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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY TENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE OF… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1932

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 DEPARTMENT OE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
TENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1931
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield,  Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1931.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
HON. S. L. HOWE, Provincial Secretary.
P. WALKER, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM HEADQUARTERS STAFF.
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent. H. Jefferis, Bursar.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant Medical Superintendent.
M. McQuitty, M.B., Assistant Physician. H. A. Jones, M.D., Assistant Physician.
A. Hakstian, M.B., Assistant Physician.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S., Dentist.
Miss B. Bibby, Matron. Miss L. Wright, Dietitian.
J. G. Simmonds, Clerk. Miss M. L. Haycroft, Stenographer.
W. Jackson, Farm Manager.
A. N. Low, Steward. T. G. Kingscote, Book-keeper.
J. Trevors, Laundry Manager. J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Chaplain.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS.
J. R. Mathieson, Clerk of Works. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OP MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1931.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Tenth Annual Report of Tranquille Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1930, to March 31st, 1931.
Although there was no increase in the bed accommodation, more patients were treated during
the year just ended than in any previous year. This was owing to a somewhat shorter average
stay than formerly. On account of many of our patients being homeless, and as no other
provision is made for them, many patients are here for long periods. This prevents us from
making the best use of the Sanatorium and delays the admission of patients who might have
a chance to get well. Patients who are here for too long periods also become more or less
demoralized and have a demoralizing effect on the whole institution.
The conditions described above could be remedied to a great extent if the scheme which
I recommended last year was put into operation. This scheme provided for machinery for early
diagnosis, expert supervision in the home while waiting admission, shorter period of more active
treatment and training in the Sanatorium, expert supervision of remainder of treatment in homes
or special wards of general hospitals, and co-ordination of all anti-tuberculosis work in the
Province under one direction.
If such a scheme is not possible, some special provision should be made for cheaper care of
the advanced chronic cases who are likely to remain dependent on the State for an indefinite
period. The Sanatorium should be for active treatment and training only. Once the type
referred to above have been trained, they could safely be transferred to a place in the nature
of a home where they could look after themselves to a great extent. It is this type who find
the rigid Sanatorium rules irksome and make it difficult to enforce them on those in the more
active stages, for whose special benefit these rules are made. A suitable place for the care of
these people might be operated in connection with the Hospital for Incurables under the charge
of a Sanatorium-trained nurse.
MEDICAL AND SURGICAL.
The medical service is the one around which the operation of the whole institution centres.
The Sanatorium is divided into sections, with a resident physician in charge of each. He is
responsible to the Superintendent for all patients under his charge. Newly admitted patients
are allotted to the physicians in turn for their initial examination. Each week there is a meeting of the whole medical staff with the Superintendent, at which the physicians present the
cases they have examined. The possibilities of special treatment are discussed and each patient
in this way has the benefit of the opinions of the whole staff. It also familiarizes the whole
medical staff with each patient's condition. Special treatments, periodical examinations, and.
daily visits to patients keep the medical staff fully occupied.
There were 144 people referred to us for chest examinations and eleven ex-patients came in
for examination during the year.
The field of surgery in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis is being steadily extended.
Artificial pneumothorax is the simplest operation used in surgical treatment. This is performed by our own staff. At the beginning of the year there were fifty-three patients receiving
this treatment. It was attempted in sixty-four new cases during the year. No free space could
be found in twenty-one cases and it was successful in forty-three. In addition, eight cases were
admitted with the treatment already established. A total of 1,890 refills were given during
the year.
The next surgical step is avulsion of the phrenic nerve to reduce the intrathoracic space and
limit the movement of the more affected lung.    This operation was attempted in twenty-five T 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
cases, but no phrenic nerve could be found in two. The value of this operation is undoubted in
many cases and we have had some striking results.
The major operation of thoracoplasty, which involves the removal of the ribs on the badly
affected side, has been performed on forty-four patients here. During the past year there have
been only three and the results have not been good in these. On the whole, however, we are
satisfied with the results obtained here and intend to continue to recommend it in suitable cases.
There were seven tonsilectomies and six other major operations performed by the consulting
staff.
