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SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1933-34 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1935

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Full Text

 SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1933-34
BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Baxfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.  To His Honour J. W. FoRDnAM Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please "Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Sixty-third Annual Report of the Public Schools of the
Province.
G. M. WEIR,
Minister of Education.
December, 1934-  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1933-34.
Minister of Education:
Hon. GEORGE M. WEIR, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
S. J. Willis, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent of Education:
D. L. MacLaurin, B.A.
Inspectors of High Schools:
J. B. DeLong, B.A., Vancouver. A. Sullivan, B.A., Victoria.
Inspectors of Elementary and Superior Schools:
L. J. Bruce, Arancouver.
F. G. Calvert, Vancouver.
T. G. Carter, Penticton,
E. G. Daniels, B.A., New Westminster.
II. C. Fraser, M.A., Victoria.
*W. G. Gamble, B.A., Prince George.
G. H. Gower, M.A., Courtenay.
T. R. Hall, B.A.. Kelowna.
*T. W. Hall, Prince Rupert.
A. R. Lord, B.A., Vancouver.
* These men also inspect the High Schools in their districts.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Cranbrook.
A. F. Matthews, M.A., Kamloops.
A. E. Miller, Revelstoke.
H. H. Mackenzie, B.A., Vancouver.
*W. Ray MacLeod, B.A., Pouce Coupe
(died. April 14th, 1934).
*W. A. Plenderleith, B.A.., B.Paed.
J. T. Pollock, Vancouver.
P. H. Sheffield. B.A., Nelson.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Officer in Charge of Technical Education:
John Kyle, A.R.C.A.
Director of Home Economics: Welfare Officer of Rural Female Teachers:
Miss J. L. McLenaghen, B.Sc. Miss Lottie Bowron.
Officer in Charge of High Correspondence School:
J. W. Gibson, M.A., B.Paed.
Officer in Charge of Elementary Correspondence School:
Miss Isabel M. L. Bescoby, B.A.
Registrar: J. L. Watson, B.A. - Officer in Charge of Text-books: P. G. Barr.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
NORMAL SCHOOL STAFFS.
Victoria:
Vancouver:
D. M. Robinson, Principal.
A. Anstey, B.A.
W. P. Weston.
II. B. MacLean.
J. A. Macintosh, B.Sc.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc.
J. M. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
Miss E. M. Coney.
Miss Isabel Coursier.
Miss Margaret Maynard, B.A.
V. L. Denton, B.A., Principal.
B. S. Freeman, B.A.
C. B. Wood, M.A. (July to December, 1933).
H. D. Southam, B.A., D.Paed.  (January to
June, 1934).
H. L. Campbell, B.A.
John Gough, M.A.
F. T. C. Wickett, A.R.C.O.
Miss L. B. Isbister.
Miss Barbara Hinton.
Model School:
Miss Kate Scanlan.
Miss Marion James.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
George H. Deane, Victoria.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education   9
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  29
Victoria....  29
Report of the Director of the Summer School for Teachers  31
Report of the Officer in Charge of Technical Education  39
Report of the Director of Home Economics  44
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  45
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
New Westminster  49
Victoria  50
Report of the Principal, School for the Deaf and the Blind  52
Report of the Officer in Charge of the High Correspondence School  53
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Elementary Correspondence School   57
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  58
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust . 61
Report of the Board of Reference  63
PART II.
Sta'istical Returns—
High Schools (Cities) :  2
High Schools (District Municipalities)  14
High Schools (Rural Districts)  17
Superior Schools   (Cities)  20
Superior Schools ( District Municipalities)  20
Superior Schools (Rural Districts)  20
Junior High Schools (Cities)  26
Junior High Schools (District Municipalities)  30
Junior High Schools (Rural Districts)  31
Elementary Schools (Cities)  32
Elementary Schools (District Municipalities)  65
Elementary Schools (Rural Districts)  83
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each City  102
Summary of Enrolment in the Schools of each District Municipality  105
Enrolment (Recapitulation)  107
Names of Schools, Number of Teachers, etc., in each of the Electoral Districts  109 PART I.
GENEEAL KEPOBT.  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF
EDUCATION, 1933-34.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1934.
To the Honourable George M. Weir, B.A., M.A., D.Paed.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Sixty-third Annual Report of the Public Schools of
British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1934.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province decreased during the year from 116,816 to
115,792 and the average daily attendance from 104,978 to 103,389. The percentage of regular
attendance was 89.30.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Schools.
Cities.
District
Municipalities.
Rural
Districts.
Total.
14,720
50
5,665
48,734*
3,071
428
531
19,102f
1,141
3,283
69
18,992
18,932
Superior schools	
3,707
6,265
Elementary schools	
86,828
Totals, 1933-34	
09,175
23,132
23,485
115,792
Totals, 1932 33     	
70,201
23,283
23,332
116,816
* These figures include an enrolment of 77 pupils in the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and
the Blind.
t These figures include an enrolment of 83 pupils in the Provincial Model School.
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled in the— students.
High School Correspondence classes      702
Elementary School Correspondence classes      876
Night-schools   5,754
Normal School, Vancouver      198
Normal School, Victoria      115
Victoria College       258
University of British Columbia  1,606
Total  9,509
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES AND SEX.
Grade.
Boys.
.    Girls.
Total.
6,014
5,237
11,251
5,775
5,313
11,088
0,223
5,552
11,775
0,041
5,821
11,862
0,192
5,770
11,968
6,053
0,110
12,769
0.203
0,227
12,490
5,503
5,700
11,323
3,798
4,073
7,871
2,833
2,892
5,725
1,907
2,011
3,918
1,435
1,697
3,132
385
235
620
Grade I 	
Grade II	
Grade III	
Grade IV	
Grade V	
Grade VI	
Grade VII	
Grade VIII 	
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI	
Grade XII	
Senior Matriculation
Totals	
59,0S2
56,710
|       115,792 N 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS  AND PUPILS  ACCORDING  TO  THE  DIFFERENT
CLASSES OF SCHOOLS AND DISTRICTS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils
and the percentage of the pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of
pupils per teacher are shown below:—
Schools.
o.v
O a.
CO
t* c g o>
See's
ng.
High schools (cities)	
High schools (district municipalities)	
High schools (rural districts)	
Superior schools (cities)	
Superior schools (district municipalities)	
Superior schools (rural districts)	
Junior high schools (cities)	
Junior high schools (district municipalities)..
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities) *	
Elementary schools (district municipalities) t
Elementary schools (rural districts)	
Totals	
417
98
53
2
11
122
148
14
3
1,277
537
928
86
11
44
4
93
18
503
109
58
2
11
122
192
18
3
1,370
555
930
14,720
3,071
1,141
56
428
3,283
5,065
531
69
48,734
19,102
18,992
12.70
2.05
0.99
0.05
0.36
2.83
4.89
0.45
0.06
42.08
16.49
16.39
35
31
21
2S
39
27
38
38
23
38
36
20
30
27
18
20
35
23
35
34
21
35
32
18
3,010
203
3.S73  115,792  100.00
	
27
I
* These figures include 16 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 77 pupils enrolled in
the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 83 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School.
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers of each sex employed and also the
number of certificates of each class held by these teachers:—
Schools.
S
High schools (cities)	
High schools (district municipalities)	
High schools (rural districts)	
Superior schools (cities)	
Superior schools (district municipalities)..
Superior schools (rural districts)	
Junior high schools (cities)	
Junior high schools (dist. municipalities)..
Junior high schools (rural districts)	
Elementary schools (cities) *	
Elementary schools (dist. municipalities) f
Elementary schools (rural districts)	
Totals, 1933-34	
Totals, 1932-33	
414
94
53
1
14
94
5
2
125
19
41
1
4
70
50
7
647
247
456
1
6
36
1
488
263
420
35
9
10
862
1,490   1,218
80
14
835
1,449
1,309 I    69
2
To-
17
71
15
1
231
324
58
35
1
4
50
95
9
3
305
133
206
179
51
23
1
7
72
97
9
1,065
422
664
6     1,283   2,590   3,873
503
109
58
11
122
192
18
3
1,370
555
930
223
10
1,218   2,694   3,912
* These figures include 16 teachers employed in  the Provincial Government  School for the Deaf and
the Blind.
t These figures include 2 teachers employed in the Provincial Model School.
- PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 11
NEW SCHOOLS.
Vanderhoof Superior School was raised to the status of a high school, and superior schools
were established at Dawson Creek, Kaleden, Oyster North, Port Alice, and Yank.
Elementary schools were opened for the first time in nine pioneer districts.    The names of
the districts follow :—■
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Moose Heights Cariboo.
Comox Lake Comox.
Shawnigan Lake, West Esquimalt.
Chief Lake Fort George.
Savory Omineca.
Erinlea Peace River.
Digby Island, Oceanic Cannery Prince Rupert.
Claxton Skeena.
The establishment of elementary schools was authorized in the following districts, but these
schools were not opened during the school-year:—
Name of School District. Electoral District.
Slesse Creek Chilliwack.
Gold Bridge Lillooet.
Lake View, Wagner Peace River.
Inverness Cannery Prince Rupert.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and also the
cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
^ 53 ft
ri rH 5
o
o
ft   .
V tfl
ga-g
='S
6.2
u o
tfifH
6
R
t>'csS
to    «
3    §
q   «
a     a;
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
tor Public
Schools.
1877-78	
50
09
128
207
429
007
810
1,597
1,859
2,240
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3.912
3,873
45
59
104
109
213
208
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
90,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
03.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
80.17
80.05
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43t
200,255.26t
473,802.29
544,671.00
1,663,003.34
1,885,054.11
1,653,706.60
3,176,686.28t
3,532,518.95t
3,765,920.691
3,743,317.08t
3,834,727.19t
4,015,074.37J
2,849,972.02$
2,611,937.80t
1882-83	
1887-88	
1892-93	
1897-98	
1902-03	
$604,357.86
1,220,509.85
1907-08-	
1912-13	
4,658,894.97
1913-14 	
4,634,877.56
1917-18 	
3,519,014.61
1922-23	
7,630,009.54*
1927-28	
9,261,094.98$
1928-29	
11,149,996.27}
1929-30	
10,008,255.661
1930-31	
10,061,387.99}
1931-32 	
9,719,333.81}
1932-33               	
8,941,497.34}
1933-34	
8,213,369.04}
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t No information is available as to the expenditure made by school districts in addition to that made
by the Government.
X This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. N 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last twelve years and also the cost to
the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Enrolment
at High
Schools.
Enrolment
at other
Public
Schools.
Total '
Enrolment.
Percentage at
High Schools
of the Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil ioi
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1922-23    	
9,220
9,889
10,597
11,779
12,906
13,516
14,545
14,675
16,197
18,134
18,552
18,932
85,668
86,315
87,357
89,909
92,102
94,663
95,013
96,342
97,717
97,785
98,264
96,860
04,888
90,204
97,954
101,688
105,008
108,179
109,558
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
9.71
10.27
10.81
11.58
12.20
12.49
13.27
13.22
14.21
15.64
15.80
16.35
$27.92
27.36
27.17
26.09
26.40
26.92
28.32
28.07
28.03
29.02
21.55
19.51
$34.07
1923 24              	
33.21
1924 -25    	
32.17
1925 26           	
31.06
1020 27           	
31.41
1927 28      	
31.74
1928 29      	
33.03
1929 30      	
32.79
1030-31      	
32.74
1931  32          	
33.18
1932 33          	
23.98
1933 34      	
21.85
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE SCHOOL-YEAR 1933-34.
Grand total cost of education    $8,213,369.04
Less—
Grant re salaries of faculty of Victoria College       ,$2,090.10
Special grant to Victoria College        5,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia    262,499.97
Normal School, Vancouver       15,871.15
Normal School, Victoria      24,223.11
Cost of night-schools     17,105.12
Correspondence Courses :   Elementary Schools  7,610.68
Correspondence Courses :   High Schools      18,387.64
         353,387.77
Net cost for total enrolment of 115.792 pupils    $7,859,981.27
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  67.88
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on total enrolment  .68
Cost per pupil per year on average daily attendance of 103,389 pupils   76.02
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on average daily attendance  .40
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 115,792 pupils for year
($2,611,937.80—$353,387.77)      2,258,550.03
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  19.51
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days) on total enrolment   .10
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
103,389 pupils  21.85
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school day (192 days)  on average
daily attendance   .11
Cost per capita for year on population (1931) of 694.263  *11.32
Cost per capita per school-day (192 days) on population (1931) of 694,263  *.00
Cost to Provincial Government pet\capita for year on population (1931) of 694,263 3.25
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (192 days) on population
(1931) of 694,263  .02
* Computed on net total cost of $7,859,981.27. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 13
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the Province
during the year was as follows:—
V
tfl
CJ
a
3
o
CJ
tfl
CO
d
l-s
5
ii
cS >
CJ cj
tc a
Gfl
tn
CJ
O
Ph
3
g
u
cj
O
Americans
(U.S.A.).
High schools	
210
615
3
169
30
40
55
46
141
20
219
9
88
0
125
1,043
2,194
59
752
33
177
440
153
219
Elementary schools in district munici
palities	
S2
1,605
18
313
23
50
312
34
53
Kural elementary schools	
45
543
27
499
53
90
278
75
105
Totals	
1,400
5,176
116
1,821
139
363
1,210
308
518
tfl
B
tc
3
S
■   a
cd
'm
tfl
3
■A
to
u
o
SJ
o
J3
3
o
Q
3
'3
u
P
m
u
CJ
C
o> <u
So
Oft
3
o
H
11
44
59
195
12
41
189
1,860
Superior schools	
20
74
21
128
5
13
139
867
City elementary schools	
76
64
338
1,161
93
195
801
7,798
Elementary schools in district munici
palities	
17
73
179
133
1
71
317
3,281
Kural elementary schools	
52
108
88
365
731
274
445
3,778
Totals	
176
303
685
1,982
842
594
1,891
17,584
HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city high schools during the year was 14,720. Of this number, 7,381
were boys and 7,339 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment
for 1933-34 and for 1932-33 in each city are shown in the following table:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Alberni District	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack High School Area	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland..	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops •.	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Port Coquitlam	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm High School Area..
Slocan	
Trail-Tadanac	
Vancouver 	
Vancouver, North	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals..
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
~l2~
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
4
3
11
3
9
1
5
4
2
8
7
28
6
4
4
1
9
214
13
6
39
417
4
3
14
3
7
7
3
12
1
5
4
3
12
8
33
o
3
8
7
4
4
1
9
269
13
6
49
~50lT
116
111
356
69
202
57
102
27
172
88
315
20
127
96
51
235
220
971
79
90
218
164
115
137
7
251
8,338
434
242
1,310
347720"
99
103
335
58
204
00
109
' 25
179
75
333
24
132
80
78
229
237
788
40
94
244
164
97
115
9
222
8,207
418
208
1,304
34730T" N 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
HIGH SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality high schools during the year was 3,071. Of this
number, 1,390 were boys and 1,681 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the year 1933-34
and the year 1932-33 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
21
4
3
2
5
7
4
4
8
1
5
6
14
3
3
5
3
21
4
3
o
5
8
4
4
12
1
0
8
15
O
3
6
4
741
112
95
34
144
168
93
106
293
14
171
174
395
91
80
206
154
751
Delta	
103
84
35
Langley	
119
140
110
104
Oak Bay	
303
20
Penticton	
146
189
437
98
82
Surrey	
172
203
21
98
109
3,071
3,108
HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural high schools for the year was 1,141. Of this number, 516 were
boys and 625 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, together with the enrolment for the
years 1933-34 and 1932-33, are given in the table below:—
District.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
o
2
3
1
1
1
.>
3
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
4
3
1
2
3
1
1
o
2
1
27
32
40
71
27
15
20
27
01
20
29
18
124    •
43
30
13
17
31
25
15
28
101
58
18
36
57
27
18
39
51
17
26
Cobble Hill	
21
41
84
30
11
15
32
59
28
22
17
124
34
30
18
22
55
19
17
18
111
67
16
37
60
21
Telkwa	
22
38
48
Totals         	
31
53
58
1,141
1,143 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 15
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city superior schools during the year was 56. Of this number, 36
were boys and 20 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment
for 1933-34 are shown in the following table:—■
ru,,                                                 1   Number of
Cltj-                                                      Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of      Enrolment,
Teachers.         1933-34.
Greenwood ,            1
2
2
56
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality superior schools during the year was 428. Of
this number, 215 were boys and 213 were girls.
The number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of teachers, and the enrolment
for 1933-34 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
North Cowichan  (Chemainus)	
1
1
6
0
5
217
211
2
11
11
428
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural superior schools was 3,283. The number of boys was 1,647, of
girls 1,636.
The following table gives the number of schools, the number of divisions, the number of
teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1933-34:—•
District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Ashcroft	
Athalmer-Invermere
Baynes Lake	
Blakeburn 	
Brechin	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Cedar, North	
Chase	
Dawson Creek	
Fort St. John	
Hazelton	
Hedley	
Hope	
James Island	
Kaleden	
Lillooet	
Lumby	
Malcolm Island	
Michel and Natal....
McBride	
Oyster, North	
Port Alice	
Pouce Coupe	
Procter	
Queen Charlotte	
4
4
2
4
4
3
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
10
3
2
3
3
2
2
4
4
2
4
4
3
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
2
3
3
3
10
3
2
3
3
2
2
97
97
30
98
151
60
66
50
70
85
74
56
53
87
54
43
77
111
59
382
63
48
59
84
58
28 X 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS—Continued.
District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
8
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
4
3
8
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
154
Rolla	
70
271
21
68
64
102
114
115
Vahk        	
81
Totals -.	
37
122
122
3,283
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city junior high schools was 5,665. The number of boys was 2,715,
of girls 2,950.
The following table gives the number of divisions, of teachers, and the enrolment in each
school for the school-years 1933-34 and 1932-33:—
City.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
1
1
1
1
4
6
7
7
9
119
8
10
7
11
156
179
266
233
313
4,674
202
242
234
Nelson	
328
4,503
Totals   	
S
148
192
5,665
5,509
JUNIOR HIGH  SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality junior high schools during the year was 531.
Of this number, 264 were boys and 267 were girls.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years
1933-34 and 1932-33 are shown in the following table:—
Municipality.
Number of
Schools.
Number of i Number of
Divisions.     Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
1
1
7
7
10
8
266
265
257
Totals	
2
14
18
531
257
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS—RURAL DISTRICTS.
The enrolment in the rural junior high schools was 69. The number of boys enrolled was
27, of girls 42.
