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TENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PRPVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STATISTICS, 1931 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1933

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 TENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OP
THE FIEE MARSHAL
FOB   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS, 1931
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles P. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  To Bis Bonour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Tenth Annual Keport of the Fire Marshal
for the year ended December 31st, 1931.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General. ■
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1932. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Fire Marshal  5
Table I.—Inspections made and Orders issued       7,8
Table II.—Fires reported     9,10
Table III.—Causes of Fires  11,12
Table IV.—Classification of Property  13-20
Table V.—Summary        21
Table VI.—Loss of Life        22 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire Marshal,
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1932.
The Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.C., .
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Pursuant to section 34 of the " Fire Marshal Act," I have the honour to submit my
Tenth Annual Report as Fire Marshal for the year ended December 31st, 1931.
You will lie pleased to note a decrease of loss, as compared with the same period in 1930,
of approximately $1,600,000. Over $1,000,000 of this decrease must be credited to the City of
Vancouver. In no city in Canada or the United States for which this office has a record is the
work of fire prevention and investigation so well carried out as in the City of Vancouver. The
record speaks for itself. This is highly creditable to Chief C. W. Thompson and the officers of
his staff who are responsible.
The above comment is not in any sense a reflection on the excellent work being done by
other assistant fire marshals in towns and cities of the Province, many of whom are working
under adverse conditions without remuneration, and, in a number of cases, without proper
support and co-operation from the local authorities. It is to be noted, however, that the work
of the assistant fire marshals is being better understood and more appreciated by the public at
large than ever before. They report to me that in many cases their services and advice are
solicited by the citizens and any suggestions made for the removal of fire hazards are promptly
carried out.
Fire Investigation.—Owing to the economic conditions existing the work of the office along
this line has been greatly increased during the year. Mr. W. A. Walker, Deputy Fire Marshal
in charge of this work, has been very active, having investigated 207 fires reported as of
suspicious origin and held or assisted at twenty-six inquiries under section 12 of the Act. As
a result of this work five persons were charged with arson, three charges of conspiracy to
defraud insurance companies were laid, two convictions were secured, and three cases are now
before the Court. "While a charge of arson is admitted to be one of the hardest crimes to prove,
yet our work in these cases was not without result.
In the case of one incendiary fire a claim for the sum of $32,000 was made and proofs of
loss submitted. On the advice of this office the matter went to arbitration. Evidence secured
at the Fire Marshal's inquiry was used, with the result that the claim was reduced to $4,500,
and the companies interested have denied liability on the ground of fraud. This failure to
" sell out to the insurance companies" put a stop for the moment to the activities of an
organized arson gang that has attempted to operate in this Province.
It is pleasing to note, however, that in spite of the activities of these people, only 1.75 per
cent, of our total fires was found to be of incendiary origin. This statement is based on the
fact that a thorough investigation of all suspicious fires is made by this office. While we are
unable, in many cases, to ascertain the causes of fires, we do find an entire absence of motives
or circumstances which would justify us in ascribing them to incendiarism. In view of these
facts we feel that we are justified in stating that the moral hazard in the Province, from an
insurance standpoint, is excellent.
Fire Protection.—In spite of prevailing conditions a number of our cities and municipalities
have improved their Are protection by the purchase of new equipment, repairing existing equipment, etc. These include Nanaimo, Rossland, Saanich, Victoria, and West Vancouver. The
City of New Westminster has completed negotiations whereby the water system of the city will
be connected with that of the Vancouver and District Water Board. This will ensure them of
an adequate water-supply at all times for fire protection. In the City of Vancouver they have
completed and placed in commission what I am advised is the most modern and complete fire-
alarm system on this continent. This will ensure prompt response to fire-alarms by the Department and will undoubtedly be the means of reducing the amount of property destroyed.