Probably the greatest achievement of the year in our medical work was the successful
beginning of our affiliation courses for nurses-in-training. We are affiliated with the larger
hospitals of the Province and give a two-month course to each class. The course is made fairly
intensive and an examination is given at the end of it. We can give this training to between
sixty and seventy nurses each year. As they come from all parts of the Province, the value of
this work cannot be estimated in dollars and cents. In addition to teaching these young women
about tuberculosis, its early symptoms, treatment, etc., it familiarizes them with the Sanatorium
and the work it is doing. They carry this knowledge throughout the Province and pass it on
to their friends.    This is almost certain to help the Sanatorium in its relations with the public.
FINANCIAL.
There is a limit beyond which one cannot go, in reducing operating costs, without lowering
the standard of treatment. I am very happy to be able to report that during the past year we
have reduced our gross cost by 37 cents per patient-day, while actually increasing the service
to the patients. The average per capita cost for the past year was 95 cents per day less than
that reported two years ago. The credit for this showing is largely due to the better business
methods in buying, etc., introduced by Mr. Jefferis, our present Bursar.
SANATORIUM FARM.
On account of the poor financial showing of the farm in the past we have had to make
excuses for its existence. At last we are in a position to show that the farm can be made to
pay and will justify its existence financially as well as on account of its necessity for supplying
milk. In spite of considerable unproductive expenditure, such as building new corrals, fencing,
etc., there has been a drop of about $32,000 in our deficit as compared with the previous year.
I feel confident in predicting a substantial profit next year and in being able to maintain or
increase this profit.
The herd of range cattle used for beef purposes has had a natural increase of 170 head
since the spring of 1929, in addition to supplying all the beef required by the Sanatorium and
farm since the autumn of the same year. For some years previous to 1929 there had been no
appreciable increase in the herd and we had been forced to buy a great deal of our beef each
year. A short time ago we sold forty sterile scrub cattle off the range and replaced them with
forty pure-bred Hereford heifers. This will mean a great saving as we can produce our own
sires and should also have pure-bred sires for sale. In three or four years at the present rate
of increase we should have about 1,000 head of range stock and be supplying a considerable
amount of beef to other Government institutions.
Our new piggery looks very trim and clean. The spring litters have brought our total herd
of swine up to around 500. Remodelling of the slaughter-house with the addition of a cool-room
and smoke-house has enabled us to begin the curing of our own hams and bacon. All by-products
are used up in the making of sausages, lard, etc. We now have enough work to keep a full-
time butcher employed profitably.
The whole farm now presents a neat and well-kept appearance, quite the opposite from that
of a year or two ago. The outlook is most encouraging and I am confident that next year's
showing will justify my optimism.
Mr. Jackson, the Farm Manager, has worked hard to accomplish in less than two years
what we anticipated would take at least three, and I would like to commend him for the good
work he has done since his appointment in July, 1929.
An account of the farm activities would not be complete without some mention of the dairy
herd, and we are very fortunate in having a herdsman with the ability and experience of
Mr. Tapscott.   The herd was fully accredited during the last year and this will be a great advan- TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31. T 7
tage when we have stock for sale. No attempt was made to create new records of production,
but the average production of the herd is steadily being raised. Our new sire is also improving
the type. The herd was tested for bacillus abortus infection and only three reactors found.
Those were isolated and will be disposed of if they continue positive. Tests of the herd for
this infection are now done at regular intervals. The bacterial count of the milk is taken every
week and has been kept at new low levels—around 5,000.
BUILDING OPERATIONS.
No new buildings were erected in connection with the Hospital during the past year.
At the farm a cow-barn with maternity-pens on one side and stalls for young stock on the
other was added to the accommodation for the dairy herd. This is a fine building and will be
of great assistance in the handling of the herd.
An isolation-barn for the care of any dairy stock on the sick-list was built at a little distance
from the main barn. This will accommodate six head and will help prevent the spread of any
infection in the herd.
A long open driving-shed was added to the farm buildings and during the past winter we
were able to store all implements in this shed after they had been repaired.
The slaughter-house was enlarged and fully equipped by the addition of a cool-room, smoke-
room, and machines sufficiently to enable us to give it the more dignified name, " abattoir."
At some distance from the Sanatorium several substantial pig-pens were built around the
garbage-cooking house in the form of a hollow square. We now have splendid accommodation
for several hundred hogs.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
The need for the contemplated administrative block is becoming more evident every year.
This should be proceeded with as soon as finances will permit.
Now that the power question has been definitely settled for some time, our antiquated
and patch-work X-ray outfit should be scrapped and a modern machine installed. Although we
have been getting remarkably good results considering the equipment, this work, which is such
an important part of the medical work, can be improved several hundred per cent, by the
installation of a modern plant.
