Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1933

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0305095.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0305095.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0305095-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0305095-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0305095-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0305095-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0305095-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0305095-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0305095-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0305095.ris

Full Text

 ^—
TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1931, TO MARCH 31ST, 1932
PRINTED by
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  To His Honour J. AV Fordiiam Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour : . .
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1932.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1931, to March 31st, 1932.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys.   DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
P. D. AValker, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Clayton, C, Assistant Superintendent.
Sparrow, Miss M., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
Workman, Miss E., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Farm Instructor. Scott, W. J., Plumber and Engineer.
Munroe, D. AAT., Poultryman.
Peck, Miss A., Senior Female Teacher. Blagburn, E. W., Senior Teacher.
McKenzie, Miss A. B., Junior Female Teacher.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Hon. S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, British Columbia, for the year ended March
31st, 1932. The information contained within its pages, regarding the activities of our various
vocational departments and movement of population, gives some idea of what has been done on
behalf of misguided youths committed to our care.
During the year it was my privilege to visit the Okanagan and Kootenay Districts, checking
up on boys living there who passed through our hands since 1921, and I am pleased to say that
the percentage found who have made good was very satisfactory. Summarized, it works out as
follows:—
Number op Boys investigated, 60.
1921.—Discharged, 2. Both these boys are now married and have been in no further
trouble.
1922.—Discharged, 7. Five have been in no further trouble. One received a penitentiary
sentence; the other was guilty of a minor offence in 1928, for which he received a two-month
sentence in a common gaol.
1923.—Discharged, 6. Five have been in no further trouble. One was unfortunately killed
by accident while at work. The other one was in a minor trouble three years ago and allowed
out on suspended sentence.
192.'/.—Discharged, 3.    None have been in any further trouble.
1925.—Discharged, 2.    None have been in any further trouble.
7926'.—Discharged, 3.    None have been in any further trouble.
1927.—Discharged, 12. Ten have been in no further trouble. One received a sentence for
an offence committed in U.S.A.; the other one served a term in the British Columbia Penitentiary.
1928.—Discharged, 7. Six have been in no further trouble. The other one, an Indian,
served a gaol sentence for infraction of the British Columbia Liquor Act.
1929.—Discharged, 7.    None have been in any further trouble.
1930.—Discharged, 5.    None have been in any further trouble.
1931.—Discharged, 6. Five have been in no further trouble. One was committed to Mental
Hospital, where he is at the present time.
This record, in view of the present economic depression, with an army of unemployed in
every part of the Province, is a tribute to the boys themselves and the institution.
YOUTH AND CRIME.
I am often asked by interested persons if crime amongst youth is increasing, and when I
answer "Yes" a further question immediately follows: " AYhy is it so?" The latter question
is not so easily answered as the first, for the causes of delinquency are many and varied. We
do know, however, that the average delinquent boy is not born, but made so by his early environment and training, which means that his home has failed to properly train him in the fundamentals that make of character and building. Home has become to them a temporary parking-
place, so they go outside the home for their amusements, their activities, and their interests.
The quest for new experiences and adventure, to offset the humdrum and other depressing
influences of the home environment, is one of impelling influence that drives boys and young men
to associate with evil companions in groups or gangs.
Again, we find youths of to-day refuse to accept, without challenge the things we call sacred
or traditional, with the result they have drifted away from church and religion.    Another cause, greater to my mind than the average person realizes, is the aftermath of the Great AVar, when
thousands of young fathers and elder brothers were killed, leaving growing youths without the
much-needed balancing, steadying, and controlling influence of those with experience.
Many of us can remember the time in our youth when, after hearing or thinking of something we were sure was new and unknown to our elders, how small we felt when our father or
elder brother told us it was old stuff and advised us to forget it. I submit that many delinquent
boys of to-day would not have been such had they had bad some one to advise them during their
adolescent period.
It is also surprising the number of boys who have disabilities, mental or physical, unknown
to either parents or associates and often disputed by them after examination has shown then-
existence.    These disabilities are a contributing factor to delinquency in. many cases.
Whatever the cause or causes may be, it is a very disturbing fact that we have to-day youths
between the ages of 16 and 21, versatile in crime, who cold-bloodedly and calmly recite in Courts
and to friends, quite voluntarily, the most intimate details of the planning and execution of
ruthless crime, ranging from the rolling of drunks to robbery with violence and the greatest of
all crimes, murder.
I desire to express my sincere appreciation for the co-operation and assistance rendered to
the institution by the Provincial Police, Vancouver and New AVestminster Cities, and all other
police officers in the Province, who appreciate the work we are doing on behalf of the youths
from their districts. AVe have also received very valuable help from ministers and church
workers of every denomination, and the band concerts given by the Salvation Army and other
organizations are especially appreciated.
For the whole-hearted and sympathetic support given by your Department I am more than
grateful.
MOVEMENT OF "POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
On roll, March 31st, 1931  137
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1931, to March 31st, 1932     63
202
Released as wards of the Juvenile Court     20
Completed sentence     25
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm       1
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital       1
Died        1
Released on recommendation of Medical Health Officer      2
     50
Total in school, March 31st, 1932  152
Number of escapes during year     12
Number captured and returned     8
Number still at liberty     4
BISCOQ'S DAILY PROGRAMME.
6.00 a.m.    Reveille. 1.00 p.m. Trades   and   vocational
7.00 a.m.    Breakfast. training commences.
7.30 a.m.    Morning prayers. 1.30 p.m. Schools open.
7.45 a.m.    Flag-raising ceremony. 4.30 p.m. Trades and schools close.
S.00 a.m.    Trades  and  vocational 5.00 p.m. Supper.
training commences. 5.30 p.m. Recreation.
9.00 a.m.    Schools open. 8.00 p.m. Retreat and flag-lowering
11.30 a.m.    Trades and schools close. ceremony.
12.00    m.    Dinner and play. 8.30 p.m. Evening prayers.
9.15 p.m. Lights out.
Band practices are held Saturday afternoons at 1.30 and Tuesday mornings at 10.
Sunday mornings are devoted to inspection and check-ups of clothing;   Sunday afternoons
to religious services and lectures. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32.
I 9
SOME THINGS AVE EMPHASIZE AT BISCOQ.
(1.)  That instant obedience to the voice of authority is necessary at all times.
(2.) That loyalty, respect, and fidelity towards the flag of our country is the duty of all
who claim its protection.
(3.) That homage, reverence, and veneration of His name is the least tribute man can pay
his Creator.
(4.)  That a healthy body is the best assurance for old age a boy can have.
(5.) That all work is honourable, and no one has the right to sponge upon others for a
living.
(6.) That other people's property is sacred and must not be interfered with, except by the
owner's consent.
(7.)  That honesty in every form is a principle and not a policy.
(8.)  That there is nothing clever or honourable in breaking the laws of our country.
(9.) That Canada has a code of morality and a standard of living befitting her citizens, and
all who live within her borders should strive to live up to her ideals and not by any act of theirs
lower her standards.
(10.) That the really worth-while citizen is the man who plays a clean game, whether on
the side that is winning or on the one that is losing.
