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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-FIRST REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1933]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-FIRST REPORT
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS
FOR the
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1932
printed by
authority op the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  Provincial Board of Health,
AricTORiA, B.C., August 31st, 1932.
To His Honour J. AV. Fordiiam Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Medical Inspection of Schools
for the year ended June 30th, 1932.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board op Health,
A'ictoria, B.C., August 31st, 1932.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Twenty-first Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
This Report which is being issued is confined entirely to the school-work. Some years ago
we found a difficulty in publishing our Annual Report in such a way as to contain full information of the activities of the Department because of the reason that the school-year ends in
midsummer, whereas we were obliged to make our Report to Parliament for the Department in
January. AVe have carried on this way, but we find now that with the increase of the work it
would be better to issue the School Medical Report separately, and the yearly report for the
Department will issue at the end of the year, for presentation to the House.
For the present year the work of this, as in all departments, has had to be curtailed for the
simple reason of the financial condition of the country. It is to be regretted that an interruption should occur just at this time when we have become so firmly established. Our school
medical inspection work has shown a marked increase in the benefits accruing from year to year,
and if it had not been for the depression the school-year 1931-32 would have made great strides.
We were prepared to establish three new Full-time Health Units and had been approached
for eight Public Health Nurses. The best indication of the approval of the people of our work
is shown in the increase in the number of nurses—in 1921 we began with one Public Health
Nurse;  to-day we have over eighty.
When the directions were given that curtailment must be made, it was pointed out to the
school officials that they might reduce by cutting some department which had been added of
late years and which sometimes have been called " frills." Some of these departments were
omitted for the present year, but the best indication of the standing of our health-work is the
fact that not one school has, to date, asked for a withdrawal of the Nursing Service. In view
of such conditions we could not suggest any extension to other schools, which is to be regretted,
but the fears of the people were centred around the financial side entirely, and unfortunately
they could not see that the best investment under present conditions would have been, for the
sake of the children, to continue the health-work in all of its phases. It is a mistaken economy
to allow the chief asset—the human asset—to deteriorate.
Many people are finding difficulty in continuing the natural course of their lives, owing to
lack of employment and the absolute necessity of economy being practised. Unfortunately, the
depression has continued in spite of all hope to the contrary, and many people who have been
trying to carry on at the expense of their savings are beginning to find that they must ask for
relief, but before doing so the economies that they are practising, especially as regards foods, are
affecting the children, and loath as we are to admit it, yet this curtailment of nutrition will
within another year, unless relieved, show its effect upon the rising generation.
The most surprising feature during the past year has been the absence of epidemic diseases,
not only in British Columbia but throughout the North American Continent; so much so that,
attention is being called to it by all health authorities. In a measure this is attributable to the
health-work that has been carried on during the past fifteen years in immunizing of our
children against diphtheria and smallpox, but whether this condition will continue under
present economic conditions is hardly to be expected. AVhile we do not wish to be pessimistic,
still we would urge all governing bodies to consider any curtailment in expenditure for health-
work. I do not mean that large expenditures should be authorized for extension of the work,
but every effort should be made to hold what we have. It will pay a dividend in health, and
more particularly in money, if such a view is taken, and carried out; whereas a neglect at this
time, with a nation in which malnutrition is playing such a prominent part, will lay a foundation
for disease which will cost a thousandfold in another year or two. J 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
}\Te have reports from all parts of the Province continually coming in, showing the accounts
of the interest that the people are taking and the results that are being obtained.
I beg to submit reports from different points in the Province; a particularly interesting one
is from the nurse in charge of the Sunset Prairie District in the Peace River country. The
report of the difficulties they have to overcome is one of results and the account that follows
is very interesting.
I am also publishing a report from a nurse in the southern part of the Province in the
Okanagan. A careful reading of the work described in this report will give a very proper idea
of a full nursing programme.
There is, in addition, a report from a nurse in the western part of the Province, in the
Fraser Valley, in the Mission and Maple Ridge Districts. Note the improvement in the physical
condition of the pupils.
I am also publishing a report from the Full-time Health Unit at Saanich, the first established in British Columbia. The report should convince any one of the great advances that
have been made in carrying out our programme.
SUNSET PRAIRIE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
Sunset Prairie P.O., B.C., August 29th, 1932.
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg the honour to submit an outline of the work in the Sunset Prairie Public Health
Service, Peace River Block, British Columbia.
Some ten months ago a group of women in Northern British Columbia belonging to the
AVomen's Institute at Sunset Prairie asked that a Public Health Nurse be sent to their district.
Through your Department; the Hon. Mr. Hinchliffe, Board of Education ; and Mr. Cory AA7ood,
Commissioner, B.C. Canadian Red Cross, the service was established, the Public Health Nurse
reporting for duty in the middle of October, 1931.
I found that I had twelve districts, in a widely scattered area of some 280 square miles,
with no organization but this small group of institute women, and the only means of transportation a Clyde horse.
The winter was fast approaching, and wishing at least to get some idea of the area, I was
taken by the clergyman at Sunset Prairie in his car on a tour of inspection of schools and visits
to the settlers. The trip was through difficult trails, full of stumps, where one lost one's way
and often stuck in the bush and muskeg for hours. AVe finished up by coming down the cut-
bank and having, with the car, to break ice around a hole (40 feet deep) in the Kiskatinaw
River.
After much hard work and many struggles an excellent executive was chosen and committees formed in each of the twelve districts, with one member of each on a Central Board.
Like all new enterprises, it had its knockers as well as boosters. The service became known
slowly; I think the best little missionaries were the school-children, there being 208 under my
care.
In order to cover my territory the matter of transportation was gone into and a car was
loaned by the Agricultural Department. I bought a sleigh, the team being made up of the
aforementioned Clyde, which had to be blindfolded to drive; the other horse the product of a
25-cent raffle, an old gentleman of 17 years, lent the service by Miss Cody-Johnson, the schoolteacher at Sunset Prairie.    This weird team travelled 1,186 miles during the winter.
Through the keen interest of my Medical Health Officer, Dr. Beckwith, family clinics were
arranged throughout the twelve districts, where we gathered valuable data and obtained some
clear idea of what we had to contend with.
The schools were visited once a month if* at all possible. Health and hygiene were taught
and the children inspected, weighed, and measured. Dr. Beckwith and myself had some very
interesting experiences in going the rounds of the various schools; three times last winter I
upset him from the sleigh. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32. J 7
In coming to my assistance at a difficult obstetrical case, the doctor's car skidded over one
of the cut-banks, dropping nearly 400 feet. Luckily he jumped clear, and a team was able to
pull his car on to the road again, after which he completed the trip and delivered the case.
In the spring we crossed the Kiskatinaw River to inspect three schools. A Chinook started,
holes came in the snow, both horses came down, and one was lamed. The ice had opened in the
river, but if we did not get across it would mean between 70 and 80 miles extra driving. AVith
the help of four men, we finished up by swimming the horses, hand-pulling the sleigh, and we
ourselves walked over the cracking ice by putting down small birch logs. This was rather
hazardous on account of the swiftly moving current.
We find that one-third of the children have goitre, owing to the water. Iodine is given in a
goitre clinic which has been organized. There being very few cows in the area, milk is a great
problem. We find 9.1 per cent, of the children are undernourished. About 2 per cent, of the
children are vaccinated; we hope for a clinic this year. Our baby clinic has been held every
three months, the difficulty being collecting the mothers and babies at a central point. AVe have
two clinics, with 76 babies and 240 pre-school children under supervision. This service is much
appreciated by the mothers. A $20 milk fund, given by the Rev. Canon Proctor, has been a
godsend to six babies. Cod-liver oil has been given away, and much public speaking done on
the value of vitamin " D."
These homesteading people are a brave, fine crowd, grappling with that vast country against
heavy odds. Some of them have not been out for years; they are delighted to see you and
one drinks numerous cups of tea while giving advice.
One small instance: Last winter, during one of the worst storms, I was called at night to a
patient hemorrhaging. AVhen I arrived, after an 18-mile drive, I found her quite pulseless,
cold, and with a rapid respiration. The doctor was sent for—40 miles away. He made the trip
in record time, owing to the excellent work of one of my committee in relaying horses. Meantime I worked with the patient, who had rallied by the time the doctor arrived.
That district voluntarily gave $25 this year and now want to belong to the service. That
one act " sold " the service to them.
I have just finished 6,095 miles of travelling—3,593 in my car, 1,276 on horseback, and the
rest by sleigh. AVe have to depend on horsemanship and the horse, when sliding down young
glaciers, or getting out of clay holes in the river, and getting lost in the snow-drifts. The service
is becoming so well known and is of such interest to the settlers that " The Block News " reports
all our public meetings. Dawson Creek and Rolla Districts are both working hard to get nurses.
Eight public meetings were held in these districts, seven of which I addressed. This will cover
all the country south of the Peace River.
All workers love this great wild, rolling country, gouged with its huge cut-banks. The
country is full of wild life. Three weeks ago, driving back from Fort St. John, a cow moose
charged my car; she had a 2-month-old calf. I discovered a huge black bear about 100 yards
away, but fortunately it was after the calf and not my car.
The professional workers hope to establish a Peace River AArelfare Committee to help do
constructive work amongst the settlers, because of the serious conditions to be faced this winter
owing to the lack of rain and poor crops, and cutworms eating the vegetables.
Through the understanding and help of all heads of departments in Arictoria, one has
courage to go on and build stone on stone, with faith for the future of that splendid country
known as the Peace River Block.
I have, etc.,
Nancy E. Dunn, R.N.,
Public Health Nurse. J 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
PROVINCIAL PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING SERVICE,
KELOWNA RURAL DISTRICTS.
I have much pleasure in presenting for the approval of the Kelowna Rural Schools Health
Association the Fourth Annual Report of the Provincial Public Health Nursing Service for the
Kelowna Rural Districts.
The report embraces various phases of school nursing, infant and pre-school hygiene, and
general public-health organization in the Rural School Districts of Okanagan Mission, Benvoulin,
Mission Creek, East Kelowna, South Kelowna, Rutland, Ellison, AArinfield, Okanagan Centre, and
Ewings Landing.
SECTION I.—SCHOOL-AVORK.
During the year there have been 681 children on the school registers.
One hundred and eighty-nine visits have been made to the schools by the School Nurse for
the purpose of general health and cleanliness inspection, prevention and control of communicable
and skin diseases, and education in personal hygiene.
Six hundred and twenty-one medical examinations have been made by the School Medical
Officer, Dr. G. A. Ootmar, with the School Nurse in attendance, for the purpose of checking up
on the general health of the children and the discovery of defective physical conditions which
would retard the best development of the growing child. At this examination the condition of
nutrition, skin, mentality, eyesight, hearing, tonsils, teeth, glands (with especial reference to
goitre), heart, chest, and nervous system are taken into consideration.
Defects in posture and any other defective conditions are also noted, a record made, and
an effort made by the School Nurse, by constant reinspection, home-visiting, and personal talks
to the children and others interested, to remedy such conditions as are possible to improve, or
completely remedy.
During the school-year 163 new defects were discovered, 347 old defects found improved,
and 228 old defects found not improved; 315 notices of defective conditions sent to parents;
4,161 inspections of children were made in the schools and 217 visits made to homes.
Improved Conditions.
It is encouraging to note that among children with improved defective conditions were 97
cases of slight goitre, all of whom had been advised to take a small daily dose of iodine ; also 145
cases of enlarged tonsils and 105 eases of dental caries. Fourteen children had obtained glasses
for defective vision.
There is, however, still much dental caries among the children, to which no attention can
be given because of the lack of ready money among parents. The reason applies to several
children badly needing glasses for defective vision.
Underweight Children.
One thousand one hundred and twenty-three weighings and measurings were, made of
622 children, of whom 24.1 per cent, were found to be 5 to 10 per cent, underweight and 12 per
cent, of those underweight not gaining in weight.
The percentage of children 5 to 10 per cent, underweight is about the same proportion this
year as last year. It is noticeable, however, that the percentage of underweight children gaining
in weight is only 88 per cent, this year, as compared with 97, 96, and 97 per cent, in 1928-29,
1929-30, and 1930-31 respectively.
Can it be that the forced economy in housekeeping necessities having to be practised by many
parents has anything to do with this result? Also, the lack of ready money to remedy defective
conditions which act upon the general well-being of the child?
It is essential that growing children obtain plenty of the growth-promoting vitamins,
proteins, and fats contained in natural foods such as milk, butter, eggs, fresh vegetables, and
fruits. It is also noticeable that when money is scarce the first dietary essentials to be cut
down, or omitted altogether, are usually milk, butter, and eggs, all valuable and necessary for
the growth and welfare of the growing child.
In one Russian home visited the School Nurse was shocked to find the parents and five
children subsisting on potatoes, bread, apples, and tomatoes, with no milk, butter, eggs, or meat. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32. J 9
The children were developing " pellagra," a disease once common in Italy and the Southern
United States, where a cereal diet lacking in proteins and fat soluble, vitamin A, was common
among the poorer people.
In connection with the problem of malnutrition, a hot drink provided at school in the winter
wou'd do much to augment the contents of poorly filled lunch-pails brought by little children
who have often walked long distances through the snow to school. Several of our rural schools
are to be congratulated on the effort that has been made to provide such extra nourishment.
At the beginning of the school-year a letter was sent to all teachers and School Boards
stressing the value of a hot drink for children at noon, and outlining the conditions of competitions for the Rural School Health Challenge Cup presented by Dr. G. A. Ootmar for annual
competition among nine rural schools under the care of the School Health Nurse.
South Kelowna, the school winning the cup for 1931-32, had a very-well-organized school
lunch, with every child taking a small part in its preparation. Most of these children came long
distances to school, and it was a pleasure to see them enjoying their lunch, with the supervising
teacher in charge. It is without doubt possible with good co-operation and planning to duplicate
this beneficial situation in every rural school during the coming winter.
Rural Schools Health Cup Competition.
In considering the points for which the rural schools were graded for the School Health
Challenge Cup, the School Nurse endeavoured to cover every condition relating to the schools
and their surroundings which would influence the health of the children, together with the personal cleanliness of the children and the general interest taken in health matters. This comprehensive survey has resulted in a very interesting and illuminating study of the hygienic
condition prevailing in each school and its surroundings, and will form a foundation upon
which future improvements can be based.
The survey was divided into twelve sections, each relative to a definite phase of school
hygiene, of which no less than ninety items came under consideration. In each section a
maximum rating of 100 points could be scored—making a possible total of 1,200 points.
Sec. 1. Cleanliness of the School-children.—Clothes, face, neck, teeth, head, chest, arms,
and hands.
Sec. 2. Hygiene of the School-room.—Screen-windows, screen-doors; absence of flies:
cleanliness of floor, desks, windows; well-oiled floor, sweeping mixture; labelled clothes-hooks
in cloak-rooms.
Sec. 3. Sanitary Condition of Toilets.—Number of seats—boys, girls; cleanliness of seats,
etc.; proper disinfection ; toilet-paper ; other paper ; screen-doors and screened air-spaces;
state of repair;  absence of flies.
Sec. It- Drinking-water Supply.—Bacteriologically tested; pumps with drinking attachment;
running water in school;  paper cups;   individual cups ;   water cooler or container.
Sec. 5. Hand-washing Facilities.—Permanent wash-basins, or enamel basin ; waste-bucket;
jug;  soap (preferably liquid soap) ;  paper towels;  individual towels.
Sec. 6. Heating and Ventilation of the School-room.—Type of furnace—hot water, hot air,
ja.cketed stove, other type of stove; water-pan; thermometer; open windows; window-board;
cross-ventilation.
Sec. 7. Lighting of the School-room.—Sufficient windows; correct position of windows;
correct window shades or awnings; absence of glare on blackboards; finish of walls; cubic
air-space;  artificial lighting.
Sec. 8. Provision for School Lunch.—Cupboard for lunch-boxes; supervised lunch; stove
and kettle, or saucepan; lunch-room, or desks used;  hot drinks in winter-time ;  thermos bottles.
Sec. 9. Equipment of the Playground.—Basketball, football, baseball, Softball, volleyball;
swings, see-saws ;  rings and bars.
Sec. 10. Sanitary Condition of the Playground. — Cleanliness; shade; absence of dust
(grass) ;  drainage;  area.
Sec. 11. Response to Health Education.—Response to vaccination against smallpox.
Sec. 12. Interest in Health Education. — Morning inspection (junior grades); projects;
posters;  essays;  booklets;  health plays;  wall decorations in school-room. J 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A complete summary of the points scored in each section by the various schools follows
(South Kelowna winning the cup for this year with a score of 935.91 out of a possible 1,200
points) :—
Section.
rt   .
tea
rt a
51
a
VI oi
X zi
So
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a
01
1S5
d &
a
rt
o
i
•a
a
rt
I*
OO
a
3
g
V.
rt
1. Cleanliness of the children
92.25
91.00
68.00
48.00
5.00
80.00
97.00
95.00
55.00
100.00
83.00
100.00
87.22
73.00
62.00
75.00
75.00
68.00
98.00
100.00
65.00
85.00
73.00
70.00
90.80
60.00
47.00
48.00
5.00
73.00
83.00
10.00
20.00
100.00
76.00
40.00
93.22
75.00
61.00
100.00
95.00
75.00
90.00
90.00
90.00
85.00
60.00
60.00
98.75
93.00
85.00
75.00
85.00
75.00
98.00
100.00
35.00
95.00
64.30
80.00
88.48
45.00
43.00
90.00
100.00
85.00
98.00
55.00
100.00
90.00
78.00
43.00
76.17
60.00
49.00
85.00
60.00
80.00
98.00
75.00
100.00
100.00
32.00
80.00
82.70
76.00
55.00
80.00
95.00
80.00
100.00
70.00
70.00
90.00
57.00
40.00
99.91
68.00
80.00
100.00
80.00
70.00
83.00
90.00
45.00
80.00
100.00
40.00
100
100
3. Sanitary condition of toilets..
4. Facilities tor drinking-water..
5. Facilities for hand-washing...
6. Heating and ventilation of
100
100
100
100
100
8.  Facilities for school lunch
100
100
10. Playground, sanitary eondi-
100
11. Response  to   health  educa-
100
12.  Interest in health education...
100
Totals	
914.25
931.22
652.80
974.32
984.05
915.48
895.17
897.70
935.91
1,200
Communicable Diseases.
It is a pleasure to be able to report that there have been only thirty-four cases of communicable diseases in the rural schools during the year, with, as a consequence, good attendance
of school-children.
Prompt isolation of the sick child and careful watch of all school contacts, together with
good co-operation from teachers and parents, are some of the reasons which have helped to bring
about this satisfactory condition.
Disease.
School.
No. of Cases.
Families
affected.
4
4
I
13
2
2
1
3
3
1
2
Chicken-pox	
Mission Creek	
East Kelowna	
East Kelowna	
1
1
8
1
1
Rutland.	
1
3
1
In connection with the above communicable diseases, five adults and ten pre-school children
also became infected in the same families and were isolated in their homes.
The cases of typhoid were definitely traced by the Medical Health Officer to a " carrier " in
each case.
Skin Diseases.
Disease.
School.
No. of Cases.
Families
affected.
Ellison	
5
6
3
2
1
1
2
1 (?)
2
0
1
Rutland	
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
Rutland	
2
Winfleld	
4 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32. J 11
Active Immunization against Diphtheria.
In the school-year 1930-31 a district-wide campaign for protection against diphtheria by
immunization resulted in many of our school-children being protected for life.
In November and December, 1931, the parents of the children attending the schools in East
Kelowna, South Kelowna, AVinfield, Ellison, and Okanagan Centre were again given the opportunity to have their school and pre-school children protected free of cost.
Consent-slips and notices of clinics were first distributed to parents, and those children for
whom the parents desired protection were first Schick-tested to ascertain if they would be
susceptible to diphtheria if exposed; then, if found positive, were given three injections of
toxoid.
This injection causes no ill after-effects, and it is the intention of the School Health Service
to offer this free protection to our different school districts every year, both for the school and
pre-school child, until all our children are 100 per cent, immunized.
The deadly disease of diphtheria still causes a high percentage of deaths and disability,
especially in the early years of life, among the children of Canada. Much heart-trouble developing in later life can be traced to the damage done to the valves of the heart by the toxin poured
out by the germs into the blood-stream and tissues in childhood.
Disease of the heart has been for many years, and still is, the chief cause of death and
disability among our. population.
When we consider that by this simple and harmless mode of protection diphtheria has been
practically stamped out in some districts of Canada (notably the City of Hamilton, Ont.), it
seems very worth while to take advantage of this protection service provided free for all children
by the Provincial Department of Health.
An itemized report follows :—
School-children:   Schick test, 39;   found positive, 26;   inoculations with toxoid, 61.
Pre-school children:  Inoculations with toxoid, 9.
School-children completely immunized with three inoculations of toxoid, 18.
Pre-school children completely immunized with three inoculations of toxoid, 3.
Clinics held, 15.
Campaign for Vaccination against Smallpox.
In February, 1932, the serious epidemic of malignant smallpox in Vancouver, B.C., made us
consider the advisability of protecting as many of our children as possible by vaccination against
this terrible disease, which used to be termed " Captain of the Men of Death " in the dark days
before the efficacy of vaccination was discovered.
Though we were some 500 miles away from the seat of trouble so far as distance was concerned, yet in these days of rapid transportation there is so much passing of people to and fro
that it would be easily possible for an apparently well person infected with the disease-germs
(which take from six to fourteen days to develop) to bring the disease in to Kelowna and
district and start an epidemic. This has been found to be the history of most epidemics—that of
the Windsor epidemic of 1923-24 and of Vancouver in 1932.
Very many of our school and pre-school children had never been vaccinated, and many of
our adults so many years ago that their immunity was probably greatly lessened.
AVith this thought in mind, twenty-three free clinics were arranged in the different rural
schools; clinic dates and consent-slips given to all school-children to take home to parents, with
an explanation of the present emergency; 400 pamphlets on vaccination were distributed
through the schools to teachers and pupils; health talks given both by the School Nurse and
by interested teachers; and newspaper articles and announcements written by the District
Medical Health Officer.
There was, as a result, an excellent response among the rural school-children, some 440 of
whom were vaccinated or revaccinated (71 per cent, of the total school attendance).
In addition, ninety-nine infants and pre-school children and ninety-four adults were
vaccinated or revaccinated in the various rural districts. J 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
An itemized report follows:
District.
Vaccinated
Schoolchildren.
On Register.
Pre-school.
Adults.
Okanagan Mission	
Mission Creek	
Benvoulin	
38
55
44
30
9
16
198
30
20
46—53%
75—73%
58—76%
50—60%
14—64.3%
50—32%
253—78%
53—57%
20—100%
4
13
6
10
6
7
40
8
5
6
4
7
3
South Kelowna	
9
Ellison	
9
Rutland	
30
Winfield	
19
Okanagan Centre	
7
Totals	
440
619—71 %
99
94
Adventist Church School (by request)	
9
7
17
13
4
Ewings Landing	
Clinics held, 23.
SECTION II.—CHILD-WELFARE.
One of the most interesting phases of the work is the development among the infants and
pre-school children.
There are now 72 infants under 1 year and 191 pre-school children from 1 to 6 years of age
on the register, making a total of 263 names.
Twenty-four well-baby and pre-school clinics have been held to date in the Districts of
AVinfield, Rutland, Benvoulin, East Kelowna, and Okanagan Mission, with an attendance of
89 children, making 158 attendances.
The District Medical Health Officer and the Provincial Health Nurse are in attendance at
these clinics, assisted by the members of the various AAromen's Institutes, and in the case of
Benvoulin, by Mrs. J. B. Fisher, without whose kindly aid it would be impossible to carry on
this work, which is so valuable to mothers in the scattered rural districts. Tea is served by the
institute members and a table of interesting literature laid out for free distribution. Free
vaccination against smallpox is also given; this year ninety-nine of our pre-school children have
been vaccinated.
Two hundred and thirty-five home-visits to infants and pre-school children have been made
by the Health Nurse to weigh the babies and give advice as to feeding and general hygiene.
This home-visiting service is much appreciated by the mothers, and we would much like to
extend it if we had more time. Advice is also given through letters and telephone consultations,
some 659 instructional telephone consultations having taken place, 900 pieces of literature distributed, and 136 letters written during the year on various matters having to do with the
welfare of children.
Two chest clinics have been held with Dr. Lamb, Government Chest Specialist; X-ray
examinations supplemented the very careful chest examination given by Dr. Lamb, but none of
the children, contacts of tuberculosis patients, brought for examination were found to be infected
with tuberculosis.
Sixteen children and adults attended these clinics, the value of which as a preventive
service against the dread disease of tuberculosis cannot be estimated.
In connection with the arrest of pre-tuberculosis conditions in children, an endeavour is
being made to build a preventorium on the shores of the Okanagan Lake near Kelowna, where
delicate children may live an outdoor life under proper medical and nursing supervision during
the warmer months of the year.
The District Medical Health Officer, Dr. G. A. Ootmar, is the originator of the idea, which
is receiving favourable response from many service organizations throughout the Okanagan
A'alley.
Dr. Ootmar has seen excellent results from the same type of open-air treatment in his native
country of Holland, and considers the Okanagan climate, with its many hours of sunshine, ideal
for such a purpose. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 13
Summary of Free Clinics held, July, 1931, to May, 1932.
Type.
No.
Physician.
No. of
Children.
No. in
Atten ■
dance.
Chest	
Schick test	
Active immunization against
diphtheria ,
Vaccination against smallpox
Well-baby and pre-school...	
Totals	
11
23
24
li4~
Dr. Lamb, Govt. Chest Specialist	
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O	
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O	
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O., School	
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O., Pre-school
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O., Adults.	
Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District M.H.O	
16
43
456]
99
94
87
740
(94 adults)
16
39
61
649
158
923
SECTION III.—PUBLIC HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND ORGANIZATION.
Health Exhirit in Kelowna, September, 1931.
A " ATitamin " Exhibit to demonstrate the value of the vitamins contained in 150 varieties of
home-grown fruits and vegetables was staged by the District Medical Health Officer in the Old
School Building in September, 1931.
In co-operation with this idea the Health Nurses, Miss Tisdale, Kelowna city schools, and
Mrs. A. F. Grindon, Kelowna rural schools, also prepared a " House of Health " and " Vegetable
Mannequin Parade," which delighted the school-children and evoked appreciative comment in