It is also reported, although I have no official knowledge of the matter, that there is a
fire-boat on the Burrard water-front of the city. I am advised that this boat is not under the
control of the Vancouver Fire Department and is manned by men who have absolutely no
training in the work of fire-fighting.    If this latter report is correct it is regrettable.
Botels and Apartments.—The question of the safety of hotels and apartments having been
brought to our attention by the loss of two lives in a hotel fire, instructions were sent out to C 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the assistant fire marshals to ascertain if the requirements of section 24 of the Act were being
enforced. A large number of delinquents were found. Orders were immediately issued to them
to bring these places up to the required standard. Our reports show that these orders have
been generally complied with.
Educational Work.—Owing to the pressure of other duties it has been impossible for myself
and staff to give very much attention to this phase of our work, important as it is. On Vancouver Island, however, the work was ably carried on by the members of the Victoria and District
Fire Insurance Agents' Association working in conjunction with Chief Stewart, of Victoria,
representing this office. The work of the organization and the secretary, Mr. F. F. Fatt, in the
schools and homes cannot be too highly commended. Great credit is also due to the press of
the City of Victoria for publicity given to the work of fire prevention, and to the members of
the trustee boards of the district for their co-operation and support.
In this connection I think I should refer to the convention of the British Columbia Fire
Chiefs and Assistant Fire Marshals held in Vancouver. This was one of the most practical
conventions of fire chiefs I ever had the privilege of attending. In making our inspections
throughout the Province we find a great advance and improvement in methods of fire protection
and prevention as a result of this convention.
Regulations governing Inflammable Liquids.—With reference to the handling of these
liquids, these regulations, which were put in force by Order in Council on May 14th of last
year, have given us control of what was fast developing into a serious situation. While there
was some friction at first in connection with their enforcement, they are now working smoothly
and efficiently.
Theatres.—An amendment to the " Fire Marshal Act" passed in 1931 placed the motion-
picture theatres under the control of the Fire Marshal in so far as their licensing, safety, and
the qualifications for projectionists are concerned. The work of theatre inspection has been
efficiently carried out by Mr. W. A. Oswald, who, in addition to his work in general fire prevention in hospitals, schools, and other public buildings, has inspected 247 theatres and their
equipment and issued 123 orders for improvements. Two hundred and seven thousand feet of
defective film has been ordered out of service.
The Board of Examiners have conducted sixty-four examinations for projectionists during
the year, forty-one for first class, twenty for second, and three for third. Regulations under
the Act governing the construction and licensing of theatres and the examination and qualifications for projectionists have been passed by Order in Council and are being enforced.
Government Institutions.—Regular inspection of all Government institutions at Essondale,
New Westminster, Tranquille, Kamloops, Marpole, and Coquitlam has been made during the
year. At Essondale and New Westminster new fire-resistive buildings that are a credit both to
the architects and builders have been completed and are now occupied. Improvements have
been made in fire exits in existing buildings. The improvement of the water-supply at New
Westminster, as before noted, ensures an adequate water-supply for fire protection. While
conditions in some of the older buildings are not all we would desire, we feel that a great
advance in the safety of the institutions has been made.
At Tranquille improvements in the water-supply for fire protection is to be noted. A new
fire-truck equipped with ample hose and ladders will be in commission at an early date and a
fire department organized under an experienced chief. The housekeeping conditions in all our
public institutions are always found to be excellent.
In conclusion, I wish to express, on behalf of myself and assistant fire marshals throughout
the Province, our warm appreciation of the interest you as Minister of the Department have
taken in our work.    Without such support we would be seriously handicapped.
The Provincial Police have co-operated in every possible way, both in the unorganized
districts and in the cities and municipalities policed by them.
As to the members of my staff, I can only say that without their interest and co-operation
the work of the Fire Marshal's Office could not be carried on.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. ALFRED THOMAS,
Fire Marshal. REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 7
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
City Municipalities  (33).