(11.)  That all improvement of a permanent nature takes place within and works outward.
(12.)  That we are either good for something or good for nothing.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1932.
No.
Place o£ Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1007
1008
1057
1070
1079
1084
1091
1094
1095
1096
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
1108
1109
1110
1111
1112
1113
1115
1116
1117
1118
1120
1123
1124
1125
1126
1127
New Westminster, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Athabaska Landing, Alta.
Victoria, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Tabor, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
New Westminster, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Newcastle, Scotland	
Pine River, Man	
Enderby, B.C	
Red Deer, Alta	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Maillardville, B.C	
Beauvallon, Alta	
Maillardville, B.C	
Ardmore, Alta	
Sunnyside, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Arancouver, B.C	
Stry, Alta	
Winnipeg,  Man	
Fernie, B.C	
Arancouver, B.C	
Arancouver, B.C	
ATancouver, B.C	
Boston, Mass	
Kamloops, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Canadian	
I Canadian-English	
Canadian-English	
American	
English	
English	
Welsh-Canadian	
Canadian	
Quarter-breed-Indian
Scotch	
Scotch	
Ukranian	
Scotch	
Irish-Canadian	
Austrian	
Rumanian	
Rumanian	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
Norwegian-Canadian.
Canadian-Half-breed.
Canadian	
Hawaiian-English	
Polish	
Polish	
Scotch	
Serbian	
English	
Japanese	
American....	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Years.
16
12
13
17
18
18
6%
2
19
13
8
7
17
4
15
9
17
3-3 mos.
15
2-5 mos.
11
17
9
14
16
16
13
14
10
15
12
Years.
16
12
13
17
18
18
15
IS
19
13
8
18
17
15
15
12
13
17
13
15
16
11
17
17
17
16
16
13
14
10
15
12 I 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, W32—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1128
1129
1130
1131
1132
1133
1134
1135
1136
1137
1138
1139
1141
1142
1143
1144
1145
1146
1148
1149
1150
1151
1152
1156
1157
1158
1159
1160
1161
1162
1163
1164
1165
1166
1168
1169
1170
1171
1172
1173
1174
1175
1176
1177
1178
1179
1180
1181
1182
1183
1184
1185
1186
1187
1188
1189 [
1190 |
1191 |
1192 |
1193 |
B.C..
Victoria, B.C	
Nanaimo, B.C....
Alert Bay, B.C..
North Vancouver,
Arancouver, B.C	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Regina,  Sask	
Maxborough, England	
Stavenger,  Norway	
Drumheller, Alta	
Vernon, B.C 	
Fernie, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Italy	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Victoria, B.C	
Stockton-on-Tees, England..
Lillooet, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Port Alberni, B.C	
Sorsjon, Sweden	
Hathersage, Alta	
Edmonton, Alta	
Thunder Bay,  Ont	
English-Norwegian....
Dutch	
English	
Bulgarian-American..
Scotch	
Scotch-English	
American-English	
English	
Norwegian	
Irish	
Canadian	
French-Canadian	
American-Canadian...
Italian	
French-Canadian	
Canadian	
Scotch	
Indian	
Canadian-Indian	
English	
Swedish-Norwegian...
English	
Canadian-English	
Irish-English	
McLeod, Alta  Canadian..
Swift Current,  Sask	
Maillardville, B.C	
Maillardville, B.C	
Lac de Bonnette, Que	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Vancouver,  B.C	
East Prettiwell,  England..
Vancouver, B.C	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Rosthern,  Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C -..
Melford,  Sask	
Australia	
Nineveh, Nova Scotia	
Burnaby, B.C	
San Diego, Cal	
Scotland	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Rocky Point, B.C	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Montreal,  Que	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Cumberland, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C	
A'ancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Fernie, B.C	
Laidlaw, B.C....	
Vancouver,  B.C	
English	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
Russian	
English	
English	
Italian	
Canadian	
Russian	
Scotch-Canadian	
Serbian	
Indian	
English	
English	
English-Australian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
American	
Scotch	
English-Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
Scotch	
Scotch	
Indian	
Indian	
Indian	
Japanese	
French-Bulgaria n-American..
Scotch	
Canadian-English	
Italian ■.	
Indian	
English	
Years.
13
16
14
18
11
7
9
6
11
17
15
8
17
13
10
17
17
18
7
16
4
12
9
13
II
18
18
6
18
6
IS
17
IS
11
16
4
14
9
18
11
15
16
1-6 mos.
12
17
15
16
12
13
18
18
18
16
Years.
13
16
14
18
11
17
7
9
15
11
17
15
8
17
13
13
17
17
IS
7
18
13
18
15
14
13
11
18
IS
18
6
IS
11
17
16
18
17
18
16
16
16
14
9
IS
11
15
16
16
12
17
15
16
12
13
IS
18
IS
16 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32.
I 11
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1932—ContiffWd.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1194
1195
1196
1197
1198
1199
1201
1202
1203
1204
1205
1206
1207
1208
1209
1210
1212
1214
1215
1216
1217
1218
1219
1220
1221
1222
1223
1224
1225
1226
1227
122S
1229
1230
1231
1232
1233
1234
1235
1236
1237
1238
1239
1240
1241
1242
1243
1244
1245
1246
1247
1248
1249
1250
1251
1252
1253
1254
1255
Red Deer, Alta	
England	
Clear Lake, Wis	
ATancouver, B.C	
Saskatoon, Sask	
Armstrong, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Tabor, Alta	
Spokane, Wash	
Port Carting,  Ont	
Steenan,  Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Russia	
Agassiz, B.C	
Sydney, Nova Scotia	
Michel, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Nova Scotia	
Liverpool, England	
Ashcroft, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Halifax, Nova Scotia	
London, England	
Scotland	
Victoria, B.C	
Ireland	
Arancouver, B.C	
Toronto, Ont	
Pemberton Meadows, B.C
Victoria, B.C	
Lynn Valley, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Regina,  Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Edmonton, Alta...,	
Marpole, B.C	
Norway	
New Westminster, B.C	
Cloverdale, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Cowichan Bay, B.C	
Alberta	
Greenwood, B.C	
Saffron Walden, England.
London,  England	
Theodore,  Sask	
Hillcrest, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Anacortes,  Wash	
Victoria, B.C	
Aronda, Sask	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Toronto, Ont	
Vermilion, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Canadian	
English	
American-English...
Canadian-Irish	
Canadian	
English-Canadian...
Italian	
Italian	
Canadian	
American	
Canadian	
Ukranian	
Irish	
Russian	
Indian	
English-Canadian....
Russian 	
Canadian....	
Canadian	
English	
Canadian....	
Scotch-Canadian	
English....	
English	
Scotch	
Italian 	
Irish-Canadian	
Hawaiian-French....
Scotch-Canadian	
Indian	
Canadian	
Irish-Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
Syrian	
English	
English-Scotch	
Norwegian	
English-Canadian....
