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SIXTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1930-31 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1932

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 PART III.—APPENDIX.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1931.
Arithmetic.
Pabt I.    (Time, 1% hours.)
[Note.—The questions can be solved mentally, out candidates who find any of the problems too
difficult to perform mentally may work them out with pen and ink in the space left at the
bottom of the page.    The answer to each question must be placed, on the blank to the right
of the question.]
[All fractional parts of answers must be given in their lowest terms.]
1. Find the cost of:— Answer. Value.
(a.)  5 gallons of milk at 7c. a pint.   1
(&.)  31 quarts of cream at $3.60 a gallon.   ±
(0.)  6 pounds 12 ounces of cheese at 20c. a pound.   1
(d.)  6 inches of beaded dress trimming at $3 a yard.   1
2. Add:—
(a.)  .12, 1.2, and 12.   1
(&.)  .051/2, .4%, and 1.   1
(c.)  9 lb., 8 lb. 13 oz., and 8Y2 lb.  lb oz. ±
3. Subtract:—
(o.) 15/12 from 4%.  - 1
(6.)  .0607 from 30.04.   1
(c.)  5 square yards from 1 square rod.  sq. yd. X
(d.) 4 ft. 9 in. from 6.5 ft.  ft in. 1
4. Multiply:—
(a.) .0604 by .7.   1
(6.) 2% by %.   1
(0.)  2 quarts, 1 pint by 5.  qt pt. 1
5. Divide:—■
(a.)  % by 2.   1
(6.)   % by %.   1
(c.)  7% by 3.   1
(d.) 10% by 3V2.   1
(e.) 10 by %   1
6. Express:—■
(a.) %0 as a percentage.   X
(&.)  %%  as a vulgar fraction.   -£
(0.) 79% as a decimal fraction.   -J[
7. (a.) What per cent, of 5 is 3?   1
(6.)  What is 8% of $5.75?   1
(c.)  If 3% of a number is 39, what is the number?   \ L 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
8. Find:— Answer. Value.
(a.) The cube root of 8.   \
(6.) The square root of 9.   1
(c.) The cube of 10.   ±
(d.) The square of 11.   1
9. Find the average of the following quantities:—
2%, 1%, 4%, 3%.     2
10. A street is 41.7 kilometres long.    Express its length in metres     \
11. In 1930 the tax rate in a certain town was 24 mills on the
dollar.   What was the tax on property valued at $4,500?       g
12. A rectangular carpet measures 9 feet by 12 feet.   What is
" the distance diagonally from corner to corner?  ft.    g
13. A man has $8,000 invested at 7%% per annum.    What is his
monthly income from the investment?      g
14. How much must a man invest at 5%% in order that he may
receive an income of $770 a year?        ,     g
15. Three men, A, B, and C, bought for $12,000 a motor-boat which
they used in conveying passengers across the Fraser River.
A paid $4,000 towards the cost of the boat, B $6,000, and
C the remainder.    Their net profit at the end of the first
month was $750.    Find:—
(a.) A's share of the profit. $    g
(6.)  B's share of the profit. $     g
(c.) C's share of the profit. $    g
16. Write the word " True " after each statement that you regard
as true, and the word " False " after each statement that
you regard as false:—
(a.)  The diameter of a circle is the line drawn from the
circumference  to  the centre.      -j^
(6.)  All radii of the same circle are of the same length     J
(c.)  The length of the circumference of a circle might be
called the perimeter of the circle.      J
(d.) All diameters of circles are of the same length.      -£
Part II.    (Time, 1% hours.)
[All work must be shown.    One of the marks assigned to each problem will be given
for orderly arrangement.]
Value.
8       1. (o.) A man buys oranges at 25c. a dozen and sells them at 18 for 50c.   How many
dozens must he sell to make a profit of $2?
(6.) Find the value at 36c. a pound of the butter-fat in 475 pounds of milk that
contains 3.9% butter-fat.
g 2. How many cubic inches of water will a cylindrical vessel hold which is 20 inches
tall and 3.5 inches in diameter? What is the area of the lateral or curved surface
of the vessel?
8 3. On July 1st, 1930, I borrowed $700 from a friend for two months, agreeing to pay
interest at the rate of 7%% per annum. Find to the nearest cent how much
I must pay at the end of the two months to cancel the debt. PART III.—APPENDIX. L 105
Value.