our local newspapers, also commendation from Dr. H. E. Young, Provincial Health Officer.
A descriptive article of the above written for the Public Health Nurses' Bulletin has brought
interested letters from both Chilliwack and Kamloops School Nurses, who are planning to
duplicate the exhibit at their annual fall fair.
Conference of Public Health Nurses at Pentioton, October, 1931.
In October, 1931, the Public Health Nurses of the Okanagan Aralley decided to hold an
informal round-table conference in conjunction with the annual convention of the Okanagan
ATalley Teachers' Federation at Penticton.
Public  Health Nurses  present were:   Miss  Charlton,   Armstrong  schools;    Mrs.  Martin,
Arernon schools;   Miss E. Tisdale, Kelowna city schools;   Mrs. A. F. Grindon, Kelowna rural
schools ;   Miss Barton, V.O.N., Peachland-AVestbank;   and Miss- Twiddy, Penticton schools.    Dr.
Geo. C. Paine, M.O.H., Penticton, also joined in the conference.
Topics laid down for discussion were:—
(1.)  The problem of immunization in small cities and rural communities.
(2.)   Clinics for immunization of children and correction of defects in small centres.
(3.)  Nurses'  duties  in  helping  to prevent  and  control  the  spread   of  communicable
diseases.
(4.)  Closing schools to prevent spread of disease vs. keeping open for daily supervision
of contacts.
(5.)  Disinfecting class-rooms, books, etc.
(6.)  Medical supervision of the health of the pre-school child.
Each nurse gave a short opening address on her chosen topic, after which the subject-matter
of the address was taken up.    Opinions were freely exchanged and many helpful ideas discussed.
Most valuable was the presence of the Medical Health Officer, who presented the case both from
the view-point of the practising medical practitioner and the Medical Officer of Health.
In the pioneering work of developing preventive medicine and publi-health nursing a " get-
together " round-table conference of medical men and health nurses to discuss the many
problems involved is both stimulating and helpful, leading to intelligent co-operation and mutual
respect.
The conference closed with an address by Dr. MacGregor, of Penticton. J 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Meetings addressed.
(1.) October, 1931. Ruund-table Conference of Public Health Nurses at Penticton. Subject :  " Methods in promoting an immunization campaign in small centres and rural districts."
(2.) November, 1931. Round-table Conference with Rutland School Trustees. Subjects:
(1) The proposed Health Cup Competition;   (2) The hot school lunch.
(3.) November, 1931. Benvoulin School (opening of new room). Subject: "The value of
co-operation between teachers, parents, school trustees, and the school nurse in promoting the
health of school-children."
(4.) December, 1931. Rutland AAromen's Institute. Subject: "The need of co-operative
organization for the purpose of the distribution of material relief in the Kelowna Rural Districts " (with especial reference to local conditions). As an immediate result of this meeting, a
representative, Mrs. T. G. Chambers, with social-service experience was appointed from Rutland
to the Kelowna City and District Relief Association. Some very excellent work was organized
and carried out by Mrs. Chambers and many families were helped during the winter months
with both food and clothes, after careful investigations of home conditions.
(5.) January, 1932. Annual meeting of the Arictorian Order of Nurses. AVestbank and
Peachland Branch. Impromptu address on " Some practical reasons why we need a Public
Health Nursing Service in the country districts."
(6.) April, 1932. AVinfield Women's Institute. Subject: "The need for. and the value of.
the well-baby and pre-school clinics"  (with especial reference to local conditions).
(7.) May, 1932. Okanagan Mission AAromen's Institute. Subject: "Some helpful suggestions for the care of the sick in their own homes " (with practical demonstration).
(8.) May, 1932. Rural Schools Track Meet. Rutland. Presentation of the School Health
Challenge Cup, donated by Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District Medical Health Officer, with short address
(through megaphone) on "The Aims of the School Health Cup Competition."
OTHER ACTIVITIES.
Prenatal Care to Expectant Mothers.—Three cases were opened and closed during the year
and twenty-three advisory visits paid. The Health Nurse would much like to extend this
service, but with a very full programme it is almost impossible at the present time.
In conclusion, my appreciative thanks are due to all those who by their interest are
promoting and encouraging the work of the Public Health Nursing Service in the Kelowna
Rural Districts; more especially the Provincial Health Officer; Dr. G. A. Ootmar, District
Medical Health Officer: the local physicians; the executive and members of the Kelowna Rural
Schools Health Association; the Women's Institutes; and the teaching staffs of the rural
schools.
Anne Frances Grindon, R.N..
Nurse in Charge, Provincial Public Health, Nursing Service,
Kelowna Rural Districts.
MISSION AND MAPLE RIDGE DISTRICTS.
The health shields awarded by the Provincial Board of Health and Mission and Maple
Ridge School Boards have been given, as last year, to the school in each district which has the
highest percentage of children free from the four common remedial defects—decaying permanent
teeth, decidedly enlarged tonsils, defective vision, and children 10 per cent, or more underweight.
In Mission District, the Mission Central School won the shield with 50.3 per cent, free from
those defects, an advance of 6 per cent, from their last year's record. Stave Falls, the holder
of the shield last year, is a close second this year, with 50 per cent., a raise of 2 per cent, for
them. The other schools rank as follows: Cedar Valley, 46.7 per cent.; Hatzic, 43.2 per cent.;
Silverhill, 42.8 per cent.; Steelhead, 33.3 per cent.; Silverdale, 32.1 per cent.; and Stave
Gardens, 20 per cent.
Maple Ridge School, in the Maple Ridge District, won their shield with a percentage of
57.6, an advance for them of 4 per cent, over their last year's figure. Haney School held the
shield last year and comes second this year with 57.1 per cent., a decrease in per cent., but the MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32. J 15
school assimilated numbers of pupils from elsewhere at the beginning of the last term. The
other schools' standing is as follows: AVhonnock, 55.7 per cent.; AVebster's Corners, 52.7 per
cent.;  Alexander Robinson, 50.3 per cent.;   Ruskin, 50 per cent.;   and Hammond, 45.2 per cent.
The number of children examined in the two districts was 1,554, the percentage free from
defects of the total number being 49.5 per cent. These figures, as before, are very conservative,
as only defects obvious to a nurse in a routine examination were counted and no doubt numbers
were missed. If it were not for the long trying winter there would perhaps have been a higher
percentage, a condition much desired for the children of the district, as these are the formative
years of their lives, both mental and physical, and these defects are capable of remedy, also
capable of doing much harm if left unremedied.
Toxoid.—Beginning June 1st, inoculations of toxoid for the prevention of diphtheria were
started in the Mission City School. Over 60 per cent, of the pupils are availing themselves of
the opportunity. The toxoid serum is provided by the Provincial Board of Health free of
charge. Dr. Eacrett, as Health Officer for the village, is giving the treatment, assisted by the
School Nurse, with the co-operation of the teachers. The serum is given in three doses, by
hypodermic, three weeks apart, and it confers immunity from diphtheria for life.
The first two doses of the series were given in June; the final one to be given July 14th
and 18th at the school. The third dose is a very important one and it is hoped that all shall
endeavour to receive theirs.
M. E. Grierson, R.N.,
School Nurse.
SAANICH FULL TIME HEALTH UNIT.
The beginning of a health service to the municipality was made about twelve years ago,
when a nursing service was started, with a part-time Medical Officer of Health and a part-time
School Medical Officer to carry out the duties required by Statute.
This service was subject to the same unsatisfactory conditions which obtain elsewhere when
part-time officials are employed.
The men's own private interests, which paid better, necessarily commanded first consideration.    There was also lack of co-ordination of the work and co-operation due to natural reasons.
As a result of each man working independently in his own narrow sphere and in a limited
time, conditions affecting the general welfare of the community were not fully recognized and
necessary remedial measures were not instituted. Hence, true public-health work and education
of a lasting character and adequate in its scope was conspicuously absent.
This state of affairs and the high cost of part-time service were finally recognized, and
through the co-operation of the Council and School Board and the Provincial Health Officer,
and the generosity of the Rockefeller grant, a full-time unit was born in 1927.
The staff was composed then, as it is now, of a Medical Officer of Health, who in addition
took over the duties of School Medical Officer, and four nurses. The prime condition of employment was that each member be fully trained in public health and in possession of a degree in
public health. In my opinion this is absolutely necessary, as the view-point of curative medicine
and that of preventive medicine differ to a considerable extent. In the last few years, however,
this difference has been undergoing great changes.
The first act of the new organization was to make a thorough survey of the municipality
and determine upon a suitable programme adequate and progressive in its scope.
Saanich has an area of 55 square miles, about a fourth of which is semi-urban and the rest
is strictly rural. The population, numbering about 15,000, however, is composed of about one-
fifth farmers and the rest of wage-earners.
Owing to the fact that the municipality is devoid of industrial establishments—barring fruit
and vegetable canneries—giving scope for industrial medicine, we have outlined our programme
so as to concentrate our activities on: (a) The control of infectious diseases, which under
part-time control would assume epidemic proportions, necessitating the closure of schools;
(6) correction of insanitary conditions, which were legion because of absence of a sewerage
system and lack of proper sanitary inspection and building restrictions;   (c) the improvement J 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of the health and protection of the school population; (d) prenatal and infant welfare;
(e) health education; (/) raising of the standard of the milk-supplies, dairying being a major
activity in this area.
In the first two years I was rather opposed to the bedside-nursing service which we had
inherited from the former organization, and, having worked in the United States in a County
Health Unit where no such service was given, thought that such service had no place in a
public-health organization.
Since then I have become converted to the idea that it is a valuable aid in gaining the
confidence of the people and in giving them concrete service, paves the way for immediate and
future public-health education, in the home. It also makes the Health Department an intimate
friend and not simply an aloof impersonal division of Government with police authority.
It places the health authorities on the same footing with the family as the old-time family
physician.
We may now proceed to view of what has been accomplished during the past five years.
(a.) Control of Communicable Diseases.—As I have remarked, the municipality experienced
epidemics before the establishment of a Full-time Health Unit which frequently necessitated
the closure of schools. This, in my opinion, is practically always due to the fact that insufficient
information regarding the occurrence of disease is available and that insufficient means of
control are employed.
It is generally believed that reporting of infection by the physician is the principal factor
in the control of communicable disease. From our own experiences we find that is hardly so,
for few people call their physician unless in their opinion the patient is quite ill, and it is the
policy of our nurses, who are so frequently consulted, to advise the calling-in of a physician
at once. This certainly makes for better care of the sick and favouring his chances of a
complete recovery. Knowing that the greatest percentage of infection occurs in the school-
child ; that in all infections of an epidemic nature the child is " under the weather " and unable
to attend school for about a week, we instituted a regulation that any child absent two days or
longer cannot return to school without a signed permit from the Medical Officer, which is only
granted after an examination by the Medical Officer or a visit and examination of the absent
child at his home by the nurse. Furthermore, any child taking sick or feeling unwell at school
is sent heme and stays away until seen by the nurse. With a sufficient staff we can also save
the child needless absence from school when exposed to infection by allowing him to attend in
the incubation period ; and in the average child this may mean the difference between passing
and repeating a grade.
This method gave us the required information and control of infection, and we are proud
to say we have had no epidemics or closure of schools since the Health Unit has begun functioning. But what is most gratifying is that the community at large has now learned to co-operate
with us, and their first thought is to call a nurse for advice and so notify the nurse of any illness.
So well has this control benefited Saanich that the saving alone in Isolation Hospital bills,
saving of school-time, and lessening of retardation has already probably repaid the cost of the
Unit in the past five years. AVith the exception of chicken-pox and measles, our cases of
infection have dropped year by year, and even in the above-mentioned diseases our proportion
per 1.000 of population has been less than a third of any comparable community.
In the past year we are fortunately able to say we have not had a single case of diphtheria,
scarlet fever, or smallpox.
The following figures show the marked reduction in the costs of Isolation Hospital bills to
the municipality since the new Unit has taken control:—
1925   $2,110
1926      5,535
1927  :    1,181
Full-time Health Department—
1928         140
1929 (isolation of diphtheria carriers)   795
1930    350
1931    235
1932   Nil MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 17
This control of infection plus the correction of defects for which regular school medical
examination and supervision are responsible have brought about an increase of over 13 per cent,
in the attendance.
Since the annual budget for education is about $140,000, in the past five years the school
population has benefited to the extent of about $96,000, which would otherwise have been wasted.
The attendance record is shown below:—
Percentage of Attendance of Enrolled Pupils, Saanich Schools.
School-year.
05
01
O
>
o
CJ
CJ
Q
5
ri
01
fe
01
u
rt
ro
<j
r-i
rt
3
CD
to
O £
> bH
■< d
1924-25 	
93.08
94.3
93.3
93.5
94.7
94.7
95.5
95.2
89.1
89.7
91.3
91.6
93.9
93.1
93.3
96.3
88.1
90.3
87.2
93.2
92.5
92.9
95.2
94.3
85.3
88.7
84.2
89.2
93.3
94.1
95.8
94.42
1
84.3
80.2
78.4
91.2
88.6
87.6
94.6
92.7
79.7
77.8
79.9
92.4
90.5
88.3
92.4
92.6
76.8
76.7
81.7
92.9
94.01
93.0
92.6
93.33
74.7
79.4
77.7
92.8
93.6
93.2
94.4
94.77
74.02
76.8
79.2
95.8
90.8
93.2
94.5
95.74
74.1
75.9
76.9
92.2
92.9
93.8
91.5
91.9
%
81.92
1925-26	
82.98
1926-27	
82.98
1927-28*	
93.48
1928-29*.. '.	
92.48
1929-30*	
92.40
1930-31*	
93.98
1931  32*     	
94.12
* Full-time Health Unit in charge.
In the control of diphtheria we have continuously campaigned for immunization with toxoid,
and we have been able to immunize about 700 children, none of whom have contracted the
disease though exposed to it.
Every year we vaccinate many children as a routine at the request of their parents, and
this year when there was an outbreak in Arancouver we vaccinated 440 individuals.
We have also experimented in two cases of severe hemorrhagic measles with intramuscular
injection of blood from convalescents in the same family, and it is my belief that this proved
to be a life-saving measure.
AATiatever causes or conditions may underlie the diminution, and whatever conclusions may
be drawn from the following figures showing the number of nursing visits made by the staff,
we leave to the reader:—
1926   2,803
1927   2,966
1928   2,355
1929   1,853
1930  1,959
1931  :  1,602
(It.) In every community the attention given to sanitation is not only repaid by the lessening of morbidity, but also by the added civic pride. In Saanich we are handicapped by the
absence of a sewerage system and by the laxity in former years in sanitation and construction.
However, year by year the installation of proper septic tanks has been progressing rapidly and
the old-time privy is becoming a landmark, and nuisance complaints are not as numerous now
as in former years.
Saanich with its numerous beaches proves a yearly attraction for campers and vacationists
and the summer colonies assume considerable proportions. In the past few years we have done
considerable inspection of these resorts and have brought the sanitation to a fairly high
standard.
Two years ago a Sanitary Inspector who is also Building Inspector has been added to the
staff. He has been responsible for a considerable amount of work in improving sanitation and
the character of construction that is now going on.
We have also been fortunate in the enforcement of building restrictions which obviate the
repetition of past errors in sanitation and housing.
(6.) It is in the field of work among the school population that we have expended most of
our energies, and it is upon them, I believe, that we are justified in centring our attention and
hopes. The adult, unless he has been exposed in his youth to the teachings of public health,
2 J 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
is to a great extent impervious to new learning of the preventive type. AAThether he admits it
or not, he is not greatly impressed by " new-fangled " ideas and theories and what was good
for him is good enough for his children. To justify this statement, witness how reluctantly
the adult accepts new public-health ideas and only after such a prodigious amount of education.
The mind of youth is plastic and an impression or lesson once taught is seldom forgotten.
In youth, too, we meet conditions which are correctable or amenable to treatment or proper
guidance, thus ensuring proper development of mind and body into useful manhood or womanhood, provided always that we have properly inherited material, bodily and mental, with which
to begin.
A proper medical examination forms the logical basis of work among the school-children.
AVhere formerly under part-time control a school with about 250 pupils would be examined in
a couple of hours, it now takes us about two weeks.
Each child is bared to the waist and is thoroughly examined. The older girls are covered
with a specially designed shirt.
Such aids as a thermometer, auriscope, nasal speculum, and occasionally a sphygmomanometer are used where indicated.
It is surprising what unsuspected conditions are frequently found at these examinations,
such as heart-lesions, pulmonary infections, otic infections, and nasal infections, etc.
Each defect is carefully noted and where advice or a correction is deemed necessary the
parents are visited by the nurse, who explains the condition and urges the parent to adopt the
necessary steps for the child's welfare. Frequently several such visits are necessary. AA7here
the parents' means are insufficient we always endeavour to obtain the correction by the co-operation of the family physician or other agencies. Many a pair of tonsils have been taken out in
such a manner and many pairs of spectacles provided.
That there is a noticeable improvement in the general health of the school population can
be seen by comparing the number of defects found in 1,900 children in 1928, which was 1,977,
with only 389 new defects found among 2,200 children in 1931. During the past four years
correction of defects obtained varied between 47 and 52 per cent.
Where necessary a child may be examined two or three times in a year to check the progress
of a pulmonary infection or a heart-lesion. The children are weighed and measured about
twice a year.    Their eyesight is tested at least once.    They are inspected frequently.
AVhen it is seen that the school population numbers about 2,200, it will be seen what a
prodigious amount of work has to be done to maintain the good health of the pupils and how
this work has gradually increased.
Home School
Visits.
Children
Inspections.
Children
weighed.
Children
measured.
Eyesight
tested.
1926	
200
148
1,314
3,015
2,017
2,445
2,621
1,517
1,649
8,164
9,022
6,876
8,138
10,923
5,335
5,018
1927	
Full-time Unit—
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
School term 1931-32	
3,807
In the past school term various notices to parents numbering 5,740 were sent out. In
addition to the above, minor treatments numbering 2,659 were given in the schools.
We have in addition a school dentist who holds a clinic every morning during the school
term. He works in a school until all the necessary work has been done and then he moves on
to the next school.    His complete outfit is portable.
Adhere in former years there was a central dental clinic to which children from all schools
were transported with a great loss of time, now no time is lost and more work is accomplished.
(d.) From past experience I am averse to clinics conducted at regular intervals in such a
far-flung territory as Saanich, with its problems of transportation. Furthermore, depending for
attendance on the whims of those who should avail themselves of services offered does not make
for efficiency and good use of valuable time. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32. J 19
In the field of prenatal and pre-school child-welfare we have found it more satisfactory for
our nurses to pay monthly visits to the very home of every expectant mother and of every child
up to the age of 3. We have, however, three regular monthly baby clinics in the more thickly
populated area to supplement the monthly visiting.
In the past year the staff made 284 prenatal visits, 1,372 visits to infants, and 1,081 preschool visits. There were twenty-eight clinics, with a total attendance of mothers and babies'
of 569. To the end of the last year we conducted pre-school dental clinics. Of these, forty-two
were held, with 244 attendances.
Due to financial stringencies we were forced to discontinue this valuable work until times
improve.
(e.) In the field of education we have obtained gratifying results. Health is now taught as
a regular subject in the public schools. The children are encouraged to write essays and draw
health posters. AArhenever the opportunity offers a short talk is given by a member of the staff.
Last year 247 such talks were given.
In the high school, classes in home-nursing and first aid were given last year. This year,
in our largest high school, the Medical Officer has taken over the teaching of health, as this gives
him an unparalleled opportunity to interpolate public-health ideas and awaken the consciousness
of youth to the responsibility he owes to his community and how to promote its welfare.
Occasional talks and exhibits are given at meetings of the AVomen's Institutes.
That the Health Unit is now considered as a friendly agency for the benefit of the community is evident by the co-operation given it by the people and the frequency with which it is
consulted upon practically every question in the matter of health, prevention, sanitation, and
other matters.
(/.) The number of dairies hag been growing steadily in the past few years. Besides those
qualified to conduct the business of production and marketing, the trade is attracting many
persons who have either failed in other occupations or because of financial reverses. Many of
these newcomers are totally unsuited because of lack of intelligence or cleanliness and unless
closely supervised constitute a menace to the public health.
In my opinion the business of dairying in these days requires a fairly high order of intelligence and considerable training in cleanliness and in the responsibility which a dairyman owes
his clients, for carelessness on his part may constitute a grave menace.
AA7hen the Health Unit was first organized the survey showed that in the municipality, due
to lack of control and supervision, it was only necessary to pay the required licence fee in order
to carry on the trade.
Conditions in some of the dairies were appallingly filthy. In many the handling of the milk
was carried on in the house. There was an ever-present menace of an outbreak of some milk-
borne disease.
In the past four years continuous effort at education and individual demonstration as to
how improvements may be carried out at low cost, and the ease with which these may be done,
have totally changed the situation. Practically all our producers have attained the Provincial
Grade A Standard and have adopted measures which further safeguard milk from the public-
health point of view.
It has now been brought home to our dairymen that not only equipment but mainly the
human factor that is most important in the production of safe milk. At the present time a new
milk by-law is being introduced which stresses this human factor, and when passed it will enable
us to prevent the unfit from engaging in this business.
There are now about 150 dairies in the municipality and gradually the dairymen now
located in the city are moving in.
Conclusion.—After five years of work, intimate knowledge of the community, and careful
observations, one arrives at fairly definite conclusions as to the adequacy of public health and
the role it is to play in future human welfare and progress.
Hitherto public-health programmes were concerned with the betterment of human environment and the prevention or removal of the conditions which may unfit him mentally and
physically.
As the war showed us the need for public-health work of the type carried on until now, so
does the present economic depression show us what must be added in order that public-health
work may widen its scope and service. Not only must the public-health worker be trained in medical science, but he must also be a
thinker in economic terms. Does he not feel frustrated and cheated when he sees the results of
years' work swept away and nullified by such a depression? Does he not see the mental and
physical deterioration of a large number of the people take place before his eyes under economic
stress? And how can he condone with a programme of economies in expenditure in public
health, when the relatively small sums saved at a time when more expenditure is needed will
cost society probably a hundredfold in added human suffering, disease, deterioration, and
economic and social unfitness?
As a premise it should be stated that in times such as these, when the income of so many
is stopped, public-health expenditure should not be pared, but increased, as there is a greater
need for free or cheaper medical and nursing aid, clinics, etc.
D. Berman,
Medical Health Officer.
Details for the examination of each school follow.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial, Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:   151.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:   150.
High Schools.
High schools.    1930-31, 70:   Reported, 53;   not reported, 17.    1931-32, 73:   Reported, 53;
not reported, 20.
Pupils inspected :  1930-31. 12,046 ;   1931-32, 12,832 :   an increase of 7S6.
Junior High Schools.
Junior High Schools.    1930-31, 7:   Reported, 6;   not reported, 1.    1931-32, 8:   Reported, 7;
not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected :  1930-31, 4,919 ;   1931-32, 4,953;   an increase of 34.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.    1930-31, 33 :   Reported, 33;   all reported.    1931-32, 33 :   Reported, 33 ;   all reported.
Pupils inspected :  1930-31, 48,585 ;  1931-32, 47,834;  a decrease of 751.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1930-31, 24:   Reported, 23;   not reported, 1.    1931-32, 24:   Reported, 21;
not reported, 3.
Pupils inspected :  1930-31, 17,705 ;   1931-32, 16,196 ;  a decrease of 1,509.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected :  1930-31, 708, at a cost of $16.571.45;  1931-32, 727, at a cost of $17,557.20.
Schools not inspected :  1930-31, 174;   1931-32, 24.
Pupils inspected :  1930-31, 19,655 ;  1931-32, 20,728;   an increase of 1,073.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1930-31, 85.3 cents;  1931-32, 84.7 cents.
Percentage of defects :  1930-31,101.29;   1931-32,107.37;   an increase of 6.08.  J 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
I
s .
. p
p.
rr%
<« n
o -■-.
a
l»5   «
fl
fl
OS
0>
"■§ fl
a .2
0>
0)
S fl
11
o u
2
si
+3 3
V et
Qffl
IS
'3
c
to ,2
P
G o
>
is
US
Oh
T3
rt  C
C.2
BO
224
143
233
143
3
1
1
11
8
6
11
14
4
34
6
50
10
10
7
HIGH
81
30
17
20
212
412
12
18
340
73
195
71
54
02
106
93
164
14
75
41
37
126
95
65
137
70
81
488
277
15
420
24
13
11
36
75
254
56
75
30
17
20
211
408
12
15
340
73
183
69
51
91
99
93
164
14
75
41
36
120
95
62
130
68
78
488
243
15
413
24
12
9
34
75
247
55
1
5
9
1
3
8
5
9
7
63
125
4
6
72
5
5
7
13
5
7
6
15
2
10
Anyox;
Mrs. G. V. Yard....
9
4
1
1
4
5
11
5
8
13
5
2
31
8
3
8
2
7
3
5
1
17
3
Burnaby:
5
11
1
1
11
12
D. P. Hanington	
Miss E. G. Allen...
1
3
Miss G. Homfray...
11
12
1
24
8
2
1
3
10
8
5
2
6
3
25
9
G. E. L. MacKinnon
15
1
G. K. MacNaughton.
A. A. King	
3
1
o
Delta:
11
6
H. P. Swan	
J. S. McCallum
Miss B.. Jenkins	
Miss Morrison	
Miss V. Seymour...
2
7
3
1
25
5
2
o
1
7
6
2
R. D. Rush	
3
6
7
7
9
7
3
5
5
78
3
1
37
3
2
6
10
11
19
6
5
9
19
207
23
41
13
1
10
73
7
2
6
13
1
3
4
32
15
9
3
2
3
1
73
1
5
2
9
W. J. Knox	
Miss E. W. Tisdale
6
D. P. Hanington	
Miss E. G. Allen...
5
1
....
3
3
1
1
1
3
G. H  Tutill     	
1
2
23
1
4
Miss M. Grierson...
Miss E. Carruthers
10
133
2
4
72
30
1
13
10
1
4
Nanaimo	
W. F. Drysdale	
E. C. Arthur     	
47
26
12
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught----
D. A. Clark	
A. E. Kydd	
Miss A. Stark
14
2
1
2
27
1
41
1
5
1
2
4
21
1
1
3
W. Buchanan	
9
Port Coquitlam:
6
6
8
4
49
2
1
11
99
3
Miss M. Osborne...
19
1
1
1
18
3 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 23
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Mastoiditis, 1; appendix, 2; diseased
bone {jaw), 1; nervous breakdown, 11; appendicitis, 8; anaemia,
1; shingles, 1; smallpox, 2; bronchitis, 3; pneumonia, 6; Bell's
palsy, 1; pleurisy, 3; infantile
paralysis,   1; empyema,   1;  heart, 2
Heart-murmur, 8; loose semi-lunar
cartilage, 1; acne, 13; dental
plates, 2; synovitis knee, 1; not
vaccinated,  29
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2..
Influenza colds..
Heating, ventilation,
and accommodation good
Good-
Good; yes.
Clean;  adequate.
SCHOOLS.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory, but too
dark
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K.
Yes.
Measles	
Diphtheria,   1;  measles,   16
Diabetes,   1:  pneumonia,   1;  cardiac,
7
2
Building      crowded,
class-room    being
held      in      basements ;      ventilation only fair
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated
Pair.
1: nervous, 2
O.K.
Yes.
Good	
nasal septum,  1; skin-disease,  1
Good	
Yes.
Fair	
O.K.
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated;      well
located
O.K	
1
O.K.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Chicken-pox;  German measles....
Good.
Good	
Good.
bone out of bead.  1
New building; in excellent condition
quate; sanitary.
Yes.
1; T.B.  spine,  1
Orthopaedic, 2;  nervous, 1;  cardiac, 2.
	