The number of schools, of divisions, and of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-years
1933-34 and 1932-33 are shown in the following table:—
District.
Number of    Number of
Schools.       Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Ocean Falls	
1         |           3
3
69
66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 17
SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT IN HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The following is a summary of enrolment in high and junior high schools:—
Number
of
Pupils
enrolled
Boys.
Girls.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Number of Pupils in Grades.
c?-^§
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XI.
XII.
High schools :
Cities	
District municipalities..
14,720
3,071
1,141
7,381
1,390
510
7,339
1,681
625
12,567.38
2,663.68
980.89
4,404
1,094
378
4,343
889
293
3,016
588
221
2,386
464
238
571
36
11
18,932
9,287
9,645
16,211.95
5,876
5,525
3,825
3,088
61S
Junior high schools :
Cities	
District municipalities..
5,665
531
69
2,715
264
27
2,950
207
42
5,137.82
470.48
63.23
2,246
196
24
1,966
193
20
1,453
142
25
6,265
3,006
3,259
5,671.53
2,466
2,179
1,620
25,197
12,293
12,904
21,883.48
2,466
2,179
7,496
5,525
3,825
3,088
618
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—CITIES.
The enrolment in the city elementary schools was 4S.734. The number of boys was 25,179,
of girls 23,555.
The number of schools, the number of divisions and of teachers, and the enrolment in each
city are shown in the table below:—
City.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith....	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail-Tadanac	
Vancouver	
School for Deaf and Blind*
Vancouver, North	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
5
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
53
1
3
1
16
4
10
11
8
15
12
12
3
14
9
16
2
17
7
8
20
19
69
11
7
5
10
20
15
12
4
2
33
718
9
33
20
122
4
10
11
8
16
14
12
3
15
9
16
2
17
20
20
75
11
7
5
11
21
16
12
4
2
34
776
16
33
23
131
119
1,277
1,370
138
416
441
303
552
427
426
105
514
371
552
66
642
284
287
734
701
2,707
398
230
197
384
774
534
431
144
57
1,268
28,083
77
1,307
830
4,354
141
443
448
305
566
448
439
111
569
359
597
07
709
268
291
765
696
2,076
389
239
197
384
889
567
493
145
55
1,246
28,664
83
1,360
879
4,606
48,734
49,529
* Provincial Government School.
2 N 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES.
The enrolment in the district municipality elementary schools was 19,102. The number of
boys was 9,949, of girls 9,153.
The following table gives the enrolment and the number of schools in operation in each
municipality during the school-years 3933-34 and 1932-33:—
Municipality.
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Divisions.
Number
of
Teachers.
Enrolment,
1933-34.
Enrolment,
1932-33.
19
15
2
5
2
9
1
2
10
7
11
8
2
1
1
7
15
8
4
1
23
5
3
114
38
4
11
2
18
12
6
30
29
19
19
17
2
14
37
55
10
10
8
49
19
14
125
38
4
11
2
18
14
6
30
29
19
20
18
2
14
37
55
10
10
9
51
19
14
4,322
1,175
120
399
43
603
447
213
1,080
1,018
623
644
640
51
580
1,424
1,984
272
324
292
1,585
697
560
4,373
Chilliwack	
1,128
125
Coquitlam !	
412
250
Delta	
620
472
Kent	
210
1,113
Maple Ridge	
999
Matsqui.	
616
666
Oak Bay	
Peachland -	
656
49
583
181
1,408
1,989
292
317
295
1,592
737
770
Totals-	
167
537
555
19,102
19,865
* These figures include 2 teachers employed by the Provincial Government and 83 pupils enrolled in the
Provincial Model School.
ELEMENTARY  SCHOOLS—RURAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The number of pupils that were enrolled and the number of teachers employed  in the
elementary schools of the rural districts were as follows:—
Number
of
Schools.
Number
of
Pupils.
Boys.            Girls.
Number of
Teachers
employed.
733
18,992
9,703
9,229
930
SALARIES.*
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average monthly salary paid to teachers
during the school-year 1933-34   (ten monthly payments) :—
High Schools.
Elemen-taky Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest        Average
Salary.          Salary.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Cities.
$175
200
160
$135
130
130
$148
141
142
$143
160
169
150
$80
■85
78
90
$101
108
108
107
* In the above table the salary is quoted in dollars only. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 19
SALARIES—Cont inued.
Cities—Continued.
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand  Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo .-	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith- 	
Merritt , '.	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Port Alberni-.	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody -	
Prince George - -	
Prince Rupert 	
Revelstoke -	
Rossland  -	
Salmon Arm -	
Slocan-....	
Trail-Tadanac	
Vancouver	
Vancouver, North	
Vernon —	
Victoria  	
For all cities... .--	
District Municipalities.
Burnaby	
Chilliwack   -	
Coldstream -	
Coquitlam -	
Cowichan,  North	
Delta 	
Esquimalt	
Kent 	
Langley —	
Maple Ridge.	
Matsqui..  	
Mission -	
Oak Bay 	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Richmond -	
Saanich - - 	
Salmon Arm 	
Sumas -	
Sumas-Abbotsford 	
Summerland -	
Surrey..-	
Vancouver, North -	
Vancouver,  West	
For all district municipalities
Rural Districts.
For all rural districts	
High Schools.
Highest
Salary.
Lowest
Salary.
$228
170
170
142
275
204
278f
162
261f
180
120
231t
290f
307
189J
209
191
183
270
215
210
120
284
314f
230
240
338
S838t
$245
150
222
120
180
170
135
185
297
130
240t
180
230
130
184
161
241f
$207t
$206f
$128
120
120
120
133
130
131T
162
120f
120
120
119f
150f
124
126$
122
126
125
147
122
168
120
152
891
130
153
140
$89f
$120
120
184
120
120
120
120
120
173
130
106t
120
118
120
133
120
117f
$100f
$120|
Average
Salary.
$147
139
133
131
159
158
172f
102
153f
143
120
143t
182f
213
148J
166
147
143
182
189
179
120
187
184
170
171
220
$101f
$107
130
197
120
132
127
126
150
243
130
1401
139
166
123
152
133
155f
$1491
$155t
Elementary Schools.
Highest
Salary.
$216
188
102
138
275
180
224
131
261
140
180
127
229
250
170
120
120
190
180
240
178
185
115
248
275
200
244
258
$275
$218
140
120
119
105
150
240
113
110
140
90
200
289
103
160
170
180
110
100
184
115
143
160
$289
$266
Lowest
Salary.
$90
78
78
87
99
99
102
100
90
86
86
78
92
84
91
80
79
90
90
96
81
105
90
70
75
100
84
89
$75
$78
78
98
83
100
78
111
78
78
78
78
80
95
90
75
78
78
80
80
81
78
90
91
$75
A verage
Salary.
$116
107
94
109
122
112
133
115
118
108
94
107
124
127
105
94
93'
113
122
120
103
133
103
113
130
124
117
149
$113
$110
90
109
100
103
86
134
88
86
86
80
100
150
96
107
98
100
92
89
105
84
105
122
$102
$89
t These figures include salaries paid to teachers in high and junior high schools.
t These figures refer to Alberni District High School.
§ With the exception of one district. N 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Superior Schools.
00 t^.
>4 w
tit
Highest
Salary.
CJ U
iJOQ
Average
Salary.
$153
140
110
110
126
125
165
110
110
152
120
110
152
120
140
150
141
110
115
110
110
$108
110
80
85
78
103
115
82
90
100
100
78
111
100
100
95
90
89
98
78
7S
$119
118
95
94
99
110
133
96
100
114
107
85
131
110
120
113
115
09
108
93
93
$153
120
110
110
140
120
127
110
120
128
144
110
150
120
150
100
145
100
140
$95
80
100
80
78
100
95
78
85
80
80
78
95
90
108
78
90
00
100
$104
McBride	
95
105
88
100
110
111
Queen Charlotte	
94
95
Rolla 	
Rutland	
Sand Creek, Big :..	
105
100
Fort St. John
94
118
Hazelton	
Hedley  	
Sooke 	
100
126
Wellington, South	
87
118
Woodfibre	
Yahk           	
US
113
For all superior schools,.
Malcolm Island	
$165
$78
$106
The average monthly salai'y (ten monthly payments) paid teachers employed in all public
schools (elementary, superior, junior high, and high) of the Province for the school-year
1933-34 was $123: to teachers employed in elementary and superior schools, $107; and to
teachers employed in junior high and high schools, $155.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1933-34.
Minister's Office:
Salaries    $5,259.60
Office supplies   185.72
Travelling expenses  -  709.95
General Office:
Salaries   $19,470.07
Office supplies   2,291.35
Travelling expenses   220.11
Text-book Branch:
Free text-books, maps, etc	
Correspondence Courses, High Schools :
Salaries   $10,612.79
Office supplies   3.248.16
Revision of courses  1,071.50
Travelling expenses   28.30
Science equipment  200.64
$21,161.39
Less fees         2,773.75
Correspondence Courses, Elementary Schools :
Salaries       $6,224.69
Office supplies          1,385.99
  7,610.68
$6,155.27
21,981.53
47,550.72
18.387.64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 21
Industrial Education:
Salaries   $8,995.68
Office supplies  2,462.84
Travelling expenses   2,259.00
Night-schools    17,105.12
Inspection of Schools:         $30,822.64
Salaries   $61,896.32
Office supplies   3,521.77
Travelling expenses   24,086.25
.$89,504.34
Less amount paid by School Boards   4.060.79
Normal School, Vancouver : 85,443.55
Salaries (less deduction for rent, $468)   $30,328.24
Office supplies  1.119.57
Travelling expenses   98.40
-Fuel, light, and water   2,105.10
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools   406.08
Maintenance and repairs (by Public AVorks)   284.39
Incidentals    614.37
$34,956.15
Less Normal School fees  19,085.00
Normal School, Victoria : 15,871.15
Salaries (part by Public Works)   $28,970.48
Office supplies   1,197.15
Travelling expenses   203.28
Fuel, light, and water (by rublic Works)    2.124.93
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   2,023.80
Transportation of students to outlying practice-schools  380.85
Incidentals    228.62
$35,135.11
Less Normal School fees  10,912.00
School for the Deaf and the Blind: 24,223.11
Salaries (less deduction for rent. etc.. $3,824.30)    $22,618.73
Office supplies   829.14
Travelling expenses   123.64
Fuel, light, and water   2.001.41
Maintenance and repairs (by Public Works)   329.23
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment   428.95
Provisions   2.483.30
Incidentals   132.89
$28,947.29
Less amount received for board and tuition of pupils from
Alberta           2.124.99
 .        26.822.30
High. Junior High.      Superior. Elementary.
Salary grants to cities   $199,426.22    $79,986.48     $1,758.10      $533,490.16       814.666.96
Salary grants to district municipalities        40.798.10     11,951.70       6.990.40        330,140.65       389,880.85
Salary grants to rural school
districts        37.540.38       1,440.00     80,122.80        622.690.76.       741.793.94
$277,764.70    $93,378.18    $88,871.30    $1,486,327.57 N 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
School buildings, erection and maintenance and special aid to school districts        $28,608.91
Rural Female Teachers' Welfare Officer (nine months) :
Salary         $1,209.60
Expenses         1,004.79
  2,214.39
Education of soldiers' dependent children and expenses  9,478.55
Examination of High School and Entrance classes      $33,951.42
Less fees for examination and certificates      29,653.74
  4.297.68
Conveying children to central schools  :  60,158.88
School libraries   7S.93
Summer Schools and teacher-training for special certificates        $6,305.40
Less Summer School fees        4.432.0S
  1.873.32
Official Trustee, Community School Districts :
Salary          $2,136.00
Expenses   799.65
$2,935.65
Less paid by districts          1,467.83
Board of Reference          $531.23
Less fees   300.00
1,467.82
231.23
Incidentals and contingencies   4,817.78
University of British Columbia        262.499.97
Special grant to Victoria College   5,000.00
Total cost to Government   $2,011,937.80
Amount expended by districts, including debt charges:
High. Junior High.       Superior.        Elementary.
Cities   $1,247,962.53    $382,682.00       $1,836.77    $2,489,992.07 4,122.473.37
District municipalities         217,070.15        31,524.35        11,071.97         579,776.79 839,443.20
Rural school districts           61,287.73          5,263.65        97.194.30         475,768.93 639,514.61
$1,526,320.41    $419,470.00    $110,103.04   $3,545,537.79
Grand total cost of education     $8,213,369.04
EXAMINATIONS.
High School Entrance Examination, June, 1934.
The High School Entrance Examination was held on June 27th, 28th, and 29th at 242
centres throughout the Province.
Under the regulations of the Department, promotion by recommendation is granted as
follows :—
"(a.) Entrance pupils attending a public school in a school district where a high or superior
school is in operation and Entrance pupils attending a public school in a school district adjacent
to a district having a high or superior school who are reported by their teachers to have covered
thoroughly the work prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction for Grade VIII., and who
are recommended for promotion to high school by a committee composed of the principal of the
nearest high or superior school, and the Inspector of Schools, Provincial or Municipal, having
jurisdiction in that district, shall be issued Entrance certificates by the Department.
"(5.) In any other public school, where, in the opinion of the Inspector, the grading of the
pupils is satisfactory, their standing is of a high order, and a teacher of proven work is employed, Entrance pupils who are reported by the teacher to have covered thoroughly the work
prescribed by the Council of Public Instruction for Grade VIII. and are jointly recommended PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 23
for promotion to high school by the teacher and the Inspector for the district, shall also be
issued Entrance certificates by the Department."
The number of pupils who obtained certificates was as follows:—
By recommendation (including 161 who entered the competition for the
Governor-General's medals)      5,198
By examination      1,338
Total      6,536
Betty Morton, a pupil of Edmonds Street School, Burnaby, had the honour of leading the
Province with the exceptionally high total of 556 out of a possible of 600.
The names of the winners of His Excellency the Governor-General's bronze medals were:—
District.
Name.
School.
Marks.
No.   1
520
No.   2
514
No    3
530
No    4
556
No    5
524
No    6
Amy Fong	
512
No    7
526
No.   8
No.   9
No. 10
John Malcolm Russel Margeson	
Edward Benson 	
Central School, Trail	
Kimberley School	
Booth Memorial School, Prince Rupert-
540
524
538
High School Examinations, 1934.
The following are the results of the examinations held in the various high schools and
superior schools throughout the Province:—
June, 193J,.
Total
No. of
Candidates
Writing.
Writing the Full Examination.
Writing Partial
Examination.
No. of
Candidates.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
No. of
Candidates.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade IX  	
167*
105*
54*
3,729
785
2
Ill
29
20
2,107
400
2
69
14
10
1,416
180
2
42
15
10
691
214
56
76
28
1,622
385
52
Grade X             	
64
Grade XI	
24
Grade-XII	
1,384
Senior Matriculation....	
Academic Standing for First-
class Teacher's Certificate	
286
Totals	
4,842
2,675
1,703
972
2,167
1,810
* Under the regulations of the Council of Public Instruction, the teachers of superior schools have the
right in Grades IX. and X. apd the teachers of high schools have the right in Grades IX., X., and XI. to
determine promotions. As a result, the number of candidates sitting for Departmental Examination in
these three grades is comparatively small.
August-September, 193A.
No. of
Candidates
Writing.
No. passed
in all
Subjects.
No. granted
Partial
Standing.
Grade XII.                               ..    ..
992
351
2
322
60
2
516
191
Academic Standing for First-class Teacher's
Certificate....
Totals  ..-  ....  	
1,345
384
707 N 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Grade XII.
Of the 322 Grade XII. candidates who secured " complete " standing at the August-September
Examinations, 1934, 178 had written a full examination for the first time in June, 1934, and
obtained partial standing. Thus, of the 2,107 candidates who wrote the full examination for the
first time in June, 1934, 1,416 + 178, or 1,594, completed their standing in one year (1934). This
is 75.7 per cent.
Senior Matriculation.
Of the 60 Senior Matriculation candidates who secured " complete " standing in August-
September, 1934, 29 had written a full examination in June, 1934, and secured partial standing.
Thus, of the 400 full Senior Matriculation candidates writing the examination for the first time
in June, 1934, 186+29, or 215, completed their standing in one year (1934).    This is 53.7 per cent.
The following summary shows the total number of candidates writing each paper and the
average mark obtained on each paper at the June Examinations by Grade XII. and Senior
Matriculation candidates:—
Subject.
Grade XII.
No. of
Candidates.
Average
Mark.
Senior Matriculation.
No. of
Candidates.
Average
Mark.
English Composition	
English Grammar	
English Literature	
Social Studies (History)	
Algebra	
Geometry	
Chemistry ..
Physics	
Agriculture	
Biology	
Geography	
Latin Authors	
Latin Composition	
French Translation (Literature).
French Grammar (Language)	
German Translation (Authors) —
German Grammar (Composition)
Arithmetic	
Health	
Music	
Nutrition and Physiology	
Poods and Cookery	
Clothing and Textiles	
Applied Art	
Wood and Metal Work (Theory)..
Draughting	
Greek I	
Art III	
Trigonometry	
2,209
2,303
2,192
2,198
2,148
2,119
2,179
966
97
22
677
745
744
1,892
1,851
58
57
331
503
1
70
74
71
72
108
100
4
4
53.7
61.8
60.4
63.3
63.5
63.9
60.5
52.7
62.5
75.2
56.9
62.8
61.7
61.2
66.7
77.2
69.2
62.4
63.7
71.0
66.5
66.4
68.1
70.6
64.8
76.9
62.3
61.3
395
390
102
382
382
340
152
9
122
123
361
353
16
16
3
387
56.1
58.4
56.5
55.3
56.9
52.4
56.8
75.0
52.5
52.9
55.1
57.7
71.S
55.7
61.3
58.7
His Excellency the Governor-General's silver medals which are awarded annually to the
five leading Junior Matriculation students were won this year by the following:—
Name.
High School.
Per Cent.
Betty May Buckles	
Faith Mary Grigsby	
Anna Carolina Eichenberger
Kathleen Bundy	
John Will Stewart	
Rossland	
North Vancouver	
John Oliver, Vancouver	
Creston	
Prince of Wales, Vancouver.
90.0
89.3
87.8
86.6
86.5 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 25
The Royal Institution Scholarships awarded annually by the University of British Columbia
to the student obtaining the highest marks in the Junior Matriculation Examination and to the
seven others who led in their respective districts were won by the following:—
District.
Name.
High School.
Per
Scholar
Cent.
ship.
90.6
$150
85.0
150
82.9
150
89.3
150
87.8
150
83.7
150
80.4
150
86.6
150
Province-
No.