8 4. An agent bought sugar for a business firm in Vancouver at $6 a sack on a commission of 2%. The agent prepaid freight charges on the sugar to Vancouver at
20c. a sack. If he sent the firm a bill amounting to $2,212, how many sacks of
sugar did he buy?
8       5. A. B. McKinnon borrowed $4,000 from a bank and deposited as security 90 shares
of Canadian Pacific Railway stock worth at the time $46 a share.
(a.) How much more was the value of the securities he deposited than the amount
of the loan?
(6.) If the value of the securities should later fall 20%, how much more or less
than the amount of the loan would they be worth?
10 6. A farmer paid $3.20 a bushel for his seed-wheat and sowed 1% bushels per acre in
a rectangular field % mile long and 40 rods wide. His crop averaged 34%
bushels to the acre and sold at $.75 a bushel. If the expenses of tillage and
harvesting amounted to $14.50 an acre, what was the farmer's profit on the
whole crop?
Canadian History.    (Time, 2% hours.)
gO       1. Extension of Canada since Confederation.   Fill in correctly the words omitted:—
The Dominion of Canada was formed by the passing of the	
 Act in the year     This Act
brought about the federal union of the four provinces,  ,
 ,  , and
     Two years later the Dominion
Government purchased for the sum of £300,000 the vast territory controlled
by the , and soon afterwards
a fifth province,  , was added to Canada.
Serious disorders accompanied this change, the Red River valley half-breeds
rising in rebellion under ;   but order was
effectively maintained later by a splendid body of troops, the	
    A second revolt,
known as the Rebellion, and led by
 , occurred in 1885, and was crushed
by Canadian Militia under  at	
In 1896 and some of the following years thousands of settlers came into
the prairies and in the year 1905 two more provinces,	
and  , were created.    British
Columbia entered the Dominion in the year : , the principal
condition of her entry being the promise, by the Dominion Government, of
a railway connecting with the	
Two years later , now one
of the Maritime provinces, entered confederation.   Nine provinces are, at
the present time, included in the Dominion.
17       2. The World War and League of Nations.   Fill in correctly the words omitted:—
There were several causes that led to  the World War;   but the spark that
started the fire, so to speak, was the	
of at Sarajevo in the Austrian
province of Bosnia, June 28th, 1914.   In August of that year the German
armies invaded in order to reach and attack
France, and on August 4th Britain declared war on Germany because she L 106
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
15
had guaranteed the	
Germany's attack on France was halted by the battle of ,
and for three years the rival armies faced each other in lines of trenches
that stretched from the North Sea to	
The British navy kept the sea open for the allies, and after the naval victory
in the battle of , May, 1916, the German
fleet remained in harbour till the end of the war, when it surrendered to
the British.    The Germans tried to ruin British trade and to cut off food
and other supplies by the ruthless use of	
and that led to the entry into the war of another country,	
    The aid of this country made
up for the loss of one of Britain's allies, , whose
government had made peace with Germany in 1917.    Canada raised about
 men for war service, and three-fourths of these went
overseas.    The most famous Canadian leaders were ,
later governor-general of Canada, and ,
who was at one time a school teacher in British Columbia and who is now
president of  University.    Canadian
soldiers fought heroically in such battles as	
and , and on Armistice Day they
triumphantly entered Mons, where some of the earliest fighting had taken
place.    The World War was closed by the Treaty of	
One important result of the treaty was the formation of the  League  of
Nations.
3. On the left-hand side below are given the names of persons notable in the history
of Canada. On the right-hand side are given a list of descriptions referring to
the positions that were filled by such persons, or to the services that were
rendered by them. The candidate should read each description carefully ; then he
should place the number that is before the description, in the brackets after
the name of the person to whom the description applies.
Names.
Sir R. Borden
Lord Elgin
Sir Guy Carleton
Isaac Brock
Sir Wilfrid Laurier
George Brown
Joseph Howe
Lord Durham
Wm. Lyon Mackenzie
Louis Papineau
Sir James Douglas
Sir George Simpson
Dr. John McLoughlin
(        ) 1. Leader in  Upper  Canada  of  the 1837
Rebellion.
( ) 2. The French-Canadian premier of Canada.