Yes.
Yes,
...
1
3
Good	
Good.
vaccinated,   20
1
Fairly   good;   ventilation good; lighting fairly good
Some rooms seriously  crowded
Piedic, 10; fractures, 3; nervous, 1
Clean;  adequate.
O.K.
Orthopaedic,     4;    heart-defects,     10;
anaemic,   2;   nervous,   1;   pulmonary, 1
..
Good	
Good in every respect
Excellent	
Clean;  adequate.
	
.   ..
	
Yes.
	
	
	
Myocardial    weakness,    3;    hysterical
manifestations,  I
Good	
.
Papilloma.  1; cardiac, 4 ; scoliosis, 5 ;
pharyngitis bronchitis, 1; anaemia, 1
Good	
Good.
1
 1 	
.
1
	 J 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
s
rH       .
. o
o y
a g
fl      .
rr%
<~ s
°i
Si
a
o
a
01 oi
ca
1 i
s .2
ii .2
*3
si
'A
o S
> .5
33 A
CU  d
CO
"3
a
w
*o
•<
S o
0J
T3
<u    ■
HC5
'5
C3
G A Charter
11
156
81
92
95
257
115
60
25
130
16
27
183
947
430
800
363
484
959
1227
235
792
954
214
215
13
16
11
154
66
92
95
257
102
59
25
120
16
27
183
951
445
670
355
528
862
1181
166
690
1048
203
212
13
16
 ! !	
1
 i	
J. H. Hamilton	
E. E. Topliff	
5
7
1
2
10
16
4
1
6
1
5
5
	
8
14
11
59
5
17
5
1
3
3
7
1
8
1
o
Saanich:
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
3
8
o
D. Berman	
Drs. Beech & Beech.
13
Salmon Arm	
o
1
5
17
5
3
13
Squamish	
1
1
1
2
1
18
19
32
34
21
79
79
35
4
28
32
1
3
3
1
2
4
10
4
5
2
18
20
25
1
5
8
20
2
3
2
5
3
23
227
~86
125
74
188
100
310
8
172
232
22
2
2
S. Mills           	
2
3
7
2
1
4
2
	
7
1
4
F. S. Eaton   	
9
2
1
3
2
2
1
8
2
3
14
Vancouver:
Miss M. McLellan.
Miss M. Ewart
Mrs. D. Bellamy....
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss M. Campbell-
Miss M. Ewart
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss Ij. Drysdale..,
Mrs. D. Bellamy....
Miss I. Smith	
8
Lord Byng	
W. Dykes	
H. White	
18
4
King George	
7
H  White
3
1
2
9
Magee	
W. Dykes	
32
45
W. Dykes	
5
School of Commerce...
Technical	
Vancouver, West:
1
1
1
*>
G. A. Lamont	
7
6
Mrs. S. Martin
Miss E. G. Allen...
	
3
D. P. Hanington	
C. G. S. Maclean	
1
1
 1	
1
2
	
 |	
1
JUNIOR HIGH
J.
H.
M.
W.
H.
W.
W.
H.
W
21
20
....
6
10
19
6
103
1
1   .
3
3
83
26
62
804
104
390
1
6
5
6
1
23
5
Enderby	
Kamloops	
1
231     23
372|   372
1
2421   238
!
3481   337
1731   173
150911601
12471   962
1
1322!1210
1
1
9
18
48
3
52
12
72
2
3
G.   Archibald....
Miss O. M. Garrood
Miss E. W. Tisdale.
20
2
1
11
26
52
Vancouver:
White.	
Mrs. D. Bellamy..
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Ewart
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss Grant	
6
81
45
124
4
2
1
1
280
185
323
	
	
19
4
7
3
3
T
12
Point Grey	
Dykes	
White	
19
95
17
17
16
GRADED CITY
Alberni	
Armstrong..
Chilliwack..
A. D. Morgan..
L.  A.  Patten	
Miss P. Charlton.
Miss G. Homfray..
144
589
137
589
	