Betty May Buckles	
Eric Edward Lewis	
Marjorie Gladys Jessup	
Faith Mary Grigsby	
Anna Carolina Eichenberger....
Signe Patricia Austring	
Jack Davis	
Kathleen Bundy	
Rossland	
Mount View, Saanich	
Ocean Falls	
North Vancouver.	
John Oliver, Vancouver..
McLean, Maple Ridge	
Kamloops  	
Creston	
In addition to the above,  the following candidates for Grade XII. Examination,  whose
names are given in alphabetical order, passed with honours (80 per cent, or over) :—
Name. School.
David Blee Prince of Wales High School, Vancouver.
Gordon Brown Trail High School.
Arthur Ernest Chapman Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Constance May Clark Trail High School.
Gladys Eileen Corcoran John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Marjorie Maud Crane Esquimalt High School.
Alan Scott Croll Prince of Wales High School, Vancouver.
John Stanley Garratt Oak Bay High School.
Edythe Emily Guy Magee High School, Vancouver.
Marjorie Gertrude Henry John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Mun Hope Victoria High School.
Joshimitsu Higashi Britannia High School, Vancouver.
Hideo William Iwasaki Ocean Falls High School.
Cyril Peter Jones Victoria High School.
Edith Pearl King North Vancouver High School.
Robert H. King Magee High School, Vancouver.
John Duncan Leslie Magee High School, Vancouver.
Alair Lips Kitsumgallum High School.
Jean Meredith Crofton House (Private), Vancouver.
Hazel Wilma Merten Duke of Connaught High School, New Westminster.
Ethel Blanche Moffat Magee High School, Vancouver.
Frances Marion Moran Trail High School.
Audrey Muriel McDonald Abbotsford High School.
Flora MacEachern Surrey High School.
Jean Rosmee McTaggart-Cowan St. Anthony's (Private)  School, Vancouver.
Pan Hope Nasmyth North Vancouver High School.
Dorothy Elizabeth O'Neil Prince Rupert High School.
Alexander C. Ritchie Nelson High School.
Nicholas Weber Rodin Surrey High School.
Mary Pauline Roy McLean High School, Maple Ridge.
Jean Marguerite Seton Prince of AVales High School, Vancouver.
Phyllis Shaw North Vancouver High School.
Norah MacLachlan Sibley Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
John Will Stewart Prince of Wales High School, Vancouver.
William Lang Stirling John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Arthur Leslie Sutton B.C. School of Pharmacy & Science (Private),
Vancouver.
Peter Julian Swan Duncan High School.
George Takakazu Tamaki Ladner High School.
Inga Madeline Thomson North Vancouver High School.
George Charles Walsh Britannia High School, Vancouver. N 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
The winners of the three scholarships awarded by the University of British Columbia on
the results of the Senior Matriculation Examination to (1) the two students obtaining the
highest standing in the Province, (2) the student obtaining the highest standing in districts
other than Greater Vancouver and new Westminster, were:—
Name.
High School.
Per
Cent.
Scholarships.
Sheila Clare Buchanan	
Columbian College (Private), New Westminster.
84.0
S3.0
80.0
$150
150
150
In addition to the above, the following candidates for Senior Matriculation, whose names
are given in alphabetical order, passed with honours (80 per cent, or more) :—
Name. School.
Alice Hagen King Edward, Vancouver.
John Stafford Kendrick John Oliver, Vancouver.
Ruth Evelyn Oehlerking King George, Vancouver.
" EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT."
For the year 1933-34, the sum of $10,000 was set aside to assist in the high-school education
of the children of veterans of the Great War.
At the two meetings of the Commission appointed to administer the " Education of Soldiers'
Dependent Children Act," 224 applications were considered, of which number 179 fulfilled the
necessary requirements and were awarded grants. The remaining forty-five were not eligible
for assistance owing to the fact that the applicants were either over age or had not reached the
required educational standard, or else their parents were not residents of British Columbia
prior to enlistment. Before the commencement of school seven students dropped out, and
during the year another seventeen discontinued school, some because they had obtained employment and some because of ill-health. It was thus made possible at Christmas to consider
fourteen new applications which came to hand after the second meeting of the Commission. Of
these, nine were found to be in order and grants were awarded them.
The following table shows geographically the distribution of the allowances :—
Armstrong     2
Atchelitz   1
Bui'naby    6
Canoe   2
Chase   1
Chilliwack     3
Cloverdale  2
Cobble Hill   4
Courtenay   1
Duncan    1
Egmont   2
Errington   1
Fanny Bay   1
Fernie    3
Gabriola,  South   1
Ganges  4
Happy Valley  2
Heffley Creek   1
Kamloops   1
Kaslo   1
Langford  1
Merritt     1
Merville   1
New Westminster  8
North Vancouver   3
Penticton   3
Port Clements   1
Robson  1
Saanich   15
Salmon Arm  1
Sardis    2
Sidney   2
Stewart   1
Surge Narrows   1
Telkwa    1
Tranquille     1
Vancouver     54
Victoria   18
Westbank   1
West Vancouver   4
Westwold    1
White Rock   3
A close check was kept on the educational achievements of all children receiving assistance.
and the satisfactory reports sent in from month to month by the various school principals, as
well as the fact that a large majority of the students received promotion at the end of the
school-year, indicate that a satisfactory standard was maintained on all sides.    The results of the final examinations conducted by the Department of Education also showed that these
students made good progress in their studies. Eleven of them gained complete and seven
gained partial Junior Matriculation standing. One student was successful in obtaining both
Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance standing.
A number of the parents have written in to the Department expressing their appreciation
of the assistance given and showing their willingness to co-operate with the Commission to the
best of their ability.
The total cost of administering the " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act " for
1933-34 was $50.55.
It might prove of interest to recall that the Act first became effective in 1930-31. The
following table shows the amount appropriated by the Legislature and the amount expended by
the Commission in assisting in the high-school education of the children of veterans of the
Great War:—
Fiscal Year. Amount voted. Amount spent.
1930-31    $12,000.00 $8,269.00
1931-32   15,000.00      14,769.40
1932-33  12,000.00      11,862.50
1933-34   10,000.00       9,838.05
In 1930-31 the grants ranged from $75 to $150 a year; in 1931-32, from $100 to $125; in
1932-33 there was a flat grant of $68; and in the last school-year the regular grant was $55.50.
This year, 1934-35, owing to a very large increase in the number of eligible candidates, the
regular grant had to be cut to $34. Candidates who were late in applying received $12 only
until the appropriation was exhausted.
There has been a yearly increase in the number of eligible candidates as shown hereunder :
1930-31, 87;  1931-32, 131;  1932-33, 166 ;  1933-34. 188 ;  1934-35, 251.
The likelihood of a still further increase in the number of applicants for 1935-36 would
suggest the necessity of having a somewhat larger appropriation in the Estimates for the next
fiscal year.
IMPORTANT AMENDMENTS MADE TO THE " PUBLIC SCHOOLS ACT " IN 1934.
Government Grants to Teachers' Salaries.
The Government grant towards the salary of each high-school teacher was fixed at least
$75 in excess of the grant towards the salary of each elementary-school teacher and at least
$25 in excess of the grant towards the salary of each junior high-school teacher in any school
district.
The minimum grant towards the salary of each elementary-school teacher was raised from
$250 to $305 per annum.
Age of Free Tuition.
The age under which tuition fees may not be charged any pupil resident in any school
district was raised from 15 years to 18 years or until the pupil has completed Grade XII.
Boards of School Trustees were empowered to refuse to admit to school because of nonpayment of tuition fees any pupil who is over the compulsory attendance age of 15 and has
completed Grade XII. or has reached 18 years of age before completing Grade XII.
Dismissal of Teachers.
The period in which a teacher may give notice of appeal after having received a notice of
dismissal from any Board of School Trustees was extended from five to fifteen days.
Boards of School Trustees were given power to dismiss, by giving proper notice, any teacher
or teachers in the district if the total number of teachers in the district owing to a decrease
in the enrolment of pupils becomes greater than the Board deems sufficient for the needs of the
district. The number of teachers so dismissed must not, however, exceed the necessary
reduction in staff occasioned by the decrease in enrolment.
The Board of School Trustees in any municipal district was given power to transfer a
teacher or teachers from one school to another when such reduction in staff has become
necessary, and to adjust the salary of any teacher so transferred at such time as the Board
determines. N 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Suspension of Pupils.
Any pupil who is persistently disobedient to the principal or any teacher of a school may
now be suspended or expelled. As the Act formerly read, the pupil might have been suspended or
expelled if he was persistently disobedient " to his teacher."
Qualification of Voters.
The existing- disqualification of ratepayers from voting who were in arrears in payment of
school taxes in rural school districts was removed, thereby extending the same rights to ratepayers in rural school districts as are given to ratepayers in other school districts. Persons
eligible for the office of school trustee, as formerly, must not be in arrears in the payment of
their school taxes.
Taxation.
Each joint owner of a piece of property (except husband and wife) was made liable to the
minimum tax imposed for school purposes on that property. This will prevent any attempt to
evade taxation imposed on non-property owners by several jointly purchasing a small piece of
property and paying a tax thereon.
Minimum and maximum limits were placed on the school tax that might be imposed on
non-property owners, thereby providing justice for both property and non-property owners.
AMENDMENTS MADE TO THE " TEACHERS' PENSIONS ACT " IN 1934.
Provision was made whereby the Teachers' Pensions Board, at its discretion, may grant
a pension in the case of a contributor who through becoming permanently and completely
disabled cannot comply with other existing provisions.
The Minister of Finance was empowered to invest moneys at the credit of the Teachers'
Pensions Fund not required for immediate use in the payment of teachers' pensions, the field of
investment being restricted to Government-guaranteed securities.
The Act was also amended to provide that a contributor under the Act shall retain all
statutory rights upon appointment to the Civil Service as an employee of the Department of
Education instead of losing, as formerly, 50 per cent, of the accrued contributory service.
Another amendment provides that a contributor will receive pension benefit for the time
spent in military service, provided that immediately preceding his joining for service he was
engaged in teaching in a public school in the Province.
The Act formerly provided that in the case of a contributor who died a pension would be
paid to a nominated dependent only if the contributor had been at least fifteen years in service.
By amendment the condition that he should have been at least fifteen years in service was
removed. The pension paid shall be based on the single-life plan based on the age of the
recipient.
DEATH OF INSPECTOR AV. RAY MacLEOD.
The Department of Education once again suffered a serious loss in the death in April, 1934,
of Mr. AV. Ray MacLeod, B.A., Inspector of Schools.
Mr. MacLeod was a graduate of the Arancouver Normal School and of the University of
British Columbia. From 1912 to 1914 he taught in the schools of Burnaby and South Vancouver.
The three years following this were given to service overseas in the Great AArar, in which he
was seriously wounded. From 1918 to 1931 he was principal of the Lynn Valley School, North
Vancouver. On August 17th, 1931, he was appointed Inspector of Schools and took charge of
the Peace River District.
For over three years he devoted himself enthusiastically to the advancement of education
in the isolated schools of this northern portion of the Province, and by his efficient and sympathetic supervision  greatly  endeared  himself to  the  teachers  and  pupils  of his inspectorate.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
S. J. AVILLIS,
Superintendent of Education. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 29
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF D. M. ROBINSON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1933-34 opened on September 13th. During the term, September to December,
1933, 193 students—137 young women and 56 young men—were in attendance. During this
term one student withdrew on account of illness. At the close of the term in December three
students with previous Normal School training were granted diplomas. Three students discontinued the course at the close of the September-December term.
At the opening of the new term in January 186 of those who had attended during the
autumn term returned. These were joined by two students with previous training and three
special students (regularly certificated teachers from Saskatchewan or Alberta). Thus the
total enrolment for the January-June term was 191.
The following shows the enrolment and results of the session:—
Young
Women.
Young
Men.
138
57
2
1
140
58
4
12
5
122
52
Total.
Regular students 	
Special students (diplomas not granted)	
Total enrolment ....'	
Withdrawals (illness, unsatisfactory work)
Not awarded diplomas	
Recommended for Interim certificates	
195
3
198
4
17
174
The personnel of the staff remained as it was in 1932-33.
The instruction in physical education (Strathcona Trust) was conducted by Sergeant-Major
Frost and Sergeant-Instructor Hawkes. Of the 186 students examined at the close of the
session, 179 qualified for Grade B certificates.
During the session eight weeks were devoted to observation and practice-teaching—seven
weeks in graded city schools and one week in one- or two-roomed schools in neighbouring
municipalities and on Vancouver Island. I should like to take this opportunity of thanking
principals and teachers for their very hearty co-operation in this department of the work of
teacher-training.
The session just closed has been a very successful one. The students have shown a wonderful spirit of enthusiasm in all school activities, and a spirit of most willing co-operation with
the staff has been strongly in evidence.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF Y. L. DENTON, B.A., PRINCIPAL.
The session of 1933-34 opened on September 13th, 1933, and closed on June 8th, 1934.
During the fall term 112 attended. Of this number, five, who were receiving further training,
were awarded diplomas in December; three students withdrew. In January three students
came in for further training. The year closed with an enrolment of 107. Of these, ninety-seven
were awarded Normal diplomas, five of whom received honour standing.    Ten failed to qualify.
The following table presents a summary of the enrolment:—
Women.
Men.
Total.
66
3
6
36
4
102
Withdrew from course	
3
10
Totals	
75
40
115 N 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
In the Strathcona Trust physical-training course ninety-one secured Grade B certificates.
Mr. James A. Petch received the award of the gold medal for greatest proficiency in this work.
Practice-teaching was carried on in the municipal schools of Arictoria, Oak Bay, Esquimalt,
and Saanich, and in near-by rural schools. The principals and critic-teachers gave valuable
assistance in this important part of the work.
At the end of June, 1933, Miss I. M. F. Barron retired from Division II. of the Model School.
She had been in charge of the Junior Grade pupils since the opening of the Normal School in
1915. The staff extends to her their best wishes for a pleasant rest after many years of the
most faithful and efficient services. Miss M. D. James, of the Victoria AArest School, was
appointed to fill the vacancy in Division II.
During the Christmas recess Mr. C. B. Wood, M.A., was transferred to the University of
British Columbia, and Mr. H. D. Southam, M.A., D.Paed., was appointed in his place. Mr. AArood
joined the Normal staff in September, 1924, and carried on his work in a most painstaking and
efficient manner. His leadership of the Dramatic and Debating Society was outstanding and
Normal graduates will long remember some of the enjoyable Friday afternoon performances.
The gradual building of homes in the Saanich area between Foul Bay Road, Bay Street,
and Richmond Road is presenting a problem. The accommodation at the Model School is
limited to two rooms and the Cedar Hill School is 2% miles distant. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 31
SUMMER SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS.
REPORT OF JOHN KYLE, A.R.C.A.,  DIRECTOR.
A Provincial Summer School for Teachers was held in Arictoria and Vancouver from July
9th to August 10th, 1934.
The registration fee charged was $3;   the tuition fee ranged from $3 to $12.
The enrolment by classes in Victoria was as follows:—
Primary Grade Course      98
Rural and Indian School Problems      26
English       33
History     10
Geography     24
Art 1     41
Art II.     13
Applied Art      13
Vocal Music I     16
Vocal Music II       5
Choral Music     19
Art of Singing  :     15
Arithmetic        12
Technique of Teaching      25
Teaching of Oral and Silent Reading in the Elementary Schools     24
Speech-training      27
Penmanship      12
Folk-dancing       31
School Service     16
Short-story Writing  ,     16
The enrolment by classes in Vancouver was as follows:—
Physical Education     50
Commercial Subjects      32
Choral Singing, with Rudiments of Music and Melody and Harmony     10
Electricity      14
The total individual enrolment was 361 students.
The following members comprised the teaching staff:—
Victoria—
Arthur Anstey, B.A History.
Gerald H. Barry Rural and Indian School Problems.
Arthur L. Bagshaw Life-saving.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A Primary Grade.
Miss Ethel M. Coney ATocal Music I.
Miss Nancy Ferguson, B.A Folk-dancing.
Miss Barbara Fraser, A.T.C.M Accompanist.
T. R. Hall, B.A Technique of Teaching and Teaching of Oral and
Silent Reading.
R. Jones  Penmanship.
N. de Bertrand Lugrin Short-story Writing.
A. E. C. Martin, B.Sc Arithmetic.
H. H. MacKenzie, B.A English.
Heber Nasmith The Art of Singing.
Mrs. Wilfrid Ord, F.T.C.L., M.R.S.T. Speech-training.
Vaughan G. Pritchard School Service (Typewriting, Multigraphing,
preparing Courses of AVork, etc.).
Miss Isobel Routledge Librarian.
H. D. Southam, B.A., D.Paed Geography.
Mrs. Ina D. D. Uhthoff, Dip. G.S.A Applied Art and Art II.
W. P. Weston Art I.
F. T. C. AVickett, A.R.C.O Subjects for B.C. School Music Certificates. N 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Vancouver—
AV. K. Beech, M.A., B.Paed Commercial Course.
AV. G. Brandreth, M.I.H., B.P.E Physical Education Course.
Graham Bruce, B.A Commercial Course.
Gordon Darling, B.Sc Electricity.
C. E. Findlater, L.T.C.L., A.T.C.M., A.T.S.C Choral Singing, with Rudiments
of Music and Melody and Harmony for B.C. School Music Certificates.
W. L. Lockhart Physical Education Course.
Miss S. MacDonald Accompanist.
Miss C. AAratkins Folk-dancing.
The social functions of the school were much upset owing to the fact that the gymnasium
floor was lifted for repairs and we were compelled to discontinue the weekly dances which have
always been so popular. However, two excellent recitals were given in the Assembly Hall—one,
a Song Recital by Mr. Heber Nasmith, and the second a Piano Recital by Mr. Alggo Kihl from
Toronto.
A course of lectures on "Art in the Schools of London, England," by Miss Marion Richardson,
Supervisor of Art, was much enjoyed. She brought a fresh outlook on the subject of that
creative work which can be expected from school-children.
Mr. Douglas Flintoff also gave a series of talks on the industries of the Province, illustrated
by moving pictures.
In addition, the students had a successful concert near the end of the session which disclosed
much talent.    A picnic to Elk Lake was also much enjoyed.
PRIMARY GRADE AVORK.
In the above course a comprehensive survey was given of modern methods in teaching
primary grades. Special consideration was given to the two subjects of Reading and Manual
Arts.
In Reading, special stress was put upon the building-up of a pre-primer course based upon
the child's natural activities, word recognition, devices for practice, and the extension of the
reading vocabulary.