3. Canada's    prime-minister    during    the
(         ) World War.
4. The first British governor of Canada.
)          5. Leader  in  Lower Canada  of the 1837
Rebellion.
) 6. Governor of Canada when the Quebec
Act was passed.
) 7. First prime-minister after Confederation.
8. First governor of the colony of British
) Columbia.
9. The  governor  of  Quebec  who  greatly
) helped the loyalists who arrived in
1781.
)        10. British navigator who  first landed on
Vancouver Island.
)       11. His earlier  name was  Donald  Smith,
and he helped to finance and build
) the C.P.R.
12. Signed Rebellion Losses Bill, thus estab-
) lishing " responsible government."
13. Famous Liberal leader in Nova Scotia—
) at first opposed Confederation. PART III.—APPENDIX.
L 107
Value.
David Thompson (
Col. Thomas Talbot (
Sir F. Haldimand (
Gen. James Murray (
Lord Strathcona (
Sir John A. Macdonald (
Capt. George Vancouver (
12
14. Founded  a  famous  English  settlement
on the shores of Lake Erie.
15. Commanded  the  British  at  Queenston
Heights.
16. The explorer of the Columbia River.
17. The   first   governor   of   the   combined
Hudson's Bay and North West Companies.
18. Political leader in Upper Canada at the
time of Confederation.
19. Chief Factor of Hudson's Bay Co. at the
time the Oregon Treaty was passed.
20. Governor whose " report " to the British
Government led to the Act of Union,
1840.
12
24
4. You have met the following terms in your reading of Canadian History.    In a few
words explain the meaning of each:—
Representative government.
Responsible government.
Reciprocity.
International Joint Commission.
Rebellion Losses Bill.
5. (a.)  Give the two principal objections to the Constitutional Act of 1791.
(b.) What causes led to the outbreak of the War of 1812?
(c.)  What were some of the advantages to the people of Canada of the confederation
of the provinces?
6. Write as fully as you can regarding the boundary-line between  Canada  and the
United States, using the following headings:—
(1.)  The Maine boundary.
(2.)  The western boundary.
(3.)  The Oregon boundary.
(4.)  The Alaska boundary.
Drawing.    (Time, 2% hours.)
[Candidates should be alloioed 15 minutes to select the examples called for in question (a). The
drawing books and portfolios should be collected at the end of that time and should be
returned to the candidates when the examination in the subject is completed.]
20       (ff-)  Select and hand in from drawings done by you during the year an example of each
of the following:—
(1.) A drawing of a flower, a spray of leaves, or an insect.
(2.) A coloured design in a square, circle, or triangle.
(3.)  A drawing of any common object finished in pencil, pen, or colour.
(4.)  An example of lettering or a poster with lettering.
H        (b.)  Draw a rectangle 4%" by 6%" and letter therein the following notice, making the
capital letters about %" high with the small letters of suitable size:—
RUGBY GAME.    Feb. 6th, 1931.    2 P.M.    CENTRAL PARK. L 108
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
26        (c.)  Make a pencil drawing of the photograph shown below to fill a rectangle 5%" by 7".
11        (d.)  Make an outline drawing from memory of a pitcher standing below the eye-level.
26        (e-)  Make a drawing of the given fish design in a triangle having a base of 6" and an
altitude of 3%". PART III.—APPENDIX. L 109
English Composition.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
8 1. Combine each group of sentences into one sentence.
(a.) A lark had a nest in a field of wheat. The wheat was almost ripe. The
lark was afraid that reapers would come to cut the wheat before her
young ones were able to fly.
(6.) The young eagle had fallen with him. The eagle sat on the farthest edge
of the shelf.   The eagle eyed him with savage dread.
9 2. Rewrite each of the following sentences;   but instead of using the phrase in italics,
use, where possible, one word to express the same meaning:—
(a.) What will become of him in time to come?
(6.) At school he sits in an uncomfortable state until the bell rings.
(c.)  Yet he creeps, like a snail, not at his own wish, to school.
(d.) The lad is clever beyond what is common.
(e.) Holland is a country bordering on the sea.
(/.) The boy given up to thought will prove the better scholar than the boy given
up to talk,
(g.) I have two lists;   one contains the names of persons who owe me money
and the other the names of persons to whom I owe money.