1
23
5
52
26
60|
422
422
20
4
14
7
4
32
40
47
284
43
51
101
13
1
13
184 MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 25
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
fl
o
>
0)
'-3
at
Q
CD
6
a
1
a
-    to
O
&
M
fl
£
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated   and
heated
Clean; adequate.
Good	
optosis,  1; epilepsy,  1; cardiac,  12
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
1; anaemia,   1
Yes.
diabetes,  1
Good	
 1
Crowded;     ventilation difficult
Good	
i
... i
Yes.
i
Good	
Adequate	
Yes.
  i .
Yes.
  i ...
  i	
Cardiac,  1; pulmonary,  2; vaccinated.
i
i
Mumps,   2;   measles,   4;   poliomyelitis,   1
..... i	
Measles	
Good	
Old    building;
crowded
Satisfactory	
Good	
cardiac,   3
i
SCHOOLS.
Measles, 3	
Whooping-congh	
Good;     well     ventilated   and  heated
Good	
ichthyosis,  1
fects improved,  31
asthma,   1
V.D.H., 5
20
3
22
22
16
3
14
14
20
2
G
6
5
Mumps,    1ft;   chicken-pox,   22;
measles,  12; scarlet fever,  1
Mumps,    19;   chicken-pox,   22;
measles,  12; scarlet fever, 1
Mumps,     8;     chicken-pox,     4;
measles, 18; scarlet fever, 1
1,070
4
858
SCHOOLS.
Congenital dislocation of hip, 1; deformity of hip, 1; deformity of
ankle, 1; cleft palate, 1; asthma,
3; blepharitis, 12; stuttering, 1
strabismus, 2; heart-murmur, 4
endocarditis,   1; brain-tumour,   1
Tuberculosis,   1; cardiac condition,  1
incision   and   drainage   of   cervical
gland,     1;    umbilical    hernia,     1
bronchial condition,  2; kidney con'
dition,   1;  appendicitis,   2
Measles,  3; rheumatic fever,   1;
chicken-pox,   6; nephritis,  1
Scarlet fever, 1; pneumonia, 1;
measles, 198; death from septic sore throat followed by
pneumonia; whooping-cough,
3; chicken-pox, 4; diphtheria,   1
Wood	
Condition of schools
good; clean and
well ventilated
Good.
Clean; adequate. J 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
0)  0)
oa
o
ow
OK
OH
Courtenay	
Cranbrook:
Central	
South Ward	
Kootenay Orchards
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie:
Central	
West	
Annex	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops:
Lloyd George	
Stuart Wood	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith:
Central	
Merritt	
Nanaimo;
Thos. Hodgson..
North Ward	
South Ward..
Middle Ward-
Nelson :
Central-.
New Westminster:
John Robson	
F. W. Howay..
Lord Kelvin	
Herbert Spencer..
Richard McBride..
Queensboro	
Port Alberni	
Port CoQuitlam:
Central	
James Park....
Port Moody	
J. McKee..
G. E. L. McKinnon..
G. E. L. McKinnon..
G. E. L. McKinnon..
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. P. Swan...
H. W. Keith..
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan..
W. Truax	
W. H. Wood	
M. G. Archibald..
M. G. Archibald..
D. J. Barclay..
W. J. Knox—
D.  P.  Hanington..
G. H. Tutill	
W. F. Drysdale..
W. F. Drysdale..
W. F. Drysdale..
W. F. Drysdale..
E. C. Arthur	
E. C. Arthur..
D. A. Clark—
D. A. Clark....
D. A. Clark—
D. A. Clark—
D. A. Clark—
D. A. Clark—
D. A. Clark—
A. R. Wilson..
R. G. Langston..
R. G. Langston..
C. R. Symmes—
Miss B. Jenkins-
Miss W. Seymour,.
Miss W. Seymour-
Miss W. Seymour-
Miss O. M. Garrood
Miss O. M. Garrood
Miss E. W. Tisdale.
Miss E. G. Allen-
Miss E. Carruthers
Miss E. Carruthers
Miss E. Carruthers
Miss E. Carruthers
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss Kelly	
529
23
15
448
410
116
024
31
40
315
55
293
59
684
280
318
348
254
529
22
15
432
347
105
624
31
40
312
55
293
57
677
74
2751  14
291  13
348
69
100
741..
I
811-
167! 159!   8|
641  60|   21..
226| 226|   31
121
1
157| 157
I
1151 115
I
1631 163
1811 206
I
335! 329
I
480| 473
4161 398
I
422! 417
I
I
534! 528
155| 145|  271   1
I    I    I
408! 397|   61	
I    I
II  44
24
5  26
5  49
17
121
11
12
17
3
13
22!.
121
131
4
6
114
2
3
262
550
20
24
34
11
91
131
10
118
64
46
72
112
58
123
81
115
87
I
87| 105
58
220
150
40
22
7
300
67| 72
29| 21
201 35
I
26|  811 1531   3
90|  60
2451  99
1371  57
44
101
100
92
90
36!
I
203!
I
131
61
1
10
10
1
1
38
15
9
19
41
10
13
3
34
62  42
24
29
43
5
4
3
1
10 MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 27
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
01
>
3
o
6
M
'•G
01
p.
a
o
&
I
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
2 	
Measles;   pertussis;   chicken-pox
Not crowded; poorly
ventilated
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
O.K."
2
*
catarrh,    18;   skin   ailments,    17;
blepharitis, 8; pulmonary, 2; stammering,   3;   cleft  palate,   1;  anas-
mia,   31
O.K.
Good	
Yes.
2
3
Poliomyelitis, 1; chicken-pox,  6
O.K	
O.K.
O.K	
O.K.
1
1
Building in need of
repair
Fair	
O.K.
3
1
Chicken-pox;  German measles....
old building.
Yes.
5
1
Scarlet   fever,    1;   chicken-pox;
mumps
Good	
Fair  .
Cardiac,   7;  nervous,   10;  bronchitis,
4
16
Chicken-pox,   40;   rubella,    13;
typhoid,   4;   pinkeye,   3;   impetigo, 4; scalsies, 3; pedicu-
lesis capitis, 2
Both      frame      and
brick in excellent
repair;      modern,
adequate in every
particular, and all
surrounded     by
beautiful      lawns
and adequate playgrounds
Modern; adequate;
9;    chorea,     6;    orthopaedic,     18;
asthma,  2
Cardiac, 6; nervous, 3; orthopaedic, 1
sanitary.
2
12
3
2
1
20
3
4
1
Yes.
7
5
4
16
Measles,   56;   scarlet   fever,   2;
chicken-pox,   1;  mumps,   1
Measles,   42;   scarlet   fever,   1;
chicken-pox,   18
Good.
tures,  4; pulmonary,  3
Nervous,   5;   asthma,   1;   eczema,   1;
Inadequate    hall-
space ;   no method
of artificial lighting
Good;   no    artificial
lighting;    heating
fairly   good
Fairly good; no hall-
space
Under  existing   conditions, all rooms
having  35   pupils
or more are overcrowded
36 pupils overcrowd
rooms
rheumatism,   1
4
5
fractures,  1; eczema,  1
Pneumonia, 1; bronchitis, 1; nervous,
2; septic sore throat, 1
Measles, 56; chicken-pox, 2
liness   commendable.
Fairly good; fairly
clean.
Good.
Orthopaedic,    4;    heart-defects,    4 ;"]
nervous,   3
Orthopaedic,    6;    heart-defects,    3; J-
nervous,   1; pulmonary,  2; anae- |
mic,  3                                                   J
2
4
3
5
1
7
6
5
3
15
5
6
5
8
6
4
1
5
13
2
	
1      3
Chicken-pox,   39;   mumps,
3;     scarlet     fever,     2;
measles,    241;    whoop- -{
ing-cough,   32;   vaccina- |
tions,   960                            |
1                                                       1
1                                                       1
1
i                                                       1
i                                                       1
J                                                       I
Scarlet fever,   8; measles,  2
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
anaemic,   1; nervous,  4; pulmon- |
ary,   1                                                     J.
Good	
nervous,   1
Good	
Yes.
anaemic,    6;   nervous,    4;   pulmonary,  1
Yes.
mic, 3; nervous,  1; pulmonary,  1
Orthopaedic, 1; heart-defects, 2; anaemic,  3; nervous,   1
1
1       2        6
1          1
I       8|     30
1          1
1         31         5
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
1        2
1   io
2         5
Measles,    55;   chicken-pox,    15;
whooping-cough,   10
Excellent	
1 J 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
r.
Ph   .
o|
. o
II
'ft
3   .
"■3
>~ a
°a
d «
d
3
a
£ a
OS
s
0>
ol   .
H .5
oa
ti
01 +j
01  CO
01   b
on
3
'3
s
01
■o
H
T3
oi ^
|'i
rt o
$8
Oh
T3
01     ■
o c
wo
'8
O
Prince George:
C. Ewert	
317
68
90
303
24
524
54
294
299
469
170
58
883
336
09
313
375
397
244
355
429
938
436
412
524
575
262
457
395
709
623
449
640
497
721
5
o
1
65
3
114
8
1
1
5
4
8
61
6
3
o
37
1
50
5
3
3
1
7
5
4
5
4
37
14
4
149
12
230
23
9
24
75
48
11
26
14
4
22
26
14
12
13
25
38
36
39
62
54
20
4
12
29
24
29
62
28
20
148
42
3
2
8
o
C. Ewert	
.
Prince Rupert:
R. G. Large	
Miss M. Osborne...
Miss M. Osborne...
Miss M. Osborne...
Miss M. Osborne...
Miss Lee	
311
25
530
54
297
304
496
186
60
883
336
69
368
555
406
276
408
425
896
450
453
615
675
268
530
338
745
750
462
875
545
758
11
11
200
20
360
38
7
17
161
41
5
483
180
l4
75
20
51
37
39
34
269
48
81
111
49
52
95
45
113
158
75
149
83
128
150
15
291
33
14
11. G. Large	
61
2
8
8
50
19
3
67
16
8
14
9
8
4
13
6
17
21
64
36
12
29
9
1
6
1
8
29
9
1
6
7
9
1
23
12
2
6
1
6
3
18
10
26
Revelstoke:
J. H. Hamilton	
J. H. Hamilton	
E. E. Topliff	
12
30
54
12
9
1
2
3
4
2
1
10
15
3
1
19
4
34
2
15
2
2
2
Rossland:
4
10
2
32
10
4
71
105
57
62
61
41
99
68
48
93
126
15
58
69
3
3
	
	
10
S. E. and A. Beech..
10
36
Trail-Tadanac:
F. S. Eaton	
9
2
3
2
2
3
2
]
3
4
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
23
8
2
o
2
9
160
East Trail	
F. S. Eaton	
42
F. S. Eaton	
3
Vancouver:
H. White	
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss M. Henderson-
Miss G. Hilton
Miss J.   Aske	
Miss I. Smith	
Miss E. Bell	
5
14
Bayview	
W. Dykes	
2
14
H. White	
1
23
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss N. Campbell..
MissM. Henderson.
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss D. Olmstead..
Mrs. M. Schultz....
Miss D. Shields
Miss G. Hilton
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
Mrs  M. Schultz....
Miss G. Hilton
Miss G. Jeeves	
12
Annex
II. White	
1
3
1
1
3
1
	
6
7
7
7
2
6
4
2
12
1
	
10
H. White	
17
41
11
10
H. White	
4
5
36
12
33
5
121
126
59
134
54
97
18
Annex
H. White	
H. White	
H. White	
W. Dykes	
W. Dykes	
4
9
9 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
6
M
O)
*J
3
P.
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Squint, 1; sty, 1; pediculi, 3 ; eczema,
2; blepharitis, 4; asthma, 1; cardiac,  1; orthopaedic,  3
Pediculi, 4; conjunctivitis, 1; cardiac,
3;  orthopaedic,   2; blepharitis,   1
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1; blepharitis,   1
Cardiac, 2; bronchitis, 8; chicken-
pox, 1; orthopedic, 0; anaemia, 2;
oral papillomata, 1; nervous, 2;
eczema, 1; cleft palate, 1
Bronchitis, 3; wry-neck, 1; tachycardia.  1
Orthopaedic, 6; bronchitis, 15; cardiac, 6;   anaemia, 2;  tongue-tied, 1;
"    dermatitis,  1; pharyngitis,   1
Bronchitis,   1;  chicken-pox,   1	
Orthopaedic,  1 -...,	
Suspicious chest  (T.B.), 1.
Pulmonary,   1;   cardiac,   1;
die,  1
Cardiac,  3; nervous,  1	
orthop i
Cardiac,   1	
Toxoid,   57;  vaccinated,   232..
Cardiac,   5;   toxoid,    85;   vaccinated,
267
Cardiac,    1;    pulmonary,    2;    toxoid,
113; vaccinated,  223
Cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 1; toxoid, 50;
vaccinated, 130
Cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 3; toxoid, 77;
vaccinated, 107
Cardiac,   2;   toxoid,    73;   vaccinated,
214
Cardiac,   7; pulmonary,  5; toxoid, 61;
vaccinated,   449
Cardiac,   3; pulmonary,   1; vaccinated,
278
Cardiac,    1;    pulmonary,    2;    toxoid,
149; vaccinated, 346
Cardiac,     1;    pulmonary,     3;    toxoid,
119; vaccinated, 367
Cardiac,   3;   toxoid,   110;  vaccinated,
341
Toxoid, 35; vaccinated, 154; cardiac,   1
Pulmonary, 1; toxoid, 63; vaccinated,   210
Pulmonary, 3; toxoid, 5 6; vaccinated,   148
Toxoid,  212; vaccinated, 426	
Cardiac,    1;    pulmonary,    3;    toxoid,
220;   vaccinated,   463
Pulmonary,    2;   toxoid,    104;   vaccinated,   243'
Cardiac,    2;    pulmonary,    1;    toxoid,
145; vaccinated,  380
Cardiac,    1;    pulmonary,    2;    toxoid,
144; vaccinated,  380
Card'ac,   4;   toxoid,   205;   vaccinated,
478
Diphtheria, 1;   German  measles,
2; chicken-pox,  1
Scarlet fever; measles..
Scarlet fever; measles..
Chicken-pox,  15..
6
7
2
131
7
Mumps.  10
measles,
Mumps, li
measles,
Mumps, 3
measles,
scarlet i
Mumps, 1
measles,
Mumps,  15
; whooping-cough, 1;
38; chicken-pox,  2
; whooping-cough, 4 ;
36;  chicken-pox,  20
whooping-cough, 7;
6 7 ; chicken-pox, 7;
:ver,  1
whooping-cough,   1;
37; scarlet fever,   1
measles,   66	
Mumps, 1; whooping-cough, 6;
measles, 36; diphtheria, 1;
smallpox,   1
Mumps. 45; measles. 117; scarlet fever,   7; smallpox,   1
Mumps, 21; measles, 78; rubella, 1; scarlet fever, 3;
diphtheria
Measles, 51; scarlet fever, 3	
Mumps, 2; measles, 28; chicken-
pox,  49; whooping-cough,   4
Mumps, 27; chicken-pox, 28;
measles, 58; whooping-cough,
IS; scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria,  4; carriers,   3
Measles,  32; whooping-cough,  5
Measles, 33; chicken-pox, 2;
whooping-cough, 5; rubella, 1;
scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 2; measles, 48; scarlet
fever,   2
Mumps, 1; measles, 21; chicken-
pox, 1
Mumps, 56; whooping-cough, 14 ;
measles, 111; chicken-pox, 1;
rubella,  1; scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 2; measles, 66; chicken-
pox, 8; whooping-cough, 3;
scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 1; whooping-cough, 4;
measles,  152; diphtheria, 3
Mumps, 2; measles, 37; chicken-
pox, 30; whooping-cough, 3;
scarlet fever,   1
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 26;
measles, 166; rubella, 3;
diphtheria, 1;  poliomyelitis, 1
Good-
Good. .
Good-
Good..
Good..
Good-
Good	
Satisfactory ..
Poorly  heated;  very
old building
Satisfactory-
Satisfactory-.
Adequate	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Clean.
O.K.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;
adequate
C'ean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate
Clean;
adequate J 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
rU       .
o
SB
§  .
■**   a,
4-1        rC
"I
d
o
3
a
•It
"H
OS
"S.S
OS*
> m
+3 .a
ow
> ,s
o +->
AM
■3
'3
a
01
■3
H
■3
!§
B °
•as
OH
-3
o   -
^ *3
d 3
■a .3
HO
'3
O
Vancouver—Continued.
W. Dykes	
W. Dykes	
W. Dykes	
G. A. Lamont	
W. Dykes	
G. A. Lamont	
H. White	
Miss G. Jeeves
Miss G. Hilton
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss F. Innes	
Miss Tj. Drysdale...
Miss F. Innes	
Mrs. M. Schultz....
Miss F. Innes	
Miss M. Ewart
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss D. Shields
Miss D. Shields
Miss I. Smith	
Miss M. Henderson.
Miss J. Aske	
Miss D. Shields
Miss L, Drysdale...
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss M. Ewart
MissM. Henderson.
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
010
327
511
457
626
677
506
713
746
569
524
507
7S3
000
615
72
3G2
475
301
320
593
790
637
816
359
667
1332
750
724
568
299
554
440
589
588
502
H93
004
511
496
475
709
554
552
64
558
420
276
344
543
666
603
677
380
704
1189
065
717
!    1
62        22
1
17
10
29
33
90
20
22
47
30
48
20
24
31
03
81
3
30
12
33
57
09
48
97
71
60
52
69
35
91
39
92
31
84
112
88
94
54
94
56
72
134
31
75
21
75
36
23
98
161
114
71
41
130
178
135
138
4
1
5
1
o
7
3
1
3
4
3
1
1
1
o
14
25
5
7
3
29
IS
6
47
60
74
106
96
73
	
18
4
20
9
3
1
o
i
i
8
2
4
5
8
David Lloyd George....
5
0
	
19
4
24
1
20
2
3
16
100
1
941	
19
W. Dykes	
4
96
78
81
143
86
59
6
14
3
5
17
24
23
Model     	
4
i
18
10
H. White      	
32
10
23
12
23
30
8
0
46
46
46
37
7
2
13
i
i
10
,s
Norquay and Annex....
G. A. Lamont	
H. White	
34
6
37
54
54
44
102
144
94
143
30
50
223
128
	
2
4
2
 1    i
7
W. Dykes
6
G. A. Lamont	
H. White	
H. White       	
6
1
7
8
8
8
1
7
o
1
Laura Secord	
H. White	
27
Selkirk	
3
...
38
20
2
1
20
11
Miss 0. Kilpatrick
Miss M. McLellan.
Miss D. Olmstead..
Mrs. D. Bellamy...
67
66
9
21
6
3
1
3
1
1
31
15
26
8
H  White
H. White	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 31
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
o
be
to
9
a
M
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Cardiac,   1;   toxoid,   169;  vaccinated,
373
Toxoid,   84;  vaccinated,   187..
Cardiac,   1;   toxoid,   173;   vaccinated
318
Cardiac,   2;  pulmonary, 3; toxoid, 58
vaccinated,   202
Toxoid,   ISO;  vaccinated,   377..
Cardiac,   5; pulmonary,
vaccinated,   257
toxoid, 73
vaccinated.
Cardiac, 1;   toxoid,    95
261
Cardiac, 1;  toxoid,   123;  vaccinated,
316; pulmonary,   6
Cardiac, 1;   toxoid,   283;   vaccinated,
474
Cardiac, 3; toxoid, 72; vaccinated,
300
Pulmonary, 2; toxoid, 173; vaccinated,  346
Pulmonary, 1; toxoid, 82; vaccinated,
264
Cardiac, 6; pulmonary, 5; toxoid,
205; vaccinated,  407
Cardiac, 6; toxoid, 77; vaccinated.
312
Cardiac, 8; pulmonary, 7; toxoid, 90;
vaccinated,   276
Cardiac, 2;   pulmonary, 1;   toxoid, 17;
vaccinated,   39
Cardiac,     2;    pulmonary,     3;    toxoid,
156; vaccinated, 282
Cardiac, 4; toxoid, 172; vaccinated,
336
Cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 2; toxoid,
105; vaccinated,  227"
Cardiac, 3 ; pulmonary, 1; toxoid, 73
vaccinated,   172
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 4; toxoid,
141; vaccinated, 403
Pulmonary, 3; toxoid, 133; vaccinated, 512
Pulmonary, 2; toxoid, 88; vaccinated,  241
Cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 3; toxoid,
122; vaccinated, 402
Cardiac,   3;   toxoid,   S5;   vaccinated,
198
Cardiac,    5;    pulmonary,    1;    toxoid,
352;   vaccinated,   470
Cardiac,    1;   pulmonary,    5;    toxoid,
612; vaccinated, 1,297
Cardiac,    4;    pulmonary,    3;    toxoid,
63; vaccinated,  373
Cardiac,   1;  toxoid,   184;   vaccinated,
449
6
4
14
5)
13
II     18
I
31        5
11
6
51     13
10
Mumps,   109;   chicken-pox,   2
measles,   136;  diphtheria,   1
whooping-cough,    10;    small
pox,  1
Measles,    32;    chicken-pox,    2
whooping-cough,   3;   diphthe
ria,   1
Mumps,    27;    chicken-pox,    7
whooping-cough,    4;   measles
149
Mumps,   2;   whooping-cough,   1
measles,   36;  chicken-pox,   1
scarlet fever,   3
Mumps,     33;    chicken-pox,    2
measles, 57;   whooping-cough,
1; scarlet fever,  1
Mumps,     22;    chicken-pox,     1
measles, G3 ;   whooping-cough
6;  scarlet  fever,   1
Measles,   45;   scarlet   fever,   6
diphtheria,   2; carriers,   5
Mumps, 3;   whooping-cough, 13
measles,  65; rubella,  1; scar
let  fever,   1
Mumps,   2;  whooping-cough,   3
measles,     151;     chicken-pox
75; rubella,  4;  scarlet fever
1
Measles, 32;  whooping-cough, 3
chicken-pox,   13;   rubella,   1
scarlet   fever,   1
Measles, 20;  whooping-cough, 7
chicken-pox,   9;   smallpox,   1
Measles,   24;   chicken-pox,   2...
Measles,    79;   scarlet   fever,   2
chicken-pox,     IS;    whooping
cough,    11;   diphtheria,    15
carriers,   12
Mumps,   3;   whooping-cough,   9
measles,   29;  chicken-pox,   1
scarlet fever,   1
Measles,   76;   scarlet   fever,   4
chicken-pox,      2;     whooping
cough,   19
Mumps,   8;   whooping-cough,   7;
measles, 101; chicken-pox, 1;
scarlet fever,   3
Mumps,   3;   whooping-cough,   1;
measles,  30; chicken-pox,  24
Mumps,   8;   whooping-cough,   1;
measles, 58; chicken-pox, 10;
rubella,  3
Mumps,   1; measles,  47; scarlet
fever,   2
Measles, 47;  whooping-cough, 4
chicken-pox,   2;  scarlet  fever
Mumps,   1;  whooping-cough, 7
measles, 53 ; chicken-pox, 2
Mumps,   1; whooping-cough, 2
measles,   63; chicken-pox, 6
poliomyelitis,   1
Mumps,   6;  whooping-cough, 5
measles, 74;  chicken-pox, 13
rubella,  4;  diphtheria,   1
Measles,    51;   chicken-pox, 7
scarlet fever,   1
Mumps,   4;  whooping-cough, 4
measles,   90;  chicken-pox, 7
scarlet fever,  1
Mumps,   1;   whooping-cough, 3
measles,   56;  chicken-pox, 1
Mumps,   4;   whooping-cough, 9
measles,   61;  chicken-pox, 5
rubella,     1;    diphtheria, 1
smallpox,   2
Mumps,     1;     chicken-pox, 2
measles,  59; scarlet fever, 4
Clean; adequate.
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
adequate.
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate,
adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate,
Cltjan; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean ;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean ;
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;
Clean ;
Clean;
Clean;
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
Clean;  adequate. -
J 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
G
3
£<   .
o ~i
. 'o
c fc
Q,
3    .
^■3
o
u~ a
°f
6S
a
_o
3
3
'S
£ a
QJ   01
oa
o
o 3
o; °
"qj .23
.£ bo
O   0)
'oJ
ej
•r,
ti
01 -J
01 cj
"qJ £
an
."2
'3
3
o
■3
H
•3
11
01
y-
0 jo
01 S
« S
OH
■3
01   _■
i- "3
id 3
3.2
WO
ip
g
'o
O
Vancouver—Continued.
M:ss E.  Bell	
Miss E.  Bell	
Miss E. Lowther...
Miss E. Lowther...
Miss E. Lowther..
Mrs. D. Martin..__
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss C. Mowbray_..
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowhray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss 0. Mowbray...
Miss I. E. Adams-
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss I. E. Adams-
429
440
447
555
399
852
106
129
310
237
508
420
353
320
129
406
500
209
69
69
329
161
284
410
459
347
252
188
820
106
129
310
237
508
420
353
320
129
406
500
269
69
69
329
161
284
37
34
13
19
14
3
14
16
12
5
4
6
3
3
4
15
2
1
16
6
10
7
7
1
8
4
14
2
2
1
6
17
30
23
2
30
24
29
44
17
61
68
62
65
39
49
2
2
1
6
8
35
44
157
170
100
36
23
G. A. Lamont	
G.  F.  Amyot	
12
Vancouver,  North:
40
35
25
3
G.  F.  Amyot	
Vernon :
Consolidated Schools-
Victoria :
Bank Street -
Beacon Hill	
0. Morris	
D.  Donald	
14
D.  Donald :	
	