In Manual Arts, a course was followed which could be carried out with such simple waste
material as may be obtained at no cost—cardboard boxes, spools, sticks, wrapping-paper, string.
A class of twelve little beginners, who had not previously started school, gave the instructor
an opportunity to demonstrate the methods in a practical manner.
The course included Reading, Language, Number-work, Nature, and Health.
COURSE FOR TEACHERS IN RURAL AND INDIAN SCHOOLS.
The work covered in this course was designed to place before teachers in rural aud Indian
schools, and those seeking positions in these schools, the latest approved methods in rural
practice.
With the exception of a very short lecture daily, the whole of the work was covered by
means of demonstration lessons given to a class of children. This class consisted of forty-five
children in Grades III. to VIII., inclusive.
While most of the subjects taught in rural schools received consideration, special emphasis
was placed on the teaching of Reading, Arithmetic, Language, Grammar, Geography, and Nature.
Considerable time was devoted to the demonstration of special methods best suited to rural
conditions, and to schools in which there may be a number of non-English-speaking beginners.
While type lessons were being taught to one or other of the grades, the remainder of the children
were engaged on the most modern types of seat-work, all of which was later corrected during
the final period of the day. This Demonstration class was in session from 1 to 3.30 p.m. daily
for the full five weeks of the Summer School.
Various types of Reading, Number, and Colour Charts were constructed by the teacher-
students. The standard of the work turned out was very high, and the individual charts
should prove of great use to the teachers in their own schools during the coming year. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 33
ENGLISH.
The procedures and techniques advanced during the period of this course were based upon
the findings of recent psychological research in educational processes. The physiological and
psychological grounds upon which Silent Reading techniques are based were examined, and
the direct application of these techniques to class-room situations whereby desired abilities and
skills in Reading may be developed was demonstrated.
The importance of Oral Reading was stressed and effective methods were advanced for
developing real appreciation of worth-while literature. These techniques took cognizance of
the " audience situation" in Oral Reading, in the presentation of a poem, and the need for
speech-training.
In dealing with poetry, the Ballad and Lyrical Romance were studied and treated as types
of the Narrative Poem, while the song, ode, sonnet, and elegiac poem were studied as types
exemplifying the Lyric.
As far as time permitted, attention was given to methods of dealing with longer literary
units;  e.g., " The Lady of the Lake," " Treasure Island," " Ivanhoe."
Attention was directed to children's Reading, and recognized principles underlying the wise
selection of books for children's libraries and general reading were discussed. Results of studies
made in this field of research were given careful consideration.
Definite methods for developing, grade by grade, ability in oral and written expression were
discussed at length.
During this part of the course, special stress was given to the following points: Oral
composition (socialized recitation employed) ; development of sentence-sense; the business of
the sentence to express " the proper and exact relationship between ideas"; development of
paragraph-sense; vocabulary-building; correct English usage; letter-writing; gradual development in theme-writing until reasonable skill is acquired in narrative, descriptive, and more
simple types of expository themes.
The question of grammar in the elementary grades was discussed and stress laid upon
functional, rather than formal, grammar.
HISTORY.
One aim of this course being to stress the social values of history-study, the inspirational
as well as the informational aspects were emphasized as fully as possible. Very generally it
may be said that the work fell under three broad divisions: (a) A consideration of the aims
and objectives with which History is studied in the schools; (6) an analysis of selected material
with the purpose of organizing it into learning units and also of deciding upon suitable assimilative material for study by the pupils; (c) a review of teaching methods as based on accepted
educational principles. The class periods were characterized by much free discussion; suitable
types of project activity were undertaken; and visits were made to the Provincial Archives,
providing opportunity to become familiar with some of the raw material from which History
is built up.
GEOGRAPHY.
As fully as time would permit, consideration was given to the treatment of Geography on
the unit basis, stressing the physical, regional, economic, and human phases of each topic
outlined. Both lectures and discussions were made as practical as possible through development
of suggested teaching and testing procedures based on sound and modern psychological principles.
The following selection of lecture topics will indicate the scope of the course: The Sociological Approach to Geography Teaching; First-hand Geography—A Study of Home and Community Life; " Human Use" Regions—Initial AVorld Understandings in the Intermediate
Grades; Canada in its World Relations—A Problem and Project Programme for the Senior
Grades; Materials and Tools of Geography Teaching—An Examination of the Place and Value
of Text-books, Maps, and Pictures; Examinations and Tests in Geography—A Consideration of
" Testing as Teaching " ; The Geographical Background of Modern Problems—" Long Views "
in Geography for the Progressive Teacher.
Many recently published text-books and supplementary readers, files of illustrative material
for problems and projects, and the latest maps were available for inspection by the class.
Each teacher was provided with a comprehensive and carefully selected bibliography and a list
of practical teaching suggestions and aids for future reference and use.    Exchange of ideas N 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
for help in geography-teaching among the members of the class and a visit to the workshops
of one of Victoria's local industries lent further practical worth to this course.
ART COURSE I.
The students attending the Art Course covered the work extending from Primary Grade to
Grade IX.
The following were the divisions: Object Drawing with pencil, crayon, pen, and brush;
Nature Drawing with pencil, pen, and brush; Design and illustrative work for use in teaching
History, Geography, Health, and Nature-study;  Art Geometry;  Lettering;  Blackboard Drawing.
The work was in keeping with the new Drawing Manual published for school-teachers.
ART COURSE II.
The Second-year Art Course consisted of the subjects required in Grades IX. and X.—
Nature-study, Posters, Design, and Lettering. A special feature was made of Lettering with
pencil, pen and ink, and colour, and with the manuscript and ball-pointed pens. Colour
harmonies were also studied.
APPLIED ART.
The Course in Applied Art was arranged with the object of linking up the drawing and
design of the elementary and high schools with the hand-work of the Manual Training and
Home Economics—to teach the child to create beauty in every-day objects and that Art need
not be confined to working on paper.
Linoleum Block Printing was taught as a practical means of teaching Design by repetition
of the block in different layouts, borders, all-overs, panels, to be applied to linens, sheeting, or
monk's cloth for curtains, cushions, screens, etc., which can have the added enrichment of simple
stitchery. Christmas cards were designed and the blocks cut. From these blocks countless
printings were made in black and white and in several colours. Designs were also carried out
on wood, using simple water-colours, on such as boxes, panels for interior decoration, tea-trays,
book-ends.
' VOCAL MUSIC I.
Owing to the curtailment of the time usually given to this subject, the work differed somewhat from other years. One had to assume that the students were musical and no individual
tests were given.
Although a brief survey of all the work was taken, the major part of the time was spent
in discussing "methods of teaching." The various phases (song-singing, ear-training, sight-
singing, and rhythmic work) were well covered.
The interest and the appreciation of the students were up to the usual high standard. The
regular attendance and the punctuality of the students were exceedingly gratifying.
Primary Music.—Suggestions were given for teaching Music in the Primary Grades. The
students were all provided with a suggested monthly syllabus to cover the work of the first
two years at school.    The students seemed extremely interested in " Percussion Band " playing.
A^OCAL MUSIC II.
The course included the study of Elementary Harmony, Rudiments of Music, and Choral
Singing, the last subject being also available as a separate course.
It need scarcely be said that the study of Harmony is extremely useful in advanced ear-
training. It is also of great value to a music-teacher or music-supervisor in enabling him to
harmonize in a correct manner simple melodies to which accompaniments have not been supplied,
or in arranging easy four-part music. The subject was developed as far as possible during the
comparatively short period of a Summer School. Attention has also been given to melody-
making. The study of Rudiments of Music was treated exhaustively, a good knowledge of which
was deemed essential. The classes in the above subjects have been attended by very earnest
and diligent students, who have benefited greatly by their study.
CHORAL MUSIC.
In the Choral Group, instruction was given in all the varied and manifold points connected
a class of small children. About twenty songs, including unison songs, two-, three-, and four-
with Choral Singing.    Students were taught to conduct not only themselves as a class, but also PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 35
part songs, and also songs with descant were studied. Articulation, treatment of vowels and
consonants, and artistic interpretation received very careful attention. All the students were
regular in attendance, keen in observation, and enthusiastic in their work.
THE ART OF SINGING.
This course, which was designed primarily for teachers, also featured solo singing for
Recital, Radio, and Church. The two-hour periods daily were generally divided into three
forty-minute periods.
The first period dealt with the fundamental principles underlying all correct tone production
and included artistic breathing, attack intonation, proper vowel formation, staccato, trills, and
sustained tone. The students were required to take notes, while being free at all times to ask
questions.
The second period of forty minutes was generally given to actual demonstrations; for
example, the cause and cure of breathy tone, relaxation in singing, correct blending of the
registers of the voice, classification of voices, development, care, and preservation of the child's
voice, vocal hygiene.
The third period was devoted to the interpretation of the classic song, and in this period
songs by Robert Franz, Handel, Schubert, Robert Schumann, Brahms, as well as many songs
by modern composers, were analysed. The subject was presented in such a way that all students
in the class were given an equal opportunity to demonstrate the ideas, so that they in turn
might be fitted to teach others, either in class or individually. Many of the songs were written
out on the blackboard and sung in unison by the entire class, and in this way the finer points
of interpretation were experienced by the entire class.
The last week witnessed a decided change in the daily routine, inasmuch as talks were
given on " diction for singers," " the development of the Folk Song in England and America,"
and " History and development of the German Lieder."
ARITHMETIC.
The Arithmetic class began the course with a brief survey of the place and importance of
Arithmetic as a school subject from the Middle Ages to the present time. The historical
development of processes, such as that of multiplication, and of our number system, was used
to help in appreciation of our debt to the past as well as to give a better understanding of
present practice. Modern values and aims of the subject and the resultant changes in subject-
matter and method were discussed. Individual problems were faced and solutions proposed with
mutual profit. Stenographic copies of a number of Arithmetic lessons given by teachers in our
own schools were studied and evaluated.
Working in pairs, the student-teachers undertook to subdivide the work of the grades in
Arithmetic into monthly assignments, and to prepare suitable examinations to test each term's
work. This was well done and brought out the need, among other things, for better continuity
of purpose and method. Methods of teaching the topics of the prescribed course in Arithmetic
were studied with special attention to portions difficult to teach. In this connection much
use was made of reports of experimental research in this field.
TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING.
An attempt has been made to present this as a background course presenting general
methods and procedures. To avoid too great a degree of theory, each procedure was discussed
in terms of situations arising in connection with the teaching of the various subjects of the
curriculum. To render further the course practical, a considerable proportion of the time—
not less than 40 per cent.—was given to class discussion. The following were the chief topics
taken up: The relative values of technique and desirable personality traits; the laws of
learning; teaching aims: the assignment; how to study, with special reference to directed
study; the drill lesson: the recitation, embracing the topical recitation, the discussion period,
the socialized recitation: the project method; the lesson in appreciation; organization and
control.
ORAL AND SILENT READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.
AVhile not minimizing the value of Silent Reading, the course pointed out the prevailing
tendency to overlook the values of Oral Reading;   the interrelationship between the two was N 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
pointed out and teaching implications developed. The following were discussed : The psychology
of Reading; the degree of stress to be placed on Silent and Oral Reading at various stages;
various types of Silent Reading; training for speed and for comprehension, with suggestive
exercises; procedures in teaching Oral Reading; training in enunciation ; vocabulary training;
how to teach longer units; teaching for appreciation, with special reference to Hayward's
" The Lesson in Appreciation," type lessons illustrating the principles laid down.
SPEECH-TRAINING.
As the radio and talking pictures now focus attention on the importance of good speech, this
course is a significant one.
Especial attention was given to the sounds of spoken English; good usage of the language;
correct production of the speaking voice; the acquiring of breath-control; and the fundamental
rules underlying the Art of Expression through Speech. Daily individual practice and criticism
followed each lecture, so that every student made genuine progress in developing natural powers
of Expression. The material used included some of the finest modern poems, readings from
Dickens, excerpts from Shakespeare, and a One-act Modern Play. The united Verse Reading
proved a great aid to rapid progress in technique and literary appreciation.
PENMANSHIP.
The course, being limited to three weeks (July 23rd to August 10th, inclusive), was given
twice daily, 11 a.m. to 12 m. and 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Though the course was intensive, it was not
possible to go as far as the class would have liked. Letter formation, capitals, small letters, and
figures were studied closely. Each student spent twenty-five to thirty minutes daily at blackboard-writing, with special attention being given to arrangement of work. This was followed
by a minimum assignment of one hour per night. The effect of " showing" rather than
" telling " was stressed. Theory was taken as incidental to practice—primary to commercial
writing in high school. Questions were invited and free discussion in the class was encouraged.
Rhythm was stressed as a basis for fluency. How to measure writing for speed and how to
scale exercises for the grades was also covered.
FOLK-DANCING.
For twenty-five periods of one hour each, Folk-dance students met in the auditorium of the
Girls' Central School. The work covered was as follows: Steps and technique of English
Country Dancing; four English Country Dances; steps and technique of Scottish Country
Dancing; four Scottish Country Dances; Dances of other countries—Ireland, Denmark, Sweden,
Norway, Germany, and Italy; Novelty Dances suitable for concert-work; and Rhythmic Exercises and Interpretive Dance. In all, thirty-one dances were taught. Students received mimeographed copies of the directions and music for each dance.
At the closing concert of the Summer School, students of the Folk-dancing class performed
five dances, one dance chosen from each of the five divisions of the work of the course, namely:
"Gathering Peascods" (English Country Dance); "Dashing AVhite Sergeant" and " AValtz
Country Dance" (Scottish Country Dances); "Tarantella" (Italian); "Toy Soldiers"
(Novelty Tap Dance) ;   " AA'altz of the Flowers" (Interpretive).
TYPEAVRITING AND SCHOOL SERAHCE.
This class appealed to more teachers than ever this year. In the first place the manual
training which it gives provides a pleasant relaxation from the mental strain of other courses.
Then, again, teachers are finding that it is a most useful accomplishment to be able to type
letters, notes, and c!ass requirements. This year's class was a most enthusiastic one and by
steady practice every student was able to type ordinary material such as prose or poetry selections, letters and correspondence, at a fair rate and with perfect accuracy.
In the Duplicating Section the following material was available: Geography Project on
Empire Resources; Geography Completion Test and Numbered Feature Map; a page of twenty
questions on Topics of the Day; Map Reading—a series of questions requiring study of Map 18
(Cornish) to provide answers; Project in Geography—for use with the new Outline Map of
British Columbia; Arithmetic—review-work on the fundamentals, answers being given on
separate sheet;   History—summary of exploration in British Columbia for use with the new PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 37
Outline Map of British Columbia; History—questions on Early History of British Columbia
based on Wallace's and Gammell's texts, " History of Canada " ; Canadian History Test—32
questions from the beginning to 1763 (with answers separate) ; Arithmetic Test—30 questions
with answers; seat-work project on Lumber (reference, Cornish's Geography) ; Literature—a
series of quotations from the " Aroice of Canada " requiring name of author, context, explanation;
Dictation—a recent test paper; History—British and Canadian; Composition, Grammar,
Geography, Arithmetic fundamentals, Mental Arithmetic, and Arithmetic Problems (a series of
tests in each of the above subjects with answers separate) ; Number-work, Number Games,
Language seat-work, illustrated stories, seat-work material for colouring and flash-cards.
SHORT-STORY WRITING.
The work taken up consisted of the study of Short-story technique, under the following
heads: The Beginning, the Body, the Ending, with subheads—the introduction, unfolding of
plan or plot, struggle between opposing forces; climax; conclusion; unity and plot; main
narrative question; points of view; objective and dramatic methods; character delineation;
dialogue; setting and atmosphere; emotional traits; use of word-tools; readers' response;
markets.
Almost daily brief assignments were given to the class and each student completed one
short story, according to the given rules of technique.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
The students who attended the Summer School of Physical Education could be divided into
three groups: (a) Those who were attending the Department's courses in Physical Education
for the first time; (b) those who had attended one or two winter or summer sessions previously; and finally (c) specialists in Physical Education from other Colleges or Universities
outside this Province who were attending the summer session in order to obtain the British
Columbia Certificate in Physical Education. In view of the wide differences in degree of
previous training or knowledge of this subject, it was considered advisable to divide the student-
body into three groups. There being sufficient men to warrant the formation of a Men's class,
this was done. The ladies were then divided into two groups—namely, the Elementary School
Group and the Junior and Senior High School Group. This latter group included the specialists
referred to above.
The programme of work was drawn from the texts referred to in the Programme of Studies
for Elementary Schools, for Junior High Schools, and for High Schools—namely, " Syllabus of
Physical Training for Schools, 1933," " Reference Book of Gymnastic Training for Boys,"
" Supplement for Older Girls," and the " Canadian Book of Games."
In the Elementary School Course special emphasis was placed on the use of hoops, bean-
bags, individual and class skipping-ropes, vaults and jumping, while the Junior and Senior High
School Course placed emphasis on the wise and safe use of portable equipment.
An added feature of the work was the introduction of Danish Gymnastics for all students
and Folk-dancing for the men.
On August 8th an " Open Night" was held, when both students and spectators showed great
appreciation of and enthusiasm in the work displayed.
SWIMMING AND LIFE-SAVING.
Classes in Swimming and Life-saving were held both in Victoria and Arancouver. In Victoria
eight students qualified for the Bronze Medallion and Certificate of the Royal Life Saving
Society, and in Arancouver seven students qualified similarly.
COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS.
The courses in above subjects were arranged to fill the requirements for the B.C. High
School Assistant Commercial Teacher's Certificate and also the B.C. High School Specialist
Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
The subject-matter for the former consisted of: Stenography—theory and practice; Typewriting—theory and practice; Book-keeping—theory and practice; Business Law ; Commercial
Arithmetic ;   Economics ;   and Correspondence and Filing.
The requirements for the latter were: Auditing; Accounting; Business Finance; Office
Practice and Organization;  History of Commerce and Industry ;   Shorthand ;  and Typewriting. N 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
TECHNICAL SUBJECTS.
The only technical class held this year was one in Electricity. The work covered in Electricity I. was comprehensive and was comprised of the following: Elementary Circuits ; Ohm's
Law; Electrical Power and Energy; Electrical Equivalent of Heat; Efficiency of Transmission
Lines; Electrical Conductors (circular-unit-foot); Specific Resistance ; Temperature Coefficient;
AVheatstone's Bridge; Magnetism; Electromagnetism; Static Electricity. Seventeen experiments were carried out in the laboratory by groups of three men each.
