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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCAIL SECRETARY ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1933]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OP
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOE   THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1932
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1932.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. S. L. HOWE, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM HEADQUARTERS STAFF.
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent. H. Jefferis, Bursar.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant Medical Superintendent.
H. A. Jones, M.D., Assistant Physician. A. IIakstian, M.B., Assistant Physician.
H. F. P. Grafton, M.D., Assistant Physician.
G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
Miss B. Bibby, R.N., Matron. Miss L. Wright, Dietitian.
J. G. Simmonds, Clerk. Miss M. L. Haycroft, Stenographer.
W. Jackson, Farm Manager.
A. N. Low, Steward. Miss D. Creech, Book-keeper.
J. Trevors, Laundry Manager. J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Chaplain.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS.
J. Mathieson, Clerk of Works. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OP THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1932.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Eleventh Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1931, to March 31st, 1932.
There was an increase in the daily average patient population over any previous year,
resulting in an increase in the number of days' treatment given.
I would refer you to my remarks and recommendations as set forth in the annual reports
of the two preceding years, regarding the need for the adoption of more active and vigorous
methods in attacking the tuberculosis problem in this Province. I have nothing new to add at
this time, but feel that our present methods are far from adequate to cope with the situation.
It has been conclusively proven in other Provinces—namely, Saskatchewan and Ontario—that
money spent in extending the scope of anti-tuberculosis work is an economical procedure. It
not only saves money by shortening the term of treatment required in each case, but also by
reducing the number of cases and deaths. Both of the Provinces mentioned have a death-rate
of about half that of British Columbia.
The saving or prolonging of lives is indisputably a good investment, and particularly lives
menaced by tuberculosis, which takes its toll during the early years of manhood and womanhood,
when large sums of money, spent on rearing and education, are just beginning to yield good
dividends in the way of the earning-power of the individual.
It would be considered brutal, to say the least, for a community to stand by and watch
thousands of young people being slowly dragged down to their death without some heroic effort
being made to save them. We have this very thing happening in our midst, and it is time that
the people, not only of this Province, but of every community, realized that through increased
efforts in the right direction a large percentage of these young people could be saved and restored
to health. In addition, thousands of children now growing up would be protected from the
infections, which mean tuberculosis and all the expense and misery which go with it, in later
years.
MEDICAL AND SURGICAL.
These services, being the ones which affect the patients most intimately, should naturally
be the best and most up-to-date possible. Economies effected last December reduced the personnel of some of the branches of these services. Those remaining have shouldered the extra
load good-naturedly and the patients have not been allowed to feel the change. Every one has
co-operated to keep the standard of treatment at as high a level as possible. Staff meetings held
each week for the discussion of cases give each patient the benefit of the judgment of all the
members of the staff.
Owing to our isolated situation the number of cases referred to us for examination is not so
large as it might otherwise be. During the past year there were 179 such cases, an increase of
thirty-five over the previous year.
Surgical procedures occupy a very prominent place in the modern treatment of pulmonary
tuberculosis.
At the beginning of the year there were fifty-nine cases receiving artificial pneumothorax
treatment. This treatment was attempted in fifty-eight new cases during the year and was
successfully instituted in forty-eight. There were nine cases admitted with the treatment
already established.   The total number of refills given during the year was 23,008.
Phrenicectomy for paralysis of the diaphragm, with resulting partial collapse on one side,
was attempted in forty-eight cases and was successful in forty-five.
Thoracoplasty, a major operation involving the removal of a large section of each rib on
one side, was done in four cases and good results were obtained in all. This makes a total of
forty-eight of these operations which have been completed on our patients to date. We expect to be using gomenol and oil for suitable cases in the immediate future, but have
been waiting the publication of some results which is to be made shortly.
Our affiliation course appears to be working out very satisfactorily and in the past year
fifty-eight student-nurses have received a diploma for having completed the two months'
intensive course. All of "these nurses made high marks in the examination which is given at the
end of each course.
FINANCIAL.