The laying of a steam-line to the farm with improvements in the dairy facilities should be
earnestly considered again. By having all heating centralized the saving in fuel and labour
would soon pay for this undertaking.
There is land available close by, at a moderate price, suitable'for growing hay. If we are
to continue increasing the beef herd this land should be purchased.
At this time I would not recommend any extension to the grounds, but the hard-surfacing
of roads and paths should be extended each year.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
I take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation for the community welfare-work which
has been done by the members of the Red Cross, the I.O.D.E., the visiting clergymen, and various
organizations which have provided entertainments during the year. Also for any donations
received from individuals or organizations.
The very hearty co-operation of all members of the staff of the Sanatorium as well as the
work of the consulting staff is gratefully acknowledged.
In conclusion, allow me, Sir, to thank you for the support and encouragement which I have
had not only from yourself, but from all members of your Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP, M.B.,
Medical Superintendent. T S
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1930-31.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Military.
Female.
Total.
184
11
130
325
102
26
109
237
119
20
96
235
286
37
239
562
160
24
143
327
325
118,558
Number of patients in   Sanatorium,  March  31st,   1930
Number of patients admitted,   1930-31	
Number of patients discharged, 1930—31	
Number of patients treated,   1930—31	
Number of patients in  Sanatorium,   March  31st,   1931
Daily average population	
Total  number of patient-days	
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 237 CASES ADMITTED TO  SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1930-31.
Classification.
Male.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
8
35
56
3
13
13
....
1         i.
31
67
.    !
18
79
136
4
7.6
33.3
Far advanced	
57.4
1.7
Totals	
102
26
109
237
100.0
TABLE No. 3.—CLASSIFICATION OF FOUR CASES  ADMITTED AS  MISCELLANEOUS.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
1
1
1
1
Debility	
1
1
Torn Is
3
1
4
TABLE  No. 4.—SHOWING  CIVIL  STATE  OF  PATIENTS  ADMITTED  FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st, 1931.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
52
72
1
3
38
62
1
8
90
134
2
11
Totals     	
128
109
237 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31.
T 9
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING THE NATIONALITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st, 1931.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
6
50
28
4
5
2
2
1
17
1
1
1
5
6
71
1
13
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
7
2
12
127
1
41
6
1
1
7
3
<>
1
1
Scotch                       	
24
1
3
1
AVelsh                                                     	
128
109
237
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS  CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS  FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st, 1931.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
1
3
3
"i
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
Black  Pool              '. ,	
1
1
4
1
4
o
1
1
1
1
1
o
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
o
18
Kaslo           	
1
4
1
1
Michel                      	
1
1
3
42
30
72 T 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
42
1
1
2
1
2
3
67
7
1
1
30
5
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
50
1
1
2
7
1
1
1
72
Prince Rupert	
5
2
2
3
1
1
2
1
Trail...          	
4
4
117
1
1
2
14
Webster's Corners	
1
1
Williams Lake	
1
1
1
Totals           	
128
109
237
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st, 1931.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
4
3
21
2
7
9
2
2
15
2
8
2
2
2
1
3
2
3
7
5
24
7
8
38
2
13
3
9
2
8
9
3
7
2
3
28
8
2
7
9
o
38
2
15
2
2
8
15
3
9
2
2
3
3
8
n
3
16
Waiter                           ...                      	
8
31
128
109
237 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31.
T 11
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st. 1931.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
15
29
16
14
16
11
9
6
6
1
1
3
25
31
19
10
8
6
1
4
1
1
7
15 to  20       „    	
40
21   „   25      „                      	
60
26   „   30       „    	
35
31   „   35       „    	
24
30   „   40       „    	
•     24
41   „   45       „    	
17
46   „   50       „    	
10
51   „   55       „               	
10
56   „   00       „    	
7
61   „   65       „    	
*>
06   „   70       ,,    	
1
Over    70      „    	
Totals    .                           	
128
109
237
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MARCH 31st, 1931.
Month.
Admissions.
Male.     Female.     Total.
Discharges.
Male.    Female.    Total.
Deaths.
Male.    Female.    Total
1930.
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1931.
January	
February	
March	
Totals....