In Electricity II. the subjects included : Study of Magnetic Circuit; Theory of Electromagnetic Induction ; Spark-coil; Mutual Induction ; Self-induction ; Mechanical Induction ;
D.C. Generator-construction; Theory of Commutation; No Load Characteristics; Load Characteristics ; Shunt—Series and Compound Generators ; Principle of D.C. Motor ; Counter e.w.f.;
Speed-control;   Starting-boxes ;   Efficiency of the D.C. Motor.
Advanced laboratory-work consisted of practical tests on the D.C. Generator, D.C. Motor,
Starting-boxes, Rheostat-control.
CHORAL SINGING, WITH RUDIMENTS OF MUSIC AND MELODY AND
HARMONY.
A class in ATancouver, studying for the Music Certificates for Elementary and Junior and
Senior High Schools, was held under the direction of C. E. Findlater.
The course covered : Rudiments of Music; Melody and Harmony I.; and Choral I. for the
Elementary School Teacher's Certificate; Harmony II. and Choral II. for the Junior and Senior
High School Teacher's Certificate.
The aim was to make the subject as practical as possible by showing the use of and
necessity for all theory-work in the class-room when teaching Music or leading a school choir.
In consequence, there was necessity for continual choralation. The choral subjects were incomplete without the application of numerous theoretical examples, and the same was true of the
theory courses.
In the advanced courses, Choral II. and Harmony II., as much practical information as
possible was given. For instance, in the Harmony Course the following were discussed :
Secondary Sevenths and Diminished Sevenths, Auxiliary notes in their entirety, Sequences,
Suspensions; also a little about such as Primary Sevenths and Augmented Chords, so that the
students would be able to analyse an ordinary piece of music. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 39
TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF JOHN KYLE, A.R.C.A., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
I have the honour of presenting a report on the following educational activities: (a) Establishing and maintaining manual-training centres in elementary schools and Industrial Arts
centres in junior and senior high schools; (b) establishing and maintaining technical courses
in high schools; (c) establishing and maintaining technical schools where vocational and trade
classes may be held; (d) establishing and maintaining commercial and agricultural courses in
high schools;  (e) establishing night-schools for adult education.
MANUAL TRAINING  (AVOODAVORK).
(Grades AH., VII., and VIII.)
The following school districts have manual-training centres in operation: Burnaby, Chilliwack City, Chilliwack Municipality, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Esquimalt, Fernie,
Harewood, loco, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Maple Ridge, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
AVestminster, Oak Bay, Ocean Falls, Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Powell River, Richmond, Summer-
land, Surrey, ATancouver, Arernon, Victoria, and AArest A'ancouver.
These places vary greatly in character and therefore the privilege of changing the course of
study set by the Department of Education is freely given. Everything is done to capture the
interest of the pupil and to encourage originality and creative skill.
The total number of centres in the Province in which elementary-school manual training is
taught, together with the number of pupils attending, are as follows:—
Elementary-school manual-training shops       93
Elementary-school manual-training instructors       52
Elementary-school pupils attending  8,281
High-school pupils attending elementary-school centres     489
JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS  (INDUSTRIAL ARTS).
(Grades VII., VIII., and IX.)
The manual-training course entitled " Industrial Arts" comprises woodwork, metalwork,
electricity, and, in some cases, printing.
The total number of centres in the Province where Industrial Arts are taught, together with
the number of pupils attending, are given hereunder:—
Number of junior and senior high-school centres       19
Number of junior and senior high-school workshops at centres       39
Number of junior and senior high-school instructors       39
Number of junior and senior high-school pupils taking courses  4,488
As the same shops are used in some centres both for elementary-school and junior and senior
high-school work, it will be necessary to add to this statement in order that one may know how
many individual shops, instructors, and students there are in the Province. These are as
follows:—
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
shops        130
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
instructors          88
Total number of individual elementary and junior and senior high-school
pupils taking courses  13,258
HIGH SCHOOL TECHNICAL OPTIONS " A " AND " B."
High School Technical Options "A" (AVoodwork) and "B" (Metalwork) are accepted by
the University authorities in lieu of a second science or second foreign language, with credits
counting towards the Junior Matriculation Certificate.
These options are to be found in the following high schools: Kamloops; Kelowna ; Nanaimo;
Nelson; T. J. Trapp Technical High School, New AVestminster; Oak Bay; Penticton; John
Oliver High School, Vancouver;  King Edward High School, A'ancouver;   Kitsilano Senior High N 40
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
School,  Vancouver;   Lord Byng High  School,  Vancouver;   Magee High  School,  Vancouver;
Technical School, Vancouver;   Victoria High School.
In addition to the High School Technical Option Courses " A " and " B," there is, in some
high schools, a straight technical course for Grades IX. and X., and this is planned to form a
connecting-link with the Arancouver Technical School so that transference may be made and
technical work be taken along specific trade lines.
AGRICULTURE.
(Horticulture, Poultry, and Animal Husbandry.)
Agriculture as a school subject is taught in few high schools, yet it is at once scientific,
technical, vocational, and educational.
A serious attempt is being made in the High Schools of Chilliwack, Maple Ridge, New
AA'estminster, Richmond, Salmon Arm, Summerland, and Victoria to link up the work of the
school with that of the farm.
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
Vancouver Technical School offers four courses. A full outline of these courses has already
been given in the Annual Report of the Public Schools of this Province for 1932-33.
Day students in the Technical School, Vancouver, numbered 947, which was a reduction
from last year owing to the fact that some of the high schools have also been providing straight
technical courses in addition to the technical option courses leading towards matriculation.
THE T. J. TRAPP TECHNICAL SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER.
The range of courses to be found in this school embraces junior high, technical high, vocational, commercial, and home economics. The subjects are arranged to suit those who desire
to go to University as well as those who have no such intention. The high standard of work
accomplished is just what one might expect from an excellent staff working in well-equipped
shops.
The enrolment numbered 519.
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF DECORATIVE AND APPLIED ART.
Excellent instruction is given in the above school on drawing and painting from life, design,
interior decoration, applique" and embroidery, lettering and illumination, show-card writing and
poster-work, pottery and clay modelling, and decoration of wood and metal. The character of
the work is modern, without being bizarre, and there is no neglect of principles or good
draftsmanship.
Students attending the day classes numbered 56 and those attending evening classes
numbered 279.    AH these students pay tuition fees.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
A full list of school districts participating in the work of technical education is appended.
This shows an enrolment of 11,787 day students taking courses as follows: Commercial, 4,617;
Technical, 4,122 ;   Home Economics, 2,626;   Agriculture, 366:   and Art, 56.
School District.
Course.
Enrolment.
198
94
Delta	
IS
42
43
19
39
Commercial	
76
72
71
165
240
61
40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 41
SCHOOL DISTRICTS—Continued.
School District.
Course.
Enrolment.
70
Oak Bay    ..                             	
30
40
39
108
33
31
28
10
Revelstoke....	
Commercial	
23
23
Commercial	
127
47
24
Commercial	
3,393
3 281
2 185
Art	
50
41
45
295
189
99
44
177
165
Total	
11.787
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
Two objects are kept in view in organizing night-schools. One is to give opportunity to
those who would improve themselves at the work by which they earn their daily bread. The
second is to give opportunity to those who would develop a hobby—some activity in which they
find intense interest. When the first and second are one, then success is well assured. Both
are important factors in life.
The undermentioned subjects were included in the night-school courses: Academic courses
for junior and senior matriculation, mathematics, history, algebra, geometry, trigonometry,
French, Latin, physics, chemistry, psychology, singing and choral work, English for new
Canadians, commercial English, commercial French, commercial Spanish, public speaking, shorthand, typewriting, secretarial practice, business correspondence, book-keeping and accounting,
cost accounting, salesmanship, commercial arithmetic, technical drafting, machine construction
and drawing, machine-shop practice, motor mechanics, automotive electricity, electric engineering, stationary engineering, Diesel engineering, mining engineering, assaying, mining, acetylene
welding and cutting, heating and welding for steam-fitting trade, building construction for
carpenters and mill-workers, cabinetmaking, sheet-metal work, general and decorative concrete
work, plumbing, painting and decorating, sign and pictorial painting, plain and ornamental
plastering, radio course, wireless telegraphy and telephony, printing and press-work, show-card
writing, carpentry and joinery, art metalwork, cookery, dressmaking, millinery, china-painting,
drawing and design, life drawing, applied art in leather, metal, pottery, weaving, current events
and current history, current economics, short-story writing, instrumental music, gardening,
poultry husbandry.
A summarized statement of attendance and teachers at night-schools is attached herewith. N 42
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Summarized Statement of Attendance and Teachers in Evening Vocational
Schools for Period July 1st, 1933, to June 30tii, 1934.
Municipality or
School.
Anyox and Granby Bay
Armstrong	
Blakeburn	
Burnaby	
Castlegar	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Comox	
Corbin	
Courtenay	
Cumberland	
Ganges Harbour	
Greenslide	
Groundbirch	
Hare wood	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Malcolm Island	
Maple Ridge	
Michel and Natal	
New Westminster	
North Vancouver....	
Ocean Falls	
Pioneer Mine	
Port Alberni	
Port Moody	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert	
Progress	
Quesnel 	
Richmond	
South Wellington	
Summerland	
Surrey	
Trail	
Tsolum	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
West Vancouver	
Totals	
OB
1
12
1
6
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
66
1
36
1
l?5S
HO
185
3
13
1
7
6
1
3
2
3
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
97
2
48
254
I
E3 CJ.BO
g-sg
52
14
12
173
12
59
20
12
53
71
37
11
17
21
53
42
99
37
120
55
197
24
70
97
34
50
29
66
18
14
86
45
55
15
33
12
2,592
24
1,148
175
■p£S
c °,2
1,863
326
1,021
7.612
1,232
4,576
300
1,230
3,542
5,147
2,012
70
854
102
. 1,925
2,186
2,840
898
5,412
3,472
9.071
2,510
2,168
3,545
1,176
4,802
4.110
2,961
322
384
8,678
2,286
1,222
1,157
1,204
937
122,723
236
53,099
15.980
5,754  I 285,797
No. of Individuals
enrolled.
Male.
39
12
62
9
40
4
53
42
29
20
34
29
73
24
69
55
130
17
42
97
33
36
22
55
14
02
22
18
9
33
4
1,300
551
175
3,222
Female
13
14
111
3
19
20
29
8
11
9
1
19
13
26
13
51
67
7
28
1
14
7
11
4
14
24
23
37
6
1,292
24 |
597 I
Total.
52
14
12
173
12
59
20
12
53
71
37
11
17
21
53
42
99
37
120
55
197
24
70
97
34
50
29
66
18
14
86
45
55
15
33
12
2,592
24
1,148
175
2,532 I 5,754
Teachers.
Male.
1
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
4
1
10
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
47
35
3
143
Female. Total.
27
1
17
67
1
1
1
2
3
4
2
5
1
13
1
4
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
74
1
52
3
210
CLASSES FOR THE UNEMPLOYED.
Classes were organized for the unemployed in three centres: North Vancouver (151 students
enrolled) ;   West Vancouver (183 students enrolled) ;   and Victoria  (20 students enrolled).
In addition to above, technical subjects were taught by correspondence by the staff of the
Arancouver Technical School to 872 students in the various unemployed camps. The staff gave
their services free.
The total expenditure on the classes for unemployed amounted to $1,557.52.
MINING.
A pronounced call for instruction in Mining arose owing to the great demand in the country
for gold. The Department of Mines and the Department of Education collaborated, and the
result was that twenty-four classes were formed throughout the Province. Each student was
provided with a synopsis of each of the twenty lectures, the result being a keen interest throughout the course and a high average attendance.
The enrolment numbered 2,136 and the expenditure amounted to $2,336.79. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 43
Summarized Statement of Attendance and Teachers in Mining Classes
for Period February 1st, 1934, to June 30th, 1934.
O
C tfj
ri <U
S3
O 3
o
y, A
__:     O
•zl K
s in
Bo
GS-W g
Bgo
+J
a
col
BBo
No. of Individuals
enrolled.
Teachers.
Municipality or
School.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
64
276
136
119
58
47
255
114
147
79
53
80
85
47
127
51
31
38
30
189
73
37
437
4,170
3,357
1,860
1,960
788
4,682
4,560
3,492
1,400
237
2,250
1,308
395
3,334
823
477
273
431
2,071
1,740
438
64
270
127
117
53
46
248
110
147
79
52
80
85
47
127
51
30
38
30
177
73
35
6
9
2
5
1
7
4
1
1
12
2
64
276
136
119
58
47
255
114
147
79
53
80
85
47
127
51
31
38
30
189
73
37
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Burnaby	
•
2
1
1
Fort Steele	
1
1
1
Nelson	
1
1
Penticton	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Trail	
1
1
1
1
Totals	
24
2,136
40,483
2,086
50
2,136
23
23
TEACHER-TRAINING.
No successful scheme of technical education is possible without a measure of teacher-
training, and for this reason the Department of Education has, for some years past, operated
Teacher-training classes on Saturdays and at Summer Schools, whereby the following certificates
may be obtained :—
(a.)  B.C. Manual Training Teacher's Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(6.) B.C. Industrial Arts Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools.
(c.)  B.C. Technical School Certificate.
(d.) B.C. Physical Education Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(e.)  B.C. Physical Education Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools.
(/.)  B.C. School Music Certificate for Elementary Schools.
(<7.)  B.C. School Music Certificate for Junior and Senior High Schools.
(h.) B.C. High School Assistant Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
(i.) B.C. High School Specialist Commercial Teacher's Certificate.
The following  was  the  enrolment in  the  above  Teacher-training  classes:    Manual  and
Technical, 43;  Commercial, 32 ; Physical Education, 44;  Music, 22.
ARANCOUVER APPRENTICESHIP COUNCIL.
Attention should be drawn to those men connected with the building trades who form the
Arancouver Apprenticeship Council and whose one desire is to see that the young men of British
Columbia are given an opportunity to become skilled craftsmen.
It. is only natural to expect that this Council are facing great obstacles at the present time,
but their organization is held together with a sincere desire to improvement conditions of vocational training. For this reason they have a great interest in the Vancouver Technical School,
and the Superintendent of Apprentices has been actively engaged during the past year in
compiling courses of study in carpentry and joinery connected with the erection of timber- N 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
constructed dwellings.    An excellent series of lessons in roofing and the use of the carpenter's
square is also embodied in this course.
Classes for apprentices in plumbing, sheet-metal work, machine-shop work, motor mechanics,
and printing meet as night-schools, and all come within the ambit of the Apprenticeship Council.
TECHNICAL SUBJECTS BY CORRESPONDENCE.
It is encouraging to see the beginning of advancement in the above direction, as it will be
quite impossible to have apprentice classes throughout the Province. The young man engaged
in industry can, however, study his trade by correspondence no matter where he may be working.
The enrolment of students taking Commercial Subjects by Correspondence numbered 93;
Home Economics, 30;  Mechanical Drawing, 12;  Agriculture, 11;  making a total of 146.
TECHNICAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS JESSIE McLENAGHEN, B.Sc, DIRECTOR.
Despite the economic conditions obtaining during 1933-34 and the demand for curtailment
of educational costs, the work of this branch of education has functioned even more efficiently
than formerly. The teachers have accepted conditions as a challenge, and, as a whole, have
doubled their efforts to make the work link more closely with daily living. Assistance in
planning expenditures on depleted budgets has been freely given, and these efforts have helped
to increase public confidence in the value of home economics as a school subject.
Tangible evidence of this increased confidence is to be found in the opening of two new
centres—one at Langley Prairie and the other at University Hill, Arancouver: in the reinstatement of the work in the High School of Prince Rupert; and in the extension of the work in the
High Schools of Chilliwack, AVest Vancouver, and Nelson.
This year we have broadened our three-year course—which is an accepted science for Junior
Matriculation—to include a (CC) course, offering seven credits in Foods, five credits in Clothing,
and three credits in Applied Art.    This course is especially suited to the small high school.
A change has been made in the marking of our Matriculation-work. Each student continues
to write two papers, but the total number of marks is now one hundred instead of two hundred
as formerly. AArith this adjustment, students in Home Economics may now compete for the
Governor-General's medal.
The course in Home Economics (A), which may be taken by correspondence, is increasing
in popularity. At present we have thirty-two students, and in June we had four girls write their
Junior Matriculation, securing creditable standing.
The total number of home-economics centres in operation during the year
was        81
The total number of home-economics teachers was        71
The total number of pupils taking home economics was as follows :—
In elementary schools 8,163
In junior high schools  2,910
In high schools  2,026
Of these, the total number taking:—
(1.)  Home Economics (A) was     492
(2.)  Home Economics (B) was      982
(3.)  Home Economics (C) was      519
(4.)  Home Economics for Normal Entrance was       94
The total number of boys taking home economics in junior high schools
was       49
The total number of boys taking home economics in high schools was      30
The  total  number  of young  women  in  Normal  Schools   taking  home
economics was     215
The total number of young men in Normal Schools taking nutrition was....     98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
N 45
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS.
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION.
Enrolment for September in the Arancouver City schools decreased in the year 1933-34 by
approximately 700 over the enrolment for the year 1932-33. It was more difficult to organize
under a decreasing enrolment than under an increasing one. The services of the teachers who
had been appointed temporarily in 1932 were no longer required. These reductions in staff,
together with the few resignations, were not sufficient to adjust the staff of the elementary
schools. Further reductions in teaching staff of the whole system were not necessary, however,
as the enrolment in the junior and senior high schools had increased. This necessitated the
transferring of several elementary teachers with successful experience and the necessary
academic qualifications to the junior high schools, and again from the junior high schools into
the senior high schools. These administrative adjustments involved a great number of transfers
in the teaching staff. From the teacher-training and professional point of, view it was excellent
for the system. For too many years we have functioned in compartments. By such progressive
promotions any part of the system has a knowledge of how the other parts operate. In time it
makes for better professional attitude and more tolerance on the part of ail. It is only by such
experience that the problems of the elementary, junior, and senior high schools can be thoroughly
appreciated by our teaching staff. This is so necessary to the whole field of vocational guidance.
The following is a table of the enrolment by grades in September, 1933, as compared with the
enrolment by grades in September, 1932:—■
Enrolment,
Sept., 1932.
Enrolment,
Sept., 1933.
Change.
Grade I	
Grade II	
Grade III	
Grade IV	
Grade V	
Grade VI	
Grade VII	
Grade VIII	
Grade IX	
Grade X	
Grade XI	
Grade XII   	
Grade XIII.   (Senior Matriculation)
Special classes	
Students specializing	
Totals	
973
675
,614
939
021
,880
,616
483
245
637
,842
,088
300
449
104*
3,636
3,422
3,504
3,479
3,950
3,942
3,804
3,789
3,247
2,480
1,730
1,308
274
299
297*
39,866
39,161
—337
—253
—110
—460
— 71
+ 62
-f-188
+ 306
+ 2
—157
—112
+ 220
— 26
—150
+ 193
—705"
* The 1933 figure includes commercial as well as technical specialists. In 1932 the commercial specials
are included in grades.
