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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1933

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
EEPOET
OP
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
FOR THE YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1931
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  To His Honour J. W. Fokdham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Youb Honoub :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1931.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1932. Office of the Game Commissioner,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1932.
Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.C, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1931.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. BRYAN WILLIAMS,
Game Commissioner. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
1931.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
The past year has been a notable one in many ways, and a large number of improvements
have been made in the organization of the Department, with highly satisfactory results. From
almost every part of the Province, authentic reports have agreed that there has been a noted
increase of practically every species of big game and, with the exception of a few districts, game
birds, including wild fowl, have afforded better sport than for many years past. As a result,
the sportsmen of the Province feel that they are at last getting results from the strenuous
efforts they have made to have game conservation placed on its present basis.
On the whole, the present state of the Game Department is, considering present financial
conditions, as satisfactory as could be expected. While the Department still needs a number
of additional men and more equipment, there has been such an enormously increased feeling
of interest in the future of the Department and expressed willingness by those directly interested
to contribute more in the way of fees, that the prospects for the future can reasonably be
considered very bright.
During the past year the Game Wardens have given the Provincial Police a great deal of
assistance. In a few cases Game Wardens have devoted more time to police-work than they
should have, and in consequence some of their own work has suffered. This, however, could
not be helped. Conditions have at times been such that it was vitally necessary that the police
have the assistance of men they could rely on.
For their part, the Provincial Police have done all in their power to assist us and in many
instances have been of the greatest service. Nowhere on this continent is there such wholehearted co-operation and nowhere have such valuable results been obtained.
While the work of practically every Game Warden has been extremely good, a number of
them have made patrols in execution of their duties or in assisting the Provincial Police in
searches for lost men, which would not only make most interesting stories, but which would be
a revelation as to the hardships which Game Wardens endure. It would be impossible to
mention all of these patrols as there are too many of them, and it would not be fair to single
out any individual case. It may be said, however, that some of the patrols extended from
periods of two weeks to as much as two months, and they were carried on in spite of blinding
snow-storms, often lasting for days at a time, and sometimes in the course of their travels high
mountains and occasionally treacherous glaciers had to be crossed. Sometimes, for days travel
was through forests with no trail. Occasionally packs had to be dropped and trails broken
ahead and then a return made for the packs. Snow-shoeing was unusually bad and often the
cold was excessive, even down to 60 degrees below zero.
It takes hardy, determined men to carry out their duties under such conditions. Nevertheless, not one man failed in his mission, though they frequently risked their lives in so doing.
Their work has been a great credit to the Department.
ANNUAL MEETINGS.
It has now become a yearly practice to hold meetings of the officers in charge of each Game
Division, who are now given the title of Divisional Game Supervisors, as the title of District
Game Warden was misleading. These meetings are held at the head ofiice of the Department
in Vancouver.
At these meetings, the seaons for all game and fur-bearing animals are very thoroughly
discussed, as are recommendations in regard to amendments to the " Game Act." In addition,
every matter which affects the working of the Department is gone into. In this way we have
a commission of first-class practical men who are thoroughly conversant in every detail of their
work and who have a perfect knowledge of the various species and quantity of game in their
respective divisions. Such men are far better qualified to give opinions on conservation than
anybody else could possibly be.    Surely it would be hard to find a better system. H 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GAME ASSOCIATIONS.
The work done by the various Game Associations during the past year has been most
valuable. At one time many of these associations were inclined to take an interest only in
their own local affairs, particularly with regard to the open and close seasons, about which
they generally differed in opinion with adjoining districts. Frequently they did not even agree
among themselves. During the past year or two, all this has changed. They are now getting
together and coming to mutual agreements not only in regard to their own local affairs, but on
the general principles of conservation. In consequence, the help they now render the Game
Department is valuable in the extreme.
The stand of the Game Associations when suggestions were made that the present organization be again changed and that it be linked up with either the Provincial Police or the Forestry
Departments made it very apparent that any changes in the present method of administration
would be bitterly resented. Practically every Game Association in the Province held a special
meeting and voiced their disapproval of any such change in no uncertain terms.
GAME CONSERVATION.
Once again an effort was made to change the present method of game administration.
It seems that this sort of thing is bound to happen periodically. After years of ups and downs,
no sooner does this Department begin to get on a substantial basis than some misguided
individuals do their best to upset all the work done. The supporters of the proposed change
apparently consisted of two classes. One group included those with absolutely no knowledge
or interest in the matter who based their plea on the mistaken idea that it would be an economy.
The other group unquestionably consisted of those who did so for purely personal reasons.
On the latter group there need be no comment.
It is astonishing that in these enlightened times there are still people who do not realize
that our wild life is a business proposition and not just a sportsman's hobby. Such people
never stop to think that some of our industries are dependent on our stock of game, while nearly
all of them are more or less affected by its quantity. A well-known conservationist once said:
" The angler follows the fish, the hunter follows the game—let the world know you have fish
and game and the world will be your guest and pay its good money for that sort of sport."
Such a saying should be particularly taken to heart by everybody who has a real interest in
the welfare of the Province. Here we are striving for a better tourist trade. Game and fish
combined with scenery are what, our visitors want. Any person who gives the matter a
moment's thought should realize its vast commercial importance, that any economy which
affects it will prove a very fatal, false economy, and that its conservation, cost what it may,
is a vital necessity. Everybody should realize that wild life is a heritage, not for this generation
alone, but for those who come after us, and that we have a great responsibility to keep that
heritage unimpaired.
Now, if we are to have proper conservation, money must be spent for this purpose or the
game will soon disappear. You cannot get away from this fact. It is an utter fallacy to
suppose that the present personnel of the Provincial Police or of the Forestry Department could
attend to the multitudinous duties that the Game Wardens have. They have plenty of work
of their own, often more than they can do, without having additional work thrust upon them.
Previous experiences have already amply proved this to be the case. It was simply and solely
due to this fact that the gun licence was brought in at the request of those directly interested.
Therefore, a force of trained Game Wardens is an absolute necessity, and these men will have
to be paid their salaries, and travelling expenses as well as be furnished with suitable and
up-to-date equipment.
Some of these misguided economists seem to think that the police have lots of spare time
and that Game Wardens have nothing to do in the summer months. Such ideas simply show
how lacking in knowledge they are and how dangerous it is to advocate changes in any system
without first making a thorough study of it.
The ordinary man cannot know what amount of work a police officer or a Game Warden
has to do or what his responsibilities are. A Game Warden has his whole time occupied, every
day of every month of the year, and to do his work properly he has to work long hours,
frequently finding it almost impossible to take his annual leave of absence. In fact, some of
them cannot always manage to take the leave to which they are entitled. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 7
Then, again, after all is said and done, who is furnishing the money which the Game
Department is spending? It has not cost the general public anything, not even those businesses
which are directly or indirectly dependent on our stock of game. All the money which is spent
on game-protection comes from the pockets of those who shoot or trap. The Game Department
is not even credited with the nine or ten thousand dollars which it collects in fines each year,
and yet it is practically self-supporting. Surely those who contribute the funds towards game-
protection have a right to consider it trust money and that they should have the chief say as
to how the money should be spent.
Unquestionably, in years to come, if we continue to improve our present system, which is
now generally acknowledged to be the finest on the continent, our game will multiply and
eventually be our greatest source of wealth.
The people of the United States are very much alive to the value of their wild life. The
States of Washington and Oregon, notwithstanding the hard times, spent nearly a million
dollars last year in an effort to bring back some of the game which they have lost. They look
at it purely from a business point of view and think the money well spent, and yet there are
men (men who should know better than to make such statements) who have stated that the
small amount of money spent by the Game Department is gross extravagence. There might be
some reason for such a statement if we had not obtained any results, but we unquestionably
have in the past three years. There has been a great increase in our big game and game birds,
and our fur-bearing animals, which were down to a fairly low ebb, are now in a more satisfactory condition. If, however, sufficient funds are not forthcoming to carry on, it will be only
a few years before our game and fur-bearers will have gone and all the revenue we are now
deriving from it will be a thing of the past.
Not only would our tourist trade suffer, but some of our industries would be ruined and
others very badly hurt. British Columbia has been advertising its glorious mountains as a
tourist attraction. It realizes what a marvellous inducement they are to people who come here,
but it does not yet properly realize that if our game goes all the romance and the greatest
attraction of those glorious mountains will disappear too.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
While our stock of fur-bearing animals is by no means as large as we would like it to be or
as it should be, nevertheless, considering the excessive trapping that was carried on for a
number of years, due to the enormous prices paid for pelts, we have every reason to be thankful
that we have any fur-bearing animals left at all. As it is, owing to weather conditions being
extremely unfavourable to trapping operations during the past two years, and more particularly
to our sytem of trap-line registration bringing good results, we have quite a fair-sized stock left.
At any rate, it is sufficient to make future prospects look quite good.
The situation with regard to beaver is distinctly encouraging. According to our royalty
returns, the total catch for the year 1929 amounts to only 14,787 pelts. In 1930, though the
price of pelts had fallen to such an extent that trappers were not trapping as heavily as they
had previously, the catch increased to 17,137 and in 1931 it rose again to 18,123, which is an
increase of 3,335 pelts in the past two years.
This is certainly very satisfactory, for the price of beaver-pelts again took a very great fall
and there was no inducement for heavy trapping. In fact, reports from all over the Province
indicate that trappers were not taking more beaver than they absolutely had to in order to
obtain money to live on.
In addition to what has already been stated, beaver have returned to localities where there
had been none for years.    We even have had a couple complaints of damage being done by them.
In view of these facts, it must be very evident that, taking the Province as a whole, beaver
are increasing and are not doomed to extermination as some pessimists would have us believe.
While the situation in regard to beaver is at any rate fair, there is no doubt that they are
practically doomed to extinction in the greater part of those districts where water is used for
irrigation purposes. There is a very exaggerated idea as to the amount of water that beaver
conserve. It also seems impossible to get people to understand that beaver cannot exist without
water, and if the dams are drained for irrigation purposes what little they conserve will soon
be run off. Also, a lengthy drought such as we have had during the past year or two has a
serious effect on the stock.    If the water from beaver-dams is taken away at any time, except H 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in the early summer months, the dams never fill up again and the beaver must either die during
the winter or move elsewhere. If they attempt to move, they stand serious risks of being killed
by predatory animals during their journey.
During the past year an experiment in restocking with beaver was tried on a small scale.
Eleven beaver were trapped on the Bowron Lake Game Reserve and were released in the vicinity
of Williams Lake. Whether or not all these beaver stayed where they were released is not yet
definitely determined, though we know that some of them did. At any rate, the experiment
has proved sufficiently successful to warrant an attempt on a much larger scale. However, the
difficulty is going to be in finding suitable places where they can be preserved and where there
will be no outcries about damage they may do should they really increase to any extent.
(Since this report was written it has been determined that all the beaver are alive and
doing well.)
As we expected, there was a very large increase in the catch of muskrats. The total catch
for the year amounted to 106,920, an increase of 54,224 over the year 1929. It was the largest
catch since 1923.
The catch of muskrats on Vancouver Island amounted to about 9,000 pelts. While there
is no doubt that muskrats are not a desirable animal on the south end of Vancouver Island and
that they will have to be exterminated by some means, at the same time the money derived from
the sale of their pelts, which are of good quality and fetch a fair price, was a great help to a
number of needy men who would otherwise have probably had to go on relief and be. an expense
to the Government.
While the catch of mink exceeds that of last year by 1,533, it is considerably below the
average for the past ten years.
The catch of marten was extremely disappointing. We anticipated an increased catch,
but the reverse was the case and it was a little over 1,000 pelts short of the year 1930. However,
considering the trapping conditions, it is really rather surprising that the catch was not even
smaller. In numbers of localties trappers often found it almost impossible to operate at all.
They would no sooner get their traps set than a heavy fall of snow would bury them, and
numbers of men, after numerous attempts, gave it up in despair.
The low price of furs resulted in about 300 trappers giving up their trap-lines. A great
number of those who abandoned their lines were men who operated on the Coast, where the
fur does not fetch such high prices as that of the Interior. In addition, some of these men
probably had not conserved their fur as they should have done. Unquestionably, a few preferred to go on relief rather than do the arduous work that trapping entails with little hope of
making more than a bare living.
Nevertheless, in spite of all the drawbacks we have suffered during the past year in respect
to fur-bearing animals in general, our royalties showed an increase of $624 over that of the
previous year.
BOUNTIES AND DESTRUCTION OF PREDATORS.
Owing to the necessity for economy and the consequent small amount of the vote for the
destruction of predatory animals and birds, it became necessary to reduce the bounty on
cougars and finally to do away with it altogether in November. This resulted in a great deal
of criticism.
That such action had to be taken is most regrettable, but at the same time fair-minded
people should realize that these bounties have to be paid, and if sufficient money is not available
for this purpose we have to make the best of it until times improve. One thing is very certain,
and that is that if those who were loudest in their criticism of the removal of the bounties had
been asked to pay increased taxes so that bounties could be placed at the high figures they
suggested, they would have refused most emphatically.
There is no question, however, as to the amount of damage that cougar do both to domestic
animals and deer. There is also very little doubt that at the present time the only satisfactory
method of dealing with this particular pest is by means of a bounty.