This is fully covered by the Bursar's report. Every possible economy consistent with
efficiency has been practised, and as a result we have again reduced both our gross and net
per capita costs. The gross daily cost per patient is down 28 cents below last year, but it is
not safe to predict that we can lower it another year. It has, like everything else, touched a
new low for all time.    Mr. Jefferis must again be congratulated on his good work.
SANATORIUM FARM.
The balance-sheet showing the results of the farm operations is most encouraging, considering the present prices of farm stock and products. In spite of having to reduce inventories
greatly on this account, we were able to show a profit of almost $2,400 in operation. Operating
expenditures included large items for fencing, ditching, etc., investments on which there is no
cash return. With any improvement in prices the farm should prove a real paying proposition,
and I feel that we are very fortunate in these times to be showing any profit.
The range stock is increasing very satisfactorily and we are supplying all beef to the
Sanatorium. We are turning out about 700 head this spring and should have over 900 come in
in the autumn. Reduction of the inventory values of this and other stock has been the chief
reason for us not showing the handsome profit we anticipated a year ago.
The dairy herd is being steadily improved both in type and production records. We have
had a splendid increase of young heifers with good records back of them, and in a year or two,
when there is a better demand, should be in a position to dispose of some" of this stock to good
advantage. Regular tests in our laboratory show us to he keeping our bacterial count well
within the limits of certified milk.
We raise two litters of hogs each year from our sows. These amount to over 600 per year
and supply us with all pork products, the curing and packing being done at our own abattoir.
In view of the past year's showing I feel very optimistic about the future of the farm and
think that I can safely predict increasing profits each year, particularly if we are able to retain
Mr. Jackson, the present manager.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
I can only repeat what I recommended last year, but owing to the present financial situation
it is not likely that these recommendations can be carried out.
A new X-ray machine is urgently needed and, as it is the most important.part of our medical
equipment, we must make a special effort to purchase it during the coming year.
ACKNOAVLEDGMENTS.
Many organizations in Kamloops have contributed to the welfare and entertainment of our
patients. The Elks' Club, the Red Cross, and I.O.D.E. deserve special mention. The visiting
clergymen merit our appreciation, also those who have given any donations for the benefit of
the patients.
This has been a difficult year in some respects and I appreciate the loyal co-operation which
I have had from the staff.
In conclusion, allow me, Sir, to gratefully acknowledge the assistance I have had from the
members of your Department. ,
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP, M.B.,
Medical Superintendent. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32.
O 7
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1931-32.
Movement of Population.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1931
Number of patients admitted, 1931-32	
Number of patients discharged, 1931-32	
Number of patients treated, 1931-32	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1932
Daily average population	
Total number of patient-days	
160
128
124
288
160
24
17
23
41
24
Female.
143
96
90
239
143
Total.
327
241
237
568
327
330
120,654
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 241 CASES ADMITTED TO SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1931-32.
Classification.
Male.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
Incipient	
19
32
73
4
1
7
9
12
34
50
32
73
132
4
13.3
30.3
54.8
1.6
Totals  	
128
17
96
241
100.0
TABLE No. 3.—CLASSIFICATION OF FOUR CASES ADMITTED AS MISCELLANEOUS.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
1
1
1
1
Lung abscess 	
1
1
Totals	
4
4
TABLE No. 4.—SHOWING CIVIL STATE OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
59
83
2
1
39
55
1
1
98
Single                                      -	
138
3
2
145
90
241
* O 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING THE NATIONALITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
6
66
1
28
3
1
1
1
6
3
1
6
1
12
1
6
1
1
5
1
71
1
8
1
1
7
1
11
1
137
2
36
4
1
1
1
7
3
1
6
1
19
1
7
1
1
Welsh	
Totals	
145
96
241
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
14
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Atlin                                 	
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
Falkland	
1
3
Field            	
1
Gifford	
1
18
3
36
27
63 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32.