1
6
5
D.  Donald	
D.  Donald	
8
1
1
Burnside.	
George Jay	
Girls'   Central.	
Margaret Jenkins
Kingston Street	
North  Ward	
Oaklands	
D.  Donald	
	
1
D.  Donald	
1
D.  Donald	
	
	
6
6
4
1
3
1
2
3
8
i
3
1
2
3
D.  Donald	
	
D.  Donald	
D.  Donald	
D.  Donald	
i
D.  Donald	
Quadra Primary	
Railway Street ....
South Park	
Spring Ridge	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
	
	
	
	
	
4
1
4
1
1
1
7
2
1
7
	
	
	
1
1
]
*UR
AL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue	
62
37
288
212
565
841
21
194
644
319
452
79
24
03
16
120
03
57
252
110
22
46
73
29
18
57
33
268
201
544
772
21
188
594
306
436
78
24
60
ir,
115
59
57
242
110
22
46
73
29
18
...
1
2
1
10
5
10
35
1
6
23
10
7
2
2
1
2
2
»
13
24
39
9
5
41
40
74
117
1
33
83
46
67
6
4
7
o
14
9
14
30
4
1
2
1
3
38
162
123
308
451
13
103
347
189
258
53
16
37
10
79
38
38
152
4
2
7
3
8
6
56
44
97
143
	
36
139
62
88
IS
6
10
Capitol Hill	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street:	
Gilmore Avenue	
Hamilton Road	
Inman Avenue	
Kingsway, West	
Kitchener Street	
Nelson Avenue	
Riverway, East	
....
1
1
o
1
1
1
	
I
17
30
n
10
10
1
1
1
1
1
o
1
9
20
13
6
1
1
12
24
15
24
	
2
1
2
1
1
5
5
3
15
3
T. G. McCammon....
1
1
1
Sperling Avenue -...
Windsor Street	
Chilliwack:
Atrhelitz	
Camp Slough	
1
1
2
5
13
11
8
41
1
	
1
1
3
1
1
....
10
	
1
3
5
1
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
M:ss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
 1	
4
1
1
	
1
East Chilliwack-..	
Fairfield Island	
Lotbiniere	
1
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
2
	
 I	
	
	
1
1   •      1          1          1          1
> MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Cardiac,   2;   toxoid,   58;   vaccinated,
192
Cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 2; toxoid, 75
vaccinated, 205
Nervous,    5;   cardiac,   3;   pulmonary,
6; curvature of spine,  2
Nervous, 5 ; cardiac, 2 ; pulmonary,  2 ;
defective speech,  2; orthopaedic,  2;
curvature of spine,  2
Nervous, 2; cardiac,  5 ; pulmonary, 1;
orthopaedic,   1
Cleft palate, 2; diabetic, 1; stammering, 2; cardiac, 5; deformed
arm, 2; vaccinated, 578; toxoid,
432
Defective speech,  1..
Cardiac,   1..
Atrophy of leg, 1	
Pulmonary,   1;  chest,   1	
Cardiac,   1	
Torticollis,   1;  atrophy  of left arm, 1
Pulmonary,   1;  chest,   1 '.	
Cardiac,   2	
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 1; spine, 1;
nervous,  1; defective speech,  1
Cardiac, 1; atrophy of leg, 1; nervous,   1
Nervous,   1	
14
4
11
4
4
5
7
31
I
41
15
8
15
3
10
10
13
1
19
Measles,   61;   chicken-pox,    17 ;
whooping-cough,     7;     scarlet
fever,   7
Mumps,     12;    chicken-pox,    1;
measles, 43; scarlet fever,  1;
diphtheria,   1
Measles, 41; rubella, 2; chicken-
pox,  3
Measles, 112; chicken-pox, 5;
rubella,  1
Measles, 63; chicken-pox, 3;
rubella,  2
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 22;
rubella,   15
('hicken-pox,  2; scarlet fever,  1
Chicken-pox, 1; whooping-cough,
8; measles,  7
Chicken-pox,   2;   diphtheria,   2;
measles, 8; whooping-cough, 1
Measles, 93; whooping-cough, 2
Measles,  7 -	
Whooping-cough,   3;   measles,   1
Whooping-cough, 1; measles, 11
Measles, 2	
Chicken-pox,  1; scarlet fever,   1
Whooping-cough,  2; measles,  2.
Measles,   5;  scarlet fever,  2	
Measles,  24; chicken-pox, 4..
Measles,   22;  chicken-pox,   1_.
Whooping-cough,  2	
Scarlet  fever,   3	
Measles,   1;  whooping-cough,
chicken-pox, 9
Chicken-pox,  33;  measles,  2..
Good.
Good
Good,
Good; crowded; fairly well ventilated
Good..
Good-
Good..
Good-
Good ..
Good-
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good	
Good, being repaired.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
New.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Improved.
Clean;  adequate.
New  toilets required.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
New.
Clean;  adequate.
SCHOOLS.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
vision,  4
3
3
2
4
4
4
2
2
Good	
Yes.
vision,   13
8
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
1
Good	
Yes.
vision,  30
Good	
Yes.
corrected vision,   6
Good	
Yes.
1
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
4
1
1
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
	
3
2
4
2
2
2
2
1
5
Pair.
Corrected vision,  1; wax in ears,   1....
1
5
Pair	
Fair. J 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PAL
RURAL MUNICI
-
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
B
su
a
3   .
Ph "3
r-i  Q,
*. a
°a
i s
s'
3
a
J3
Is
o
° o
0J      .
<2 el
os
"rt
a
Z,
fr .5
"1
CU   cj
"3 £
on
'o
3
01
■3
<
•3
Is
a o
01
>
oi .3'
QJ t£
"S s
aS
n
01 .„•
S-3
S3
HO
oi
'0
CB
Chilliwack—Continued.
Promontory Flats	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
It. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
It. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
S. G. Baldwin	
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell...
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. CardwelL.
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Cardwell..
Miss M. Card well-
24
152
157
17
200
46
77
22
82
84
34
91
27
154
68
29
208
26
23
12
27
30
25
300
21
64
50
21
19
510
167
27
59
36
96
31
77
30
27
147
68
162
61
28
34
29
38
87
162
201
299
57
24
152
157
17
200
46
77
22
82
84
34
87
27
150
62
28
194
25
23
10
1
 |	
.
 1	
8
6
8
7
5
1
5
2
	
.
1
2
5
10
2
15
2
l
3
11
9
	
4
.
7
7
1
4
2
3
4
5
1
14
5
4
12
1
	
8
4
'
4
6
2
16
10
4
69
11
4
3
9
7
10
74
6
14
17
7
0
50
68
14
3
o
6
1
5
1
1
5
1
20
1
4
1
1
2
2
3
2
7
1
9
5
2
3
1
..
Coldstream:
Coldstream	
3
2
S. G. Baldwin	
2
8
4
23
4
5
72
.   11
3
3
5
5
3
17
4
12
8
3
1
20
2
5
Coquitlam:
	
Glen     . -	
	
	
1
1
7
1
1
12
14
3
1
	
Cowichan, North:
Miss M. F. Young.
Miss M. F. Young.
Miss M. F. Young.
	
1
13
1
Crofton	
Westholme	
Delta:
Annacis Island	
H. B. Rogers	
H. B. Rogers	
	
1
1
3
.
1
	
2
3
7
6
2
22
5
10
4
6
4
13
68
14
3
2
22
27
25
294
21
64
50
21
18
510
161
27
57
35
84
' 28
69
29
25
139
63
152
52
25
30
28
33
79
153
192
295
57
3
4
3
Canoe  Pass	
Delta, Central	
Delta, East	
4
7
3
1
3
61	
..
7
3
4
3
3
13
68
14
3
2
....
2
8
2
2
3
5
5
A. A. King	
	
1
Westham Island	
Esquimalt:
1
2
9
2
1
2
4
1
2
2
1
4
77
15
2
6
4
1
5
12
3
5
23
12
23
9
2
3
6
0
11
46
66
60
8
J. S. McCallum
P. McCaffrey	
Miss E. Morrison...
6
4
1
3
1
1
5
3
11
2
Kent:
Langley:
Aldergrove	
B. B. Marr	
Belmont	
B. B. Marr	
1
1
B. B. Marr	
2
B. B. Marr	
1
5
B. B. Marr	
1
1
B. B. Marr.	
1
1
4
Glen Valley	
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
91	
41
2
1
7
3
1
8
1
1
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
1
1
1
Otter	
B. B. Marr	
3
Otter,  South	
B. B. Marr	
Patricia	
B. B. Marr	
1
Sperling	
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
1|	
1[
1
5|        3
1
8|        3
9|        3
21        1
1
1
2
7
10
8
3
1
4
4
8
21
46
64
7
1
9
12
0
3
1
2
3
2
4
	
16
28
35
7
2
2
	
Maple Ridge:
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
1
01
r-
!3
01
CQ
t
a
a
i
P
3
S
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
5
5
8
8
5
Fair
Fair
4
2
3
4
Good
1; elevated temperature,   1
3
3
18
	
	
One  room   crowded;
poorly ventilated
1
1
 |	
1
 1	
Measles; whooping-cough; scarlet
fever
0 K	
right    hip    deformity,     1;    mitral
regurgitant  murmur,   2;  overweight
and  endocrine disturbance,   1
2
O K
Defective speech, 1; anscmia, 1; nasal
discharge,     1;    granular    lids,     5;
pigmented    mole     (warty     type) ;
gingivitis,   1
Granular lids,  3; defective speech,  2;
pigeon-chested,  1
1
0 K
O.K	
O.K	
1
1
	
Measles	
Not crowded; ventilation   fair;  heating fair
Not crowded; ventilation and heating
good
Not  crowded;  ventilation and heating
good
Good	
1
	
	
	
No.
2
Whooping-cough, 3; meningitis, 1
Measles,   2	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
7
2
6
12
Yes.
Measles,   5	
Measles,   1	
Whooping-cough,   4	
Measles,   1	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
2
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
3
10
6
Pneumonia, 2; chicken-pox, 26;
measles,  72
Not crowded;  ventilation   and   heating fair
Rheumatism,   1;  orthopaedic,   2;  diabetes mellitus,  1
Good	
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
 |	
Yes.
Yes.
3
.....   .1	
1
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
1
1
2
2
5
1
3
1
1
1
Two rooms crowded;
one    room     poor
light
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Measles,   11;  chicken-pox	
Chicken-pox,  ">; measles	
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Good.
1
Good	
Good.
	
Good	
Good. J 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
>AL
RURAL MUNICH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
s
^   .
rr
. o
"p.
5 .
°i
6 «
3
3
3
3
3
£;5
ti
a>
to
.t, to
+3 a
a, C
cZ  cj
01  01
aa
*3
rf
Si
"££
3 ^
01  cO
"oJ £
OS
'3
s
•6
I'a
3  3
01
■si
-3
oi ^
u "d
CB   3
3.2
H'J
01
'5
O
Maple Ridge—Con.
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson,
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson.
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss M. E. Grierson
Miss B. Bradshaw.
Miss B. Bradshaw.
26
91
110
67
59
28
28
31
15
15
334
288
48
882
193
185
290
118
65
27
36
157
78
59
98
24
48
116
314
234
67
24
16
30
42
52
299
15
77
204
22
31
27
25
22
112;
1
26
89
106
63
55
28
27
30
15
15
334
273
46
882
176
183
282
113
64
26
36
154
78
57
98
24
47
112
310
234
20
'    67
22
16
28
40
50
299
13
73
202
21
3lj
1
24!
22|
22
1
1
1061
1
2
3
4
5
11
20
23
20
13
8
13
4
10
4
16
18
6
148
54
14
21
5
6
1
3
9
10
20
40
20
16
10
6
8
7
4
7
33
8
85
39
22
35
12
17
3
3
13
7
7
19
2
5
23
38
48
11
30
8
12
10
5
17
148
3
1
4
9
7
6
4
2
2
2
1
o
3
1
1
1
1
1
Webster's Corners	
10
8
12
10
8
6
2
6
i
i
2
3
3
3
7
3
4
2
i
i
i
i
Mission:
31	
Silverhill	
3
2
1
1
2
2
4
2
1
30
1
10
18
1
4
i
Oak Bay:
Monterey	
W. P. Walker	
W. P. Walker	
55
26
5
11
5
4
1
1
8
9
41
77
1
4
	
1
	
Peachland	
Wm. Buchanan	
15
1
11        3
Miss M. A. Twiddy.
108
3
7
2
4
1
7
1
2
1
8
12
0
3
0
7
2
9
16
1
4
4
5
	
10
7
10
Pitt Meadows	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss M. Harvey
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
7
15
1
Keating	
D. Berman	
Lake Hill     	
2
10
4
6
4
1
1
3
11
17
2
5
2
....
1|	
2
|
McKenzie Avenue	
Model School	
Jas. P. Vye	
D. Berman	
1
1
8
15
1
2
6
38
24
9
15
2
7
10
10
14
79
1
3
21
2
1
t
H	
41
!
1
Saanichton	
D. Berman	
Saanich, West	
2
10
12
19
4
9
3
4
5
3
9
48
1
2
7
1
1
j
2
1
5
12
7
3
1
9
4
101
1
2
5
3
2
1
1
3
2
D. Berman	
7
17
2
11
Tolmie	
Salmon Arm:
D. Berman	
Drs. Beech & Beech
Drs. Beech & Beech
Drs. Beech & Beech
3
9
6
Canoe, South	
It       1
1
1
1
1
58
	
2
3
1
8
6
31
1
Larch Hill	
5
1
1
Salmon Arm, West
Drs. Beech & Beech.
41        3
Surrey:
Anniedale	
Clayton	
F. D. Sinclair	
	
2
1
i
	
Cloverdale	
Colebrook	
F. D. Sinclair	
11
1
1
1
11
11
31
1
|
61
1
F. D. Sinclair .....
i
Crescent	
Elgin	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
.. .    1
i
F. D. Sinclair ....
1
|
i     i
i
1
Grandview Heights
Green Timbers	
Hall's Prairie	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
i
1
1
7
|
F. D. Sinclair	
j
1]
1
1
!
21
1
1
1
F. D. Sinclair	
1
1
1
ii	
i
i
I     i
1
|
1
1 MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
, Disease, etc.).
1
01
>
i
■a
a
o>
m
d
a
o
a
2
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
1
4
3
3
3
Light influenza,  1G	
Chicken-pox, 5; measles	
Whooping-cough;    light    influenza,   20
Good.
Water-supply  unsatisfactory
Water-supply  unsatisfactory
One room poor light
Good	
1
Good.
cinated,  26;  strabismus,   1
Good.
3
Chicken-pox; measles,   10	
Measles,   3	
Measles,   1	
Fair	
Good	
Adequate.
Good.
Cardiac,   1;   vaccinated,   16;   chronic
Good	
Good.
eczema,  3
Good	
Good.
Vaccinated,   6	
Mitral   sclerosis,   2;   mitral   regurgita
1
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Measles; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
tion,  1
Cardiac, 7; orthopaedic, 1; anaemia,  1
Clean; adequate.
Nervous,   7;   cardiac,   5;   asthma,   5;
7
•>.\       •>.
Acne,   11; psorasis,   1;  eczema,
4; German measles
hay-fever,  1; appendicitis,  chronic,
3; orthopaedic, 11; defective speech,
5; nephritis, 1
3
2
3
15
1
l
5
Good
Clean; adequate.
Pulmonary, 4; cardiac, 4; strabismus,
1;  stammering,   1;  Bell's palsy,   1
Cardiac, 9 ; pulmonary, 1; epilepsy, 1;
1
4
strabismus,  2; stammering,  1
1
3
Cardiac, 2; epilepsy, 1; pulmonary, 2.
2
Orthopaedic,   2;   vaccinated,   38;   cor
rections,   31
1
5
3
3
15
20
5
1
5
2
Cardiac,   3;  pulmonary,   1; congenital
torticollis,   1
2
4
8
3
7
4
1
cardia
8
tinal  tumour;  strabismus,   3
Yes.
 L...
Satisfactory	
Not satisfactory	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Fair	
No.
1
15
Yes.
Good; frame on concrete     basement;
modern heat  and
plumbing
Untidy.
Water   uncertain   as
to supply and
quality
Rooms need painting
Needs  inside  painting; water uncertain
Needs   inside  painting
Good	
Clean.
Chicken-pox; mumps	
Poor.
carditis,    1;   strabismus,    1;   hay-
fever,   1; systolic,   1
Fair.
Clean.
Clean.
Inadequate.
1   .
Dark;   needs   inside
painting;  ventilation difficult
Good	
Dirty.
in weight,  1
Tongue-tie,    1;    insufficient    gain    in
weight,   5; poor posture,  1; endocarditis, 1
Measles; mumps; chicken-pox.... J 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
Surrey—Continued.
Hjorth Road	
Johnston Road....
Kensington, East	
Kensington Prairie..
Newton	
Port Kells..
Port Mann ...
Strawberry Hill-
Surrey Centre	
Tyne Head	
Westminster, South-
White Rock-
Woodward's Hill..
Vancouver, North:
Capilano	
Dollarton	
Keith Lynn-
Lynn Valley-
North Star-
Vancouver, West:
Dundarave	
Holly burn	
Pauline Johnson..
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair...
F. D. Sinclair—
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair. .
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair. .
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair..
F. D. Sinclair..
G. F. Amyot....
G. F. Amyot. .
G. F. Amyot..
G. F. Amyot..
G. F. Amyot..
A. C. Nash..
A. C. Nash..
A. C. Nash..
School Nurse.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
p   .
rrV
<~ a
gl
43
46
102
85
75
80
30|     29
I
76|     71
170|  161
25
116
I
381
24
116
Oj  oi
ait
ii
99|
1
99
10
285]
1
285
26
i
191|
1
191
21
1
308|
50|
379[
1
298
46
371
8 J
OB
I I I I
4|       7
I
I
11       15
4
T
1
13
3
1
3
5
15
29
29
17
40
24
29
42
3
2
80
4
67
2
3
I
1    1
I
2
141       4
53]     14
I
I
32|        3
I
59)     30
I I
169      53|     28
81
85 23
17 13
861 38
I
1
3
10
RURAL AND
Abbotsford Public	
234
10
14
11
13
9
18
69
7
15
20
222
8
14
11
13
9
16
69
5
15
20
14
1
12
1
13
13
26
2
0
1
28|
1
81-
1
151
1
I
17
M. G. Archibald	
	