In certain areas, particularly on Vancouver Island, it is possible that predatory-animal
hunters may prove satisfactory and economical as far as the protection of domestic animals
is concerned, but it is questionable whether it would be economical to adopt such a method over REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 9
the whole of the Province. Later on, when the Game Department is in a position to employ
more men, it might be advisable to have a certain number of Game Wardens whose principal
duty will be the destruction of predatory animals and birds. At the present time all Game
Wardens do a great deal towards the destruction of vermin of all kinds, but as the protection
of game and not domestic animals is their first duty, they naturally have to confine their
attentions in most districts to vermin which prey upon game birds.
Nevertheless, a few of the Game Wardens keep hounds which will tree cougars, and during
the past year they have been very successful in destroying these pests. Unfortunately, cougar-
hunting necessitates many long and often fruitless days of travel, and few Game Wardens can
spare so much time. They can, however, in the course of their ordinary duties, kill numbers
of other species of vermin. This they have done with most excellent results not only in protecting game, but domestic stock as well.
One of the greatest menaces we now have in the more settled areas is the domestic cat
which has gone wild. These pests seem to thrive in the wild state, and during the past year
Game Wardens have destroyed 994 of them. In addition, probably an even greater number were
accounted for by farmers and others to whom the Game Department furnished traps. Yet in
the more wooded areas the number of cats shows no diminution.
The bounty on magpies in the Interior was money well spent. Altogether, bounties were
paid on 3,427 of these birds, and, in addition, Game Wardens accounted for 1,385, making a
total of 4,812 which were destroyed.
Anybody who is aware of the havoc these pests have wrought among domestic sheep in some
of the States (to say nothing of game birds) will realize how important it is that we take every
means to exterminate them.
While we were not able to continue the payment of bounties, we were able to retain the
services of our predatory-animal hunters, and these few men have done most excellent work
in protecting domestic stock from cougars, coyotes, and sheep-killing birds.
GAME-BIRD FARMING.
Game-bird farming has made considerable progress during the past year. As can be seen
from the tabled returns, there were forty-three persons engaged in rearing pheasants and ducks.
While the majority of those breeding pheasants have not, up to the present, met with the
success they anticipated, this has been due to their lack of knowledge. A few, however, have
done quite well, and unquestionably next year there will be a far greater number who, profiting
by the experience which they have already gained, will have much better results.
It is most unfortunate that just at the time that this industry seems to be getting on a
substantial footing a financial depression should decrease the market for these birds. However,
even at present low prices, pheasants can be raised at a good profit, and in spite of difficulties
there is an excellent prospect of the industry attaining very large proportions.
This year a few pheasants were sold in the eastern part of Canada by one of our local
breeders, and it is to be hoped that a good market may be developed there.
During the past year 785 leg-bands were sold, which is a large increase over the previous
year.
REVENUE RETURNS.
Considering the financial depression and the consequent decrease in almost all Government
receipts, it would naturally be expected that the revenue derived from licence fees and royalty
would also suffer in a similar manner. It is most pleasing to be able to report, however, that
while there has been some decrease in our total revenue, it has been a comparatively small one.
While our resident ordinary firearms licences are a few less in number than the previous
year, still they are slightly larger than in 1929. This year these licences reached a total of
29,357, which is 811 less than last year, but 2,597 more than in the previous year.
There was quite a decrease in the number of trappers' licences (resident special firearms
licences). This is due to the fact that many of those whose lines lay in the western part of
the Province, where fur is scarce and of less value than that of the Interior, did not consider
it worth while to endure the strenuous work which trapping necessitates for the small amount H 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of money they would make.    A number were unquestionably influenced by the fact that they
could go on relief.
Another factor of importance in regard to the loss of revenue is the decrease in the number
of non-resident big-game hunters visiting this Province.
ROYALTY.
There has been some agitation for the reduction of royalty on furs. At first there appears
to be considerable justification for such a demand. It must be remembered, however, that when
the present scale of royalties was fixed the value of furs was considerably lower than what it
became in subsequent years. During this period of prosperity the trappers and fur-dealers
flourished. During such times the royalty should have been raised, but, as this was not done
then, there does not seem to be any valid reason why it should be lowered now.
It must also be remembered that our system of trap-line registration confers benefits on our
trappers such as they obtain nowhere else in the world. It must also be remembered that such
a system, while producing splendid results, is an extremely costly one, and our revenue from
trappers' licences alone would not permit us to continue this system and give the trappers the
protection they need. Consequently, if we lowered our royalty fees, it might, and probably
would, be necessary to either do away with our system of trap-line registration or more than
double our trappers' licence fee.
It must also be remembered that in this Province there are approximately 2,500 Indians
who have trap-lines. These Indians pay no licence fee whatever, and yet we are put to the
expense of registering their trap-lines and protecting their fur-bearing animals. It is only
through the royalty that we get anything from them.
In addition, while we might lower the royalty and increase our trapper's licence fee, this
would be too great a burden on the trappers in the western part of the Province who probably
could not afford to pay a heavy fee.
' EXPENDITURE.
A statement is contained on page 26 showing the amount of money voted for game-protection
purposes during the firscal year 1931-32.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Prosecutions.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences,
Fees, and Furs.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Pines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
24,595.SO
51,093.89
1921	
1922	
1923	
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62 535 13
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45 161 11
1931	
46,091.08 "A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
By J. W. Graham, Divisional Game Supervisor.
I beg to submit herewith my annual game report covering game conditions in this Division
for the year ended December 31st, 1931.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are quite numerous on Vancouver Island, although there have not been
as many reports received from farmers this year as in previous years in regard to damage.
Grizzly bear are numerous at Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlets.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are on the increase and are to be found in the Shaw Creek
Game Reserve, the Nitinat River and its tributaries, and in the Oyster River District. From
patrols made it is estimated that the Oyster River band shows an increase, and this also
applies to the wapiti in the Elk River District. A band of ten cows and ten calves was seen
in the vicinity of the Shaw Creek Game Reserve last July. On the west coast elk are reported
to have been seen at the headwaters of the Nahwitti River.
Deer.—Deer are still plentiful on Vancouver Island, and a number of complaints have been
received from farmers as to damage being done by these animals.
The disease known as " liver-fluke " has not been reported or noticed in any part of the
Division except in the Courtenay District.
Many sportsmen recommend that a tag system be put into effect covering deer killed during
the open season.
Goat.—At Knight, Kingcome, and Seymour Inlets, as well as at Thompson, Wakeman, and
Mackenzie Sounds, goats are reported as being plentiful. The goats liberated in the Shaw
Creek Game Reserve some years ago are still to be found on the high ridges, and one goat was
also reported seen on Mount Hooker in the Nanaimo Lake area.
Fur-hearing Animals.
Beaver.—The continued close season for the past few years for the trapping of these
animals on Vancouver Island has helped considerably, but beaver are still reported as being
scarce throughout the most of Vancouver Island, with the possible exception of the Courtenay
District. I would not care to recommend any open season on Vancouver Island for the trapping
of beaver.
Marten.—These animals are not plentiful, although they are to be found in good numbers
in some parts of Vancouver Island.
Mink.—Mink are fairly plentiful.
Racoon.—Throughout Vancouver Island these animals are plentiful, especially along the
shore-line.
Muskrats.—These animals seem to have adapted themselves to Vancouver Island and are
increasing rapidly. Complaints have been received from farmers in regard to damage being
done by these animals to their crops and property, and in a number of instances permits have
been issued to farmers to trap the animals during the close season.
Otter.—An increase in otter is reported to have been observed on tne northern end of the
island, but throughout the remaining portion are scarce.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Blue and ruffed grouse have not been observed in any large numbers, but good
bags were obtained during the past open season in the northern portions of the island. These
birds are very scarce in the Duncan and Cowichan Lake Districts and the season should remain
closed for another year at least.
Pheasants.—These birds are not considered as being as plentiful as in past years. Very
few hunters secured bag limits when shooting was allowed on these birds during the past year.
Quail.—Throughout the southern portions of Vancouver Island quail have been very
plentiful and an increased number of birds was noted in the Courtenay District.
Partridges.—These birds do not seem to be increasing on the island. In the Saanich
District a number have been seen.
Ptarmigan.—On Vancouver Island these birds are reported as being very scarce. H 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—These birds are common to Vancouver Island, but are not what would be considered
plentiful, except in the extreme northern part of the island and on the west coast.
Brant.—In some districts brant have been seen in good numbers.
Geese.—In the Courtenay and Alert Bay Districts reports of geese in fairly good numbers
have been received.    Throughout the remainder of Vancouver Island they have been scarce.
Swans.—Eight swans were observed on Cowichan Lake and a number of these birds were
also observed in the vicinity of the Nanaimo Lakes, Hilliers, and Qualicum. A few of these
birds were observed in the Courtenay and Campbell River Districts.
Vermin.
Cougar still seem to be on the increase. A few complaints were received during the year
from farmers in regard to their domestic stock being killed by cougar, but in most instances
they did not report the loss of their stock until they had endeavoured to hunt the cougar themselves, and when they called for assistance it was too late. It is felt that in doing away with
the payment of bounties the destruction of cougar will only be in small numbers, and it is
expected that there will be a decided increase in the numbers of these animals.
Wolves seem to be on the increase, and while no bands have been reported, odd animals
have been seen in various parts of the island.
Domestic cats which have been allowed to run wild are causing considerable damage to
game birds. Throughout the year the Game Wardens in this Division have paid particular
attention to the destruction of these cats and other vermin.
Game-protection.
This Division has been constantly patrolled and the provisions of the " Game Act" strictly
enforced. One hundred and thirty-four convictions were obtained during the year. The Game
Wardens have co-operated with Fishery Officers and thirty-two of these convictions were
obtained under the British Columbia Fishery Regulations. Three convictions were obtained
under section 11 of the " Game Act," resulting in prison sentences, and two of the cases brought
up for night-hunting were dismissed with a warning.
I am pleased to say that the members of the Provincial Police Force have co-operated and
have always been willing to give any assistance in their power in enforcing the " Game Act."
A good deal of credit is due the constable at Port Alice for the assistance he has given in
enforcing the game laws, and also in connection with the trouble he has taken in registering
trap-lines in his district.
Game Propagation.
Approximately 1,100 pheasants have been liberated during the year on Vancouver Island.
These birds were put out in suitable areas. Two hundred and ninety-seven quail and eight wild
turkeys were also liberated on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands during 1931.
Game Reserves.
There are five game reserves on Vancouver Island—namely, Mount Douglas Park, Little
Saanich Mountain, Shaw Creek, Elk Lake, and Strathcona Park, including the Forbidden
Plateau. These reserves are well protected at all times and have proved to be wonderful
game-breeding areas.
Bird sanctuaries were recently created on Esquimalt Lagoon, Shoal Harbour, and
Roberts Bay.
, Fur Trade.
Very little information can be supplied in regard to the fur trade, as the majority of the
fur trapped is generally shipped direct to Vancouver, although a certain amount of trading in
fur is engaged in along the west coast.
Fur-farming.
There are quite a number of fur-farms on Vancouver Island. From reports received all
those engaged in this business seem to be making a success of their business. A number of game-bird farms have been established on the island during the past few
years.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There are now 483 trap-lines registered in this Division. The system of registration is
proving to be most satisfactory, as the majority of the trappers feel that it is to their interest
to protect the fur on their registered trap-lines. Very few complaints have been received during
the year of conflictions in regard to trap-lines in the Division.
Registration of Guides.
There are very few guides registered in this Division.
Special Patrols.
Patrols have been made throughout this Division continuously and many good results
obtained therefrom. Whenever possible, joint patrols were made with the British Columbia
Police and as a result of these joint patrols a great deal of expense was saved.
Hunting Accidents.
I am very pleased to report that the number of hunting accidents this year was less than
during the previous year, only four accidents being reported, which are as follows:—
David Marshall, of Royston, B.C., accidentally shot himself while hunting in the vicinity
of the old Bloedell logging area near Union Bay on September 20th, 1931. Marshall was a
minor, as classed under the " Game Act," as he was only 17 years of age.
On December 19th, 1931, Stuart V. Snider, of Metchosin, B.C., accidentally shot himself
while hunting in the vicinity of Metchosin. Upon investigation being made it was evident that
Snider had slipped on a snag and fallen face downward on his gun, which was discharged,
killing him almost instantly.
C. H. Coldwell, Victoria, B.C., was accidentally shot by one W. E. Eddy, of East Sooke, B.C.,
on October 18th, 1931. Coldwell was hunting with companions in the vicinity of Sooke when
a shot was fired at a deer by Eddy, accidentally hitting Coldwell in the right breast. Coldwell
was immediately taken to the hospital, and although the wound was a serious one, it was not
fatal.    Eddy, who was 17 years of age at the time, has had his firearms licence cancelled.
Callin Carto, Albert Saunders, and two other boys, all of Comox, B.C., were out target-
practising on October 25th, 1931, and when they were returning home the .22 calibre rifle which
they had been using, and which was being carried by Albert Saunders, was accidentally discharged, striking Callin Carto and inflicting a wound in the right thigh. The wound was not
serious.