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
North Vancouver	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals	
District Municipalities (t&)
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam	
Delta	
Esquimalt	
Fraser Mills	
Glenmore	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
North Cowichan	
North Vancouver	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
Spallumcheen	
Sumas	
Summerland	
12
82
2
2,084
57
163
50
574
111
3
322
326
55
17
638
1,122
1,026
1,261
148
72
263
447
171
513
26
1,722
46,806
10,557
70,520
150
16
4
36
151
60
292
28
11
21
3
21
2
11
89
19
30
53
1
30
4
36
11
12
54
182
163
45
2
119
195
4
66
2
112
5,051
192
6,595
43
1 C 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS—Continued.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
District Municipalities—Continued.
16
Tadanac	
Totals	
796
70
Village Municipalities (14).
Abbotsford	
56
134
77
3
3
21
27
Mission	
16
60
Silverton	
2
1
11
9
Totals	
321
99
Fire Districts (12).
44
2
220
.508
121
203
86
7
50
Prince Rupert, County
of    .
16
15
Totals .
1,184
88
72,821
60,136
56,954
43,075
47,221
6,852
1930..
6,912
6,832
1928
4,938
1927
4,437 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 9
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
City Municipalities (33
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna..	
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster..
North Vancouver...
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals-
District Municipalities  (28,).
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam	
Delta	
Esquimalt	
Fraser Mills	
Glenmore	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
North Cowichan....
North Vancouver..
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
Spallumcheen	
Sumas	
Summerland	
Surrey	
Tadanac	
West Vancouver...,
Totals....
2
6
8
2
18
3
7
1
15
7
18
5
29
13
6
33
21
67
48
6
5
6
17
20
10
10
1
18
1,104
14
153
1,673
114
25
2
$94
2,929
11,972
82
6,259
370
60,213
10
7,145
9,170
19,768
8,434
6,274
10,015
13,565
9,810
11,641
81,018
30,171
4,275
13,010
3,713
17,421
11,797
18,902
5,272
35
12,007
481,324
32,976
167,456
$1,057,728
$120,406
28,901
9,678
9
21,752
1
2,750
13
36,385
4
9.605
11
8,599
27
52,531
33
95,094
10
19,149
7
8,719
13
53,693
20
12,307
49      ■
33,479
2
2.563
10
4,580
3
4,872
16
15,759
36
44,075
3
5,360
2
7,366
5
2,251
3
8,602
38
67,532
9
2,700
18
7,378
483
$686,086 C 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Village Municipalities (l!t).
Abbotsford	
Burns Lake	
Creston	
Gibsons Landing-
Hope	
Mission	
New Denver	
Quesnel	
Silverton	
Smithers	
Stewart	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake-
Totals..
Fire Districts (12).
Cariboo, County of..
loco	
Kootenay, County of	
Nanaimo, County of	
Pacific Mills, Limited	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert, County of-
University Area	
Vancouver, County of	
Victoria, County of	
Westminster, County of	
Yale, County of	
Totals	
Grand totals..
44
54
4
128
96
6
6
29
6
24
24
15
480
2,680
$12,279
13,227
8,680
45
6,895
306
7,468
7,321
4,980
16,644
871
$78,716
$227,076
327
255,944
316,338
5,268
172
57,039
2,502
120,871
75,650
60,842
217,835
$1,339,864
$3,162,394
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting         18,   loss
Brick or concrete       219,      ,,
Frame  2,443,
2,680,
$3,636
270,349
2,888,409
3,162,394 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 11
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Acetylene-torch  carelessness	
Ashes against wood	
Asphalt boiling over	
Boiler Insufficiently protected	
Brush and comb, drying in oven, ignited	
Candle carelessness	
Carburettor back-firing	
Car upset	
Chair too near stove	
Children playing with fire	
Cleaning-rags left on engine	
Clothes too near fireplace	
Clothes too near furnace	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe	
Coal-gas explosion	
Coat hung on compressor-pipe	
Collision	
Curtains from candle	
Curtains from lamp	
Curtains from stove	
Defective belt	
Defective brooder	
Defective chimney	
Defective film	
Defective fireplace	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe	
Defective matches	
Defective motor	
Defective oil-burner	
Defective stove or stove-pipe	
Defective wiring	
Electrical appliances	
Ether explosion	
Explosion of child's steam toy	
Exposure	
Fire-crackers	
Floor-boards ignited by exhaust-pipe.	