O 9
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS—-Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
36
11
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
79
1
5
27
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
51
2
1
1
63
1
1
14
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
.  2
Sardis	
1
9
1
Trail             	
2
4
Usk	
1
130
3
6
1
Totals	
145
96
241
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
2
3
7
19
3
3
8
2
16
3
4
5
2
5
3
2
3
7
8
2
2
3
13
2
16
3
10
36
7
7
6
7
3
7
2
8
2
2
3
7
3
29
Cook            	
3
3
8
2
36
7
10
3
4
2
12
6
7
3
2
3
7
8
5
2
3
20
Tailor	
2
2
24
Totals
145
96 O 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
26
19
13
20
22
20
13
1
7
1
23
34
14
14
7
1
2
1
3
15 to 20       ,,                              ...
49
21   „   25       ,,                     	
53
26   „   30       ,,    	
27
31   ,,   35       „	
34
36   ,,   40       ,,                        .   ..
29
41   „   45       ,,                    !	
21
46   ..   50       „    	
15
51   ,,   55       „                          	
2
56   .,   60        ,     .   -
7
61        65       ,,    	
1
66   .,   70       ,,                    	
Over   70      ,,                                     	
Totals	
145
90
241
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS  FROM
APRIL 1st, 1931, TO MARCH 31st, 1932.
Month.
Admissions.
Discharges.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1931.
16
11
9
18
11
14
25
5
10
3
14
9
8
8
9
11
5
0
14
6
5
5
10
9
24
19
18
29
16
20
39
11
15
8
24
IS
14
11
11
8
12
12
15
5
5
3
15
11
7
6
7
4
3
6
7
2
4
5
5
9
21
17
18
12
15
18
22
7
9
8
20
20
1
2
1
4
2
4
7
2
2
4
1
3
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
3
2
May	
3
4
Julv 	
6
o
8
October....	
9
3
3
1932.
1
3
2
Totals	
145
96
241
122
65
187
25
25
50
TABLE No. 10.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 237 DISCHARGES
DURING 1931-32.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
Incipient	
9
2
1
9
49
64
1
2
4
21
9
1
1
13
1
6
43
1
21
02
141
13
Totals	
12
123
36
16
50
237 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32.
O 11
TABLE No. 11.—AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCE OF 171 DISCHARGED
PATIENTS.
Condition.
Male.
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved	
Days.
224
535
575
Days.
1,128
550
331
TABLE No. 12.—SHOWING LONGEST AND SHORTEST PERIODS OF RESIDENCE
IN 171 DISCHARGES.
Condition.
Longest Period.
Shortest Period.
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved	
Days.
3,092
6,649
3,297
Days.
7
10
TABLE No. 13.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 11 CASES
(MISCELLANEOUS)  DISCHARGED.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Bronchial asthma	
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
Totals	
8
3
11
TABLE No. 14.—SHOWING WORK COMPLETED BY PATIENTS  IN OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY CLASSES DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1932.
Reed-work—
Trays, size 14 by 20   36
Trays, size 12 by 18   52
Trays, size 12 by 12   21
Doll-cradles     28
Flower-baskets    GO
Pin-trays   18
Table-lamps    6
Dresser-lamps   '.  5
Flower-vases     16
Pine-needle work—
Trays, size 12 by 18   7
Sewing-baskets    4 O 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Woodwork—
Picture-frames  36
Cribbage-boards     16
Tables, small   6
Pine-cone storks  106
Bead-work—
Bags   16
Watch-fobs   12
Embroidery—
Table-centres   10
Table-runners     6
Pillow-slips   16
Hand-bags     16
Painted handkerchiefs  209
Painted scarfs   46
Passe-partout work—Pictures framed   200
Note.—A sale of work was held In December which netted $110 for the patients; they also
had a stall at the Kamloops Fair which brought in $44. Also quite a number of articles are sold
from the show-case during the year.
TABLE No. 15.—WEATHER SUMMARY, BEGINNING APRIL 1st, 1931, AND
ENDING MARCH 31st, 1932.
Month.
Max. Temp.
Min. Temp.    Ave. Temp.