Several persons have been reported lost during the past hunting season, but upon search-
parties being sent out all were successfully located, with the exception of Benny Sands, of North-
field, B.C., who was lost in the vicinity of Siwash Ridges while hunting near Nanoose on
December 6th, 1931. Searches have been conducted from time to time for the purpose of
endeavouring to locate this missing hunter, but without success.
Summary- and General Game Conditions.
The conditions in respect to game on Vancouver Island can be considered as being fairly
good. This island has always been considered as a place to hunt by non-residents of the
Province, but a considerable decrease has been noted during the past season owing to the fact
that the licence fee was increased.
All complaints received pertaining to the Game and Fisheries Acts have been attended to
immediately and all parts of the Division have been patrolled continuously. Pit-lamping has
been carried on to a certain extent, but not as much as in previous years. At any rate, the.
Game Wardens have spent night after night in an effort to check this illegal practice, and
although only three convictions were obtained and two cases dismissed with a caution, I am of
the opinion that as a result of the patrols made by the Game Wardens the practice of pit-
lamping is being kept down to the lowest possible minimum.
I also wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the work done by the
Game Wardens throughout the Division, and also to members of the British Columbia Police
Force, who have always been willing to give assistance whenever possible. H 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Game Wardens in " B " Division.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Grizzly and black bear are to be found in fairly large numbers. Black bear in some
districts have done considerable damage to private property.
Caribou.—These animals are to be found in certain parts of the Division, but not in any
large numbers.
Moose.—During the past year there was a marked increase in the number of moose in the
Fernie District, although only a few of these animals were killed during the open season. In the
Upper Kootenay Valley moose are fairly plentiful.
Deer.—Deer appear to be holding their own and in some districts are slightly increasing.
Considerable damage was done to deer in the southern part of the Division as a result of forest
fires.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are reported as being plentiful in most parts of the Division,
with the exception of the Boundary District.
Mountain-sheep.—On Ashnola Creek and the east side of Dog and Vasseau Lakes there are
a few sheep.    In the Fernie District a marked increase has been noted in these animals.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk have increased throughout the East Kootenay District and some
excellent hunting was afforded on these animals during the past open season. Wapiti have
increased very rapidly in the Penticton District, and as a result numerous complaints have
been received of their doing damage to private property.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Muskrats and lynx are plentiful in some parts of the Division. Fur-bearing animals in
general throughout the Division are scarce. A good deal of damage was done to quite an
extent of territory in the Cranbrook District as the result of forest fires, and due to this fact
many fur-bearing animals in this affected area were destroyed.
Game Birds.
Grouse.—Ruffed and blue grouse, considering the Division as a whole, have been plentiful,
and in some parts Franklin grouse and ptarmigan are increasing. In the Boundary District
blue and ruffed grouse were reported as being scarce. In the Revelstoke area, however, they
are on the increase.
Pheasants.—It is reported that in the Boundary District pheasants were as plentiful as in
past years and some excellent shooting was obtained by sportsmen in this district.
Quail.—In those parts of the Division where quail are to be found, excellent shooting was
had and it would appear that these birds are on the increase.
Migratory Game Birds.
In certain parts of the Division migratory game birds appeared in approximately the same
numbers as in previous years.    In the Revelstoke District ducks and geese were quite plentiful.
Vermin.
Coyotes have not decreased by any means, as quite a number of these animals were
destroyed during the year by trappers and others.
Reports of cougar indicate that they are not plentiful. Noxious birds, however, have been
destroyed in fairly large numbers by Game Wardens and others throughout the year.
Game-protection. ,.
The Division has 'been carefully and constantly patrolled throughout the year. Many
patrols have been made into outlying parts of the Division with beneficial results.
A great deal of assistance has been given by members of the British Columbia Police in
enforcing the provisions of the "Game Act " and Regulations. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 15
Game Reserves.
The only large reserve lying within the boundaries of this Division is known as the Elk
River Game Reserve, and this reserve has been constantly patrolled, and it is pleasing to note
from reports that all kinds of game in this reserve are increasing and spreading out to the
surrounding country. There are a number of Dominion parks in this Division which also
provide excellent breeding areas for game animals and game birds.
Fur Trade.
A large percentage of the fur taken in this Division is shipped to Vancouver to be sold,
while some of the fur finds its way to markets in the East or in the United States. There does
not appear to be any great decrease in the amount of fur taken each year by trappers.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registered trappers in this Division are each year more than ever endeavouring to
protect the fur-bearing animals on their trap-lines, in view of the fact that they realize it is
to their interest to conserve the fur, and this has been brought about as a result of the registration of trap-lines.
The Game Wardens in this Division have done their utmost throughout the year to bring
the registered trap-lines in their respective districts up-to-date, and as a result registration
certificates have been issued to a number of trappers.
Registration of Guides.
Care has been taken this year to see that all guides in the Division secure registration and
report before proceeding with a hunting-party and also on their return from a hunting-trip,
and by this means a close check has been kept on the operations of the various guides and their
parties during the year.
Special Patrols.
Many patrols have been made to the outlying parts of the Division during the year, with
the result that more definite information has been received as to game conditions in these outlying districts.
Hunting Accidents.
There has been a few hunting accidents in this Division during the past year, but not many
of them have been serious.
Summary.
Some excellent big-game bags were taken by non-resident hunters in the Division, and
resident hunters have had good sport due to the fact of the increase in the numbers of the
various big-game animals and game birds.
In regard to fur-bearing animals, while registered trappers have undoubtedly done their
utmost to protect their stock of fur, still at the same time, through depredations by predatory
animals and forest fires, the stand of fur in some districts has decreased.
"C"  DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS,  YALE,  OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,  AND CHILCOTIN
DISTRICTS).
By Divisional Game Supervisor R. M. Robertson.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual game report for the year 1931.
Big Game.
Moose, bear, and deer are numerous in the north-eastern portions of the Division. Grizzly
bear are to be found on Cayoosh Creek and also at the head of the tributaries of the Upper
Bridge River and Hurley River. Black and brown bear have been fairly numerous throughout
the Lillooet District, while in the vicinity of Quesnel reports have been received of their doing
damage to domestic sheep. Moose are rapidly increasing in the Lillooet District, while a good
number of these animals were secured by hunters in the Clinton area during the past season.
Caribou are in fair numbers north and east of Canim Lake, Mahood Lake, and also in the
Clearwater country. H 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Wapiti are doing fairly well and are spreading to Gun Creek and the main Bridge River
District.
Mountain-sheep are increasing slightly. A number of these animals were observed in the
Shorts Creek District.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are not considered as being numerous, although on the larger trap-lines
they appear to be in good numbers. In the southern portion of the Division beaver are scarce,
due undoubtedly to the very dry weather during the past few years. In the Lillooet District,
particularly along the main Bridge River, Hurley River, and Cadwallader Creek, fur-bearing
animals are reported as being in fairly good numbers.
The yearly average of fur-bearing animals taken in this Division, however, is being kept
up, and undoubtedly in some districts there is an increased stock of fur.
Upland Game Birds.
Blue and ruffed grouse in the Kelowna District are scarce and a close season is recommended, while in the Merritt, Quesnel, and Williams Lake District these birds are reported as
being plentiful.
Pheasants and partridges apparently are on the increase in those parts of the Division
where they are to be found, especially the Vernon District. Prairie-chicken are reported as
increasing in the Quesnel District, while in other districts they are not in any large numbers.
Migratory Game Birds.
A greater concentration of ducks has been observed during the last season and this situation
is accounted for by the continued dry weather and the drying-up of small bodies of water
throughout the Division. In certain localities, such as Salmon Arm, Kamloops, and Williams
Lake, ducks and geese are reported as being numerous.
Vermin.
Coyotes are reported as being numerous in most districts, while cougar in the Hanceville
area, particularly in the Tatlayoko Lake area, are reported as being very numerous.
Big-horned owls and other noxious birds are plentiful, and it is recommended that in order
to prevent these birds from doing damage amongst the stock of game birds a bounty be placed
on them.
It is suggested that by the employment of predatory-animal hunters a great deal of good
will be derived, as undoubtedly trained men will account for the destruction of more predatory
animals and noxious birds than under the bounty system.
Game-protection.
There were 104 convictions for violations of the Game and Fishery Regulations in this
Division during the past year. The continuous patrols conducted by trained Game Wardens
have had a very beneficial effect. It is suggested that it probably would be advisable to transfer
Game Wardens from one district to another for short periods during the open season, as if this
were done undoubtedly better enforcement would be the result.
The destruction of vermin has been carried on by Game Wardens throughout the year, and
very good work has been done in this connection. It is proposed, as a measure of economy,
to construct crow-traps in suitable areas and also to distribute cat-traps, as by the use of these
traps a greater number of vermin will be destroyed at a less cost than by the use of firearms.
Game Propagation.
The pheasants shipped into the Hanceville District a few years ago are doing very well and
are spreading out along the Fraser and Chilcotin Rivers. In the Salmon Arm District pheasants
are increasing, and, as a matter of fact, this applies to many parts of the Division.
Ten live beaver were taken from the Bowron Lake Game Reserve last fall and released in
the vicinity of Lac la Hache. These animals have established themselves, and there is every
reason to expect them to increase. It is recommended that the trapping of these beaver be
continued for release in other parts of the Division where they are required.    If the Department REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 17
had created a game reserve in the Southern Interior for the protection of deer before any
mining or farming activities took place, that reserve, which was abolished several years ago
because of local opposition, would have been a splendid feeder of game animals for the surrounding country. Failing the creation of a reserve for game and fur-bearing animals, I would
strongly recommend the closing of certain areas for trapping scattered throughout the Province
to be used as fur-breeding areas. AVith the Province so heavily covered with trap-lines at
present, it might be arranged that several lines eligible for cancellation could be kept free from
registration and used as breeding areas for fur-bearing animals. This could be tried on a small
scale for a period of years and the results noted.
Game Reserves.
There are two game reserves in this Division, one at Tranquille and the other at Bowron
Lake. The latter has been a great success as a breeding-ground for fur-bearing animals.
The matter of extending the Tranquille Reserve is under consideration at the present time.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade has been at a very low ebb, due to poor fur prices. A great deal of the fur
trapped in this Division is shipped to fur-dealers in Vancouver.
The irresponsible fur-buyer is to a great extent the cause of a good deal of smuggling of
fur and also for illegal trapping. The travelling fur-trader who cares little for the stock of
furs on the trap-line is one of the trapper's greatest enemies. The promise to " buy anything
you have " by unscrupulous fur-traders has a lot to do with the scarcity of fur.
Fur-farming.
Taken on the whole, the fur-farming situation in this Division is not a bright one, clue to
the poor prices being received and also in view of the fact that there are no markets for farm-
raised fur. Fur-farming is a business requiring a good deal of intelligent handling, and those
making a success of this business will accomplish this through a proper scientific study of the
raising and feeding of fur-bearing animals in captivity.
Registration of Trap-lines.
There are too many half-hearted trappers endeavouring to make a few dollars each winter
by registering and operating a very short trap-line. It is realized by these trappers that what
they have does not amount to very much and it is little or nothing out of their pockets if they
do overtrap, but fortunately the Department's stand in regard to the overtrapping of registered
trap-lines will stop most of these trappers from depleting the fur.
There are a number of trappers who are conserving their fur and the system of trap-line
registration is apparently working out very well in these cases. One of the faults in this
Division, however, is the fact that there are too many trappers.
Registration of Guides.
A form of examination should be passed by guides and the whole system of registration
of guides raised to a high standard of efficiency.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made by Game Warden Farey to Maiden Creek, and three Indians
were, as a result, arrested for killing does and fawns. Another patrol was made into the
Princeton District by Game Warden Jobin, where a deer-sausage factory was found and the
remains of twenty-seven deer discovered. Several other convictions were obtained, and in
the case of the owner of the sausage-factory a fine was imposed and his licence cancelled for
the coming year.
Hunting Accidents.
Antoine Belanger, prospector, was shot and killed in mistake for a deer by one George Guay
on May 14th, 1931.
Edward Caddon, aged 16, of Mara, B.C., accidentally shot himself in the stomach on
October 25th,  1931,  and  died shortly afterwards.    The  deceased  was leaning  on  his  loaded
2 H 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
shotgun with the butt of the gun on a log. The butt slipped and presumably the hammer was
forced against the cartridge, as the gun went off with the barrel against his stomach.
J. C. Kendrick was shot through the body and instantly killed. The shot was fired by
George Dillabough, with whom he was hunting.
Marcus McAbee, Ashcroft, B.C., was shot and killed on a hunting-trip by Alexander M.
Hinkes, Clinton, B.C., on October 16th, 1931.
In all of these cases investigations were conducted by the Provincial Police and action taken
under the Criminal Code and the " Game Act."
Summary.
I wish to comment on the assistance rendered in several cases by members of the British
Columbia Police under the " Game Act." A co-operative spirit exists in this Division between
the Game and Police Departments, and valuable and timely assistance rendered by members
of the British Columbia Police Force was greatly appreciated by the Game Wardens in this
Division.
Patrols have been well carried out during the past year and credit is due the Game Wardens
in this Division for the efficient manner in which these duties were executed.