Friction of logging-cable	
Friction on brake-drum	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected..
Gas-burner insufficiently protected	
Gas explosion	
Gas-furnace back-firing	
Gasoline carelessness	
Gasoline explosion	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe	
Gasoline-torch carelessness	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected	
Grease on stove	
Hot soldering-iron carelessness	
Incendiary	
Lamp explosion	
Lamp upset	
Lantern upset	
Lightning	
Live coals	
Loose hay ignited by hot muffler	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with	
Matches, mice with	
Mattress too near stove	
Oil-furnace back-firing	
Oil-stove explosion	
Overheated dry-kiln	
1
19
1
2
1
13
33
4
1
2
1
3
2
57
3
1
1
11
2
3
1
3
140
3
24
6
2
1
5
30
26
110
1
1
134
16
1
2
2
8
1
1
1
31
5
10
3
2
28
1
47
2
7
4
8
29
2
32
32
2
1
3
2
2
9,641
21
3,281
7
30,456
19,347
1,475
20
954
179
36
13
8,465
743
27
445
386
1,036
4,930
97
760
135,384
513
2,488
8,908
30
2,125
807
19,436
135,634
19,651
29
26
156,586
7,322
12
23,253
911
3,748
15
1,000
25
23,376
9,067
1,961
1,644
281
4,509
7
194,890
2,970
11,259
3,583
43,990
508
5,249
3,718
4,524
3,254
600
1,483
537
21,701 C 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Overheated electric motor	
Overheating of machinery bearings	
Paper from stove	
Rubbish too near stove	
Samples ignited from gas-heater	
Short circuit	
Smokers' carelessness	
Sparks from boiler	
Sparks from bonfire	
Sparks from burning rubbish	
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from cupola	
Sparks from engine	
Sparks from fireplace	
Sparks from forge „
Sparks from furnace or furnace-pipe—	
Sparks from locomotive	
Sparks from mill burner	
Sparks from motor	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe	
Spontaneous combustion	
Static electricity	
Stove explosion	
Stove-lid fell on floor	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sulphur burning	
Sun's rays	
Tar boiling over	
Thawing pipes	
Unknown	
Varnish boiling over	
Water in lime	
Wood too near furnace	
Wood too near stove	
Totals	
2
1
1
98
513
6
9
o
44
204
1
1
184
3
9
1
5
3
00
37
3
6
1
101
2
1
9
2
417
1
1
4
11
!380~
$142
140,084
1,165
190
25
61,251
55,764
147,585
2,269
1,633
137,416
134,763
308
2,532
10,312
7,314
49,094
50
89,489
6,860
50,066
54,905
276
1,220
15
73,836
86
40
6,450
30
1,184,549
10
27
405
2,745
$3,162,394 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 13
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Apartments      107
Armouries 	
Asphalt in barrels
Automobile camps
Automobiles   	
1
1
2
180
Bakeries   	
Banks   	
Barber-shops
Barns    	
Ashes against wood 	
Clothes too near stove 	
Defective  oil-burner	
Defective  stove  	
Electrical   appliances  	
Fire-crackers	
Gasoline carelessness 	
Grease on stove 	
Live coals 	
Match  carelessness 	
Matches,  children  with  	
Oil-furnace back-firing 	
Short  circuit   	
Smokers'   carelessness   	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from fireplace 	
Spontaneous combustion 	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Unknown   	
Incendiary   	
Asphalt boiling over
Exposure    	
Sparks from stove
Carburettor   back-firing   	
Car upset 	
Cleaning-rags left  on  engine  	
Collision .".	
