co-operation during
the year.
" Yours truly,
" J. W. Rushton,
Bandmaster."
INTERESTING VISITORS.
The Hon. G. M. Weir; Deputy Provincial Secretary, P. Walker; Professor J. F. Day,
University of B.C.; Professor C. W. Topping, U.B.C.; Dr. Pilcher, U.B.C.; Colonel E. AV. Pepler,
Victoria; Dr. A. S. Lamb, Victoria ; H. N. MacCorkindale, Vancouver; J. D. Anson, Ottawa,
Ont.; R. M. Grierson, B.C. Penitentiary, New Westminster; Rev. M. Shirouzu, Tokyo, Japan;
Mr. and Mrs. F. Allen, London, Eng.
The members of the New Westminster Rotary Club came out for lunch and we enjoyed
having them very much indeed.
BISCOQ LIBRARY.
The following data are submitted for the annual report:—
Number of books—
The library reopened on May 1st, 1933, with 830 books      830
Books discarded        16
814
Books donated by boys        49
Donated by staff        16
Donated by Mr. Triggs (Provincial Home)         10
Old books collected, repaired, and listed         13
Books on shelves at present       902
Membership—
Cards issued to boys   124
Cards issued to staff  13
Boys who did not take any books   14
Total library cards issued   137
Books issued—
Issues made to boys   1,659
Issues made to staff   63
Total issues made during year   1.722
Books reviewed in Biscoq Boys' Paper, 28;   books rebound, 56.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
During the year religious services were held every Sunday and often during the week. The
following are letters of appreciation:—
" Superintendent,
Provincial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—For many years it has been the privilege of the Salvation Army to conduct
meetings with the boys at Biscoq the first Sunday of each month. It has been my privilege to
conduct these services personally with my assistants, and in this connection we have enjoyed
the hearty support and co-operation of yourself and staff. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1933-34. M 19
" There is no doubt that a good work is being done in the interests of these youths, as they
have been of the very best behaviour and have shown a keen interest at all gatherings.
" We sincerely trust the happy relations of the past will continue to be ours in the future.
" Yours to serve,
"W. Kerr,
Commanding Officer."
" Superintendent,
Boys' Industrial School,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—The Boys' Industrial is attended from the Holy Rosary Cathedral and all
through the year there has been Mass and instruction twice a month. Besides, the boys have
received instruction from lay sources.
" The Superintendent and other officials have given us every facility in the performance of
our duties toward the Catholic boys confided to the care of the institution.
" Yours truly,
" Peter Pineault."
VICTORIA.   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield. Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.
400-1034-9148 

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