The general game condition throughout this Division is very satisfactory, and if continued
patrols are made and the game kept under close supervision there is no reason why a decided
increase will not be noted in the next few years.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND
YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Divisional Game Supervisor T. Van Dyk.
Game Animals.
Moose.—In spite of the great number of moose killed during the last two seasons, the
animals are increasing in every district and are continuing to spread westward, and have been
reported in greater numbers west of Hazelton, reaching as far as Terrace. The portion of the
Skeena Electoral District east of the Cascade Range could be included in the territory provided
with an open season on moose.
Caribou.—These animals, not being extensively hunted, are increasing. Very good reports
have been received from the Cassiar, Peace River (Toad River area), and Upper Fraser River
Districts.
Wapiti.—Further proof that these game animals were very abundant in the past over a
wide area of the Peace River District, east of the Rocky Mountains, came to hand again this
season in the finding of two sets of horns north of the Halfway River.
In view of the reported increase in the number of elk in Jasper Park, of which a number
were seen in the vicinity of Yellowhead, B.C., during the month of November, 1931, and their
possible migration north, the close season north of the Canadian National Railway line represented in my last report is again suggested.
A herd of these animals was reported south of the Canadian National Railway, Prince
Rupert line, in the vicinity of Cluskuz Lake, Vanderhoof District, where an elk was killed by an
Indian during the month of October last. Further information in regard to the number of
animals, location of herds, etc., is being obtained.
No definite report has been received regarding the wapiti liberated on Queen Charlotte
Islands.    Only four cows with young have been reported.
Sheep.—Good reports have been received from the Toad River area (Peace River District),
where numerous bands were noted by big-game hunters and guides. Mr. H. S. Snyder, of
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A., reported having seen one band containing 150 Stone sheep. He secured
two very nice trophies.
The Sheep Creek Pass, Wapiti Pass area, are not so favourable, as sheep are reported scarce
there, but as the main range is situated in Alberta a close season in British Columbia should
not be contemplated unless the Government of the Province of Alberta could be induced to
co-operate and a close season declared covering both areas.   Fairly good reports have been REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 19
Received from the Cassar District, indicating that sheep are as numerous as ever.    Some very
good trophies were secured during the past season.
Goat.—These animals are never hunted extensively, and as a result are increasing and in
no danger of extermination.
Deer.—These animals are on the increase in every district. An improvement in the Coast
deer, especially on Porcher Island, has been noted.
Bear.—Black bear are very numerous throughout the Division and grizzly bear are on the
increase.
Fur-bearing Animals.
All species are reported in fair numbers; especially is this the case on some of the registered
trap-lines.
An average catch is again expected this season. Many trappers will secure sufficient pelts
to cover expenses only, allowing the trap-lines to be built up. In view of this fact, the size of
the catch cannot be used as a gauge to determine the increase or decrease of fur-bearing animals.
Beaver may be found in any part of the Division and the fear of extinction, felt a few years
ago, has entirely disappeared.
The open seasons for trapping which have been in effect during the past few years appear
to meet with the approval of all trappers and should be again adopted this coming season.
Upland Game Birds.
All species of grouse have made a remarkable recovery during the last two years. This is
very noticeable in the Peace River area. In the case of ptarmigan and pintail grouse, in that
portion of the Fort George Electoral District situate and lying to the east of the Rocky
Mountains, it has been suggested that the seasons be set covering the months of September
and October.
Migratory Game Birds.
Stcans.—It is not definitely established that trumpeter swans are wintering on the Tachie
River, Stillwater River (near Bella Coola), and on the Queen Charlotte Islands. A small flock
has wintered at Tachie for the last five or six years, while another flock has been reported on
Stillwater River, near Bella Coola, and recently a flock was reported in the vicinity of Masset,
Queen Charlotte Islands.
Geese.—The breeding season in the northern part of this Division was very favourable,
resulting in a greater number of geese being noted during the fall migration in the Fort George
and Peace River areas. The spring close season and the short fall open season is sufficient to
protect these birds.
Ducks.—The breeding season in this Division on these birds is very favourable. Numerous
flocks were seen on rivers and lakes north of Prince George during the migration periods.
The Coast district is noted for its ducks, which were exceptionally numerous during November
and December.
Vermin.
With the return of the rabbits, coyotes are reported on the increase. Numerous complaints
have been received throughout the Division regarding the abnormal increase and the great
damage being done by wolves, especially to animals of the deer family. Like coyotes, owls
and hawks seem to return with the increase of the rabbits and grouse, and undoubtedly cause
a great deal of damage amongst our game birds.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols have been conducted at all times throughout the Division. Special patrols
for specific purposes were undertaken with very good results, as will be noted from the prosecutions conducted in this Division during the year, which show an increase of nearly 100 per cent.
over the year 1930.
The enforcement of the " Game Act " was carried out by thirty-seven officers of the British
Columbia Police Force and eleven Game Wardens; 20 per cent, of the prosecutions being
launched by the former and 80 per cent, by the latter. The splendid results obtained are worthy
of commendation, and are no doubt due to the fine spirit of co-operation existing between the H 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
two forces.    Anticipating this spirit to prevail during the coming season, we may look forward
to further improvement in all game-protection work.
Game Propagation.
Reports regarding the increase in the number of elk liberated on Queen Charlotte Islands
have been received. In one instance one cow was seen with three young. This information,
although not covering the whole herd, is quite satisfactory.
At Tlell, Queen Charlotte Islands, Skeena Crossing, and Kitwanga, information comes to
hand indicating an increase in the number of pheasants in these areas, and it would therefore
appear to be advisable to release further birds during the coming season in the vicinity of
these places.
A further request has been received from the Vanderhoof Board of Trade that European
partridges should be introduced into their district, and it is recommended that another trial
be made with a view of complying with their request.
Game Reserves.
Three game reserves—Kaien Island, Lake Kathlyn, and the Prince George Game Reserves,
the latter established as a safety-zone—have been patrolled at various times and are fulfilling
the purposes for which they were established. In regard to the Kunghit Island Reserve, I have
no information available, as this reserve is located in such an isolated place that no patrols
have been made to the same in view of lack of transportation facilities.
Fur Trade.
As the data for this Division are very incomplete owing to the great number of fur-traders'
licences being issued in Vancouver and as the bulk of the pelts are shipped to Vancouver, no
satisfactory reports can be submitted in regard to the fur trade.
Fur-farming.
The licensing of fur-farmers is advocated with a view of financing the appointment of a
capable supervisor or inspector for the Province.
I am very pleased to report that very satisfactory results have been obtained by Louis
Tereshuk, a fur-farmer of Red Rock Lake, Prince George Post-office, in the breeding and raising
of fisher in captivity. I hope to obtain complete data on the breeding of fisher, and will submit
a report at a later date, in order that this information may be made available in pamphlet form
for distribution among other farmers who are interested in the farming of fisher.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of all trappers, which created an extraordinary amount of work, will be
completed during the coming year.
Registration of Guides.
One hundred and ninety-four guides have been registered at this office in past years,
although only twenty-nine took out licences during the past season.
The introduction of regulations providing for an examination of all applicants for guides'
licences should be given serious consideration, thereby increasing the efficiency of the guides in
general and the reputation of our Province as a big-game country in particular.
Special Patrols.
A number of lengthy patrols were undertaken by Game Wardens during the year.
The following patrols are brought to your attention:—
Taku and Tulsequah Rivers Patrols: March 22nd to April 17th; miles covered, 700 by
boats. This patrol, undertaken by Game Wardens E. Martin and E. W. Baker, is worthy of
notice as it shows a splendid co-operation as existing between the Game and Police Forces of
the Province and the officials of the Alaska Game Commission. The B.C. Police Motor-launch
No. 8 was used wherever possible, and an Alaska Game Warden accompanied the patrol for the
purpose of assisting our officers in Alaskan territory. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 21
Rainbow Creek Patrol: June 10th to June 17th; miles covered, 300 by horses. Patrol
undertaken by Game Warden S. F. Faherty, of Vanderhoof, B.C., for the purpose of visiting
the gold-digging of Rainbow Creek. This Game AVarden showed his aptitude for game-work,
undertaking the patrol alone.
Sheep Creek Pass Patrol: August 6th to September 22nd ; miles covered, 740 by saddle-
horse and pack-horses. Patrol undertaken by Game Wardens A. J. Jank and S. F. Faherty
for the purpose of patrolling the British Columbia-Alberta boundary-line during the hunting
season. This patrol has been very favourably commented on by two non-resident big-game
hunters during the course of their journey.
Mr. E. Van Der Grinten, who has hunted throughout the United States and every Province
in Canada, stated that this was the first time he had been asked to produce his licence. This
was highly approved of and looked upon as encouragement to return to a Province where game
was so efficiently protected. It is very encouraging indeed to discover that the real sportsmen
appreciate the efforts of our Department in conserving the game of the Province, and I respectfully suggest that similar patrols be sent into the big-game areas every year.
Fort Nelson Patrols: The numerous patrols undertaken by Game Warden J. S. Clark and
his assistant, B. Villeneuve, are again brought to your attention. The efficient manner in which
the patrols and work are carried out by this Game AVarden and his assistant is worthy of
commendation, and I respectfully suggest that my recommendation regarding the promotion of
Game AVarden be given kind consideration.
Hunting Accidents.
Two hunting accidents occurred in this Division during the last calendar year.
On September 27th, 1931, John Howard Bimie, of Smithers, B.C., was accidentally shot by
Herbert Edwin Blanchard, of the same address, while hunting deer. The firearms licence of
Mr. Blanchard was cancelled.
Ronald B. Durrant, of Terrace, B.C., accidentally shot himself on October 18th, 1931, while
hunting ducks on Lakelse Lake. The deceased on leaving the boat apparently pulled the gun
towards him, accidentally discharging the same and receiving a shot in the throat. Death was
instantaneous.
Summary.
Game conditions have been very favourable during the year. Heavy snowfalls are prevailing at present,'with heavy crust, and as a result animals of the deer family will suffer somewhat
from depredations of coyotes and wolves. Game birds have increased enormously, due to the
fact that weather conditions have been ideal during the nesting season. On the whole, game
conditions compare very favourably with previous years and, due to the present system of game-
conservation, improvement may be expected from year to year.
Before concluding my report I respectfully wish to thank the members of the Game Department, the British Columbia Police, and the various Game Associations located in the Division
for their hearty co-operation in the administration and enforcement of the " Game Act" and
Regulations thereunder.
"E" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER, COAST,  AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By Divisional Game Supervisor J. G. Cunningham.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Deer are still very plentiful throughout the mainland portion of this Division, but
are scarce on the islands in Howe Sound. The Squamish, Pitt, Stave, and Harrison Districts
produced more deer than ever. The Squamish and Harrison proved to be the most popular
places, and I know of many sportsmen who secured their season's bag limit in these districts.
Sportsmen inform me that in the Squamish District more deer have been seen there during the
past season and appear to be quite plentiful.
No reports of disease amongst deer have been received recently. The disease amongst deer
a few years ago apparently killed off a large number of deer on the islands in Howe Sound
and Jervis Inlet. H 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
AA7e have again had an agitation for the opening of a season on does, but I am not in favour
of such an open season.
Goat.—Mountain-goat are holding their own. These animals have been reported as appearing along the Seymour Range, Narrows Arm, McNab Creek, and the mountain range on the east
side of Howe Sound, in addition to the usual number at Alouette, Stave, and Powell Lakes, and
at Bute and Toba Inlets.
Bear.—Black bear are very plentiful, but are not extensively hunted, as there is very little
demand for the pelts and practically no demand for the meat.
A few complaints were received of bear doing damage in the Division during the year.
Moose.—This is the first time I have had occasion to mention moose, but while at Pemberton
recently I learned from trappers of that district that a moose had been seen along the valley
of the Upper Lillooet River.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—These animals are not plentiful in this Division, except in the Upper Stave River,
Skagit, and the Lillooet River Districts, where they are most confined to the lines of registered
trap-line holders.    The supply of beaver is about the same as in past years.
Marten.—These animals are just about holding their own, and, as they are very easily
trapped, it is felt that they would have been trapped out in many parts of the Division if it had
not been for the registration of trap-lines.
Mink.—Mink are holding their own in most parts of the Division.
Muskrats.—These animals are again plentiful in spite of the fact that they have been
heavily trapped in some localities. Trappers along the north side of the Fraser River, in the
Pitt River, Pitt Lake, Cloverdale, and Mission Districts have not been very successful in view
of the fact of the heavy rains during September.
Otter.—Very few otter are to be found in this Division.
Racoon.—The usual number of racoon have been trapped, although prices for their pelts
have not been very encouraging.
Red Fox.—This animal is considered a pest, especially on the south side of the Fraser from
Chilliwack to Point Roberts, and every step is taken to prevent these animals increasing in
this district.
Upland Game Birds.
AVithout a doubt the season for the hunting of pheasants during the past year was exceptionally good. Many hunters obtained their daily bag limit on the opening day and a number
obtained their season's limit during the season. The mild winter of 1930-31 no doubt had a
great deal to do with the increase of pheasants, and the destruction of vermin by Game AVardens
and others also was responsible for an increase in these birds. It is a "known fact that cats,
crows, and other vermin account for far more birds than the hunters, and during the past two
years the Game AA7ardens in this Division destroyed 1,200 cats and 4,500 crows.