11-
6!
3|
5|
91
241
. .     1
	
 1
3
K. Terry	
1
1
1
■
1
1
1
4
4
11
3
3
8
3|..
4|
21
10|-
|
3
3
1
L. N. Beckwith	
5
8
F. H. Stringer	
1
5
5
G. R. Baker	
J.   E.   Knipfel	
2
1
1
2
2
5
31
31
I
11
21
1
H. S. Trefry	 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 39
SCHOOLS—Continued,
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Endocarditis,    1	
Hemiplegia,   1;   defective   palate,   1;
acute     bronchitis,     1;     insufficient
gain in weight,  2; endocarditis,  2
keloid,   1
Arthritis,     1;    insufficient    gain    in
weight,   1
Sub-acute   appendix,    1;   pyelitis,    1;
systolic,  1; alopecia,   1; insufficient
gain in weight, 2
Loss   of   weight,   1;   cleft   palate,   1;
endocarditis, 2; insufficient gain in
weight,   5
Congenital deformity,   1	
Mitral insufficiency, 3; impediment in
speech, 1; disordered action of
heart, 1
Strabismus, 1; insufficient gain in
weight, 1
Insufficient in weight, 9; pigeon-chest,
2;   defective  palate,   1;   systolic,   2
Torticollis, 1; insufficient gain in
weight, 15; pigeon-chest, 2; bronchitis, 1; endocarditis, 2; strabismus, 1; anaemia, 2; keloid, 1;
disordered action of heart, 2;
eczema,  1
Acute panopthalmia, 1; impediment
in speech, 1; conjunctivitis, 2;
pigeon-chest, 1; chorea, 1; spinal
deformity, 1; defective palate, 2;
cleft palate, 1; endocarditis, 1
Pneumonia, 1; pigeon chest, 1; endocarditis,  1
Cardiac, 3 ; pulmonary, 2 ; posture, 2 ;
defective speech, 1; dermatitis, 1;
gastric ulcer,   1
Curvature, 1; rigidity of spine, 1;
high pelvis-bones,   1; posture,   1
Cardiac, 7; posture, 1; pallor, 3;
chest deformity, 7; ana:mia, 1;
defective speech,  1
Cardiac, 10; nervous, 1; pallor, 5;
ana'mia, 6; flat feet, 1; posture, 2;
chest deformity, 3; curvature. 1;
thyroid deficiency, 1; congenital interstitial luetic keratitis, 1; defective speech, 4
Cardiac, 4; posture, 3; nervous, 4;
hernia, 1; defective speech, 2; anse-
mia, 2; pallor, 4; deformed hand,
1; blepharitis,  1; catarrh,  1
Asthma,   1	
Asthma,   1; cardiac,   1;  eczema,   1..
9
4
Chicken-pox	
Chicken-pox; measles..
Chicken-pox. .
Chicken-pox; measles; mumps..
Chicken-pox	
Measles; infantile paralysis, 1..
Measles; mumps..
Measles, 32; chicken-pox, 1..
Measles,  4; chicken-pox,  2	
Measles, 23; whooping-cough, 6
Measles; scarlet fever..
Measles	
Measles	
Lighting poor	
Needs   inside  painting
Good-
Needs inside painting
Needs inside painting
Rooms dark and
dirty; steps fire-
hazard
Needs inside painting
Needs inside painting; water uncertain as to quantity and quality
Water doubtful as
to quality
Basement   damp;
rooms dark
Crowded	
Basement needs flooring ;   heating   dif-
Needs inside paint
ing; water uncer
tain
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Excellent.
Excellent.
Excellent.
Clean.
Good.
Clean.
Untidy.
Fair; no water.
Clean.
Unfit for use.
Clean.
Poor.
Fair.
Fair.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Both.
Both.
Both.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
i
	
Sporadic cases of scabies and impetigo; epidemic of mild form
of measles
Good	
Clean; adequate.
disease,  1
	
Clean; adequate.
	
Good	
Fair.
Fairly good	
O.K	
Yes.
O.K.
Pair	
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
O.K.
Fair	
Fair.
Good	
Good. J 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
CU   .
-d
°K
. o
o g
£<  01
M
ft
3    .
u-, a
o -g
a
li
<,   01
a
o
a
a1
it
£ a
01 «
ait
>
Ii
<D .2
4>     .
||
® 3
OK
"3
si
01 +J
on
."2
"3
01
H
to 3
I a
01
oi so
01 tj
V, oi
01  q,
ati
o*>3
a a
! HO
'3
Alice   Arm	
9
24
31
8
24
30
2
4
5
3
2
2
3
10
4
1
3
8
1
5
32
4
2
11
7
7
3
7
2
8
1      1
31     i;
Alice Siding	
i
2
i
i
3
1
1
1
Allen  Grove	
R. B. White	
2
	
2
Anarchist Mountain	
W.  H. Wood	
1
7         7
i
Anderson Creek	
R. W. Irving	
2
3
2
Anglemont	
8
44
17
8
19
14
12
17
120
20
7
8
42
17
8
18
15
12
17
110
20
7
2
2
3
4
21
8
	
	
Amiable	
Trail-Rossland Clinic
1
2
Appledale	
Argenta	
Arrowhead	
A. L. Jones	
2
8
2
4
27
5
4
13
2
9
4
1
8
9
6
3
12
3
8
21
1
1
13
6
Arras	
L. N. Beckwith
H. F. Tyerman	
Miss N. E. Dunn...
i
7
1
5
7
1
5
26
1
6
Arrow Park, East	
3
3
1
1
2
Arrow Park, West	
H. F. Tyerman	
3
2
28
Ashton Creek	
H. W. Keith	
Aspen Grove	
G. H. Tutill	
3
3
7
F. E.  Coy..   .
2
2
11        4
1
11
1
11
5
2
2
l
Atlin	
Avola	
10
8
25
10
26
10
8
24
10
24
2
Bainbridge	
Balfour	
D.  G.  Barclay	
1
3
6
Balmoral	
2
5
Bamberton	
F. T.  Stanier	
Cowichan Health
Centre
1
1
Bamfield	
1
28|     26
HI        1
24|     23
9j     10
14|     14
341     34
8|        8
13|     11
81        8
15|     15
15|     15
1   . .
2
Barkerville	
G. R. Baker	
1
10
Barnston Island	
1
3
1
2
1
9
6
1
3
1
4
1
Barriere	
M.  G. Archibald	
Barriere Forks	
M. G. Archibald	
2
3
2
7
1
1
6
11
10
Baynes Lake	
H. A.  Christie	
3
Bear  Flat	
H. A. W. Brown	
Beaton ....
1
9
14
3
2
2
3
5
9
Beaverdell	
2
Beaver Lake	
G. W. Ross	
(School closed)....
Beaverly	
H. S. Trefry	
121     12
1
4
5
2
P.   Ewert	
(School closed) —
Beaver Point	
R. D. Rush	
111     11
7|        7'
01        9
10|     10
18       18
411     41
22       19
6|        7
24|     21
1
13|     11
60|     59
9[        9
44|     421
221     22
101        8|
8|        8
16|     14
1
1
2
2
6
4
1
6
2
7
6
24
4
2
10
4
21
1
19
12
2
3
7
1
9
4
1
1
9
3
15
6
Beaver River     ... .
M.  F.  Lucas	
1
Bednesti	
1
10
31
13
2
Belford  H.   H.   MacKenzie—
1
7
6
2
24
10
3
3
Bella  Coola	
3
2
2
	
5
3
2
1
Belleview	
1
1
Bench	
F. T. Stanier	
Cowichan Health
Centre
Bend	
M. F. Lucas	
Benvoulin	
*20
3
15
3
3
2
	
3
15
14
3
3
2
o
7
1
4
1
16
Beresford	
R. W. Irving ,
Bevan	
2
3
3
10
3
16
4
2
2
10
1
19
Bickle	
1
Big-Bar Mountain	
R. Gibson	
Big Creek	
1
2
4
1
Big Eddy	
G. W. Ross	
10|        7
191     19
10|     10|
10]        8
Birch Island	
J. A. Shotten	
4
1
1
6
1
Ulack Canyon	
R. Gibson	
3
1
"Black Creek...
G. W. Ross	
|
1
Black Mountain	
G. A. Ootmar	
C. J. Willoughby
51. G. Archibald	
1
1
Black Pines	
26
89
181
261
1
o
2
4
4
9
28
5
3
1
3
1
1
5;
5
4
4
1
9
4
1
3
4
Blind Bay	
16
F. H. Stringer	
5|        5|
9|        91
23|     23|
31|     311
1          1
1
141      141
1
|
3
|
Bliss Landing	
1
Bloedel ;	
R. E. Ziegler	
11 1
4
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
4
2
Blubber Bay	
T. H. Lougheed	
21
1
1|
4
6
J. M. Willoughby	
2
i
	
1
1
1
I
* Includes defective nasal breathing, adenoids, and enlarged tonsils, MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued,
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
.5
>
E3
02
d
tt
4)
ft
a
a
o
H
bo
§
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1     1     1
Good	
Seats  should  be  rearranged
 1	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Measles,   1	
Good        	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Mild form of scarlet fever	
Good	
Good.
...
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good.
Whooping-cough   (small outbreak
of scabies and impetigo)
Measles,   2	
Not crowded;  ventilation   and   heating adequate
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Pertussis	
Satisfactory	
Neither	
Good	
O.K.
i
Mumps,  17	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
     1
O.K.
Satisfactory.	
1
i
 i1	
31         1
Measles,   2	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Wooden  building in
fair   repair;   poor
ventilation;    adequate heat
Good	
Two; good repair.
Good.
in a child of 8  (boy) ; one case of
mild mitral lesion; history of chorea
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Not    crowded;    well
ventilated;   fairly
well heated
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
1 J 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
•3
a
3
ol
.'o
° £
[fl
!.
(-•$
°i
Si
a
o
3
a
s
£a
01  01
01
ahr
01
.5
<£   Oi
o 01
aa.
*3
a
3
S3
si
01 +^
01 d
"3 £
OS
T3
'3
a
01
erf
H
TJ
1!
trt Oi
•rt
oi „•
03  S
a3
HO
01
'3
O
32
13
8
7
22
17
11
12
17
12
28
11
30
13
10
10
124
17
17
16
147
20
70
95
14
21
13
6
3
17
57
30
11
8
11
11
72
21
57
70
19
14
15
24
23
10
34
8
14
82
24
8
17
60
16
24
18
25
52
27
97
18
43
13
8
18
16
7
29
12
8
7
21
17
11
12
17
10
26
11
30
13
10
9
120
16
16
16
132
19
70
93
14
21
13
5
3
17
54
30
11
8
11
11
72
20
54
68
19
14
15
24
23
10
34
7
14
80
24
8
12
56
14
24
18
23
52
27
95
18
43
13
8
18
15
1
31	
41	
1
1
2
1
1
2
12
1
6
2
6
3
2
3
2
15
2
5
12
15
4
3
14
4
13
3
10
1
5
6
43
9
12
2
55
6
39
37
6
6
4
3
2
.
37
3
5
2
2
1
11
11
17
14
7
3
4
6
8
2
25
10
2
2
2
8
1
L. N. Beckwith	
i
.
4
.
1
o
A. E. Kydd	
2
2
	
W. H. Wood	
	
1
1
1
i
10
1
6
F. Inglis	
...
4
	
	
3
	
6
2
6
10
2
	
	
1
4
11
3
2
4
2
4
	
N. J. Paul	
	
	
i
1
	
H. A. W. Brown	
1
	
3
1
1
3
1
	
5
1
26
6
3
3
16
	
....
3
	
6
3
2
1
	
1
7
W. H. Wood
1
	
	
9
Brigade Lake	
2
6
3
1
	
Trail-Rossland Clinic
	
2
2
	
6
2
1
3
1
46
3
2
9
1
5
7
5
5
27
8
14
74
7
2
2
...
2
44
	
3
2
1
10
J. AV. Laing	
11
M  G  Archibald
1
1
1
    1	
7
G. H  Tutill
2
2
1
2
2
	
	
1
1
1
1
2
	
 |	
	
	
 1	
....
Burgoyne Bay	
R  D  Rush
2
4
2
11
5
3
28
5
3
4
2
2
8
2
7
8
	
	
10
	
	
3
	
1
9
5
	
35
31	
1
2
	
1
2
	
	
3
1
3|,
 1	
1
	
1
2
2
8
2
9
4
3
21	
2
6
	
Camp No. 3, Headquarters
1
    1
F. F. Coy	
3
1
1
5
	
	
4
11
3
6
3
8
H. S. Trefry
4
..
2
3
2
2
2
3
3
1
2
12
2
4
13
5
1
1
12
3
1
3
2
14
4
41
5
13
3
3
3
3
2
3
1
3
1
2
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
D. P. Hanington
Miss E. G. Allen-
5
1
1
3
4
2
36
12
	
1
Trail-Rossland Clinic
D. McCaffrey	
4
2
4
	
3
Cawston	
Miss B. Thompson.
1
2
	
1
1
	
1
1
1
	
2
3
1
4
22
6
8
10
9
3
Cedar, North	
	
3
4
2
1
5
6
1
V. E. R  Ardagh
	
2
1
1
	
1
3
5
	
1
Trail-Rossland Clinic
J. F. Haszard	
2
2
9
*>
1
6
1
41
5
9
52
10
25
4
3
2
3
1
....
2
2
2
5
1
	
Chase River	
D. P. Hanington
Miss E. G- Allen...
7
	
9
6
7
2
4
2
3
1
Chilco
2
	
3
3
	
3
5
	
2 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
1
H
to
>
S
IS
tt
w
d
bo
p.
a
s
g
O
&
tt
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Good    	
Yes.
Poorly lighted; poorly heated
Good             	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good
In good condition...
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Ventilation,  etc.,
good
Good            	
Yes.
2
Well ventilated;  not
crowded; well
heated
Yes.
O.K	
Good
Satisfactory	
O.K	
Yes.
Yes.
12
Fair.
Well heated and ventilated; not
crowded
Good    condition;
somewhat crowded ;  ventilation
and heating good
Chicken-pox,  22
mitral regurgitation,  1; chorea,  1;
pityriasis rosea,  4
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good
Good.
Good	
Good               	
i
Whooping-cough
Good.
O.K.
O.K.
Good	
Good.
O.K..
O.K.
Chicken-pox, 1; measles, 2	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
1
Fair.
       1      .
1
...       1
Measles; varicell
        |
T B.  1.                    	
        |
O.K.
        |
German measles
 1	
Good.
1
|
 |	
|
Yes.
condition
. ..  1	
In good condition....
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Measles;  varicel
Good.
 ...1	
All  had  whooping-cough  during
winter
Fairly good	
Fair.
Yes.
Good.
	
Poorly heated; dark
and dirty
	 J 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
s
. o
<*   Oi
P.
3   .
rU "3
Z.S
°1
is
o
3
a
'd
it
ii
ait
0)
'■£ 3
£ p
o£
4)    .
£ a
■is!
*rt
CO
%
^ .5
<£ 33
01   u
on
23
'o
a
01
crl
H
01    m
to£
rt 'w
a o
ti
01   Q,
Oh
T3
o> _;
co a
■33
HO
ai
'o
O
14
18
9
12
14
13
40
-    59
44
39
13
13
18
11
40
153
18
10
19
82
53
62
14
160
33
10
20
211
18
6
18
17
19
9
17
76
11
IS
13
19
28
8
37
13
16
101
27
12
13
9
15
27
6
8
11
13
10
13
27
19
25
8
20
0
13
9
16
8
49
20
26
14
18
9
12
14
13
38
59
44
38
9
13
18
11
39
149
13
8
18
82
51
60
14
158
32
10
18
207
16
5
18
15
19
8
17
76
11
18
13
19
28
8
36
12
18
99
27
12
12
8
15
26
6
8
11
12
10
13
26
17
25
8
20
5
13
9
15
8
46
20
26
1
2
1
2
1
i
l
2
1
3
4
5
2
2
4
2
2
3
4
8
28
10
14
6
6
5
2
9
37
3
3
8
20
15
16
1
12
7
5
1
4
3
1
5
i
1
i
i
5
1
i
3
2
1
1
l
2
	
15
4
2
18
7
3
5
5
9
5
3
7
53
4
4
1
10
10
16
11
4
4
1
1
12
5
i
10
1
2
3
2
4
3
1
4
1
4
1
1
5
Trail-Rossland Clinic
Columbia Valley	
	
1
4
5
3
3
31
4
4
7
2
1
1
i
15
3
17
1
9
1
4
Copper  Mountain	
1
1
2
i
i
1
10
2
5
1
9
9
R. Elliot     	
2
10
8
4
11
F. T. Stanier	
H. N. Watson
Cowichan  Health
Centre
Miss V. Miller	
1
9
1
1
6
4
24
3
6
3
6
29
9
2
5
10
Crescent Valley	
3
10
i
8
1
1
30
3
1
o
4
30
3
14
29
3
3
11
2
6
2
4
50
5
5
10
5
3
12
6
9
19
16
1
6
1
5
1
4
4
7
4
1
4
4
4
3
1
7
3
8
5
12
1
30
13
4
2
2
27
3
3
Criss Creek	
R. Elliot     	
2
1
3
1
2
o
2
2
	
1
I
	
B
1
1
49
5
9
4
o
3
1
7
1
5
29
3
o
6
1
2
3
1
2
5
1
2
	
1
6
2
1
3
4
3
9
1
3
7
1
3
	
2
9
3
6
1
28
5
13
7
27
5
11
7
10
L N Beckwith
9
1
3
2
3
2
7
T. C. Holmes	
2
Deep Cove	
Mrs. E. M. Wall-
H. W. Keith	
3
1
1
7
2
4
21
1
1
2
2
 1	
4
1
7
1
4
20
1
Departure Bay.	
2
20
1
2
1
1
L. N. Beckwith
W. H. Mclntyre	
Miss N. E. Dunn...
1
i
2
3
13
1
4
5
14
2
3
G. W. Ross	
	
1
1
1
1
Donley's Landing	
H. B. Maxwell	
 1      1
 l	
1
1
l
2
6
6
1
3
1
3
R. W. Irving .. .
	