Defective wiring  	
Exposure	
Floor-boards ignited  by exhaust-pipe..
Friction on brake-drum 	
Gasoline carelessness  	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe 	
Loose hay ignited by hot muffler 	
Match  carelessness 	
Short  circuit  	
Smokers' carelessness  ...
Sparks from bonfire 	
Sparks from bush fire	
Unknown   	
4   Electrical  appliances   	
Spontaneous  combustion
Unknown   	
Exposure    	
Short  circuit
3   Exposure
57 | Carburettor   back-firing
Defective wiring  	
Exposure    	
Gasoline  explosion   	
Incendiary   	
Lamp upset  	
Lantern  upset  	
Lightning  	
Short circuit  	
Smokers' carelessness ....
Sparks from bonfire 	
Sparks from bush fire .
1
i
l
3
1
1
• 1
74
2
2
1
1
$2,232
25
463
110
105
77
264
10
8
101
25
348
213
2,994
40
55
302
5
43,130
1
1
1
$825
1
31
29
$11,134
4
1,475
1
179
1
445
1
9
8
1,140
1
12
2
911
5
1,077
9
1,901
2
5.249
4
1,193
55
10,591
19
3,158
1
700
1
288
37
13,472
1
$35
1
224
2
5,661
2
$451
1
536
3
$866
5,729
1.238
2,750
6,945
1,209
1,592
30
500
910
436
7,117
$50,507
275
21
856
52,934
5,920
.987
2,158 C 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE  IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Barracks   5
Bicycle-repair shops   1
Blacksmith-shops   6
Boarding-houses      10
Boat-building works    1
Boat-houses     2
Bridges     6
Bunk-houses  5
Canneries     2
Cereal plants   1
Chicken-houses   21
Churches
12
Sparks from chimney  -  1
Spontaneous   combustion  5
Unknown  27
Defective chimney   1
Smokers' carelessness  2
Spontaneous  combustion    •   1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
 ,  1
Defective furnace    1
Electrical  appliances    1
Sparks from  forge    2
Unknown     2
Defective  match    1
Electrical  appliances  2
Live   coals     1
Smokers'   carelessness     2
Sparks from chimney   2
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown  1
Unknown  1
Exposure      1
Tar boiling over   1
Incendiary     2
Smokers' carelessness   2
Unknown     2
Mattress too near stove   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Unknown     2
Incendiary     1
Unknown     1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Ashes against wood   2
Defective  brooder    • 3
Defective  stove    1
Exposure  12
Lantern upset   2
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from bonfire  1
Stove insufficiently protected   2
Unknown     6
Ashes against wood  ,  1
Defective chimney  1
Defective furnace-pipe   1
Defective wiring  1
Exposure      1
Casoline-torch carelessness   1
Incendiary  2
Lightning :  1
Sparks from furnace    1
Thawing pipes   1
Unknown     l
$108
8,003
39,621
$6,000
9
798
100
$5,901
206
3,876
1,115
$25
18
5
20
22
25
6,000
$7
300
$500
301
0,513
$600
23
289
18,106
$46,880
19,878
$856
760
200
380
1,794
1,612
325
155
7,047
$100
9,461
60
88,661
30
103
25,861
25
840
15
15
$77,054
0,907
75
11,158
6,115
3,261
307
7,314
19,018
66,758
59
13,129
125,171 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 15
TABLE  IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Clubs
12
Coal-chutes 	
Cooperages  	
Dairies   	
Dry-cleaning  establishments
Dwellings    1,648
Smokers' carelessness   7
Sparks from chimney  - 3
Tar boiling over   1
Unknown  1
Unknown     1
Sparks from stove   1
Spontaneous   combustion    1
Live coals   1
Unknown      1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Gasoline  explosion    1
Match carelessness   1
Static electricity   2
Ashes against wood   11
Brush and comb, drying in oven, ignited  1
Candle   carelessness     10
Chair too near stove   1
Children playing with fire   3
Clothes too near fireplace   3
Clothes too near furnace   2