Certain sportsmen recommend an open season on hen pheasants, but in my opinion no such
open season should be allowed.
The situation in respect to partridges was not very satisfactory. The season in this
Division has been closed, with the exception of a small district in Surrey lying between the
Great Northern Railway and the Pacific Highway.
A few coveys of partridges were observed in the Delta and Sumas Districts, but they are
not in sufficient numbers to warrant any open season, although it is possible that a short open
season might be beneficial, as this would break up the coveys, and this is required in so far
as partridges are concerned. A few partridges have been observed on Lulu Island and at
Pitt Meadows.
As was the case in 1930, the season on blue grouse was only fair. On the islands in Howe
Sound they appear to be scarce, but they were plentiful on Nelson Island. On the opening day
of the season at Nelson Island I observed fifty-four of these birds.
In some localities ruffed grouse were fairly plentiful, and a number of these birds have been
observed during the close season in various parts of the Division.
Migratory Game Birds.
The past season on ducks has, without a doubt, been the best since the fall of 1920, when
the farmers lost most of their grain through rain.    AAre were fortunate, from a sportsman's REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 23
point of view, in having early rains, and the ducks were in the fields long before the season
opened, which has not been the case in past years.
Mallards appeared to be in the majority, although there were a large number of pin-tailed,
widgeons, and green-wing teal observed.
This winter has been fairly open and I have taken the opportunity of visiting some of the
private game reserves in the Division, and from the number of ducks observed there, undoubtedly these reserves have a great deal to do with keeping the ducks in the Province and allowing
them to increase.
One of the reasons for feeling that ducks were more plentiful than last season was owing
to the fact that a Game AVarden in this Division caught and banded as many ducks on the
McGillivray Creek Game Reserve in the first month of the past season as he and an assistant
caught and banded during three months in 1930.
It is a fact that the so-called drought of the Central Provinces of Canada has had no bad
effect on the ducks migrating through this Division, and it is therefore felt that it is not at
all necessary to curtail the season on ducks in this Division.
AArood-ducks are very plentiful in certain parts of the Division.
AA7ilson snipe afforded some splendid sport for those few sportsmen who hunt them. Snipe
were more plentiful during the past season than during 1930.
Snow-geese have been very plentiful, but not very many of these birds were shot owing
to the fact that they are hard to obtain, except during the very cold weather.
Brant so far this season have appeared in fair numbers, but not very many of them were
obtained owing to weather conditions. The majority of brant are obtained at Boundary Bay,
although occasionally a few are obtained off Canoe Pass, AArestham Island, Mary Island near
Cortes Island, and I have observed a number in Sechelt Inlet.
A few swans were obtained throughout the Division. Twenty-five of these birds were
observed flying south over Pitt Meadows and three were seen off the mouth of the Fraser, while
a similar number of these birds were observed near Lund.
Undoubtedly band-tailed pigeons appear to be on the increase and complaints have been
received throughout the year of their doing damage to crops. In September these birds were
a decided pest to the farmers on Sumas Prairie, as they were there in large numbers.
Vermin.
Coyotes are not plentiful in this Division, although a few complaints have been received
of their doing damage in the farming area.
A complaint was received from Thurlow Island of wolves doing damage there, but, considering this Division as a whole, these animals are not plentiful.
There are very few cougar in this Division, although from time to time one or more of these
animals are killed.
Red fox, skunk, and weasel should be classed as vermin in this Division, as they do untold
damage to domestic and game birds.
The Game AVardens in this Division have been very active in destroying crows. We have
continued the operation of the crow-trap at Essondale, and as a result captured and destroyed
694 crows. A similar trap has been tried in other parts of the Division without success.
Big-horned and snowy owls have been scarce.
The following is a summary of the vermin killed by Game AVardens in this Division during
the year 1931:—
Crows   2,288 Cats         611
Eagles          35 Dogs        27
Owls        14 Skunk          6
Hawks      118 Coyotes         1
Game-protection.
The past year has been a difficult one from an enforcement standpoint, due to the general
depression. A great many of the. game violators were men out of work, and in some cases on
relief, and any fines imposed worked extreme hardships on the families of these men.
The Game AVardens have been as active as ever and were furnished every assistance by
the British Columbia Police throughout the Division. H 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Provincial Constables P. T. Davies (Port Coquitlam), J. D. H. Stewart (Agassiz), and
AV. G. H. Gill (Squamish) have rendered the Department excellent assistance, as well as the
Constables at North Bend, Hope, Chilliwack, Abbotsford, and Mission City. Assistant Commissioner AV. R. Dunwoody and Sub-Inspector J. Shirras, of the British Columbia Police, have
been ready and willing at all times to assist this Department. The fullest co-operation exists
between the Game and Police Departments.
Some 251 prosecutions were conducted under the various Acts pertaining to game and fish,
showing a decrease of twenty-five compared to 1930.
Game Associations throughout the Division have again given the Department very valuable
assistance.
Game Propagation.
The following is a list of the pheasants liberated throughout the Division during the past
year, these birds having been received from the Provincial Game Farm at Elk Lake, near
A'ictoria, B.C. :—
Agassiz   85 Port Moody       26
Pitt Meadows  '.  109 North Vancouver       32
Squamish   12 Mission      110
Surrey-Langley   160 Chilliwack       160
Sunnyside  20 Delta     275
Port Haney   10 loco        16
Lulu Island   125 Coquitlam         25
Halfmoon Bay   11                                                                               	
Sumas-Matsqui   225                        Total 1,411
Hopkins Landing   10                                                                                              ,
The Department is indebted to the Matsqui and Upper Sumas Game Associations for their
co-operation with Game AVarden AA'illiams, of Abbotsford, in keeping over birds allotted for that
district in pens until the opening of the spring.
Game Reserves.
The game reserves in this Division have been constantly patrolled. McGillivray Creek still
continues as one of our most valuable reserves in so far as migratory birds are concerned.
The North Vancouver Reserve was extended slightly, taking in a portion of the settled area
along the water-front of AVest Vancouver. This was done more for the safety of the public.
Encouraging reports have been received of the increase in the number of goats on the Goat
Island Reserve at Powell Lake.
Fur Trade.
The past season has been a disastrous one for the fur trade. This business is feeling the
depression more than any other class of business. The fur market, at the time of this report,
is practically demoralized and it is certain that trappers are going to suffer.
Fur-farming.
The fur-farming industry has been badly hit, especially the larger mink and fox farms.
The overhead expense is great on such farms, and as a result they have been forced to pelt a
large number of their animals. Farmed fur, for some unknown reason, does not bring a very
good price on the fur market.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division is practically complete and a number of
registration certificates have been issued. The system of registration is, without a doubt,
popular with the trappers. It is felt that something should be done about a number of the
trap-lines registered in the names of Indians along the Coast, as information has been received
of Indians holding trap-lines but not trapping them. If the Indian trapping licence could be
made compulsory, then these Indians would not wish to register so many lines.
Registration of Guides.
There is never any great demand for guides in this Division and those guides taking out
licences in Vancouver operate in some other part of the Province. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 25
Special Patrols.
Very few special patrols were conducted during the past year, as this was unnecessary in
view of the fact that the Game AVardens in the Division were very active and visited most parts
of their respective districts. A special patrol was made into the Upper Pitt River and Stave
Lake areas on a complaint from a party who had trapped there a few years ago. This patrol
resulted in a number of convictions for violations of the " Game Act."
Hunting Accidents.
I regret to state that five deaths have occurred as a result of hunting accidents in this
Division. The total number of accidents amounted to sixteen, as compared with five for the
season 1930. Seven of these accidents were caused by the hunters' own carelessness, three of
which were caused by dragging the gun towards them, muzzle first. Six of the accidents were
caused through the carelessness of other people.
Summary-.
The season for the hunting of pheasants, ducks, and deer has been the best for some years,
and game in general appeared to be on the increase throughout the Division.
It was expected that the revenue under the " Game Act" would fall off considerably owing
to so many people being out of work, but it is pleasing to note that, comparing the revenue
received in 1931 to 1930, during 1931 an increase has been observed.
Again I wish to mention that the officers and men of the British Columbia Police, the Game
Wardens in this Division, and the Game Associations of the Lower Mainland have co-operated
to the greatest possible extent.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS  OF THE ELK LAKE  GAME  FARM.
By Game AArARDEN J. AV. Jones.
I respectfully submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake Game
Farm during the past year.
Owing to very heavy rains during June the conditions in respect to the rearing of pheasants
on the farm were very unsatisfactory.    In some parts of the rearing-fields coops were floating
in the water and several hundred young birds were drowned.    Notwithstanding the difficult
time we had as a result of these weather conditions, a nice lot of birds were raised.
Particulars of the birds raised, distributed, etc., are as follows:—
Pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1930       900
Breeding stock to the extent of (approximately)      400
Hen pheasants   (approximately)         320
Cock pheasants (approximately)          80
Strayed from pens during year         14
Number of eggs laid  (approximately)      6,000
Set under hens   4,500
Eggs hatched   3,800
Young pheasants raised     3,000
Casualties owing to heavy rains       675
Strayed from rearing-fields       125
Small late eggs used for feeding     '250
Eggs shipped out to farmers   1,175
Shipped or liberated     2,500
Birds in pens, December 31st, 1931      500
Melanistic mutant pheasants in pens as at December 31st, 1931         22
Stock birds          3
Young birds raised        19
Eggs laid      100
Eggs hatched        50
Partridges in pens, December 31st, 1931         17
Breeding stock          9
Young birds raised          8 H 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Quail in pens, December 31st, 1931         30
Turkeys in pens, December 31st, 1931   3
Stock birds          3
Young birds raised         1
Eggs laid        40
Eggs hatched         10
Unfertile eggs         30
Geese: Two settings of eggs were obtained from Penticton, but only two
birds were hatched, the remaining eggs proving unfertile.    These
two geese were liberated on the Elk Lake Game Reserve.
Vermin destroyed.—Cats, 75 ;  hawks, 55;  barn-rats, 150.
In regard to the melanistic mutant pheasants, eight hens and two cock birds were obtained
in the spring of 1931. These birds arrived in a very weak condition, and some of them died
shortly after. As a result of these birds being in a weak condition, the young birds, when
hatched, could not survive, and only nineteen birds remain. These birds, however, are in good
condition, and it is hoped we will have better success with them during the coming year.
In order to continue the raising of partridges, it will be necessary to obtain some new stock,
which also applies in respect to wild turkeys.
As well as the work carried on on the Game Farm, game patrols have been maintained, as
well as looking into complaints in regard to cougar doing damage. Three cougar were killed
during the year.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Statement showing estimated expenditure, fiscal year, 1931-32  26
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, 1931  27
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences, 1931  28
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
1931  29
Statement showing particulars of various pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has
been collected during the year 1931    30
Comparative statement showing number and kind of pelts of fur-bearing animals on which
royalty has been collected during the period 1921-31  31
Total collections from fur trade, 1921-31  32
Bounties paid, 1931  32
Comparative statement of bounties paid, 1922-31  33
Statement showing vermin killed by Game Wardens, 1931  33
List of fur confiscated or surrendered for bounty, 1931  33
List of firearms confiscated, 1931  34
List of guides, 1931 J '  35
Hunting accidents, 1931  37
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid, 1931  38
Prosecutions, 1931  40
Returns of trappers, season 1930-31  43
Game-bird farm returns, 1931  44
Fur-farm returns, 1931 (Statement No. 1)  46
Fur-farm returns, 1931 (Statement No. 2)  57
Statement of migratory game birds banded by members of the Game Department, 1931  58
Personnel of Game Department, 1931  57
Statement of Estimated Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1931-32.
Game Department—
Salaries and expenses  $206,445.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 27
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue deeived prom Sale of Non-besident Licences, January 1st, 1931,
to December 31st, 1931.
Government
Agents.
General
Firearms
and Anglers.
WeekXy Bird.
Season Anglers.
Daily Anglers.
Total,
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
16
1
3
1
5
2
13
38
3
8
24
1
11
1
4
41
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
26
4
5
2
7 '
1
13
2
1
27
3
81
5
7
3
2
2
4
1
39
2
42
1
$60.00
70
7
53
14
49
284
6
303
17
133
181
9
34
8
3
9
42
139
637
68
8
7
5
11
5
1
5
4
25
53
31
73
$108.00
11.00
$168.00
161.00
$150.00
Atlin
50.00
54.00
23.00
78.00
496.00
9.00
369.00
104.00
23.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
725.00
50.00
150.00
50.00
250.00
50.00
30.00
260.00
40.00
50.00
158.00
806.00
99.00
519.00
50.00
20.00
21.00
186.00
226.00
19.00
60.00
27.00
766.00
236 00
70.00
10.00
130.00
20.00
446.00
79.00
$5.00
445.00
97.00
5.00
5 00
10.00
3.00
10.00
114.00
174.00
1,205.00
83.00
13.00
10 00
270.00
30.00
810.00
50.00
384 00
550.00
1,825.00
150.00
550.00
754.00
3,840.00
283.00
Pouce Coupe	
550.00
70.00
30.00
20.00
20.00
40.00
20.00
19.00
35.00
18.00
9.00
1.00
5.00
4.00
90.00
1,475.00
50.00
1,524.00
105.00
38.00
550.00
599.00
1.00
5.00
50.00
10.00
64.00
Telegraph Creek... .