English	
English-Scotch	
Indian	
Canadian	
Canadian-Irish	
English	
Irish-Swiss	
Ukranian	
English	
Scotch	
Canadian-American
Irish-English	
Canadian	
Hawaiian-Chilian.;..
Italian	
American	
Canadian-English...
Scotch	
English-American...
American...	
Years.
16
18
16
14
IS
18
17
16
'   18
16
16
11
16
13
14
15
IS
12
15
18
14
14
17
17
13
17
16
17
15
14
15
14
11
17
13
13
15
11
16
18
14
17
11
17
13
17
10
16
16
17
15
18
14
16
11
14
15
17
18
Years
16
18
16
14
18
18
17
16
18
16
16
11
16
13
14
15
18
12
15
IS
14
14
17
17
13
17
16
17
15
14
15
14
11
17
13
13
15
11
10
18
14
17
11
17
13
17
10
16
16
17
15
18
14
16
11
14
15
17
18 I 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)    6
Austrian (both)   1
Canadian  (both)    23
Dutch (both)   1
English  (both)    23
Indian (both)   9
Irish   (both)     2
Italian (both)   7
Japanese (both)   2
Norwegian (both)    2
Polish  (both)   ...'.  2
Rumanian (both)   2
Russian (both)   4
Scotch (both)    13
Serbian (both)    2
Syrian (both)    1
Ukranian  (both)    3
Canadian-American   1
Canadian-English   5
Canadian-Indian  1
Canadian-Half-breed   1
Canadian-Welsh   1
Canadian-Irish     2
French-Canadian    8
English-Canadian   4
Scotch-Canadian   3
Irish-Canadian    2
American-English   2
Norwegian-Canadian   1
English-Norwegian  1
English-American   1
English-Australian   1
Quarteivbreed-Indian  1
Irish-Swiss   1
Scotch-English  1
Hawaiian-Chilian   1
English-Scotch  2
Hawaiian-French   1
Irish-English   3
French-Bulgarian-American     2
Hawaiian-English  1
American-Canadian   1
Swedish-Norwegian   1
Total 152
AVHERE BOYS AVERE BORN.
Alberta    23
British Columbia   85
Saskatchewan   10
Manitoba  2
Ontario  .'.  4
Quebec  2
England  8
Scotland    2
United States  5
Ireland     1
Italy  1
Russia   1
Norway   2
Sweden    1
Australia  1
Nova Scotia   4
Total 152
AVHY THEY CAME TO US.
Arson   1
Incorrigibility   17
B.E. & S  27
Theft   84
Receiving   4
False pretences   1
Damage to property  3
Indecent assault  3
Assault with intent to rob   3
Forgery   1
Vagrancy     3
Unlawful   obstruction   of   C.N.R.
property    1
Unlawful possession of firearms.. 2
Burglar's tools in possession  1
Sexual immorality   1
Total 152
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Agassiz   1
Armstrong    2
Ashcroft    1
Burnaby    8
Chemainus   1
Chilliwack    1
Creston   1
Cumberland   1
Duncan    1
Enderby     1
Fernie    2
Fort St. John  1
Greenwood   1
Hope     1
Kamloops   2
Kelowna   2
Kimberley  1
Maillardville    5 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32.
I 13
PLACES OF APPREHENSION— Continued.
Nanaimo   3
Penticton   4
Pemberton    1
Pouce Coupe   1
Port Coquitlam   1
Prince George   1
Prince Rupert   8
New Westminster  25
North Vancouver   5
Roberts Creek      3
Saanich      1
Sechelt     1
Squamish       1
Vancouver     47
Arictoria   17
Total 152
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908  20
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  67
2 years  39
3 years     6
4 years     2
5 years     1
1 year     1
Indefinite     13
Sec. 17, J.D.A     3
Total 152
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
9 years     1
10 years     2
11 years     9
12 years     7
13 years  15
14 years  19
15 years  16
Averas
16 years  29
17 years  21
18 years  24
19 years     9
Total 152
e age, 15.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholics  50
Methodist     1
Presbyterian  26
Church of England  37
Baptist     5
United   18
Buddhist      1
Lutheran     5
Salvation Army  5
Latter Day Saints   1
Greek Catholic   1
Christian Science   1
Seventh Day Adventist  1
Total 152
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have parents both living  95
Number who have both parents dead     3
Number who have father living and mother dead  16
Number who have mother living and father dead  15
Number who have stepfathers  13
Number who have stepmothers  10
HOAV ALL ARE EMPLOYED.
Farm and dairy  15
Poultry    9
Carpentering   6
Painting    1
Shoemaking   4
Tailoring  5
Cottage duties  3
Kitchen and bakery   3
Dining-rooms   4
Blacksmith  :     2
Plumbing    :.    2
Garage     1
Gardens     2
General outside work   28
School all day   67
Total 152 I 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HEALTH.
The health of our boys during the year has been very good. The usual examination upon
admission and the medical after-care was well taken care of by our Medical Officer, Dr. C. R.
Symmes, Port Moody. The dental work, which is increasing every year, was well attended to
by Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., New AArestminster, B.C.
Medical Report.
" The Superintendent,
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—During the year we have had a very clean bill of health and have been exceptionally
free from infectious and contagious diseases, when considering the epidemics of measles, smallpox, etc., existing in surrounding municipalities during the past year. By closing the Boys'
Industrial School to visitors and segregating the new boys admitted for incubation period of two
weeks before allowing them to intermingle with the other boys when epidemics were prevalent
in surrounding districts was responsible for the clean bill of health.
" Our routine practice on admitting boys, by keeping all suspicious cases under observation,
and in the case of suspected infectious and contagious diseases by taking swab cultures from the
nose and throat, by the use of sputum outfits supplied by the Provincial Board of Health, the
cultures being forwarded to the Bacteriological Laboratories in Arancouver, the Royal Columbian
and St. Mary's Hospital in New AArestminster, has tended materially in keeping the school in
excellent state of health.
" The first fatal accident in the history of the institution happened on July 24th, 1931.
caused by a bank of earth which the boys were excavating breaking away and falling on a boy.
No blame was attached to any one by the Coroner's jury and the investigation which followed the
accident. Cases admitted to the Royal Columbian and St. Mary's Hospital, New AVestminster,
B.C., were as follows : Appendicitis, 2 ; infected hands, 2 ; fractures of the humerus of the elbow-
joint, 2; tonsils and adenoids removed, 3; acute rheumatism, 1; fractures of the radius and
ulna, 1; fractures of the tibia and fibula, 2.
" All the boys and members of the staff were vaccinated at the time smallpox was prevalent
in the surrounding municipalities.
" The following conditions have occurred which did not necessitate hospital treatment:
Sprained ankles; sprained knees; sprained wrist; infected hands; abscess which necessitated
opening under local anaesthetic; enlarged tonsils : influenza ; rheumatism ; pleurisy ; chicken-pox;
septic sore throat; boils ; indigestion ; conjunctivitis; sore ears ; scabies; impetigo ; endocarditis:
enlarged heart; fractures of ribs; athlete's foot; stomatitis; epilepsy; mental deficiency and
epileptics examined and sent to Mental Hospital. There were sixty-five boys admitted during
the year and several were found to be suffering from gonorrhoea, enlarged glands, strabismus,
goitre, ulcers of legs, and eczema.