Ave. Hum.      Rainfall
Snowfall.
Sunshine.
1931
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1932.
January	
February	
March	
Deg. F.
85
90
98
92
69
48
44
01
62
Deg. F.
28
40
44
50
49
38
33
6
— 2
-10
-16
13
Deg. F.
51.66
59.75
63.31
70.70
68.34
58.43
47.774
30.999
28.82
24.24
27.49
37.45
Deg. F.
50.10
54.677
62.19
51.38
54.13
64.995
69.032
Inches.
0.155
0.685
0.945
0.105
0.73
0.40
0.28
0.10
Nil
Nil
Nil
0.94
Inches.
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
7.86
9.76
2.66
3.50
5.20
Hours.
201.8
238.6
183.5
342.5
310.9
135.1
173.5
68.3
46.8
81.6
100.9
140.8
Total rainfall during the year, 4.34 inches ;
during the year, 2,024.3 hours.
total snowfall during the year, 28.98 inches ;. total sunshine TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32.
O 13
GENERAL WORK DONE IN LABORATORY.
Material examined.
'£
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to
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178
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1
22
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23
23
30
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1
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19
19
1
3
1
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4
8
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140
61
79
397
13
2
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24
26
26
27
27
20
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1
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150
54
90
26
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20
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11
16
2
1
2
15
16
3
4
8
4
1
153
70
83
23
4
31
31
32
32
26
24
1
1
1
11
16
1
1
1
3
4
8
4
5
1
147
60
87
339
22
1
16
16
19
19
22
29
1
3
8
8
1
1
1
1
4
10
5
5
2
138
71
67
21
2
1
11
11
13
13
16
17
1
1
2
24
6
3
2
2
2
4
8
4
1
245
103
142
57
3
1
2
6
1
49
49
49
49
49
49
6
1
1
10
16
4
3
1
2
20
5
10
5
1
119
58
61
332
103
32
131
27
11
11
11
11
23
21
11
13
13
1
1
2
4
8
4
1
131
54
77
56
33
33
11
9
9
8
8
6
8
2
3
11
13
1
1
2
6
4
8
4
1
251
95
156
33
4
3
1
1
31
35
2
4
21
18
3
2
2
2
4
4
4
1
1
291
78
173
345
5
5
22
3
1
1
23
24
1
3
3
11
13
4
4
4
1
285
65
220
44
2
2
4
2
2
2
3
3
21
31
1
1
2
8
15
1
2
2
2
5
5
5
1
2,228
840
1,388
1,065
223
37
186
133
12
Blood—
197
197
205
205
278
Sedimentation	
Blood-sugar	
313
4
6
11
19
19
166
181
27
22
10
12
20
Tissue sections	
33
57
Milk chemistry	
86
47
17
Miscellaneous	
2 O 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1932.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet and the Profit and Loss
Accounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1932.
As has been invariably the case in past years, our accommodation has been taxed to the
utmost during the year just ended. The number of days' treatment given exceeded last year's
by slightly over 2,000 days. There has also been a slight acceleration in admissions and discharges, making corresponding increases in the number of patients treated ; these figures, in all
cases, being somewhat in advance of any previous year.
The gross per capita cost per patient per day has been scaled down to $2.60, by comparison with last year's figure of $2.88, up to that time the lowest on record. Every economy
consistent with efficiency has been practised, and it is difficult at the time of writing to envision
any possibility of further reductions in operating costs. These latter appear to have reached a
level which can hardly be lowered without seriously impairing the services of the institution.
In the summary of operations shown in Table D of the accompanying statistics it will be seen
that the net cost to the Government per patient per annum has been reduced from $1,133.86 in
1928-29 to $671.69 in 1931-32.
Some further relief, however, may be expected from an increase in the revenue owing to
the higher assessments now being levied on the cities and municipalities, but only the close of
the current fiscal year will show how far our hopes in this direction are justified.
I desire to express my appreciation of your cordial support in the performance of my duties.
and of the active co-operation of the department heads and members of the office staff.