400.00
2,300.00
400.00
5.00
390.00
20.00
420.00
10.00
77.00
104.00
84.00
2,772.00
124.00
200.00
100.00
50.00
5.00
709.00
110.00
5.00
125.00
180.00
Totals	
189
$10,025.00
5
$25.00
289
$2,890.00
2,294
$3,777.00
$16,717.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 29
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and from Royalty
or Tax on Fur, January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931.
Government
Agents.
Resident
Fur-traders.
Non-resident
Fur-traders,
Fur Tax.
Taxidermists.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
4
1
2
3
1
20
2
0
1
1
42
12
15
13
11
10
39
3
2
9
$100.00
40
4
17
2
31
4
9
33
44
8
2
20
8
2
7
2
24
1
2
126
94
64
24
15
2
3
7
32
481
9
68
19
17
$210.88
3.05
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
2
2
$5.00
$315.88
3.05
25.00
50.00
75.00
25.00
25.00
Atlin	
258.27
7.15
339.97
5.40
32.92
226.91
617.38
69.58
4.56
308.27
82.15
364.97
5.40
5.00
5.00
37.92
231.91
500.00
50.00
1,117.38
124.58
5.00
4.56
150.00
75.90
21.14
5.00
230.90
21.14
8.67
29.50
5.40
218.03
2.00
11.59
7,379.60
8.67
Merritt	
25.00
54.50
5.40
218.03
25.00
27.00
11.59
Pouce Coupe	
1,050.00
8,429.60
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
300.00
375.00
1,123.44
1,192.35
5.00
5.00
1,428.44
1,572.35
Quesnel	
325.00
661.69
33.72
5.59
14.70
8.80
265.06
27,742.36
38.62
211.87
141.76
88.22
10.00
5.00
990.69
38.72
5.59
14.70
275.00
250.00
975.00
75.00
50.00
225.00
5.00
288.80
Telegraph Creek
515.06
35.00
10.00
10.00
28,752.36
123.62
271.87
366.76
88.22
Totals    ..
197
$4,925.00
1,221
$41,056.08
22
$110.00
$46,091.08 H 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921-31.
Year.
Fur Royalty
or Tax.
Fur-trade
Licences.
Total.
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926..           	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
62,446.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927	
1928..                      	
71,324.96
58,823.07
1929	
1930	
1931	
47,329.89
45,161.11
45,981.08
Totals	
$532,873.57
$72,790.00
$605,663.57
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1931.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Big-horned
Owls.
Magpies.
Total.
1
99
$3,415.00
Ashcroft ■
1
94
500.00
Atlin	
16
5
6
2
157
180
30
250.00
950.00
Cranbrook	
1,133.00
12
187
1
6,420.50
Duncan	
1
39
1,175.00
Fernie	
7
120
837.50
Fort Fraser	
147
747.50
Golden	
33
122
1,930.00
1
32
298
250
2,677.50
1
1
2
34
14
40.00
Lillooet	
236.40
Merritt	
11
240
2
1,630.20
Nanaimo	
24
720.00
Nelson	
20
60
1,045.00
Prince Rupert	
80
8
18
1,250.00
Pouce Coupe	
42
28
690.00
Penticton	
11
417
1,646
2,557.55
Prince George	
20
10
183
1,447.50
Quesnel	
24
111
1
1,532.60
Revelstoke	
7
19
262.50
Rossland	
1
40.00
Smithers	
3
3
20
237.50
Telegraph Creek	
70
31
975.00
Vancouver	
62
109
48
4,582.50
Vernon	
15
143
1,484
1,440.90
Williams Lake	
1
46
383
3,312.50
Totals	
310
701
2,864
1
3,427
$42,036.15
Note.—The sum of $4,525.58 was paid to predatory-animal hunters employed by the Game Department
during the year 1931. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 33
Comparative Statement of Bounties paid from 1922-31.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Totals.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923	
14,840.00
1924     	
172
20,398.40
1925     	
24,397.00
1926	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927	
65,377.95
1928	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
1929	
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
1931	
42,036.15
Totals	
3,116
3,598
59,453
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$397,542.80
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds destroyed by Game Wardens during
the Year 1931.
Bear     1
Cougar            12
Coyotes             33
Crows    5,700
Cats         944
Dogs            66
Eagles          51
Groundhogs           43
Hawks         302
Magpies     1,385
Owls         130
List of Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1931,
to December 31st, 1931.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Jan.
Feb.
22
30
3
4
19
March    2
9
11
11
28
30
7
17
12
23
30
12
16
16
25
Aug.        3
Sept.     26
Oct.
Nov.
April
May
June
Dec.
.30
3
30
28
Tomlinson, B. W....
Bessette, A. J	
Hewlett, C. J	
Stenborg, J	
Dominick, P	
August, J	
Jenner, T	
Nygren, A	
Busst, H	
Johnson, E. O	
Snider, J	
Strong, W	
LafCorgue, F	
Berglund, J	
Dominick, P	
Thompson,  S	
Badine, J	
Dennis, N., et al	
Modiste, A., et al....
Cook,  Mrs. T..~	
Blair, A	
Morrison, P	
Nonies,  W	
Launchbury, H. W..
Ross, W	
Marriott,  W	
Callbreath, R	
Totals	
Comox	
Lumby	
Hope	
Wakeman  Sound..
Penticton	
Merritt	
Coquitlam	
Wales Island	
Wales Island	
Sproat Lake	
Vancouver.-...	
Tulsequah	
Hope	
Ocean Falls	
Kyoquot	
Prince Rupert	
Nelson Forks	
Fort McLeod	
Fort McLeod	
Fort McLeod	
Whitewater	
Claxton Cannery-
Salmon River	
Chemainus	
Exstew River	
Alert Bay	
Telegraph Creek...
"A'
"C
"E '
"A '
"B'
"C
" B '
" D '
"D'
"A'
" E '
" D '
" B '
" D '
"A'
"D '
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"C
"A'
"D'
"A'
« D ,
20
CO
15
34
3
[
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of surrendered coyote-pelts under Bounty Regulations,  and confiscated fur under the " Game Act," during the calendar year 1931, $1,288.81. H 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1931,
to December 31st, 1931.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind of Firearm
confiscated.
Jan.
April
June
July
Aug.
9
9
27
30
8
26
6
17
17
17
19
20
24
24
Sept. 8
9
10
14
22
1
5
10
10
13
14
14
20
2
7
14
14
20
30
4
9
16
28
29
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Beaudoin, F	
Joe, J	
Able, S	
Jones, A	
Jacobson, A	
Gerty, A	
Letts, F	
Moore, M	
Mackie, A	
Salo, B	
Ida, T	
Caverly, R	
Schmidt, E	
Kocker, D	
Kinloch, D	
Bodin, J	
Chan, J	
Borne, A	
Mearns, A	
Elliott, R	
Hornby, J. C	
Davies, A	
Casey, C. W	
Kronquist, I. L	
Vanderspeck, J	
Gustavson, W	
Eve, C. H	
Petrie, G	
Wrolson, C	
Jack, H	
Sinclair, B	
Cowdell, N	
Baarsden, H	
Duck, Chong	
Louie, A	
Egan, R	
Lemirand, A	
Muyleart, A., alias Kirkpatrick, D.
Nutt, F	
Hosmer	
Pavilion	
Pavilion	
Skidegate Mission
Shames	
Chilliwack	
Oona River	
Duncan Bay	
Sointula	
Sointula	
Alberni	
Williams Lake	
Chilliwack	
Cloverdale...	
Vernon	
Anyox	
East Delta	
Vancouver '.	
Minstrel Island	
Dawson Creek	
Spokane, Wash	
Minnie Lake	
Prince Rupert	
D.S.A	
Princeton	
Youbou	
Victoria	
Armstrong	
Tupper Creek	
Westholme	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
New Westminster.
Chilliwack	
Cowichan Bay	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Rio Grande, Alta..
"B '
"C
"C
a D !
" D '
"E '
"D'
"A'
"A '
"A '
"A '
"C '
" E '
" E '
"C
■u D.
" E '
" E '
"A'
" D '
"B'
"•C '
"D'
"E '
" B '
"A'
"A'
"C
"D'
"A '
" E '
" E '
" E '
" E '
"A '
" E '
" E '
" E '
"D'
pump  shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
auto,  shotgun.
1 rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
pump shotguns.
rifle.
shotgun.
shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
auto, shotgun.
rifle.
pump  shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
pump shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
Summary.—Rifles confiscated, 28 ;   shotguns confiscated, 12 ;   total, 40. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 35
List of Guides, 1931.
Barkerville District.
Anderson, M. A Barkerville.
Armstrong, Mrs. F. E  „
Brown, A. F  ,,
Cochrane, J. D  „
Emely, Milo  „
House, Joseph S  ,,
McCall, Max A Barkerville.
Reed, F. DeWitt	
Rivers, Henry  „
Thompson, Norman  „
Thompson, Roy  „
Wendle, Joseph  ,,
Cassiar District.
Ball, George B ..Telegraph Creek.
Brooks, Ned  „
Edzerza, Nanock     . „
Henue, Pete Telegraph Creek.
Williams, Mike  „
Wrigglesworth, C  „
Fort George District.
Allen, Kenneth W Mount Robson.
Bowman, George A Tete Jaune.
Carr, Stanley J  „
Clark, James E., Jr Wistaria.
Colebank, Gale .'.Hixon.
Corless, R. F., Jr Prince George.
Crate, Harvey Mount Robson.
Dayton, Martin Dome Creek.
Dennison, G. M Red Pass.
Edmonds, F. A McBride.
Hale, Leslie Dome Creek.
Hargreaves, G. E Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, Roy F  ,,
Harrison, Bryan Wistaria.
Haynes, E. B Dome Creek.
Hooker, Jas. B  ,,
Hooker, L. J Dome Creek.
Huble, A. J Prince George.
Jensen, E. H Dome Creek.
Kruse, A. G Taylor.
LeBeck, Ole Swift Creek.
McAvoy, J. N Lucerne.
McGaghran,  Jack Salmon Valley.
Miller, Raymond Longworth.
Minty, C. P McBride.
Read, A. E. C Longworth.
Ridler, Thos Willow River.
Saladano, Joseph Mount Robson.
Scherk, Kenneth Prince George.
Smith, Jas. M Snowshoe.
Sykes, Ben L Penny.
Woods, L. N. W Prince George.
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts.
Anderson, Axel Fawn.
Decker, English Cauim Lake.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Higgins, E  ,,
Manson, William Lillooet.
Miller, Harry F Lillooet.
Pigeon, J. R Clinton.
Rioux, Ed Fawn.
Stewart, J. W Pavilion.
Turney, Wm Fawn.
Kootenay District.
Ashman, L Corbin. Thomas, Guy A Parson.
Couillard, Harry Natal. Thomas, W. S      „
Nixon, J. H Invermere. West, C. D Skookumchuck.
Riehter, Frank Radium Hot Springs. York, H. M Invermere.
Stevens, Charles Wasa.
Peace River District.
Anderson, Stewart Hudson Hope.
Beckman, W. H Fort St. John.
Cassie, F. W Hudson Hope.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla.
Esswein, P. B East Pine.
Gladu, Pascal .Kelly Lake.
Golata, F. W Rolla.
Hill, Wm Beaver Flats.
Keily, Wm. S Hudson Hope.
Noske, N Rio Grande, Alta.
Ross, James A Hudson Hope.
Williams, Geo .Beaver Valley. H 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Allen, G. H Quesnel.
Armstrong, T. B         „
Baity, E. S	
Cooper, Joseph        „
Erickson, Eric Likely.
Hooker, F. C Horsefly.
Hutch, John Keithley Creek.
Kirkendall,  Floyd Quesnel.
McDonald, J	
Myers, A. K Horsefly.
Quesnel District.
Oak, Ernest Horsefly.
Parniinter, Ross Likely.
Pinkham, E. H Beaver Lake.
Pinkham, H. E Canim Lake.
Rawling, A. L Quesnel.
Stephenson, Allan Likely.
Tibbies, James Quesnel.
Walters, L. E Horsefly.
Walters, Glen	
Walters, R. 1 150-Mile House.
Vancouver and Victoria Districts.
Appleby, Gordon Hope.
Harrison, Geo. H Victoria.
Johnson, John Vancouver.
Raake, Paul Harrison Hot Sp.
Louie, Joe Deroehe.
Mansell, Fred North Vancouver.
Phillips, F. A	
Stanton, Jas. K Knight Inlet.
Tait, Albert R Nanaimo.
Blackman, William..
Kamloops District.
..Valemount. Gillis, Maurice..
.Sicamous.
Birnie, John H Smithers.
Henson, C. F Ootsa Lake.
McKinley, Thos  „
Hazelton District.
McNeill, John W Ootsa Lake.