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe   52
Coal-gas   explosion     3
Curtains from candle   10
Curtains from lamp   2
Curtains from stove   1
Defective   chimney     123
Defective   fireplace     23
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe   2
Defective  match     1
Defective  oil-burner    1
Defective stove or stove-pipe   23
Defective wiring   12
Electrical  appliances     89
Ether explosion   1
Explosion of child's steam toy  1
Exposure      53
Fire-crackers     13
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected 6
Gas-furnace  back-firing    1
Gasoline carelessness  12
Gasoline   explosion  2
Gasoline-torch carelessness  1
Grease on stove  20
Hot  soldering-iron carelessness    1
Incendiary     25
Lamp explosion  2
Lamp  upset     6
Lantern upset  1
Lightning    4
Live coals  26
Match carelessness   17
Matches,  children with    25
Matches, mice with  2
Oil-furnace back-firing  , 1
Oil-stove explosion  1
Paper from stove   1
Short  circuit    18
Smokers'   carelessness     274
Sparks from bonfire   3
Sparks from burning rubbish   2
$4,855
215
1,250
29
$450
220
$25
729
$300
594
648
228
$3,945
7
1,997
20
974
36
13
8,332
743
385
1,036
4,901
91,830
2,151
2,662
5
25
18,834
18,185
11,507
29
26
31.019
7,157
3,708
25
7,214
723
1,479
2,623
7
34,494
2,970
10,050
197
2,526
470
1,339
3,752
3,254
30
135
10
21,161
17,681
425
1,633
$6,349
1,500
670
754
1,770 C 1G
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Elevators   (grain)	
Factories   (box)   	
Factories   (gypsum and ala-
bastine)    	
Factories   (mattress)   	
Factories (roofing material)
Factories (sash and door)....
Factories (tent and awning)
Factories (vinegar)  	
Fertilizer  plants  	
Fire-halls   	
Foundries   	
Fruit-packing plants
Garages 	
49
Gasoline-stations          2
Greenhouses           1
Halls          13
Sparks from bush fire   28
Sparks  from  chimney    181
Sparks from fireplace   176
Sparks from furnace or furnace-pipe  5
Sparks from motor   1
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe  48
Spontaneous  combustion    13
Static electricity   1
Stove explosion   5
Stove-lid fell on floor   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected— SO
Sulphur burning    2
Sun's rays   1
Tar boiling over   2
Thawing   pipes     1
Unknown     196
Water in lime   1
Wood too near furnace   4
Wood too near stove   10
Incendiary    -.  1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Electrical   appliances  1
Sparks from furnace    1
Tar boiling over    1
Unknown      2
Sparks from motor   1
Defective wiring    1
Lightning     1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Smokers'   carelessness  1
Boiler insufficiently protected   1
Exposure     1
Sparks from chimney   1
Sparks from cupola    1
Sparks from  forge    1
Exposure      1
Carburettor   back-firing  1
Defective wiring   1
Exposure  8
Gasoline carelessness    4
Grease on stove   1
Short circuit     7
Smokers'  carelessness  5
Sparks from chimney   1
Sparks from motor   1
Spontaneous  combustion     4
Unknown     16
Coat hung on compressor-pipe   1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Unknown      1
Defective wiring   1
Exposure      1
Matches, children with    1
Smokers'   carelessness     4
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     5
$1,950
19
3,740
8,582
1,151
11,001
3,869
5
1,035
3.105
76,257
$27
250
$50
2.200
379
60
22
9.856
110,714
277
1,000
12,567 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 17
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Hospitals
Hotels
House-boats
Launches
65
Laundries   	
Lime plants 	
Logging   camps
Lumber-piles ...
Lumber-yards ...