In March, 1933, due to reduction of the School Board budget, the Board of School Trustees
decided to close eight special classes—the Detention Home class in the Hastings School, the
three classes in the Open Air School, the Preventorium class in the Beaconsfield School, the
Hospital class in the Model School, the Sight Conservation class in the General Gordon School,
and the Crippled Children's class in the David Lloyd George School. The three last-named
classes, however, were kept in operation because the Department of Education assumed financial
responsibility for them. The Preventorium class was also kept open as the Rotary Club of
Vancouver assumed financial responsibility. The other classes were closed at the end of April.
The pupils of the Open Air classes were distributed among the regular classes of the city.
On November 1st, 1933, the Detention Home class was reopened by the School Board. Since
January 1st, 1934, the Board has also assumed financial responsibility for the Crippled Children's
class, the Sight Conservation class, and the Hospital class. Since the opening of the new Home
for Crippled Children on Fifty-ninth Avenue near Main Street, this class has been transferred
to the Sexsmith School from the David Lloyd George School.   It is to be regretted that during N 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
this depression many children in unfortunate circumstances, over which they have no control,
have been denied the privilege of a type of education which is justly theirs. To date no special
provision has been made for the children who were distributed from the Open Air classes. It is
to be hoped that by next year the work among these special types of pupils will be restored at
least to where it was prior to our drastic budget reduction in 1931.
SOME CHANGES IN THE Si'STEM.
Handicrafts.—The subjects of manual training and home economics in the elementary
schools have long been organized as special subjects. The pupils left their home-room teacher
for quarters in many cases quite apart from the school plant itself. The instructional groups
in these subjects in all cases were approximately half the regular roll class, the girls taking home
economics, the boys taking manual training. The teachers of home economics and manual
training in a number of cases felt that they were not an integral part of the school system.
The instructional cost under such an organization is relatively high. Every one realizes
that the home-economics and manual-training classes could be closed and the pupils cared for
by the home-class teacher without affecting the rest of the teaching personnel of the system.
On account of this administrative set-up, some manual-training and home-economics centres in
the Province of British Columbia have been closed. This emphasizes the importance of having
these subjects incorporated in the school organization on the same basis as any other subject.
The teachers of these subjects must be made roll-class teachers, handling groups similar in size
to the groups for the other subjects. By such an organization the hand-work (we have too little
of it at present) in our schools could be extended to a point which would compare very favourably
with some of the most progressive systems in the world.
On February 1st, 1934, as a first step towards such a reorganization, the elementary schools
of Vancouver City were organized up to and including Grade AH., along the lines suggested above.
The plan now is to teach manual arts in Grades I. to VI., practical arts (drafting, woodwork,
metalwork, electricity, applied art and design, foods and clothing) in Grades VII., VIII., and IX.
(as at present in the junior high schools). Technical and Household Science options will then
follow this period of exploration and guidance of the elementary and junior high schools. Until
our whole school system is reorganized on the plan of the junior high school, this progressive
policy cannot be extended to its final conclusion. At present Canada is the only country in the
world of any educational importance that does not begin secondary education at the age of
11 or 12. British Columbia, with its junior high schools, is one of the few exceptions to this
defect in educational practice.
Under the reorganization plan, instruction in manual arts is largely in" the hands of the
grade-teacher. In some centres the manual-training teachers and special manual-art teachers
do the entire instruction in handicrafts. It is our plan eventually to have all the manual arts
of the first six grades taught by a specially qualified group of grade-teachers. Manual-training
and home-economics teachers will be withdrawn from the handicrafts work of the elementary
schools and reserved for the instruction of Grades VII., VIII., and IX. in practical arts (defined
above).
Where possible, suitable work-rooms, properly equipped, were established in each of the
elementary schools. In many of the smaller schools the manual-arts room was also used as a
library and music-room. We found this plan worked very satisfactorily indeed. In a few
schools we were unable to equip special rooms because of accommodation. In these cases we
used the regular class-room.    This plan was not as satisfactory as the special room.
By means of this reorganization sufficient money was found to provide for the cost of
establishing the manual arts as long as the course operates, and it also provided extra teachers
that were used to relieve some principals who, previous to this, had no spare time to supervise
their schools. Special supervision time was assigned directly in proportion to the enrolment
of the school.
Courses of instruction for teachers had to be started at once. From February until June
more than 100 teachers attended a class for two hours a week. It should be mentioned in
passing that we had a waiting-list of more than 100 teachers who were anxious to qualify as
instructors in handicrafts. These classes will be continued soon after the opening of the schools
in September. Under the School Board, instruction was given to those teachers by Mr. Hamilton, Supervisor of Manual Training;   Mr. Henry Hill, who was borrowed from the John Oliver PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 47
High School staff, technical department; and Mr. Judge, Supervisor of Art. Because of their
untiring efforts these men are worthy of special mention for the success of the plan. The
teachers selected to teach manual arts and receive instruction were naturally those with aptitude
for the subject. The manual arts course or elementary handicrafts is simply a co-ordination
of art, science, and hand-work. It aims to satisfy one of the greatest urges of life—power to
create something: " Man can never be truly happy unless he creates. This is true not only in
literature, art, and science, but in every phase of human endeavour." Needless to say, the pupils
are delighted with this craft-work and the teachers are more than pleased with the excellent
progress that has been made. In passing, allow me to express my deep gratitude not only to
the supervisors of art and hand-work, but to the principals and teachers for their untiring
efforts in making such a successful beginning in our work of reorganizing hand-work. By such
excellent co-operative efforts I am more than confident that we can accomplish our objective.
MUSIC.
The course of music in our elementary schools, thanks to the co-operation of the Department
of Education, has very much improved. In the lower grades we have provided graded sight
music readers of a progressive nature. I am confident we are laying a truly fine musical foundation upon which we hope to continue to build. Our aim is to have every child, by the time he has
completed Grade VI., read music just as he reads a printed page from his school text. Our
success up to the present is very gratifying indeed.
In our secondary schools (junior and senior high schools) excellent progress has also been
made. There has been a decided increase in the number of students choosing music as a free
elective.    Our choirs, bands, and orchestras are on the increase.
This year, through the co-operation of the officials and leader of the Arancouver Symphony
Orchestra, between 1,000 and 1,200 students from our secondary schools were allowed once
a month, free of charge, to attend the final rehearsal of the Symphony Orchestra. These
rehearsals were held at 8.45 on Saturday mornings. More attentive and appreciative audiences
I have never seen. I should also mention the generosity of the manager of the Strand Theatre
in making this such an unqualified success.
Special mention should be made of Mr. AVaddington, our Music Supervisor, for the way in
which he has adopted some of the best practices that are now common in a great number of
countries in Europe and many parts of the Empire. I believe the time is not far distant, if it
is not already here, when every teacher of the elementary schools at least must be qualified to
teach music in one of its many phases. This is only in keeping with similar progress made in
other parts of the educational world.
HEALTH.
Eighteen assistant nurses who had been working for only two-thirds time have been restored
to full-time work as from May 1st. Our nurses and school medical officers are to be commended
for the way in which they have cared for so many children in desperate circumstances during
this period of unemployment.    This has been done both in and out of school-time.
The Board of School Trustees have also restored two of the three dental clinics as from
May 15th, to operate throughout the holiday months of July and August until December 31st.
In this way they hope to give some measure of relief to the most needy cases in our school
system. In this department more extensive organization must be undertaken to provide for
over 4,000 children who are in desperate need of dental attention and whose parents, through
no fault of their own, are unable to provide the necessary services. Some definite policy should
be adopted immediately in the way of consolidating the whole health service into a plan that
would prevent disaster to health later in life.    Money so spent would be very wisely invested.
CHANGES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS.
Because of the wide options offered in the composite high schools under the curriculum of
the Department of Education, it was thought that an opportunity school such as the Fairview
Junior High School could be closed. The Board of School Trustees have decided to make King
Edward High School a composite high school. To do this they have to add the metalwork
option of a technical course and all the commercial options. This would be a very simple matter
if King Edward absorbed Fairview Junior High School. This school was not a junior high
school but an opportunity school.   The staff will be absorbed by the system in September. N 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
The Board of School Trustees have also decided to give biology as an option in three of our
large high schools—John Oliver, Magee, and King Edward. These courses will be started in
September next. This course in biology will tend to correct a long-felt weakness, as it will
provide for the elementary teacher the foundation for the content of the nature-study course
taught in the elementary schools. Physics and chemistry do not provide the necessary preparation for the teaching of this course. Besides, excellently qualified graduates in biology from
our own University of British Columbia are now available. This extension of science-teaching
in our schools is in keeping with the general trend of curriculum construction in the most
educationally advanced countries of the world. Many of them are introducing an extensive
course in the natural sciences.
ArOCATIONAL GUIDANCE.
It was unfortunate that the depression caused the elimination of one of our newest departments—vocational guidance. It is my hope that by next year we shall have restored this
essential branch of our educational system. A good guidance programme is essential in this
day and generation.
SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION.
The enrolment, as pointed out earlier, is falling in the elementary schools and increasing in
the secondary schools. Naturally, many of our high schools are operating under conditions that
do not lend themselves to the best of working facilities. We are badly in need of a building
programme to provide for our ever-increasing secondary-school population. The attendance at
the high schools will always be supplemented by the children of parents who move to Vancouver
City to give their families the advantages of a secondary education. Besides, it is now an
accepted fact that secondary education is essential.
SCHOOL MAINTENANCE.
In spite of the financial depression, our school buildings have been kept in fairly good
condition at an expenditure of about $125,000. This is less than 2 per cent, of their actual cost.
This maintenance figure will have to be increased soon if we are to provide against depreciation
that might be prevented by more exterior cleaning and painting.
SCHOOL FINANCE.
The School Board budget for 1934 was $635,000 less than in 1932. In spite of this fact, the
Council of the City of Arancouver failed to budget for the school estimates of 1934 as submitted
by the School Board to the extent of approximately $255,000. Legally the estimates must stand
as submitted by the Board. At present we are very hopeful that a satisfactory solution will be
evolved whereby the sum of money necessary to keep the schools in operation for the entire
school-year will be forthcoming. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 49
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOLS OP THE CITY OP NEW WESTMINSTER.
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The pupil enrolment of the New Westminster schools at September 30th, 1933, was 3,517,
with 107 teachers on the staff: Elementary schools, 2,588 pupils, 74 teachers; Duke of Con-
naught High School, 442 pupils, with 14 teachers ; T. J. Trapp Technical High School, 487 pupils,
with 19 teachers.
In June the Board of School Trustees had decided to abolish entirely the junior high-school
system formerly adopted and to return to the elementary- and high-school organization, or
8-4 system.
It is a pleasure to report that a number of our teachers are Continually seeking improvement
through summer-school courses; each year a number of our teachers have had conferred on
them the Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of British Columbia, while others are
well advanced in their degree-work. Others have taken courses farther afield and the feeling
of preparedness for more efficient service is deep-rooted throughout our staff.
The Programme of Studies as issued by the Department of Education has been followed
and progressive development has been the result. The marvellous exhibition of school-work
shown at the Kiwanis Exhibition and Hobby Show in November, under the directorship of
Mr. F. J. Simpson, of the T. J. Trapp Technical High School, bore testimony to the efficacy of
the work being done.
Evening classes were operated at the T. J. Trapp Technical High School under directorship
of Mr. R. B. ATaughan, M.A., and while the attendance was disappointing the value of the effort
was outstanding. It is regrettable that more people do not take advantage of the opportunities
thus offered by the Department of Education and the Board of School Trustees.
Special activities such as Armistice Day ceremonies, Christmas concerts, Sports Day, Empire
Day, and May Day all received proper recognition. Again I wish to pay tribute to the efficient
and painstaking efforts of the teaching staff and the hearty co-operation of student-body in
obtaining from each activity the results desired.
To public-spirited citizens for assistance on Armistice Day and Empire Day we tender our
appreciation, to Parent-Teacher Associations for continued support and interest, and to all who
in so many ways have assisted in the development of a stronger and more united student-citizen
development programme we owe a debt of gratitude.
Throughout the year a carefully worked-out programme of tests was presented to all grades
up to and including Grade VIII. To the principals who so ably assisted I express my appreciation, and I wish to commend them on the grading of their schools as shown by the close relationship existing between their efforts and those from this office.
The efficiency of the Medical and Dental Departments mentioned in former reports is being
ably maintained. The Dental Clinic, from the standpoint of the public who are unable to avail
themselves of the services of the family dentist, has come to be regarded as an established
institution. The co-operation given by the parents and teachers as well as the children themselves is indicative of the feeling of the community toward this branch and does much in
promoting its success. The results that have been gained thereby in lessening retardation has
more than warranted the efforts which have been put forth in the clinic.
Early in the school-year representatives of the Teachers' Federation placed before the Board
of School Trustees a request for salary revision. As no definite agreement could be reached,
it was left to an Arbitration Board consisting of Justice MacDonald, who later retired in favour
of Justice Harper, Mr. H. Charlesworth, and Mr. George Grant. The findings of this Board are
expected the latter end of September.
May I again express sincere appreciation to the Department of Education for its unfailing
courtesy and able assistance at all times, and to the Board of School Trustees, keen, capable
business-men who are giving freely of their time and attention to the interests of Education.
4 N 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA.
REPORT OF GEORGE H. DEANE, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
I beg to submit the following report on the public schools of the City of Alctoria for the
school-year 1933-34 :—
There was a small decrease in the total enrolment in the city schools. The following return
shows certain changes since 1930:—
Enrolment— October, 1930.    October, 1934.
Victoria College      260 221
High School   1,178 1,318
Elementary schools   4,619 4,133
Total enrolment   6,057   ' 5,672
Total staff     212 191
The Board realized the acute financial situation facing the City Council and decided to keep
its own estimates for the fiscal year 1934 below those of the previous year. This objective was
accomplished by carrying out a policy of rigid economy with the zealous co-operation of
principals, teachers, and janitors. The reduction in school expenditures since 1930 is as
follows:—
Gross expenditures, 1930  $640,495.73
Estimated gross expenditures, 1934     546,200.00
Decrease     $94,295.73
Notwithstandingthe curtailment in expenditures, the buildings and grounds were maintained
in good condition and satisfactory accommodation was provided in all schools.
The character of the work in the schools was satisfactory. Only a small percentage of the
pupils registered in Grade VIII. failed to obtain High School Entrance certificates. Monthly
limits, which were outlined in co-operation with a committee of teachers from the District
Association, have helped to co-ordinate the work and stimulate achievement. Special commendation is due the teaching staff for the time and effort given to extra-curricular activities. These
provide not only recreational opportunities, but a valuable training for future life activities.
At the Musical Festival, held in Alctoria last May, over 1,500 pupils from city public schools
took part in choir and folk-dancing competitions. The performances by these groups were very
creditable and the attention given to this work is justified by the results. During the year ten
rhythmic bands were organized in the junior grades and are being conducted under an excellent
scheme planned by Miss Clark, primary teacher of the Spring Ridge School. The pupils of
Grades I. to IV. take a keen interest in this activity, which has a real foundational value.
The High School and Victoria College had a satisfactory year and a high standard of
achievement was maintained at both these institutions. In the Commercial Department of the
High School an intensive one-year course was organized for students who had matriculated.
This class was so successful that it is being continued this year and more students have applied
for admission than can be accommodated. Excellent work was done in the Technical Department, which should be extended to include a suitable course in practical electricity as soon as
the finances of the Board will permit. High School girls should also have the opportunity of
electing a course in Household Economics. By reorganizing the work in the elementary schools
it may be possible to provide facilities for this course at little additional cost. If our secondary
schools are to achieve their objectives, the courses of training must cover a wider field than
University Entrance requirements.
The evening classes conducted by the Board were carefully organized and the enrolment
was greater than in former years. The exhibition of work held at the close of the session
reflected credit on both teachers and students.
The School Board suffered a severe loss when death removed Trustees J. L. Beckwith and
J. M. Campbell. Mr. Beckwith, a former Mayor of the city, was Chairman of the Finance
Committee at the time of his death.    Mr. Campbell was elected to the Board in 1931, following PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 51
his retirement from the teaching staff on pension. Both trustees were men of the highest type
and had a record of long and faithful service.
It was with sincere regret that the Board accepted the resignation of Principal Ira Dilworth
of Victoria High School, who resigned to accept the position of Associate Professor on the staff
of the University of British Columbia. Mr. Dilworth, a teacher and principal of outstanding
abilities, performed his duties efficiently for a period of eighteen years and made a real contribution to educational progress in this city. He carries with him the best wishes of the Board
and the teaching profession.
At the close of the school-year Miss Louise Sylvester retired from the staff after serving the
Board faithfully for a period of thirty-two years. N 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
REPORT OF S. H. LAAVRENCE, PRINCIPAL.
The time has again come round when it becomes my duty to lay before you the usual report
of the state of the School for the Deaf and the Blind.
The attendance for the school-year 1933-34 was noticeably smaller than for the previous
year. It fell off about 10 per cent. This resulted partly from families moving to other Provinces, but chiefly on account of the widespread economic depression. Parents out of work
found it a heavy burden to equip children and send them away from home. Had it not been
for the assistance given by the Department of AVelfare the attendance would have been much
smaller.
In the latter part of January mumps broke out in the school. They were brought in by a
day pupil from the city, and all efforts to arrest their progress was in vain. Just when we
thought we had them checked, then a new case would appear, and when it had run its course
another case would have to be taken care of. It was not until early in June that we got rid of
them.    Apart from the mumps, we had one case of chicken-pox.
Formerly, when an infectious disease appeared, the patient could be sent to the Infectious
Disease Hospital, but last year there was such an epidemic of such diseases that the hospital
was overcrowded and could not admit any from this school. AAre had, therefore, to do the best
possible with our limited accommodation.
I might remark here, in passing, that each year sees the need of added accommodation for
pupils who may be indisposed or coming down with an infectious disease. At present it is
practically impossible to do any isolating.
Notwithstanding the inconvenience and interruptions caused by mumps and occasional colds,
commendable progress was made along all lines of endeavour. In the department for the blind
all pupils passed their respective grades, and the ones taking music, typing, and reed-work made
a good showing at the close of the school-year.