Mitchell, Ira C	
Valleau, H. T Tatla Lake. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 37
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
3«
W 3
3
a .
—■ 3
rt tt
Amount.
Ashcroft—'
Schronover, Dr. H. F., Seattle, Wash
Ochsner, Dr. B. J., Durango, Col	
Stauber, R., Prairie de Sac, Wis	
Ochsner, E. D., Prairie de Sac, Wis.—
Knight, E.  S., Ashcroft, B.C	
Atlin—
Gault,  R.  E.,   Skagway,  Alaska	
Barkerville—
Owen, K., Terre Haute, Ind	
Ijams, F. B., Terre Haute, Ind...	
Kivits,  W. H.,  Terre Haute,  Ind	
Fernie—
Dunn, W. W.,  St. Paul, Minn	
Dunn, L. V., St. Paul, Minn	
Fort Fraser—
Walker, G. P., Central Point, Texas...
De Ganahl, C. F., White Plains, N.Y..
Grand Forks—
Jilg,   John,   Seattle,   Wash	
Bauer, Eddie,  Seattle, Wash	
Voshell, R. E., Spokane, Wash	
Bucher,  Chas.,  Spokane,  Wash	
Greenwood—
Fairbanks, F. M., Seattle, Wash	
Golden—
Ely,  A.,  New York	
Hinchly, J. A., New York	
Kingly, L.  B., Portland, Ore :....
Harris, B. B., Champaign, 111	
Benham, J. D., Chicago, 111	
Flinn,  G.  H.,  New  York	
Mudge,  I.,  New York	
Chanler, W., New York	
Nelson—
Moffltt, R. C,  Seattle, Wash	
Moffltt,  T.  E.,  Tacoma,  Wash	
New Westminster—
Cooper, C, E,, Seattle, Wash	
Farhsworth, C. E., Everson, Wash	
Markham,  J.  H.,  Centralia,  Wash	
Colemah, W. F., Seattle, Wash	
Parker, J. K., Seattle, Wash	
Hook, A., Bellingham, Wash	
Luckey, F.  E.,  Portland,  Ore	
Merkeley, E. W., Seattle, Wash	
Prince Rupert—
De Ganahl, C." F., White Plains, N.Y..
Bateman, J. L., Ocean Falls	
Neveu, A., Ocean Falls	
Prince George—
Roach, H. E., Los Angeles, Cal	
Bronson, C. B., Beverley Hills, Cal....
Parrott, S., Saskatoon,  Sask	
Vickers, A. D., London, England	
Loving, M. V., Chicago, 111	
Buchanan, R. F., Dallas, Texas	
Buchanan, Mrs. R. F., Dallas, Texas...
Beal, Carl, Los Angeles, Cal	
I I
$15.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
00.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
45.00
45.00
75.00
90.00
45.00
60.00
30.00
45.00
30.00
15.00
65.00
5.00
45.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
20.00
45.00
15.00
30.00
30.00
25.00
15.00
30.00
90.00
30.00
30.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 39
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
3.2
01 u
CQO
3 a
m o
3P3
3 u
So
rt tt
Amount.
Prince George—Continued.
Johnson, Fred, San Mateo, Cal	
Murphy, L., Melbourne, Australia	
McKay, W. O.,  Seattle, Wash	
Savidge, S. L.,  Seattle, Wash	
Bingham, Jerry, Toledo, Ohio	
Biles, W. F., Frankfort, Ky	
King, J. J., Frankfort, Ky	
Finton, Dr. W. L., Jackson, Mich	
Nagler, F., Milwaukee, Wis	
Tefft, W. W., Jackson, Mich	
Poe, F., Evanston, 111	
Canfleld, F. W.,  Portland, Ore	
Graham, E. A., Portland, Ore	
Pouce Coupe—
Henry, Mrs. M. G., Philadelphia, Pa
Chandler,  B.   S.,   Philadelphia,  Pa	
Brewster,  J.,  Jasper,  Alta	
Quesnel—
Keaster, J. B., Pasadena, Cal	
Mooney, R. M., Seattle, Wash	
Ochsner, Dr. B. J., Durango, Col	
Ochsner, E. D., Prairie de  Sac, Wis.
Gilder, G. F., Portland, Ore	
Williams Lake—
Bartmus,  P.,  Redonda  Beach,  Cal.....
Matthews,  J.,  Seattle,  Wash	
Sutherland, R., Seattle, Wash	
Frem, H. H., Seattle, Wash	
Pearson, G., San Bernardino, Cal	
Rendler, J., Glendale, Cal	
Wilmer—
Cummings, D. B., Tell City, Ind	
Vancouver—
Hunter, T. F., Wichita Falls, Texas-
Gentry, J. D., San Bernardino, Cal...
Tiffany, Col. J., New York, N.Y	
Perry, A., Medford,  Ore	
Perry,  J.  A.,  Medford,  Ore	
Kennedy, W. A., Calgary, Alberta	
Sheldon, W. G., Milton, Mass	
Borden, R., Milton, Mass	
McElroy, C. P., Seattle, Wash	
Fuller, K., Cleveland, Ohio	
Totals	
28
2(i
11
28
33
$60.00
15.00
75.00
50.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
45.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
75.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
45.00
60.00
55.00
25.00
70.00
30.00
15.00
55.00
30.00
30.00
5.00
30.00
$2,580.00
Note.—The reason for the decrease in the amount of big-game trophy fees paid during 1931 is due to
the increase in licence fees and reduction in trophy fees. H 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
5   O
-    rn
: Q
OS,
'   cn
at
- a
SS,
SO
ho
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Qame Animals.
Exceeding bag limit on big game	
Hunting deer between one hour after sunset
and one hour before sunrise	
Killing or having in possession game animals
of the female sex	
Killing, hunting, or having in possession game
animals during the close season	
Possession of deer under one year of age	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals
during close season	
Running deer  with  dogs	
Removal of evidence as to sex of a game animal killed or taken	
Selling game animals or parts thereof	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds between
April 15th and August 15th	
Game birds on premises of a shop, etc	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
Hunting or in possession of migratory game
birds during close season	
Hunting migratory game birds between one
hour after sunset and one hour before sunrise 	
Killing, hunting, or in possession of upland
game birds during the close season	
Killing or in possession of migratory insectivo
rous birds 	
Licences.
Buying or trading in fur without a licence
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Failing to produce a licence on  request of a
Game  Warden   	
Minor carrying firearms without being accom
panied   by   an   adult   holder   of   a   firearms
licence	
Making a false application for a licence	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling
without  a licence	
Non-resident Indian  hunting game in British
Columbia 	
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying firearms in or discharging same from
an   automobile,   etc	
Carrying or in possession of an unplugged
pump shotgun or an automatic shotgun	
Carrying firearms or traps in a game reserve..
Discharging firearms on or across a highway
in a municipality	
Trapping.
Allowing traps to remain set after end of open
season   	
Interfering with a registered trap-line	
1
30
11
13
58
12
2-
3
13
35
7
13
6
3
129
...   |
12
27
2
7
16
10
47
1
5
138
2
10
$20.00
60.00
295.00
540.00
145.00
315.00
50.00
100.00
20.00
70.00
10.00
20.00
145.00
80.00
780.00
20.00
175.00
1,352.50
20.00
30.00
40.00
250.00
210.00
10.00
200.00
300.00
175.00
80.00
80.00
20.00
70.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 41
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931—
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
5 Q
PQ.S
: Q
OS
i a
5    co
at
s p
Zi QJ
Bo
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Trapping—Continued.
Setting traps for big game	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence..
Trapping during the close season	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line-
Trapping on a game reserve	
Using   meat   of   game   animals   as   bait   for
trapping	
Miscellaneous.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing animals taken during the close season	
Carrying firearms in  automobile,   etc.,  during
the close season without a permit	
Failing to keep a record-book or make returns
of furs purchased	
Fur-farming without a permit	
Feeding meat of game animals to fur-farmed
animals  	
Non-resident hunting big game without a B.C
guide   	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to
a Game Warden	
Pit-lamping    	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals dur
ing close season without a permit	
Trespassing   	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding daily bag limit on fish	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited area-
Fishing  or  in  possession   of   fish  during   the
close season 	
Fishing with a gill or other net in prohibited
waters  	
Jigging fish 	
Obstructing   the   passage   of   fish   going   to
spawning-grounds	
Possession of crabs less than 0% inches across
breadth of shell 	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length ...
Using more than one lure on a line	
Gaol Sentences.
Buying or trading in pelts of fur-bearing ani
mals taken during the close season	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Carrying a loaded firearm in an automobile	
Killing game of the female sex	
Killing or in  possession  of game  during the
close  season  	
14
8
16
$25.00
405.00
240.00
240.00
30.00
20.00
150.00
50.00
150.00
150.00
107.50
500.00
110.00
140.00
8.00
43.00
135.00
52.50
63.00
25.00
278.50
40.00
$8,645.00
1, 10 days.
1, 2 days; 1, 7
days; 2, 10
days each; 1,
14 days;  1,
30 days.
2, 10 days each;
1, 7 days.
1, 90 days.  •
3, 30 days each;
1,   14  days;   1,
15 days;   1,   6
months. H 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1931, to December 31st, 1931—
Continued.
See Foot-note.
"3
i
s
w
a
o
Zl
a
o
o
O 3j
So
Ou_,
H o
Description of Offence.
a
.2
~     0!
: Q
a"
o
"   so
: 0
a
o
o'B
-. a
a
o
a'B
a
.2
- 'ui
: 0
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Gaol Sentences—Continued.
Non-resident carrying firearms or traps with-
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
11
1
1
1
1
*
4
3
1
6
1
3
11
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
6
1
3
11
1
1
1
1
1,   2   days;   1,   7
days;     1,     21
days;      1,     30
days.
Possession of deer from which evidence as to
1,  90 days.
1,  7  days.
2, 30 days each ;
Possession of live fur-bearing animals during
close  season   v '.	
1,   42   days;   1,
60 days;  2, 90
days each.
1, 30 days.
3,   30   davs  each.
2, 60 days each;
1, 10 days.
1, 30 days.
Trapping without first  obtaining registration
1, 30 days.
1, 10 days.
1, 30 days.
134
61
104
■92
234
51
625
676
NOTE.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " B " Division : Vancouver,
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 43
Returns from 1,780 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1930-31.
Big Game.
Bear    369
Moose  447
Goat  145
Sheep    18
Caribou     113
Deer    1,120
Elk     3
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver  4,378
Fox   450
Fisher   443
Lynx     786
Marten   1,195
Mink   3,793
Muskrats  !  35,289
Otter   208
Racoon   1,212
Weasel    26,068
Wildcat     80
Wolverine    :  112
Skunk   115
Predatory Animals.
Coyotes     919
Cougars    94
Badgers    6
Wolves  :  29 H 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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H 45
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1861 'IS '33CI 'Piibh
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H 47
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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k a o REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 57
Fur-fabm Returns, 1931 (Statement No. 2).
Name and Address.
Beaver. Fisher.
Lynx.
Racoon.
Albreeht, C. W., Quilchena	
Baird, A. M., and Tindill, T. W., Blue Elver	
Baity, E. A., Quesnel '.	
Bang, Henry, McMurphy	
Bernard,  G. M., Parksville	
Bland, C. L., and Bland, L. E., Quatsino	
Burke, J. E., Great Central	
Christensen, T., and Nielson, P., Prince George	
Christofferson, J.,  Lower Nicola	
Coates, A. P., Edgewood	
Deep Creek Pur Farm, Quesnel	
Dorman Lake Fur Farm, Fort Fraser	
Eakin,  S., Ootsa Lake	
Edwards,  It.  A.,  Atnarko	
Fennell, M., Chu Chua	
Godbout, A. L., Albas	
Grieve, W., Queens Cove	
Gustafson, A. C, and Gustafson, A. A., Matsqui	
Harper,  C,   Northfleld	
Hendrix,   J.,   Canim   Lake	
Hillier, H. E., Ucluelet	
Hoppe, F., Vancouver	
James, H. J., and M. L., New Westminster	
Jenkins, Mrs. L. M., Black Pool	
Johnson, F. E., Barriere	
Kirkland, G. H., J. W. ;   and Ray, S. H., Fort Fraser
Latta, R., Vancouver	
Lawson, Dr. E. H., Saltspring Island	
McCay, L.,  Simoom  Sound	
McParland, J. A., Dunster	
Mallory, E., Sardis	
Manring, S. E., Mazama	
Mansell, V.,  North Vancouver	
Mundy, R. F-, Matsqui	
Negaard, O., and Scott, C. E., Engen	
Nesbitt,  F. A.,  Edgewood	
Nord, 0., McMurphy	
Nord, O. A., McMurphy	
Patterson, D., Shoal Bay	
Peel, M. A., Pinantan Lake	
Pick, G. B., Vanderhoof	
Piton, Nellie M., Shawnigan Lake	
Porteous,  S. D.,  Needles	
Purver, C. A., Clayburn	
Seel, G.  V.,  Wistaria	
Shaw, A. G.,  Saanich, V.I	
Shields,   S.  L.,   Sooke	
Shortreed, Mrs. A. A., Vanderhoof	
Silke,   S.,   Clearwater	
Silvey, Mrs. J. and D., Kuper Island	
Smith, E.  G., Beaverdell	
Solloway, O., Burnaby	
Stearns, R. G., Burns Lake	
Stewart, C. W., Galena	
Tereschuk, L., Prince George	
Widen,  E.   P.,  Telkwa	
Wilde, J. E., Powell River	
Young, W. E., East Pine	
Totals	
2
3
10
3
12
4
7
15
1
15
1
25
1
28
2
2
4
18
2
4
13
10
1
2
12
3
10
4
12
2
190
60
102
Permits cancelled, 7 ;   nil returns, 37.