10       3. Rewrite and punctuate the following, supplying capital letters where necessary:—
(a.) james smith esq m a 11 d
(6.) the rev t c jones
(c.) he asked you did you go home.
(d.) in canada there are two great transcontinental railways viz the c n r and
c p r
(e.) charge Chester charge on Stanley on
were the last words of marmlon.
8       4.  (a.) Rewrite the following sentences, changing the direct quotations to the indirect:—
Frances asked her mother, " Where is my coat? "
Nelson signalled to the fleet:  " England expects every man to do his duty."
(6.) Rewrite the following sentences, changing the indirect quotations to the direct:—
John said that he did not know where he had left his books.
His uncle asked him why he had no money.
7        5. Rewrite the following sentences, making necessary corrections:—
Try and be on time.
Can't you find a peg to hang your hat on?
The young man was able to satisfactorily answer all the questions asked him.
I am looking for the young lady whom I was told to give the message to.
The prisoner said that he was willing to die for his country repeatedly.
Nobody may enter the hall to-night who have not tickets.
10 6. Write a letter to your landlord complaining of the bad state of the roof of the house
and pointing out the need for repairs. (Use your examination number for your
name.)
48       7- Write on one of the following subjects an essay of at least one page, containing
several paragraphs:—
Life on the farm.
Wild animals of British Columbia.
Our school district.
Our town or city. L 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
24
10
English Grammar.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. (a.) When Mr.  Tulliver first learned that the lawsuit was decided  against him
every one who happened to observe him at the time thought that he bore
the blow remarkably well.
(6.) As wreath of snow on mountain breast
Slides from the rock that gave it rest,
Poor Ellen glided from her stay,
And at the Monarch's feet she lay.
Give the clauses (principal and subordinate) in the above sentences.    State the kind
of each clause and the relation of the subordinate clauses.
2. Supply the correct word in each blank in the following:—
(a.) The feminine plural of hero is	
(6.)  Possessive singular of me is	
(c.)  The superlative degree of well is	
(d.) The present participle of lie is	
(e.)  An abstract noun that is formed from anxious is	
(/.) The singular of data is	
(g.) The plural of alley is _	
(h.) The possessive plural of baby is	
(i.)  The past participle of drink is	
(j.) The plural possessive of she is	
10       3. In the following sentences pick out the phrases and give the kind and the relation
of each:—
(a.) It is difficult to teach this boy.
(6.)  On a fine autumnal day Rip had unconsciously scrambled to one of the
highest parts of the Kaatskill Mountains.
Phrase.
Kind.
Relation.
• PART III.—APPENDIX.
L 111
Value.
16
4. Rewrite the following sentences, making any necessary corrections.    Give reasons
for the changes you make:—
(1.) I feel badly to-day.
(2.)  He may of done it.
(3.) I shall not allow that dog in the car.
(4.)  She sung with you and I.
(5.) These are the pupils of which I spoke.
(6.) John had went into the house.
(7.)  I, he, and you can finish it.
(8.)  I lay here and watch the clouds.
9       5. Give the tense and the voice of the verb or verb phrase in each of the following
sentences:—
11
Sentence.
(1.)  Snow had fallen during the
evening.
(2.) I shall be surprised to see
him.
(3.) He  comes  occasionally   at
this season of the year.
(4.) A   true   friend   has   been
gained in this way.
(5.)  The children were reading
loudly.
(6.)  They will be coming to the
party.
(7.) The forts were captured at
dawn.
(8.) He is receiving help.
(9.)  He came to this country in
1887.
Voice.
6.  (a.)  Man discovered that fear destroyed his happiness and spoiled his usefulness.
(&.) This he did by vnwenting stories, wondrous tales of god-like heroes, of knights
who swept all before them, of kind fairies and happy elves. L 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
The words given in the form below are from the foregoing sentences.    Tell what part
of speech each word is.    Give also the relation of the word:—
Word.
Part of Speech.
Relation.
that
his
spoiled
usefulness
this
inventing
tales
god-like
who
before
elves
10       7. In each of the following one of the degrees of comparison is given.    Fill in the other
degrees:—
Positive.
Comparative.
Superlative.
forth
more
worst
next
better
former
least
top Value.
10
8. Give the past tense and the past participle of the following verbs:—
Present Tense.