I have, etc.,
H. Jefferis,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1932.
Assets.
Land and improvements   $12,684.05
Buildings  634,176.95
Plant and equipment   148,236.94
Furnishings, linen, bedding, etc  48,665.15
Inventory    13,731.4 i
Petty Cash Account   1,500.00
Accounts receivable   15,489.40
$874,483.93
Cost of operating, 1931-32   261,939.20
$1,136,423.13
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia  $1,136,423.13 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32. O 15
Profit and Loss Account, March 31 st, 1932.
Salaries   $147,698.21
Office supplies  2,226.58
Travelling and transportation   2,524.46
Fuel, light, and water   49,114.29
Maintenance  10.946.85
Bedding, linen, etc  4.397.29
Provisions, etc  74,787.61
Medical and surgical   13,546.14
Incidentals   7,972,39
$313,213.82
Depreciation—
Buildings  30,756.05
Plant and equipment   6.974.10
Bedding and linen  2,561.30
$353,505.27
Revenue—
Dept. of P. and N.H  $23,994.17
Municipalities   62,709.20
Patients  3.862.70
Donation, J. B. Greaves Estate   1.000.00
$91,566.07
Net operating expenses   261,939.20
$353,505.27
Summary of Profit and Loss Account, 1931-32.
Yearly
Per Capita.
Salaries   $147,698.21 $447.65
Office supplies   2,226.58 6.73
Travel and transportation   2,524.46 7.64
Fuel, light, and water   49,114.29 148.82
Maintenance   10,946.85 33.16
Bedding, linen, etc  4,397.29 13.32
Provisions   74,787.61 226.62
Medical and surgical   13.546.14 41.04
Incidentals   7,972.39 24.15
$313,213.82 $949.13
Less revenue        91,556.07 277.44
Net cost of operating  $221,657.75 $671.69
Depreciation (plant, building, and fixtures)       40,291.45 122.09
$261,949.20 $793.78
Remarks.
No. of days' treatment given during year 1931-32  120,654
No. of patients in residence, March 31st. 1931   327
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1932   330
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year   $949.13
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   2.60
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year   671.69
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   1.84 O 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
Average Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921 22           ..           	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
216.00
214.31
293.00
325.00
330.00
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
308,194.82
294,674.82
299,621.79
347,939.58
342,120.06
313,213.82
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1922-23	
1923-24	
1,506.46
1924-25	
1,357.75
1925 26                        	
1,312.44
1,382.04
1926-27	
1927 28    -                           	
1,364.24
1928-29	
1.400.10
1929-30         	
1,187.51
1930-31         	
1,052.67
949 13
1931 32
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
EC
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482.22
479.85
467.52
479.75
501.57
554.98
603.51
544.63
484.06
447.65
$9.01
8.09
7.46
0.01
8.97
9.51
10.32
9.67
10.21
8.09
6.73
$20.56
11.32
9.42
11.93
8.09
14.81
11.89
12.60
8.78
6.52
7.04
$225.14
232.81
243.48
211.11
189.92
173.22
169.48
190.78
157.94
132.71
148.82
$138.43
133.03
85.77
70.55
68.62
65.85
64.20
82.77
62.23
48.92
33.16
$57.79
66.89
13.70
25.78
6.62
33.96
34.93
24.66
.92
14.23
13.32
$421.96
472.17
441.26
288.S6
392.98
426.23
448.96
421.89
338.82
297.72
226.62
$28.37
13.07
39.93
26.17
34.68
39.32
53.82
42.95
50.34
44.93
41.04
$72.06
28.46
65.76
33.05
19.31
12.36
15.65
11.27
13.64
15.69
24.15
$1,429.85
1922 23	
1,460.55
1,506.46
1,357.75
1923  24     .             	
1924  25     	
1925 26	
1,312.44
1926 27       	
1,382.04
1927 28    	
1,364.24
1,400.10
1928 29         	
1929  30          	
1,187.51
1,052.67
949.13
1930  31           	
1931  32            	 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32.