Note.—The following fur-farmers unable to state number of beaver on their respective farms as these
animals are being farmed at large: Black Lake Fur Farm Co., Vancouver; Clarke, D., Alberni; Edwards,
G. W., Golden;   Ludlow, M. W., Eholt;   Musquash Farms, Ltd., Vancouver. H 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement
showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department during the Year 1931, and
Returns op Birds killed or retrapped.
No. of
Band.
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A601001
A601002
A601003
A601004
A601005
A601006
A601007
A601008
A601009
A601010
A601011
A601012
A601013
A601014
A601015
A601016
A601017
A601018
A601019
A601020
A601021
A601022
A601023
A601024
A601025
A601026
A601027
A601028
A601029
A601030
A601031
A601032
A601033
A601034
A601035
A60103C
A601037
A601038
A601039
A601040
A601041
A601042
A601043
A601044
A601045
A601046
A601047
A601048
A601049
A601050
A601051
A601052
A601053
A601054
A601055
A601056
A601057
A601058
A601059
A601060
Dec.     7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
,,         7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
,,         7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
/
,,        7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
,,         7
Chilliwack.
Dec.   15
A601004
1
"    	
\ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 59
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A601061
Dec.  7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
11
11
11
11
11
Nov. 15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
„  15
„  15
15
15
15
„  15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
„  15
15
15
15
15
„  15
„  15
„  15
„  15
.,  15
15
15
15
„  15
15
„  15
Mallard	
Female	
A601062
A601063
A601064
A601065
.. 1  	
A601066
Pintail	
Male      	
A601067
A601068
A601069
Mallard	
A601070
A601071
A601072
A601073
A601074
Dec. 13
A601074
Sumas.
A601075
A601076
"
A601077
"
A601078
Male	
A601079
A601080
A001081
A601082
"
A624624
A624625
»
A624626
A624627
"
A624628
A624629
A624630
A624631
A624632
A624633
"
■
A624634
"
A624635
"
A624036
A624637
A624638
A624639
A624640
A624041
A624G42
A624643
A624644
A624645
A624646
A624647
A624648
A624649
A624651
A624652
A624653
A624654
A624655
"
A624656
A624657
A624658
A624659
A624660
A624661
A624662
A624663
"
A624664 H 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of   r
ate of
nding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.    Ba
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624665   N
ov. 15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
,  15
15
,  15
15
15
15
15
15
15
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Mallard	
A624666    ,
Male
A624C67    ,
A624668    ,
"
A624669    ,
"
A624670
"
A624671    ,
A624672
A624673
A624674    ,
A624675
A624676    ,
A624G77    ,
A624678
A624679
A624681    ,
"
A624682    ,
A624683    ,
A624685
A624686
A624687
"
A624688    ,
A624690
A624692
4
A624693
A624694
A624695
A624701
A624702    ,
A624703
A624704
A624705
A624706
A624707
A624708
A624709
A624710
A624711
Male 	
A624712
Nov. 4-6
A624712
Recaptured.
A624713
A024714
A624715
A624716
A624717
Nov. 6
A624717
	
Recaptured.
A624718
A624719
Male     .. .
..... 1  	
A624720
A624721
Nov. 4
Nov. 6-9
A624721
A624722
Sumas.
A624722
Recaptured.
A624723
A624724
Nov. 9
A624724
Recaptured.
A624725
A624726
Nov. 6
Nov. 6
A624726
A624727 .
Recaptured.
A624727
Recaptured.
A624728
A624729
.
A624730
A624731
A624732
\624733
   1	
A624734
Nov. 7
Nov. 6-9-
11
A624734
A624735
Recaptured.
A624735
" 	
Recaptured. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 61
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of     E
ate of
nding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.    Bi
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624736   N
ov. 4
4
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
,    7
/
7
7
7
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
0
9
9
9
Mallard	
Widgeon	
Mallard	
A624737
A624738
Nov. 11
A624738
A624739
A624740    ,
A624741    ,
Nov. 8
A624741
Pitt River.
A624742
A624743
A624744    ,
"
Dec. 13
A624744
Sumas.
A624745    ,
A624746
A624747
A624748
A624749
A624750    ,
A624751    ,
A624752
..
A624753    ,
A624754    ,
A624755
A62475C
"
A624757    ,
"
A624758    ,
Nov. 9
A624758
Recaptured.
A024759    ,
A624760    ,
A624761
Male
A624762
A624763
A624764
"
A624765    ,
A624766
A624767    ,
A624768    ,
A624769
A624770
"
A624771    ,
"
A624772    ,
A624773
"
A624774
"  	
A624775
A624776
"
A624777
A624778
A624779
"
A624780
"
A624781
A624782
A624783
"
4.624784
"
4624785
A624786
"
A624787
A624788
"
4624789
A024790
A624791
A624792
A624793
"
AG24794
Nov. 9
A624794
Sumas.
4624795
4624796
A624797
1 H 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624798
Nov. 9
Mallard	
Male
Nov. 13
A624798
Recaptured.
A624799
9
9
13
13
„  13
13
13
13
13
13
„  13
13
13
„  13
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
,,      14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
„  14
„  14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
A624800
A624801
A624802
A624803
A624804
A624805
A624806
A624807
A624808
A624809
Dec.  5
Dec. 27
A624809
A624810
A624810
Harrison Hot Sp.
A624811
Widgeon	
Female	
A624812
Male	
A624813
A624814
Mallard	
A624815
A624816
A624817
A624818
A624819
A624820
A024821
Dec. 12
A624821
A624822
A624823
A624824
A624825
A624826
A624827
A624828
A624829
A624830
A624831
A624832
A624833
A624834
A624835
A624836
1
A624837
1
A624838
■ A624839
A624840
A024841
A624842
1
A624843
A624844
A624845
A624846
A624847
A624848
A624849
A624850
A624851
A624852
A624853
A624854
A624855
A624 856
A624857
A624858
A624859 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.
H 63
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624860
Nov. 14
14
14
„  14
14
14
14
„  14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
„  14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
„  14
„  14
14
14
14
14
14
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
0
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Mallard	
Male 	
A624861
A624862
A624863
A624864
A624865
A624866
A624867
A624868
A624869
A624870
A624871
A624872
A624873
A624874
A624875
A624876
A624877
A624878
A624879
"
A624880
A624881
A624882
A624883
A624884
A624885
A624886
A624887
A624888
A624889
A624890
A624891
	
A624892
A624893
A624894
A624895
A624896
"
A624897
Nov. 22
A624897
Lulu Island.
A624898
A024899
A624900
A624903
Male 	
A624904
A624905
A624906
A624907
"
A624908
A624909
A624910
Nov. 11
Nov. 23
■ A624910
A624910
Recaptured.
A624911
Sumas.
A624912
A624913
A624914
A624915
A624916
A624917
A624918
A624919
A624920
A624921
A624922
	
A624923
	 H 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of    I
ate of
inding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.    B
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624924   N
ov. 9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
,  11
11
11
11
11
11
11
,  U
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
13
13
,  13
A624925
A624926
A624927
A624928
A624929
A624930
"
A624931
A624932
"
A624933
"
A624934
A624935
A624936
A624937
A624938
A624939
A624940
"
A624941
Male  -	
A624942
A624943
A624944
A624945
A624946
A624947
Female	
A624948
A624949
A624950
A624951
A624952
A624953
A624954
Nov. 13
A624954
A624955
A624956
A624957
A624958
A624959
A624960
A624961
Nov. 30
A624961
A624962
A624963  ]  ,
A624964
A624965
A624966
A624967    ,
.4624968
Male	
A624969
A624970
A624971
A624972    ,
A624973
A624974
A624975    ,
A624976
A624977
A624978
A624979
A624980    ,
A624981    ,
A624982
A624983
Female	
A624984
A624985 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931.                       H 65
Statement
showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
' banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624986
Nov.  13
„      13
„      13
13
„      13
13
„      13
„      13
13
13
„      13
„      13
13
„      13
„      13
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
13
13
„      13
„      13
„      13
„      13
„      13
13
Mallard	
Sumas.
A624887
A624988
A624989
A624990
A624991
Male
A624992
A624993
A624994
A624995
A624996
A624997
A624998
A624999
A625000
Nov. 23
A625000
537009
Green-wing teal	
Female	
Male    .
537010
537011
537012
537013
537014
537015
Female	
537016
537017
537018
537019
537020
537021
537022
537023
Male	
Female	
537024
537025
537026
537027
Male	
Female	
537028
Green-wing teal	
537029
537030
537031
Male	
537085
537086
537087
537088
Female	
537089
537090
537091
537092    '
537093
537094
537095
537096
537097
Male
537098
537099
537100
537101
537102
537103
537104
537105
537106
537107
537108
5 H 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
Sex of Bird
Returns.
Band.
banded.
• banded.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
537109
Nov. 13
„  13
13
13
13
13
„  13
13
13
13
14
14
15
15
Dec.  7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
537110
Pin
537111
'
537112
537113
'
537114
'
537115
537116
'
537117
'
537118
'
537119
tail	
'
537120
Ma
Fe
Ma
Fe
le    	
537121
Wi
Sh<
Gri
537122
Igeon	
537123
537124
le 	
537125
Widgeon	
537126
537127
537128
537129
537130
'
Dec. 13
537130
537131
537132
537133
537134
537135
male	
537136
537137
537138
537139
Wii
Igeon	
537140
Note.—The  following  bands  were  missing from  series  when  received  from  U.S.   Biological   Survey,
Washington, D.C., U.S.A. :   A624650 ;   A624684 ;   A624689 ;   A624691 ;   A624696 to A624700, inclusive.
Word " recaptured " means that bird was trapped a second time and band number noted and the bird
released.
Where a town or city is mentioned under heading " Killed or recaptured,"  this means that the bird
was killed at or near such town or city.
Summary.
Birds handed.
Mallards   446
Widgeon  •.  9
Wood duck   1
Green-wing  teal    72
Shoveller     1
Pintail     4
Total...:  533 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1931. H 67
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1931.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. II. Pooley, K.C Victoria.
Game Commissioner A. Bryan Williams Vancouver.
Chief Clerk F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk T. H. M. Conly Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Junior Clerk J. B. Smith., Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Kelly Vancouver.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Divisional Game Supervisor J. W. Graham Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Cowichan Lake.
Game Warden R. Marshall Duncan.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden R. Gidley Victoria.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield JNanaimo.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Thompson Nanaimo.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Game Warden A. S. Cochran Windermere.
Game Warden I. J. Brown Natal.
Game Warden R. D. Sulivan Penticton.
Game Warden W. J. Nixon Invermere.
Game Warden N. Cameron Cranbrook.
Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Canal Flats.
Game Warden M. J. Wilson .Revelstoke.
Game Warden L. F. Washburn Fernie.
Game AVarden (Special) M. B. Ewart : Greenwood.
Stenographer Miss G. M. Lowery Nelson.
"0" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Game Warden C. F. Kearns Salmon Arm.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden A. E. Farey Lillooet.
Game Warden F. E. Aiken Williams Lake.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game Warden J. F. Ritchie Kamloops.
Game Warden N. L. Robinson Quesnel.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Clinton.
Game Warden L. Jobin Merritt.
Game AVarden W. A. Broughton Hanceville.
Game Warden D. Cameron Kamloops.
Game Warden (Probationer) F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Clerk D. W. Rowlands Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor T. Van Dyk .Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game Warden J. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game AVarden E. Martin Prince Rupert. H 68 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts)—Continued.
Game AVarden D. Roumieu Burns Lake.
Game AVarden J. H. Cummins Fort St. John.
Game AATarden A. J. Jank Pouce Coupe.
Game AVarden S. F. Faherty Vanderhoof.
Game AA'arden V. L. AA7illiams Finlay Forks.
Game AArarden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Stenographer Miss B. Allen Prince Rupert.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Smyth Prince George.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Divisional Game Supervisor J. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Game Warden A. P. Cummins Vancouver.
Game AVarden AV. Clark Vancouver.
Game AVarden E. AV. Baker Vancouver.
Game AVarden L. H. AValker Vancouver.
Game AVarden J. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game AArarden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game AA'arden G. C. Stevenson Sechelt.
Game AVarden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game AArarden G. AVilliams Abbotsford.
Game AVarden J. A. Stuart Mission.
Game AVarden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game AVarden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game AVarden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game AArarden J. AV. Jones Victoria.
Game AVarden E. Boorman Victoria.
Game Warden AAr. Mudge Victoria.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
Special Game AVarden J. C. Smith .» Comox.
Special Game AVarden C. Shuttleworth Penticton.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.
825-932-490

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