In the department for the deaf steady progress was also made. A feature which particu'arly
attracted me was the increased naturalness of the children, both in the class-rooms and outside.
They freely used colloquial speech and were quite quick at repartee. The woodwork done by the
boys in the manual-training class and the sewing by the girls in the domestic-science class
revealed touches of originality and showed painstaking effort on the part of both teacher and
taught.
The class in shoemaking has demonstrated that it has been worth while. Already two boys
who have left school are earning a livelihood at their homes by means of the knowledge and
practice they received while attending school.
In all our activities the chief aim is to make all imparted knowledge practical. We
endeavour to inculcate habits of industry and lay such foundations of individual character as
will encourage the child to erect a superstructure of human betterment that will not fall when
the floods of adversity and the storms of temptation beat against it.
To this end the teachers in their sphere of action and the matron and supervisors lend
harmonious co-operation. They simplify subject-matter so that it can be assimilated to expand
knowledge and strengthen mental fibre.
The duties of the matron and her assistants are varied and manifold. To them falls the
care of about sixty children outside of the regular class-room hours. Properly balanced meals
must be provided, torn clothes have to be mended, injuries must be attended to, and these
children of diverse temperaments must be taught to regard the rights of the other fellow.
In closing this report, I want again to express my hearty thanks to you. sir, and through
you to the Honourable the Minister of Education and other officials of the Department, for the
many kindnesses shown me and help given in all times of need. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 53
HIGH CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL.
REPORT OF J. AV. GIBSON, M.A., B.PAED.,  OFFICER IN CHARGE.
The enrolment for the year ended June 30th, 1934, was 702, which is a slight gain over that
of the previous year. In the matter of quality as well as volume of work received, our records
show an appreciable advance. The scope of the work is also being gradually broadened and
now includes full courses leading to Junior Matriculation, Normal Entrance, High School
Graduation, Commercial, Technical, and A^ocational. Of the last mentioned four major courses
are now offered: Mechanical Drawing and Drafting, a course of immediate value to builders,
technicians, and prospective engineers; Engineering Drawing, which is immediately applicable
to the work of pattern-makers, foundry-workers, tool-makers, millwrights, marine and mining
engineers, automobile repairers and machinists; Building Construction, which is a practical and
instructional course for yourig men and apprentices interested in the planning and building of
ordinary houses; Practical Electricity, which is an extensive first course for persons engaging in
any branch of industry in which electricity is used.
Several other vocational courses are under consideration and will be introduced as soon as
funds are available for the purpose. As our vocational courses become more widely known and
also more numerous we anticipate a much larger enrolment in them.
REASONS GIVEN BY STUDENTS FOR AVITHDRAAV1NG.
AVhilst it is true that certain students may offer excuses rather than genuine reasons for
withdrawing before having finished their courses, still a good deal of weight can safely be given
to statements received from students who write in to us quite voluntarily when they have decided
not to continue with their correspondence studies. It is also a matter of note that in withdrawing from the courses students not infrequently express the hope that at some future time circumstances may permit of their returning to pick up their studies again. Needless to say, we always
invite them to do so. During the present year we have on our active list no less than forty-five
students who had previously withdrawn and who have returned to work with us—sometimes on
a much modified programme.
Frem an examination of the circumstances connected with the withdrawal, during the past
two years, of some 350 students, the following summary of reasons assigned has been prepared:—
(1.)  Objective gained—course completed     95
(2.)  Started to high school     49
(3.)  Dropped out for lack of time     65
(4.)  Expense too great     10
(5.)  Illness        15
(6.) New occupation precluding study     14
(7.)  Unfavourable conditions for study      14
(8.)  Weak eyes       7
(9.) Moved away      6
(10.)  Found work too difficult alone       7
(11.) No reason assigned      68
Total  350
The first and largest of the above groups may be regarded as being made up of wholly
successful students. Those in the second group have at least attained a measure of success, as
we realize how important it is that every young person should at some time enjoy the social
advantages of a good school. In most cases the decision to attend high school grew out of an
interest awakened through correspondence studies. In the third group, also claiming a substantial number, there are no doubt a good many excuse-makers who in this are by no means
unique in our modern society. The remaining groups call for no special comment and their
reasons may be accepted as substantially correct. The last group of all, however, is much too
large and in future will no doubt be greatly reduced. In many cases circumstantial evidence
shows no particular reason for withdrawal unless it be the summer vacation. The majority of
cases, those in this group, were straight cancellations rather than withdrawals. The regular
practice is that wThen we have not heard from a student for a month or so, especially after the N 54 . PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
summer vacation, we send a letter of inquiry. If this does not bring a response, a notice of
cancellation (but with the door left open for re-entry) is sent, after which, if no reply is received
within a reasonable time, the file is removed from the active list. Occasionally we reach such
students later through their former teachers and get them started again, but we have often been
forced to the conclusion that they had found themselves unable to pay even the small registration
fee and refused to report themselves in such a position. This is to be regretted, as we have
never allowed inability to pay fees to debar a deserving and promising student from finishing
his or her studies. Pressure of work, especially during the early autumn months, makes continued inquiry or follow-up work impossible with our very limited staff.
AVe receive every year a great many expressions of gratitude and appreciation from both
parents and students.
A Commercial Course student stated in a recent letter: " I cannot let this opportunity pass
without expressing to you and to your department my gratitude for the wonderful work you are
doing.    Your course has really surprised me."
A student on one of the northern islands writes: " 1 wish to thank you and the staff of the
Correspondence Courses for your kind help during the time I was a member and trust your very
helpful work will always prosper. It certainly is a help to people living in outlying districts
where there aren't high schools."
A Junior Matriculation student writes: " I wish to say that I fully appreciate all the help
you have given me in the past few years and I will recommend this way of learning to any one
else."
Another matriculant writes: " As I am' now attending University I will need no further
courses by correspondence. The Chemistry I have done by your courses has enabled me to take
Chemistry here on an even footing with the other students."
A student who finished High School Graduation by correspondence writes: " I am certainly
glad that I finished my high school by your wonderful course. It certainly is very interesting
and instructive."
A girl who took her final mathematics for Normal Entrance with us wrote as follows : " I
would like to take this opportunity of thanking you for the kindly interest on my behalf of both
you and your instructors in mathematics. If I fail to make the grade in either Geometry or
Algebra, it will certainly be through no fault of my instructors, for I have learnt more from
them this past year than I did in the three years I was in high school."    She passed.
A girl who found it impossible to finish her course writes: " I must express my regret at
having to discontinue my lessons for good. I have been very satisfied with the correspondence
method of teaching and will recommend it to my friends."
I quote a few extracts from letters received from parents:—
The father of a girl who had to withdraw on account of ill-health wrote: " I wish to thank
you for the kindly interest you displayed toward my daughter during the past school term.
Her failure to accomplish much was in nowise due to you or the very excellent course prescribed
by the Department of Correspondence Instruction. My praise for the whole system is without
stint.   'It has been a most pleasant revelation to me, I assure you."
The mother of a girl who had to leave the city and go to live out of reach of a high school
wrote as follows: " My daughter was successful in the five matriculation subjects which she
wrote off in June. I wish to thank you for giving her the opportunity of pursuing her studies
while in the country."
The father of a boy who completed Grade IX. with- us and then got a chance to go to high
school wrote as follows: " We find it difficult sufficiently to express our appreciation of the very
careful and thorough way in which you and your staff have supervised his work in the 9th
Grade, and trust that, if we are unable later to continue the present transportation arrangements, he may be permitted to re-enroll with you."
Another father whose son took Grade IX. with us wrote as follows: " My son is discontinuing the correspondence courses and is. attending high school. I wish to take this opportunity
of expressing to you my appreciation of the course. The way the papers are got up makes it
easy for the student to grasp the subject-matter, and the manner in which the papers are
corrected shows the pupil plainly where he has fallen down; and, on the other hand, the word
of encouragement on a good paper is a great help. He has been admitted to the third year and
seems to be getting along well, due, I am satisfied, to the thorough grounding he obtained from
the correspondence courses." PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 55
SENIOR MATRICULATION COURSES.
The persistent demand for correspondence courses leading to Senior Matriculation has now
been met, and at the time of writing the indications are that there will be quite a large enrolment. Many of those making inquiry or sending in their applications are teachers now holding
second-class certificates. It can hardly be doubted that the benefits of this extension of correspondence instruction to include Senior Matriculation work will prove highly beneficial in helping
to raise the standard of teachers' qualifications throughout the Province.
AA7hen the initial cost of preparing the Senior Matriculation courses has been met, these
courses will be self-supporting, and even this initial cost will be recovered through student fees
in the course of a few years. This can be done on the scale of fees to be adopted and which
must be 'considered as very moderate—$67 for the full course if taken in one year. AVe have
been most fortunate in securing the services of several recognized experts within our own
Province iii the preparation of these advanced courses and already the success of the undertaking seems assured.
CHANGES IN THE REGULATIONS AFFECTING CORRESPONDENCE COURSES.
Three years ago, in order to make these courses partially self-supporting, it was decided to
charge tuition fees, based upon the age of the student and the number of subjects carried, with
certain exemptions. Two years ago this scale was raised, and although the increase was by no
means great, it undoubtedly resulted in deterring a number of the older students from continuing
their correspondence studies. In spite of the fact that during this past year our registrations
were twenty-seven over those of the previous year, the amount received in student fees was
$416 less. The increase in enrolment was entirely due to a larger number of candidates coming
under the exemption clauses—those under 15 years of age, those whose parents are on relief, and
those who are the dependents of returned soldiers.
By a recent decision tuition fees have now been reduced, and at the time of writing registrations are noticeably in excess over those received for the same period last year. Not only
have we a larger number of new students applying, a larger proportion of our former students
are remaining.    The present schedule of fees for the school-year 1934-35 is as follows:—
All students, regardless of age or subjects carried, pay the annual registration fee of $2.
Students under 18 years of age pay no tuition fees.
Students of 18 or 19 years pay a tuition fee of $2 per subject.
Students of 20 or 21 years pay a tuition fee of $3 per subject.
Students over 21 years of age pay $5 per subject.
The tuition fee for each vocational subject is $5 regardless of age.
Young men in unemployment camps and students whose parents are on relief are not
required to pay fees.
CLASSES FOR THE UNEMPLOYED.
During the past year a small number of unemployed men registered for correspondence
courses, chiefly in vocational subjects. Sixteen of these carried on with a fair measure of
success, and although this is but a small beginning, enough has been done to show that, with
the co-operation of the camp authorities, much might be done to enable those who wish to study
to acquire greater efficiency along vocational lines. Lack of text-books and supplies as well as
of proper facilities for study are the chief drawbacks at the present time, and unfortunately the
Correspondence Branch has no means whereby such things can be supplied.
During the first three months of the present year a very successful and praiseworthy educational service was carried on in the interests of men in unemployment camps by the principal
and certain members of the staff of the A'ancouver Technical School. Correspondence courses
prepared by instructors in this school in Drafting, Engineering Drawing. Electricity, Motor
Mechanics, Diesel Engines, Mathematics, and Geology were carried on successfully with 370
students. It is to be hoped that before long a more general scheme for the educational improvement of unemployed men, both at home and in the camps, will be organized. Courses for young
women are also of great importance at this time and might well command equal attention.
SUBJECTS, COURSES, AND INSTRUCTORS.
At the present time we are offering four-year courses in the following subjects:   English
Literature, English Grammar and Composition, History and Civics, Algebra, Geometry, Latin, French, and Health; three-year courses in Book-keeping, Shorthand, and Typewriting; two-
year courses in Arithmetic, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Geography, Agriculture, and Home
Economics; one-year courses in Art, General Science, Mechanical Drawing, Engineering Drawing, Building Construction, and Practical Electricity. In addition to these, we are introducing
Senior Matriculation Literature, Composition, History, Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry,
Physics, and French, with the prospect of including Chemistry and Latin.
Our present staff of instructors comprises three full-time instructors on salary and twelve
part-time instructors who are paid a rate per paper examined. In large measure the success of
our work is 'due to the unremitting interest of our instructors in the work in hand. Careful
records are kept of the standing of each student throughout his or her entire course. A member
of the office staff has full charge of student records, although the instructors generally keep their
own private notes on the progress or failure of the students whose work they are handling.
Incomplete or unsatisfactory work on the part of any pupil is noted at once and must be made
good before the paper can be assigned a passing grade. A student must make a minimum mark
of 60 per cent, on his work throughout before being promoted and in a few subjects 75 per cent.
Our students are, as a rule, most appreciative of the work done in their interests by the
instructors, and it is most gratifying to note from time to time their appreciative remarks.
It is our hope that as soon as proper broadcasting facilities can be provided we may be
able to supplement on the air what we are doing through the mails in the interests of our widely
scattered students. A series of weekly broadcasts would provide a much-needed contact with
our students, and would also be of great interest to many others.
CHOICE OF COURSES AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE.
As in former years, consideration has been given to numerous requests from parents, and
from students themselves, as to what courses might prove most beneficial under given circumstances. Difficult financial conditions have greatly added to the anxiety of parents to do all
they possibly can, and at least expense, to help their sons and daughters to become self-
supporting. Many questions are asked concerning different vocations and the subjects best
suited as a means of preparation for them. Those who have three or four years in prospect for
study usually register for a full high-school course leading to Junior Matriculation, Entrance to
Normal, or Commercial. During the past year 43.5 per cent, of our students were registered for
Junior Matriculation, 18 per cent, in the Commercial courses, 10.8 per cent, for Entrance to
Normal, 5.1 per cent, for Technical-Vocational, and 22.6 for Personal Improvement. Those
making up this last group are not greatly interested in high-school credits and do not usually
work on more than three or four subjects. AVhilst it is true that a fair percentage of these
particular students do good work, and work consistently for two or three years, a good many
do not continue beyond the first year. Many of them have their own regular work to carry on
day by day and are unable to devote themselves to a continuous programme of study, and it may
be that absence of a definite goal helps to account for their early retirement from the work of
home-study.
PROBLEMS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS.
Correspondence education has its own peculiar difficulties, some of which may never be
wholly overcome. The problem of maintaining interest, if not of actually creating it, is always
a problem. How to maintain high educational standards without making the work too difficult ;
how to give guidance in a subject without doing too much for the student; how, in short, to
help a student in the best possible way to help himself, and to think independently, and to carry
on courageously. In solving these peculiarly delicate and difficult problems, the finest personal
and professional qualities of the instructor are taxed to the utmost. Correspondence instruction
is not a job for a second-rate educationist. A correspondence instructor is not an examiner or
corrector of errors, but a patient, skilful leader with keen insight and a thorough knowledge of
the science of education. Granted that the courses as prepared conform to the best educational
procedure and the instructors are well qualified and each ready to do his best for his absentee
pupil, many of these difficulties so peculiar to the work of instruction may be overcome
AVith each year's added experience the outlook for future development, both as to number
and quality of courses to be offered, widens. No age-limits have been set and in a very real
sense our correspondence schools are becoming "the schools of all the people." To apprehend
and to meet the people's needs, in so far as our ability and our resources may permit, is our
constant aim and endeavour. ELEMENTARY CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL.
REPORT OF MISS ISABEL BESCOBY, B.A., OFFICER IN CHARGE.
During the school-year 1933-34 the Elementary Correspondence School continued to serve
children in outlying districts, invalids, and adults who have hitherto been unable to secure an
elementary-school education. The total enrolment increased from 830 in 1932-33 to 876 in
1933-34.    By grades, the enrolment was distributed as follows:—
Grade 1  141 Grade VI     83
Grade II  123 Grade VII     94
Grade III  124 Grade VIII     72
Grade IV  130 	
Grade Y  109 Total    876
Of this total enrolment, 672 pupils were considered to be active in June, 1934. During the
year, 13,775 lessons were corrected by the staff of teachers and stenographers, which increased
from seven in September, 1933, to ten in June, 1934.
Toward the end of the school-year preparations were made for completely reorganizing the
Elementary Correspondence School and for rewriting the lessons in all grades and all subjects.
A new series of lessons will be sent to pupils during the coming year. The text-books used by
pupils in the regular public schools of the Province will be used in correspondence instruction,
and efforts will be made to keep correspondence courses as similar as possible to courses in
regular elementary schools.
During the past year the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire has materially
assisted pupils of the school by providing text-books and other supplies to needy pupils. Children
of many poor families living in isolated districts have been able to continue their education
through the co-operation of the I.O.D.E. with correspondence instructors. These pupils have
shown their appreciation of this assistance not only by written word, but also by their care of
books and supplies. In practically all cases pupils have returned the material supplied by the
I.O.D.E. when they, themselves, had no further use for it. The returned material was then sent
to other needy pupils by the correspondence instructors.
Parents and pupils in almost every district of the Province continue to appreciate the opportunity of education by correspondence. A few extracts from letters received during the year
follow:—
" I received your instruction papers on Friday, February 23rd, and I wish to thank you for
them. I have taken special care in reading them over. I find they are a great help. They have
made me understand the teaching of my brother and sister much better. They also have given
me a new light and interest in my own lessons which I asked for some time ago.    .    .    ."
" I should like to thank you and your staff for the splendid instructions our children have
received over a period of nine years.    Had it not been possible to obtain the correspondence
lessons, I do not know how we could have managed to give B and E  any systematic
course of studies.    Although we are glad to see a school opened here, my husband and I very
much appreciate the help your department has given us.    .    .    ."
" We thank you for all past favours and the attention given to D , and can assure you
we are very satisfied with the progress made under your tuition.    .    .    ."
" My husband and I both thank the Department very much, as we certainly appreciate the
interest the school had for the children.    .    .    ."
" I am anxious for them to have as thorough an education as possible, and I think they are
getting it in the correspondence course. AVhen B  went to school after a term of correspondence, he headed a class of forty in his second month—came fourth the first month.
" It is a wonderful thing for B.C. and we do appreciate it to the full." N 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH.
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE.
In regard to free supplies, it was pleasing to note during the year under review that a
great many teachers and principals evidently strove hard to effect sound economy in connection
with the use of free books. There are, however, individual cases where there is too much waste,
but as all free text-books are now on the " Lending Plan " I hope that much of this will finally
be eliminated.
All principals should note that it is not only unnecessary, but also wasteful, to carry large
stocks in reserve " for possible future use," as additional requests may be made to this office
at any time for books required to make up a shortage either through books wearing out or the
arrival of additional pupils. When these requests are made, the official Free Requisition Form
should be used (properly completed), but if no form is on hand the request may be made by
letter. The information in regard to " stock on hand " and the "number of pupils in the
grades " must be furnished always.