Machine-shops   .
Meat-packing plants   1
Motor-cycles    1
Offices          10
Oil-houses 	
Oil-refining plants
Oil-tankers   	
Pole camps 	
Pool-rooms   	
Post-offices   	
Defective   chimney    :  1
Short  circuit  1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Stove explosion   1
Unknown      1
Candle  carelessness    1
Defective furnace-pipe  1
Electrical  appliances    2
Exposure     -  0
Incendiary     2
Short   circuit     1
Smokers'   carelessness     39
Sparks from chimney   2
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe   2
Spontaneous  combustion   1
Stove insufficiently protected    1
Unknown  7
Sparks from  stove-pipe   1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Gasoline-torch carelessness   1
Exposure      1
Overheating of machinery bearings   1
Sparks from chimney   1
Unknown      1
Unknown ■   1
Friction of logging-cable   2
Sparks from bush Are   3
Sparks from  engine   1
Unknown     1
Unknown      2
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Gas-burner insufficiently protected    1
Unknown    -  2
Varnish boiling over   1
Short  circuit     1
Carburettor   back-firing     1
Defective furnace  1
Defective stove-pipe    1
Grease on stove  -  1
Incendiary     1
Smokers'   carelessness     3
Unknown     3
Exposure   -  1
Unknown      1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Sparks from bonfire   1
Sparks from bush fire   2
Smokers' carelessness   1
Unknown      1
Exposure      1
$41
316
30
37
31,500
$7,468
175
384
56,389
8,635
1,236
1,494
28,683
207
15,603
15
77,003
500
756
$450
62
$1,302
664
1,000
153
$23,253
18,773
2,532
$15
15
121
10
$50
22
288
80
175
4,242
$373
24,661
1,030
$31,924
187,292
1,258
512
3,119
6,069
44,558
20
742
161
159
397
4,857
2,128
226
4,844
25,034
1,911
,59 C 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE  IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Power-houses
Printing-offices      1
Railway-stations     3
Restaurants         20
Rinks 	
Rooming-houses
Round-houses
Sawmills 	
Schools
Sheds
1
30
22
Defective   motor     1
Lightning     1
Short  circuit    1
Unknown      1
Overheated motor   1
Defective wiring   1
Sparks from bonfire   1
Unknown      1
Exposure      5
Grease on stove   1
Incendiary     2
Short  circuit  1
Smokers' carelessness.   2
Sparks from stove  1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.... 2
Unknown     6
Unknown      1
Curtains from stove   2
Defective   chimney     2
Defective  stove    1
Defective wiring  1
Electrical appliances   2
Exposure      1
Gas-plate insufficiently protected   1
Smokers' carelessness   14
Sparks from chimney   3
Sparks from fireplace   2
Unknown     1
Unknown      1
Incendiary  3
Overheating of machinery bearings   1
Sparks from boiler  5
Sparks from mill burner   2
Spontaneous combustion    1
Unknown      8
Curtains  from   candle     1
Defective chimney   1
Exposure      1
Gas:plate insufficiently protected   1
Incendiary     1
Match carelessness    1
Matches, children with   1
Short  circuit  1
Sparks from chimney  1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     4
Candle carelessness  1
Defective  fireplace     1
Defective stove-pipe   1
Exposure      3
Gasoline carelessness   1
Matches,  children  with    3
Oil-stove  explosion     1
Short  circuit    1
Sparks from bush fire   1
Sparks from stove    1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown   7
$2,125
1,664
1,000
6,400
$20
10
12
$17,715
140
395
92
19
2,845
2,335
13,633
$29
2,190
17
1,587
13
57
271
3,821
252
29
20
$17,314
139,420
147,213
89,145
2,894
118,838
$1
425
1,219
10
2,234
50
100
50
55
16
13,725
337
170
836
75
185
402
80
409
618
40
1,911
$11,189
42
42
37,174
18
8,286
2,336
514,826
17,885
5,143 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Shingle-mills
Shipyards  	
Smelting plants
Stables
Steam-baths
Stockyards .