5
2
1
l
2
1
2
1
2
2
	
	
9
i
i
3
2
	
	
2
1
2
2
2
i
1
6
1
1
	
	
3
	
	
4
	
4
	
G. F. Young _
Mrs. A. Grindon....
Mrs. MacDonald....
«25
o
i
1
25
Elphinstone Bay	
2
	
	
	
1
1
_
.   .
Includes defective nasal breathing, adenoids, and enlarged tonsils. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
01
id
C3
o
W
d
'-3
01
P.
a
H
a
o
p
1
rt
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Fair; door defective.
Yes.
clean.
Good.
1
Influenza,   15	
Well    heated;     fair
ventilation;      not
crowded
Good	
Good.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
 L.
O.K	
O.K.
2
Good	
V.D.H.,  1
Good	
Good.
Good	
Measles,  3; influenza,  25	
Good.
Good	
1
 L
1       1
Good
 1 1..
 1 1..
 1 1	
.      .
Good	
 1 j..
Good	
 1 1_.
 1 1	
'
 I L.
Old  log  dwelling  in
poor repair
Good	
1
 j	
repair.
Good.
 |	
Satisfactory	
 |	
 1	
Yes.
 1 L.
Good	
9
1
	
 ] |..
Fair	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
 ...1 |	
 1 |_.  ..
Good condition	
1                1
 | |	
clean.
 1 !..
Good	
 | ]..
 1 |„
Cleft palate,   1; V.D.H.,  3	
 | |..
Clean;   sanitary	
Satisfactory	
 1 1..
11        4|        3
 .1 L.
....
 1 |„
Poorly located	
Satisfactory	
.
Clean;  adequate.
 I |..
 1 L.
Measles,   1;  chicken-pox,   3 ;
 t '-■
Ventilation  good
Satisfactory	
.   1   ..     1
Clean;  adequate.
Two need new pits.
 1 |„
 1 L.
 1 L.
 1	
 L
 1	
Good	
Yes.
..
Crowded; badly ventilated ;   new
school going up
	
..
 1	
	
chest-walls,  1
	
	
 1	
..
...    .
 I	
	
	
5
|	
	
	
Typhoid,  2	
1...  ..
5
	
Ventilation,   etc.,
good
Clean;  adequate.
1
 1	
1
	 J 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector,
Enderby, North	
Engen	
Englewood	
Enterprise	
Erickson	
Errington	
Evelyn	
Ewings Landing	
Extension  -...
Falkland	
Fanny Bay	
Fauquier	
Ferndale	
Field	
Fife	
Fish Creek	
Flagstone	
Florence Mine	
Forestdale	
Forest Glen	
Forest Grove	
Forfar	
Fort Fraser	
Fort Fraser, North-
Fort George, Central.
Fort George, South-
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John	
Fort St. John, East-
Fort Steele	
Four Mile	
Francois Lake, North
Francois Lake, South
Fraser Flats	
Fraser Lake	
Fraser Lake, North-
French Creek	
Fmitlands..
Fruitova	
Fruitvale	
Gabriola, East—-
Gabriola, North..
Gabriola, South-
Galena Bay	
Galena	
Galiano, North—
Galiano, South—
Gallie Bay-
Ganges	
Gibson Creek...
Gilford Island-
Gill	
Giscome	
Glacier	
Glade	
Glenbank	
Glenemma	
Glenora	
Glenrosa	
Glentanna	
Goldstream	
H. W. Keith
W. Ross Stone.
F. H. Springer
G. W. Ross	
G- B. Henderson
C- Davidson
F. V. Agnew.
G. A. Ootmar
D. P. Hanington
P. S. Tennant.
T. A. Briggs
J. E. H. Kelso
H. S. Trefry.
G. A. Cheeseman
W. Truax	
H. A. W. Brown
H. A. Christie.
D. J. Barclay.
T. C. Holmes.
H. F. Tyerman
G. W. Ross.
H. A. W. Brown
W. C. Pitts.
W- C. Pitts.
H. S. Trefry
H. S. Trefry.
W. Ross Stone.
H. A. W. Brown
H. A. W. Brown
F. W. Green
L. B. Wrinch
T. C. Holmes
T. C. Holmes
H. S. Trefry
W. C. Pitts
W. C. Pitts
C. Davidson
M- G. Archibald
W. Truax
Trail-Rossland Clinic
O. G.Ingham
O. G. Ingham
O. G. Ingham
A. L. Jones.
P. Ewert.
R. D. Rush
C. H. West.
R. E. Ziegler.
R. D. Rush
H. H. MacKenzie.
F. H. Stringer
A. D. Morgan
H. S. Trefry.
A. L. Jones.
H. H. MacKenzie.
H, F. Tyerman.
P. S. Tennant
H. N. Watson
W. Buchanan
F. V. Agnew
K. Terry	
* Includes defective nasal breathing, adenoids, and enlarged tonsils. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931
-32.
J 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
a
a
01
r*
u
m
d
u
ft
a
a
o
oo
00
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
O.K	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
For   somewhat   debilitated   children   recommended   cod-liver
oil
Two    rooms;    frame
building; no basement; one schoolroom only in use
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Measles; varicella	
Satisfactory	
Building condemned
Adequate.
Chronic bronchitis,  3;  chronic appendix,   1;   mitral   disease,   1;   paralysis,   1
1
2
2
Measles, 4	
small school in- ■
adequate     and
filthy.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Fair	
Impediment of speech,  2	
2
Good.
Yes; good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Good.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good
Good.
10
Good	
O.K	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good :	
Good.
Mumps,   1	
Clean;  adequate.
Lighting from wrong
side
Two    rooms;    frame
building    on    cement     basement;
not crowded; well
heated   and   ventilated
Three-roomed building   with   hall   in
good     condition;
adequate   ventilation     and     well-
heated ;  not overcrowded
Fair	
	
,
dition.
 I	
Good     	
Measles	
Measles	
Good     . 	
Yes.
New, but crowded
Satisfactory	
Good;   well   heated;
well     ventilated;
not crowded
Good	
 1	
boys require
new one.
i
Satisfactory	
Good       	
Orthopaedic	
i
 i	
adequate.
 i	
 i	
 i	
Good.
 i	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
 i	
 i	
Good                   	
 i	
 i	
 .....1 1 1	
Satisfactory	
Not  good	
O.K	
 1 1 1	
                       	
Yes.
 j 1 1	
O.K.
1     1     1
	
• J 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
r.
Cm   .
"%§
£1
'S
rt   .
^ s
°a
°i
a
P
3
*rt
rr,
ts
£b
01  01
oa
01
Jr
1 c
o£
o
.5
OK
*rt
rt
S3
?!
era
w
33
'3
a
01
•rt
H
oi „■
oo3
i«
EH
01
>■
01 JO
ai £
°aj S
Oh
-a
oi „•
oo3
oi c
■33
ECS
ai
'5
cs
1
182!    189
2
25
o
i
1
1
20
1
5
4
7
5
11
3
12
7
19
1
52
5
10
5
6
1
14
5
25
12
23
4
9
4
5
100
	
11
2
19
10
30
8
12
	
30
6
21
H. W. Keith	
14
11
7
9
13
36
12
11
7
9
13
36
1
Granite Bay	
2
	
2
5
1
9
5
1
H. A. Christie
2
2
8
3
	
1
2
4
	
5
4
10
1
4
1
4
15
	
	
1
1
	
	
3
5
	
	
	
1
6
1
1
 1
8
i
4
	
3
231     23
751     72
131     16
1311   130
111     11
1
191     19
46|     39
10|        9
2381   238
8|        8
311      31
	
9
H. W. Keith
5
5
3
8
3
1
o
3
1
2
3
3
2
3
L. N. Beckwith	
Miss N. E. Dunn-
3
3
2
	
4
3
3
4
1
	
4
3
9
10
1
3
3
1
6
1
5
3
15
6
13
6
6
3
4
43
2
14
7
10
16
21
6
6
F. H. Stringer
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
14
6
12
6
4
.
27
P. Ewert
3
1
3
	
1
6
W. H. Mclntyre
28
29
36
61
17
40
8
12
20
7
10
7
45
84
11
4
21
30
15
107
12
6
7
9
10
13
10
21
8
12
10
16
113
22
16
8
7
18
58
9
12
7
9
13
40
9
15
33
57
14
94
22
28
36
57
17
39
6
12
19
7
10
9
44
79
11
41
21
29
I
15
1071
1
111
6'
7!
9'
10'
131
10|
181
81
121
101
16'
1131
171
141
81
71
18|
581
1
91
12'
7!
9!
131
32!
91
15|
341
53'
121
941
1
12
2
	
2
D   McCaffrey
	
2
4
1
1
	
1
...   .
2
1
3
2
	
1
6
1
1
1
5
1
8
1
11
3
1
	
1
5
3
	
1
5
3
4
5
3
2
5
5
27
3
7
1
2
3
5
21
11
3
1
7
8
9
23
3
1
11	
1
  1	
H W  Keith
1
4
2
2
	
1
1
4
4
3
Miss M. Griffin
9
27
3
7
3
1
	
1
2
5
	
1
1
9
Houston	
3
	
	
Mrs. MacDonald—
1
1
15
	
32
1
	
	
1
.....
	
	
H
11
21
11
11
 1
11
1
2
1
2
2
1
91
1
1
2
2
	
K
2
3
	
 I
H. A. Christie
	
	
	
2
2
	
i
	
 1
1
	
5
 1
91
41
21
1
8
	
1
 |
1
3
  1
3
2
 1
H. S. Trefry
4
Ingraham Mountain	
W. H  Wood
 1
	
2
2
13
4
2
4
3
7
12
4
4
1
161
  I
61
21
4
1
1
3
1
1
31
11
21
 |
	
9
24
H. B. Maxwell	
R. T>. Rush
 1
1
21
7
1
2
I
11
9
4|
12
27
4
2
1
2)
21
101
11
11
2
 1
29|
1
1
41
11
|
H. S. Trefry
|
6
Jackson Bay	
 |
1
S. W. Leiske
Miss Alice Field....
1
Johnson's  Landing	
	
1
 1
4
1
1
1
G. H. Tutill
 1
	
|
1
 1	
 1
4
1
7
3
1
1
51
1
31
 1
1
1|
1
1
3
R  B. White
1
1
2
1
11
11
11
 1
1
11
61
J
21
9|
1
1
2
21
11
A. E. Kydd
Kelly Creek	
s|
8
»21
•10
29
1
19|
	
1
	
341
1
211
341
sl
581
1
17
Kelowna, East	
Kelowna, South	
Keremeos	
G. A. Ootmar	
G. A. Ootmar	
D. McCaffrey	
Mrs. A. Grindon....
Mrs. A. Grindon....
Miss B. Thomson..
15
 |
41
1
9
* Includes defective
nasal breathing, ade
noids, and enlarged tonsils. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
,1 49
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
1
01
>
<D
o
w
d
OO
a
P.
a
a
p
&
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
....   ...!........
Satisfactory---	
systolic murmur at apex, 1;  atrophy
of   calf   and   thigh   muscles   due   to
congenital talipes equino-valgus,  1
i
ing of lavatories.
Yes.
	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
....
i
Yes.
i
Satisfactory	
Modern	
Ventilation,   etc.,
good
Fair (crowded)	
O.K.--	
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
O.K.
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Poorly lighted	
Good	
i
sis,   1
Good.
	
5
Good	
1
.. ..i	
Measles,   5	
Good	
....
Since   examination   an   epidemic
of   chicken-pox
Stove-guard required
Good '. -	
catarrhal  rhinitis,   2
Ventilation bad —
	
covered.
Yes.
	
. ,.i	
Fair  ...
.1	
Well ventilated:   not
crowded; well
heated
Good	
I
i ....
Good.
...
i
Good	
 i	
All satisfactory	
Well kept	
Building in good
condition
Good	
 I	
 I	
I
.. .i	
Yes.
81      12
Ventilation,   etc.,
good
Fairly  good—	
	
 I	
 i	
O.K	
No....	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
i
Yes.
.!	
Yes.
I
O.K	
O.K.
1    	
Good	
Good.
I
Good	
Good.
1     ....
Good.
 |	
Satisfactory	
Good	
I
Yes.
3
41
l
Excellent	
Good	
Yes.
21
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
 1...	
Satisfactory	
Good condition	
Good	
Four water-closets;
clean.
Fair.
O.K	
O.K.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
	
	
1
	
Good	
1
Satisfactory	
In good condition
1
	
..]	
.
Tongue-tie,   1;  pulmonary T.B.,   1
11
1
Crowded	
Good	
1
German    measles,     1;    chicken-
pox,  13
Chicken-pox,  2 —..
pulmonary, 1
.
Good	
Good. J 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
°a
ot>
CJ   QJ
C«
Qfrn
Kettle Valley..
Kidd	
Kildonan	
Kimberley	
Kingcome Inlet..
Kingfisher	
Kingsgate	
Kinnaird	
Kispiox	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum....
Kitwanga	
Kleindale	
Knutsford	
Koksilah	
Krestova	
Killarney	
Lac la Hache—.
Laidlaw	
Lakelse	
Lakes District—.
Landry ,
Lang Bay	
Langford	
Lantzville	
Larchwood	
Lardeau	
Lasqueti Island...
Lee	
Lillooet	
Lily Lake	
Lily Pad	
Lister	
Lone Butte	
Long Beach	
Longworth	
Longworth, South.-..
Loos....,	
Louis Creek 	
Louis Creek, Upper..
Lumberton	
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton 	
Lytton, North	
Mable Lake	
Magna Bay	
Malakwa	
Malahat	
Mamette Lake	
Manson's Landing..
Mapes	
Maple Grove ,...
Mara	
Marten Lake	
Martin Prairie	
Marysville	
Masset	
Mayne Island	
Mayo	
Mayook	
Meadowbrook	
Meadow Spur	
Meadowvale	
Meadow Valley..
Medora	
Meldrum Creek..
Menzinger Creek..
Metchosin	
Michel-Natal	
Midway..
W. H. Wood...
M. F. Lucas....
A. D. Morgan..
J. F. Haszard..
(School closed).
F. H. Stringer	
H. W. Keith	
G. B. Henderson	
Trail-Rossland Clinic
L. B. Wrinch	
G. B. Henderson	
S. G. Mills	
V. E. R. Ardagh	
H. B. Maxwell	
J. A. Ireland	
H. N. Watson	
H. H. MacKenzie	
R. B. Manson	
G. W. Ross	
AV. E. Henderson	
S. G. Mills	
W. Ross Stone	
L. N. Beckwith	
A. Henderson	
K. Terry	
O. G. Ingham	
F. W. Green	
D. J. Barclay	
O. G. Ingham	
M. F. Lucas	
Miss Taylor	
Miss II. Kilpatrick.
Miss Kelly..
J. C. Stuart	
W. C. Pitts	
G. W. Ross	
G. B. Henderson...
R. Gibson	
H. H. MacKenzie..
H. S. Trefry	
H. S. Trefry	
M. F. Lucas	
M. G. Archibald....
C. J. Willoughby-
F. W. Green	
O. Morris	
R. E. Ziegler	
A. E. Kydd	
A. E. Kydd	
O. Morris	
W. Scatchard—
A. L. Jones	
F. T. Stanier....
II. L. Burris	
R. E. Ziegler—
W. Ross Stone..
O. G. Ingham...
H. W. Keith....
W. Ross Stone..
W. Scatchard—
J. F. Haszard—
J. C. S. Dunn...
C. H. West	
H. N. Wratson	
H. A. Christie	
J. F. Haszard	
Trail-Rossland Clinic
W. Ross Stone	
F. W. Andrew	
O. Morris ,
J. E. Knipfel	
M. F. Young-
E. R. Baker...
K. Terry	
G. F. Young..
W. H. Wood..
10
538j   534
7
7
15
15
10
10
27
25
157
148
12
11
12
12
5
5
31
27
20
11
7
7
11
10
27
25
18
16
8
8
19
15
13
13
70
66
41
40
10
10
9
9
8
8
6
5
34
24
16
6
16
71
13|
131
I
13|
28|
375|
73
68
15
15
6
5
40
40
20
20
12
12
33
33
13
13
14
14
9
9
7
7
39
39
03
99
12
12
25
25
10
10
14
14
20
18
54
54
10|-
131
20|.
431.
71
18|.
26|.
211.
191.
27|
23 .
161.
61.
16|
7|-
13.
131
I
13
28
341
21
..I..
I
lj....
it...
81..-..
2 ....
3|....
3
H-
41..
21..
II-
II-
8|..
31..
11..
I
....I | 21..
7|        8| 20|
I I
-I I 5|
I
10
""Hi
25|   125
-I
13|     13|
.....
II 1
21 2
I
H '  1
31 3
151 23
81
4
4
1
6i
45|
1|
21
13|-
3|
6|
5|
2
27
10
1
6
9
1
2
1
8
10]
141-
91-
41
31
41
1
4
9
2
2
4
10
5
10
1
10       15
9|        1
 I	
2
3
1
14
1
24
10
1
41        1[ I	
4 5|        5|	
711 1931     25|        3
I I           I
101 91     26|     11
[
I MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.}.
d
1
to
4)
|3
cd
te
d
£
a
|
|
o
te
fl
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Y s
Clean; adequate.
Hydrocephalus,   1;  epilepsy,   1;   acne,
3; enuresis,  1; blepharitis,   6; cleft
palate, 1; cardiac, 2; chronic bronchitis,  1; pigeon-chest, 1
In good condition;
well ventilated
 1	
Yes
i
Yes
|
Good
 1	
i
Good
New building O.K.—
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Measles	
 1	
0 K.
4
Dingy appearance
Clean;  adequate.
0 K
O.K.
0 K
Yes.
Good
Measles	
Good
Satisfactory	
0 K
cleaned.
Poorly ventilated
Poorly ventilated
Excellent.
Good.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate.
O.K	
Good
Clean;  adequate.
In good condition
In good condition
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate.            •
Clean;   adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
O.K	
y
Clean
0 K
Satisfactory	
Much improved	
Excellent	
Good;  not  crowded;
well      ventilated;
recently     painted
inside
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Roof leaks	
Clean;  adequate.
J 	
 |	
.    I    ....
O.K	
Yes
 1	
Good     ... .   	
No outer room	
Good	
Influenza	
voor.
O.K.
O.K.             	
0 K.
Orthopaedic,   2; icthyosis,   1; cardiac,
3 ; scarface,  1
Lower   room   crowded ;    needs    more
light
	 J 52
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
ND
RURAL A
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
rH      .
o ~
. o
fl
3    .
rWrt
01
° E
d
p
3
C
■u
3
£a
0,  01
ait
01
11
a>
QJ
-5 a
a >rj
o qj
aa
'A
si
qj rt
QJ £
CM
23
'o
01
<
TJ
H o
01
cl JO
01 *.
aS
oi   0
fv.
■33
B8
6
'o
O
Mill Bay
F. T. Stanier	
E. R. Hicks
Cowichan Health
Centre
27
76
11
8
80
7
26
6S
11
8
78
7
1
5
1
5
25
5
2
2
8
40
4
27
6
i
i
3
1
 1	
17
o
2
2
39
	
G. W. Ross	
2
2
1
*38
3
o
G. A. Ootmar	
Mrs. A. Grindon....
14
2
Mitchell Bay
3
111        5
121     12
151     14
1
4
2
1
4
3
3
8
1
2
"   1
4
6
1
4
14
6
7
1
2
3
12
14
10
2
16
4
4
3
10
6
3
2
12
lb
15
32
4
5
108
11
3
3
1
5
3
4
2
 1	
N. G. Archibald	
....
4
2
15
IS
9
12
10
8
27
32
11
13
13
65
20
19
18
8
120
80
51
13
40
18
10
8
13
25
44
38
14
29
8
58
62
110
11
18
273
48
20
40
5
8
145
18
14
11
9
15
14
9
12
10
8
26
32
11
13
12
63
20
17
7
18
7
120
80
50
13
40
18
10
8
13
25
35
30
14
28
8
58
62
113
11
17
259
45
18
36
5
8
138
18
14
9
9
	
3
1
1
1
1
2
Mountain Ridge	
1
1
1
	
1
1
5
2
7
5
0
5
i
 1        X
5
5
4
5
4
30
6
12
5
1
4
9
37
33
1
4
6
1
5
8
3
3
6
7
5
54
30
30
6
11
59
22
8
9
4
o
11
F. W. Green..   ,
H. S. Trefry.
 1	
W. H. Wood	
3
1
3
7
9
1
3
6
9
1
1
2
i
i
W. H. Mclntyre	
3
1
1
1
3
2
5
i
i
i
5
6
2
1
4
2
7
1
5
C. J. Willoughby	
1
2
10
1
2
	
10
4
10
1
1
1
2
4
0. G. Ingham	
2
4
12
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
33      21
          1
1         7
1         6
31	
81
7|        4
31        4
1|-
101
4         7
12|        3
4|        4
231        5
1
1
71        3
21        1
231        1
3|     13
1       6
3|        1
1
2
H  S  Trefry
IT. S. Trefry	
1
2
G. H. Tutill	
1
9
1
9
9
1
8
2
5
2
4
6
1
2
6
3
<>
I
W. H. Mclntyre
W. C. Pitts	
i     i
H. N. AVatson	
Miss V. Miller	
8
o
7
1
A. E. Kydd	
Northfleld	
2
1
1
1
3
1
S. W. Leiske.	
Miss A. Field	
W. H. Wood	
Notch Hill..
..
5
8
*28
«9
5
P. P. Smyth	
8
4
39
I
6
8
2
4
4
G. A. Ootmar	
G. A. Ootmar	
R. B. White	
Mrs. A. Grindon...
Mrs. A. Grindon...
..
3
Olalla	
Miss B.  Thomson.
1
22
1
5
3
3
2
4
1
3
1
3
37
10
4
5
2
6
43
6
3
3
1
1
04
7
3
18
	