The total number of free text-books issued during the school-year 1933-34 to the public
schools (elementary, superior, high, night, etc.), and in connection with the Correspondence
Courses for High School and Elementary School pupils, was as follows: 3,700 Canadian First
Reader; 3,308 Canadian Second Reader; 3,234 Canadian Third Reader; 2,800 Canadian Fourth
Reader; 4,316 Canadian Fifth Reader; 6,897 MacLean Practice Compendium No. 1; 6,914 Compendium No. 2; 7,840 Compendium No. 3; 9,233 Compendium No. 4; 6,405 MacLean Senior
AVriting Manual; 69 Teachers' AAMting Manual; 6,286 Spelling- for the Grades; 4,888 New Canadian Arithmetic, Book 1; 5,646 New Canadian Arithmetic, Book 2; 3,535 Junior High School
Mathematics, Book 1; 3,567 Junior High School Mathematics, Book 2; 1,294,975 sheets of
Drawing Paper, 6 by 9 inches; 52,932 sheets of Drawing Paper, 9 by 12 inches; 2,474 Teachers'
Manual of Drawing; 219 Teachers' Manual of Drawing and Design ; 131 Teachers' Record Book
of Free Texts; 19 Principals' Record Book of Free Texts; 1,977 Monthly Reports of Attendance,
Cities; 723 Monthly Reports of Attendance, Municipalities ; 1,116 Monthly Reports of Attendance,
Rural; 100,063 Monthly Reports to Parents; 1,033 Register of Pupils, Large; 254 Register of
Pupils, Small; 23,586 Progress Record Cards; 236 Smith and Roberts' Arithmetic, Book 1; 162
Smith and Roberts' Arithmetic, Book 2; 17 Citizenship in B.C. (Angus) ; 194 Progressive Road
to Reading, Book 1; 148 Progressive Road to Reading, Book 2; 120 Progressive Road to Reading,
Book 3a ; 174 Everyday Canadian Primer; 6 Silent Study Reader, Book 1; 120 Silent Study
Reader, Book 2; 20 Silent Study Reader, Book 3; 31 Silent Study Reader, Book 4; 76 B.C. Third
Reader; 17 Trees and Shrubs, Food, Medicinal, and Poisonous Plants of British Columbia; 24
Syllabus of Physical Training; 18 Flora of Southern British Columbia; 19 Bird Study in British
Columbia; 33 Wall Maps, World   (Spring Roller); 33 AA'all Maps, Canada   (Spring Roller);
32 AVall Maps, British Columbia (Spring Roller) ; 26 AVall Maps. British Isles (Spring Roller) ;
33 Wall Maps, North America (Spring Roller); 186 Flags, Small; 54 Flags, Large; 3,243
Annual Public Schools Report, 1932-33; 276 Manual of School Law (complete with amendments) ; 775 Programme of Studies, Elemental^: 152 Programme of Studies, Junior High;
1.244 Programme of Studies, High; 15,731 Honour Rolls.
Sixteen free libraries of approximately forty titles were issued to new schools and the usual
service was given the School Boards who wished to purchase books of this kind.
The usual report forms were forwarded to all School Boards where and when required.
To purchase and distribute the free books and supplies listed above required an expenditure
of $41,013.62, and 2,203 free requisitions were received and filled.
Under the plan whereby " a pupil who supplies himself " with a book which would otherwise
have been issued free, we have distributed to pupils this year $6,684.57, covering claims from
487 schools.
As all free books are now issued as the property of the school, the above Claim System is no
longer in effect.
The total cost of free supplies, including the amounts paid to pupils who supplied themselves
with books which would otherwise have been given free, is $47,698.19.
During the school-year 1933-34, 9,229 orders were filled from dealers, School Boards, or
others, throughout the entire Province, and the sum of $138,845.19 was deposited in the Treasury
from these sales. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 59
In regard to saleable books, it is necessary again to point out that in districts where there
are no dealers saleable books may be ordered by the School Boards, and if the orders are
submitted by the Secretary, and in reasonable quantity, the dealers' discount will be allowed.
AVhen the books are resold to pupils a fair overhead may be charged, but they must not be
resold at more than the Department's List Price. Please note that the order must be signed by
the Secretary and amount to $2 or over before discount will be allowed, and books purchased
through this office are not returnable for credit unless when recalled by us if, and when, they
are removed from the Course of Study by the Department of Education.
The following is a copy of the Annual Report of the Text-book Branch for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1934 :—
Victoria, B.C., May 31st, 1934.
The Honourable the Minister of Education,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Officer in Charge of
the Text-book Branch, together with the Balance-sheet and Profit and Loss Statement for the
twelve months ended March 31st, 1934.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
P. G. BARR,
Officer in Charge, Text-book Branch.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1934.
Sales.
Our total sales for the year amounted to $157,215.24, and discounts allowed to dealers, etc.,
totalled $22,355.05; the distribution of free texts, etc., cost $47,647.54, against an estimated
figure of $56,200, and in the above $47,647.54 is an item of $6,611.65, which was the amount paid
to pupils who supplied themselves with used copies of free books which would otherwise have
been issued free by the schools.
Profit.
It will be noted that the net profit for the year amounts to $8,425.36.
In conclusion, I wish to express again my appreciation of the splendid spirit of loyalty and
co-operation shown amongst the employees of this Branch who during our busier periods are
required to give much additional service, and for the courtesy and co-operation shown by all
members of the Department of Education, School Boards, and dealers throughout the Province.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
P. G. Barr,
Officer in Charge, Text-book Branch.
Mag 31st, 193!,.
Profit and Loss Statement, Year ended March 31st, 1934.
Gross sales   $157,215.24
Less discount, etc., allowed        22,355.05
  $134,860.19
Stock on hand, April 1st, 1933   $114,398.38
Less claims, etc  273.67
 $114,124.71
Purchases for year:
Cost        $89,458.33
Freight and duty        2,273.52
■      91,731.85
Carried fonvard   $205,856.56 $134,S60.19 N 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
Profit and Loss Statement, Year ended March 31st, 1934—Continued.
Brought forward   $205,856.56 $134,860.19
Less stock on hand, March 31st, 1934      91,692.77
Net cost of goods sold    114,163.79
Gross profit for year      $20,696.40
Expenses:
Salaries and wages      $11,719.92
Freight and delivery         2,542.99
Packing and general expenses        1,261.63
Bad debts written off   1.05
      15,525.59
Net operating profit for year  $5,170.81
Add:
Exchange and sundries   32.12
Bad-debt recoveries   1,222.43
Total profit for year to Consolidated Revenue       $6,425.36
Certified correct. Certified correct.
J. F. Meredith, P. G. Babr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1934.
Petty cash:
On hand  $50.00
In bank  -  150.00
         $200.00
Stock inventory:
Reserve       $14,986.32
Active      76,706.45
      91,692.77
Accounts receivable:
Departmental        $1,815.47
General   .'  423.87
$2,239.34
Less reserve for bad debts  500.00
        1,739.34
$93,632.11
Liabilities.
Treasury advances   $200.00
Operating Account   $92,682.11
Reserve for obsolescence of stock   750.00
$93,632.11
Certified correct. Certified correct.
J. F. Meredith, p. G. Babb,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 61
THE STRATHCONA TRUST.
REPORT OF J. L. AVATSON, B.A., SECRETARY, LOCAL COMMITTEE.
INSTRUCTION OF TEACHERS IN PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1933-34.
A total of 302 prospective teachers received theoretical and practical instruction in physical
training at the Normal Schools during the year 1933-34, a decrease of sixty-two in the number
qualifying during the previous year. This decrease was largely due to the smaller Normal
School enrolment.
The gold medals, awarded annually by the Local Committee to the students gaining the
highest standing in physical training, were won by Marshall Sinclair Wark, Vancouver, and by
James Alfred Petch, Victoria. Both winners of these awards did excellent work in the other
subjects of the Normal School Course.
PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1933-34.
At the annual meeting held November 28th, 1933, provision was made for the granting of
eighty-three prizes of $7 each for competition in the various schools for the year 1933-34.
A total of seventy-six recommendations was received from Government and Municipal Inspectors
and $532 distributed as prizes.
PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1934-35.
For competition in the various schools ninety-five prizes of $8 each have been granted.
These prizes are to be allocated as follows: Three prizes to each of the twenty inspectorates;
twenty-seven prizes to Vancouver; four prizes to ATictoria; and two prizes each to New AVestminster and the Municipality of Saanich. For purposes of competition and inspection the
schools in each of the twenty inspectorates are to be divided, where possible, into three groups,
namely: Group A, of five divisions or more; Group B, of two to four divisions, inclusive;
Group C, of schools containing only one room or division. In any inspectorate or municipality
where this classification is not applicable, the mat!er of deciding what schools or divisions of
schools are entitled to receive awards is to be left to the discretion of the Inspector in charge.
The full amount of the award is to be expended for a picture or some piece of apparatus
(suitably inscribed) for the room or school in which the prize was won. Only those teachers
who are the holders of physical-training certificates granted under the Strathcona Trust are
eligible to compete. i
Subject to the approval of the Executive Council, Strathcona Trust, the Local Committee
has granted from the funds available the sum of $105 to be used in 1934-35 as prizes for the
encouragement of training in first aid in the public schools' of this Province. The Province is
to be divided into seven districts corresponding to the seven University Scholarship districts,
and $15 assigned as prizes to each. The school in each district obtaining the highest number of
first-aid certifica'es of the St. John Ambulance Association is to receive a prize of $10. and the
one obtaining the next highest number of these certificates a prize of $5.
CADET CORPS, 1933-34.
In 1932-33 there were sixty-six active cadet corps with an enrolment of 6,170. In 1933-34
these numbers had decreased to twenty-six and 1,640 respectively. This decrease wTas due to
two factors:—
(1.)  The decision of the Vancouver School Board to sever connection with the Depart-
ment of Militia and Defence, and continue some form of modified cadet-training
under its own system.
(2.)  The reduction of Cadet Instructors' allowance, and the raising of the age to 15
years before the reduced allowance of $1 per cadet could be obtained.
At the annual inspection, Oaklands Cadet Corps, Victoria, in charge of A. J. Stevenson', Esq.,
was given the highest marks for general efficiency.    Second place was awarded Armstrong Cadet
Corps, under command of Lieut-Colonel T. Aldworth.
A total of $195, divided into eleven prizes, was distributed in accordance with the schedule
adopted at the last annual meeting held October 25th,  1934.   The  following schedule was N 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
adopted:  1st prize, $30;  2nd prize, $25 ;  3rd prize, $20;  4th and 5th prizes, $18 each;   6th and
7th prizes, $16 each;  8th and 9th prizes, $14 each;   and 10th and 11th prizes, $12 each.
A continued improvement in the work clone in physical training by cadet corps was apparent.
Very fine displays in this work were given at Oakland's and Boys' Central Schools, Victoria, and
at Duke of Connaught High School, New AVestminster.
During the past year 900 cadets received general instruction in first aid and ninety passed
the examination conducted by the St. John Ambulance Association.
Instruction in first aid was also included in the Physical Training Course at Vancouver and
A'ictoria Normal Schools, but no examinations for certificates were held.
Thirty-eight boys attended special courses in cadet signalling and obtained certificates and
the usual bonus.
RIFLE SHOOTING.
From the grant for rifle shooting, 1933-34, were distributed : Seven prizes of $1.50 each;
seven prizes of $1.25 each; and seven prizes of $1 each. The amount expended under this head
was $26.25.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT.
The funds at the disposal of the Local Committee for the year 1933-34 amounted to $1,706.08,
and the expenditures for the year amounted to $791.41, leaving a balance of $914.67. Of this
amount, $760 has been voted for physical-training prizes for 1934—35; $105 as prizes for the
encouragement of training in first aid during 1934-35; and $36 for the purchase of two gold
medals for presentation to students at the Normal Schools in June, 1935.
Receipts.
1933-34.     Balance on hand from 1932-33  $651.37
Interest to November 30th, 1933  :.-.. 18.50
Interest to May 31st, 1934   8.36
Allowance to Secretary added to fund   10.00
Grant for 1933-34   1,017.85
$1,706.08
Expenditures.
1933-34.     Prizes for physical training   $532.00
Prizes for cadet-training   195.00
Prizes for rifle shooting   26.25
Gold medals for Normal Schools   36.00
Revenue stamps -.  2.16
$791.41
Balance on hand   $914.67 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34. N 63
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REFERENCE.
The Honourable Dr. G. M. Weir, September 5th, 1934.
Minister of Education, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Board of Reference has the honour to submit the following report with reference
to its duties under section 162b of the " Public Schools Act" :—
The Board was constituted under the above section in June, 1933, and held its first meeting
on July 18th of that year. During the period July 18th to August 20th, 1933, eighteen appeals
from school-teachers were considered and disposed of. In December, 1933, four appeals and
from July 12th to August 18th, 1934, eighteen appeals were dealt with. Altogether since its
appointment the Board has disposed of forty appeals.
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.
1. Investigation and Evidence generally.
Before the 1933 amendments to the Act, the procedure of the Council of Public Instruction
was to appoint a Commissioner to take evidence in the locality in which the dismissal was made,
and, on considering his report, to take such action on the appeal as it deemed advisable.
The Board has power to appoint Commissioners for this purpose, and has done so on one
occasion without obtaining very satisfactory results, and its opinion, based on the experience
gained in cases considered to date, is that in the majority of cases this practice now serves no
useful purpose. In the smaller communities there are usually two opposing factions in the
matter, and evidence obtained by a Commissioner is largely repetition of the written statements and letters which the School Board and teacher concerned have already forwarded to
the Department, the only difference being that it is taken under oath.
The Board has therefore decided to use this method of obtaining evidence as little as
possible and to visit a locality itself, or by one or two of its members, where the situation as
disclosed by the file appears to call for a personal investigation or hearing.
The necessity for personal investigation has been obviated to a considerable extent by the
amendments of 1933, particularly by the insertion of the words " for cause " in section 133 (lc),
together with the limitation placed on the Board by section 162b (3), which confines it to the
reasons given by a School Board in its written notice of dismissal to the teacher. If, therefore,
there is a good cause against a teacher which is not covered by the notice of dismissal, the
Board is not competent to take it into consideration, or, in other words, is without jurisdiction.
The Board has found that a great deal of evidence submitted by School Boards has not fallen
within their stated reasons and has therefore been obliged to consider it irrelevant.
A personal investigation or a hearing is therefore only decided upon when the file and a
close examination of the Inspector shows a likelihood of obtaining valuable information relevant
to a sufficient cause alleged in the notice of dismissal. The Board's practice is to examine the
Inspector in each case coming before it. This evidence has been very useful, particularly in the
matter of general information concerning the district or community from which the appeal
originates, and it has served to indicate some valuable sources of evidence.
2. School Boards.
(1.)  The Board has heard  the  opinion  expressed  that  the  Department  and  the  Board
favoured the teachers, as shown by the fact that nearly all appeals are allowed.
The record of the cases disposed of shows that the majority of teachers' appeals have been
allowed, and the reasons that more have not been dismissed are principally as follows:—
(a.) Failure of School Boards to allege a sufficient cause in their notices of dismissal, in
many cases failure to allege any cause whatever.
In some cases School Boards have had good reasons for dismissal, but have not included
them in their notice or made the reasons given wide enough to cover them. Some examples are
as follows :—
(i.)  "The ratepayers desire a change."
.   (ii.)  " The Board wishes to engage a male teacher."
(iii.)  " Your services will not be required."
(iv.)  " Lack of co-operation."    (This reason has been given several times when the real
cause of dismissal was general inefficiency.)    Lack  of co-operation  is a very N 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
indefinite term, and while it often provides a good secondary reason, it has not so
far been found to be a good primary reason in most cases. It is often chargeable
equally against the School Board.
(6.) Failure of School Boards to see that the teacher gets thirty clear days' notice as
required by the Act.
(c.) Attempts by School Boards, usually in the smaller communities, to dismiss teachers for
personal reasons and to effect dismissal by piling up a number of trivial complaints, often based
on stories carried home by children.
The Act undoubtedly affords protection to teachers. The Board, however, is of the opinion
that if more School Boards would base their dismissals on a careful study of the Act, its effect
and its requirements, there would be fewer dismissals coming before the Board on futile reasons
and a consequent reduction in the proportion of successful appeals.
(2.) The Board feels that attention should be drawn to the fact that all dismissals of
teachers do not reach the Board of Reference. Teachers who belong to the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation usually seek advice from officials of their organization who are thoroughly
familiar with the School Law, and consequently only those cases in which prima facie evidence
of injustice appears are appealed. The other dismissals are accepted, or, in some instances, by
agreement with the trustees, changed to resignations.
(3.) It is worthy of note also that, in all appeals so far heard by the Board of Reference,
the decisions have been unanimous.
3. Section 133  (2)  of the " Public Schools Act."
Under this section a teacher on appealing is required to furnish the Department and the
School Board concerned with a copy of his or her notice of appeal containing the reasons on
which the appeal is based. On an appeal being lodged, the Department requires the School
Board to forward a written statement of its case, but does not require a copy of this to be
forwarded to the teacher. The result, in many cases, has been that teachers have been unaware
of many of the accusations against them' until the matter has come before the Board of Reference, and considerable delay has been occasioned in obtaining both sides of the case. School
Boards have also caused delay by being late in forwarding their statements to the Department.
The Board is of the opinion that an amendment to the Act covering procedure would be of
assistance, or, failing this, the establishment of a definite practice in this regard by the Department in its preliminary correspondence with teachers and Boards.
It is suggested that School Boards be given ten days after receipt of the teacher's notice of
appeal to submit its statement to the Department and to furnish the teacher with a copy of same.
It is also suggested that Boards and teachers be requested to advise the Department as to
whether or not they wish to appear before the Board of Reference or to be represented before
the Board. The Board feels that a great deal of delay would be obviated if these suggestions
are carried out. It also appears only just and in accordance with legal practice that a teacher
should have a copy of the School Board's written statement.
4. Section 155 of the " Public Schools Act."
There is a possibility that some School Boards will endeavour to make use of this section to
effect dismissals without the necessity of showing cause against the teachers.
In cases where this section is invoked, the Board requires evidence of bona fides and an
affidavit in this connection before any recommendation is made.
In closing, the Board wishes to express its appreciation of the courteous co-operation shown
by the Superintendent of Education, the Assistant Superintendent, the Inspectors, and the staff
generally.    The assistance rendered has been of great value to the Board in dealing with cases
coming before it.
AA7e have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
k. g. macdonald,
Chairman.
A. G. PERRY,
G. W. CLARK.
Members. PAET II.
STATISTICAL RETURNS. N 2
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1933-34.
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