Stores	
Stores and apartments .
Stores and dwellings
11
36
Overheated  dry-kiln   2
Sparks from boiler   1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown     1
Defective wiring   1
Boiler insufficiently protected   1
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Gas  explosion     1
Overheated electric motor   1
Short  circuit     1
Sparks from furnace   2
Sparks from locomotive   1
Tar boiling over   1
Exposure     2
Gasoline carelessness    1
Incendiary     1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     2
Spontaneous  combustion     1
Unknown      1
Ashes against wood   1
Clothes too near stove   2
Defective   chimney     4
Defective  oil-burner    1
Defective  stove-pipe   1
Defective wiring   1
HIectrical  appliances    4
Exposure      9
Gasoline carelessness   2
Incendiary     3
Match  carelessness  , 7
Paper from stove   1
Rubbish too near stove   1
Short  circuit  3
Smokers' carelessness   28
Sparks from chimney  -  5
Sparks from stove   1
Stove insufficiently protected   4
Unknown  17
Defective   chimney     2
Fire-crackers     1
Matches,  children  with    1
Short  circuit    1
Smokers' carelessness   3
Sparks from fireplace  1
Spontaneous   combustion    1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Clothes too near stove   2
Defective  chimney     3
Defective stove-pipe   1
Defective wiring   2
Electrical  appliances    1
Exposure     6
Gasoline carelessness   2
Grease  on   stove    1
Incendiary     1
Smokers' carelessness   6
Sparks from fireplace   1
$21,701
370
25
58
41,224
$150
25
1,000
100
50
1,300
50
25
$250
85
20
330
550
$110
47
6,408
79
15
1,925
7,034
7,619
1,659
9,974
402
1,155
190
2,401
6,187
1,103
6,953
5,064
54,498
83
2,229
120
5
61
10
$61
1,260
68
3,804
70
12,444
2,920
27
14
88
4
$63,378
1,000
2,700
1,235
4,818
17,653
112,823
12,452 C 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE  IV.—CLASSIFICATION  OF PROPERTY  BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Sparks from  stove           2
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.—         2
$115
1,510
19,480
Stores and halls           1
Stores and hotels   ■.          1
Stores  and  offices        18
             1,807
..  ..                            25
Smokers' carelessness  :         1
Ashes against wood            1
$1,900
20,911
240
Smokers' carelessness           9
Spontaneous  combustion            1
Unknown             5
1,348
422
27,830
Stores, offices, and rooms....         4
$4,905
Short  circuit         1
75
10
23,704
Stores and  rooms         36
$23
7,913
1,531
4
Exposure              3
326
250
Incendiary             2
Short  circuit            1
Sparks from fireplace           1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.-.         2
Unknown             7
Wood too near stove          1
Short  circuit             1
Defective  belt           1
16,702
3,500
4,067
30
073
693
68,388
40
               6,061
$97
513
Defective  wiring            1
10,566
10
1,165
                800
$560
60
$5,000
5,000
Ashes against wTood           1
Warehouses          21
$475
3,516
Incendiary          2
1,510
1,105
Smokers' carelessness           3
Sparks from bush fire           1
2,862
6,000
213
41,829
                155
                  25
Wood-working plants           1
00
Totals 2,680
 2,680
  $3,162,394 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1931.
C 21
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE VI.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1927^1931.
Occupancy.
Cause of Fire.
Loss of Life.
Adults.
Children.
Club     	
Tar  boiling   over	
1
1
2
2
1
1
Hotel    	
Stove-pipe insufficiently  protected	
Totals, 1931	
6
8
5
16
8
2
Totals, 1930    	
5
Totals, 1929     	
Totals, 1928	
Totals, 1927	
4
VICTORIA,  B.O. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield,   Trinter to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1032.
725-432-9224  

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