3
1
150-Mile House	
G. W. Ross	
R. B. Manson	
One Mile Creek	
1
T. C. Holmes	
1
1
4
1
7
1
4
W. C. Pitts	
Osland	
A. E. Perry	
(Closed) .'.
Osoyoos	
27
16
19
26
1     16
1      19
2
1
1
6
	
4
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
5
8
3
1
4
15
3
5
|
5
7
3
5
5
17
4
.19
7
12
4
2
8
o
4
2
Othello	
8
1
1
5
4
3
2
j
Otter Point	
K. Terry	
1
2
W. Truax	
291     28
65|     63
1
37|     32
11!     11
27|     26
151     14
Oyama	
1
Oyster, North	
0. Morris	
T. A. Briggs	
Miss E. G. Allen...
a
3
1
1
Oyster, South	
D. P. Hanington	
J. C. Stuart	
Miss E. G. Allen...
2
I        1
	
 !      2
1
1
1        1
1
* Includes defects
e nasal breathing, ad
snoids, and enlargec
tons
Is. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Other Conditions, specify,
Acute Fevers which have
Building.    State if
Closets.    State
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
y
occurred during the
crowded, poorly
if clean and
Disease, etc.).
c
m
.Ml
o
Past Year.
ventilated, poorly
adequate.
g
%
QJ
ft
tD
heated, etc.
>
CJ
d
tf
Good	
1
	
Good	
Adequate	
2
1
in good repair.
Adequate	
.....    1
Good	
clean.
Satisfactory	
Building very delap-
idated
O.K.
Two; clean.
Good	
Intestinal flu,  1 mild	
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Good.
Yes.
Fair	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Partially built	
Clean;  adequate.
Only  one  toilet.
Adequate, but not
O.K	
too clean.
O.K.
Well kept	
Good	
Clean.
Good.
Good .■	
Yes.
.....    [
Good frame on concrete     basement;
modern  heat  and
plumbing
Good	
Yes.
Measles	
Yes.
3
O.K	
O.K.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Clean;   tendency   to
crowding
Clean, but crowded-
Poorly ventilated
Yes.
Clean.
1
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
In good condition	
Clean;   adequate.
Measles	
 .....
Good condition	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Six water-closets;
cardiac,   1
clean; good condition.
Yes.
Repairs badly
5
1
Measles,   135	
needed.
Good.
2
Repairs needed.
Scarlet fever; measles	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Poliomyelitis,     1;    conjunctivitis,     1;
eczema,   2;   cardiac    (post-chorea),
1; herpes,  1; acne,  1
German   measles,    2;    chicken-
pox, 41'
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good	
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Mumps,  1; measles,  1; chicken-
pox,   1
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
O.K	
O.K.
Very poor	
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated
Satisfactory	
Good	
Poor.
Clean; adequate.
Adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Adequate.
O.K	
Fair. ,T 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
3
Oh   .
°|
. o
<, oi
fl
3    .
0)
^. C
°a
° 5
o
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I
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it
£ a
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OS
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>
ti
01   01
ca
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rt
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01  tO
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TO
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a
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so °
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QJ    QJ
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0
V. E. R. Ardagh	
15
13
13
15
95
18
32
17
12
8
24
8
55
S
14
18
8
8
23
12
6
16
19
51
13
16
69
10
14
74
19
15
381
18
25
239
49
20
74
33
34
21
7
118
19
12
11
29
11
14
24
8
9
10
11
10
9
12
37
8
22
10
13
90
20
9
11
7
15
11
14
14
90
17
24
17
12
1
5
4
7
6
3
16
1
3
J
3
8
5
5
4
16
3
13
8
4
2
4
2
1
5
2
2
1
10
4
....
1
3
1
8
L. N. Beckwith	
Trail Rossland Clinic
R. D. Nasmyth
Miss N. E. Dunn..
4
5
....
1
4
Miss MacKenzie....
1
2
3
2
1
H	
.   ...1	
4
12
1
3
1
2
	
1
8
24
6
55
8
13
16
8
8
23
12
6
16
18
48
13
16
69
10
14
69
20
14
374
18
22
230
44
18
70
30
34
21
7
118
18
12
10
25
11
13
23
8
9
10
11
16
9
10
36
8
22
10
13
90
21
9
10
7
1
3
2
10
N. J. Paul	
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
R. D. Rush	
1
1
2
2
3
1
3
2
1
4
2
1
1
5
21
1
10
42
4
9
46
12
3
48
5
16
28
9
8
8
2
20
2
	
5
2
4
12
0
3
3
1
3
 |	
Perry Siding	
1        1
2
G  H. Tutill	
 1	
1
4
2
	
H. A. W. Brown	
	
	
	
3
	
1
	
1
1
	
2
2
8
1
4
10
4
18
2
23
5
9
3
1
2
10
3
i|	
 i	
1
	
4
6
	
12
50
6
13
37
17
8
14
10
13
48
12
10
13
20
17
3
1
1
6
2
9
53
l
2
W. E. Bavis  	
4
2
l
i
1
1
14
2
o
25
1
2
3
13
3
9
	
18
3
	
1
1
3
36
9
1
6
35
9
1
6
14
7
11	
1
691        2
7
12
W. Ross Stone	
1
31 ...
1
7
2
11
16
8
4
8
11
7
5
L. N. Beckwith
Miss N. E. Dunn...
Miss Griffin	
3
1
	
7
	
1
1
1
2
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
	
	
5
17
	
	
13
13
..!'..
..
	
3
1
2
3
4
4
F. E. Coy
	
3
 1	
9
6
2
2
0
2
	
2
1
H. S. Trefry	
1
	
2
4
9
	
2
2
R. D. Rush	
2
2
3
11
2
2
9
7
5
6
39
7
3
6
1
1
8
o
1
5
3
5
8
3
3
44
6
3
14
2
5
1
1
W  H. Wood  	
2
2
1
T
8
1
1
2
1
5
1
1
1
10
Mrs. R. MacDonald
Robins Range	
C. J. Willoughby	
	
	
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
2
1
4
2
1
	
Rock Bay	
Rock Creek	
W. H. Wood  	
2
19
5
T
9
2
	
6
7
9
Rock Mountain	
W. H. WTood	
4
Roe Lake	
R. Gibson	
2
22
3
Rolla	
7|	
21
1
3
2
25
3
25
Rolla, North	
L. N. Beckwith..   .
9
Roosville	
H. A. Ohrstie	
Rosebank	
A. E. Kydd	
1
2
	
1
4 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued,
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
I
01
>
to
3
o
6
01
I
a
o
js
on
C
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Adequate; good condition
Good
Orthopaedic,   2	
0 K
Eczema,   1	
Satisfactory.
0 K
Measles	
Cl
Good	
Adequate.
Adequate.
Good
Clean
0 K
Good
Nervous,   3	
	
1
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
 1
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.    *
Clean;  adequate.
Some closets open
and   unclean.
Clean;  adequate.
Adequate.
Building   satisfactory
1
Aortic regurgitation, 1;  extra  systolic,
1
Pulmonary,  2;  orthopaedic,   1;  epilep
tic, 1; cardiac,  1
Cardiac,   1	
O.TT
V
	
crowded;   lighting
fair;   seating   accommodation fair
Good
11	
Club-foot,   1	
2
Fairly  clean.
Ana?mic,   2	
	
	
Well  ventilated  and
heated;     not
crowded
Not    crowded;    well
ventilated     and
heated
Good	
Not    crowded;    well
ventilated     and
heated
1
1
  1 	
... 1
1
1
  1    ....
Influenza	
O.K
Good
Good
Yes
i
Satisfactory	
O.K
Good        ....
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
1
..1      1   ..
Yes.
..1    ..1......
1      1
1      1   ..
Ventilation,   etc.,
good
O.K	
|
O.K.
1     ..
Good       	
Measles	
Fairly    well    ventilated
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good       	
Yes.
Intestinal  flu	
Good.
2
Improvement needed.
Exceptionally clean-
Satisfactory	
In good condition
3
1
1
1
O.K. J 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Ph   .
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23
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198
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26
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271
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196
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26
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6
7
3
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T. C. Holmes...
2
1
4
3
3
3
3
1
i
2
3
5
52
8
1
4
4
9
147
8
4
5
6
G. A. Ootmar	
H. N. Watson	
Mrs. A. Grindon....
Miss M. F. Young.
i
i
5
•116
5
67
4
H. H. MacKenzie....
1
3
2
i
1
2
2
2
1
4
4
1
3
6
1
8
11
2
2
2
9
1
5
3
1
2
9
7
3
4
3
U
3
	
4
1
0
13
1
9
13
2
6
4
5
2
1
1
II  S. Trefry	
5
2
2
i
7
28
IS
1
1
2
1
3
1
i
6
9
8
7
L. N. Beckwith
3
3
i
2
1
4
1
1
4
1
8
1
2
4
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
3
2
3
L. B. Wrinch..
7
10
7
8
23
16
2
3
13
4
1
1
Mrs. R. MacDonald.
1
2
1
1
2
1
6
2
4
7
2
.}
Shalalth   	
1
1
4
F. T. Stanier	
Cowichan Health
Centre
7
1
5
5
3
4
1
3
3
5
8
Shelley	
H. S. Trefry	
16
1
1
3
1
6
Shirley	
1
	
7
2
7
9
1
2
2
3
9
1
8
2
21
7
7
o
3
1
8
15
26
4
5
20
1
1
1
17
2
4
8
1
5
4
3
1
3
21
4
14
7
2
8
	
6
4
20
2
 -
7
2
6
E Buckell
2
2
8
S. W. Leiske
Miss Ruth Fisher-
Silver Creek	
	
5
47
8
1
5
2
2
46
	
4
5
4
1
H  S. Tref-y
	
18
	
G  R. Bake-
1
o
2
15
32
90
9
4
32
5
3
2
10
3
6
10
0
0
4
3
4
4
43
16
3
0
4
0
5
.
	
4
2
10
1
1
2
8
1
1
15
1
1
9
1
4
18
1
1
9
1
4
2
	
71
4
	
G. W. Ross
5
10
3
1
15
12
3
4
1
	
0
1
..
	
	
1
1
1
3
	
1
1
9
3
1
1
	
	
K. Terry
1
3
W. E. Bavis .. .
.....1	
	
1
2
5
1
2
	
2
7
G  H. Tutill
1
4
1
4
1
L. N. Beckwith	
G. W. Ross  	
Miss N. E. Dunn-
1
2
6
	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
N. J. Paul     	
1
2
1
1
15
4
7
1
15
4
7
1
11
2
5
	
7
1
5
2
R. E. Ziegler
	
1
H. A. Whillans	
2
2
2
1
	
1
o
2
1
3
	
6
5
	
	
..
Stuart..	
F  H. Str-'nger
1
	
3
	
1
	
	
..
.
[           i
	
Sullivan Hill	
 |  |	
2
7
4
1
2
	
1           1
Includes defective nasal breathing, adenoids, and enlarged tonsils. MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
1
QJ
>
%
rt
O
OS
6
"-£
ID
ft
J
a
to
O
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good.
Good       	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Measles	
German measles, 4; typhoid, 1..
 1 i 1	
Good.
Satisfactory	
O.K	
Good
Condition of building
good;  well ventilated and heated;
not crowded
Very fair	
Two; 0 K.
Good.
Ventilation good
O.K.
O.K	
Need of lighting
Dirty.
Good.
	
Good.
3
0 K
O.K.
1
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
In good condition
Satisfactory	
0 K
clean.
3
O.K.
O.K.
Satisfactory.
Good..	
Clean;  adequate.
0 K
0 K
0 K
0 K
2
One class crowded.—
Clean;  adequate.
Dirty.
Satisfactory	
Good.
0 K
...
 1	
.
0 K
Systolic murmur	
 1	
 1
	
0 K
—    .
 1
In   good   condition;
well ventilated
1
... J 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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33
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19
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20
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7
12
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29
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218
16
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60
10
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212
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14
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9
63
100
22
38
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14
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110
11
32
11
6
9
23
26
74
41
8
8
9
2
1
4
3
9
5
20
20
1
9
10
12
5
2
4
9
1
8
3
4
2
E. Buckell	
2
5
3
10
20
3
6
7
8
2
5
7
6
1
L. N. Beckwith
Miss N. E. Dunn...
2
	
5
2
13
3
2
7
2
5
2
1
13
3
2
7
2
7
	
1
2
5
	
	
1
1
1
2
L. N. Beckwith
L. N. Beckwith
R. E. Ziegler	
Miss N. E. Dunn...
Miss N. E. Dunn..
	
5
5
4
2
14
7
4
5
4
	
3
2
	
1
4
	
	
4
	
6
1
9
F. T. Stanier	
H. S. Trefry.
Cowichan  Health
Centre
2
2
3
	
1
1
4
4
9
11
H   S. Trefry
1
7
3
8
3
E. Buckell   . .
2
3
1
1
3
	
3
3
3
2
3
1
12
5
7
	
1
1
2
Tatla Lake	
T E. Knipfel..  .     .
2
1
2
2
2
3
2
3
1
3
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
3
6
11
2
6
1
5
6
1
4
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
80
6
4
	
Ta Ta Creek	
2
H. A. W. Brown
T. C. Holmes	
3
1
2
1
2
8
16
9
3
Telkwa	
1
1
	
10
H. S. Trefry	
1
	
3
3
1
	
....
11
6
2
6
18
3
8
....
1
6
1
6
5
2
11
5
1
	
6
1
F. H. Stringer
2
2
2
3
Tintagel	
1
1
Tofino	
1
4
1
1
6
1
1
1
Topley	
1
1
M. G. Archibald
.
1
1
1
..   1
2
1
H. W. Keith	
1
1
14
6
1
68
3
6
4
2
1
74
5
5
1
1
1
18
33
5
5
5
1
2
9
1
1
6
Turtle Valley	
W. Scatchard	
L. N. Beckwith
Miss N. E. Dunn...
2
3
3
4
1
2
4
6
4
2
9
6
2
9
6
13
6
21
6
5
2
3
4
3
28
3
3
2
4
1
7
12
27
11
2
1
4
1
12
6
12
4
27
22
7
2
6
1
3
56
5
4
3
3
4
17
9
45
22
4
5
4
	
	
16
	
20
1
G. Palmer    	
T. C. Holmes..     .    .
3
2
E. R. Hicks
4
1
7
4
1
1
1
4
H. W. Hill  	
Mrs. C. A. Lucas...
Usk      	
S. Mills	
2
3
3
5
3
R. E. Ziegler	
	
1
2
18
4
2
1
5
1
8
1
3
2
2
1
4
	
1
4
2
2
1
R. D. Rush	
R. D. Rush	
M. G. Archibald
1
1
3
1
1
1
8
2
2
2
1
9
	
1
4
2
H. A. Christie	
4
1
*>
D. P. Hanington
Miss E. G. Allen...
3
4
1
G. R. Baker	
1 MEDICAL INSPECTION OP SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS— Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
QJ
QJ
cd
W
6
w
QJ
ft
a
rH
a
to
O
&
tl)
fl
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Condition fair;   good
heating;     poorly
ventilated
Satisfactory	
Excellent	
Good	
but clean.
Yes.
.
3
Measles,   10	
Good.
Heating   not   adequate
Dark;  crowded	
Good	
T.B.   1
	
Yes.
	
	
	
Fair; light not good-
Neglected    appear
ance
Good	
Mental,   2	
Good....
Good.
3
Good....
Good.
Good	
hernia,  1
Satisfactory	
No outer room	
Yes.
	
	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Chickon-pox, 1	
Good....
Yes.
Good....
Good.
Ramshackle	
Fair; old building....
No.
Heart,  2	
Good...
Neither	
clean.
Yes.
Good condition; well
heated and ventilated
Squint, 2	
sanitary.
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Septic throat, 2	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Very satisfactory
Good-
Clean;   adequate.
quate.
Good—
Good...
1
Good-
8
Scarlet fever, 1; measles, 7; rubella,     1;    chicken-pox,    9;
mumps,   2
Heating   and   ventilating    might   be
improved
Good
adequate.
Slightly crowded	
Good	
Yes
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
O.K.—
Good...
3
7
Adequate.
Adequate.
8
	
Good
	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good...
Measles,   varicella	
Adequate.
Yes.
O.K..
j
Good
0 K
1 J GO
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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3
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35
92
13
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175
41
15
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98
94
14
11
35
34
15
18
18
28
59
50
8
91
19
8
19
55
80
21
30
10
32
60
33
91
10
27
10
9
172
38
15
12
7
95
94
15
11
35
34
15
16
18
27
55
46
8
88
16
81
18
55
77
21
27
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1
1
6
3
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5
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11
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2
11
6
29
7
1
12
18
50
6
5
1
2
4
9
4
2
3
4
31
9
2
8
6
10
10
3
5
37
26
5
34
5
4
3
12
15
12
2
	
7
1
3
8
1
23
3
10
1
3
4
1
2
1
4
3
D. P. Hanington
G. A. Ootmar	
AVm. Buchanan	
W  H. Wood
Miss E. G. Allen-
Miss G. Hill	
3
1
14
3
2
9
3
20
3
26
4
1
2
2
8
12
3
25
5
1
3
M. G. Archibald  .....
R. E, Ziegler	
1
E. Buckell	
16
9
1
1
2
3
13
29
6
5
10
11
1
7
2
4
11
1
2
6
3
3
13
3
5
1
L. N. Beckwith
Miss N. E. Dunn-
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
5
II. S. Trefry	
1
3
25
Willow Valley	
L. N. Beckwith
F. E. Coy... .
Miss N. E. Dunn...
3
2
1
K. E. Cov	
1
1
2
10
2
1
13
1
3
	
3
*20
4
1
13
1
3
15
3
44
3
3
2
7
10
11
11
2
17
2
7
6
18
7
3
1
G. A. Ootmar	
Mrs. A. Grindon....
10
1
2
1
4
1
1
4
C. G S. Maclean -  .
2
H. S. Trefry  	
0
Wycliffe	
	
4
2
4
1
4
1
3
9
11
4
6
10
11
1
1
Yahk                  	
1
1
2
11
Yale	
1
3
0
9
G R Baker
0
Miss V. Miller	
3
10
10
14
Includes defective nasal breathing, adenoids, and enlarged tonsils. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1931-32.
J 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
fl
1
QJ
01
Ttl
d
bD
01
P.
|
8
O
H
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
1
|
Measles	
Measles	
Measles;  varicella _.._	
Good-
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Frame;   fair   condition; heating and
ventilation good
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
orthopedic,   1
Crowded; poorly ventilated;   poor   re-
repair
Yes.
1
Satisfactory	
Good....
Yes.
 1	
Good
Good.
1
1
Good....
Intestinal   flu	
Good.
Good...
Good.
O.K	
Yes.
Excellent -	
Good	
3
6
Good-
Ventilation     and
light  poor
Good	
Good ..
1
!
H	
1
.1    	
Mumps,   24;   whooping-cough,
10
Good	
Yes.
I
Good	
O.K..
|
Yes.
|
Yes.
|
Good	
Good.
1
| 	
Good	
Good	
•1    	
O.K.
1           1
1
1
SUMMARY OF DEFECTS, 1931-32.
o
0
Ol
03
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"3
0
02
ta
HH
if
H .fl
roW
5
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Tl  O
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■£
0
JO
Tl V2
Si?
■3
0
4
1
10
6
11
18
40
00
10
7
68
341
0
706
62
65
88
522
2,512
254
517
199
791
404
31
13
15
217
1,535
41
248
93
5,584
166
2,048
367
793
1,709
5,285
9,862
2,482
1,852
981
527
180
606
121
529
763
2,325
4,476
1,405
546
506
674
266
1,471
220
1,245
2,380
4,616
6,669
2,275
2,000
427
7,921
615
5,254
807
2,656
4,979
13,005
25,114
6,467
5,176
2,274
244
5,268
3,388
31,129
11,984
22,255
74,268
367
376
13,296
12,832
5,274
4,953
50,824
47,834
16,750
16,196
21,543
20,728
108,054
102,919 VICTORIA,  B.O. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to tiie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.
725-932-620  

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