" Dr. A. S. Lamb, Travelling Medical Health Officer, on his semi-annual visit, only found
sixteen cases in the institution that should be re-examined next visit if still in the institution.
There was nothing of any infectious nature about any of these cases, but they were to be kept
under observation.
" In conclusion, from personal observation, the boys entering this institution are, to a large
extent, criminalistic and indifferent and careless about their mode of life previous to entering
' Biscoq.' Great credit is due the staff for the results which are obtained by the training of these
boys at this school, as, in many cases, they have been for some fifteen years under poor home
environment before entering this institution.
" Yours, etc.,
" C. R. Symmes, M.D."
The total cost for this department includes doctor's salary, medical supplies, and cost of
operations and hospital: Total expenditure, Medical Department, $1,286.59; per capita cost per
boy per day, 2% cents.
Dental Report.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1932, the mouths of all boys entering the institution have been carefully examined, record charts made, and emergency completed. " Of the 132 boys examined, only two were found with teeth showing no disease. This poor
condition of the teeth of the majority might be expected, since very few of the boys have had
dental attention previously.
" It was necessary, during the year, to extract 117 hopelessly diseased teeth. This work was
done with local amesthetic so as to reduce the pain to the minimum. Of the many teeth filled,
27 were restored with amalgam fillings and 34 with cement fillings. Ten patients were treated
for gingivitis, and over 30 for the prevention of decay. All patients were taught methods of
brushing and caring for the teeth to help prevent disease.
" Because of being handicapped by the need of a more complete equipment, it has been
impossible to perform some of the detailed work required, yet the best possible has been done
with the opportunity offered.
" The work done on these mouths will have a lasting effect on the health and future progress
of these boys.
" Emery Jones. D.D.S."
The total cost for this department includes dentist's salary and dental supplies amounting to
$639.89;  per capita cost per boy per day, 1 cent.
EDUCATIONAL.
In an institution like ours, where boys, upon admission, are usually found to be several
grades below where they should have been according to their physical age, it is very necessary
that we have teachers who thoroughly understand that type of boy, and we are particularly
fortunate in having in Mr. E. W. Blagburn, Miss Ayra Peck, and Miss Agnes B. McKenzie,
teachers who at all times work conscientiously on behalf of their pupils, and the results obtained
have been most gratifying.
Report of Division I.
" Sir,—During the spring of 1931 the number of boys attending school had increased to such
an extent that it was thought advisable to add another teacher to the staff. This was done,
commencing the fall term, and the results, I believe, have warranted such action. In this
division it was possible to give much more personal attention to the Entrance class than in the
preceding year.    The boys, with one or two exceptions, have worked well.
" I should like to take this opportunity to thank both Miss McKenzie and Miss Peck for
their co-operation at all times.
" Eric \V. Blagburn."
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1931   28
Pupils admitted during year      9
Pupils received from Division II     1
38
Pupils removed for various reasons  16
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1932   22
Report of Division II.
" Sir,—The following shows the movements of boys in this division from April 30th, 1931, to
April, 1932 :  Admitted, 4;  discharged, 3;  Grade Ar., 7;  Grade ATL, 8.
" Classes in this division were Grades Ar. and VI. all the time and Grade IV. half of each
day. The classes have made good progress. The increased teaching staff has made it possible
to give more individual attention to retarded pupils and the boys have responded well. The
ready and cheerful co-operation of all officials is much appreciated.
" Ayra E. Peck."
Report of Division III.
" Sir,—The following shows the classification of boys in this division from April 30th, 1931.
to April, 1932 : Admitted, 8 ; discharged, 5; Grade I., 1; Grade II., 6; Grade III., 7; Grade
IV., 8.
" Classes in this division were Grades I., II., and III. all the time and Grade IAr. half of
each day. I 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"Pupils of these grades required a good deal of individual attention. However, favourable
results were obtained and the boys showed gratifying interest in their work.
" I should like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and support afforded me by
the rest of the teaching staff and officials,
" Agnes B. McKenzie."
Educational Standing of all Boys in School.
Grade 1     1 Grade VIII  26
Grade II     7 Grade IX  12
Grade III  11 Grade X	
Grade IV     9 Grade XI     2
Grade V  16 Special class  11
Grade VI  25 	
Grade VII  32 Total 152
SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT.
" D. B. Brankin, Esq.,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—My last inspection for the year was on March 10th and 11th. At that time sixty-two
pupils were enrolled and all were present during the inspection. There are twenty in Division L,
sixteen in Division II., and twenty-six in Division III.
" The class-rooms are bright, well lighted, sanitary, and suited to the special conditions
under which the teachers and pupils are working.
" The school is well equipped. The teachers have made intelligent use, both of intelligence
and standardized tests, throughout the term and have duly recorded the results.
" The three teachers now employed are capable and display keen interest in their work. The
tone of all three rooms shows a marked improvement. The attitude of the pupils as a whole is
pleasing, as the general atmosphere indicates that the pupils are interested in their work and
that they appreciate the earnest efforts of their teachers. It is most pleasing and gratifying to
find such a spirit pervading an institution of this kind. I feel that you and your teachers have
accomplished work of enduring and beneficial result related to the lives and characters of the
boys attending the school courses.
" All three teachers have done good work, but some of the results in Grade III. are outstanding and worthy of special mention.
" Yours very truly,
" J. T. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT.
Showing Classified Expenditure and Per Capita Cost.
I would respectfully point out that the per capita cost includes all purchases made by contract and allows full market price for milk, eggs, vegetables, and fruit brought from our own
farm, and with the thought in mind that our population is growing boys and young men. who
must be provided with substantial, wholesome, and appetizing meals, the cost per meal is very
reasonable.
Sample Menu for One AVeek—Staff.
Sunday:
Breakfast,—Mush, bacon and eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea
or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, butter, milk
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, baked potatoes,
cheese, sausage, cake, jam, fruit, tea. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 17
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef or pork, gravy, potatoes, beets, brown and white bread, butter,
fruit pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, cold meat, potatoes, stew,
cheese, salad, jam, fruit, cake, and tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, gravy, potatoes, turnips, brown and white bread, butter, bread
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, baked potatoes, cold
meat, cheese, macaroni, fruit, cake, tea.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, apple
pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, cup eggs, potatoes, salad, or
pork and beans, cheese, fruit, cake, tea.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, beans, brown and white bread, butter, cake
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, fried potatoes, fish,
cheese, jam, fruit, cake, tea.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, gravy, potatoes, carrots, brown and white bread, butter,
gooseberry pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, fried potatoes, salmon,
cake, jam, cheese, fruit, tea.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, butter, milk
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, baked potatoes,
cheese, sausage, cake, jam, fruit, tea.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Sample Menu for One AArEEK—Boys.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, jam, brown and white bread, butter, tea for big boys, milk for
small boys.
Dinner.—Sausage and onions, potatoes, brown and white bread, boiled pudding, sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, canned pineapple, iced cake, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, stewed currants, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, bread pudding.