7
20
15
13
9
7
15
11
8
7
10
6
128
21
11
10
9
6
9
9
7
8
109
28
31
25
22
15
16
24
18
16
12
17
13
237
16
14
10
11
3
2
8
10
12
10
6
4
5
4
5
9
76
24
20
20
17
7
13
12
13
15
14
14
180
35
TABLE  No.  10.—SHOWING  CLASSIFICATION  OF  235   DISCHARGES
DURING 1930-31.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
Incipient	
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced	
5
2
7
53
33
4
7
15
15
1
5
32
1
6
47
2
17
73
127
,18
Totals	
7
93
41
39                   55
1
235 T 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 11.—AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCE OF 141 DISCHARGED
PATIENTS.
Condition.
Male.
Female.
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved	
Days.
Days
219
361
489
433
336
296
TABLE No.  12.-
-SHOWING LONGEST  AND  SHORTEST PERIODS  OF  RESIDENCE
IN 141 DISCHARGED PATIENTS.
Condition.
Longest Period.    Shortest Period
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved -	
Days.
Days
542
219
4,570
22
2,380
16
TABLE No. 13.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 18 CASES
(MISCELLANEOUS)  DISCHARGED.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
11
7
18
TABLE No. 14.—SHOWING WORK COMPLETED  BY PATIENTS  IN  OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY CLASSES DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1931.
Reed-work—
Trays, size 14 by 20   122
Trays, size 12 by 18  95
Trays, size 12 by 12  36
Pin-trays, small   46
Sandwich-trays     72
Doll-cradles    38
Flower-baskets    85
Sewing-baskets    48
Table-lamps  -•  11
Flower-vases  .....  43
Waste-paper baskets   6 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31.
T 13
Woodwork—
Picture-frames     60
Cribbage-boards      24
Storks, pine-cone   128
Bead-work—
Bead-bags  :     14
Necklaces   •„       7
Watch-fobs      10
Wrist-bands  :       5
Hand-painted work—
Handkerchiefs     400
Scarves      46
Cushion-tops        62
Table-centres       6
Table-runners        4
Hand-painted cards  300
Passe-partout work—Pictures framed   326
Note.—About 140 patients have taken part in the above work. A sale of work was held in
December which netted $161 for the patients. Most of this work is shipped and sold throughout
the Province, and many articles are sold from the show-ease during the year.
TABLE No. 15.—WEATHER SUMMARY, BEGINNING APRIL 1st, 1930, AND
ENDING MARCH 31st, 1931.
Month.
Max. Temp.   Min. Temp
Ave. Temp.
Ave. Hum.
Rainfall.      Snowfall.     Sunshine.
1930.
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1931.
January	
February	
March	
Totals.
Deg. F.
73
81
80
96
91
83
08
03
42
51
54
65
853
Deg. F.
34
34
43
45
50
33
26
19
21
19
15
18
Deg. F.
53.95
56.50
03.00
08.09
68.37
63.26
44.30
37.08
32.25
34.83
31.74
41.565
357
584.935
Deg. F.
64.86
67.80
85.00
55.61
52.90
56.66
75.16
74.56
79.50
81.40
79.50
65.90
"838.91
I
Inches.    |    Inches. Hours.
I I
212.8
199.1
226.1
315.0
299.1
207.8
105.9
39.4
61.8
0.330
0.200
0.634
0.530
0.00
0.430
0.00
0.520
0.00
0.490
0.00
0.890
0.00
0.440
0.00
1.050
0.50
0.200
5.00
0.160
2.00
5.934
1.75
1.00
0.50
10/
41.6
56.1
138.0
1,902.7 T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DENTAL EEPOET.
Teanquixle, B.C., March 31st, 1931.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report and statement of work completed in
the Dental Clinic of the institution during the year ended March 31st, 1931:—
Routine examinations have been carried out as usual for all patients, the full mouth X-ray
examination proving of great assistance, and the necessary work. This work has been kept up
to date during the entire year.
The patient's X-ray examination is made on admission and approximately one month is
allowed to elapse before any work is attempted by the Clinic, excepting emergency work. This
interval is used to allow the patient to become adjusted to the general routine of the institution.
I have found that this is an admirable procedure with all types of patients.
When work is started, all evidences of haste are controlled as far as possible, with the
control of pain being foremost, and the different operations are carried out slowly and appointments are limited to approximately once a week.
From the examinations of the patients of the institution during the past number of years,
the conclusion as to the great prevalence of dental decay and various infections of the mouth is
very easily arrived at. However, it has been my experience that the greater part of my work
has to do with newly admitted patients. After a patient has had the necessary dental work
done, the Clinic has very little more to do with him during his stay in the institution, whether
it be for a period of months or years.