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1- O 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table E.—Summary of Laundry-work, April 1st, 193]
, to March 31st, 1932.
Month.
Personal.
Flat-work.
Total.
Value of Work
done.
1931.
17,006
15,817
18,587
16,971
16,443
17,382
16,419
16,692
17,284
15,063
16,424
17,811
48,848
48,194
49,657
49,831
47,859
50,842
51,845
48,247
50,219
40,500
45,448
52,442
65,854
64,011
08,244
66,802
64,302
68,224
68,204
64,939
67,503
61,623
61,872
70,253
$3,556.42
3,508.18
3,866.61
July                                      .     	
3,654.92
3,440.80
September	
3,748.16
3,590.42
3,360.76
3,644.00
1932.
3,194.54
3,364.54
3,828.90
Totals	
201,899
589,992
791,891
$42,758.25
Flat-work, 589,992 ;   personal, 201,899 ;   total, 791,891.
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1932.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report of the operations of Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1932.
It has been a very busy year on the farm owing to the increase in the amount of stock, the
preparation of 15 additional acres for cultivation, the necessity of building new corrals,
additional fencing, etc.
The meadow-hay crop was light on account of low water. The alfalfa-crop was also light
on account of a very hot summer and the lowering of the water In the storage-lakes at an earlier
date than usual. This has resulted in the necessity of feeding all hay grown and we will have
none to carry over to next season.
These conditions will be remedied in another year by increased acreage under alfalfa, and
also by a greatly increased storage capacity for irrigation-water.
A large storage-basin on Tranquille Creek west of Tranquille Lake has been discovered.
The outlet is very suitable for the building of a dam. A wagon-road has been cut through the
woods to this site and the slashing and clearing around the site of the new dam all completed.
During the summer the dam will be built. There will be two metal flumes set in concrete collars
with metal gates for controlling the flow of water. The soil to lie used in the construction of the
dam proper is particularly suitable, being a heavy clay which seems to be impervious to water,
and which is very hard when dried. The dam when completed will be 17 feet high, 80 feet
thick, and 330 feet long at the top.
Since coming here I have brought over 30 acres, which was lying idle, under cultivation.
With this acreage and the greatly increased water-supply, there should be an abundance of hay
in the future.
The Hudson Bay lots have just been acquired under lease and will give us over 1,000 acres
of additional bottom land for cutting meadow-hay and good winter pasturage. This is absolutely
necessary to us if we are to allow the range herd to increase to about 1,000 head as we hope to do. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931^32. O 19
All water-holes on the leased range have now been fenced off and large troughs placed beside
them.    In this way the watering of the increased herd can be easily taken care of.
The new fencing has all been done with cedar posts and droppers, using four or five strands
of barbed wire. The cost of this work has been surprisingly small and the result very gratifying.
All fences now have a very substantial and neat appearance.
The swine have done exceptionally well and favourable comments from experts familiar
with conditions throughout Canada have been encouraging. Mr. Baker, who has charge of the
department, deserves a great deal of credit for the splendid showing being made. A new pen
suitable for use as winter quarters for the breeding sows was built and found very helpful. We
can now rear 600 or 700 pigs annually and supply the Sanatorium with all pork products. We
also have a surplus of by-products which we have been able to dispose of to other Government
institutions and camps.
The herd of pure-bred Hereford cattle purchased last year has wintered satisfactorily and
the young stock born on our farm here are looking very promising. There are several fine-
looking young bulls amongst this lot and we should be able to raise all our own bulls for the
range herd from now on.
We turned out 681 range cattle this spring and have supplied all beef to the Sanatorium
since the autumn of 1929. I would suggest that we dispose of all off-colour stock this fall if
there is a fair market for it. We can improve the herd by doing this and still be able to produce
more beef than the Sanatorium can use.