2 —
I 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, canned pears, egg omelet, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, stewed dates, brown and white bread, butter, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Meat pie with paste, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, ginger pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, pork and beans, syrup, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, beans with tomato puree, stewed currants,
tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, stewed prunes, brown and white bread, butter, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Shepherd's pie, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, cake pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, soup, stewed figs, tea for big boys, milk
for small boys.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, stewed figs, brown and white bread, butter, tea for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Chicken or vegetable stew, potatoes, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, eggs, stewed raisins, cheese, tea for
big boys, milk for small boys.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Porridge, milk, peanut butter, brown and white bread, butter, coffee for big
boys, milk for small boys.
XHwraer.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, fruit pie.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, macaroni and cheese, canned peaches,
tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries   $5,702.28
Meat and fish from butcher  2,366.39
Bread   2,775.50
Flour, rolled oats, etc  344.61
Milk from farm  3,098.08
Eggs from poultry-farm   828.15
Poultry from poultry-farm  1,007.05
Vegetables from farm   1,264.01
Beef from farm  267.15
Pork from farm  :. 609.75
Fruit from farm   50.12
Turnips from Colony Farm   29.25
Carrots from Colony Farm   29.56
Parsnips from Colony Farm   4.37
Potatoes from Colony Farm  27.00
$18,403.27
Meals supplied— = —
Boys     161,307
Staff       32,777
Total   194,084
Average cost per meal, 9% cents. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 19
Per Capita Cost.
This includes cash expenditure for all purposes during the year and covers all attendants,
instructors, teachers, doctor and dentist salaries, all repairs, extensions, replacements, food,
clothing, footwear, light, water, heat, and food for stock.
Actual cash expenditure during year   $93,672.07
Less cash from sale of poultry, eggs, etc  $8,220.21
Less money refunded for board and room     9,610.67
    17,830.88
Balance   $75,841.19
Per capita cost per boy per month  $40.76
Per capita cost per boy per day :       1.31%
1931-32.
. T .  , Cost per Year  Cost per Day
(1.)   Administration— ±uuu. per Boy. per Boy.
Expenditure        $999.55
Salaries, Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent, Matron, Stenographer, Storekeeper, two Night-watchmen       7,456.68
Light, fuel, water  991.54
i,447.77 $62.16 $0.17%
(3.)   School-
Expenditure   $276.13
Salaries, three teachers {less perquisites) 3,147.48
Light, water, fuel  269.50
(4.)  Sports, gymnasium—
Expenditure   $99.23
Salary, Instructor (less perquisites)  981.20
Light, fuel, water   706.27
(5.)  Doctor—
Expenditure         $686.59
Salary          600.00
(6.)  Dentist—
Expenditure   $40.89
Salary          600.00
(7.)  Kitchen-
Expenditure   $11,746.19
Salaries, four officials (less perquisites)      3,783.00
Light, water, fuel  898.17
Produce from farm        5,604.86
Produce from poultry        3,160.68
1
(2.)  Travelling expenses, transportation        $648.86 4.27 .01%
'■2
3,693.11 24.30 .07
$1,786.70 11.75 .03%
$1,286.59 8.46 .02%
$640.89 4.22 .01%
'2
$25,192.90 165.74 .45% I 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(8.)
(9.)
(10.)
(11.)
(12.)
(13.)
(14.)
1931-32.
Farm—
Expenditure 	
Salary, two farm officials   (less perquisites)    	
Total.
$3,570.48
2,003.20
229.13
Cost per Year
per Boy.
1.30
10.22
5.0'2
20.12
33.13
3.52
Cost per Day
per Boy.
.00%
.02%   (Cr.)
.01%
■05%
.09%
.01  (Cr.)
Light, water, fuel	
Less credits 	
Poultry—
Expenditure 	
Salaries   of   Poultryman   and
assistant (less perquisites)
Light, fuel, water 	
Hauling charges for eggs to A
minster 	
Credits—
Eggs and poultry supplied to
Eggs shipped 	
Credit balance	
part-time
$5,802.81
5,604.86
$197.95
$7,607.09
1,601.00
288.13
331.50
ew West-
kitchen.-.
$9,827.72
$3,160.68
8,220.21
$11,380.89
9,827.72
$1,553.17
$763.73
Laundry, expenditure 	
Shoes and clothing, expenditure 	
Shoe-shop—
Expenditure 	
Salary, Instructor (less perquisites)
Light, fuel, water 	
Credits—
Shoes made and repaired 	
Credit balance	
$3,057.88
$5,034.09
$1,321.20
1,429.20
110.13
$2,860.53
$3,396.55
2,860.53
$536.02
Tailor-shop—
Expenditure 	
Salary. Instructor (less perquisites)
Light, fuel, water 	
$354.43
1,356.75
80.63
$1,791.81
r REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 21
1931-32.
p    rtu Tnt , Cost per Year   Cost per Day
*-'reaits i0tiU' per Boy. per Boy.
Clothing made and repaired      $2,436.65
1,791.81
Credit balance        $644.84 4.24 .01  (Cr.)
(15.)  Plumbing—
Expenditure          $45.56
Salary, Plumbing-Instructor (less perquisites)        1,447.80
Light, fuel, water  29.50
$1,522.86 10.02 .03
(16.)  Carpenter—
Expenditure         $232.78
Salary,  Carpenter-Instructor   (less  perquisites)        1,571.40
Light, fuel, water  59.00
$1,863.18 12.26 .03%
(17.)  Electrical—
Expenditure   $28.83
Light   29.50
$58.33 .38 .00%
(18.)  Blacksmith-
Expenditure         $189.00
Light, fuel, water   83.63
'8
$272.63 1.79 .00%
(19.)  Garage-
Expenditure   $102.98
Salary, Mechanic (less perquisites)  640.80
Light, fuel, water   29.50
Credits- *773'28
Hauling eggs to New Westminster  331.50
$441.78 2.91 .00%
(20.)  Miscellaneous—
Honour-money,   band,   ministers,   paint,
roads, etc     $1,185.46
Light          236.00
$1,421.46 9.35 .03
(21.)  Gardens-
Expenditure   $99.38
Water  86.50
$185.88 1.22 .00%
(22.)  Salaries of officials not shown under other
headings (less perquisites)      $3,181.46 20.93 .06 I 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1931-32.
(23.)  Cottage No. 1- Total.         Co^eBr0^ar  C°pB<rp&£ay
Salaries, two men, one woman (less perquisites)     $2,448.00
Light, fuel, water  1,500.40
$3,948.40 25.98 .07%
(24.)  Cottage No. 2— 	
Salaries, two men, one woman (less perquisites)        $2,448.00
Light, fuel, water      1,500.40
$3,948.40 25.98 .07%
(25.)  Cottage No. 3— 	
Salaries, two men, one woman (less perquisites)       $2,646.00
Light, fuel, water       1,500.40
$4,146.00 27.28 .08
$1.36
Less credits 04%
$1.31%
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
It has been our aim during the year, as in past years, to emphasize the importance of work,
and officials are ever urged to make this thought uppermost in the minds of the boys in their
care.