Past Tense.
Past Participle.
bid
forsake
wet
sow
lie  (recline)
choose
swell
lay
bereave
shoe
Geography.    (Time,'2% hours.)
10       1.  (&•) The tides are caused chiefly by the pull exerted by the	
The rise of the tide is called the and the fall is
called the     The tide with the greatest range is
called the tide;   and the one with the least range
is called the tide.' The highest tides occur in
the	
(b.) The greatest known depth in the ocean is about miles.    Near the coasts
of the continents there are usually shallow areas called	
Such areas are  important to  man, for  on  them  are found the  greatest
 of the world.   Three products which
man obtains from the sea other than those used as foods are ,
 , and 	
(c.)  Goods brought into a country are called , and goods
shipped out are called     Bringing goods into a
country illegally is called     Five principal
seaports through which foreign goods enter Canada are ,
and..
8       2. Select the best answer to each of the following,
answer in the brackets at the right:—
Write the number of the best
(a.) The instrument that measures the pressure of the air is (1) a thermometer, (2) a barometer, (3) a thermostat, (4) an isotherm—.(
(6.) Africa has been called the "dark continent" on account of (1) its
black people, (2) backward civilization, (3) black soil, (4) muddy
streams (
(c.) The chief industry of France is (1) agriculture, (2) mining, (3) lumbering, (4) silk manufacturing ( L 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
(d.) The leading manufacturing country on the mainland of Europe is
(1) Austria,  (2) Italy, (3) Germany, (4)  France (        )
(e.)  The   climate   of   Southern   Alberta   is   modified   by   (1)    typhoons,
(2) monsoons, (3) trade winds,  (4) Chinook winds..., (        )
(/.)  In Switzerland the principal industry is  (1)  catering to the tourist
trade, (2) manufacturing watches, (3) dairying, (4) fur-farming.. ( )
(g.) The chief industry of Holland is (1) fishing, (2) dairying, (3) cutting
of diamonds, (4) building of canals (        )
(h.) The  Sahara Desert is caused chiefly by   (1)   the nearness of the
equator, (2) the vertical rays of the sun, (3) the position of the
Atlas Mountains, (4) the trade winds from the north-east (        )
12       3. Write after the name of each product the names of three countries that export the
product in large quantities:—
Product.
Country.
Country.
Country.
Tea	
Coffee	
Sugar	
Cotton	
Wool	
Raw silk	
Rice	
Wheat
8       4. Name the principal raw material from which each of the following is manufactured :-
Calico	
Macaroni	
Flannel	
Chewing Gum..
Steel	
Gasoline	
Linen	
Glass	
Raw Material. PART III.—APPENDIX.
L 115
Value.
14
The circle below represents the earth.
(a.) Draw on it the following parallels of latitude and give the number of degrees
each is from the equator:   Arctic  Circle,  Tropic of Capricorn,  Antarctic
Circle, Tropic of Cancer.
(6.)  Draw the prime meridian and number it.
(c.)  Mark a point A where the latitude and longitude are zero.
(d.) By arrows indicate the position and direction of the westerly winds and the
trade winds.    Write the names of these winds in their proper positions.
Indicate also the position of the Doldrums and of the horse latitudes.
12       6. Write briefly regarding  (a)  the climate,  (6) the agricultural possibilities,   (c)  the
transportation facilities of the Peace River Block in British Columbia.
12       7. Under the following heads describe briefly either Argentina or the Union of South
Africa:—
(a.) The inhabitants.
(6.)  Their occupations.
(o.) The surface and drainage of the country.
(d.) Its climate. L 116
. PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
24
S.   (a.)
On the map furnished you sixteen rivers are indicated by the numbers 1 to 16.
After each of the numbers given below write the name of the river that is
represented on the map by the number:—
1       9	
2     10	
3     11 :	
4 :  12	
5     13	
6     14	
7     15	
(b.)
8     16	
The  numbers  17 to  24 on  the map  represent  seaports.    After  each  of  the
numbers given below write the name of the seaport that is represented on
. the map by the number:—
17     21	
18     22 '.	
19     23	
20     24	
(c.)