The dairy herd continues to improve in type and average production. We are supplying the
Sanatorium with certified milk and have no difficulty in keeping the bacterial count at a very
low level. We have a good supply of promising-looking heifers coming along to take the places
of the older cows, a few of which have to be replaced every year. With a better market we
should be able to dispose of several good heifers advantageously.
Allow me to express my appreciation of your interest and encouragement in the successful
operation of the farm.
I have, etc.,
W. Jackson,
Farm Manager.
BURSAR'S REPORT, TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1932.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements   $105,511.18
Equipment   -.  5,243.82
Land   70,405.88
Automobile Account  850.00
Accounts receivable   602.34
Dam Account  421.72
Petty cash  500.00
Inventory    71,024.23
$254,559.17
Liabilities.
Capital balance   $252,215.60
Operating profit, 1931-32         2,343.57
254,559.17 O 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1932.
Expenditure.
Salaries   $19,220.01
Office supplies   35.65
Travel, tractors and automobile   1,945.94
Fuel and light   1,135.03
Maintenance and janitors' supplies   1,793.68
Feed   15,312.73
Provisions .  4,083.44
Leases  349.56
Seeds   : '.  12.11
Blacksmith's supplies  35.63
Implements and harness   112.07
Drug's and veterinary   122.67
Incidentals   282.08
Boarding-house   587.62
Depreciation     805.45
$45,833.70
Net operating profit   2.343.57
$48,177.27
Receipts.
Live stock and products   $16,279.87
Milk-sales  '.  24,415.75
Garden produce  1,144.49
Swine and products   6,337.16
$48,177.27
Table showing Financial Results.
Year.                                                                                                                                                  Profit. Deficit.
1922    $2,282.42 	
1923  $13,785.68
1924  22,023.05
1925  2,597.03       	
1926  3,655.69
1927  4,524.03
1928  9,629.12
1929  15,411.51
1930  34,270.93
1931  2,507.95
1932  2,343.57      	
Note.—Excessive loss in 1930 due to revaluation of inventory.    Live stock and implements
appraised at market values.
Summary of Farm Production for Fiscal Year 1931-32.
Alfalfa, 230 tons at $9   $2,070.00
Meadow-hay, 155 tons at $5  775.00
Green feed, 378 tons at $5   1,890.00
Corn ensilage, 415 tons at $5   2,075.00
Mangels, 100 tons at $5   500.00
Potatoes, 40 tons at $10   400.00
Potatoes, 1 ton at $25   25.00
Carried forward  .'.       $7,735.00 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1931-32. O 21
Summary of Farm Production for Fiscal Year 1931-32—Continued.
Brought forward    $7,735.00
Onions, 6 tons at $20  120.00
Carrots, 6 tons at $20  120.00
Beets, 4 tons at $20   80.00
Lettuce, 23 crates at $1  ,  23.00
Vegetable marrow, 2,320 lb. at 2% cents   58.00
Spinach, 100 lb. at 3 cents   3.00
Turnips, 3% tons at $40   140.00
Parsnips, 1,388 lb. at 1% cents !  20.82
Corn, 78 dozen at 20 cents   15.60
Apples, 130 boxes at $1  130.00
Rhubarb, 210 lb. at 2% cents   5.25
Greengages, 214 lb. at 2 cents   4.28
Citron, 945 lb. at 1 cent   9.45
Pears, 63 boxes at $1.25   78.75
Honey, 115 lb. at 16 cents   18.40
$8,561.55
Sundries sold to Sanatorium.
Beef and beef products, 51,347 lb. at 9 cents  $4,621.23
Pork, 14,413 lb. at 12 cents   1,729.56
Ham, 7,848 lb. at 21 cents  ~ :  1,648.08
Bacon, 8,754 lb. at 23 cents   2,013.42
Sausage, 5,237 lb. at 20 cents   1,047.40
Lard, 4,237 lb. at 10 cents   423.70
Sundries sold to Provincial Home, camps, etc  562.68
$12,046.07
Milk produced from Dairy Herd.
Milk, 79,384.3 gallons at 40 cents   31,753.90
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.
$43,799.97
525-1132-1169   

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