Tailoring Department.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 455 pairs  $682.50
Tweed pants, large, 70 pairs  420.00
Tweed pants, small, 71 pairs  177.50
Uniform pants, 8 pairs  56.00
Value of work for other departments (time only)— $1,336.00
Table-covers, 121   $12.10
Sheets, 129  12.90
Tea-towels, 118  7.00
Curtains, 10 pairs   9.50
Pillow-covers, 168   25.20
Cushion-covers, 8   4.00
Dusters (coats), 12  3.00
Khaki aprons, 62   37.20
AVhite overalls, kitchen, 3   3.00
Clothes for concerts   40.00
Car-covers, 4 sets  13.00
„ ,,  160.90
Repairs (general) —
Overalls   $198.50
Aprons for kitchen   6.00
Shirts   24.00
Mackinaws     25.00
Carried forward   $253.50    $1,502.90 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 23
Tailoring Department—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward      $253.50    $1,502.90
Repairs (general)—Continued.
Carpets   9.00
Clothes for boys going home  4.00
Pressed suits        11.25
Underwear         10.00
Uniform pants          14.00
Repairs for dining-room  7.00
Repairs for cottages   8.00
Uniforms pressed, 174        174.00
Small repairs        167.00
657.75
Value of time spent on other duties          276.00
Total credits     $2,436.65
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of instructor      $1,596.75
Material used as follows :—
Denim, black, 1,000% yards      $215.05
Denim, blue stripe, 651 yards        139.97
Tweed, 125 yards       231.25
Repairs to machines         24.03
         610.30
Total debits      $2,207.05
Balance of credits over debits         $229.60
Average cost per boy per month, $1.21.
Shoemaking Department.
Credits.
New shoes made, etc.—
200 pairs at $5.50      $1,110.00
Boots repaired, 1,914 pairs      2,286.55
Total credits     $3,396.55
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of instructor      $1,429.20
Material used as follows :—
Leather, etc  $1,023.70
Needles           20.48
Ink    4.20
Wax   3.25
Awls   2.00
Intrinsic thread          36.00
Oil  3.25
Knives, etc         29.30
Laces          81.68
Shoe-polish        131.28
Repairs           26.26
      1,361.40
Total debits      $2,790.60
Balance of credits over debits         $605.95
Average cost per boy per month, $1.53. I 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Carpentering Department.
In addition to numerous minor repairs, this department has to its credit new work completed representing in the aggregate many thousands of dollars. Chief amongst them being:
Chicken-house, 20 by 225 feet, with housing capacity for 1,100 birds; over 600 feet of lattice
fencing, 8 feet high; 150 packing-boxes for shipping chickens to institution; new floor in horse-
barn ; demolished inside of No. 1 Chicken-house, converting same into up-to-date brooder-house;
erecting of new up-to-date bandstand: building picket fence 300 feet long and erecting form-
work for walls and foundation of new Aroeational Building.
Painting and Glazing Department.
In an institution where we have over 10,000 panes of glass and 152 healthy boys, accidents
are bound to happen. AVe do, however, charge against the boy's honour-money damages occurring
wilfully or carelessly. This has the effect of making the boy realize that all damage to property
must be paid for by some one and tends to make them more thoughtful and careful.
During the year this department has to its credit the painting of walls and roof of No. 5
Chicken-house, all trim-work being given two coats of paint; the painting of the grandstand,
fences, and gates around the farm, also the picket fencing along the ravine and at the back of
the Auditorium.
Plumbing, Heating, and Blacksmith Department.
During the year this department was kept busy overhauling and repairing the heating equipment and attending to the necessary plumbing repairs in all buildings, which, in itself, means
considerable work. Repairing farm implements, sharpening and repairing tools, in addition to
installing new hot-water supply in No. 1 Cottage and making new lamp-signs.
A7alue of the above, in the aggregate, amounted to not less than $3,700.
Cement and General Work Gangs.
This department has been kept busy grading for lawns, new roads, putting in drains and
culverts, and repairing old roads. They have also built cement piers, walls, and made cement
floors in Chicken-houses Nos. 1 and 5. In addition to this, they have built concrete walls and
footings for the new Vocational Building (75 cubic yards) and made 4.000 cement bricks. They
also built a rock wall 4 feet high and 50 feet long on the farm and have made numerous plaster
and cement repairs in the various buildings.
All work is carried out in connection with the Public AArorks Department.
Garage.
Salary of Attendant-Mechanic after deductions for board, etc  $579.75
Gasoline for all purposes  •  271.00
Oil and grease   36.26
Repairs at service-station and own shop  120.93
$1,007.94
Less credits for hauling eggs to institutions for shipment          331.50
$676.44
Cost to institution for use .of truck and passenger-car, $1.85 per day.
GENERAL FARMING AND KITCHEN GARDEN STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Debits for the Year.
For the simplifying of administration the following subsections are grouped together under
the above heading: (a) Dairying; (6) piggery; (c) kitchen gardens and general farming; (d)
land-clearing, teaming, hauling, and road-work: but in the last named the value of work
accomplished cannot be shown in dollars and cents. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 25
Dairying.
Credits.
Milk, 85,360.8 lb. at 4 cents per pound     $3,414.03
Beef to kitchen, 1,781 lb. at 15 cents          267.15
Total credits     $3,681.18
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $813.57
Medicine    11.14
Stock registration  24.14
Total debits         $84S.85
Piggery-.
Credits.
Pork to kitchen, 4,130 lb. at 15 cents        $609.75
Debits.
Feed purchased         $101.20
Pigs purchased from Colony Farm         157.50
Total debits        $258.70
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Aregetables—
Potatoes   $759.72
Onions, bunches   40.75
Onions, lb  11.02
Spinach     .20
Lettuce   66.00
Beets   60.36
Beet greens   .90
Radishes     .20
Parsley   5.45
Carrots   103.02
Peas  25.36
Turnips  2.50
Beans    28.20
Cabbage    87.70
Chives   .95
Cauliflower    33.48
Rabi     14.90
Corn on cob  10.50
Parsnips   11.40
Brussels sprouts  1.20
    $1,263.81
Fruit—
Cherries  .'.  $6.99
Apples  16.20
Plums   2.79
Crab-apples   2.10
Prunes     2.70
Rhubarb   10.80
Carried forward       $41.58    $1,263.81 I 26                                                             BRITISH COLUMBIA.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens—Co>
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward 	
Mnued.
$41.58
2.90
5.64
$1,263.81
50.12
450.75
Fruit—Continued.
Strawberries 	
Raspberries 	
Miscellaneous—
Mangels, 6% tons at $7 	
$43.75
62.50
65.00
60.00
48.00
30.00
14.00
60.00
67.50
Carrots, field, 6% tons at $10	
Oats and peas for silage, 13 tons at $5 	
Corn for silage, 12 tons at $5	
Timothy-hay, 3 tons at $16	
Rye-hay, 3 tons at $10 	
Rye-straw, 2 tons at $7	
Small potatoes for pigs, 4 tons at $15	
Potatoes used as seed, 4% tons at $15	
Total credits	
$1,764.68
Debits.