My conclusion, from this experience, is that under the supervision of the dietary department
of the institution the diet of the patients is controlling, to a great extent, dental decay in the
institution. It is a well-known fact that dental disease, the most prevalent disease in the world
to-day, can be controlled by intelligent dietary measures. First, by building up a strong, healthy
dentition during the early years of life, by the assimilation of the proper constituents of tooth
structure; and, secondly, by maintaining this dentition in a healthy and efficient condition during
the adult years of life by the proper diet.
I wish to thank the staff of the institution for the considerate assistance given to the Dental
Clinic during the past year.
Following is a statement of work completed :—
Fillings    679
Extractions     464
Dentures      78
Repairs       10
. Inlays       45
Bridges      19
Treatments     399
Root fillings       9
Prophylaxis      71
Special cases       2
I have, etc.,
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Tkakquiixe, B.C., March 31st, 1931.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Tenth Annual Laboratory Report.
Since the opening of the Greaves Building last year, and the subsequent admission of 100
new patients, the technical work for year ended March, 1930, showed a decided increase. AYith
the fewer admissions during the past twelve months, there has been a slight decline in the
aggregate number of examinations. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31.
T 15
Since the inception of the training-school for pupil nurses an added responsibility has been
incurred, in that each nurse comes to the Laboratory for her technical training, entailing the
services of a technician as instructor. Two lectures were delivered during the year to the
patients and staff and one to the pupils of the local school. The senior technician also lectures
to the undergraduate nurses on bacteriological methods in tuberculosis.
The Laboratory staff has also been employed in two educational exhibits—one at the
Vancouver Exhibition and the other at the B.C. Hospitals Association Convention. Through
these channels much beneficial publicity has been gained for the profession and the institution
and the public has profited from the information disseminated.
I wish to avail myself of the opportunity to thank you for the appreciation and encouraging
interest which you have evinced in the activities of this department, and also to thank the
Assistant Technician for his faithful co-operation.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
GEORGE DARLING,
Labratory  Technician.
GENERAL WORK
DONE IN LABORATORY.
Material examined.
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25
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172
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107
27
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147
05
82
328
20
135
67
68
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180
56
124
35
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132
71
61
359
27
160
62
98
26
1
126
59
67
10
146
76
70
339
23
157
78
79
17
1,893
818
1,075
1,608
Albumin	
114
T.B. in urine	
o
12
2
1
10
2
2
8
1
6
3
49
2
12
2
1
1
3
7
2
2
2
'2
6
2
1
2
4
1
2
8
41
Renal functional test	
5
Blood—
Erythrocytes	
38
17
38
21
16
19
2S
14
20
10
10
12
243
Hemoglobin	
38
17
38
21
16
20
28
14
20
10
10
12
244
38
38
38
16
16
23
39
39
29
21
21
22
17
17
13
21
21
24
28
28
14
17
17
16
21
21
33
11
11
7
11
11
14
15
15
19
255
255
Kahn precipitin	
252
Sedimentations	
47
87
48
47
76
52
11
34
48
10
17
25
502
Blood-sugar	
1
1
Cebrospinal Fluid	
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
10
Autopsies	
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
Guinea-pig inoculation ,
3
1
3
1
4
2
1
3
18
Guinea-pig autopsy	
1
1
2
1
4
3
1
13
27
27
6
6
14
14
20
24
10
10
4
8
7
12
43
48
27
30
25
18
10
6
59
63
252
272
Autogenous vaccine	
1
1
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3
1
6
1
1
1
15
4
3
1
8
6
3
1
4
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
1
33
T.B. positive	
18
T.B. negative	
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
3
15
Faeces	
1
1
2
Agglutinations	
41
15
49
3
3
5
116
Tissue sections	
1
1
3
4
4
4
5
6
4
4
4
4
4
51
Milk chemistry	
6
12
8
10
12
12
8
8
8
8
8
10
110
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12 T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1931.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sib,—I have the" honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet and the Profit and Loss
Accounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1931.
The year which has just closed has been the busiest in the history of the institution. The
number of days' treatment given during the year amounted to 118,558, which is considerably in
excess of any other year, while the average daily patient population has been maintained at
325, a figure which has necessitated the constant use of our entire accommodation.