The numbers 25 to 32 represent other important cities.    After each number
given below write the name of the city represented on the map by the
number:—
25     29	
26     30	
27     31	
28    32	
(rf.) The numbers 33 to 40 represent islands. After each number given below write
the name of the island represented by the number, and the name of the
country to which the island belongs:—
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
(e.)  The letters A to H on the map represent large coast waters.    After each letter
given below write the name of the coast water represented by the letter:—
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
(/.) The letters I to L on the map represent straits.   After each letter given below
write the name of the strait represented on the map by the letter :—
I     K.
J     L. PART III.—APPENDIX. L 117
(g.) The letters M, N, O, P on the map indicate large inland waters. After each
letter below write the name of the lake or inland sea represented on the
map by the letter:—
M     O	
N     P	
Penmanship and Dictation and Spelling.    (Time, 1% hours.)
(25 marks for Penmanship and 75 marks for Dictation and Spelling.)
[Note.—The Supervisor shall read Sections A and B to the candidates three times—the first time
to enable them to gather the meaning; the second time sloioly and clearly in subsections as
marked by the bars, allowing all the candidates sufficient time to write the words; and the
third time for review. He should repeat icords and phrases, when necessary, in order that
every candidate may hear distinctly. Punctuation-marks should not be dictated. Candidates
are not permitted to rewrite the passages.]
Value.
23 A- The Normans introduced the custom I of building large and beautiful castles I and
churches, I whereas the Saxons | had only miserable houses I made of wood. I
They introduced I the use of the longbow also, I which became so general I that
the English were accounted I the best archers in the world. I The Normans
lived I in a more civilized manner I than the Saxons I and observed toward each
other | the rules of civility and good breeding, I of which | the Saxons were
ignorant. I The Norman barons I were also great friends I to national liberty.
They would not allow their kings I to do anything I contrary to their privileges,
but resisted them I whenever they attempted anything I beyond the power
which was given them by law. I Schools were set up in various places | by the
Norman princes, I and learning was encouraged. | Large towns were also
founded I and received favour from the kings, I who desired to have | the
assistance of the townsmen, I in case of any dispute I with their nobility. I
Thus the Norman conquest, I though a most unhappy event I at the time it
took place, I rendered England a more wise, I more civilized, I and more powerful
country I than it had been before. |
16 B- As I lay there reading I I was startled I to see a tiny and exceedingly beautiful
fairy I approach me. I She was dressed in shining garments I and had a
glittering crown on her head I with a silver star just above her forehead I that
twinkled as she walked. I
She came close to the hammock I and said: I ■" I want you to go home with me. I
Will you? "  |
" Where is your home? "   asked I. I
" Down by the lake under a spreading elm tree," I replied she. I " I am the queen
of the fairies I and my subjects and I I are anxious to have you come I and see
our tiny kingdom.  I    We know that you are our friend."  I
" I shall be delighted to visit your home," I I responded eagerly. I
She touched me with her tiny wand I and made me as small as herself. | Then she
took me by the hand I and we skipped away over the fields I to the home of
the fairies. |
16        C. The candidates I made preparations I for the political campaign. I
The preceding arrangement    was regarded | as mutually satisfactory. |
This regrettable occurrence     caused the leader I to forfeit the confidence I of his
principal supporters. I
They completed the ascent I gradually and with comparative ease. I
Genuine sympathy I was felt for those I who suffered through this unfortunate error. I
The development [ of Canada's natural resources | proceeded rapidly I during recent
years. I L 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1930-31.
Value.
20
A great author has said I that genius is nothing more I than an infinite capacity I
for taking trouble. I
The library contained I many current magazines  | as well as numerous works of
reference. |
D. disappointed
alcoholic
alleys
secretary
dissimilar
anxiety
parliamentary
beneficial
until
acquaintance
transferred
iceberg
wondrous
pronunciation
throughout
zealous
aching
bachelor
cancel
miraculous
certificate
conveyance
efficiency
partially
approval
exhibited
imitation
invisibility
occasionally
irregularity
fulfil
achievement
conqueror
disperse
cordially
recompense
noticeably
criticism"
losing
chimneys
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATION PAPERS.
Copies of the High School Examination Papers that were prepared
by the Department of Education for candidates who sat for examinations
in June, 1931, may be obtained from the Officer in Charge of Text-books,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Price 25 Cents, Postage Prepaid.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Mii.icsry.
1931.
0,925-1131-6977

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