Feed purchased during year 	
Fertilizer	
Shovels, etc	
Seed-potatoes 	
$1,839.61
171.00
61.59
30.00
3.20
3.78
16.50
109.49
37.67
61.15
8.30
13.85
18.56
15.14
10.40
79.47
200.00
Express on potatoes	
Milk-fever outfit 	
Lime 	
Express on hav 	
Rubber boots 	
Seed 	
Rope, twine, bull-rings   	
Oil, grease, gasoline 	
Laundry, soap, etc	
Medicine 	
Brooms, brushes, cheese-cloth, etc	
Coal 	
Horse-shoeing and blacksmith repairs 	
Total debits	
$2,679.71
Land-clearing, Teaming, Hauling, and Road-
Single cart, hauling soil, gravel, manure, etc., 36 davs at $4
Single cart, hauling for gardens, 21% days at $4	
WORK.
$144.00
86.00
15.00
748.00
44.00
460.50
40.00
516.00
204.00
84.00
212.00
24.00
256.00
Single cart, hauling tools, greens, snow, etc., 3% days at $4
Single cart for labour gang, 187 days at $4	
Single cart, hauling cement, rock, etc., 11 days at $4	
Team and single cart doing chores, etc., 307 davs at $1.50
Team hauling lumber for poultry buildings, 5 days at $8	
Team for labour gang, 64% davs at $8	
Team for clearing land, 25% davs at $8	
Team hauling soil, gravel, etc., 10% davs at $8	
Team hauling wood, rock, brush, etc., 26% days at $8
Team hauling manure, etc., 3 days at $8	
Team for poultry grading, etc., 32 days at $8	
$2,833.50 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 27
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy     $3,681.18 $848.85
Piggery            609.75 258.70
General farming, kitchen gardens       1,764.68 2,679.71
Salary of Instructor and Assistant   2,220.00
Land-clearing, etc       2,925.50 	
Credit balance   2,973.85
5,981.11 $8,981.11
BISCOQ POULTRY-RANCH STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Expenditure during the Year.
Credits.
Eggs produced during the year, 34,305% dozen;  eggs in storage from March, 17 dozen;  eggs
bought from B.C. Pool, 1,800 dozen;  total, 36,122% dozen.
Eggs disposed of as follows :—
Eggs for own use and hatching purposes, 5,312% dozen  $1,299.89
Eggs shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 14,460 dozen  3,662.98
Eggs shipped to Essondale Mental Hospital, 9,300 dozen  2,280.40
Eggs shipped to New Westminster Mental Hospital, 2,880 dozen.. 751.90
Eggs shipped to Home for Incurables, 3,360 dozen  777.00
Eggs shipped to Provincial Home, 990 dozen  252.90
Eggs on hand, March 31st, 1932, 200 dozen.
Poultry shipped to kitchen, hens and cockerels  1,886.05
Poultry shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium  469.77
Total credits  $11,380.89
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $6,486.69
Chicks purchased during year  713.60
Salary of Instructor and Assistant, part time   2,000.00
Transportation of eggs by own truck   309.00
Express on empty crates returned from Tranquille   117.01
Coal for brooders and coal-oil   110.85
Laundry, soap, etc  18.14
Thermometers, wafers, etc  15.27
Brooms, pails, brushes, stamps, scissors, cheese-cloth  26.72
Killing-knives     700
Lime   124.18
Leg-bands, poultry-netting, etc  57.64
Shells for gun   2.90
Fees to Poultry Association  1.00
Medicine   39.40
Eggs from Pool, 1,800 dozen   333.90
Total debits   $10,363.90
FLOAVER-GARDENS.
In spite of unseasonable weather experienced the early part of the year, the flower-gardens
at Blscoq have been up to the usual standard. Many changes and alterations were made and
the grounds extended. The roses were particularly good, visitors commenting upon the appearance of the rose-beds and of the gardens generally. I 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SWIMMING AND AQUATIC SPORTS.
As in previous years, the swimming-tank was a favourite resort during the hot weather;
many boys taking the opportunity of learning to swim, and the competition between cottages
made very interesting sport.
BOYS' BRASS BAND.
At the present time our band is in very fine condition and during the year were able to
perform at several public functions. Their playing, morning and evening, is favourably commented upon by the residents in the vicinity.
Great credit is due our Bandmaster, Mr. J. AAT. Rushton, for the very efficient way he carries
out his duties.
BISCOQ LIBRARY.
The library reopened on September 1st, 1931. Particular interest was shown by the schoolboys, very few of them taking less than one book a week. A great deal of credit is due Mr. C.
Clayton, School Librarian, for his work in this department, also to the cottage-library boys who
spend a considerable amount of their spare time in collecting and listing books for the benefit
of the other boys.
Number of books on hand     632
Number of new books added during season      33
Number of old books reconditioned        38
703
Old books discarded and lost  .-         7
Total books in library     696
Number of boys who borrowed books      155
Number of books issued to boys 1,918
Number of staff who borrowed books        18
Number of books issued to staff     140
Number of books lost during season          1
CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
The Riot Squad from Vancouver came out and put on a concert, which was much appreciated
by all.
Coquitlam Trinity Church Choir were up and gave a very good cantata entitled " Consider the
Lilies."    There were also solos and duets, which were much enjoyed.
Chown Church Choir, Arancouver, under the direction of Mr. A. Capon, paid us a visit and
gave a concert, which was very much enjoyed.
A party from Vancouver, under the leadership of Mrs. H. Duker, came out and put on a play
entitled " Les Voyageurs," which was a real treat indeed.
The Canadian Legion Band and Hawaiian Orchestra from Coquitlam put on a very fine
concert.
Our annual concert was put on in November and was a great success.
The Salvation Army, New AVestminster, paid us their annual visit and put on a concert,
which was much enjoyed.
Biscoq Gymnasium night was held in January and was a howling success.
SPECIAL VISITORS REPRESENTING ORGANIZATIONS.
The Ministerial Association of New AVestminster paid us their annual visit and remained for
luncheon. They had a short service in the Auditorium, after which they looked around and
visited the various vocations, expressing themselves as being delighted with everything.
A large number of school trustees and exchange teachers, from Vancouver and the Old
Country and various parts of the Province, paid us a visit and were with us for luncheon. They
too were pleased with everything and expressed their appreciation of the work we are doing for
the boys under our care. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 29
A delegation of thirty-two ladies from Burquitlam AA7omen's Institute were out to look
around.    They were delighted with everything and stayed for luncheon.
Representatives from different organizations of ladies of New Westminster paid us a visit
and looked around our institution, expressing themselves as delighted with our system and the
effort we are making on behalf of the delinquent boy.    They stayed for afternoon tea.
The Fraser Aralley Jersey Breeders' Association held their annual picnic at Biscoq. All were
delighted on this occasion. We were fortunate in having with us the Deputy Provincial
Secretary, Mr. P. D. AA'alker, Arictoria, who made every one feel at home.