The gross per capita cost per patient per annum has been reduced to a new low figure" of
$1,052.67, while the net daily per capita cost to the Provincial Government is now lower than
at any time since the Sanatorium revenue was depleted by the withdrawal of large numbers of
military patients maintained by the Dominion Government.
To bring about this result, full advantage has been taken of the general lowering of market
prices, and in accordance with prevailing conditions a policy of strict economy has been steadfastly pursued, and expenses have been kept down to the minimum consistent with efficiency.
It might be of interest to you to know that in reviewing other annual reports of similar
institutions I note a marked difference in the cost of fuel, light, and water, an item which is
very heavy in our expenditure.
Muskoka Sanatorium in Ontario, which is in a colder district than ours, shows an expenditure of $27,000, as against $44,000 for the same size institution. This item alone increases our
per capita about 15 cents as compared to theirs.
I desire to express my appreciation of your cordial support in the performance of my duties,
and of the active co-operatio» of the department heads and members of the office staff.
I have, etc.,
H. Je;feris,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1931.
Assets.
Land and improvements  $8,494.05
Buildings    :  615,122.05
Plant and equipment  139,481.67
Furnishings, linen, bedding, etc  51,226.45
Inventory   15,660.59
Petty Cash Account  1,000.00
Accounts receivable   2.614.76
$833,599.57
Cost of operating, 1930-31  298,573.95
1,132,173.52
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia $1,132,173.52 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31. T 17
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1931.
Depreciation—
Buildings        $32,374.85
Plant and equipment        6,943.68
Furnishings, etc        2,551.34
Salaries     157,319.27
Office supplies        2,627.69
Transportation         2,054.53
Fuel, water, and light      43,130.67
Maintenance supplies      15,898.79
Provisions    :.      96,758.11
Medical and surgical       14,604.17
Incidentals          5,101.46
Bedding, linens, etc        4,625.37
By Revenue       $84,465.98
Donation, J. B. Kennedy Estate   950.00
Balance         298,573.95
$383,989.93    $383,989.93
Summary of Profit asd Loss Account, 1930-31.
Yearly
Per Capita.
Salaries  $157,319.27 $484.06
Office supplies   2,627.69 8.09
Travelling and transportation  2,054.53 6.32
Fuel, water, and light  43,130.67 132.71
Maintenance and janitors' supplies  15,898.79 48.92
Furnishings  (linens and beddings, etc.)  4,625.37 14.23
Provisions     96,758.11 297.72
Medical and surgical  14,604.17 44.93
Incidentals   5,101.46 15.69
$342,120.06        $1,052.67
Less revenue        85,415.98 262.81
Net cost of operating  $256,704.08 $789.86
Depreciation (plant, building, and fixtures)      41,869.87 128.83
$298,573.95 $918.69
Remarks.
Number of days' treatment given during year 1930-31  118,558
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1930  327
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1931  325
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,052.67
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day :  2.88
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  789.86
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  2.16 T 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per ChVpita Cost.
Year.
Average Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921-22	
1922-23	
1923-24	
1924-25    	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
216.00
214.31
293.00
325.09
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
308,104.82
294,674.82
299,621.79
347,939.58
342,120.06
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1,506.46
1,357.75
1925-26	
1926-27	
1,312.44
1,382.04
1927-28	
1928-29	
1929-30	
1,364.24
1,400.10
1,187.51
1030-31	
1,052.67
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
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8.97
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9.67
10.21
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$20.56
11.32
9.42
11.03
8.09
14.81
11.89
12.60
8.781
6.52
$225.14
232.81
243.48
211.11
189.92
173.22
169.48
190.78
157.94
132.71
$138.43
133.03
85.77
70.55
68.62
65.85
64.20
82.77
62.23
48.92
$57.79
66.89
13.70
25.78
6.62
33.96
34.93
24.66
.92
14.23
$421.96
472.17
441.26
288.86
392.98
426.23
448.90
421.89
338.82
297.72
$28.37
13.07
39.95
26.17
34.68
39.32
53.82
42.95
50.34
44.93
$72.06
28.46
65.76
33.05
19.31
12.36
15.65
11.27
13.64
15.69
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1022-23	
1923-24	
1,506.46
1924-25	
1,357.75
1925-26	
1,312.44
1,382.04
1926-27	
1927-28	
1,364.24
1,400.10
1928-29	
1929-30	
1930-31	
1,187.51
1,052.67 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31.
T 19
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table E.—Summary of Laundry-work, April 1st, 1930, to March 31st, 1931.
Month.
Personal.
Flat-work.
Total.
Value of Work
done.
April	
15,874
15,208
17,202
15,225
14,620
15,832
15,777
14,667
17,498
15,958
15,371
18,265
44,110
46,147
41,952
45,210
45,245
45,980
46,417
43,047
47,228
45,482
42,281
48,161
59,984
61,355
59,154
60,435
59,865
61,812
62,194
57,714
64,726
61,440
57,652
66,426
$3,335.18
3,241.18
June	
July	
3,423.24
3,280.04
August	
September	
Oetober	
November	
December	
3,171.49
3,352.94
3,297.13
3,033.97
3,480.62
3,197.19
3,100.81
March	
3,656.81
Totals                             	
191,497
541,260
732,757
$39,570.80
Flat-work, 541,260 ;  personal,  191,497 ;   total, 732,757.
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1931.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium,
Tranquille, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the operations of the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1931.
The crops, with the exception of the meadow-hay, were up to the average. Owing to the
low water in the lake the meadow did not get enough water on it, which caused the crop to be
lighter. About 15 acres of land which has for several years been non-producing has been seeded
to alfalfa, and I hope next year to break up another 10 acres of land which has been lying idle
and seed to alfalfa in 1932.
A considerable amount of fencing has been done on our range this year—over 8 miles of
barbed-wire fence put in to replace old fence which was in bad repair, and also new fences.
Several of the water springs on the range have been equipped with troughs, thus making it
easier for the cattle to get the water.
Our range herd is being gradually improved. We are disposing of the cows that are non-
producing and are breeding to Hereford bulls entirely. Forty head of pure-bred Hereford heifers
were obtained from Alberta this month, also six Hereford bulls. In time we hope to build up
a pure-bred herd.
The swine have done well. The new piggery is away from the buildings. We are able to
supply the Sanatorium with hams, bacon, and sausages. We are utilizing the old piggery for
this work and a cold-storage room has been added to it.
The new calf-barn and isolation-shed for the dairy cattle are appreciated and the large
implement-shed fills a long-felt want.
I have, etc.,
WM. JACKSON,
Farm Manager. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1930-31. T 21
BURSAR'S -REPORT, TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1931.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements :  $86,846.50
Equipment, plant, and machinery  5,236.00
Land Account   70,405.88
Automobile Account   483.00
Accounts receivable   3,230.61
Dam Account   421.72
Petty cash  -.  500.00
$167,123.71
Inventory—
Range and dairy cattle     $47,525,00
Hogs           5,030.00
Implements and  machinery        2,541.20
Tools    254.75
Feed            5,826.60
Produce     110.00
Gasoline    46.00
Coal    366.48
      61,700.03
Gross operating loss         2,507.95
$231,331.69
Liabilities.
Petty Cash Account         $500.00
Capital        230,831.69
$231,331.69
Pkofit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1931.
Expenditure.
Salaries   $18,659.98
Office supplies   75.12
Travel and  transportation  1,668.12
Fuel, light, and water  1,239.17
Maintenance     693.92
Feed     7,634.72
Provisions  4,169.50
Leases  S19.41
Seeds   434.35
Blacksmith's supplies   28.23
Implements and harness  108.38
Drugs and veterinary  820.91
Incidentals   261.80
Boarding-house  468.68
Depreciation     4.987.1S
$42,069.47 T 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Receipts.
Milk-sales   $25,388.30
Produce      2,187.23
Hogs         8,536.69
Cattle, beef, etc      3,449.30
Deficit for year       2,507.95
$42,069.47
Summary of Farm Production for Fiscal Year 1930-31.
Alfalfa    425 tons. Potatoes       27% tons.
Meadow-hay     180
Green feed   350
Corn silage ,  465
Mangels        82
Carrots       18
Beets        4%    ..
Onions        2V4    ..
Lettuce     208   lb.
Apples   436  boxes.
Pears   125      „
Milk produced from Dairy Herd.
Milk  805,370 lb.
Sundries sold to Sanatorium.
Beef    51,400 lb. Bacon   2,207 lb.
Pork   10,720   „ Sausage       310   „
Ham         534   „ Lard        430   „
Note.—The above figures for hams, bacon, etc., are for a period of less than three months,
having started curing about the middle of January. It is anticipated that the farm will be in a
position to supply all Sanatorium requirements in beef and pork products.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield,  Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1932.
525-232-8202

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