Delegations from AAThittier, California, and Penticton, B.C., who came out to study our
system, went away much impressed.
The Child AArelfare Association from ATancouver paid us a visit and found everything to
their satisfaction.
SEASIDE OUTINGS.
During the summer the Matron has taken boys by truck, on different days, to Crescent Beach.
The outings have been very much enjoyed and are looked forward to with keen delight.
SPORTS SECTION.
Football.—Burquitlam paid us a visit and after much scoring Biscoq won 5 to 4.
Renfrew Baptists, Arancouver, came out and played Biscoq. AATe again won by a score
of 3 to 2.
Coquitlam Alliance team came up. Thisis a big team and as far as size was concerned they
had Biscoq outclassed.    However, the score told a different story, as our boys won 3 to 1.
Coquitlam Juniors came up and again Biscoq was successful by a score of 2 to 1.
Basketball.—Coquitlam team came up twice to play our Juniors. The first game was won by
Coquitlam by a score of 15 to 13.    The second game was won by Biscoq with a score of 27 to 14.
The loco team came to play our Seniors. The visitors have a reputation of rarely ever
having been beaten. The game was fast from the beginning and the final score ended by a
victory for Biscoq of 39 to 21.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
During the year religious services were held every Sunday and sometimes during the week.
The Salvation Army, Baptist, Anglican, Apostolic Faith, and Christian Mission alternated with
each other.    The Roman Catholic priest came when convenient to himself.    The following letters
«
show appreciation of the courtesy shown and the facilities we have to assist these unselfish
workers in their efforts to help the delinquent boy on the right path:—
" Mr. I). B. Brankin,
Coquitlam, B.C.
"■ Dear Mr. Brankin.—lt has been my privilege to conduct a monthly service on Sunday
afternoon for the boys at Biscoq throughout another year.
" I am glad to report the usual courtesy on the part of the staff and good attention on the
part of the boys that characterized former years.
" We humbly trust that this relationship has meant something to the boys and that it will
result in the development of nobler character;
'■ Yours sincerely,
" J. L. Sloat."
" Mr. D. B. Brankin,
Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—It has been the privilege of the officers of this Corps to conduct a meeting with
the boys of the Provincial Industrial School on the first Sunday of each month during the past
year.
" In this connection we have enjoyed the whole-hearted support and co-operation of the
Superintendent and every member of the staff. The boys have been well-behaved and have
shown an intelligent interest in these services at all times connected with the institution. " It is our opinion that a splendid work is being done in the interest of these future citizens
of this great Province, and we sincerely hope that we may long continue to enjoy those happy
relations which we are now privileged to enjoy with those connected with this school.
" With best wishes, I am,
Yours sincerely,
" E.   T.   AArATERSTON,
" Mr. David B. Brankin, Commanding Officer."
Provincial Industrial Scliool for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—In reply to your letter of July 18th, our report covering the services held by
our Church at your institution is as follows : Sunday service twice a month from March to July,
inclusive, amounting to ten;  week-day service seven times, the total being seventeen.
" We wish to express our deep appreciation of the attention and courtesy shown us by the
officials of the institution and of the facilities provided for us on our visits there.
" Arery sincerely yours,
" P.  PlNEAULT."
" David B. Brankin, Esq.,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial School for Boys.
'■' Dear Sir,—May I again express thanks to you and your staff for the courtesies extended
to me during my visitations the past year.
" It has been a pleasure to conduct services at the school. The boys enter very heartily into
the singing and one feels that the effort is not wasted.
" On several occasions I have had a chat with individual boys and have found them to be
happy and desirous of making good in life. Two boys, at different times, told me they were
better off at the school than they would be elsewhere and had no desire to leave. I am sure the
methods employed by you are good, and, in many cases, must inevitably produce lasting results.
" I am,
Yours very sincerely,
" Herrert Pearson,
Vicar, St. Catherine's Church."
INTERESTING VISITORS.
Major J. H. Johnson, Arancouver; Mr. N. F. Burdick, Arancouver; Mr. R. D. Sutherland and
Mr. and Mrs. Sclater, Arancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Fleming and Mr. I. C. Rawton, Arancouver; Mr.
and Mrs. Lennet, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Quinn, Vancouver; Chief Police John Cameron, New
Westminster; Rev. J. D. Hobden and Miss M. Patterson, Arancouver; Dr. A. D. Lapp, Superintendent, Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille; Mr. H. Jefferies, Tranquille; Mr. P. D. Walker, Deputy
Provincial Secretary, Arictoria; Mr. H. AArhittaker, Government Architect, Arictoria; Mr. R.
Bridges, Architect, Vancouver; Mr. I. T. Haines, Toronto, Ont.; Mr. Arincent I. Schmidt,
Kitchener, Ont.; Mr. J. S. Foran, Vancouver; Mr. A. B. McAArhinnie and Mr. R. K. Ferguson,
Arancouver; Mr. Fred Allen, Revelstoke; Mrs. C. A. Allen, A?ernon; Mrs. B. R. Field and Raymond, Mr. and Mrs. L. Nicolson, Centerville, Ne"w Brunswick; Rev. J. L. Sloat and Mrs. Sloat,
New AArestminster; Mr. and Mrs. Jamieson, Arancouver; Mr. and Mrs. A. Noble, Kamloops;
Mrs. D. Burkett, Alexandra Orphanage, Vancouver; Mrs. Emma Palmer, Alexandra Orphanage,
A'ancouver; Mrs. B. Kennedy, Alexandra Orphanage, Arancouver; Mrs. Lucille Davis, University
of British Columbia, Arancouver.
NEWS OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE IN OUR CARE.
During the year we received more than the usual number of letters and personal calls from
former Biscoqites, and one would be callous indeed who was not touched by the spirit of gratitude
expressed by one and all for the help and encouragement given them while under our care.
AAfe from time to time receive letters from various parts of the world to which our boys have
wandered in their quest for adventure and for work. Returned missionaries, coming back from
India, China, or Japan, call to see us and bring news of old boys they have met in those countries
and who in most cases are doing remarkably well.    There is not a Province in Canada but where REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1931-32. I 31
there are some of our old boys making good. One boy, who lives in one of the Maritime Provinces, has written me for twelve years on the anniversary of his coming to Biscoq and who is
to-day doing very well indeed. Others bring their wives and children to see the school and staff,
and it is interesting to listen to them making comparisons between the place as it was and is now.
We do hear from time to time of those who have failed to make good and got into trouble.
In many of these cases a close study of the situation clearly proves that the boy was not always
in the wrong, but was the victim of a condition over which he had no control. I still believe
that a little more intelligent thought, from sympathetic hearts on the part of adults, would make
the path much easier for the boy who has passed through our hands and who finds it difficult to
walk along the highway of life without stumbling and falling down.
" There is always room in every land,
For folks who lend a helping hand,
AA7ho brighten life with sunny smiles
And help the lame dog over stiles,
Who to the code of service hold
And ask for neither thanks or gold."
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.
925-1032-879 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0305095/manifest

Comment

Related Items